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Sample records for rat muscle abnormal

  1. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  2. Metabolic abnormalities induced by mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of the renal carcinoma Eker (TSC2+/-) rat model.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yumi; Shirai, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Hino, Okio; Tsujii, Yoshimasa; Inoue, Hirofumi; Kazami, Machiko; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) is a mediator of insulin signal transduction, and a loss of function in TSC2 induces hyperactivation of mTORC1 pathway, which leads to tumorigenesis. We have previously demonstrated that Eker rat model, which is heterozygous for a TSC2 mutation, exhibits hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia. The present study was to investigate whether these changes also can affect metabolism in skeletal muscle of the Eker rat. Wild-type (TSC2+/+) and Eker (TSC2+/-) rats underwent an oral glucose tolerance test, and the latter showed decrease in whole-body glucose utilization. Additionally, reductions in the expression of glycolysis-, lipolysis-, and ketone body-related genes in skeletal muscle were observed in Eker rats. Furthermore, ATP content and mitochondrial DNA copy number were lower in skeletal muscle of Eker rats. These data demonstrate that heterozygous to mutation TSC2 not only affects the liver metabolism, but also skeletal muscle metabolism, via mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27031579

  3. Abnormal activation of potassium channels in aortic smooth muscle of rats with peritonitis-induced septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jiunn-Horng; Chen, Shiu-Jen; Shih, Chih-Chin; Lue, Wei-Ming; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2009-07-01

    This study was conducted to examine the role of membrane hyperpolarization in mediating vascular hyporeactivity induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in endothelial-denuded strips of rat thoracic aorta ex vivo. The CLP for 18 h elicited a significant fall of blood pressure and a severe vascular hyporeactivity to norepinephrine as seen in severe sepsis. At the end of the in vivo experiments, thoracic aortas were removed from both CLP-treated and control rats. After removal of the endothelium, aortic segments were mounted in myographs for the recording of isometric tension and smooth muscle membrane potential. The membrane potential recording showed that a hyperpolarization was observed in the CLP-treated rats when compared with the control rats. This hyperpolarization was reversed by iberiotoxin (a large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel blocker), 4-aminopyridine (a voltage-dependent K+ channel blocker), barium (an inward rectifier K+ channels blocker), N-(1-adamantyl)-N'-cyclohexyl-4-morpholinecarboxamidine hydrochloride (a pore-forming blocker of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K+ channels [KATP]), or methylene blue (a nonspecific guanylyl cyclase [GC] inhibitor). However, this hyperpolarization was not significantly affected by apamin (a small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel blocker), glibenclamide (a sulfonylurea blocker of KATP), N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (a NOS inhibitor), or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (an NO-sensitive GC inhibitor). In addition, the basal tension of the tissues obtained from CLP rats was increased simultaneously, whereas membrane potential was reversed. In contrast, none of these inhibitors had significant effects on the membrane potential or the basal tension in control tissues. Thus, we provide electrophysiological and functional evidence demonstrating that an abnormal activation of K+ channels in vascular smooth muscle in animals with septic shock induced by CLP. Our observations

  4. Current source imaging for high spatial resolution magnetocardiography in normal and abnormal rat cardiac muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, S.; Iramina, K.; Goto, K.; Ueno, S.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify the current source produced by acute ischemia and infarction. We measured magnetocardiograms (MCG) and electrocardiograms (ECG) of five male rats using a high-resolution dc superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer in a magnetically shielded room after performing coronary artery occlusion. The spatial resolution of the detecting magnetic field of our system is higher than the typical system, thus permitting the measurement of magnetic fields in small animals. Distribution of the magnetic fields B(t) and distribution of |rot B(t)|, which corresponded to the distribution of the current source, were imaged by 12-channel MCGs. As a result, the distribution of current source changes in the affected area of the myocardium during the ST segment, and amplitude of the peak significantly increased after occlusion. Our system can be used to help clarify the mechanism of the ST shift related to severe heart disease.

  5. Abnormal skeletal muscle bioenergetics in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C. H.; Kemp, G. J.; Taylor, D. J.; Conway, M.; Rajagopalan, B.; O'Donoghue, A.; Styles, P.; McKenna, W. J.; Radda, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the skeletal muscle metabolic manifestations of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. DESIGN: A case-control study. SETTING: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the calf muscle was performed on volunteers from a centre specialising in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PATIENTS: Five patients with abnormal beta myosin heavy chain protein in cardiac and skeletal muscle and five patients with a troponin T abnormality in cardiac muscle were compared with healthy controls. RESULTS: High energy phosphate metabolism in vivo was examined in a non-invasive manner. In resting muscle, the beta myosin heavy chain group had a higher ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP concentration (4.51 (SD 0.17)) than either the troponin T group (3.88 (0.42)) or controls (n = 16; 4.04 (0.40)). Exercise duration was reduced compared to controls, and during the fourth minute of exercise phosphocreatine depletion and muscle acidification were greater in both patient groups. After exercise, the recovery of phosphocreatine-an index of oxidative metabolic capacity of the muscle-was slower in the beta myosin heavy chain group (mean half time 0.65 (0.08) minutes) than in the troponin T group (0.60 (0.17) minutes) or controls (0.48 (0.14) minutes). CONCLUSIONS: Exercise metabolism was abnormal in both groups of subjects, and the affected contractile protein determined the metabolic changes in muscle at rest and during recovery. In patients with abnormal beta myosin heavy chain protein, there was a decrease in oxidative capacity consistent with the reduction in mitochondria reported in muscle biopsy studies of similar patients. PMID:9326994

  6. Oculomotor nerve and muscle abnormalities in congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Engle, E C; Goumnerov, B C; McKeown, C A; Schatz, M; Johns, D R; Porter, J D; Beggs, A H

    1997-03-01

    Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles is an autosomal dominant congenital disorder characterized by bilateral ptosis, restrictive external ophthalmoplegia with the eyes partially or completely fixed in an infraducted (downward) and strabismic position, and markedly limited and aberrant residual eye movements. It has been generally thought that these clinical abnormalities result from myopathic fibrosis of the extraocular muscles. We describe the intracranial and orbital pathology of 1 and the muscle pathology of 2 other affected members of a family with chromosome 12-linked congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles. There is an absence of the superior division of the oculomotor nerve and its corresponding alpha motor neurons, and abnormalities of the levator palpebrae superioris and rectus superior (the muscles innervated by the superior division of the oculomotor nerve). In addition, increased numbers of internal nuclei and central mitochondrial clumping are found in other extraocular muscles, suggesting that the muscle pathology extends beyond the muscles innervated by the superior division of cranial nerve III. This report presents evidence that congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles results from an abnormality in the development of the extraocular muscle lower motor neuron system. PMID:9066352

  7. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  8. Abnormal Cortex-Muscle Interactions in Subjects with X-linked Kallmann's Syndrome and Mirror Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, S. F.; Harrison, L. M.; Mayston, M. J.; Parekh, A.; James, L. M.; Stephens, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    X-linked Kallmann's (XKS) subjects, who display mirror movements, have abnormal corticospinal tracts which innervate motoneurons of the left and right distal muscles of the upper limb. The size of the abnormal ipsilateral projection is variable. We have used coherence and cumulant analysis between EEG and first dorsal interosseous muscle (1DI) EMG…

  9. Influence of spaceflight on rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Thomas P.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a 7-day spaceflight (aboard NASA's SL-3) on the size and the metabolism of single fibers from several rat muscles was investigated along with the specificity of these responses as related to the muscle type and the size of fibers. It was found that the loss of mass after flight was varied from 36 percent in the soleus to 15 percent in the extensor digitorum longus. Results of histochemical analyses showed that the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity in muscles of flight-exposed rats was maintained at the control levels, whereas the alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) activity was either maintained or increased. The analyses of the metabolic profiles of ATPase, SDH, and GPD indicated that, in some muscles, there was an increase in the poportion of fast oxidative-glycolytic fibers.

  10. Effects of microgravity on rat muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that humans exposed to long term spaceflight experience undesirable progressive muscle weakness and increased fatigability. This problem has prompted the implementation of inflight exercise programs because most investigators believe that the major cause of diminished muscle performance is a combination of disuse and decreased workload. Inflight exercise has improved muscle health, but deficits have persisted, indicating that either the regimens utilized were suboptimal or there existed additional debilitating factors which were not remedied by exercise. Clarification of this question requires an improved understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of spaceflight-induced muscle deterioration. To this end, multiple investigations have been performed on the muscles from rats orbited 5 to 22 days in Cosmos biosatellites and Spacelab-3 (2,4,5,8,10 to 14,16,18,19,21 to 23,25,27,28). The eight Cosmos 1887 investigations examined the structural and biochemical changes in skeletal and cardiac muscles of rats exposed to microgravity for 12.5 days and returned to terrestrial gravity 2.3 days before tissues were collected. Even though interpretation of these results was complicated by the combination of inflight and postflight induced alterations, the consensus is that there is marked heterogeneity in both degree and type of responses from the whole muscle level down to the molecular level. Collectively, the muscle investigations of Cosmos 1887 clearly illustrate the wide diversity of muscle tissue responses to spaceflight. Judging from the summary report of this mission, heterogeneity of responses is not unique to muscle tissue. Elucidating the mechanism underlying this heterogeneity holds the key to explaining adaptation of the organism to prolonged spaceflight.

  11. Cardiac Muscle Studies with Rat Ventricular Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Bert K.; Faleschini, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    Details undergraduate physiology laboratory experiments that demonstrate mechanical properties of cardiac muscle, using strips from the ventricle of a rat heart. Includes procedures for obtaining length-tension curves, demonstrating the role of calcium in excitation-contraction coupling, and showing effects of several cardiovascular drugs…

  12. Testosterone and muscle hypertrophy in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, F. E.; Max, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) on compensatory muscle hypertropy in female rats are examined. The 48 female rats were placed in one of four test groups: (1) no overload (synergist removal), no TP, (2) overload, no TP, (3) no overload + TP, and (4) overload + TP. The technique used to administer the TP is described. The preparation of the plantaris muscle, the analysis of pyruvate oxidation and the determination of malate and lactate dehydrogenases and the noncollogen protein are explained. The results which reveal the effect of overload and TP on body weight, noncollogen protein concentration, lactate and malate dehydrogenase activities, and pyruvate oxidation are presented and discussed. It is concluded that in terms of body weight, protein content, pyruvate, glycolysis, and oxidative metabolisms chronic TP treatments do not change compensatory muscle hypertropy.

  13. Muscle fibre types in the suprahyoid muscles of the rat

    PubMed Central

    COBOS, A. R.; SEGADE, L. A. G.; FUENTES, I.

    2001-01-01

    Five muscle fibre types (I, IIc, IIa, IIx and IIb) were found in the suprahyoid muscles (mylohyoid, geniohyoid, and the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric) of the rat using immuno and enzyme histochemical techniques. More than 90% of fibres in the muscles examined were fast contracting fibres (types IIa, IIx and IIb). The geniohyoid and the anterior belly of the digastric had the greatest number of IIb fibres, whilst the mylohyoid was almost exclusively formed by aerobic fibres. The posterior belly of the digastric contained a greater percentage of aerobic fibres (83.4%) than the anterior belly (67.8%). With the exception of the geniohyoid, the percentage of type I and IIc fibres, which have slow myosin heavy chain (MHCβ), was relatively high and greater than has been previously reported in the jaw-closing muscles of the rat, such as the superficial masseter. The geniohyoid and mylohyoid exhibited a mosaic fibre type distribution, without any apparent regionalisation, although in the later MHCβ-containing fibres (types I and IIc) were primarily located in the rostral 2/3 region. In contrast, the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric revealed a clear regionalisation. In the anterior belly of the digastric 2 regions were observed: both a central region, which was almost exclusively formed by aerobic fibres and where all of the type I and IIc fibres were located, and a peripheral region, where type IIb fibres predominated. The posterior belly of the digastric showed a deep aerobic region which was greater in size and where type I and IIc fibres were confined, and a superficial region, where primarily type IIx and IIb fibres were observed. PMID:11322721

  14. Abnormal tracheal smooth muscle function in the CF mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Helen L; Southern, Kevin W; Connell, Marilyn G; Wray, Susan; Burdyga, Theodor

    2013-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility is thought to underlie symptoms of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In the cystic fibrosis (CF) airway, ASM anomalies have been reported, but have not been fully characterized and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We examined ASM in an adult CF mouse tracheal ring preparation, and determined whether changes in contractility were associated with altered ASM morphology. We looked for inherent changes in the cellular pathways involved in contractility, and characterized trachea morphology in the adult trachea and in an embryonic lung culture model during development. Results showed that that there was a reduction in tracheal caliber in CF mice as indicated by a reduction in the number of cartilage rings; proximal cross-sectional areas of cftr−/− tracheas and luminal areas were significantly smaller, but there was no difference in the area or distribution of smooth muscle. Morphological differences observed in adult trachea were not evident in the embryonic lung at 11.5 days gestation or after 72 h in culture. Functional data showed a significant reduction in the amplitude and duration of contraction in response to carbachol (CCh) in Ca-free conditions. The reduction in contraction was agonist specific, and occurred throughout the length of the trachea. These data show that there is a loss in the contractile capacity of the CF mouse trachea due to downregulation of the pathway specific to acetylcholine (ACh) activation. This reduction in contraction is not associated with changes in the area or distribution of ASM. PMID:24400140

  15. Abnormal taste preference for saccharin in hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Gordon, B H; Wong, G Y; Liu, J; Rivlin, R S

    1992-08-01

    Taste preferences for saccharin in concentrations ranging from 0.16 mM to 50 mM were determined in rats made hypothyroid with radioactive iodine and in their littermate controls. Hypothyroid rats demonstrated taste preferences for saccharin which were similar to those of controls only at very low (0.016 mM) or very high (49.0 mM) saccharin concentrations. At these concentrations of tastant, the preferences for tastant and water were similar to one another. At a concentration of 5.1 mM, preferences were also very similar in both groups but were very high. At intermediate saccharin concentrations of 1.1 and 3.0 mM, hypothyroid animals showed significantly lower percent preferences for the sweet tastant than did controls, mean +/- SEM (62.48 +/- 5.97 vs. 82.92 +/- 4.60, p = 0.0002) for the 1.1 mM concentration and (74.98 +/- 5.12 vs. 89.40 +/- 2.54, p = 0.0029) for the 3.0 mM concentration. These changes in taste preference for saccharin in hypothyroid rats were similar in direction and magnitude to those previously published by this laboratory using sucrose as the tastant. Thus, hypothyroid rats demonstrate abnormalities in taste preference for both the nonnutritive sweetener, sodium saccharin, as well as for the nutritive sweetener, sucrose. PMID:1523267

  16. Age-related changes in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles: analysis of muscle fibers, muscle fiber proteins, and subneural apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Taguchi, Aki; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Desaki, Junzo

    2013-03-01

    We compared age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of aged and young adult rats by determining the number and diameter of muscle fibers, contractile muscle protein (myosin heavy chain isoforms, MHC) composition, and the morphology of the subneural apparatuses. In aged rats, both the numbers and the diameters of muscle fibers decreased in the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The number of fibers, but not diameter, decreased in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. In the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, neither the number nor the diameter of fibers changed significantly. Aging was associated with a decrease in type IIB and an increase in type IIA MHC isoform levels in CT muscle, but no such changes were observed in the TA or PCA muscles. Morphological examination of primary synaptic clefts of the subneural apparatus revealed that aging resulted in decreased labyrinthine and increased depression types in only the CT muscle. In the aged group, morphologically immature subneural apparatuses were found infrequently in the CT muscle, indicating continued tissue remodeling. We suggest, therefore, that age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles primarily involve the CT muscle, whereas the structures of the TA and PCA muscles may better resist aging processes and therefore are less vulnerable to functional impairment. This may reflect differences in their roles; the CT muscle controls the tone of the vocal folds, while the TA and PCA muscles play an essential role in vital activities such as respiration and swallowing. PMID:23100084

  17. Muscles involved in naris dilation and nose motion in rat

    PubMed Central

    Deschênes, Martin; Haidarliu, Sebastian; Demers, Maxime; Moore, Jeffrey; Kleinfeld, David; Ahissar, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    In a number of mammals muscle dilator nasi (naris) is known as a muscle that reduces nasal airflow resistance by dilating the nostrils. Here we show that in rats the tendon of this muscle inserts into the aponeurosis above the nasal cartilage. Electrical stimulation of this muscle lifts the nose and deflects it sideway towards the side of stimulation, but does not change the size of the nares. In the head-fixed alert rat, electromyographic activity of muscle dilator nasi is tightly coupled to nose motion, not to opening of the nares. Yet, contraction of muscle dilator nasi occurs during the pre-inspiratory phase of the respiratory cycle, suggesting a role in sniffing and sampling odorants. We also show that opening of the nares results from contraction of pars maxillaris profunda of the muscle nasolabialis profundus. This muscle attaches to the outer wall of the nasal cartilage and to the plate of the mystacial pad. Contraction of this muscle exerts a dual action: it pulls the lateral nasal cartilage outwardly, thus dilating the naris, and it drags the plate of the mystacial pad rostralward, provoking a slight retraction of the whiskers. On the basis of these results, we propose that muscle dilator nasi of the rat be renamed muscle deflector nasi, and that pars maxillaris profunda of the muscle nasolabialis profundus be named muscle dilator nasi. PMID:25257748

  18. Protective Effects of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) Extract against Diabetes-Induced Heart Abnormality in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ilkhanizadeh, Behrouz; Khadem Ansari, Mohamad hasan; Nemati, Samira; Rasmi, Yusef

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetic cardiomyopathy is an important causal factor in morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients, and currently, no effective means are available to reverse its pathological progress. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of ginger extract on apolipoproteins (apo) A and B, hyperhomocysteinemia, cathepsin G and leptin changes, as well as cardiac fibrosis and heart muscle cell proliferation under hyperglycemic conditions in vivo. Methods Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: control, non-treated diabetic, and ginger extract-treated diabetic groups. The ginger extract-treated diabetic group received a 50 mg daily dose of ginger extract intragastrically for 6 weeks. Results The results revealed concurrent significant increases in plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), homocysteine (Hcy), cathepsin G and apoB levels and decreases in apoA and leptin levels in the non-treated diabetic group compared to the control group. Moreover, heart structural changes, including fibrosis and heart muscle cell proliferation, were observed in non-treated diabetic rats compared to the control rats. Significant amelioration of changes in the heart structure together with restoration of the elevated levels of Hcy and CRP, leptin, cathepsin G, and apoA and B were found in the ginger extract-treated diabetic group compared to the non-treated diabetic group. Conclusion The findings indicated that ginger extract significantly reduces heart structural abnormalities in diabetic rats and that these effects might be associated with improvements in serum apo, leptin, cathepsin G, and Hcy levels and with the antioxidant properties of ginger extract. PMID:26912155

  19. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    1993-01-01

    This grant focused on the mechanisms of metabolic changes associated with unweighting atrophy and reduced growth of hind limb muscles of juvenile rats. Metabolic studies included a number of different areas. Amino acid metabolic studies placed particular emphasis on glutamine and branched-chain amino acid metabolism. These studies were an outgrowth of understanding stress effects and the role of glucocorticoids in these animals. Investigations on protein metabolism were largely concerned with selective loss of myofibrillar proteins and the role of muscle proteolysis. These investigations lead to finding important differences from denervation and atrophy and to define the roles of cytosolic versus lysosomal proteolysis in these atrophy models. A major outgrowth of these studies was demonstrating an ability to prevent atrophy of the unweighted muscle for at least 24 hours. A large amount of work concentrated on carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation by insulin and catecholamines. Measurements focused on glucose transport, glycogen metabolism, and glucose oxidation. The grant was used to develop an important new in situ approach for studying protein metabolism, glucose transport, and hormonal effects which involves intramuscular injection of various agents for up to 24 hours. Another important consequence of this project was the development and flight of Physiological-Anatomical Rodent Experiment-1 (PARE-1), which was launched aboard Space Shuttle Discovery in September 1991. Detailed descriptions of these studies can be found in the 30 peer-reviewed publications, 15 non-reviewed publications, 4 reviews and 33 abstracts (total 82 publications) which were or are scheduled to be published as a result of this project. A listing of these publications grouped by area (i.e. amino acid metabolism, protein metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and space flight studies) are included.

  20. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1. PMID:26018658

  1. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S.; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1. PMID:26018658

  2. Smooth muscle calcium and endothelium-derived relaxing factor in the abnormal vascular responses of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Conger, J D; Robinette, J B; Schrier, R W

    1988-01-01

    Abnormal renovascular reactivity, characterized by paradoxical vasoconstriction to a reduction in renal perfusion pressure (RPP) in the autoregulatory range, increased sensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS), and loss of vasodilatation to acetylcholine have all been demonstrated in ischemic acute renal failure (ARF). To determine if ischemic injury alters vascular contractility by increasing smooth muscle cell calcium or calcium influx, the renal blood flow (RBF) response to reductions in RPP within the autoregulatory range and to RNS were tested before and after a 90-min intrarenal infusion of verapamil or diltiazem in 7-d ischemic ARF rats. Both calcium entry blockers, verapamil and diltiazem, blocked the aberrant vasoconstrictor response to a reduction in RPP and RNS (both P less than 0.001). In a second series of experiments the potential role of an ischemia-induced endothelial injury and of the absence of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) production were examined to explain the lack of vasodilatation to acetylcholine. Acetylcholine, bradykinin (a second EDRF-dependent vasodilator), or prostacyclin, an EDRF-independent vasodilator, was infused intrarenally for 90 min, and RBF responses to a reduction in RPP and RNS were tested in 7-d ischemic ARF rats. Neither acetylcholine nor bradykinin caused vasodilatation or altered the slope of the relationship between RBF and RPP. By contrast, prostacyclin increased RBF (P less than 0.001), but did not change the vascular response to changes in RPP. It was concluded that the abnormal pressor sensitivity to a reduction in RPP and RNS was due to changes in renovascular smooth muscle cell calcium activity that could be blocked by calcium entry blockers. A lack of response to EDRF-dependent vasodilators, as a result of ischemic endothelial injury, may contribute to the increased pressor sensitivity of the renal vessels. PMID:3261301

  3. Myofascial force transmission between transferred rat flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and former synergistic palmaris longus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Huub; Huijing, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We investigated the extent of mechanical interaction between rat flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL) muscles following transfer of FCU to the distal tendons of extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus (ECRB/L) muscles. Five weeks after recovery from surgery, isometric forces exerted at the distal tendons of FCU and PL were quantified at various FCU lengths. PL was kept at a constant length. Changing the muscle-tendon complex length of transferred FCU (by maximally 3.5 mm) decreased PL force significantly (by 7%). A linear relationship was found between changes in FCU muscle belly length, being a measure of muscle relative positions, and PL force. These results indicate that despite transfer of FCU muscle to the extensor side of the forearm, changing FCU length still affects force transmission of its, now, antagonistic PL muscle. We conclude that a transferred muscle may still be mechanically linked to its former synergistic muscles. PMID:23738260

  4. Temporal changes in sarcomere lesions of rat adductor longus muscles during hindlimb reloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krippendorf, B. B.; Riley, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Focal sarcomere disruptions were previously observed in adductor longus muscles of rats flown approximately two weeks aboard the Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellite flights. These lesions, characterized by breakage and loss of myofilaments and Z-line streaming, resembled damage induced by unaccustomed exercise that includes eccentric contractions in which muscles lengthen as they develop tension. We hypothesized that sarcomere lesions in atrophied muscles of space flow rats were not produced in microgravity by muscle unloading but resulted from muscle reloading upon re-exposure to terrestrial gravity. To test this hypothesis, we examined temporal changes in sarcomere integrity of adductor longus muscles from rats subjected to 12.5 days of hindlimb suspension unloading and subsequent reloading by return to vivarium cages for 0, 6, 12, or 48 hours of normal weightbearing. Our ultrastructural observations suggested that muscle unloading (0 h reloading) induced myofibril misalignment associated with myofiber atrophy. Muscle reloading for 6 hours induced focal sarcomere lesions in which cross striations were abnormally widened. Such lesions were electron lucent due to extensive myofilament loss. Lesions in reloaded muscles showed rapid restructuring. By 12 hours of reloading, lesions were moderately stained foci and by 48 hours darkly stained foci in which the pattern of cross striations was indistinct at the light and electron microscopic levels. These lesions were spanned by Z-line-like electron dense filamentous material. Our findings suggest a new role for Z-line streaming in lesion restructuring: rather than an antecedent to damage, this type of Z-line streaming may be indicative of rapid, early sarcomere repair.

  5. Muscle MRI reveals distinct abnormalities in genetically proven non-dystrophic myotonias.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Jasper M; Matthews, Emma; Raja Rayan, Dipa L; Fischmann, Arne; Sinclair, Christopher D J; Reilly, Mary M; Thornton, John S; Hanna, Michael G; Yousry, Tarek A

    2013-08-01

    We assessed the presence, frequency and pattern of MRI abnormalities in non-dystrophic myotonia patients. We reviewed T1-weighted and STIR (short-tau-inversion-recovery) 3T MRI sequences of lower limb muscles at thigh and calf level in 21 patients with genetically confirmed non-dystrophic myotonia: 11 with CLCN1 mutations and 10 with SCN4A mutations, and 19 healthy volunteers. The MRI examinations of all patients showed hyperintensity within muscles on either T1-weighted or STIR images. Mild extensive or marked T1-weighted changes were noted in 10/21 patients and no volunteers. Muscles in the thigh were equally likely to be affected but in the calf there was sparing of tibialis posterior. Oedema was common in calf musculature especially in the medial gastrocnemius with STIR hyperintensity observed in 18/21 patients. In 10/11 CLCN1 patients this included a previously unreported "central stripe", also present in 3/10 SCN4A patients but no volunteers. Degree of fatty infiltration correlated with age (rho=0.46, p<0.05). Muscle MRI is frequently abnormal in non-dystrophic myotonia providing evidence of fatty infiltration and/or oedema. The pattern is distinct from other myotonic disorders; in particular the "central stripe" has not been reported in other conditions. Correlations with clinical parameters suggest a potential role for MRI as a biomarker. PMID:23810313

  6. Myelin Lipid Abnormalities in the Aspartoacylase-Deficient Tremor Rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianfeng; Leone, Paola; Wu, Gusheng; Francis, Jeremy S.; Li, Hong; Jain, Mohit Raja; Serikawa, Tadao

    2015-01-01

    The high concentration of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in neurons of the central nervous system and its growing clinical use as an indicator of neuronal viability has intensified interest in the biological function of this amino acid derivative. The biomedical relevance of such inquiries is highlighted by the myelin-associated pathology of Canavan disease, an inherited childhood disorder resulting from mutation of aspartoacylase (ASPA), the NAA-hydrolyzing enzyme. This enzyme is known to be localized in oligodendrocytes with bimodal distribution in cytosol and the myelin sheath, and to produce acetyl groups utilized in myelin lipid synthesis. Loss of this acetyl source in Canavan disease and rodent models such as the tremor rat are thought to account for the observed myelin deficit. This study was undertaken to further define and quantify the specific lipid abnormalities that occur as a result of ASPA deficit in the tremor rat. Employing mass spectrometry together with high performance thin-layer chromatography, we found that myelin from 28-day-old animals showed major reduction in cerebrosides (CB) and sulfatides (Sulf) with unsubstituted fatty acids, and equal if not greater changes in myelin from 7-month-old tremors. Cerebrosides with 2-hydroxyfatty acids showed little if any change at either age; Sulf with 2-hydroxyfatty acids showed no significant change at 28 days, but surprisingly a major increase at 7 months. Two species of phosphatidylcholine, 32:0 and 34:1, also showed significant increase, but only at 28 days. One form of phosphatidylethanolamine, PE36:1, was reduced a modest amount at both ages, whereas the plasmalogen form did not change. The dysmyelination that results from inactivation of ASPA is thus characterized by selective decreases as well as some increases in specific lipids. PMID:18478328

  7. 31P-NMR study of different hypothyroid states in rat leg muscle.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, P; Klein, M; Robin-Lherbier, B; Walker, P; Escanye, J M; Brunotte, F; Robert, J; Duc, M

    1991-12-01

    Using phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, this study was undertaken to determine the effects of experimental hypothyroidism on muscle bioenergetics. The peaks of phosphocreatine (PCr), Pi, phosphodiesters (PDE), sugar phosphomonoesters, and ATP were obtained at rest, during a 2-Hz hindleg muscle stimulation, and during a subsequent recovery period from four groups of anesthetized rats as follows: one control and three hypothyroid (HT) groups treated by propylthyouracil during 2, 4, and 6 wk, respectively. Resting spectra showed a significant rise in Pi by 30% and decreased intracellular pH and PCr/Pi in all three HT groups. PDE progressively increased to 200% of its initial value with hypothyroidism duration. Muscle stimulation did not lead to significant differences in PCr depletion. The percentage of PCr recovery is less in HT muscle than in control muscle. An abnormal H+ metabolism is obvious in all three HT groups. These results indicate abnormal bioenergetics in HT muscle and suggest an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism and of the H+ efflux. They also evoke a high sensitivity of cellular energetics to thyroid deficiency. PMID:1767830

  8. Leucine supplementation improves regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2015-12-01

    The decreased regenerative capacity of old skeletal muscles involves disrupted turnover of proteins. This study investigated whether leucine supplementation in old rats could improve muscle regenerative capacity. Young and old male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine; then, the muscles were cryolesioned and examined after 3 and 10 days. Leucine supplementation attenuated the decrease in the expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in young and old muscles on day 3 post-injury and promoted an increase in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers from both young and old soleus muscles on day 10 post-injury. This supplementation decreased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and increased the proteasome activity in young regenerating muscles, but the opposite effect was observed in old regenerating muscles. Moreover, leucine decreased the inflammation area and induced an increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells in both young and old muscles. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation improves the regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats, through the preservation of certain biological responses upon leucine supplementation. Such responses comprise the decrease in the inflammation area, increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells and size of regenerating myofibers, combined with the modulation of components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:26481769

  9. Abnormal skeletal muscle oxidative capacity after lung transplantation by 31P-MRS.

    PubMed

    Evans, A B; Al-Himyary, A J; Hrovat, M I; Pappagianopoulos, P; Wain, J C; Ginns, L C; Systrom, D M

    1997-02-01

    Although lung transplantation improves exercise capacity by removal of a ventilatory limitation, recipients' postoperative maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) remains markedly abnormal. To determine if abnormal skeletal muscle oxidative capacity contributes to this impaired aerobic capacity, nine lung transplant recipients and eight healthy volunteers performed incremental quadriceps exercise to exhaustion with simultaneous measurements of pulmonary gas exchange, minute ventilation, blood lactate, and quadriceps muscle pH and phosphorylation potential by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Five to 38 mo after lung transplantation, peak VO2 was decreased compared with that of normal control subjects (6.7 +/- 0.4 versus 12.3 +/- 1.0 ml/min/kg, p < 0.001), even after accounting for differences in age and lean body weight. Neither ventilation, arterial O2 saturation nor mild anemia could account for the decrease in aerobic capacity. Quadriceps muscle intracellular pH (pH(i)) was more acidic at rest (7.07 +/- 0.01 versus 7.12 +/- 0.01 units, p < 0.05) and fell during exercise from baseline values at a lower metabolic rate (282 +/- 21 versus 577 +/- 52 ml/min, p < 0.001). Regressions for pH(i) versus VO2, phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate ratio (PCr/Pi) versus VO2, and blood lactate versus pH(i) were not different. Among transplant recipients, the metabolic rate at which pH(i) fell correlated closely with VO2max (r = 0.87, p < 0.01). The persistent decrease in VO2max after lung transplantation may be related to abnormalities of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. PMID:9032203

  10. Normal protein content but abnormally inhibited enzyme activity in muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Diana; Zierz, Stephan

    2014-04-15

    The biochemical consequences of the disease causing mutations of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are still enigmatic. Therefore, CPT II was characterized in muscle biopsies of nine patients with genetically proven muscle CPT II deficiency. Total CPT activity (CPT I+CPT II) of patients was not significantly different from that of controls. Remaining activities upon inhibition by malonyl-CoA and Triton X-100 were significantly reduced in patients. Immunohistochemically CPT II protein was predominantly expressed in type-I-fibers with the same intensity in patients as in controls. Western blot showed the same CPT II staining intensity ratio in patients and controls. CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations estimated by ELISA were not significantly different in patients and in controls. Citrate synthase activity in patients was significantly increased. Total CPT activity significantly correlated with both CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations in patients and controls. This implies (i) that normal total CPT activity in patients with muscle CPT II deficiency is not due to compensatory increase of CPT I activity and that (ii) the mutant CPT II is enzymatically active. The data further support the notion that in muscle CPT II deficiency enzyme activity and protein content are not reduced, but rather abnormally inhibited when fatty acid metabolism is stressed. PMID:24602495

  11. Atrophy of rat skeletal muscles in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Ginoza, H. S.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A hypokinetic rat model was used for elucidation of the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting which occurs in weightlessness. Rats were suspended from a back-harness with the head tilted downward and the hind limbs totally unloaded. A progressive decrease in the size of the soleus muscle from suspended rats was observed as a function of time. The rate of protein degradation of the homogenates from the soleus muscles of suspended and control animals was not significantly different. The rate of cell-free protein synthesis was severely repressed in the atrophied muscle. An initial rise in the levels of plasma glucose and corticosterone was observed on the second day of suspension, but they subsequently returned to normal values.

  12. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  13. Normal Muscle Oxygen Consumption and Fatigability in Sickle Cell Patients Despite Reduced Microvascular Oxygenation and Hemorheological Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, Xavier; Pichon, Aurélien; Lemonne, Nathalie; Mougenel, Danièle; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Lamarre, Yann; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Hue, Olivier; Connes, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Although it has been hypothesized that muscle metabolism and fatigability could be impaired in sickle cell patients, no study has addressed this issue. Methods We compared muscle metabolism and function (muscle microvascular oxygenation, microvascular blood flow, muscle oxygen consumption and muscle microvascular oxygenation variability, which reflects vasomotion activity, maximal muscle force and local muscle fatigability) and the hemorheological profile at rest between 16 healthy subjects (AA), 20 sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease (SC) patients and 16 sickle cell anemia (SS) patients. Results Muscle microvascular oxygenation was reduced in SS patients compared to the SC and AA groups and this reduction was not related to hemorhelogical abnormalities. No difference was observed between the three groups for oxygen consumption and vasomotion activity. Muscle microvascular blood flow was higher in SS patients compared to the AA group, and tended to be higher compared to the SC group. Multivariate analysis revealed that muscle oxygen consumption was independently associated with muscle microvascular blood flow in the two sickle cell groups (SC and SS). Finally, despite reduced muscle force in sickle cell patients, their local muscle fatigability was similar to that of the healthy subjects. Conclusions Sickle cell patients have normal resting muscle oxygen consumption and fatigability despite hemorheological alterations and, for SS patients only, reduced muscle microvascular oxygenation and increased microvascular blood flow. Two alternative mechanisms can be proposed for SS patients: 1) the increased muscle microvascular blood flow is a way to compensate for the lower muscle microvascular oxygenation to maintain muscle oxygen consumption to normal values or 2) the reduced microvascular oxygenation coupled with a normal resting muscle oxygen consumption could indicate that there is slight hypoxia within the muscle which is not sufficient to limit

  14. Airway smooth muscle changes in the nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia rat model.

    PubMed

    Belik, Jaques; Davidge, Sandra T; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Jingyi; Greer, John J

    2003-05-01

    In the fetal rat, nitrofen induces congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and pulmonary vascular remodeling similar to what is observed in the human condition. Airway hyperactivity is common in infants with CDH and attributed to the ventilator-induced airway damage. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that airway smooth muscle mechanical properties are altered in the nitrofen-induced CDH rat model. Lungs from nitrofen-exposed fetuses with hernias (CDH) or intact diaphragm (nitrofen) and untreated fetuses (control) were studied on gestation d 21. The left intrapulmonary artery and bronchi were removed and mounted on a wire myograph, and lung expression, content, and immunolocalization of cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated. Pulmonary artery muscle in the CDH group had significantly (p < 0.01) lower force generation compared with control and nitrofen groups. In contrast, the same generation bronchial smooth muscle of the CDH and nitrofen groups developed higher force compared with control. Whereas no differences were found in endothelium-dependent pulmonary vascular muscle tone, the epithelium-dependent airway muscle relaxation was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in the CDH and nitrofen groups. The lung mRNA levels of COX-1 and COX-2 were increased in the CDH and nitrofen groups. COX-1 vascular and airway immunostaining, as well as COX-1 and COX-2 lung protein content, were increased in the CDH group. This is the first report of airway smooth muscle abnormalities in the nitrofen-induced fetal rat model of CDH. We speculate that congenital airway muscle changes may be present in the human form of this disease. PMID:12612200

  15. Neural control of glutamine synthetase activity in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Feng, B; Konagaya, M; Konagaya, Y; Thomas, J W; Banner, C; Mill, J; Max, S R

    1990-05-01

    The mechanism of glutamine synthetase induction in rat skeletal muscle after denervation or limb immobilization was investigated. Adult male rats were subjected to midthigh section of the sciatic nerve. At 1, 2, and 5 h and 1, 2, and 7 days after denervation, rats were killed and denervated, and contralateral control soleus and plantaris muscles were excised, weighted, homogenized, and assayed for glutamine synthetase. Glutamine synthetase activity increased approximately twofold 1 h after denervation in both muscles. By 7 days postdenervation enzyme activity had increased to three times the control level in plantaris muscle and to four times the control level in soleus muscle. Increased enzyme activity after nerve section was associated with increased maximum velocity with no change in apparent Michaelis constant. Immunotitration with an antiglutamine synthetase antibody suggested that denervation caused an increase in the number of glutamine synthetase molecules in muscle. However, Northern-blot analysis revealed no increase in the steady-state level of glutamine synthetase mRNA after denervation. A mixing experiment failed to yield evidence for the presence of a soluble factor involved in regulating the activity of glutamine synthetase in denervated muscle. A combination of denervation and dexamethasone injections resulted in additive increases in glutamine synthetase. Thus the mechanism underlying increased glutamine synthetase after denervation appears to be posttranscriptional and is distinct from that of the glucocorticoid-mediated glutamine synthetase induction previously described by us. PMID:1970709

  16. Autophagy Signaling in Skeletal Muscle of Infarcted Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jannig, Paulo R.; Moreira, Jose B. N.; Bechara, Luiz R. G.; Bozi, Luiz H. M.; Bacurau, Aline V.; Monteiro, Alex W. A.; Dourado, Paulo M.; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brum, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF)-induced skeletal muscle atrophy is often associated to exercise intolerance and poor prognosis. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HF-induced muscle atrophy may contribute to the development of pharmacological strategies to prevent or treat such condition. It has been shown that autophagy-lysosome system is an important mechanism for maintenance of muscle mass. However, its role in HF-induced myopathy has not been addressed yet. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate autophagy signaling in myocardial infarction (MI)-induced muscle atrophy in rats. Methods/Principal Findings Wistar rats underwent MI or Sham surgeries, and after 12 weeks were submitted to echocardiography, exercise tolerance and histology evaluations. Cathepsin L activity and expression of autophagy-related genes and proteins were assessed in soleus and plantaris muscles by fluorimetric assay, qRT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. MI rats displayed exercise intolerance, left ventricular dysfunction and dilation, thereby suggesting the presence of HF. The key findings of the present study were: a) upregulation of autophagy-related genes (GABARAPL1, ATG7, BNIP3, CTSL1 and LAMP2) was observed only in plantaris while muscle atrophy was observed in both soleus and plantaris muscles, and b) Cathepsin L activity, Bnip3 and Fis1 protein levels, and levels of lipid hydroperoxides were increased specifically in plantaris muscle of MI rats. Conclusions Altogether our results provide evidence for autophagy signaling regulation in HF-induced plantaris atrophy but not soleus atrophy. Therefore, autophagy-lysosome system is differentially regulated in atrophic muscles comprising different fiber-types and metabolic characteristics. PMID:24427319

  17. NO contributes to abnormal vascular calcium regulation and reactivity induced by peritonitis-associated septic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiu-Jen; Li, Shaio-Yun; Shih, Chih-Chin; Liao, Mei-Huei; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2010-05-01

    Calcium plays an important role in determining vascular smooth muscle tone. Norepinephrine (NE)-induced vascular contraction contains two components: 1) Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum as the fast phase and 2) Ca2+ influx via a voltage-dependent calcium channel as the slow phase. This study used functional isometric tension recording to evaluate mediators contributing to abnormal NE-induced Ca2+ handling and reactivity in isolated thoracic aortas from septic rats. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and thoracic aortas were removed at 18 h after CLP. Our results showed that rats that received CLP for 18 h manifested severe hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity to NE in vivo. This vascular hyporeactivity to NE was also observed in the aorta obtained from CLP-induced sepsis rat. Both the fast and slow phases of NE-induced contraction were reduced in aortas from sepsis rats. To clarify what possible mediators contribute to the abnormal Ca2+ handling in aortas from sepsis animals, inhibitors of Ca2+ channel and release were used. Inhibition by 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borane, ryanodine, and cyclopiazonic acid of the NE-induced contraction in Ca2+-free solution was greater in the aorta from sepsis rats and inhibitions of cyclopiazonic acid and ryanodine, but not of 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borane, were attenuated by NOS inhibitor N[omega]-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. In addition, the attenuation of NE-induced contraction by nifedipine in the aorta was also greater in the CLP group. Our results suggest that abnormal NE-induced Ca2+ handling associated with vascular hyporeactivity in the CLP-induced sepsis is caused by a major decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum function and a minor impairment of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels on membrane to Ca2+ handling, at least, in the aorta, and this could be attributed to an overproduction of NO in sepsis. PMID:19749606

  18. Transfer of beta-amyloid precursor protein gene using adenovirus vector causes mitochondrial abnormalities in cultured normal human muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Askanas, V; McFerrin, J; Baqué, S; Alvarez, R B; Sarkozi, E; Engel, W K

    1996-01-01

    As in Alzheimer-disease (AD) brain, vacuolated muscle fibers of inclusion-body myositis (IBM) contain abnormally accumulated beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP), including its beta-amyloid protein epitope, and increased beta APP-751 mRNA. Other similarities between IBM muscle and AD brain phenotypes include paired helical filaments, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, apolipoprotein E, and mitochondrial abnormalities, including decreased cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) activity. The pathogenesis of these abnormalities in IBM muscle and AD brain is not known. We now report that direct transfer of the beta APP gene, using adenovirus vector, into cultured normal human muscle fibers causes structural abnormalities of mitochondria and decreased COX activity. In this adenovirus-mediated beta APP gene transfer, we demonstrated that beta APP overproduction can induce mitochondrial abnormalities. The data suggest that excessive beta APP may be responsible for mitochondrial and COX abnormalities in IBM muscle and perhaps AD brain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8577761

  19. Reduction-oxidation state and protein degradation in skeletal muscle of fasted and refed rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    Redox state and protein degradation were measured in isolated muscles of fasted (up to 10 d) and refed (up to 4 d) 7- to 14-wk-old rats. Protein degradation in the extensor digitorum longus muscle, but not in the soleus muscle, was greater in the fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. The NAD couple was more oxidized in incubated and fresh extensor digitorum longus muscles and in some incubated soleus muscles of fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. In the extensor digitorum longus muscle of refed or prolonged fasted rats, protein degradation was slower and the NAD couple was more reduced than in the fed state. Therefore, oxidation of the NAD couple was associated with increased muscle breakdown during fasting, whereas reduction of the NAD couple was associated with muscle conservation and deposition.

  20. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers of rats after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akuzawa, M.; Hataya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers were electron microscopically studied in rats forced to run on the treadmill until all-out. When they were mild and limited to relatively small areas, the reconstruction of filaments ensued within 10 days without infiltration of cells. When they were severe and extensive, phagocytes infiltrated in the lesions and removed degenerative sacroplasmic debris from muscle fibers. A little later, myoblasts appeared and regeneration was accomplished in 30 days in much the same manner as in myogenesis.

  1. Reducing abnormal muscle co-activation after stroke using a myoelectric-computer interface: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Zachary A.; Zev Rymer, W.; Slutzky, Marc W.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant factor in impaired movement caused by stroke is the inability to activate muscles independently. While the pathophysiology behind this abnormal co-activation is not clear, reducing the co-activation could improve overall arm function. A myoelectric computer interface (MCI), which maps EMG signals to cursor movement, could be used as a treatment to help retrain muscle activation patterns. Objective To investigate the use of MCI training to reduce abnormal muscle co-activation in chronic stroke survivors. Methods Five healthy subjects and five stroke survivors with hemiparesis participated in multiple sessions of MCI training. The level of arm impairment in stroke survivors was assessed using the upper extremity portion of Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMA-UE). Subjects performed isometric activations of up to five muscles. Activation of each muscle was mapped to different directions of cursor movement. The MCI specifically targeted one pair of muscles in each subject for reduction of co-activation. Results Both healthy subjects and stroke survivors learned to reduce abnormal co-activation of the targeted muscles with MCI training. Three out of five stroke survivors exhibited objective reduction in arm impairment as well (improvement in FMA-UE of 3 points in each of these subjects). Conclusions These results suggest that the MCI was an effective tool in directly retraining muscle activation patterns following stroke. PMID:24376069

  2. Skeletal muscle gene expression in space-flown rats.

    PubMed

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Ishidoh, Kazumi; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Ishihara, Ibuki; Ikemoto, Madoka; Kano, Mihoko; Kominami, Eiki; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ogawa, Takayuki; Adams, Gregory R; Baldwin, Kenneth M; Yasui, Natsuo; Kishi, Kyoichi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2004-03-01

    Skeletal muscles are vulnerable to marked atrophy under microgravity. This phenomenon is due to the transcriptional alteration of skeletal muscle cells to weightlessness. To further investigate this issue at a subcellular level, we examined the expression of approximately 26,000 gastrocnemius muscle genes in space-flown rats by DNA microarray analysis. Comparison of the changes in gene expression among spaceflight, tail-suspended, and denervated rats revealed that such changes were unique after spaceflight and not just an extension of simulated weightlessness. The microarray data showed two spaceflight-specific gene expression patterns: 1) imbalanced expression of mitochondrial genes with disturbed expression of cytoskeletal molecules, including putative mitochondria-anchoring proteins, A-kinase anchoring protein, and cytoplasmic dynein, and 2) up-regulated expression of ubiquitin ligase genes, MuRF-1, Cbl-b, and Siah-1A, which are rate-limiting enzymes of muscle protein degradation. Distorted expression of cytoskeletal genes during spaceflight resulted in dislocation of the mitochondria in the cell. Several oxidative stress-inducible genes were highly expressed in the muscle of spaceflight rats. We postulate that mitochondrial dislocation during spaceflight has deleterious effects on muscle fibers, leading to atrophy in the form of insufficient energy provision for construction and leakage of reactive oxygen species from the mitochondria. PMID:14715702

  3. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yali; Su, Dan; Zhang, Ling; Wei, Shaofeng; Liu, Kuangyi; Peng, Mi; Li, Hanyun; Song, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL−1 for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL−1. The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle. PMID:27190533

  4. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yali; Su, Dan; Zhang, Ling; Wei, Shaofeng; Liu, Kuangyi; Peng, Mi; Li, Hanyun; Song, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL(-1) for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL(-1). The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle. PMID:27190533

  5. Correcting of pronated feet reduce skeletal muscle injury in young women with biomechanical abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Tulaar, Angela B. M.; Immanuel, Suzana; Purba, A.; Mansyur, Muchtaruddin; Haryadi, Ratna Darjanti; Hadisoebroto, Ismail; Husni, Amin; Ibrahim, Nurhadi

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical abnormalities of pronated feet accompanied by functional leg length disparity may increase the risk of skeletal muscle injury. Objective of the study is to prove that correction of pronated feet by the foot orthoses will reduce the creatine kinase-MM (CK-MM) concentrations as the muscle injury indicator. The design study was double blind randomized clinical trials with control. Research subjects were divided into two groups, group 1 used the foot orthoses while group 2 did not used the foot orthoses. The whole subject examined the concentrations of the CK-MM enzyme before, and 24–72 hours after the walking test. The walking test was conducted 15 minutes with maximum speed. The concentration of the CK-MM enzyme before walking test on treatment group was 70.07±15.33 International Unit (IU), similar with the control group was 69.85±17.03 IU (P=0.971). The increased in CK-MM enzyme concentrations 45 hours after the walking test was lower in the treatment group (7.8±9 IU) than the control group (22.0±11.5 IU) (P=0.001). The CK-MM enzyme concentrations continued to decline in the treatment group after the second walking test (77.21±17.47 IU), and after the third walking test (69.86±11.88 IU) (P=0.018). The foot orthoses for correcting the pronated feet on the young women with biomechanical abnormalities is able to reduce the degree of the skeletal muscle injury after walking activity. PMID:27051564

  6. Endurance training facilitates myoglobin desaturation during muscle contraction in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Hisashi; Furuichi, Yasuro; Yamada, Tatsuya; Jue, Thomas; Ojino, Minoru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwase, Satoshi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Masuda, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    At onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) immediately releases its bound O2 to the mitochondria. Accordingly, intracellular O2 tension (PmbO2) markedly declines in order to increase muscle O2 uptake (mO2). However, whether the change in PmbO2 during muscle contraction modulates mO2 and whether the O2 release rate from Mb increases in endurance-trained muscles remain unclear. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of endurance training on O2 saturation of Mb (SmbO2) and PmbO2 kinetics during muscle contraction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 4-week swimming training (Tr group; 6 days per week, 30 min × 4 sets per day) with a weight load of 2% body mass. After the training period, deoxygenated Mb kinetics during muscle contraction were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy under hemoglobin-free medium perfusion. In the Tr group, the mO2peak significantly increased by 32%. Although the PmbO2 during muscle contraction did not affect the increased mO2 in endurance-trained muscle, the O2 release rate from Mb increased because of the increased Mb concentration and faster decremental rate in SmbO2 at the maximal twitch tension. These results suggest that the Mb dynamics during muscle contraction are contributing factors to faster O2 kinetics in endurance-trained muscle. PMID:25801957

  7. Endurance training facilitates myoglobin desaturation during muscle contraction in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Hisashi; Furuichi, Yasuro; Yamada, Tatsuya; Jue, Thomas; Ojino, Minoru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwase, Satoshi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Masuda, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    At onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) immediately releases its bound O2 to the mitochondria. Accordingly, intracellular O2 tension (PmbO2) markedly declines in order to increase muscle O2 uptake (mVO2). However, whether the change in PmbO2 during muscle contraction modulates mVO2 and whether the O2 release rate from Mb increases in endurance-trained muscles remain unclear. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of endurance training on O2 saturation of Mb (SmbO2) and PmbO2 kinetics during muscle contraction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 4-week swimming training (Tr group; 6 days per week, 30 min × 4 sets per day) with a weight load of 2% body mass. After the training period, deoxygenated Mb kinetics during muscle contraction were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy under hemoglobin-free medium perfusion. In the Tr group, the VmO2peak significantly increased by 32%. Although the PmbO2 during muscle contraction did not affect the increased mVO2 in endurance-trained muscle, the O2 release rate from Mb increased because of the increased Mb concentration and faster decremental rate in SmbO2 at the maximal twitch tension. These results suggest that the Mb dynamics during muscle contraction are contributing factors to faster VO2 kinetics in endurance-trained muscle. PMID:25801957

  8. Histology, composition, and quality traits of chicken Pectoralis major muscle affected by wooden breast abnormality.

    PubMed

    Soglia, F; Mudalal, S; Babini, E; Di Nunzio, M; Mazzoni, M; Sirri, F; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2016-03-01

    Only a few years ago, the poultry industry began to face a recent abnormality in breast meat, known as wooden breast, which frequently overlaps with white striping. This study aimed to assess the impact of wooden breast abnormality on quality traits of meat. For this purpose, 32 normal (NRM), 32 wooden (WB), and 32 wooden and white-striped (WB/WS) Pectoralis major muscles were selected from the same flock of heavy broilers (males, Ross 708, weighing around 3.7 kg) in the deboning area of a commercial processing plant at 3 h postmortem and used to assess histology, proximate (moisture, protein, fat, ash, and collagen) and mineral composition (Mg, K, P, Na and Ca), sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein patterns, and technological traits of breast meat. Compared to the normal group, WB/WS fillets showed more severe histological lesions characterized by fiber degeneration, fibrosis, and lipidosis, coupled with a significantly harder texture. With regard to proximate and mineral composition, abnormal samples exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher moisture, fat, and collagen contents coupled with lower (P < 0.001) amounts of protein and ash. Furthermore, increased calcium (131 vs. 84 mg kg(-1); P < 0.05) and sodium (741 vs. 393 mg kg(-1); P < 0.001) levels were found in WB/WS meat samples. The SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a significantly lower amount of calcium-ATPase (SERCA, 114 kDa), responsible for the translocation of Ca ions across the membrane, in normal breasts compared to abnormal ones. As for meat quality traits, fillets affected by wooden abnormality exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher ultimate pH and lower water-holding/water-binding capacity. In particular, compared to normal, abnormal samples showed reduced marinade uptake coupled with increased drip loss and cooking losses as well. In conclusion, this study revealed that meat affected by wooden breast or both wooden breast and white striping abnormalities exhibit poorer nutritional value, harder

  9. Astaxanthin intake attenuates muscle atrophy caused by immobilization in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Yamaguchi, Yusuke; Miyaji, Nobuyuki; Yoshihara, Toshinori; Naito, Hisashi; Goto, Katsumasa; Ohmori, Daijiro; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Sugiura, Takao

    2016-08-01

    Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment and has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of oxidative damage. We tested the hypothesis that astaxanthin intake would attenuate immobilization-induced muscle atrophy in rats. Male Wistar rats (14-week old) were fed for 24 days with either astaxanthin or placebo diet. After 14 days of each experimental diet intake, the hindlimb muscles of one leg were immobilized in plantar flexion position using a plaster cast. Following 10 days of immobilization, both the atrophic and the contralateral plantaris muscles were removed and analyzed to determine the level of muscle atrophy along with measurement of the protein levels of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and selected proteases. Compared with placebo diet animals, the degree of muscle atrophy in response to immobilization was significantly reduced in astaxanthin diet animals. Further, astaxanthin supplementation significantly prevented the immobilization-induced increase in the expression of CuZn-SOD, cathepsin L, calpain, and ubiquitin in the atrophied muscle. These results support the postulate that dietary astaxanthin intake attenuates the rate of disuse muscle atrophy by inhibiting oxidative stress and proteolysis via three major proteolytic pathways. PMID:27482075

  10. Respiratory muscle weakness in the Zucker diabetic fatty rat.

    PubMed

    Allwood, Melissa A; Foster, Andrew J; Arkell, Alicia M; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Snook, Laelie A; Romanova, Nadya; Murrant, Coral L; Holloway, Graham P; Wright, David C; Simpson, Jeremy A

    2015-10-01

    The obesity epidemic is considered one of the most serious public health problems of the modern world. Physical therapy is the most accessible form of treatment; however, compliance is a major obstacle due to exercise intolerance and dyspnea. Respiratory muscle atrophy is a cause of dyspnea, yet little is known of obesity-induced respiratory muscle dysfunction. Our objective was to investigate whether obesity-induced skeletal muscle wasting occurs in the diaphragm, the main skeletal muscle involved in inspiration, using the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat. After 14 wk, ZDF rats developed obesity, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance, compared with lean controls. Hemodynamic analysis revealed ZDF rats have impaired cardiac relaxation (P = 0.001) with elevated end-diastolic pressure (P = 0.006), indicative of diastolic dysfunction. Assessment of diaphragm function revealed weakness (P = 0.0296) in the absence of intrinsic muscle impairment in ZDF rats. Diaphragm morphology revealed increased fibrosis (P < 0.0001), atrophy (P < 0.0001), and reduced myosin heavy-chain content (P < 0.001), compared with lean controls. These changes are accompanied by activation of the myostatin signaling pathway with increased serum myostatin (P = 0.017), increased gene expression (P = 0.030) in the diaphragm and retroperitoneal adipose (P = 0.033), and increased SMAD2 phosphorylation in the diaphragm (P = 0.048). Here, we have confirmed the presence of respiratory muscle atrophy and weakness in an obese, diabetic model. We have also identified a pathological role for myostatin signaling in obesity, with systemic contributions from the adipose tissue, a nonskeletal muscle source. These findings have significant implications for future treatment strategies of exercise intolerance in an obese, diabetic population. PMID:26246509

  11. Glutamate-induced sensitization of rat masseter muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Cairns, B E; Gambarota, G; Svensson, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Berde, C B

    2002-01-01

    In rats, intradermal or intraarticular injection of glutamate or selective excitatory amino acid receptor agonists acting at peripheral excitatory amino acid receptors can decrease the intensity of mechanical stimulation required to evoke nocifensive behaviors, an indication of hyperalgesia. Since excitatory amino acid receptors have been found on the terminal ends of cutaneous primary afferent fibers, it has been suggested that increased tissue glutamate levels may have a direct sensitizing effect on primary afferent fibers, in particular skin nociceptors. However, less is known about the effects of glutamate on deep tissue afferent fibers. In the present study, a series of experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of intramuscular injection of glutamate on the excitability and mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers in anesthetized rats of both sexes. Injection of 1.0 M, but not 0.1 M glutamate evoked masseter muscle afferent activity that was significantly greater than that evoked by isotonic saline. The mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers, which was assessed with a Von Frey hair, was reduced by approximately 50% for a period of 30 min after injection of 1.0 M glutamate, but was unaffected by injections of 0.1 M glutamate or isotonic saline. Injection of 25% dextrose, which has the same osmotic strength as 1.0 M glutamate, did not evoke significant activity in or decrease the mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers. Magnetic resonance imaging experiments confirmed that injection of 25% dextrose and 1.0 M glutamate produced similar edema volumes in the masseter muscle tissue. Co-injection of 0.1 M kynurenate, an excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, and 1.0 M glutamate attenuated glutamate-evoked afferent activity and prevented glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization. When male and female rats were compared, no difference in the baseline mechanical threshold or in the magnitude of glutamate

  12. Bone and muscle atrophy with suspension of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Marsh, C.; Evans, H.; Johnson, P.; Schneider, V.; Jhingran, S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to identify a suitable model for the study of muscle atrophy due to suspension in space, a modified version of the Morey tail suspension model was used to measure the atrophic responses of rat bone and muscle to 14-30 days of unloading of the hindlimbs. The progress of atrophy was measured by increases in methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake. It is found that bone uptake of methylene diphosphonate followed a phasic pattern similar to changes in the bone formation rate of immobilized dogs and cats. Increased MDP uptake after a period of 60 days indicated an accelerated bone metabolism. Maximum muscle atrophy in the suspended rats was distinctly different from immobilization atrophy. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that the tail suspension model is an adequate simulation of bone atrophy due to suspension.

  13. Insulin resistance in SHR/NDmc-cp rats correlates with enlarged perivascular adipocytes and endothelial cell dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hariya, Natsuyo; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Inoue, Seiya; Morioka, Kosuke; Shimada, Masaya; Okuda, Tohru; Goda, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic adipose tissue in skeletal muscle is implicated in the development of insulin resistance, which is frequently induced by abnormal dietary habits such as excessive eating and a high-fat diet. However, the characteristics of ectopic adipocytes are unknown. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of ectopic adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive corpulent congenic (SHR/NDmc-cp) rats as a model of insulin resistance from excessive eating. SHR/NDmc-cp rats displayed overt insulin resistance with high plasma glucose, insulin, and triacylglycerol concentrations relative to control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. In contrast, streptozotocin (STZ)-treated WKY rats had high glucose but low insulin concentrations. Ectopic adipocytes were found around blood vessels in the gastrocnemius in SHR/NDmc-cp rats. Areas of perivascular adipocytes and protein expression of resistin were greater in SHR/NDmc-cp rats than in control and STZ-treated WKY rats. The level of the phosphorylated (active) form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the gastrocnemius was lower in SHR/NDmc-cp rats than in the other groups. Insulin-resistant SHR/NDmc-cp rats showed enlarged perivascular adipocytes and greater endothelial cell dysfunction in the gastrocnemius. PMID:24759260

  14. Decreased phosphofructokinase activity in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Bauer, B A; Younathan, E S

    1984-01-01

    The activities of phosphofructokinase, aldolase and pyruvate kinase were diminished in extracts from skeletal muscle of streptozotocin diabetic rats, whereas the activities of glucose phosphate isomerase and phosphoglucomutase were not changed. Treatment of diabetic rats with insulin restored the activity of phosphofructokinase to normal. A kinetic study of the partially purified enzyme from normal and diabetic rats showed identical Michaelis constants for ATP and equal sensitivity to inhibition by excess of this substrate. Extracts of quick frozen muscle from diabetic rats had higher levels of citrate (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase) and lower levels of D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and D-glucose-1,6-bisphosphate (activators of this enzyme). The levels of D-fructose-6-phosphate, D-glucose-6-phosphate, ATP, ADP and AMP were the same for the two groups. Our data suggest that the in vivo decrease of phosphofructokinase activity in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats is due to a decrease in the level of the enzymatically active protein as well as to an unfavorable change in the level of several of its allosteric modulators. PMID:6237837

  15. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  16. Morphofunctional responses to anaemia in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Esteva, Santiago; Panisello, Pere; Casas, Mireia; Torrella, Joan Ramon; Pagés, Teresa; Viscor, Ginés

    2008-01-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups: control and anaemic. Anaemia was induced by periodical blood withdrawal. Extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles were excised under pentobarbital sodium total anaesthesia and processed for transmission electron microscopy, histochemical and biochemical analyses. Mitochondrial volume was determined by transmission electron microscopy in three different regions of each muscle fibre: pericapillary, sarcolemmal and sarcoplasmatic. Muscle samples sections were also stained with histochemical methods (SDH and m-ATPase) to reveal the oxidative capacity and shortening velocity of each muscle fibre. Determinations of fibre and capillary densities and fibre type composition were made from micrographs of different fixed fields selected in the equatorial region of each rat muscle. Determination of metabolites (ATP, inorganic phosphate, creatine, creatine phosphate and lactate) was done using established enzymatic methods and spectrophotometric detection. Significant differences in mitochondrial volumes were found between pericapillary, sarcolemmal and sarcoplasmic regions when data from animal groups were tested independently. Moreover, it was verified that anaemic rats had significantly lower values than control animals in all the sampled regions of both muscles. These changes were associated with a significantly higher proportion of fast fibres in anaemic rat soleus muscles (slow oxidative group = 63.8%; fast glycolytic group = 8.2%; fast oxidative glycolytic group = 27.4%) than in the controls (slow oxidative group = 79.0%; fast glycolytic group = 3.9%; fast oxidative glycolytic group = 17.1%). No significant changes were detected in the extensor digitorum longus muscle. A significant increase was found in metabolite concentration in both the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of the anaemic animals as compared to the control group. In conclusion, hypoxaemic hypoxia causes a reduction in

  17. Neural control of skeletal muscle cholinesterase: a study using organ-cultured rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, B; Younkin, L H; Younkin, S G

    1979-01-01

    1. It has been proposed that the influence of innervation on the cholinesterase activity (ChE) of skeletal muscle and on end-plate ChE in particular is mediated by trophic substance(s) moved by axonal transport and released from nerve. We have tested this hypothesis using rat extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) and diaphragm muscles denervated in vitro for several days and then maintained in organ culture to assay putative trophic substance(s). 2. The cholinesterase activity (ChE) of rat extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) muscles decreased dramatically after 5 days of denervation in vivo as previously reported. The ChE of rat e.d.l. muscles denervated in vivo for 3 days and then maintained in organ culture for 2 days was essentially identical to that of muscles denervated 5 days in vivo. 3. The ChE OF E.D.L. MUSCLES DENERVATED IN VIVO FOR 3 DAYS AND THEN MAINTAINED FOR 2 DAYS IN CULTURE MEDIUM SUPPLEMENTED WITH SCIATIC NERVE OR INNERVATED MUSCLE EXTRACT WAS SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER THAN THAT OF MUSCLES DENERVATED IN VIVO FOR 5 DAYS OR DENERVATED IN VIVO FOR 3 DAYS AND THEN CULTURED FOR 2 DAYS IN CULTURE MEDIUM ALONE. Supplementing the culture medium with brain or spinal cord extract also significantly increased the ChE of organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles. 4. Supplementing the culture medium with liver or spleen extract or with the extract of muscle denervated for 3--7 days in vivo before extraction did not increase the ChE or organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles. 5. The effect of muscle extract on the ChE of organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles was dose dependent and occurred gradually reaching a maximum after approximately 24 h of culture. 6. Substance(s) which increased the ChE of organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles were found to accumulate in transected sciatic nerve in the region just proximal to the site of transection where substances moved by axonal transport are known to accumulate. 7. Media conditioned with neurally stimulated e.d.l. or diaphragm muscles caused a substantial and

  18. Influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury to skeletal muscles in rats.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Ryo; Fujita, Naoto; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kawada, Shigeo; Ishii, Naokata; Miki, Akinori

    2011-02-01

    The influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury was examined in the rat extensor digitorum longus. After the injury, animals were randomly divided into nonicing and icing groups. In the latter, ice packs were applied for 20 min. Due to the icing, degeneration of the necrotic muscle fibers and differentiation of satellite cells at early stages of regeneration were retarded by ∼1 day. In the icing group, the ratio of regenerating fibers showing central nucleus at 14 days after the injury was higher, and cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers at 28 days was evidently smaller than in the nonicing group. Besides, the ratio of collagen fibers area at 14 and 28 days after the injury in the icing group was higher than in the nonicing group. These findings suggest that icing applied soon after the injury not only considerably retarded muscle regeneration but also induced impairment of muscle regeneration along with excessive collagen deposition. Macrophages were immunohistochemically demonstrated at the injury site during degeneration and early stages of regeneration. Due to icing, chronological changes in the number of macrophages and immunohistochemical expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IGF-I were also retarded by 1 to 2 days. Since it has been said that macrophages play important roles not only for degeneration, but also for muscle regeneration, the influence of icing on macrophage activities might be closely related to a delay in muscle regeneration, impairment of muscle regeneration, and redundant collagen synthesis. PMID:21164157

  19. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  20. Oseltamivir reduces hippocampal abnormal EEG activities after a virus infection (influenza) in isoflurane-anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Cissé, Youssouf; Inoue, Isao; Kido, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Background Oseltamivir phosphate (OP, Tamiflu®) is a widely used drug in the treatment of influenza with fever. However, case reports have associated OP intake with sudden abnormal behaviors. In rats infected by the influenza A virus (IAV), the electroencephalogram (EEG) displayed abnormal high-voltage amplitudes with spikes and theta oscillations at a core temperature of 39.9°C to 41°C. Until now, there has been no information describing the effect of OP on intact brain hippocampal activity of IAV-infected animals during hyperthermia. Objective The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of OP on abnormal EEG activities in the hippocampus using the rat model of influenza-associated encephalopathy. Methods Male Wistar rats aged 3 to 4 weeks were used for the study. Influenza A/WSN/33 strain (1 × 105 plaque forming unit in PBS, 60 µL) was applied intranasally to the rats. To characterize OP effects on the IAV-infected rats, EEG activity was studied more particularly in isoflurane-anesthetized IAV-infected rats during hyperthermia. Results We found that the hippocampal EEG of the OP-administered (10 mg/kg) IAV-infected rats showed significant reduction of the high-voltage amplitudes and spikes, but the theta oscillations, which had been observed only at >40°C in OP non-administered rats, appeared at 38°C core temperature. Atropine (30 mg/kg) blocked the theta oscillations. Conclusion Our data suggest that OP efficiently reduces the abnormal EEG activities after IAV infection during hyperthermia. However, OP administration may stimulate ACh release in rats at normal core temperature.

  1. Sex steroids do not affect muscle weight, oxidative metabolism or cytosolic androgen reception binding of functionally overloaded rat Plantaris muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of sex steroids on muscle weight and oxidative capacity of rat planaris muscles subjected to functional overload by removal of synergistic muscles were investigated. Ten weeks after bilateral synergist removal, plantaris muscles were significantly hypertrophic compared with unoperated controls. After this period, the ability of the muscles to oxide three substrates of oxidative metabolism was assessed. Experimental procedures are discussed and results are presented herein. Results suggest a lack of beneficial effect of sex hormone status on the process of hypertrophy and on biochemical changes in overloaded muscle. Such findings are not consistent with the idea of synergistic effects of sex steroids and muscle usage.

  2. Proteomic Profiling of Rat Thyroarytenoid Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Marriott, Gerard; Bless, Diane M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Proteomic methodologies offer promise in elucidating the systemwide cellular and molecular processes that characterize normal and diseased thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. This study examined methodological issues central to the application of 2-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) to the study of…

  3. Loquat leaf extract enhances myogenic differentiation, improves muscle function and attenuates muscle loss in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Min Jo; Kim, Minjung; Jeong, Ji Won; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-09-01

    A main characteristic of aging is the debilitating, progressive and generalized impairment of biological functions, resulting in an increased vulnerability to disease and death. Skeletal muscle comprises approximately 40% of the human body; thus, it is the most abundant tissue. At the age of 30 onwards, 0.5‑1% of human muscle mass is lost each year, with a marked acceleration in the rate of decline after the age of 65. Thus, novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function are required to improve the quality of life of older subjects. The aim of the present study was to determine whether loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) leaf extract (LE) can prevent the loss of skeletal muscle function in aged rats. Young (5-month-old) and aged (18‑19-month-old) rats were fed LE (50 mg/kg/day) for 35 days and the changes in muscle mass and strength were evaluated. The age‑associated loss of grip strength was attenuated, and muscle mass and muscle creatine kinase (CK) activity were enhanced following the administration of LE. Histochemical analysis also revealed that LE abrogated the age‑associated decrease in cross‑sectional area (CSA) and decreased the amount of connective tissue in the muscle of aged rats. To investigate the mode of action of LE, C2C12 murine myoblasts were used to evaluate the myogenic potential of LE. The expression levels of myogenic proteins (MyoD and myogenin) and functional myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were measured by western blot analysis. LE enhanced MyoD, myogenin and MyHC expression. The changes in the expression of myogenic genes corresponded with an increase in the activity of CK, a myogenic differentiation marker. Finally, LE activated the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which is involved in muscle protein synthesis during myogenesis. These findings suggest that LE attenuates sarcopenia by promoting myogenic differentiation and subsequently promoting muscle protein synthesis

  4. An evaluation of the reliability of muscle fiber cross-sectional area and fiber number measurements in rat skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The reliability of estimating muscle fiber cross-sectional area (measure of muscle fiber size) and fiber number from only a subset of fibers in rat hindlimb muscle cross-sections has not been systematically evaluated. This study examined the variability in mean estimates of fiber cross-s...

  5. Rat hindlimb muscle responses to suspension hypokinesia/hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Deavers, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Hypokinetic/hyupodynamic (H/H) whole body suspension of rats eliminates hindlimb load bearing functions while permitting continued use of the forelimbs. Responses of hindlimb muscles were assessed in terms of absolute and relative weights during 1 and 2 weeks of H/H suspension. Muscle mass loss was in the order soleus greater than gastrocnemius equal to plantaris greater than extensor digitorum longus (EDL). The soleus, a postural antigravity muscle composed mainly of slow twitch fibers, was most sensitive, losing 35 and 45 percent of its weight during the first and second weeks, respectively. The gastrocnemius and plantaris showed losses during the first week but no significant loss during the second wee. The EDL showed little or no weight loss. During post suspension recovery all muscles showed a weight gain. H/H suspended rats failed to grow; following removal from suspension they gained weight linearly, comparable to controls. Products of muscle metabolism including urea, ammonia, and 3-methylhistidine increased in the urine during H/H suspension and were significantly reduced approaching control levels during recovery. This suspension model offers considerable promise for comparison with H/H responses during weightlessness.

  6. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance in hamsters with diabetes developed from obesity is involved in abnormal skeletal muscle LXR, PPAR and SREBP expression

    PubMed Central

    LI, GUO-SHENG; LIU, XU-HAN; ZHU, HUA; HUANG, LAN; LIU, YA-LI; MA, CHUN-MEI

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ‘lipotoxicity’ theory suggests that fat-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance (FISMIR) in obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD), which leads to ectopic lipid accumulation in insulin-sensitive tissues, may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. However, the changes in gene expression and the molecular mechanisms associated with the pathogenesis of FISMIR have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study the changes in skeletal muscle gene expression were examined in FISMIR in obese insulin-resistant and diabetic hamster models induced by HFD with or without low-dose streptozotocin-treatment. Microarray technology and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) were used to explore the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. The pathophysiological and metabolic features of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans are closely resembled by these hamster models. The results of microarray analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes associated with metabolism were mostly related to the abnormal regulation and changes in the gene expression of liver X receptor (LXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcriptional programs in the skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant and diabetic hamsters. The microarray findings confirmed by RT-qPCR indicated that the increased expression of SREBPs and LXRβ and the decreased expression of LXRα and PPARs were involved in the molecular mechanisms of FISMIR pathogenesis in insulin-resistant and diabetic hamsters. A significant difference in the abnormal expression of skeletal muscle LXRs, PPARs and SREBPs was found between insulin-resistant and diabetic hamsters. It may be concluded that the combined abnormal expression of LXR, PPAR and SREBP transcriptional programs may contribute to the development of FISMIR mediated by skeletal muscle lipid accumulation resulting from abnormal

  7. Acute iron overload leads to hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis abnormalities in female rats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Emilly M; Marques, Vinicius B; Nunes, Dieli de O; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Podratz, Priscila L; Merlo, Eduardo; dos Santos, Leonardo; Graceli, Jones B

    2016-01-01

    Iron plays a critical role in a mammal's physiological processes. However, iron tissue deposits have been shown to act as endocrine disrupters. Studies that evaluate the effect of acute iron overload on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis health are particularly sparse. This study demonstrates that acute iron overload leads to HPG axis abnormalities, including iron accumulation and impairment in reproductive tract morphology. Female rats were treated with iron-dextran (Fe rats) to assess their HPG morphophysiology. The increasing serum iron levels due to iron-dextran treatment were positively correlated with higher iron accumulation in the HPG axis and uterus of Fe rats than in control rats. An increase in the production of superoxide anions was observed in the pituitary, uterus and ovary of Fe rats. Morphophysiological reproductive tract abnormalities, such as abnormal ovarian follicular development and the reduction of serum estrogen levels, were observed in Fe rats. In addition, a significant negative correlation was obtained between ovary superoxide anion and serum estrogen levels. Together, these data provide in vivo evidence that acute iron overload is toxic for the HPG axis, a finding that may be associated with the subsequent development of the risk of reproductive dysfunction. PMID:26536400

  8. Lead exposure causes thyroid abnormalities in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Zadjali, Salah Al; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Fahim, Mohamed Abdelmonem AY; Azimullah, Sheikh; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Yasin, Javed; Amir, Naheed; Hasan, Mohammed Yousif; Adem, Abdu

    2015-01-01

    Lead is a widely-spread environmental pollutant and a commonly-used industrial chemical that can cause multisystemic adverse health effects. However, the effects of lead exposure on diabetic animals have not been reported so far. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of lead exposure on thyroid, renal and oxidative stress markers in diabetic Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozocin (STZ). Six weeks later, rats were exposed i.p. to either distilled water (control group) or 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg of lead acetate (treatment groups). We found a positive relationship between the administered doses of lead acetate and its measured levels in blood samples (P < 0.01). Treatment of diabetic animals with lead acetate resulted in significant weight loss (P < 0.001). It also caused an increase in thyroid stimulating hormone levels (P < 0.05) and reductions in thyroxine (P < 0.05) and triiodothyronine levels (P < 0.01), a clinical picture consistent with hypothyroidism. Lead acetate exposure increased urea levels (P < 0.05) and caused a significant decrease in creatinine (P < 0.05). Besides, while the concentrations of malondialdehyde were not affected, glutathione stores were depleted (P < 0.01); in response to lead exposure. In conclusion, exposure of diabetic rats to lead acetate resulted in weight loss, clinical hypothyroidism, renal damage and oxidative stress. PMID:26221254

  9. Lead exposure causes thyroid abnormalities in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zadjali, Salah Al; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Fahim, Mohamed Abdelmonem Ay; Azimullah, Sheikh; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Yasin, Javed; Amir, Naheed; Hasan, Mohammed Yousif; Adem, Abdu

    2015-01-01

    Lead is a widely-spread environmental pollutant and a commonly-used industrial chemical that can cause multisystemic adverse health effects. However, the effects of lead exposure on diabetic animals have not been reported so far. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of lead exposure on thyroid, renal and oxidative stress markers in diabetic Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozocin (STZ). Six weeks later, rats were exposed i.p. to either distilled water (control group) or 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg of lead acetate (treatment groups). We found a positive relationship between the administered doses of lead acetate and its measured levels in blood samples (P < 0.01). Treatment of diabetic animals with lead acetate resulted in significant weight loss (P < 0.001). It also caused an increase in thyroid stimulating hormone levels (P < 0.05) and reductions in thyroxine (P < 0.05) and triiodothyronine levels (P < 0.01), a clinical picture consistent with hypothyroidism. Lead acetate exposure increased urea levels (P < 0.05) and caused a significant decrease in creatinine (P < 0.05). Besides, while the concentrations of malondialdehyde were not affected, glutathione stores were depleted (P < 0.01); in response to lead exposure. In conclusion, exposure of diabetic rats to lead acetate resulted in weight loss, clinical hypothyroidism, renal damage and oxidative stress. PMID:26221254

  10. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats

    PubMed Central

    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2–4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25713324

  11. Recovery of reinnervating rat muscle after cast immobilization.

    PubMed

    Herbison, G J; Jaweed, M M; Ditunno, J F

    1984-08-01

    We evaluated the recovery of the reinnervating rat plantar flexor muscles after different periods of casting and then decasting the lower extremities. Four groups of 4-month-old, female Wistar rats underwent bilateral crush-denervation of the sciatic nerve at the sciatic notch. Two weeks after nerve crush, the hind legs of three groups of rats were immobilized with bilateral casts at the knee and ankle joints and the fourth group was a control group. Of the three casted groups, one was mobilized after 1 week and another group after 3 weeks of casting. The third experimental group remained casted until the end of 6 weeks. Six weeks after the nerve crush, all groups were evaluated for muscle weights of the soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius; absolute amounts of the myofibrillar, sarcoplasmic, and stromal proteins in the gastrocnemius; the fiber diameters and percent composition of type I and type II fibers in the soleus and plantaris; and the isometric contractile properties of the soleus muscle. Compared with the denervated control group, the experimental groups revealed the following: (i) Four weeks of casting caused a reduction in wet weight (range 30.6 to 40.4%, P less than 0.01) in the soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius muscles. Decasting led to an earlier recovery of the soleus than of the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. (ii) The myofibrillar protein returned to control values with 3 weeks of decasting but the stromal protein remained significantly elevated and the sarcoplasmic protein significantly depressed regardless of the period of mobilization. (iii) Except for the type I fibers in the plantaris, the remainder of the muscle fibers in the soleus and plantaris decreased in size due to casting. Only the type I muscle fibers of the soleus increased in size with longer periods of mobilization. (iv) Four weeks of casting significantly altered the maximum isometric twitch tension (-42.3%), contraction time (+17.1%), maximum tetanic tension (-38.1%), and

  12. Effect of gender on rat upper airway muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Cantillon, D; Bradford, A

    1998-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea arises due to upper airway (UA) collapse which is normally counteracted by contraction of UA muscles such as the sternohyoids and geniohyoids. The disorder has a marked male predominance but the effect of gender on UA muscle contractile properties is unknown and these properties have not been compared for the sternohyoid and geniohyoid muscles in the same species. Isometric contractile characteristics were determined using strips of sternohyoid and geniohyoid muscle from male and female rats in Krebs solution at 30 degrees C. For both muscles, there were no differences between male and female contractile kinetics, twitch or tetanic tension, tension-length or tension-frequency relationship or endurance. In both males and females, sternohyoid twitch and tetanic tension was greater than geniohyoid. Sternohyoid endurance was less than geniohyoid but contractile kinetics, tension-length and tension-frequency relationships were similar. Therefore, gender does not affect UA muscle contractile properties and sternohyoid tension is greater and endurance less than that of the geniohyoid. PMID:9832233

  13. Effects of methyl isocyanate on rat muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D; Goyle, S; Phillips, B J; Tee, A; Beech, L; Butler, W H

    1988-04-01

    Since the Bhopal disaster, in which the causal agent was methyl isocyanate (MIC), exposed people have complained of various disorders including neuromuscular dysfunction. In an attempt to gain some information about the response of muscle tissue to MIC its effects were investigated in cells in culture isolated from muscle of 2 day old rats. After treatment with a range of MIC concentrations (0.025-0.5 microliter/5 ml culture) the total number of nuclei of the two main cell types (fibroblasts and myoblasts) and the number of nuclei in muscle fibres (myotubes) were recorded. At lower doses which had little effect on the total number of nuclei, the formation of muscle fibres--that is, fusion of muscle cells--was prevented as the proportion of nuclei in myotubes was decreased. At higher doses both cell types were killed. This would suggest either an effect on muscle differentiation or a selective toxicity towards myoblasts. The observations were supported by light and electron microscopy. PMID:3378004

  14. Genetic Response of Rat Supraspinatus Tendon and Muscle to Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Sarah Ilkhanipour; Tobias, John W.; Bhatt, Pankti R.; Kuntz, Andrew F.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex, biologic event that aims to protect and repair tissue. Previous studies suggest that inflammation is critical to induce a healing response following acute injury; however, whether similar inflammatory responses occur as a result of beneficial, non-injurious loading is unknown. The objective of this study was to screen for alterations in a subset of inflammatory and extracellular matrix genes to identify the responses of rat supraspinatus tendon and muscle to a known, non-injurious loading condition. We sought to define how a subset of genes representative of specific inflammation and matrix turnover pathways is altered in supraspinatus tendon and muscle 1) acutely following a single loading bout and 2) chronically following repeated loading bouts. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats in the acute group ran a single bout of non-injurious exercise on a flat treadmill (10 m/min, 1 hour) and were sacrificed 12 or 24 hours after. Rats in the chronic group ran 5 days/wk for 1 or 8 weeks. A control group maintained normal cage activity. Supraspinatus muscle and tendon were harvested for RNA extractions, and a custom Panomics QuantiGene 2.0 multiplex assay was used to detect 48 target and 3 housekeeping genes. Muscle/tendon and acute/chronic groups had distinct gene expression. Components of the arachidonic acid cascade and matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors were altered with acute and chronic exercise. Collagen expression increased. Using a previously validated model of non-injurious exercise, we have shown that supraspinatus tendon and muscle respond to acute and chronic exercise by regulating inflammatory- and matrix turnover-related genes, suggesting that these pathways are involved in the beneficial adaptations to exercise. PMID:26447778

  15. Low level laser therapy on injured rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, M.; Pinheiro, J. P.; Morgado, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Although studies show the clinical effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in facilitating the muscle healing process, scientific evidence is still required to prove the effectiveness of LLLT and to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by irradiation. Here we evaluate the effect of different LLLT doses, using continuous illumination (830 nm), in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats, through the quantification of cytokines in systemic blood and histological analysis of muscle tissue. We verified that all applied doses produce an effect on reducing the number of inflammatory cells and the concentration of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines. The best results were obtained for 40 mW. The results may suggest a biphasic dose response curve.

  16. Procedures for rat in situ skeletal muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Brian R; Esau, Shane P; Holash, R John; Fletcher, Jared R

    2011-01-01

    There are many circumstances where it is desirable to obtain the contractile response of skeletal muscle under physiological circumstances: normal circulation, intact whole muscle, at body temperature. This includes the study of contractile responses like posttetanic potentiation, staircase and fatigue. Furthermore, the consequences of disease, disuse, injury, training and drug treatment can be of interest. This video demonstrates appropriate procedures to set up and use this valuable muscle preparation. To set up this preparation, the animal must be anesthetized, and the medial gastrocnemius muscle is surgically isolated, with the origin intact. Care must be taken to maintain the blood and nerve supplies. A long section of the sciatic nerve is cleared of connective tissue, and severed proximally. All branches of the distal stump that do not innervate the medial gastrocnemius muscle are severed. The distal nerve stump is inserted into a cuff lined with stainless steel stimulating wires. The calcaneus is severed, leaving a small piece of bone still attached to the Achilles tendon. Sonometric crystals and/or electrodes for electromyography can be inserted. Immobilization by metal probes in the femur and tibia prevents movement of the muscle origin. The Achilles tendon is attached to the force transducer and the loosened skin is pulled up at the sides to form a container that is filled with warmed paraffin oil. The oil distributes heat evenly and minimizes evaporative heat loss. A heat lamp is directed on the muscle, and the muscle and rat are allowed to warm up to 37°C. While it is warming, maximal voltage and optimal length can be determined. These are important initial conditions for any experiment on intact whole muscle. The experiment may include determination of standard contractile properties, like the force-frequency relationship, force-length relationship, and force-velocity relationship. With care in surgical isolation, immobilization of the origin of the

  17. Influence of suspension hypokinesia on rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Manton, J.; Glasberg, M.; Silver, C. J.; Silver, P.; Demartino, G.; Leconey, T.; Klug, G.; Hagler, H.

    1984-01-01

    Hindlimb hypokinesia was induced in rats by the Morey method to characterize the response of the soleus muscle. Rats suspended for 1-4 wk exhibited continuous and significant declines in soleus mass, function, and contractile duration. Soleus speeding was in part explained by an alteration in fiber type. The normal incidence of 70-90 percent type I fibers in the soleus muscle was reduced after 4 wk of suspension to 50 percent or less in 9 of 11 rats. A significant decline in type I myosin isozyme content occurred without a change in that of type II. Other observed histochemical changes were characteristic of denervation. Consistent with soleus atrophy, there was a significant increase in lysosomal (acid) protease activity. One week of recovery after a 2-wk suspension was characterized by a return to values not significantly different from control for muscle wet weights, peak contraction force, one-half relaxation time, and type I myosin. Persistent differences from control were observed in maximal rate of tension development, contraction time, and denervation-like changes.

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Delgado, E; Luque, M A; Alcántara, A; Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1995-01-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide-specific binding activity in rat skeletal muscle plasma membranes, with an estimated M(r) of 63,000 by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time and membrane protein concentration dependent, and displaceable by unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)-amide with an ID50 of 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptide; GLP-1(1-36)-amide also competed, whereas glucagon and insulin did not. GLP-1(7-36)-amide did not modify the basal adenylate cyclase activity in skeletal muscle plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous finding of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)-amide in rat soleus muscle, and also in isolated hepatocytes, which was not accompanied by a rise in the cell cyclic AMP content, lead use to believe that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose metabolism in the muscle could be mediated by a type of receptor somehow different to that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B cells, where GLP-1 action is mediated by the cyclic AMP-adenylate cyclase system. PMID:7784253

  19. Accumulation of organotins in seafood leads to reproductive tract abnormalities in female rats.

    PubMed

    Podratz, Priscila L; Merlo, Eduardo; Sena, Gabriela C; Morozesk, Mariana; Bonomo, Marina M; Matsumoto, Silvia T; da Costa, Mércia B; Zamprogno, Gabriela C; Brandão, Poliane A A; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Miguel, Emilio de C; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Silva, Ian V; Graceli, Jones B

    2015-11-01

    Organotins (OTs) are environmental contaminants used as biocides in antifouling paints that have been shown to be endocrine disrupters. However, studies evaluating the effects of OTs accumulated in seafood (LNI) on reproductive health are particularly sparse. This study demonstrates that LNI leads to impairment in the reproductive tract of female rats, as the estrous cycle development, as well as for ovary and uterus morphology. Rats were treated with LNI, and their reproductive morphophysiology was assessed. Morphophysiological abnormalities, such as irregular estrous cycles, abnormal ovarian follicular development and ovarian collagen deposition, were observed in LNI rats. An increase in luminal epithelia and ERα expression was observed in the LNI uteri. Together, these data provide in vivo evidence that LNI are toxic for reproductive morphophysiology, which may be associated with risks to reproductive function. PMID:26050607

  20. Implantation of muscle satellite cells overexpressing myogenin improves denervated muscle atrophy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, H.; Lv, Y.; Shen, X.Q.; Xu, J.H.; Lu, H.; Fu, L.C.; Duan, T.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) overexpressing myogenin (MyoG) on denervated muscle atrophy. Rat MSCs were isolated and transfected with the MyoG-EGFP plasmid vector GV143. MyoG-transfected MSCs (MTMs) were transplanted into rat gastrocnemius muscles at 1 week after surgical denervation. Controls included injections of untransfected MSCs or the vehicle only. Muscles were harvested and analyzed at 2, 4, and 24 weeks post-transplantation. Immunofluorescence confirmed MyoG overexpression in MTMs. The muscle wet weight ratio was significantly reduced at 2 weeks after MTM injection (67.17±6.79) compared with muscles injected with MSCs (58.83±5.31) or the vehicle (53.00±7.67; t=2.37, P=0.04 and t=3.39, P=0.007, respectively). The muscle fiber cross-sectional area was also larger at 2 weeks after MTM injection (2.63×103±0.39×103) compared with MSC injection (1.99×103±0.58×103) or the vehicle only (1.57×103±0.47×103; t=2.24, P=0.049 and t=4.22, P=0.002, respectively). At 4 and 24 weeks post-injection, the muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area were similar across all three experimental groups. Immunohistochemistry showed that the MTM group had larger MyoG-positive fibers. The MTM group (3.18±1.13) also had higher expression of MyoG mRNA than other groups (1.41±0.65 and 1.03±0.19) at 2 weeks after injection (t=2.72, P=0.04). Transplanted MTMs delayed short-term atrophy of denervated muscles. This approach can be optimized as a novel stand-alone therapy or as a bridge to surgical re-innervation of damaged muscles. PMID:26871970

  1. Myogenic regulatory factors during regeneration of skeletal muscle in young, adult, and old rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, D. R.; Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Myogenic factor mRNA expression was examined during muscle regeneration after bupivacaine injection in Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats aged 3, 18, and 31 mo of age (young, adult, and old, respectively). Mass of the tibialis anterior muscle in the young rats had recovered to control values by 21 days postbupivacaine injection but in adult and old rats remained 40% less than that of contralateral controls at 21 and 28 days of recovery. During muscle regeneration, myogenin mRNA was significantly increased in muscles of young, adult, and old rats 5 days after bupivacaine injection. Subsequently, myogenin mRNA levels in young rat muscle decreased to postinjection control values by day 21 but did not return to control values in 28-day regenerating muscles of adult and old rats. The expression of MyoD mRNA was also increased in muscles at day 5 of regeneration in young, adult, and old rats, decreased to control levels by day 14 in young and adult rats, and remained elevated in the old rats for 28 days. In summary, either a diminished ability to downregulate myogenin and MyoD mRNAs in regenerating muscle occurs in old rat muscles, or the continuing myogenic effort includes elevated expression of these mRNAs.

  2. Abnormal Skeletal Muscle Regeneration plus Mild Alterations in Mature Fiber Type Specification in Fktn-Deficient Dystroglycanopathy Muscular Dystrophy Mice.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Steven J; Modi, Jill N; Melick, Garrett A; Abousaud, Marin I; Luan, Junna; Fortunato, Marisa J; Beedle, Aaron M

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylated α-dystroglycan provides an essential link between extracellular matrix proteins, like laminin, and the cellular cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. In secondary dystroglycanopathy muscular dystrophy, glycosylation abnormalities disrupt a complex O-mannose glycan necessary for muscle structural integrity and signaling. Fktn-deficient dystroglycanopathy mice develop moderate to severe muscular dystrophy with skeletal muscle developmental and/or regeneration defects. To gain insight into the role of glycosylated α-dystroglycan in these processes, we performed muscle fiber typing in young (2, 4 and 8 week old) and regenerated muscle. In mice with Fktn disruption during skeletal muscle specification (Myf5/Fktn KO), newly regenerated fibers (embryonic myosin heavy chain positive) peaked at 4 weeks old, while total regenerated fibers (centrally nucleated) were highest at 8 weeks old in tibialis anterior (TA) and iliopsoas, indicating peak degeneration/regeneration activity around 4 weeks of age. In contrast, mature fiber type specification at 2, 4 and 8 weeks old was relatively unchanged. Fourteen days after necrotic toxin-induced injury, there was a divergence in muscle fiber types between Myf5/Fktn KO (skeletal-muscle specific) and whole animal knockout induced with tamoxifen post-development (Tam/Fktn KO) despite equivalent time after gene deletion. Notably, Tam/Fktn KO retained higher levels of embryonic myosin heavy chain expression after injury, suggesting a delay or abnormality in differentiation programs. In mature fiber type specification post-injury, there were significant interactions between genotype and toxin parameters for type 1, 2a, and 2x fibers, and a difference between Myf5/Fktn and Tam/Fktn study groups in type 2b fibers. These data suggest that functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan has a unique role in muscle regeneration and may influence fiber type specification post-injury. PMID:26751696

  3. Abnormal Skeletal Muscle Regeneration plus Mild Alterations in Mature Fiber Type Specification in Fktn-Deficient Dystroglycanopathy Muscular Dystrophy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Steven J.; Modi, Jill N.; Melick, Garrett A.; Abousaud, Marin I.; Luan, Junna; Fortunato, Marisa J.; Beedle, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylated α-dystroglycan provides an essential link between extracellular matrix proteins, like laminin, and the cellular cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. In secondary dystroglycanopathy muscular dystrophy, glycosylation abnormalities disrupt a complex O-mannose glycan necessary for muscle structural integrity and signaling. Fktn-deficient dystroglycanopathy mice develop moderate to severe muscular dystrophy with skeletal muscle developmental and/or regeneration defects. To gain insight into the role of glycosylated α-dystroglycan in these processes, we performed muscle fiber typing in young (2, 4 and 8 week old) and regenerated muscle. In mice with Fktn disruption during skeletal muscle specification (Myf5/Fktn KO), newly regenerated fibers (embryonic myosin heavy chain positive) peaked at 4 weeks old, while total regenerated fibers (centrally nucleated) were highest at 8 weeks old in tibialis anterior (TA) and iliopsoas, indicating peak degeneration/regeneration activity around 4 weeks of age. In contrast, mature fiber type specification at 2, 4 and 8 weeks old was relatively unchanged. Fourteen days after necrotic toxin-induced injury, there was a divergence in muscle fiber types between Myf5/Fktn KO (skeletal-muscle specific) and whole animal knockout induced with tamoxifen post-development (Tam/Fktn KO) despite equivalent time after gene deletion. Notably, Tam/Fktn KO retained higher levels of embryonic myosin heavy chain expression after injury, suggesting a delay or abnormality in differentiation programs. In mature fiber type specification post-injury, there were significant interactions between genotype and toxin parameters for type 1, 2a, and 2x fibers, and a difference between Myf5/Fktn and Tam/Fktn study groups in type 2b fibers. These data suggest that functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan has a unique role in muscle regeneration and may influence fiber type specification post-injury. PMID:26751696

  4. Effect of immobilization on collagen synthesis in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, J; Väänänen, K; Vihko, V; Puranen, J; Takala, T E

    1987-05-01

    The activities of prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PH) and galactosylhydroxylysyl glucosyltransferase (GGT), both enzymes of collagen biosynthesis, and the concentration of hydroxyproline (Hyp) were measured in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles of rats after cast immobilization in the middle position for 1 or 3 wk. The specific activity of PH decreased by 54 and 70-75% (P less than 0.001) in the soleus muscle after 1 and 3 wk, respectively, the corresponding decreases in GGT activity were 43 and 47% (P less than 0.001). A less pronounced decrease in the activities of these enzymes was observed in gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. The Hyp concentration in the soleus increased during the first week of immobilization but began to decrease thereafter, and the total muscular Hyp content was reduced after immobilization for 3 wk. The results suggest a marked inhibition of muscular collagen synthesis during immobilization. Electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve partially prevented this disuse atrophy and the decreases in PH, GGT, and Hyp in the tibialis anterior muscle but not in the gastrocnemius or soleus muscles. PMID:3034082

  5. Immunomodulatory effects of massage on nonperturbed skeletal muscle in rats

    PubMed Central

    Waters-Banker, Christine; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2013-01-01

    Massage is an ancient manual therapy widely utilized by individuals seeking relief from various musculoskeletal maladies. Despite its popularity, the majority of evidence associated with massage benefits is anecdotal. Recent investigations have uncovered physiological evidence supporting its beneficial use following muscle injury; however, the effects of massage on healthy, unperturbed skeletal muscle are unknown. Utilizing a custom-fabricated massage mimetic device, the purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the effects of various loading magnitudes on healthy skeletal muscle with particular interest in the gene expression profile and modulation of key immune cells involved in the inflammatory response. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (200 g) were subjected to cyclic compressive loading (CCL) over the right tibialis anterior muscle for 30 min, once a day, for 4 consecutive days using four loading conditions: control (0N), low load (1.4N), moderate load (4.5N), and high load (11N). Microarray analysis showed that genes involved with the immune response were the most significantly affected by application of CCL. Load-dependent changes in cellular abundance were seen in the CCL limb for CD68+ cells, CD163+ cells, and CD43+cells. Surprisingly, load-independent changes were also discovered in the non-CCL contralateral limb, suggesting a systemic response. These results show that massage in the form of CCL exerts an immunomodulatory response to uninjured skeletal muscle, which is dependent upon the applied load. PMID:24201707

  6. Effects of nicotine on rat sternohyoid muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Ken D

    2006-02-28

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a major clinical disorder characterised by recurring episodes of pharyngeal collapse during sleep. At present, there remains no satisfactory treatment for OSA. Pharmacological therapies as a potential treatment for the disorder are an attractive option and include agents that increase the contractility of the pharyngeal muscles. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of nicotine on upper airway muscle contractile properties. In vitro isometric contractile properties were determined using strips of rat sternohyoid muscle in physiological salt solution containing nicotine (0-100 microg/ml) at 25 degrees C. Isometric twitch and tetanic tension, contraction time, half-relaxation time and tension-frequency relationship were determined by electrical field stimulation with platinum electrodes. Fatigue was induced by stimulation at 40 Hz with 300 ms trains at a frequency of 0.5 Hz for 5 min. Nicotine at a concentration of 1 microg/ml was associated with a significant increase in sternohyoid muscle specific tension compared to control data. Dose-dependent increases in contractile tension were not observed. Nicotine had effects on tension-frequency relationship and endurance properties of the sternohyoid muscle at some but not all doses. A leftward shift in the tension-frequency relationship was observed at low stimulus frequencies (20-30 Hz) for nicotine at a concentration of 1 and 5 microg/ml and a significant increase in fatigue resistance was observed with nicotine at a concentration of 10 microg/ml. As fatigue of the upper airway muscles has been implicated in obstructive airway conditions, a pharmacological agent that improves muscle endurance may prove useful as a potential treatment for such disorders. Therefore, further studies of the effects of nicotinic agonists on upper airway function are warranted. PMID:15994135

  7. Fine structural abnormalities of the placenta in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Gewolb, I H; Merdian, W; Warshaw, J B; Enders, A C

    1986-11-01

    In the streptozocin-induced diabetic rat, the placenta is larger and the fetus is smaller than normal. To study cellular differences that might contribute to the size and functional disparity between diabetic and control placentas, a light- and electron-microscopic analysis was performed on 14-, 18-, and 22-day (term) control and diabetic placentas. Diabetic placentas, especially later in gestation, were marked by the presence of large numbers of glycogen-distended cells in the basal zone. Within the placental labyrinth, the trophoblastic layers of the interhemal membrane were significantly thicker in the diabetic placentas on days 18 and 22, and large accumulations of liid droplets were present, especially in the inner two trophoblastic layers. In normal placentas there is a marked thinning of the placental barrier in the labyrinth by day 22 of gestation, making the thickness of the labyrinthine layers in age-matched diabetic placentas even more impressive. Finally, the labyrinth of 22-day diabetic placentas contained more glycogen and rough endoplasmic reticulum in the inner trophoblastic layer, a feature that is found in less-mature (18-day) control placentas. Thus, the diabetic placentas have a number of features that are consistent with functional immaturity/dysmaturity. Cytologic evidence confirms the presence of increased glycogen and lipid reserves in both the junctional zone and the cellular area between maternal and fetal blood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3758495

  8. Light adaptation does not prevent early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Joanna; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR), the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, remains controversial. One hypothesis holds that retinal hypoxia, exacerbated by the high O2 consumption of rod photoreceptors in the dark, is a primary cause of DR. Based on this prediction we investigated whether early retinal abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats are alleviated by preventing the rods from dark adapting. Diabetic rats and their non-diabetic littermates were housed in a 12:12 hour light-dim light photocycle (30 lux during the day and 3 lux at night). Progression of early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats was assessed by monitoring the ERG b-wave and oscillatory potentials, Müller cell reactive gliosis, and neuronal cell death, as assayed by TUNEL staining and retinal thickness at 6 and 12 weeks after diabetes induction. Maintaining diabetic animals in a dim-adapting light did not slow the progression of these neuronal and glial changes when compared to diabetic rats maintained in a standard 12:12 hour light-dark photocycle (30 lux during the day and 0 lux at night). Our results indicate that neuronal and glial abnormalities in early stages of diabetes are not exacerbated by rod photoreceptor O2 consumption in the dark. PMID:26852722

  9. Multimodal Highlighting of Structural Abnormalities in Diabetic Rat and Human Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Savoldelli, Michèle; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Plamann, Karsten; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to highlight structural corneal changes in a model of type 2 diabetes, using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (CCM). The abnormalities were also characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in rat and human corneas. Methods Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were observed at age 12 weeks (n = 3) and 1 year (n = 6), and compared to age-matched controls. After in vivo CCM examination, TEM and SHG microscopy were used to characterize the ultrastructure and the three-dimensional organization of the abnormalities. Human corneas from diabetic (n = 3) and nondiabetic (n = 3) patients were also included in the study. Results In the basal epithelium of GK rats, CCM revealed focal hyper-reflective areas, and histology showed proliferative cells with irregular basement membrane. In the anterior stroma, extracellular matrix modifications were detected by CCM and confirmed in histology. In the Descemet's membrane periphery of all the diabetic corneas, hyper-reflective deposits were highlighted using CCM and characterized as long-spacing collagen fibrils by TEM. SHG microscopy revealed these deposits with high contrast, allowing specific detection in diabetic human and rat corneas without preparation and characterization of their three-dimensional organization. Conclusion Pathologic findings were observed early in the development of diabetes in GK rats. Similar abnormalities have been found in corneas from diabetic patients. Translational Relevance This multidisciplinary study highlights diabetes-induced corneal abnormalities in an animal model, but also in diabetic donors. This could constitute a potential early marker for diagnosis of hyperglycemia-induced tissue changes. PMID:24049714

  10. MR abnormalities of the lateral pterygoid muscle in patients with nonreducing disk displacement of the TMJ.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojiang; Pernu, Hannu; Pyhtinen, Juhani; Tiilikainen, Petri A; Oikarinen, Kyösti S; Raustia, Aune M

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological changes of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with anterior disk displacement with nonreduction (ADDnr) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to compare the abnormal findings of the LPM with the clinical symptoms and other pathological MRI alterations of the TMJ. Bilateral or unilateral ADDnr was demonstrated in 142 patents by MRI (176 TMJs; 106 females; 36 males; range 19 to 72 years; mean 43.9 years). In 123 TMJs, the LPMs were clearly observed in MRIs and analyzed in this study. Pathological changes of the LPM were found in 92 TMJs (74.8%) in MRI. Hypertrophy, atrophy and/or contracture were detected in the superior belly of the LPM (SBLPM) (35.8%, 44/123) or in the inferior belly of the LPM (IBLPM) (9.8%, 12/123) or in both bellies (29.3%, 36/123). The pathological changes of the LPM in MRI presented a significant association with the main clinical symptoms of TMJs with ADDnr, i.e. pain on jaw movement (P<0.01), pain in the LPM (P<0.01), pain in TMJ (P<0.05) and restricted jaw opening (P<0.05). The proportion of the abnormalities in LPM was significantly lower in TMJs with condylar limitation (63.6%) than in TMJs with condylar hypermobility (83.3%) and normal motion (88.9%)(P=0.008). Osteoarthritis was found to be correlated with condylar limitation (P<0.01). The results of this study indicate that the pathological changes of the LPM in TMJs with ADDnr could be detected by MRI and have a significant association with the main clinical symptoms of the patients. When condylar limitation happened, on the contrary, the pathological changes of the LPM in MRI were reduced. The alteration of the clinical symptoms in the patents with ADDnr might be associated with the pathological situations and symptoms of the LPM. PMID:12150268

  11. Toxicity of statins on rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, P; Török, M; Zahno, A; Waldhauser, K M; Brecht, K; Krähenbühl, S

    2006-10-01

    We investigated mitochondrial toxicity of four lipophilic stains (cerivastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, simvastatin) and one hydrophilic statin (pravastatin). In L6 cells (rat skeletal muscle cell line), the four lipophilic statins (100 micromol/l) induced death in 27-49% of the cells. Pravastatin was not toxic up to 1 mmol/l. Cerivastatin, fluvastatin and atorvastatin (100 micromol/l) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential by 49-65%, whereas simvastatin and pravastatin were less toxic. In isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria, all statins, except pravastatin, decreased glutamate-driven state 3 respiration and respiratory control ratio. Beta-oxidation was decreased by 88-96% in the presence of 100 micromol/l of the lipophilic statins, but only at higher concentrations by pravastatin. Mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c release and DNA fragmentation was induced in L6 cells by the four lipophilic statins, but not by pravastatin. Lipophilic statins impair the function of skeletal muscle mitochondria, whereas the hydrophilic pravastatin is significantly less toxic. PMID:17013560

  12. Effects of insulin and exercise on rat hindlimb muscles after simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Balon, Thomas W.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of simulated microgravity on the insulin- and exercise-stimulated glucose uptake and metabolism in the hindlimb muscles of rats was investigated using three groups of rats suspended at 45 head-down tilt (SUS) for 14 days: (1) cage control, (2) exercising (treadmill running) control, and (3) rats subjected to suspension followed by exercise (SUS-E). It was found that the suspension of rats with hindlimbs non-weight bearing led to enhanced muscle responses to insulin and exercise, when these stimuli were applied separately. However, the insulin affect appeared to be impaired after exercise for the SUS-E rats, especially for the soleus muscle.

  13. Assessments of Motor Abnormalities on the Grid-Walking and Foot-Fault Tests From Undernutrition in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Horiquini Barbosa, Everton; Vallim, José Henrique; Lachat, João-José; de Castro, Vera Lucia S S

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to verify whether different lactation conditions influenced nervous system development. The authors used motor tasks to verify changes in exploratory activity and muscle strength of weaned rats from different litter sizes and evaluated the applicability of the grid-walking test for assessing motor abnormalities caused by undernutrition. Alterations in litter size during the suckling period perturbed the nutritional status of pups, which exhibited body weight differences between the groups. Large-litter (L) pups showed significant delays in achieving developmental milestones and neurological reflexes compared to the small-litter (S) and medium-litter (M) pups. The S, M, and L group pups exhibited similar exploratory responses and muscle strength. In the grid-walking and foot-fault tests, the L group pups traveled shorter distances and, consequently, had less footsteps. However, the percentages of foot faults in the L group were higher than S and M groups. These results reflect delayed maturation of structures responsible for sensorimotor responses, such as the cerebellum, because much cerebellar maturation takes place postnatally. This is the first study to report that early undernutrition in pups resulted in suboptimal performances on the grid-walking and foot-fault tests and that the former test was sensitive to alterations caused by nutritional deficiency. PMID:25923475

  14. In vitro proliferation of aortic smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, S C

    1989-06-01

    The characteristics and proliferation of aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were studied in culture. Smooth muscle cells were isolated from the tunica media of the thoracic aorta by an explant method. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that 93-95 per cent of cells were positively labelled with antibodies raised against smooth muscle actin, indicating that these were smooth muscle cells. The proliferative activity was compared between aortic smooth muscle cells from hypertensive and normotensive rats in culture by thymidine incorporation and cell number determinations. The results demonstrate that aortic smooth muscle cells from hypertensive rats grew faster than those from normotensive rats in culture. The increased proliferative activity of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells from hypertensive rats was detectable even when they were cultured in a chemically defined serum-free medium. These data have shown that an increased proliferative activity of aortic smooth muscle cells from hypertensive rats can occur in culture conditions without the influence of arterial pressure or other stimuli as in intact animals. The mechanisms underlying the accelerated proliferative activity of aortic smooth muscle cells from genetically hypertensive rats in vitro remain to be determined. PMID:2754547

  15. Nutrient Excess and AMPK Downregulation in Incubated Skeletal Muscle and Muscle of Glucose Infused Rats

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Rudy J.; Petrocelli, Robert; Schultz, Vera; Brandon, Amanda; Cooney, Gregory J.; Kraegen, Edward W.; Ruderman, Neil B.; Saha, Asish K.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that incubation for 1h with excess glucose or leucine causes insulin resistance in rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle by inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). To examine the events that precede and follow these changes, studies were performed in rat EDL incubated with elevated levels of glucose or leucine for 30min-2h. Incubation in high glucose (25mM) or leucine (100μM) significantly diminished AMPK activity by 50% within 30min, with further decreases occurring at 1 and 2h. The initial decrease in activity at 30min coincided with a significant increase in muscle glycogen. The subsequent decreases at 1h were accompanied by phosphorylation of αAMPK at Ser485/491, and at 2h by decreased SIRT1 expression and increased PP2A activity, all of which have previously been shown to diminish AMPK activity. Glucose infusion in vivo, which caused several fold increases in plasma glucose and insulin, produced similar changes but with different timing. Thus, the initial decrease in AMPK activity observed at 3h was associated with changes in Ser485/491 phosphorylation and SIRT1 expression and increased PP2A activity was a later event. These findings suggest that both ex vivo and in vivo, multiple factors contribute to fuel-induced decreases in AMPK activity in skeletal muscle and the insulin resistance that accompanies it. PMID:25996822

  16. Effects of methylmercury on the motor and sensory innervation of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, R.K.; Riley, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    The histochemical study examined the effects of chronic methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication on the motor and sensory innervation of extensor digitorum longus muscles. Light microscopic examination of silver-stained axons in the intramuscular nerve bundles of MeHg-treated rats showed Wallerian-like degeneration and a reduction in the number of nerve fibers. Disrupted axons were predominantly sensory because 22.2% of spindle afferents (I/sub a/) and 90.0% of Golgi tendon organ (I/sub b/) sensory fibers were completely degenerated whereas less than 1% of motor ending were totally destroyed. Partial disruption occurred in the cholinesterase and motor terminals of 13.7% of endplates. Their results demonstrated greater vulnerability of sensory nerves than of motor nerves to MeHg-induced degeneration. Thus, the abnormal reflexes, ataxia, and muscle weakness following MeHg poisoning appear related to reduction of proprioceptive feedback from muscles and tendons irradiation to the documented lesions in the central nervous system.

  17. Abnormalities of AMPK Activation and Glucose Uptake in Cultured Skeletal Muscle Cells from Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Audrey E.; Jones, David E.; Walker, Mark; Newton, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Post exertional muscle fatigue is a key feature in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Abnormalities of skeletal muscle function have been identified in some but not all patients with CFS. To try to limit potential confounders that might contribute to this clinical heterogeneity, we developed a novel in vitro system that allows comparison of AMP kinase (AMPK) activation and metabolic responses to exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells from CFS patients and control subjects. Methods Skeletal muscle cell cultures were established from 10 subjects with CFS and 7 age-matched controls, subjected to electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) for up to 24h and examined for changes associated with exercise. Results In the basal state, CFS cultures showed increased myogenin expression but decreased IL6 secretion during differentiation compared with control cultures. Control cultures subjected to 16h EPS showed a significant increase in both AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake compared with unstimulated cells. In contrast, CFS cultures showed no increase in AMPK phosphorylation or glucose uptake after 16h EPS. However, glucose uptake remained responsive to insulin in the CFS cells pointing to an exercise-related defect. IL6 secretion in response to EPS was significantly reduced in CFS compared with control cultures at all time points measured. Conclusion EPS is an effective model for eliciting muscle contraction and the metabolic changes associated with exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells. We found four main differences in cultured skeletal muscle cells from subjects with CFS; increased myogenin expression in the basal state, impaired activation of AMPK, impaired stimulation of glucose uptake and diminished release of IL6. The retention of these differences in cultured muscle cells from CFS subjects points to a genetic/epigenetic mechanism, and provides a system to identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25836975

  18. Effect of swimming on myostatin expression in white and red gastrocnemius muscle and in cardiac muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Matsakas, Antonios; Bozzo, Cyrille; Cacciani, Nicola; Caliaro, Francesca; Reggiani, Carlo; Mascarello, Francesco; Patruno, Marco

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that swimming training might impact differentially myostatin expression in skeletal muscles, depending on fibre type composition, and in cardiac muscle of rats. Myostatin expression was analysed by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry of the red deep portion (mainly composed of slow and type II A fibres) and in the superficial, white portion (composed of fast type II X and II B fibres) of the gastrocnemius muscle in adult male Wistar rats: (i) subjected to two consecutive swimming bouts for 3 h; (ii) subjected to intensive swimming training for 4 weeks; and (iii) sedentary control rats. Myostatin mRNA content was in all cases higher in white than in red muscles. Two bouts of swimming did not alter myostatin expression, whereas swimming training for 4 weeks resulted in a significant reduction of myostatin mRNA contents, significant both in white and red muscles but more pronounced in white muscles. Western blot did not detect any change in the amount of myostatin protein. Immunohistochemistry showed that, in control rats, myostatin was localized in presumptive satellite cells of a few muscle fibres. After training, the number of myostatin-positive spots decreased significantly. Myostatin mRNA content in cardiac muscle was lower than in skeletal muscle and was significantly increased by swimming training. In conclusion, the results obtained showed that intense training caused a decreased expression of myostatin mRNA in white and red skeletal muscles but an increase in cardiac muscle. PMID:16873457

  19. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  20. Regulatory Mechanism of Muscle Disuse Atrophy in Adult Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    During the last phase of NAG 2-386 we completed three studies. The effects of 14 days of weightlessness; the vastus medialis (VM) from flight rats in COSMOS 2044 was compared with the VM from tail suspended rats and other controls. The type I and II fibers in the mixed fiber portion of the VM were significantly reduced in flight rats and capillary densities paralleled the fiber density changes. The results of this project compared favorably with those in the extensor digitorum longus following seven days of flight in SL 3. The cardiovascular projects focused on the blood pressure changes in head down tilted rats (HDT) and non-head down tilted (N-HDT) rats. Blood pressures (MAP, SP and DP) were significantly elevated through seven days of HDT and rapidly returned to control levels within one day after removal from the HDT position. The N-HDT showed some slight rise in blood pressure but these were not as great and they were not as rapid. The HDT rats were characterized as exhibiting transient hypertension. These results led to some of the microvascular and vascular graduate student projects of Dr. Bernhard Stepke. Also our results refute or, at least, do not agree with previous reports from other laboratories. Each animal, in our blood pressure projects, served as its own control thereby providing more accurate results. Also, our experiments focused on recovery studies which can, in and of themselves, provide guidelines for flight experiments concerned with blood pressure changes. Another experiment was conducted to examine the role of testicular atrophy in whole body suspended (WBS) and tail suspended (TS) rats. We worked in conjunction with Dr. D.R. Deaver's laboratory at Pennsylvania State University and Dr. R. P. Amann at Colorado State University. In the TS rats the testes are retracted into the abdominal cavity, unless a ligature is placed to maintain them in the external scrotal sac. The cryptorchid condition in TS rats results in atrophy of the testes and

  1. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J.; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on–1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on–3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased “voluntary activation.” In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT.

  2. Effect of suspension hypokinesia/hypodynamia on glucocorticoid receptor levels in rat hindlimb muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ilyina-Kakueva et. al. (1976) conducted an investigation in which rats were exposed to weightlessness during the Cosmos program. An examination of the rats revealed a marked atrophy of hindlimb muscles. A suspension model has been developed to simulate these weightlessness-induced alterations. In agreement with the Cosmos studies, suspension hypokinesia/hypodynamia (H/H) results in differential atrophy of hindlimb muscles in rats. Recent studies have demonstrated elevated glucocorticoid receptor numbers in the gastrocnemius muscle following immobilization and denervation. One of the objectives of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of suspension H/H on glucocorticoid receptor levels in rat hindlimb muscles. Another objective was to ascertain whether altered receptor levels reflect the differential nature of hindlimb muscle atrophy during suspension H/H. The obtained findings suggest that differential muscle atrophy resulting from H/H may result from differential alterations of glucocorticoid receptor levels.

  3. The Role of Metformin in Controlling Oxidative Stress in Muscle of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Mariana Nunes; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    Metformin can act in muscle, inhibiting the complex I of the electron transport chain and decreasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Our hypothesis is that the inhibition of complex I can minimize damage oxidative in muscles of hypoinsulinemic rats. The present study investigated the effects of insulin and/or metformin treatment on oxidative stress levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of diabetic rats. Rats were rendered diabetic (D) with an injection of streptozotocin and were submitted to treatment with insulin (D+I), metformin (D+M), or insulin plus metformin (D+I+M) for 7 days. The body weight, glycemic control, and insulin resistance were evaluated. Then, oxidative stress levels, glutathione antioxidant defense system, and antioxidant status were analyzed in the gastrocnemius muscle of hypoinsulinemic rats. The body weight decreased in D+M compared to ND rats. D+I and D+I+M rats decreased the glycemia and D+I+M rats increased the insulin sensitivity compared to D rats. D+I+M reduced the oxidative stress levels and the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in skeletal muscle when compared to D+I rats. In conclusion, our results reveal that dual therapy with metformin and insulin promotes more benefits to oxidative stress control in muscle of hypoinsulinemic rats than insulinotherapy alone. PMID:27579154

  4. The Role of Metformin in Controlling Oxidative Stress in Muscle of Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Diniz Vilela, Danielle; Gomes Peixoto, Leonardo; Teixeira, Renata Roland; Belele Baptista, Nathalia; Carvalho Caixeta, Douglas; Vieira de Souza, Adriele; Machado, Hélen Lara; Pereira, Mariana Nunes; Sabino-Silva, Robinson; Espindola, Foued Salmen

    2016-01-01

    Metformin can act in muscle, inhibiting the complex I of the electron transport chain and decreasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Our hypothesis is that the inhibition of complex I can minimize damage oxidative in muscles of hypoinsulinemic rats. The present study investigated the effects of insulin and/or metformin treatment on oxidative stress levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of diabetic rats. Rats were rendered diabetic (D) with an injection of streptozotocin and were submitted to treatment with insulin (D+I), metformin (D+M), or insulin plus metformin (D+I+M) for 7 days. The body weight, glycemic control, and insulin resistance were evaluated. Then, oxidative stress levels, glutathione antioxidant defense system, and antioxidant status were analyzed in the gastrocnemius muscle of hypoinsulinemic rats. The body weight decreased in D+M compared to ND rats. D+I and D+I+M rats decreased the glycemia and D+I+M rats increased the insulin sensitivity compared to D rats. D+I+M reduced the oxidative stress levels and the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in skeletal muscle when compared to D+I rats. In conclusion, our results reveal that dual therapy with metformin and insulin promotes more benefits to oxidative stress control in muscle of hypoinsulinemic rats than insulinotherapy alone. PMID:27579154

  5. [Metabolic processes in rat skeletal muscle after a flight on the Kosmos-936 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Nosova, E A; Veresotskaia, N A; Kolchina, E V; Kurkina, L M; Belitskaia, R A

    1981-01-01

    The study of skeletal muscles of rats flown on Cosmos-936 demonstrated different metabolic reactions in muscle fibers of different function and type to weightlessness and Earth gravity. The data obtained gave evidence that artificial gravity may considerably prevent metabolic changes in muscles developing in response to specific effects of weightlessness. PMID:7289569

  6. Muscle glucose uptake in the rat after suspension with single hindlimb weight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Fregosi, Ralph F.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    An examination is conducted of the effect of nonweight-bearing conditions, and the systemic influences of simulated microgravity on rat hindlimb muscles. The results obtained suggest that the increases in hindlimb muscle glucose uptake and extracellular space associated with simulated microgravity persist with hindlimb weightbearing, despite the prevention of muscle atrophy. The mechanism (or mechanisms) responsible for these effects are currently unknown.

  7. [Amino acid composition of the rat quadriceps femoris muscle after a flight on the Kosmos-936 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, T F; Miroshnikova, E B; Poliakov, V V; Murugova, T P

    1982-01-01

    The amino acid composition of the quadriceps muscle of rats flown onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-936 and exposed to the ground-based synchronous control experiment was studied. The weightless rats showed changes in the amino acid concentration in the quadriceps muscle. The centrifuged flight and synchronous rats displayed an accumulation of free amino acids in the above muscle. PMID:7070040

  8. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation of Head-Down Tilted Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Stepke, Bernhard; Fleming, John T.; Joshua, Irving G.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we assessed the function of microscopic blood vessels in skeletal muscle (cremaster muscle) for alterations which may contribute to the observed elevation of blood pressure associated with head-down tilted whole body suspension (HDT/WBS), a model of weightlessness. Arteriolar baseline diameters, vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine (NE) and vasodilation to nitroprusside (NP) were assessed in control rats, rats suspended for 7 or 14 day HDT/WBS rats, and rats allowed to recover for 1 day after 7 days HDT/WBS. Neither baseline diameters nor ability to dilate were influenced by HDT/WBS. Maximum vasoconstriction to norepinephrine was significantly greater in arterioles of hypertensive 14 day HDT/WBS rats. This first study of the intact microvasculature in skeletal muscle indicates that an elevated contractility of arterioles to norepinephrine in suspended rats, and suggests an elevated peripheral resistance in striated muscle may contribute to the increase in blood pressures among animals subjected to HDT/WBS.

  9. The influence of rat suspension-hypokinesia on the gastrocnemius muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Manton, J.; Leconey, T.; Hagler, H.; Glasberg, M.

    1984-01-01

    Hind-limb hypokinesia was induced in rats by the Morey method to characterize the response of the gastrocnemius muscle. A comparison of rats suspended for 2 weeks with weight, sex, and litter-matched control rats indicate no difference in gastrocnemius wet weight, contraction, or one-half relaxation times, but less contractile function as indicated by lowered dP/dt. Myosin ATPase staining identified uniform Type I (slow-twitch) and II (fast-twitch) atrophy in the muscles from 4 of 10 rats suspended for 2 weeks and 1 of 12 rats suspended for 4 weeks; muscles from three other rats of the 4-week group displayed greater Type I atrophy. Other histochemical changes were characteristic of a neuropathy. These data together with recently acquired soleus data (29) indicate the Morey model, like space flight, evokes greater changes in the Type I or slow twitch fibers of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles.

  10. Age- and hypertension-induced changes in abnormal contractions in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Jablonskis, Lina T; Head, Richard J

    2002-12-01

    The current investigation explored the potential age-dependant modulation of abnormal spontaneous constrictions (thromboxane-like) in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) aorta, observed only after the inhibition of endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO). Aortic rings from SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats of varying ages (4, 8, 12, and 18 months) were mounted in organ baths, and changes in tension were monitored. Inhibition of NO with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (NOLA) unmasked a slow contraction, which appeared to be age dependent (p < 0.05). This contraction was found in SHRs of all age groups and in older WKY rats. Denuding the endothelium in young SHRs did not influence the constriction, confirming a nonendothelial cell origin, while in the older groups this led to a 30-40% reduction in contraction. Comparable attenuation of the constrictor response was observed after incubation of endothelium intact rings with superoxide dismutase (100 U/ml) or 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Of the residual activity that was unaffected by free radical scavengers or de-endothelialization, 60-70% was sensitive to cyclooxygenase inhibition by indomethacin and/or ibuprofen. The thromboxane (TxA ) receptor antagonist SQ29548 induced a complete reversal of the abnormal constriction. In contrast, thromboxane synthetase inhibition had no effect, ruling out any involvement of TxA in mediating this abnormality. Collectively, these observations support the view that as compared with the normotensive setting, contraction induced by NO inhibition in the SHR develops prematurely and deteriorates more rapidly during the aging process. In aged rats, prostaglandin endoperoxide intermediates PGG /H and endothelium-derived free radicals rather than TxA per se appear to contribute to the NOLA-dependent TxA -like vasoconstriction. PMID:12451327

  11. Abnormal physiological conditions in acute schizophrenic patients on emergency admission: dehydration, hypokalemia, leukocytosis and elevated serum muscle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, K; Takahashi, T; Nakamura, H; Yamashiro, H; Endo, H; Fujii, S; Fukami, G; Masui, K; Asukai, N; Yonezawa, Y

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated varieties and incidence of abnormal physiological conditions in acute schizophrenic patients on emergency. Laboratory data obtained prior to treatment from patients, admitted on an emergency basis during an 18-month period, were evaluated retrospectively, as well as demographics and clinical characteristics. Of 259 male acute schizophrenic patients (ICD-10: F2), 6.9% revealed dehydration, a third had hypokalemia and leukocytosis, and two thirds showed elevated serum muscle enzymes. These percentages were statistically significant compared with those of outpatients. In addition, the former three of these conditions in the F2 group were as frequent as those in alcohol and/or psychoactive substance abusers (ICD-10: F1) on emergency admission, although elevated serum muscle enzymes in the F2 group was less frequent than that in the F1 group. In order to prevent these abnormal physiological conditions from worsening and becoming life-threatening, one fourth of the F2 group [dehydration, 6.9%, severe hypokalemia (< 3.0 mEq/l), 2.3%, and markedly elevated serum muscle enzymes (creatine phosphokinase > 1000 IU/l), 16.5%] required medical management such as fluid therapy and various types of monitoring. In cases of a behavioral emergency, laboratory screening and monitoring of urinary output were essential. Due to their lack of cooperation, case history, physical examination, and initial vital signs did not contribute to detection of their medical condition. PMID:9810481

  12. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results: The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Conclusion: Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification. PMID:25263336

  13. Emission-particle-induced ventilatory abnormalities in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Sarah Y; McGee, John K; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ledbetter, Allen; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Winsett, Darrell W; Doerfler, Donald L; Costa, Daniel L

    2004-01-01

    Preexistent cardiopulmonary disease in humans appears to enhance susceptibility to the adverse effects of ambient particulate matter. Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated enhanced inflammation and mortality after intratracheal instillation (IT) and inhalation (INH) of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline (MCT). The present study was conducted to examine the effects of ROFA in this model on ventilatory function in unanesthetized, unrestrained animals. Sixty-day-old male CD rats were injected with MCT (60 mg/kg) or vehicle (VEH) intraperitoneally 10 days before IT of ROFA (8.3 mg/kg) or saline (SAL) (control) or nose-only INH of ROFA [15 mg/m3 for 6 hr on 3 consecutive days or air (control)]. At 24 and 72 hr after exposure, rats were studied individually in a simultaneous gas uptake/whole-body plethysmograph. Lungs were removed at 72 hr for histology. Pulmonary test results showed that tidal volume (VT) decreased 24 hr after IT of ROFA in MCT-treated rats. Breathing frequency, minute volume (VE), and the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen increased in MCT- and VEH-treated rats 24 hr after IT or INH of ROFA and remained elevated 72 hr post-IT. O2 uptake (VO2) decreased after IT of ROFA in MCT-treated rats. Carbon monoxide uptake decreased 24 hr after IT of ROFA, returning to control values in VEH-treated rats but remaining low in MCT-treated rats 72 hr post-IT. ROFA exposure induced histologic changes and abnormalities in several ventilatory parameters, many of which were enhanced by MCT treatment. PMID:15175175

  14. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate inflammation in rat muscle and enhance muscle repair after eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Miura, Kyoko; Nakano, Sayako; Suzuki, Katsuya; Bannai, Makoto; Inoue, Yoshiko

    2016-09-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle damage that may lead to muscle dysfunction. Although inflammation is essential to recover from muscle damage, excessive inflammation may also induce secondary damage, and should thus be suppressed. In this study, we investigated the effect of leucine-enriched essential amino acids on muscle inflammation and recovery after eccentric contraction. These amino acids are known to stimulate muscle protein synthesis via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which, is also considered to alleviate inflammation. Five sets of 10 eccentric contractions were induced by electrical stimulation in the tibialis anterior muscle of male SpragueDawley rats (8-9 weeks old) under anesthesia. Animals received a 1 g/kg dose of a mixture containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids or distilled water once a day throughout the experiment. Muscle dysfunction was assessed based on isometric dorsiflexion torque, while inflammation was evaluated by histochemistry. Gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and myogenic regulatory factors was also measured. We found that leucine-enriched essential amino acids restored full muscle function within 14 days, at which point rats treated with distilled water had not fully recovered. Indeed, muscle function was stronger 3 days after eccentric contraction in rats treated with amino acids than in those treated with distilled water. The amino acid mix also alleviated expression of interleukin-6 and impeded infiltration of inflammatory cells into muscle, but did not suppress expression of myogenic regulatory factors. These results suggest that leucine-enriched amino acids accelerate recovery from muscle damage by preventing excessive inflammation. PMID:27168073

  15. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-01

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling. PMID:26725948

  16. Transcriptomic analysis reveals abnormal muscle repair and remodeling in survivors of critical illness with sustained weakness

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher J.; Batt, Jane; Herridge, Margaret S.; Mathur, Sunita; Bader, Gary D.; Hu, Pingzhao; dos Santos, Claudia C.

    2016-01-01

    ICU acquired weakness (ICUAW) is a common complication of critical illness characterized by structural and functional impairment of skeletal muscle. The resulting physical impairment may persist for years after ICU discharge, with few patients regaining functional independence. Elucidating molecular mechanisms underscoring sustained ICUAW is crucial to understanding outcomes linked to different morbidity trajectories as well as for the development of novel therapies. Quadriceps muscle biopsies and functional measures of muscle strength and mass were obtained at 7 days and 6 months post-ICU discharge from a cohort of ICUAW patients. Unsupervised co-expression network analysis of transcriptomic profiles identified discrete modules of co-expressed genes associated with the degree of muscle weakness and atrophy in early and sustained ICUAW. Modules were enriched for genes involved in skeletal muscle regeneration and extracellular matrix deposition. Collagen deposition in persistent ICUAW was confirmed by histochemical stain. Modules were further validated in an independent cohort of critically ill patients with sepsis-induced multi-organ failure and a porcine model of ICUAW, demonstrating disease-associated conservation across species and peripheral muscle type. Our findings provide a pathomolecular basis for sustained ICUAW, implicating aberrant expression of distinct skeletal muscle structural and regenerative genes in early and persistent ICUAW. PMID:27411715

  17. Transcriptomic analysis reveals abnormal muscle repair and remodeling in survivors of critical illness with sustained weakness.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher J; Batt, Jane; Herridge, Margaret S; Mathur, Sunita; Bader, Gary D; Hu, Pingzhao; Dos Santos, Claudia C

    2016-01-01

    ICU acquired weakness (ICUAW) is a common complication of critical illness characterized by structural and functional impairment of skeletal muscle. The resulting physical impairment may persist for years after ICU discharge, with few patients regaining functional independence. Elucidating molecular mechanisms underscoring sustained ICUAW is crucial to understanding outcomes linked to different morbidity trajectories as well as for the development of novel therapies. Quadriceps muscle biopsies and functional measures of muscle strength and mass were obtained at 7 days and 6 months post-ICU discharge from a cohort of ICUAW patients. Unsupervised co-expression network analysis of transcriptomic profiles identified discrete modules of co-expressed genes associated with the degree of muscle weakness and atrophy in early and sustained ICUAW. Modules were enriched for genes involved in skeletal muscle regeneration and extracellular matrix deposition. Collagen deposition in persistent ICUAW was confirmed by histochemical stain. Modules were further validated in an independent cohort of critically ill patients with sepsis-induced multi-organ failure and a porcine model of ICUAW, demonstrating disease-associated conservation across species and peripheral muscle type. Our findings provide a pathomolecular basis for sustained ICUAW, implicating aberrant expression of distinct skeletal muscle structural and regenerative genes in early and persistent ICUAW. PMID:27411715

  18. Reversal of tumor-induced biochemical abnormalities by insulin treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Chance, W T; Muggia-Sullam, M; Chen, M H; Murphy, R F; Fischer, J E

    1986-08-01

    In F344 rats bearing transplantable 3-methylcholanthrene (CAS: 56-49-5)-induced sarcomas, plasma concentrations of immunoreactive insulin were decreased following the development of mild or severe anorexia. Plasma levels of immunoreactive glucagon and lactate were elevated in severely anorectic tumor-bearing (TB) rats, while plasma glucose concentrations remained normal. Both groups of TB rats exhibited decreased plasma levels of serine, glutamine, citrulline, and tryptophan and increased concentrations of alanine. Plasma levels of proline and phenylalanine were also elevated in the severely anorectic TB rats. In a second experiment, 7 daily treatments with insulin corrected the anorexia for 6 days and increased body weights of TB rats. Plasma concentrations of lactate and immunoreactive glucagon were decreased, and the abnormal plasma concentrations of glutamine, proline, analine, and phenylalanine were altered toward normal following the insulin treatments. Therefore, these data are consistent with insulin treatments benefiting the TB host by increasing feeding, increasing body weight, reducing tumor glycolysis and metabolism, reducing gluconeogenesis, and reducing host catabolism, while not stimulating tumor growth. Thus insulin therapy may have potential benefits in cancer treatment by shifting glucose metabolism toward the host and away from the tumor. PMID:3525958

  19. Polarization of macrophages induced by Toxoplasma gondii and its impact on abnormal pregnancy in rats.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lanting; Zhang, Qian; Chao, Jing; Wen, Huiqin; Zhang, Yihua; Chen, He; Pappoe, Faustina; Zhang, Aimei; Xu, Xiucai; Cai, Yihong; Li, Min; Luo, Qingli; Zhang, Linjie; Shen, Jilong

    2015-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection is the leading cause of fetal intrauterine growth retardation among the five kinds of pathogens termed as TORCH, including Toxoplasma, Rubella virus, Cytomegalo virus, herpes virus and others during pregnancy. Pathogens infect the fetus through the placenta. T. gondii infection may result in congenital toxoplasmosis, miscarriage, stillbirth, and preemie, and increase pregnancy complications. Adaptive immune response induced by T. gondii infection stimulates T cells and macrophages to produce high levels of cytokines. Physiologically, the microenvironment of pregnancy was Th2-dominant. Here we set up a pregnant Sprague-Dawley rat model, and reported the polarization of macrophages induced by genotype Chinese 1 strain (Wh6) of Toxoplasma, and its adverse impact on pregnancy. The results showed that Wh6 infection pre- or in-gestation both led to abnormal pregnancy outcomes. Peritoneal macrophages in pre-gestation infection were polarized toward classically activated macrophages (M1), while in-gestation infection drove macrophages to polarize toward M2 activation. The Th2-dominant immune response in pregnant rat somewhat inhibits the excessive bias of the macrophages toward M1, and partially, toward M2. Infection of pre- and in-gestation may alter the physiological immune microenvironment in pregnant rats, giving rise to abnormal pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25496968

  20. Impaired energy metabolism and abnormal muscle histology in mut- methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, E; Wibrand, F; Ørngreen, M C; Vissing, J; Horn, N

    2005-09-27

    The authors report a 27-year-old man with B12-responsive mut- methylmalonic aciduria associated with pure muscle symptoms. Two mutations were found in the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene. An exercise test showed a reduced maximal workload and reduced oxygen uptake, and a muscle biopsy showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria and normal respiratory chain enzyme activities. These findings may be caused by inhibition of mitochondrial energy metabolism by methylmalonate or its metabolites. PMID:16186538

  1. Abnormal expression of the calmodulin gene in muscle from the dystrophic chicken

    SciTech Connect

    Hudecki, M.S.; Kibler, P.K.; Pollina, C.M.; Thacore, H.R.; Davis, P.J.; Davis, F.B.

    1986-05-29

    Compared to that of genetically-related normal chickens, pectoralis muscle from the dystrophic chicken contained increased calmodulin measured by radioimmunoassay. Determined by the dot blot procedure, expression of the calmodulin gene was enhanced in muscle from affected animals. The bioactivity of the gene product was normal. Together with previous studies reporting of increased sarcoplasmic calmodulin suggest the latter is a cellular response to defective Ca/sup 2 +/ transport at the level of cell efflux or intracellular organelle (sarcoplasmic reticulum) uptake.

  2. Detection of abnormal muscle activations during walking following spinal cord injury (SCI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Low, K H; McGregor, Alison H; Tow, Adela

    2013-04-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI participants were given assistance from physiotherapists, if required, while they were walking. In agreement with other research, larger cadence and smaller step length and swing phase of SCI gait were observed as a result of muscle weakness and resultant gait instability. Muscle activation patterns of seven major leg muscles were collected. The EMG signal was processed by the RMS in frequency domain to represent the muscle activation power, and the distribution of muscle activation was compared between healthy and SCI participants. The alternations of muscle activation within the phases of the gait cycle are highlighted to facilitate our understanding of the underlying muscular activation following SCI. Key differences were observed (p-value=0.0006) in the reduced activation of tibialis anterior (TA) in single stance phase and rectus femoris (RF) in swing phase (p-value=0.0011). We can then conclude that the proposed assessment approach of gait provides valuable information that can be used to target and define therapeutic interventions and their evaluation; hence impacting the functional outcome of SCI individuals. PMID:23396198

  3. Alleviation of metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats by Spirulina maxima

    PubMed Central

    Jarouliya, Urmila; Anish, Zacharia J.; Kumar, Pravin; Bisen, P.S.; Prasad, G.B.K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycaemia. Several natural products have been isolated and identified to restore the complications of diabetes. Spirulina maxima is naturally occurring fresh water cyanobacterium, enriched with proteins and essential nutrients. The aim of the study was to determine whether S. maxima could serve as a therapeutic agent to correct metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats. Methods: Oral administration of 10 per cent fructose solution to Wistar rats (n=5 in each group) for 30 days resulted in hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia. Aqueous suspension of S. maxima (5 or 10%) was also administered orally once daily for 30 days. The therapeutic potential of the preparation with reference to metformin (500 mg/kg) was assessed by monitoring various biochemical parameters at 10 day intervals during the course of therapy and at the end of 30 days S. maxima administration. Results: Significant (P<0.001) reductions in blood glucose, lipid profile (triglycerides, cholesterol and LDL, VLDL) and liver function markers (SGPT and SGOT) were recorded along with elevated level of HDL-C at the end of 30 days therapy of 5 or 10 per cent S. maxima aquous extract. Co-administration of S. maxima extract (5 or 10% aqueous) with 10 per cent fructose solution offered a significant protection against fructose induced metabolic abnormalities in Wistar rats. Interpretation & Conclusions: The present findings showed that S. maxima exhibited anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-hyperlipidaemic and hepatoprotective activity in rats fed with fructose. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms. PMID:22561632

  4. Cryptorchidism in the Orl Rat Is Associated with Muscle Patterning Defects in the Fetal Gubernaculum and Altered Hormonal Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Barthold, Julia S.; Robbins, Alan; Wang, Yanping; Pugarelli, Joan; Mateson, Abigail; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Ivell, Richard; McCahan, Suzanne M.; Akins, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptorchidism, or undescended testis, is a common male genital anomaly of unclear etiology. Hormonal stimulation of the developing fetal gubernaculum by testicular androgens and insulin-like 3 (INSL3) is required for testicular descent. In studies of the orl fetal rat, one of several reported strains with inherited cryptorchidism, we studied hormone levels, gene expression in intact and hormone-stimulated gubernaculum, and imaging of the developing cremaster muscle facilitated by a tissue clearing protocol to further characterize development of the orl gubernaculum. Abnormal localization of the inverted gubernaculum was visible soon after birth. In the orl fetus, testicular testosterone, gubernacular androgen-responsive transcript levels, and muscle-specific gene expression were reduced. However, the in vitro transcriptional response of the orl gubernaculum to androgen was largely comparable to wild type (wt). In contrast, increases in serum INSL3, gubernacular INSL3-responsive transcript levels, expression of the INSL3 receptor, Rxfp2, and the response of the orl gubernaculum to INSL3 in vitro all suggest enhanced activation of INSL3/RXFP2 signaling in the orl rat. However, DNA sequence analysis did not identify functional variants in orl Insl3. Finally, combined analysis of the present and previous studies of the orl transcriptome confirmed altered expression of muscle and cellular motility genes, and whole mount imaging revealed aberrant muscle pattern formation in the orl fetal gubernaculum. The nature and prevalence of developmental muscle defects in the orl gubernaculum are consistent with the cryptorchid phenotype in this strain. These data suggest impaired androgen and enhanced INSL3 signaling in the orl fetus accompanied by defective cremaster muscle development. PMID:24966393

  5. Ontogenetic, gravity-dependent development of rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Kawano, F.; Nomura, T.; Nonaka, I.; Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that rat soleus muscle fiber growth and changes in myosin phenotype during the postnatal, preweaning period would be largely independent of weight bearing. The hindlimbs of one group of pups were unloaded intermittently from postnatal day 4 to day 21: the pups were isolated from the dam for 5 h during unloading and returned for nursing for 1 h. Control pups were either maintained with the dam as normal or put on an alternating feeding schedule as described above. The enlargement of mass (approximately 3 times), increase in myonuclear number (approximately 1.6 times) and myonuclear domain (approximately 2.6 times), and transformation toward a slow fiber phenotype (from 56 to 70% fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain) observed in controls were inhibited by hindlimb unloading. These properties were normalized to control levels or higher within 1 mo of reambulation beginning immediately after the unloading period. Therefore, chronic unloading essentially stopped the ontogenetic developmental processes of 1) net increase in DNA available for transcription, 2) increase in amount of cytoplasm sustained by that DNA pool, and 3) normal transition of myosin isoforms that occur in some fibers from birth to weaning. It is concluded that normal ontogenetic development of a postural muscle is highly dependent on the gravitational environment even during the early postnatal period, when full weight-bearing activity is not routine.

  6. Increasing or stabilizing renal epoxyeicosatrienoic acid production attenuates abnormal renal function and hypertension in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Morisseau, Christophe; Wang, JingFeng; Yang, Tianxin; Falck, John R; Hammock, Bruce D; Wang, Mong-Heng

    2007-07-01

    Since epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) affect sodium reabsorption in renal tubules and dilate the renal vasculature, we have examined their effects on renal hemodynamics and sodium balance in male rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet by fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) agonist and an inducer of cytochrome P-450 (CYP) epoxygenases; by N-methanesulfonyl-6-(2-proparyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MSPPOH), a selective EET biosynthesis inhibitor; and by 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)dodecanoic acid (AUDA), a selective inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase. In rats treated with fenofibrate (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) ig) or AUDA (50 mg/l in drinking water) for 2 wk, mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and glomerular filtration rate were lower but renal blood flow was higher than in vehicle-treated control rats. In addition, fenofibrate and AUDA decreased cumulative sodium balance in the HF rats. Treatment with MSPPOH (20 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) iv) + fenofibrate for 2 wk reversed renal hemodynamics and sodium balance to the levels in control HF rats. Moreover, fenofibrate caused a threefold increase in renal cortical CYP epoxygenase activity, whereas the fenofibrate-induced elevation of this activity was attenuated by MSPPOH. Western blot analysis showed that fenofibrate induced the expression of CYP epoxygenases in renal cortex and microvessels and that the induction effect of fenofibrate was blocked by MSPPOH. These results demonstrate that the fenofibrate-induced increase of CYP epoxygenase expression and the AUDA-induced stabilization of EET production in the kidneys cause renal vascular dilation and reduce sodium retention, contributing to the improvement of abnormal renal hemodynamics and hypertension in HF rats. PMID:17442729

  7. Abnormal DNA methylation in the lumbar spinal cord following chronic constriction injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lin, Zhi-Ping; Zheng, Hui-Zhe; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Zong-Luan; Chen, Yan; You, Yi-Sheng; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain is complex and not clearly understood. Glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD 67) is a key synthetic enzyme for the main inhibitory transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and diminishes in the spinal dorsal horn in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). GAD 67 is coded by gene GAD 1. DNA methylation can regulate the expression of GAD 67 by regulating the methylation of GAD 1 promoter in the psychotic brain. DNA methylation is primarily mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and methyl-DNA binding domain proteins (MBDs). In this study, in order to discover whether DNA methylation regulates GAD 67 expression in the spinal cord in CCI rats and is involved in neuropathic pain, we examined mRNA levels of DNMTs, MBDs and GAD 67 with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and methylation of GAD 1 promoter with Pyromark CpG Assays in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. Our results showed that DNMT3a, DNMT3b and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) expression increased, MBD2 expression decreased, and DNMT1, MBD1 and MBD3 expression hardly changed in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. GAD 67 expression decreased, and methylation of GAD 1 promoter increased in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. These results indicate that decreased GAD 67 may be associated with increased GAD 1 promoter methylation, which may be mediated by DNMT3a, DNMT3b, MeCP2 and MBD2 in CCI rats. These indicate that abnormal DNA methylation may be highly involved in CCI-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:26515497

  8. Insulin effect on amino acid uptake by unloaded rat hindlimb muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Tischler, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of insulin on the uptake of alpha-amino-isobutyric acid (AIB) by unloaded rat hindlimb muscles was investigated using soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from intact and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats that were tail-casted for six days. It was found that, at insulin levels above 0.00001 units/ml, the in vitro rate of AIB uptake by muscles from intact animals was stimulated more in the weight bearing muscles than in unloaded ones. In ADX animals, this differential response to insulin was abolished.

  9. Transcriptional Abnormalities of Hamstring Muscle Contractures in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lucas R.; Chambers, Henry G.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Lieber, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a spectrum of movement disorders. Secondary to the neurological lesion, muscles from patients with CP are often spastic and form debilitating contractures that limit range of motion and joint function. With no genetic component, the pathology of skeletal muscle in CP is a response to aberrant complex neurological input in ways that are not fully understood. This study was designed to gain further understanding of the skeletal muscle response in CP using transcriptional profiling correlated with functional measures to broadly investigate muscle adaptations leading to mechanical deficits. Biospsies were obtained from both the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles from a cohort of patients with CP (n = 10) and typically developing patients (n = 10) undergoing surgery. Biopsies were obtained to define the unique expression profile of the contractures and passive mechanical testing was conducted to determine stiffness values in previously published work. Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 chips (n = 40) generated expression data, which was validated for selected transcripts using quantitative real-time PCR. Chips were clustered based on their expression and those from patients with CP clustered separately. Significant genes were determined conservatively based on the overlap of three summarization algorithms (n = 1,398). Significantly altered genes were analyzed for over-representation among gene ontologies and muscle specific networks. The majority of altered transcripts were related to increased extracellular matrix expression in CP and a decrease in metabolism and ubiquitin ligase activity. The increase in extracellular matrix products was correlated with mechanical measures demonstrating the importance in disability. These data lay a framework for further studies and development of novel therapies. PMID:22956992

  10. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types a rat model of critical illness myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Benjamin T.; Confides, Amy L.; Rich, Mark M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40–60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and −8 activities, but not caspase-9 and −12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, −27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types. PMID:25740800

  11. The combined effect of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in rat tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Murakami, Shinichiro; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Miki, Akinori; Fujino, Hidemi

    2011-05-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used to prevent muscle atrophy, but this method is different in many previous studies, appropriate stimulation protocol is still not decided. Although resistance exercise has also been shown to be an effective countermeasure on muscle atrophy, almost previous studies carried out an electrical stimulation without resistance. It was hypothesized that electrical stimulation without resistance is insufficient to contract skeletal muscle forcefully, and the combination of electrical stimulation and forceful resistance contraction is more effective than electrical stimulation without resistance to attenuate muscle atrophy. This study investigated the combined effects of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in the rat tibialis anterior muscle. The animals were divided into control, hindlimb unloading (HU), hindlimb unloading plus electrical stimulation (ES), and hindlimb unloading plus the combination of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction (ES+IC). Electrical stimulation was applied to the tibialis anterior muscle percutaneously for total 240 sec per day. In the ES+IC group, the ankle joint was fixed to produce resistance isometric contraction during electrical stimulation. After 7 days, the cross-sectional areas of each muscle fiber type in the HU group decreased. Those were prevented in the ES+IC group rather than the ES group. The expression of heat shock protein 72 was enhanced in the ES and ES+IC groups. These results indicated that although electrical stimulation is effective to prevent muscle atrophy, the combination of electrical stimulation and isometric contraction have further effect. PMID:21619551

  12. The comparative effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics and muscle relaxants on electrical field stimulation response in rat bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Min, Chang Ho; Min, Young Sil; Lee, Sang Joon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-06-01

    It has been reported that several aminoglycoside antibiotics have a potential of prolonging the action of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants by drug interactions acting pre-synaptically to inhibit acetylcholine release, but antibiotics itself also have a strong effect on relaxing the smooth muscle. In this study, four antibiotics of aminoglycosides such as gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin and neomycin were compared with skeletal muscle relaxants baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine, and a smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine. The muscle strips isolated from the rat bladder were stimulated with pulse trains of 40 V in amplitude and 10 s in duration, with pulse duration of 1 ms at the frequency of 1-8 Hz, at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 Hz respectively. To test the effect of four antibiotics on bladder smooth muscle relaxation, each of them was treated cumulatively from 1 μM to 0.1 mM with an interval of 5 min. Among the four antibiotics, gentamicin and neomycin inhibited the EFS response. The skeletal muscle relaxants (baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine) and inhibitory neurotransmitters (GABA and glycine) did not show any significant effect. However, papaverine, had a significant effect in the relaxation of the smooth muscle. It was suggested that the aminoglycoside antibiotics have inhibitory effect on the bladder smooth muscle. PMID:27260628

  13. Actin expression in smooth muscle cells of rat aortic intimal thickening, human atheromatous plaque, and cultured rat aortic media.

    PubMed Central

    Gabbiani, G; Kocher, O; Bloom, W S; Vandekerckhove, J; Weber, K

    1984-01-01

    Actin of smooth muscle cells of rat and human aortic media shows a predominance of the alpha-isoform. In experimental rat aortic intimal thickening, in human atheromatous plaque, and in cultured aortic smooth muscle cells, there is a typical switch in actin expression with a predominance of the beta-form and a noticeable amount of gamma-form. This pattern of actin expression represents a new reliable protein-chemical marker of experimental and human atheromatous smooth muscle cells. Images PMID:6690475

  14. Skeletal muscle response to spaceflight, whole body suspension, and recovery in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Fell, R. D.; Dombrowski, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a 7-day spaceflight (SF), 7- and 14-day-long whole body suspension (WBS), and 7-day-long recovery on the muscle weight and the morphology of the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats were investigated. It was found that the effect of 7-day-long SF and WBS were highly comparable for both the soleus and the EDL, although the soleus muscle from SF rats showed greater cross-sectional area reduction than that from WBS rats. With a longer duration of WBS, there was a continued reduction in cross-sectional fast-twitch fiber area. Muscle plasticity, in terms of fiber and capillary responses, showed differences in responses of the two types of muscles, indicating that antigravity posture muscles are highly susceptible to unloading.

  15. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  16. Changes of contractile responses due to simulated weightlessness in rat soleus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhammari, A.; Noireaud, J.; Léoty, C.

    1994-08-01

    Some contractile and electrophysiological properties of muscle fibers isolated from the slow-twitch soleus (SOL) and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of rats were compared with those measured in SOL muscles from suspended rats. In suspendede SOL (21 days of tail-suspension) membrane potential (Em), intracellular sodium activity (aiNa) and the slope of the relationship between Em and log [K]o were typical of fast-twitch muscles. The relation between the maximal amplitude of K-contractures vs Em was steeper for control SOL than for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. After suspension, in SOL muscles the contractile threshold and the inactivation curves for K-contractures were shifted to more positive Em. Repriming of K-contractures was unaffected by suspencion. The exposure of isolated fibers to perchlorate (ClO4-)-containing (6-40 mM) solutions resulted ina similar concentration-dependent shift to more negative Em of activation curves for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. On exposure to a Na-free TEA solution, SOL from control and suspended rats, in contrast to EDL muscles, generated slow contractile responses. Suspended SOL showed a reduced sensitivity to the contracture-producing effect of caffeine compared to control muscles. These results suggested that the modification observed due to suspension could be encounted by changes in the characteristics of muscle fibers from slow to fast-twitch type.

  17. Fatigue and contraction of slow and fast muscles in hypokinetic/hypodynamic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, R. D.; Gladden, L. B.; Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hypokinesia/hypodynamia (H/H) on the fatigability and contractile properties of the rat soleus (S) and gastrocnemius (G) muscles have been investigated experimentally. Whole body suspension for one week was used to induce H/H, and fatigue was brought on by train stimulation for periods of 45 and 16 minutes. Following stimulation, rapid rates of fatigue were observed in the G-muscles of the suspended rats, while minimal fatigue was observed in the S-muscles. The twitch and tetanic contractile properties of the muscles were measured before and after train stimulation. It is found that H/H suspension increased twitch tension in the G-muscles, but did not change any contractile properties in the S-muscles. The peak twitch, train, tetanic tensions and time to peak were unchanged in the S-muscles of the suspended rats. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that 1 wk of muscle atropy induced by H/H significantly increases fatigability in G-muscles, but does not affect the contractile properties of fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles.

  18. Green tea extract attenuates muscle loss and improves muscle function during disuse, but fails to improve muscle recovery following unloading in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Alway, Stephen E; Bennett, Brian T; Wilson, Joseph C; Sperringer, Justin; Mohamed, Junaith S; Edens, Neile K; Pereira, Suzette L

    2015-02-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that green tea extract (GTE) would improve muscle recovery after reloading following disuse. Aged (32 mo) Fischer 344 Brown Norway rats were randomly assigned to receive either 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HLS) or 14 days of HLS followed by normal ambulatory function for 14 days (recovery). Additional animals served as cage controls. The rats were given GTE (50 mg/kg body wt) or water (vehicle) by gavage 7 days before and throughout the experimental periods. Compared with vehicle treatment, GTE significantly attenuated the loss of hindlimb plantaris muscle mass (-24.8% vs. -10.7%, P < 0.05) and tetanic force (-43.7% vs. -25.9%, P <0.05) during HLS. Although GTE failed to further improve recovery of muscle function or mass compared with vehicle treatment, animals given green tea via gavage maintained the lower losses of muscle mass that were found during HLS (-25.2% vs. -16.0%, P < 0.05) and force (-45.7 vs. -34.4%, P < 0.05) after the reloading periods. In addition, compared with vehicle treatment, GTE attenuated muscle fiber cross-sectional area loss in both plantaris (-39.9% vs. -23.9%, P < 0.05) and soleus (-37.2% vs. -17.6%) muscles after HLS. This green tea-induced difference was not transient but was maintained over the reloading period for plantaris (-45.6% vs. -21.5%, P <0.05) and soleus muscle fiber cross-sectional area (-38.7% vs. -10.9%, P <0.05). GTE increased satellite cell proliferation and differentiation in plantaris and soleus muscles during recovery from HLS compared with vehicle-treated muscles and decreased oxidative stress and abundance of the Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), yet this did not further improve muscle recovery in reloaded muscles. These data suggest that muscle recovery following disuse in aging is complex. Although satellite cell proliferation and differentiation are critical for muscle repair to occur, green tea-induced changes in satellite cell number is by itself insufficient to

  19. Abnormal fertilization is responsible for reduced fecundity following thiram-induced ovulatory delay in the rat.

    PubMed

    Stoker, Tammy E; Jeffay, Susan C; Zucker, Robert M; Cooper, Ralph L; Perreault, Sally D

    2003-06-01

    Brief exposure to some pesticides, applied during a sensitive window for the neural regulation of ovulation, will block the preovulatory surge of LH and, thus, delay ovulation. Previously, we have shown that a single i.p. injection of 50 mg/kg of thiram, a dithiocarbamate fungicide that decreases norepinephrine synthesis, on proestrus (1300 h) suppresses the LH surge and delays ovulation for 24 h without altering the number of oocytes released. However, when bred, the treated dams had a decreased litter size and increased postimplantation loss. We hypothesized that the reduced litter size in thiram-delayed rats was a consequence of altered oocyte function arising from intrafollicular oocyte aging. To test this hypothesis, we examined delayed oocytes, zygotes, and 2-cell embryos for evidence of fertilization and polyspermy. In addition, we used confocal laser-scanning microscopy to evaluate and characterize cortical granule localization in oocytes and release in zygotes, because the cortical granule response is a major factor in the normal block to polyspermy. Our results demonstrate that a thiram-induced, 24-h delay in ovulation alters the fertilizability of the released oocyte. Although no apparent morphological differences were observed in the unfertilized mature oocytes released following the thiram-induced delay, the changes observed following breeding include a significant decrease in the percentage of fertilized oocytes, a significant increase in polyspermic zygotes (21%), and a 10-fold increase in the number of supernumerary sperm in the perivitelline space. Importantly, all the polyspermic zygotes exhibited an abnormal pattern of cortical granule exudate, suggestive of a relationship between abnormal cortical reaction and the polyspermy in the delayed zygotes. Because polyspermy is associated with polyploidy, abnormal development, and early embryonic death, the observed polyspermy could explain the abnormal development and decreased litter size that we

  20. Effects of hypokinesia and hypodynamia upon protein turnover in hindlimb muscles of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughna, Paul T.; Goldspink, David F.; Goldspink, Geoffrey

    1987-01-01

    Hypokinesia/hypodynamia was induced in the hindlimb muscles of the rat, using a suspension technique. This caused differing degrees of atrophy in different muscles. However, this atrophy was reduced in muscles held in a lenghthened position. The greatest degree of wasting was observed in the unstretched soleus, a slow postural muscle, where both Type 1 and Type 2a fibers atrophied to the same degree. However, wasting of the gastrocnemius muscle was associated with a reduction in the size of the Type 2b fibers. In both slow-postural and fast-phasic hindlimb muscles, atrophy was brought about by a reduction in the rate of protein synthesis in conjunction with an elevation in the rate of protein degradation. When inactive muscles were passively stretched, both protein synthesis and degradation were dramatically elevated. Even periods of stretch of as little as 0.5 h/d were found to significantly decrease atrophy in inactive muscles.

  1. [Morphohistochemical study of skeletal muscles in rats after experimental flight on "Kosmos-1887"].

    PubMed

    Il'ina-Kakueva, E I

    1990-01-01

    Morphometric and histochemical methods were used to examine the soleus, gastrocnemius (medial portion), quadriceps femoris (central portion) and biceps brachii muscles of Wistar SPF rats two days after the 13-day flight on Cosmos-1887. It was found that significant atrophy developed only in the soleus muscle. The space flight did not change the percentage content of slow (type I) and fast (type II) fibers in fast twitch muscles. During two days at 1 g the slow soleus muscle developed substantial circulation disorders, which led to interstitial edema and necrotic changes. The gastrocnemius muscle showed small foci containing necrotic myofibers. Two days after recovery no glycogen aggregates were seen in myofibers, which were previously observed in other rats examined 4--8 hours after flight. An initial stage of muscle readaptation to 1 g occurred, when NAD.H2-dehydrogenase activity was decreased. PMID:2145470

  2. Oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity of fed and starved rats.

    PubMed

    Kotlar, T J; Borensztajn, J

    1977-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was measured at short time intervals in cardiac and skeletal muscles of normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats fed ad libitum or deprived of food. In normal animals fed ad libitum, lipoprotein lipase activities of heart, diaphragm, soleus, and fast-twitch red fibers of the quadriceps muscle showed rhythmic oscillations that appeared to coincide with the nocturnal feeding habits of the animals. During the day (7 A.M. to 7 P.M.), when food consumption by the rats was greatly reduced, lipoprotein lipase activity in all muscles increased, followed by a decline to basal levels during the night. Similar oscillatory changes in lipoprotein lipase activity were observed in the muscles of diabetic rats fed ad libitum. In normal rats deprived of food, however, the oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity were not abolished and persisted for at least 48 h. In diabetic rats starved during a 48-h period, the oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity were markedly altered. In all animals, muscle lipoprotein lipase activities were not correlated to plasma glucagon levels. PMID:143895

  3. Effects of elevated temperature on protein breakdown in muscles from septic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hall-Angeras, M.A.; Angeras, U.H.; Hasselgren, P.O.; Fischer, J.E. )

    1990-04-01

    Elevated temperature has been proposed to contribute to accelerated muscle protein degradation during fever and sepsis. The present study examined the effect of increased temperature in vitro on protein turnover in skeletal muscles from septic and control rats. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP); control rats were sham operated. After 16 h, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles were incubated at 37 or 40 degrees C. Protein synthesis was determined by measuring incorporation of (14C)phenylalanine into protein. Total and myofibrillar protein breakdown was assessed from release of tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine (3-MH), respectively. Total protein breakdown was increased at 40 degrees C by 15% in EDL and by 29% in SOL from control rats, whereas 3-MH release was not affected. In muscles from septic rats, total and myofibrillar protein breakdown was increased by 22 and 30%, respectively, at 40 degrees C in EDL but was not altered in SOL. Protein synthesis was unaffected by high temperature both in septic and nonseptic muscles. The present results suggest that high temperature is not the primary mechanism of increased muscle protein breakdown in sepsis because the typical response to sepsis, i.e., a predominant increase in myofibrillar protein breakdown, was not induced by elevated temperature in normal muscle. It is possible, however, that increased temperature may potentiate protein breakdown that is already stimulated by sepsis because elevated temperature increased both total and myofibrillar protein breakdown in EDL from septic rats.

  4. Mechanisms underlying impaired GLUT-4 translocation in glycogen-supercompensated muscles of exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Kawanaka, K; Nolte, L A; Han, D H; Hansen, P A; Holloszy, J O

    2000-12-01

    Exercise training induces an increase in GLUT-4 in muscle. We previously found that feeding rats a high-carbohydrate diet after exercise, with muscle glycogen supercompensation, results in a decrease in insulin responsiveness so severe that it masks the effect of a training-induced twofold increase in GLUT-4 on insulin-stimulated muscle glucose transport. One purpose of this study was to determine whether insulin signaling is impaired. Maximally insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase activity was not significantly reduced, whereas protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation was approximately 50% lower (P < 0.01) in muscles of chow-fed, than in those of fasted, exercise-trained rats. Our second purpose was to determine whether contraction-stimulated glucose transport is also impaired. The stimulation of glucose transport and the increase in cell surface GLUT-4 induced by contractions were both decreased by approximately 65% in glycogen-supercompensated muscles of trained rats. The contraction-stimulated increase in AMP kinase activity, which has been implicated in the activation of glucose transport by contractions, was approximately 80% lower in the muscles of the fed compared with the fasted rats 18 h after exercise. These results show that both the insulin- and contraction-stimulated pathways for muscle glucose transport activation are impaired in glycogen-supercompensated muscles and provide insight regarding possible mechanisms. PMID:11093919

  5. Electrophysiological, histochemical, and hormonal adaptation of rat muscle after prolonged hindlimb suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Kyparos, Antonios; Albani, Maria; Frossinis, Athanasios; Papadelis, Christos L.; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Vivas, Ana; Guiba-Tziampiri, Olympia

    2004-05-01

    The perspective of long-duration flights for future exploration, imply more research in the field of human adaptation. Previous studies in rat muscles hindlimb suspension (HLS), indicated muscle atrophy and a change of fibre composition from slow-to-fast twitch types. However, the contractile responses to long-term unloading is still unclear. Fifteen adult Wistar rats were studied in 45 and 70 days of muscle unweighting and soleus (SOL) muscle as well as extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were prepared for electrophysiological recordings (single, twitch, tetanic contraction and fatigue) and histochemical stainings. The loss of muscle mass observed was greater in the soleus muscle. The analysis of electrophysiological properties of both EDL and SOL showed significant main effects of group, of number of unweighting days and fatigue properties. Single contraction for soleus muscle remained unchanged but there was statistically significant difference for tetanic contraction and fatigue. Fatigue index showed a decrease for the control rats, but increase for the HLS rats. According to the histochemical findings there was a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism during HLS. The data suggested that muscles atrophied, but they presented an adaptation pattern, while their endurance in fatigue was decreased.

  6. Coexistence of twitch potentiation and tetanic force decline in rat hindlimb muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Lucinda L.; Enoka, Roger M.; Volz, Kathryn A.; Stuart, Douglas G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of whole-muscle fatigue on the isometric twitch was investigated in various hindlimb muscles of anesthetized rats, using an experimental protocol designed to assess the levels of fatigability in motor units. The results of EMG and force measurements revealed the existence of a linear relationship between fatigability and the magnitude of the twitch force following the fatigue test in both soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles.

  7. Carnosine Content in Skeletal Muscle Is Dependent on Vitamin B6 Status in Rats.

    PubMed

    Suidasari, Sofya; Stautemas, Jan; Uragami, Shinji; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Derave, Wim; Kato, Norihisa

    2015-01-01

    Carnosine, a histidine-containing dipeptide, is well known to be associated with skeletal muscle performance. However, there is limited information on the effect of dietary micronutrients on muscle carnosine level. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6, is involved in amino acid metabolisms in the body as a cofactor. We hypothesized that enzymes involved in β-alanine biosynthesis, the rate-limiting precursor of carnosine, may also be PLP dependent. Thus, we examined the effects of dietary vitamin B6 on the muscle carnosine content of rats. Male and female rats were fed a diet containing 1, 7, or 35 mg pyridoxine (PN) HCl/kg for 6 weeks. Carnosine in skeletal muscles was quantified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. In the gastrocnemius muscle of male rats, carnosine concentration was significantly higher in the 7 and 35 mg groups (+70 and +61%, respectively) than in the 1 mg PN HCl/kg group, whereas that in the soleus muscle of male rats was significantly higher only in the 7 mg group (+43%) than in the 1 mg PN HCl/kg group (P < 0.05). In both muscles of female rats, carnosine concentration was significantly higher in the 7 and 35 mg groups (+32 to +226%) than in the 1 mg PN HCl/kg group (P < 0.05). We also found that, compared to the 1 mg group, β-alanine concentrations in the 7 and 35 mg groups were markedly elevated in gastrocnemius muscles of male (+153 and +148%, respectively, P < 0.05) and female (+381 and +437%, respectively, P < 0.05) rats. Noteworthy, the concentrations of ornithine in the 7 and 35 mg groups were decreased in gastrocnemius muscles of male rats (-46 and -54%, respectively, P < 0.05), which strongly inversely correlated with β-alanine concentration (r = -0.84, P < 0.01). In humans, 19% lower muscle carnosine content was found in soleus muscle of women of the lower plasma PLP tertile, but this was not observed in

  8. Effects of oxygen deprivation on incubated rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated soleus muscle deprived of oxygen produces more lactate and alanine than oxygen-supplied muscle. Oxygenated muscle synthesized glutamine, while anoxic muscle used this amino acid. Oxygen deprivation decreased adenine nucleotides leading to the efflux of nucleosides. Protein synthesis and degradation responded differently to anoxia. Synthesis almost completely ceased, while proteolysis increased. Therefore, protein degradation in soleus muscle is enhanced when energy supplies and oxygen tension are low.

  9. Decomposition of abnormal free locomotor behavior in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Benjamin; von Nicolai, Constantin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Hamel, Wolfgang; Engel, Andreas K.; Moll, Christian K.

    2013-01-01

    Poverty of spontaneous movement, slowed execution and reduced amplitudes of movement (akinesia, brady- and hypokinesia) are cardinal motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease that can be modeled in experimental animals by brain lesions affecting midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Most behavioral investigations in experimental parkinsonism have employed short-term observation windows to assess motor impairments. We postulated that an analysis of longer-term free exploratory behavior could provide further insights into the complex fine structure of altered locomotor activity in parkinsonian animals. To this end, we video-monitored 23 h of free locomotor behavior and extracted several behavioral measures before and after the expression of a severe parkinsonian phenotype following bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the rat dopaminergic substantia nigra. Unbiased stereological cell counting verified the degree of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase positive cell loss in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. In line with previous reports, overall covered distance and maximal motion speed of lesioned animals were found to be significantly reduced compared to controls. Before lesion surgery, exploratory rat behavior exhibited a bimodal distribution of maximal speed values obtained for single movement episodes, corresponding to a “first” and “second gear” of motion. 6-OHDA injections significantly reduced the incidence of second gear motion episodes and also resulted in an abnormal prolongation of these fast motion events. Likewise, the spatial spread of such episodes was increased in 6-OHDA rats. The increase in curvature of motion tracks was increased in both lesioned and control animals. We conclude that the discrimination of distinct modes of motion by statistical decomposition of longer-term spontaneous locomotion provides useful insights into the fine structure of fluctuating motor functions in a rat analog of Parkinson's disease. PMID:24348346

  10. Vinpocetine attenuates MPTP-induced motor deficit and biochemical abnormalities in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Deshmukh, R

    2015-02-12

    Up-regulation in phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) expression and decreased levels of cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP) have been reported in patients and experimental animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD). Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors have been reported to be beneficial in cognitive and motor deficit states. The present study is designed to investigate the effect of vinpocetine, a PDE1 inhibitor in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced experimental PD-like symptoms in rats. To produce stable motor deficit, MPTP was repeatedly administered intranigrally (bilaterally) at an interval of 1 week (days 1, 7 and 14). Following development of stable motor deficit, which was observed after the third infusion of MPTP (day 14) in rats, the animals were treated with vinpocetine (5-, 10- and 20-mg/kg, i.p.) from days 15 to 28. Movement abnormalities were assessed by a battery of behavioral tests. Moreover, levels of malondialdehyde, nitrite and reduced glutathione were measured in striatal brain homogenate to confirm the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress in PD. Repeated intranigral administration of MPTP produced stable motor deficits, reduced the cyclic nucleotides and dopamine levels and caused elevation in oxidative-nitrosative stress markers. Chronic administration of vinpocetine (for 14 days) significantly and dose dependently attenuated movement disabilities and oxidative-nitrosative stress in MPTP-treated rats. Moreover, vinpocetine treatment enhances cyclic nucleotide levels and restores the dopamine level in MPTP-treated rats. The observed results of the present study are indicative of the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in PD. PMID:25514048

  11. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ploug, T.; Stallknecht, B.M.; Pedersen, O.; Kahn, B.B.; Ohkuwa, T.; Vinten, J.; Galbo, H. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an increase of approximately 33% for contraction-stimulated transport in slow-twitch red fibers compared with nonexercised sedentary muscle. A fully additive effect of insulin and contractions was observed both in trained and untrained muscle. Compared with transport in control rats subjected to an almost exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold by training in fast-twitch red muscle fibers. In parallel to this, Western blot demonstrated a approximately 47% increase in GLUT-1 protein and a approximately 31% increase in GLUT-4 protein. This indicates that the increases in maximum velocity for 3-MG transport in trained muscle is due to an increased number of glucose transporters.

  12. Laing early onset distal myopathy: slow myosin defect with variable abnormalities on muscle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, P J; Udd, B; Mastaglia, F L; de Visser, M; Hedera, P; Voit, T; Bridges, L R; Fabian, V; Rozemuller, A; Laing, N G

    2006-01-01

    Background Laing early onset distal myopathy (MPD1) is an autosomal dominant myopathy caused by mutations within the slow skeletal muscle fibre myosin heavy chain gene, MYH7. It is allelic with myosin storage myopathy, with the commonest form of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and with one form of dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the clinical picture of MPD1 is distinct from these three conditions. Objective To collate and discuss the histological features reported in the muscle biopsies of MPD1 patients and to outline the clinical features. Results The phenotype of MPD1 was consistent, with initial weakness of great toe/ankle dorsiflexion, and later development of weakness of finger extension and neck flexion. Age of onset was the only variable, being from birth up to the 20s, but progression was always very slow. The pathological features were variable. In this retrospective series, there were no pathognomonic diagnostic features, although atrophic type I fibres were found in half the families. Rimmed vacuoles are consistently seen in all other distal myopathies with the exception of Myoshi distal myopathy. However, they were found in a minority of patients with MPD1, and were not prominent when present. Immunohistochemical staining for slow and fast myosin showed co‐expression of slow and fast myosin in some type I fibres, possibly indicating a switch to type II status. This may be a useful aid to diagnosis. Conclusions The pathological findings in MPD1 are variable and appear to be affected by factors such as the specific muscle biopsied, the age of the patient at biopsy, and the duration of disease manifestations. PMID:16103042

  13. Contribution of abnormal muscle and liver glucose metabolism to postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrakou, A.; Kelley, D.; Veneman, T.; Jenssen, T.; Pangburn, T.; Reilly, J.; Gerich, J. )

    1990-11-01

    To assess the role of muscle and liver in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we administered an oral glucose load enriched with (14C)glucose to 10 NIDDM subjects and 10 age- and weight-matched nondiabetic volunteers and compared muscle glucose disposal by measuring forearm balance of glucose, lactate, alanine, O2, and CO2. In addition, we used the dual-lable isotope method to compare overall rates of glucose appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd), suppression of endogenous glucose output, and splanchnic glucose sequestration. During the initial 1-1.5 h after glucose ingestion, plasma glucose increased by approximately 8 mM in NIDDM vs. approximately 3 mM in nondiabetic subjects (P less than 0.01); overall glucose Ra was nearly 11 g greater in NIDDM than nondiabetic subjects, but glucose Rd was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects. The greater overall glucose Ra of NIDDM subjects was due to 6.8 g greater endogenous glucose output (13.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.0 g, P less than 0.01) and 3.8 g less oral glucose splanchnic sequestration of the oral load (31.4 +/- 1.5 vs. 27.5 +/- 0.9 g, P less than 0.05). Although glucose taken up by muscle was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects (39.3 +/- 3.5 vs. 41.0 +/- 2.5 g/5 h), a greater amount of the glucose taken up by muscle in NIDDM was released as lactate and alanine (11.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 5.2 +/- 0.3 g in nondiabetic subjects, P less than 0.01), and less was stored (11.7 +/- 1.3 vs. 16.9 +/- 1.5 g, P less than 0.05). We conclude that increased systemic glucose delivery, due primarily to reduced suppression of endogenous hepatic glucose output and, to a lesser extent, reduced splanchnic glucose sequestration, is the predominant factor responsible for postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM.

  14. Assessment of the Potential Role of Muscle Spindle Mechanoreceptor Afferents in Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Athanassiadis, Tuija; Caram Salas, Nadia; Auclair, François; Thivierge, Benoît; Arsenault, Isabel; Rompré, Pierre; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar; Kolta, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in “functional” pain syndromes. Methodology/Principal Findings Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0) injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1–38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes), which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA), was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167) were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141), as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO), bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors) and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  15. Fatigue resistance of rat extraocular muscles does not depend on creatine kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Colleen A; Hayeß, Katrin; Andrade, Francisco H

    2005-01-01

    Background Creatine kinase (CK) links phosphocreatine, an energy storage system, to cellular ATPases. CK activity serves as a temporal and spatial buffer for ATP content, particularly in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. The extraocular muscles are notoriously fast and active, suggesting the need for efficient ATP buffering. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) CK isoform expression and activity in rat extraocular muscles would be higher, and (2) the resistance of these muscles to fatigue would depend on CK activity. Results We found that mRNA and protein levels for cytosolic and mitochondrial CK isoforms were lower in the extraocular muscles than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Total CK activity was correspondingly decreased in the extraocular muscles. Moreover, cytoskeletal components of the sarcomeric M line, where a fraction of CK activity is found, were downregulated in the extraocular muscles as was shown by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. CK inhibition significantly accelerated the development of fatigue in EDL muscle bundles, but had no major effect on the extraocular muscles. Searching for alternative ATP buffers that could compensate for the relative lack of CK in extraocular muscles, we determined that mRNAs for two adenylate kinase (AK) isoforms were expressed at higher levels in these muscles. Total AK activity was similar in EDL and extraocular muscles. Conclusion These data indicate that the characteristic fatigue resistance of the extraocular muscles does not depend on CK activity. PMID:16107216

  16. Contractile activity restores insulin responsiveness in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, P L; Tapscott, E B; Dorton, P J; Dohm, G L

    1993-01-01

    Both insulin and contraction stimulate glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Insulin-stimulated glucose transport is decreased in obese humans and rats. The aims of this study were (1) to determine if contraction-stimulated glucose transport was also compromised in skeletal muscle of genetically obese insulin-resistant Zucker rats, and (2) to determine whether the additive effects of insulin and contraction previously observed in muscle from lean subjects were evident in muscle from the obese animals. To measure glucose transport, hindlimbs from lean and obese Zucker rats were perfused under basal, insulin-stimulated (0.1 microM), contraction-stimulated (electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve) and combined insulin-(+)contraction-stimulated conditions. One hindlimb was stimulated to contract while the contralateral leg served as an unstimulated control. 2-Deoxyglucose transport rates were measured in the white gastrocnemius, red gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum longus muscles. As expected, the insulin-stimulated glucose transport rate in each of the three muscles was significantly slower (P < 0.05) in obese rats when compared with lean animals. When expressed as fold stimulation over basal, there was no significant difference in contraction-induced muscle glucose transport rates between lean and obese animals. Insulin-(+)contraction-stimulation was additive in skeletal muscle of lean animals, but synergistic in skeletal muscle of obese animals. Prior contraction increased insulin responsiveness of glucose transport 2-5-fold in the obese rats, but had no effect on insulin responsiveness in the lean controls. This contraction-induced improvement in insulin responsiveness could be of clinical importance to obese subjects as a way to improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in resistant skeletal muscle. PMID:8424787

  17. Intercostal muscle motor behavior during tracheal occlusion conditioning in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Poonam B; Davenport, Paul W

    2016-04-01

    A respiratory load compensation response is characterized by increases in activation of primary respiratory muscles and/or recruitment of accessory respiratory muscles. The contribution of the external intercostal (EI) muscles, which are a primary respiratory muscle group, during normal and loaded breathing remains poorly understood in conscious animals. Consciousness has a significant role on modulation of respiratory activity, as it is required for the integration of behavioral respiratory responses and voluntary control of breathing. Studies of respiratory load compensation have been predominantly focused in anesthetized animals, which make their comparison to conscious load compensation responses challenging. Using our established model of intrinsic transient tracheal occlusions (ITTO), our aim was to evaluate the motor behavior of EI muscles during normal and loaded breathing in conscious rats. We hypothesized that1) conscious rats exposed to ITTO will recruit the EI muscles with an increased electromyogram (EMG) activation and2) repeated ITTO for 10 days would potentiate the baseline EMG activity of this muscle in conscious rats. Our results demonstrate that conscious rats exposed to ITTO respond by recruiting the EI muscle with a significantly increased EMG activation. This response to occlusion remained consistent over the 10-day experimental period with little or no effect of repeated ITTO exposure on the baseline ∫EI EMG amplitude activity. The pattern of activation of the EI muscle in response to an ITTO is discussed in detail. The results from the present study demonstrate the importance of EI muscles during unloaded breathing and respiratory load compensation in conscious rats. PMID:26823339

  18. Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Do Not Correspond to Neuronal Hypometabolism on 18F-FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Muthusamy, Siva; Lee, Dianne E.; Ibrahim, Wael G.; Nair, Anand; Koziol, Deloris; Maric, Dragan; Hammoud, Dima A.

    2016-01-01

    Motor and behavioral abnormalities are common presentations among individuals with HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). We investigated whether longitudinal motor and behavioral performance in the HIV-1 transgenic rat (Tg), a commonly used neuro-HIV model, corresponded to in vivo neuronal death/dysfunction, by using rotarod and open field testing in parallel to [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We demonstrated that age-matched non-Tg wild type (WT) rats outperformed the HIV-1 Tg rats at most time points on rotarod testing. Habituation to rotarod occurred at 8 weeks of age (fifth weekly testing session) in the WT rats but it never occurred in the Tg rats, suggesting deficits in motor learning. Similarly, in open field testing, WT rats outperformed the Tg rats at most time points, suggesting defective exploratory/motor behavior and increased emotionality in the Tg rat. Despite the neurobehavioral abnormalities, there were no concomitant deficits in 18F-FDG uptake in Tg rats on PET compared to age-matched WT rats and no significant longitudinal loss of FDG uptake in either group. The negative PET findings were confirmed using 14C- Deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography in 32 week-old Tg and WT rats. We believe that the neuropathology in the HIV-1 Tg rat is more likely a consequence of neuronal dysfunction rather than overt neurodegeneration/neuronal cell death, similar to what is seen in HIV-positive patients in the post-ART era. PMID:27010205

  19. Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Do Not Correspond to Neuronal Hypometabolism on 18F-FDG-PET.

    PubMed

    Reid, William C; Casas, Rafael; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Muthusamy, Siva; Lee, Dianne E; Ibrahim, Wael G; Nair, Anand; Koziol, Deloris; Maric, Dragan; Hammoud, Dima A

    2016-01-01

    Motor and behavioral abnormalities are common presentations among individuals with HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). We investigated whether longitudinal motor and behavioral performance in the HIV-1 transgenic rat (Tg), a commonly used neuro-HIV model, corresponded to in vivo neuronal death/dysfunction, by using rotarod and open field testing in parallel to [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We demonstrated that age-matched non-Tg wild type (WT) rats outperformed the HIV-1 Tg rats at most time points on rotarod testing. Habituation to rotarod occurred at 8 weeks of age (fifth weekly testing session) in the WT rats but it never occurred in the Tg rats, suggesting deficits in motor learning. Similarly, in open field testing, WT rats outperformed the Tg rats at most time points, suggesting defective exploratory/motor behavior and increased emotionality in the Tg rat. Despite the neurobehavioral abnormalities, there were no concomitant deficits in 18F-FDG uptake in Tg rats on PET compared to age-matched WT rats and no significant longitudinal loss of FDG uptake in either group. The negative PET findings were confirmed using 14C- Deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography in 32 week-old Tg and WT rats. We believe that the neuropathology in the HIV-1 Tg rat is more likely a consequence of neuronal dysfunction rather than overt neurodegeneration/neuronal cell death, similar to what is seen in HIV-positive patients in the post-ART era. PMID:27010205

  20. Regrowth after skeletal muscle atrophy is impaired in aged rats, despite similar responses in signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    White, Jena R.; Confides, Amy L.; Moore-Reed, Stephanie; Hoch, Johanna M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regrowth after atrophy is impaired in the aged and in this study we hypothesized that this can be explained by a blunted response of signaling pathways and cellular processes during reloading after hind limb suspension in muscles from old rats. Male Brown Norway Fisher 344 rats at 6 (young) and 32 (old) months of age were subjected to normal ambulatory conditions (amb), hind limb suspension for 14 days (HS), and HS followed by reloading through normal ambulation for 14 days (RE); soleus muscles were used for analysis of intracellular signaling pathways and cellular processes. Soleus muscle regrowth was blunted in old compared to young rats which coincided with a recovery of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in young but not old. However, the response to reloading for p-Akt, p-p70s6k and p-GSK3β protein abundance was similar between muscles from young and old rats, even though main effects for age indicate an increase in activation of this protein synthesis pathway in the aged. Similarly, MAFbx mRNA levels in soleus muscle from old rats recovered to the same extent as in the young, while Murf-1 was unchanged. mRNA abundance of autophagy markers Atg5 and Atg7 showed an identical response in muscle from old compared to young rats, but beclin did not. Autophagic flux was not changed at either age at the measured time point. Apoptosis was elevated in soleus muscle from old rats particularly with HS, but recovered in HSRE and these changes were not associated with differences in caspase-3, -8 or-9 activity in any group. Protein abundance of apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruitment domain (ARC), cytosolic EndoG, as well as cytosolic and nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were lower in muscle from old rats, and there was no age-related difference in the response to atrophy or regrowth. Soleus muscles from old rats had a higher number of ED2 positive macrophages in all groups and these decreased with HS, but recovered in HSRE in the old, while no

  1. Effect of denervation or unweighting on GLUT-4 protein in rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Mondon, Carl E.; James, David E.; Holloszy, John O.

    1991-01-01

    The study is intended to test the hypothesis that the decreased capacity for glucose transport in the denervated rat soleus and the increased capacity for glucose transport in the unweighted rat soleus are related to changes in the expression of the regulatable glucose transporter protein in skeletal muscle (GLUT-4). Results obtained indicate that altered GLUT-4 expression may be a major contributor to the changes in insulin-stimulated glucose transport that are observed with denervation and unweighting. It is concluded that muscle activity is an important factor in the regulation of the GLUT-4 expression in skeletal muscle.

  2. Mechanism of glycogen supercompensation in rat skeletal muscle cultures.

    PubMed

    Mamedova, Liaman K; Shneyvays, Vladimir; Katz, Abram; Shainberg, Asher

    2003-08-01

    A model to study glycogen supercompensation (the significant increase in glycogen content above basal level) in primary rat skeletal muscle culture was established. Glycogen was completely depleted in differentiated myotubes by 2 h of electrical stimulation or exposure to hypoxia during incubation in medium devoid of glucose. Thereafter, cells were incubated in medium containing glucose, and glycogen supercompensation was clearly observed in treated myotubes after 72 h. Peak glycogen levels were obtained after 120 h, averaging 2.5 and 4 fold above control values in the stimulated- and hypoxia-treated cells, respectively. Glycogen synthase activity increased and phosphorylase activity decreased continuously during 120 h of recovery in the treated cells. Rates of 2-deoxyglucose uptake were significantly elevated in the treated cells at 96 and 120 h, averaging 1.4-2 fold above control values. Glycogenin content increased slightly in the treated cells after 48 h (1.2 fold vs. control) and then increased considerably, achieving peak values after 120 h (2 fold vs. control). The results demonstrate two phases of glycogen supercompensation: the first phase depends primarily on activation of glycogen synthase and inactivation of phosphorylase; the second phase includes increases in glucose uptake and glycogenin level. PMID:12962138

  3. Hyperglycemia-Induced Abnormalities in Rat and Human Corneas: The Potential of Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Gaël; Kowalczuk, Laura; Savoldelli, Michèle; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Plamann, Karsten; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-01-01

    Background Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy recently appeared as an efficient optical imaging technique to probe unstained collagen-rich tissues like cornea. Moreover, corneal remodeling occurs in many diseases and precise characterization requires overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques. In this work, we focus on diabetes, which affects hundreds of million people worldwide and most often leads to diabetic retinopathy, with no early diagnostic tool. This study then aims to establish the potential of SHG microscopy for in situ detection and characterization of hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in the Descemet’s membrane, in the posterior cornea. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied corneas from age-matched control and Goto-Kakizaki rats, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes, and corneas from human donors with type 2 diabetes and without any diabetes. SHG imaging was compared to confocal microscopy, to histology characterization using conventional staining and transmitted light microscopy and to transmission electron microscopy. SHG imaging revealed collagen deposits in the Descemet’s membrane of unstained corneas in a unique way compared to these gold standard techniques in ophthalmology. It provided background-free images of the three-dimensional interwoven distribution of the collagen deposits, with improved contrast compared to confocal microscopy. It also provided structural capability in intact corneas because of its high specificity to fibrillar collagen, with substantially larger field of view than transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, in vivo SHG imaging was demonstrated in Goto-Kakizaki rats. Conclusions/Significance Our study shows unambiguously the high potential of SHG microscopy for three-dimensional characterization of structural abnormalities in unstained corneas. Furthermore, our demonstration of in vivo SHG imaging opens the way to long-term dynamical studies. This method should be easily generalized to

  4. Endocrine and neurobehavioral abnormalities induced by propofol administered to neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sijie; Xu, Changqing; Zhu, Wanting; Willis, Jesse; Seubert, Christoph N.; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Sumners, Colin; Martynyuk, Anatoly E.

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied whether neonatal propofol anesthesia affects development of the endocrine and neural systems. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized using intraperitoneal propofol for 5 h on postnatal days (P) 4, 5, or 6. Pups that received either saline or intralipid, but not those in the negative control groups, were also maternally separated for 5 h. Serum levels of corticosterone were measured immediately after anesthesia and in adulthood after prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle testing (≥P80), followed by measurement of hippocampal neuronal activity. Results Propofol acutely increased corticosterone levels to 146.6 ± 23.5 ng/ml (n=6) vs 16.4 ± 3.5 ng/ml (n=6) and 18.4 ± 3.2 ng/ml (n=6) in saline- and intralipd-treated pups, respectively. In adulthood, the propofol group exhibited exacerbated endocrine responses to stress in a form of increased corticosterone levels (1171.58 ± 149.17 ng/ml (n=15) vs 370.02 ± 36.01 ng/ml (n=10) in the saline group). The propofol group had increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in CA1 neurons of male and female rats, but reduced PPI of startle was detected only in males. The Na+–K+–2Cl− co-transporter inhibitor bumetanide, administered to pups prior to propofol, alleviated long-term endocrine and PPI abnormalities. Exogenous corticosterone, administered to naïve pups, induced synaptic and endocrine, but not PPI effects, similar to those of propofol. Conclusions Propofol-caused acute increases in corticosterone levels and gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-mediated excitation at the time of anesthesia may play mechanistic roles in development of exacerbated endocrine responses to stress and neurobehavioral abnormalities. PMID:24992523

  5. TNF-α Suppresses α-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression in Human Dermal Fibroblasts: An Implication for Abnormal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Mytien T.; Han, Yuan-Ping; Yan, Chunli; Shaw, Michael C.; Garner, Warren L.

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal wound healing encompasses a wide spectrum, from chronic wounds to hypertrophic scars. Both conditions are associated with an abnormal cytokine profile in the wound bed. In this study, we sought to understand the dynamic relationships between myofibroblast differentiation and mechanical performance of the collagen matrix under tissue growth factor–β (TGF-β) and tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α) stimulation. We found TGF-β increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and TNF-α alone decreased the basal α-SMA expression. When TGF-β1 and TNF-α were both added, the α-SMA expression was suppressed below the baseline. Real-time PCR showed that TNF-α suppresses TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast (fibroproliferative) phenotypic genes, for example, α-SMA, collagen type 1A, and fibronectin at the mRNA level. TNF-α suppresses TGF-β1-induced gene expression by affecting its mRNA stability. Our results further showed that TNF-α inhibits TGF-β1-induced Smad-3 phosphorylation via Jun N-terminal kinase signaling. Mechanical testing showed that TNF-α decreases the stiffness and contraction of the lattices after 5 days in culture. We proposed that changes in α-SMA, collagen, and fibronectin expression result in decreased contraction and stiffness of collagen matrices. Therefore, the balance of cytokines in a wound defines the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix and optimal wound healing. PMID:17554369

  6. The distribution and time-dependent expression of MAGL during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Tian, Zhi-Ling; Wang, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Rui; Li, Shan-shan; Liu, Min; Wang, Meng; Guan, Da-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is widely distributed in mammals and largely responsible for metabolizing 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Little is known about its expression in skeletal muscles after trauma. A preliminary study on time-dependent expression and distribution of MAGL was performed by immunohistochemical staining, Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats. An animal model of skeletal muscle contusion was established in 40 Sprague-Dawley male rats. Samples were taken at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 and 21 days after contusion, respectively (5 rats in each posttraumatic interval). 5 rats were employed as control. Weak immunoreactivity of MAGL was observed in the sarcoplasm of myofibers in control rats. Intensive immunoreactivities of MAGL were observed in polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs), round-shaped mononuclear cells (MNCs), spindle-shaped fibroblastic cells (FBCs) and regenerated multinucleated myotubes in the injured tissue. Subsequently, neutrophils, macrophages and myofibroblasts were identified as MAGL-positive cells by double immunofluorescent procedure. MAGL expression was remarkably up-regulated after contusion by qPCR and Western blot analysis. The results demonstrate that the expression of MAGL is distributed in certain cell types and time-dependently expressed in skeletal muscles after trauma, suggesting that MAGL may be involved in inflammatory response, fibrogenesis and muscle regeneration during skeletal muscle wound healing. PMID:25921063

  7. Statin-induced myopathy in the rat: relationship between systemic exposure, muscle exposure and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, J; Wang, Y; Marsden, A M; Orton, T C; Westwood, F R; Azuma, C T; Scott, R C

    2009-01-01

    Rare instances of myopathy are associated with all statins, but cerivastatin was withdrawn from clinical use due to a greater incidence of myopathy. The mechanism of statin-induced myopathy with respect to tissue disposition was investigated by measuring the systemic, hepatic, and skeletal muscle exposure of cerivastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin in rats before and after muscle damage. The development of myopathy was not associated with the accumulation of statins in skeletal muscle. For each statin exposure was equivalent in muscles irrespective of their fibre-type sensitivity to myopathy. The low amount of each statin in skeletal muscle relative to the liver does not support a significant role for transporters in the disposition of statins in skeletal muscle. Finally, the concentration of cerivastatin necessary to cause necrosis in skeletal muscle was considerably lower than rosuvastatin or simvastatin, supporting the concept cerivastatin is intrinsically more myotoxic than other statins. PMID:19219751

  8. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  9. Calcium homeostasis is altered in skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats: cytofluorimetric and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Cannone, Maria; Pierno, Sabata; De Bellis, Michela; Conte, Elena; Fraysse, Bodvael; Tricarico, Domenico; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2014-10-01

    Hypertension is often associated with skeletal muscle pathological conditions related to function and metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the development of these pathological conditions remain undefined. Because calcium homeostasis is a biomarker of muscle function, we assessed whether it is altered in hypertensive muscles. We measured resting intracellular calcium and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) by cytofluorimetric technique and determined the expression of SOCE gene machinery by real-time PCR. Hypertension caused a phenotype-dependent dysregulation of calcium homeostasis; the resting intracellular calcium of extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of SHRs were differently altered with respect to the related muscle of normotensive animals. In addition, soleus muscles of SHR showed reduced activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and decreased sarcolemmal calcium permeability at rest and after SOCE activation. Accordingly, we found an alteration of the expression levels of some SOCE components, such as stromal interaction molecule 1, calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1. The hypertension-induced alterations of calcium homeostasis in the soleus muscle of SHRs occurred with changes of some functional outcomes as excitability and resting chloride conductance. We provide suitable targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at counterbalancing muscle performance decline in hypertension, and propose the reported calcium-dependent parameters as indexes to predict how the antihypertensive drugs could influence muscle function. PMID:25084345

  10. beta-adrenergic effects on carbohydrate metabolism in the unweighted rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of unweighting on the response of the soleus-muscle carbohydrate metabolism to a beta-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol) was investigated in rats that were subjected to three days of tail-cast suspension. It was found that isoproterenol promoted glycogen degradation in soleus from suspended rats to a higher degree than in weighted soleus from control rats, and had no effect in unweighted digitorum longus. However, isoproterenol did not have a greater inhibitory effect on the net uptake of tritium-labeled 2-deoxy-glucose by the unweighted soleus and that isoproterenol inhibited hexose phosphorylation less in the unweighted than in the control muscle.

  11. [Contractile properties of skeletal muscles of rats after flight on "Kosmos-1887"].

    PubMed

    Oganov, V S; Skuratova, S A; Murashko, L M

    1991-01-01

    Contractile properties of skeletal muscles of rats were investigated using glycerinated muscle preparations that were obtained from Cosmos-1887 animals flown for 13 days (plus 2 days on the ground) and from rats that remained hypokinetic for 13 days on the ground. In the flow rats, the absolute mass of postural muscles remained unchanged while their relative mass increased; this may be attributed to their enhanced hydration which developed during the first 2 days after landing. Strength losses of the postural muscles were less significant than after previous flights. Comparison of the Cosmos-1887 and hypokinesia control data has shown that even 2-day exposure to 1 G after 13-day flight can modify drastically flight-induced changes. PMID:1870316

  12. Morphometric analysis of rat muscle fibers following space flight and hypogravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, L. A.; Castleman, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hypogravity on striate muscles, containing both fast twitch glycolytic and slow twitch oxidative fibers, was studied in rats aboard two Cosmos biosatellites. Results of a computer-assisted image analysis of extensor digitorum muscles from five rats, exposed to 18.5 days of hypogravity and processed for the alkaline ATPase reaction, showed a reduction of the mean fiber diameter (41.32 + or - 0.55 microns), compared to synchronous (46.32 + or - 0.55 microns) and vivarium (49 + or - 0.5 microns) controls. A further experiment studied the ratio of fast to slow twitch fibers in 25 rats exposed to 18.5 days of hypogravity and analyzed at four different periods of recovery following the space flight. Using the previous techniques, the gastrocnemius muscle showed a reduction of the total muscle fiber area in square microns and a reduction in the percentage of slow fibers of flight animals compared to the control animals.

  13. Lithium Visibility in Rat Brain and Muscle in Vivoby 7Li NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoroski, Richard A.; Pearce, John M.; Newton, Joseph E. O.

    1998-07-01

    The apparent concentration of lithium (Li)in vivowas determined for several regions in the brain and muscle of rats by7Li NMR imaging at 4.7 T with inclusion of an external standard of known concentration and visibility. The average apparent concentrations were 10.1 mM for muscle, and 4.2-5.3 mM for various brain regions under the dosing conditions used. The results were compared to concentrations determinedin vitroby high-resolution7Li NMR spectroscopy of extracts of brain and muscle tissue from the same rats. The comparison provided estimates of the7Li NMR visibility of the Li cation in each tissue region. Although there was considerable scatter of the calculated visibilities among the five rats studied, the results suggested essentially full visibility (96%) for Li in muscle, and somewhat reduced visibility (74-93%) in the various brain regions.

  14. Effect of exercise on glutamine synthesis and transport in skeletal muscle from rats.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Ronaldo V T; Caperuto, Erico C; de Mello, Marco T; Batista, Miguel L; Rosa, Luis F B P C

    2009-08-01

    1. Reductions in plasma glutamine are observed after prolonged exercise. Three hypotheses can explain such a decrease: (i) high demand by the liver and kidney; (ii) impaired release from muscles; and (iii) decreased synthesis in skeletal muscle. The present study investigated the effects of exercise on glutamine synthesis and transport in rat skeletal muscle. 2. Rats were divided into three groups: (i) sedentary (SED; n = 12); (ii) rats killed 1 h after the last exercise bout (EX-1; n = 15); and (iii) rats killed 24 h after the last exercise bout (EX-24; n = 15). Rats in the trained groups swam 1 h/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks with a load equivalent to 5.5% of their bodyweight. 3. Plasma glutamine and insulin were lower and corticosterone was higher in EX-1 compared with SED rats (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Twenty-four hours after exercise (EX-24), plasma glutamine was restored to levels seen in SED rats, whereas insulin levels were higher (P < 0.001) and corticosterone levels were lower (P < 0.01) than in EX-1. In the soleus, ammonia levels were lower in EX-1 than in SED rats (P < 0.001). After 24 h, glutamine, glutamate and ammonia levels were lower in EX-24 than in SED and EX-1 rats (P < 0.001). Soleus glutamine synthetase (GS) activity was increased in EX-1 and was decreased in EX-24 compared with SED rats (both P < 0.001). 4. The decrease in plasma glutamine concentration in EX-1 is not mediated by GS or glutamine transport in skeletal muscle. However, 24 h after exercise, lower GS may contribute to the decrease in glutamine concentration in muscle. PMID:19207717

  15. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  16. Soya protein attenuates abnormalities of the renin-angiotensin system in adipose tissue from obese rats.

    PubMed

    Frigolet, María E; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R

    2012-01-01

    Several metabolic disturbances during obesity are associated with adipose tissue-altered functions. Adipocytes contain the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates signalling pathways that control angiogenesis via Akt in an autocrine fashion. Soya protein (Soy) consumption modifies the gene expression pattern in adipose tissue, resulting in an improved adipocyte function. Therefore, the aim of the present work is to study whether dietary Soy regulates the expression of RAS and angiogenesis-related genes and its association with the phosphorylated state of Akt in the adipose tissue of obese rats. Animals were fed a 30 % Soy or casein (Cas) diet containing 5 or 25 % fat for 160 d. mRNA abundance was studied in the adipose tissue, and Akt phosphorylation and hormone release were measured in the primary adipocyte culture. The present results show that Soy treatment in comparison with Cas consumption induces lower angiotensin release and increased insulin-stimulated Akt activation in adipocytes. Furthermore, Soy consumption varies the expression of RAS and angiogenesis-related genes, which maintain cell size and vascularity in the adipose tissue of rats fed a high-fat diet. Thus, adipocyte hypertrophy and impaired angiogenesis, which are frequently observed in dysfunctional adipose tissue, were avoided by consuming dietary Soy. Taken together, these findings suggest that Soy can be used as a dietary strategy to preserve adipocyte functionality and to prevent obesity abnormalities. PMID:21736766

  17. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  18. Short-term treatment with VEGF receptor inhibitors induces retinopathy of prematurity-like abnormal vascular growth in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ayuki; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Mori, Asami; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio

    2016-02-01

    Retinal arterial tortuosity and venous dilation are hallmarks of plus disease, which is a severe form of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). In this study, we examined whether short-term interruption of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signals leads to the formation of severe ROP-like abnormal retinal blood vessels. Neonatal rats were treated subcutaneously with the VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, KRN633 (1, 5, or 10 mg/kg) or axitinib (10 mg/kg), on postnatal day (P) 7 and P8. The retinal vasculatures were examined on P9, P14, or P21 in retinal whole-mounts stained with an endothelial cell marker. Prevention of vascular growth and regression of some preformed capillaries were observed on P9 in retinas of rats treated with KRN633. However, on P14 and P21, density of capillaries, tortuosity index of arterioles, and diameter of veins significantly increased in KRN633-treated rats, compared to vehicle (0.5% methylcellulose)-treated animals. Similar observations were made with axitinib-treated rats. Expressions of VEGF and VEGFR-2 were enhanced on P14 in KRN633-treated rat retinas. The second round of KRN633 treatment on P11 and P12 completely blocked abnormal retinal vascular growth on P14, but thereafter induced ROP-like abnormal retinal blood vessels by P21. These results suggest that an interruption of normal retinal vascular development in neonatal rats as a result of short-term VEGFR inhibition causes severe ROP-like abnormal retinal vascular growth in a VEGF-dependent manner. Rats treated postnatally with VEGFR inhibitors could serve as an animal model for studying the mechanisms underlying the development of plus disease. PMID:26500193

  19. Engineered Skeletal Muscle Units for Repair of Volumetric Muscle Loss in the Tibialis Anterior Muscle of a Rat

    PubMed Central

    VanDusen, Keith W.; Syverud, Brian C.; Williams, Michael L.; Lee, Jonah D.

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) is the traumatic, degenerative, or surgical loss of muscle tissue, which may result in function loss and physical deformity. To date, clinical treatments for VML—the reflected muscle flap or transferred muscle graft—are limited by tissue availability and donor site morbidity. To address the need for more innovative skeletal muscle repair options, our laboratory has developed scaffoldless tissue-engineered skeletal muscle units (SMUs), multiphasic tissue constructs composed of engineered skeletal muscle with engineered bone-tendon ends, myotendinous junctions, and entheses, which in vitro can produce force both spontaneously and in response to electrical stimulation. Though phenotypically immature in vitro, we have shown that following 1 week of implantation in an ectopic site, our muscle constructs develop vascularization and innervation, an epimysium-like outer layer of connective tissue, an increase in myosin protein content, formation of myofibers, and increased force production. These findings suggest that our engineered muscle tissue survives implantation and develops the interfaces necessary to advance the phenotype toward adult muscle. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of our SMUs to restore muscle tissue to sites of acute VML. Our results indicate that our SMUs continue to mature in vivo with longer recovery times and have the potential to repair VML sites by providing additional muscle fibers to damaged muscles. We conclude from this study that our SMUs have the potential to restore lost tissue volume in cases of acute VML. PMID:24813922

  20. Morphological and molecular aspects of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy in rats at different stages of postnatal development: the role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Foresto, Camila Silva; Paula-Gomes, Sílvia; Silveira, Wilian Assis; Graça, Flávia Aparecida; Kettelhut, Isis do Carmo; Gonçalves, Dawit Albieiro Pinheiro; Mattiello-Sverzut, Ana Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Muscle loss occurs following injury and immobilization in adulthood and childhood, which impairs the rehabilitation process; however, far fewer studies have been conducted analyzing atrophic response in infants. This work investigated first the morphological and molecular mechanisms involved in immobilization-induced atrophy in soleus muscles from rats at different stages of postnatal development [i.e., weanling (WR) and adult (AR) rats] and, second, the role of autophagy in regulating muscle plasticity during immobilization. Hindlimb immobilization for 10 days reduced muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area, with more pronounced atrophy in WR, and induced slow-to-fast fiber switching. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in markers of protein synthesis and an increase in autophagy. The ubiquitin (Ub)-ligase MuRF1 and the ubiquitinated proteins were upregulated by immobilization in AR while the autolyzed form of μ-calpain was increased in WR. To further explore the role of autophagy in muscle abnormalities, AR were concomitantly immobilized and treated with colchicine, which blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Colchicine-treated immobilized muscles had exacerbated atrophy and presented degenerative features. Despite Igf1/Akt signaling was downregulated in immobilized muscles from both age groups, Foxo1 and 4 phosphorylation was increased in WR. In the same group of animals, Foxo1 acetylation and Foxo1 and 4 content was increased and decreased, respectively. Our data show that muscle disorders induced by 10-day-immobilization occur in both age-dependent and -independent manners, an understanding that may optimize treatment outcomes in infants. We also provide further evidence that the strong inhibition of autophagy may be ineffective for treating muscle atrophy. PMID:27445301

  1. Sphincter Contractility After Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Autograft into the Cryoinjured Anal Sphincters of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Haet Nim; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Jun-Seok; Lee, Hye Seung

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to determine whether the injection of muscle-derived stem cells into the anal sphincter can improve functional properties in a fecal incontinence rat model. Methods Cryoinjured rats were utilized as a fecal incontinence model. The gastrocnemius muscles of normal three-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the purification of the muscle-derived stem cells. The experimental group was divided into three subgroups: normal control; cryoinjured; and muscle-derived stem cells (3 × 106 cells) injection group of cryoinjured rats. All groups were subsequently employed in contractility experiments using muscle strips from the anal sphincter, one week after preparation. Results Contractility in the cryoinjured group was significantly lower than in the control after treatment with acetylcholine and KCl. In the muscle-derived stem cells injection group, contraction amplitude was higher than in the cryoinjured group but not significantly (20.5 ± 21.3 vs. 17.3 ± 3.4 g per gram tissue, with acetylcholine (10−4 mol/l); 31 ± 14.2 vs. 18.4 ± 7.9 g per gram tissue, with KCl (10−4 mol/l)). PKH-26-labeled transplanted cells were detected in all of the grafted sphincters. Differentiated muscle masses stained positively for alpha smooth muscle actin and myosin heavy chain at the muscle-derived stem cells injection sites. Conclusions This is the first study reporting that autologous muscle-derived stem cell grafts may be a tool for improving anal sphincter function. PMID:18536965

  2. Influence of exercise training on the oxidative capacity of rat abdominal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uribe, J. M.; Stump, C. S.; Tipton, C. M.; Fregosi, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine if endurance exercise training would increase the oxidative capacity of the abdominal expiratory muscles of the rat. Accordingly, 9 male rats were subjected to an endurance training protocol (1 h/day, 6 days/week, 9 weeks) and 9 litter-mates served as controls. Citrate synthase (CS) activity was used as an index of oxidative capacity, and was determined in the following muscles: soleus, plantaris, costal diaphragm, crural diaphragm, and in all four abdominal muscles: rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique. Compared to their non-trained litter-mates, the trained rats had higher peak whole body oxygen consumption rates (+ 16%) and CS activities in plantaris (+34%) and soleus (+36%) muscles. Thus, the training program caused substantial systemic and locomotor muscle adaptations. The CS activity of costal diaphragm was 20% greater in the trained animals, but no difference was observed in crural diaphragm. The CS activity in the abdominal muscles was less than one-half of that in locomotor and diaphragm muscles, and there were no significant changes with training except in the rectus abdominis where a 26% increase was observed. The increase in rectus abdominis CS activity may reflect its role in postural support and/or locomotion, as none of the primary expiratory pumping muscles adapted to the training protocol. The relatively low levels of CS activity in the abdominal muscles suggests that they are not recruited frequently at rest, and the lack of an increase with training indicates that these muscles do not contribute significantly to the increased ventilatory activity accompanying exercise in the rat.

  3. Differential serial sarcomere number adaptations in knee extensor muscles of rats is contraction type dependent.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Leonard, Timothy R; Herzog, Walter

    2005-10-01

    Sarcomerogenesis, or the addition of sarcomeres in series within a fiber, has a profound impact on the performance of a muscle by increasing its contractile velocity and power. Sarcomerogenesis may provide a beneficial adaptation to prevent injury when a muscle consistently works at long lengths, accounting for the repeated-bout effect. The association between eccentric exercise, sarcomerogenesis and the repeated-bout effect has been proposed to depend on damage, where regeneration allows sarcomeres to work at shorter lengths for a given muscle-tendon unit length. To gain additional insight into this phenomenon, we measured fiber dynamics directly in the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle of rats during uphill and downhill walking, and we measured serial sarcomere number in the VL and vastus intermedius (VI) after chronic training on either a decline or incline grade. We found that the knee extensor muscles of uphill walking rats undergo repeated active concentric contractions, and therefore they suffer no contraction-induced injury. Conversely, the knee extensor muscles during downhill walking undergo repeated active eccentric contractions. Serial sarcomere numbers change differently for the uphill and downhill exercise groups, and for the VL and VI muscles. Short muscle lengths for uphill concentric-biased contractions result in a loss of serial sarcomeres, and long muscle lengths for downhill eccentric-biased contractions result in a gain of serial sarcomeres. PMID:15947030

  4. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  5. Influence of exercise intensity on atrophied quadriceps muscle in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shoji; Obatake, Taishi; Hoshino, Koichi; Nakagawa, Takao

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of resistance training on atrophied skeletal muscle in rats based on evidence derived from physical therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were forced to undergo squats as resistance training for 3 weeks after atrophying the rectus femoris muscle by hindlimb suspension for 2 weeks. The intensity of resistance training was adjusted to 50% and 70% of the maximum lifted weight, i.e., 50% of the one-repetition maximum and 70% of the one-repetition maximum, respectively. [Results] Three weeks of training did not alter the one-repetition maximum, and muscle fibers were injured while measuring the one-repetition maximum and reloading. The decrease in cross-sectional area in the rectus femoris muscle induced by unloading for 2 weeks was significantly recovered after training at 70% of the one-repetition maximum. The levels of muscle RING-finger protein-1 mRNA expression were significantly lower in muscles trained at 70% of the one-repetition maximum than in untrained muscles. [Conclusion] These results suggest that high-intensity resistance training can promote atrophic muscle recovery, which provides a scientific basis for therapeutic exercise methods for treatment of atrophic muscle in physical therapy. PMID:26696716

  6. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  7. Effective therapy of transected quadriceps muscle in rat: Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Staresinic, Mario; Petrovic, Igor; Novinscak, Tomislav; Jukic, Ivana; Pevec, Damira; Suknaic, Slaven; Kokic, Neven; Batelja, Lovorka; Brcic, Luka; Boban-Blagaic, Alenka; Zoric, Zdenka; Ivanovic, Domagoj; Ajduk, Marko; Sebecic, Bozidar; Patrlj, Leonardo; Sosa, Tomislav; Buljat, Gojko; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-05-01

    We report complete transection of major muscle and the systemic peptide treatment that induces healing of quadriceps muscle promptly and then maintains the healing with functional restoration. Initially, stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419, PL-10, PLD-116, PL 14736 Pliva, Croatia; in trials for inflammatory bowel disease; wound treatment; no toxicity reported; effective alone without carrier) also superiorly accelerates the healing of transected Achilles tendon. Regularly, quadriceps muscle completely transected transversely 1.0 cm proximal to patella presents a definitive defect that cannot be compensated in rat. BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg/kg) is given intraperitoneally, once daily; the first application 30 min posttransection, the final 24 h before sacrifice. It consistently improves muscle healing throughout the whole 72-day period. Improved are: (i) biomechanic (load of failure increased); (ii) function (walking recovery and extensor postural thrust/motor function index returned toward normal healthy values); (iii) microscopy/immunochemistry [i.e., mostly muscle fibers connect muscle segments; absent gap; significant desmin positivity for ongoing regeneration of muscle; larger myofibril diameters on both sides, distal and proximal (normal healthy rat-values reached)]; (iv) macroscopic presentation (stumps connected; subsequently, atrophy markedly attenuated; finally, presentation close to normal noninjured muscle, no postsurgery leg contracture). Thus, posttransection healing-consistently improved-may suggest this peptide therapeutic application in muscle disorders. PMID:16609979

  8. Influence of exercise intensity on atrophied quadriceps muscle in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shoji; Obatake, Taishi; Hoshino, Koichi; Nakagawa, Takao

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of resistance training on atrophied skeletal muscle in rats based on evidence derived from physical therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were forced to undergo squats as resistance training for 3 weeks after atrophying the rectus femoris muscle by hindlimb suspension for 2 weeks. The intensity of resistance training was adjusted to 50% and 70% of the maximum lifted weight, i.e., 50% of the one-repetition maximum and 70% of the one-repetition maximum, respectively. [Results] Three weeks of training did not alter the one-repetition maximum, and muscle fibers were injured while measuring the one-repetition maximum and reloading. The decrease in cross-sectional area in the rectus femoris muscle induced by unloading for 2 weeks was significantly recovered after training at 70% of the one-repetition maximum. The levels of muscle RING-finger protein-1 mRNA expression were significantly lower in muscles trained at 70% of the one-repetition maximum than in untrained muscles. [Conclusion] These results suggest that high-intensity resistance training can promote atrophic muscle recovery, which provides a scientific basis for therapeutic exercise methods for treatment of atrophic muscle in physical therapy. PMID:26696716

  9. Spaceflight effects on adult rat muscle protein, nucleic acids, and amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1986-01-01

    Exposure to conditions of weightlessness has been associated with decrements in muscle mass and strength. The present studies were undertaken to determine muscle responses at the cellular level. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (360-410 g) were exposed to 7 days of weightlessness during the Spacelab-3 shuttle flight (May 1985). Animals were killed 12 h postflight, and soleus (S), gastrocnemius (G), and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were excised. Muscle protein, RNA, and DNA were extracted and quantified. Differential muscle atrophy was accompanied by a significant (P less than 0.05) reduction in total protein only in S muscles. There were no significant changes in protein concentration (mg/g) in the muscles examined. In S muscles from flight animals, sarcoplasmic protein accounted for a significantly greater proportion of total protein that in ground controls (37.5 vs. 32.5%). Tissue concentrations (nmol/g) of asparagine-aspartate, glutamine-glutamate, glycine, histidine, and lysine were significantly reduced (from 17 to 63%) in S muscles from flight animals, but only glutamine-glutamate levels were decreased in the G and EDL. Muscle DNA content (microgram) was unchanged in the tissues examined, but S muscle DNA concentration (micrograms/mg) increased 27%. RNA content (micrograms) was significantly (P less than 0.025) reduced in S (-28%) and G(-22%) muscles following spaceflight. These results identify specific alterations in rat skeletal muscle during short term (7-day) exposure to weightlessness and compare favorably with observations previously obtained from ground-based suspension simulations.

  10. Vertebral muscles of the back and tail of the albino rat (Rattus norvegicus albinus).

    PubMed

    Brink, E E; Pfaff, D W

    1980-01-01

    The dorsal and ventral vertebral muscles of the back and the tail of the albino Norway rat are described and discussed. These muscles were analyzed because they are undoubtably used during the sexual posturing, lordosis, of the female rat, as well as participating in a variety of other behaviors. The muscles are described by region (thoracic-lumbar or sacrocaudal), and the classifications of Vallois are followed where possible. Of the epaxial (dorsal) muscles, the three longitudinal systems of muscles, the transversospinalis, the longissimus, and the iliocostalis systems, can be identified in the albino rat. Muscles of the transversospinalis system are fused in the lumbar region, distinct and specialized in the thoracic region, and form the tail muscle extensor caudae medialis caudally. The iliocostalis system of the lumbar region is fused with one component of the lumbar longissimus system to form lateral longissimus. Anteriorly, iliocostalis thoracis and cervicis represent the iliocostalis system. The lumbar longissimus system is represented by the longissimus component of lateral longissimus, medial longissimus, and a short-fiber component. Longissimus dorsi is the anterior continuation of the longissimus portion of the lateral longissimus. The short-fiber component also continues into the thoracic region, where it becomes difficult to separate out from longissimus dorsi. Medial longissimus represents the excursion into the lumbar region of the long, tendinous, tailbase-tail muscle, longissimus caudae; the caudal portion of this muscle is extensor caudae lateralis. The remaining dorsal muscle described is the tail muscle, abductor caudae dorsalis. The hyposomal (ventral) muscles described are quadratus lumborum and the intertransversarii, present in the lumbar region; the muslces iliococcygeus, pubococcygeus and coccygeus which arise from the medial face of the pelvis and insert onto the proximal tail; the long, tendinous, tail muscles, flexor caudae brevis and

  11. Effects of eldecalcitol on bone and skeletal muscles in glucocorticoid-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hayato; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Kasukawa, Yuji; Sakai, Sadaoki; Shiraishi, Ayako; Segawa, Toyohito; Ohuchi, Kentaro; Fujii, Masashi; Sato, Chie; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-03-01

    Glucocorticoids cause secondary osteoporosis and myopathy, characterized by type II muscle fiber atrophy. We examined whether a new vitamin D3 analogue, eldecalcitol, could inhibit glucocorticoid-induced osteopenia or myopathy in rats, and also determined the effects of prednisolone (PSL) and/or eldecalcitol on muscle-related gene expression. Six-month-old female Wistar rats were randomized into four groups: PSL group (10 mg/kg PSL); E group (0.05 µg/kg eldecalcitol); PSL + E group; and control group. PSL, eldecalcitol, and vehicles were administered daily for 2 or 4 weeks. Right calf muscle strength, muscle fatigue, cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of left tibialis anterior muscle fibers, and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured following administration. Pax7, MyoD, and myogenin mRNA levels in gastrocnemius muscles were also determined. Muscle strength was significantly higher in the PSL + E group than in the PSL group (p < 0.05) after 4 weeks, but not after 2 weeks. No significant difference in muscle fatigue was seen between groups at 2 or 4 weeks. CSAs of type II muscle fibers were significantly larger in the E group and the PSL + E group than in the PSL group at 4 weeks (p = 0.0093, p = 0.0443, respectively). Eldecalcitol treatment for 4 weeks maintained the same BMD as the PSL + E group. After 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks, eldecalcitol treatment significantly increased Pax7 and myogenin mRNA expression in gastrocnemius muscle, and PSL also stimulated myogenin expression. Eldecalcitol appears to increase muscle volume and to protect against femur BMD loss in PSL-administered rats, and it may also stimulate myoblast differentiation into early myotubes. PMID:25944421

  12. Heat stress attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy of extensor digitorum longus in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, K; Une, S; Akiyama, J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether heat stress attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, 12-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 6 per group): control (Con), heat stress (HS), diabetes mellitus (DM), and diabetes mellitus/heat stress (DM + HS). Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Heat stress was induced in the HS and DM + HS groups by immersion of the lower half of the body in hot water at 42 °C for 30 min; it was initiated 7 days after injection of streptozotocin, and was performed once a day, five times a week for 3 weeks. The muscle fiber cross-sectional area of EDL muscles from diabetic and non-diabetic rats was determined; heat stress protein (HSP) 72 and HSP25 expression levels were also analyzed by western blotting. Diabetes-induced muscle fiber atrophy was attenuated upon heat stress treatment in diabetic rats. HSP72 and HSP25 expression was upregulated in the DM + HS group compared with the DM group. Our findings suggest that heat stress attenuates atrophy of the EDL muscle by upregulating HSP72 and HSP25 expression. PMID:26551745

  13. Altered feeding differentially regulates circadian rhythms and energy metabolism in liver and muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Reznick, Jane; Preston, Elaine; Wilks, Donna L; Beale, Susan M; Turner, Nigel; Cooney, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism follows a diurnal pattern responding to the light/dark cycle and food availability. This study investigated the impact of restricting feeding to the daylight hours and feeding a high fat diet on circadian clock (bmal1, dbp, tef and e4bp4) and metabolic (pepck, fas, ucp3, pdk4) gene expression and markers of energy metabolism in muscle and liver of rats. The results show that in chow-fed rats switched to daylight feeding, the peak diurnal expression of genes in liver was shifted by 6-12h while expression of these genes in muscle remained in a similar phase to rats feeding ad libitum. High fat feeding during the daylight hours had limited effect on clock gene expression in liver or muscle but shifted the peak expression of metabolic genes (pepck, fas) in liver by 6-12h. The differential effects of daylight feeding on gene and protein expression in muscle and liver were accompanied by an 8% reduction in whole body energy expenditure, a 20-30% increased glycogen content during the light phase in muscle of day-fed rats and increased adipose tissue deposition per gram food consumed. These data demonstrate that a mismatch of feeding and light/dark cycle disrupts tissue metabolism in muscle with significant consequences for whole body energy homeostasis. PMID:22952003

  14. Impaired Exercise Performance and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Rats with Secondary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bouitbir, Jamal; Haegler, Patrizia; Singh, François; Joerin, Lorenz; Felser, Andrea; Duthaler, Urs; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of carnitine depletion upon exercise performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function remain largely unexplored. We therefore investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP), a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal carnitine reabsorption, on physical performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated daily with water (control rats; n = 12) or with 20 mg/100 g body weight THP (n = 12) via oral gavage for 3 weeks. Following treatment, half of the animals of each group performed an exercise test until exhaustion. Results: Distance covered and exercise performance were lower in THP-treated compared to control rats. In the oxidative soleus muscle, carnitine depletion caused atrophy (–24%) and impaired function of complex II and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The free radical leak (ROS production relative to oxygen consumption) was increased and the cellular glutathione pool decreased. Moreover, mRNA expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA were decreased in THP-treated compared to control rats. In comparison, in the glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with impaired function of complex IV and increased free radical leak, whilst muscle weight and cellular glutathione pool were maintained. Markers of mitochondrial proliferation and mitochondrial DNA were unaffected. Conclusions: Carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired exercise capacity in rats treated with THP. THP-induced carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired function of the electron transport chain in oxidative and glycolytic muscle as well as with atrophy and decreased mitochondrial DNA in oxidative muscle. PMID:27559315

  15. Changes in skeletal muscle and tendon structure and function following genetic inactivation of myostatin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mendias, Christopher L; Lynch, Evan B; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Flood, Michael D; Rittman, Danielle S; Van Pelt, Douglas W; Roche, Stuart M; Davis, Carol S

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle and tendon mass. Myostatin deficiency has been well studied in mice, but limited data are available on how myostatin regulates the structure and function of muscles and tendons of larger animals. We hypothesized that, in comparison to wild-type (MSTN+/+) rats, rats in which zinc finger nucleases were used to genetically inactivate myostatin (MSTNΔ/Δ) would exhibit an increase in muscle mass and total force production, a reduction in specific force, an accumulation of type II fibres and a decrease and stiffening of connective tissue. Overall, the muscle and tendon phenotype of myostatin-deficient rats was markedly different from that of myostatin-deficient mice, which have impaired contractility and pathological changes to fibres and their extracellular matrix. Extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of MSTNΔ/Δ rats demonstrated 20–33% increases in mass, 35–45% increases in fibre number, 20–57% increases in isometric force and no differences in specific force. The insulin-like growth factor-1 pathway was activated to a greater extent in MSTNΔ/Δ muscles, but no substantial differences in atrophy-related genes were observed. Tendons of MSTNΔ/Δ rats had a 20% reduction in peak strain, with no differences in mass, peak stress or stiffness. The general morphology and gene expression patterns were similar between tendons of both genotypes. This large rodent model of myostatin deficiency did not have the negative consequences to muscle fibres and extracellular matrix observed in mouse models, and suggests that the greatest impact of myostatin in the regulation of muscle mass may not be to induce atrophy directly, but rather to block hypertrophy signalling. PMID:25640143

  16. Slow- and fast-twitch hindlimb skeletal muscle phenotypes 12 wk after ⅚ nephrectomy in Wistar rats of both sexes.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; López, Ignacio; Chamizo, Verónica E; Pineda, Carmen; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2015-10-01

    This study describes fiber-type adaptations in hindlimb muscles, the interaction of sex, and the role of hypoxia on this response in 12-wk ⅚ nephrectomized rats (Nx). Contractile, metabolic, and morphological features of muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of Nx rats, and compared with sham-operated controls. Rats of both sexes were considered in both groups. A slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation occurred in the tibialis cranialis of Nx rats, particularly in males. This adaptation was accomplished by impaired oxidative capacity and capillarity, increased glycolytic capacity, and no changes in size and nuclear density of muscle fiber types. An oxidative-to-glycolytic metabolic transformation was also found in the soleus muscle of Nx rats. However, a modest fast-to-slow fiber-type transformation, fiber hypertrophy, and nuclear proliferation were observed in soleus muscle fibers of male, but not of female, Nx rats. Serum testosterone levels decreased by 50% in male but not in female Nx rats. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein level decreased by 42% in the tibialis cranialis muscle of male Nx rats. These data demonstrate that 12 wk of Nx induces a muscle-specific adaptive response in which myofibers do not change (or enlarge minimally) in size and nuclear density, but acquire markedly different contractile and metabolic characteristics, which are accompanied by capillary rarefaction. Muscle function and sex play relevant roles in these adaptations. PMID:26246512

  17. Effects of microgravity on myogenic factor expressions during postnatal development of rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inobe, Manabu; Inobe, Ikuko; Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Takeda, Shin'Ichi

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the role of gravity in the postnatal development of skeletal muscle, we exposed neonatal rats at 7 days of age to microgravity. After 16 days of spaceflight, tibialis anterior, plantaris, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles were removed from the hindlimb musculature and examined for the expression of MyoD-family transcription factors such as MyoD, myogenin, and MRF4. For this purpose, we established a unique semiquantitative method, based on RT-PCR, using specific primers tagged with infrared fluorescence. The relative expression of MyoD in the tibialis anterior and plantaris muscles and that of myogenin in the plantaris and soleus muscles were significantly reduced (P < 0.001) in the flight animals. In contrast, MRF4 expression was not changed in any muscle. These results suggest that MyoD and myogenin, but not MRF4, are sensitive to gravity-related stimuli in some skeletal muscles during postnatal development.

  18. Slower skeletal muscle phenotypes are critical for constitutive expression of Hsp70 in overloaded rat plantaris muscle.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, David E T; Aubrey, F Kris; Zeldin, David A; Michel, Robin N; Noble, Earl G

    2006-03-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp70) is constitutively expressed in rat hindlimb muscles, reportedly in proportion to their content of type I myosin heavy chain. This distribution pattern has been suggested to result from the higher recruitment and activity of such muscles and/or a specific relationship between myosin phenotype and Hsp70 content. To differentiate between these possibilities, the fiber-specific distribution of Hsp70 was examined in male Sprague-Dawley rat plantaris under control conditions, following a fast-to-slow phenotypic shift in response to surgically induced overload (O) and in response to O when the phenotypic shift was prevented by 3,5,3'-triiodo-dl-thyronine administration. Constitutive expression of Hsp70 was restricted to type I and IIa fibers in plantaris from control rats, and this fiber-specific pattern of expression was maintained following O of up to 28 days, although Hsp70 content in the O muscle doubled. When O (for 40 days) of the plantaris was combined with 3,5,3'-triiodo-dl-thyronine administration, despite typical hypertrophy in the overloaded plantaris, prevention of the normal phenotypic transformation also blocked the increased expression of Hsp70 observed in euthyroid controls. Collectively, these data suggest that chronic changes in constitutive expression of Hsp70 with altered contractile activity appear critically dependent on fast-to-slow phenotypic remodeling. PMID:16293703

  19. Dietary Fat Influences the Expression of Contractile and Metabolic Genes in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Iwamoto, Yohei; Shirouchi, Bungo; Sato, Masao; Komiya, Yusuke; Razin, Farzaneh Rahimi; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Sato, Yusuke; Nakamura, Mako; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fat plays a major role in obesity, lipid metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases. To determine whether the intake of different types of dietary fats affect the muscle fiber types that govern the metabolic and contractile properties of the skeletal muscle, we fed male Wistar rats with a 15% fat diet derived from different fat sources. Diets composed of soybean oil (n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)-rich), fish oil (n-3 PUFA-rich), or lard (low in PUFAs) were administered to the rats for 4 weeks. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were used as biomarkers to delineate the skeletal muscle fiber types. Compared with soybean oil intake, fish oil intake showed significantly lower levels of the fast-type MyHC2B and higher levels of the intermediate-type MyHC2X composition in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle, which is a fast-type dominant muscle. Concomitantly, MyHC2X mRNA levels in fish oil-fed rats were significantly higher than those observed in the soybean oil-fed rats. The MyHC isoform composition in the lard-fed rats was an intermediate between that of the fish oil and soybean oil-fed rats. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4, and porin mRNA showed significantly upregulated levels in the EDL of fish oil-fed rats compared to those observed in soybean oil-fed and lard-fed rats, implying an activation of oxidative metabolism. In contrast, no changes in the composition of MyHC isoforms was observed in the soleus muscle, which is a slow-type dominant muscle. Fatty acid composition in the serum and the muscle was significantly influenced by the type of dietary fat consumed. In conclusion, dietary fat affects the expression of genes related to the contractile and metabolic properties in the fast-type dominant skeletal muscle, where the activation of oxidative metabolism is more pronounced after fish oil intake than that after soybean oil intake. PMID:24244634

  20. The Effects of Phrenic Nerve Degeneration by Axotomy and Crush on the Electrical Activities of Diaphragm Muscles of Rats.

    PubMed

    Alkiş, Mehmet Eşref; Kavak, Servet; Sayır, Fuat; Him, Aydin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of axotomy and crush-related degeneration on the electrical activities of diaphragm muscle strips of experimental rats. In the present study, twenty-one male Wistar-albino rats were used and divided into three groups. The animals in the first group were not crushed or axotomized and served as controls. Phrenic nerves of the rats in the second and third groups were crushed or axotomized in the diaphragm muscle. Resting membrane potential (RMP) was decreased significantly in both crush and axotomy of diaphragm muscle strips of experimental rats (p < 0.05). Depolarization time (T DEP) and half-repolarization (1/2 RT) time were significantly prolonged in crush and axotomy rats (p < 0.05). Crushing or axotomizing the phrenic nerves may produce electrical activities in the diaphragm muscle of the rat by depolarization time and half-repolarization time prolonged in crush and axotomy rats. PMID:26972299

  1. Abnormal Expression of Urea Transporter Protein in a Rat Model of Hepatorenal Syndrome Induced by Succinylated Gelatin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiping; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhao, C Yingying; Cao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a serious complication of advanced chronic liver disease. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) occurs with dysfunction of multiple organs when abdominal pressure increases. Here, we report on a novel model of ACS with ascites and a model of HRS in rats to observe the urea transporter protein (UT) expression in the 2 models. Material/Methods A liver cirrhosis model was induced by CCl4. After changes of liver histopathology were observed, rats were injected intraperitoneally with succinylated gelatin to establish a model of ACS and HRS. Then, changes in BUN, Cr, and renal histopathology were detected. Moreover, the UT in ACS and HRS were also quantified. Results The surfaces of liver in the cirrhotic group became coarse, with visible small nodules and became yellow and greasy. The normal structure of the hepatic lobules were destroyed, and hyperplasia of fibrotic tissue and pseudo-lobe was observed. The levels of BUN and Cr were significantly increased in rats suffering from ACS and HRS, respectively, compared to their control groups. In addition, the mRNA levels of UT-A2 and UT-A3 decreased in rats with HRS compared to cirrhotic rats. However, there was no significant difference between the mRNA levels of UT-A2, UT-A3, and UT-B in rats with ACS vs. normal rats. Conclusions It is feasible to model ACS in rats by injecting succinylated gelatin into the abdominal cavity. Increasing the intra-abdominal pressure by succinylated gelatin is also a novel approach for modeling HRS in cirrhotic rats. Compared with control rats, there is an abnormal mRNA expression of UT in ACS rats and HRS rats. PMID:26414230

  2. Abnormal error processing in depressive states: a translational examination in humans and rats

    PubMed Central

    Beard, C; Donahue, R J; Dillon, D G; Van't Veer, A; Webber, C; Lee, J; Barrick, E; Hsu, K J; Foti, D; Carroll, F I; Carlezon Jr, W A; Björgvinsson, T; Pizzagalli, D A

    2015-01-01

    Depression has been associated with poor performance following errors, but the clinical implications, response to treatment and neurobiological mechanisms of this post-error behavioral adjustment abnormality remain unclear. To fill this gap in knowledge, we tested depressed patients in a partial hospital setting before and after treatment (cognitive behavior therapy combined with medication) using a flanker task. To evaluate the translational relevance of this metric in rodents, we performed a secondary analysis on existing data from rats tested in the 5-choice serial reaction time task after treatment with corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a stress peptide that produces depressive-like signs in rodent models relevant to depression. In addition, to examine the effect of treatment on post-error behavior in rodents, we examined a second cohort of rodents treated with JDTic, a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist that produces antidepressant-like effects in laboratory animals. In depressed patients, baseline post-error accuracy was lower than post-correct accuracy, and, as expected, post-error accuracy improved with treatment. Moreover, baseline post-error accuracy predicted attentional control and rumination (but not depressive symptoms) after treatment. In rats, CRF significantly degraded post-error accuracy, but not post-correct accuracy, and this effect was attenuated by JDTic. Our findings demonstrate deficits in post-error accuracy in depressed patients, as well as a rodent model relevant to depression. These deficits respond to intervention in both species. Although post-error behavior predicted treatment-related changes in attentional control and rumination, a relationship to depressive symptoms remains to be demonstrated. PMID:25966364

  3. Abnormal Motor Activity and Thermoregulation in a Schizophrenia Rat Model for Translational Science

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is accompanied by altered motor activity and abnormal thermoregulation; therefore, the presence of these symptoms can enhance the face validity of a schizophrenia animal model. The goal was to characterize these parameters in freely moving condition of a new substrain of rats showing several schizophrenia-related alterations. Methods Male Wistar rats were used: the new substrain housed individually (for four weeks) and treated subchronically with ketamine, and naive animals without any manipulations. Adult animals were implanted with E-Mitter transponders intraabdominally to record body temperature and locomotor activity continuously. The circadian rhythm of these parameters and the acute effects of changes in light conditions were analyzed under undisturbed circumstances, and the effects of different interventions (handling, bed changing or intraperitoneal vehicle injection) were also determined. Results Decreased motor activity with fragmented pattern was observed in the new substrain. However, these animals had higher body temperature during the active phase, and they showed wider range of its alterations, too. The changes in light conditions and different interventions produced blunted hyperactivity and altered body temperature responses in the new substrain. Poincaré plot analysis of body temperature revealed enhanced short- and long-term variabilities during the active phase compared to the inactive phase in both groups. Furthermore, the new substrain showed increased short- and long-term variabilities with lower degree of asymmetry suggesting autonomic dysregulation. Conclusions In summary, the new substrain with schizophrenia-related phenomena showed disturbed motor activity and thermoregulation suggesting that these objectively determined parameters can be biomarkers in translational research. PMID:26629908

  4. Abnormal expression of vesicular transport proteins in pulmonary arterial hypertension in monocrotaline-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongliang; Luo, Qin; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Zhihui

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular vesicular transport is shown to be dysfunctional in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the expression of intracellular vesicular transport proteins in PAH remains unclear. To elucidate the possible role of these proteins in the development of PAH, the changes in the expressions of N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), α-soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP), synaptosome-associated membrane protein 23 (SNAP23), type 2 bone morphogenetic receptor (BMPR2), caveolin-1 (cav-1), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were examined in lung tissues of monocrotaline (MCT)-treated rats by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, caspase-3, also examined by western blot analysis, was used as an indicator of apoptosis. Our data showed that during the development of PAH, the expressions of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23 were significantly increased before pulmonary arterial pressure started to increase and then significantly decreased after PAH was established. The expressions of BMPR2 and eNOS were similar to those of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23; however, the expression of cav-1 was down-regulated after MCT treatment. Caspase-3 expression was increased after exposure to MCT. In conclusion, the expressions of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNPA23 changed greatly during the onset of PAH, which was accompanied by abnormal expressions of BMPR2, cav-1, and eNOS, as well as an increase in apoptosis. Thus, changes in NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23 expressions appear to be mechanistically associated with the development of PAH in MCT-treated rats. PMID:25630652

  5. Abnormal error processing in depressive states: a translational examination in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Beard, C; Donahue, R J; Dillon, D G; Van't Veer, A; Webber, C; Lee, J; Barrick, E; Hsu, K J; Foti, D; Carroll, F I; Carlezon, W A; Björgvinsson, T; Pizzagalli, D A

    2015-01-01

    Depression has been associated with poor performance following errors, but the clinical implications, response to treatment and neurobiological mechanisms of this post-error behavioral adjustment abnormality remain unclear. To fill this gap in knowledge, we tested depressed patients in a partial hospital setting before and after treatment (cognitive behavior therapy combined with medication) using a flanker task. To evaluate the translational relevance of this metric in rodents, we performed a secondary analysis on existing data from rats tested in the 5-choice serial reaction time task after treatment with corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a stress peptide that produces depressive-like signs in rodent models relevant to depression. In addition, to examine the effect of treatment on post-error behavior in rodents, we examined a second cohort of rodents treated with JDTic, a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist that produces antidepressant-like effects in laboratory animals. In depressed patients, baseline post-error accuracy was lower than post-correct accuracy, and, as expected, post-error accuracy improved with treatment. Moreover, baseline post-error accuracy predicted attentional control and rumination (but not depressive symptoms) after treatment. In rats, CRF significantly degraded post-error accuracy, but not post-correct accuracy, and this effect was attenuated by JDTic. Our findings demonstrate deficits in post-error accuracy in depressed patients, as well as a rodent model relevant to depression. These deficits respond to intervention in both species. Although post-error behavior predicted treatment-related changes in attentional control and rumination, a relationship to depressive symptoms remains to be demonstrated. PMID:25966364

  6. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Taro Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  7. Antihyperalgesic effect of tetrodotoxin in rat models of persistent muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, P; Levine, J D

    2015-12-17

    Persistent muscle pain is a common and disabling symptom for which available treatments have limited efficacy. Since tetrodotoxin (TTX) displays a marked antinociceptive effect in models of persistent cutaneous pain, we tested its local antinociceptive effect in rat models of muscle pain induced by inflammation, ergonomic injury and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While local injection of TTX (0.03-1 μg) into the gastrocnemius muscle did not affect the mechanical nociceptive threshold in naïve rats, exposure to the inflammogen carrageenan produced a marked muscle mechanical hyperalgesia, which was dose-dependently inhibited by TTX. This antihyperalgesic effect was still significant at 24h. TTX also displayed a robust antinociceptive effect on eccentric exercise-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in the gastrocnemius muscle, a model of ergonomic pain. Finally, TTX produced a small but significant inhibition of neuropathic muscle pain induced by systemic administration of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin. These results indicate that TTX-sensitive sodium currents in nociceptors play a central role in diverse states of skeletal muscle nociceptive sensitization, supporting the suggestion that therapeutic interventions based on TTX may prove useful in the treatment of muscle pain. PMID:26548414

  8. GLP-1(7-36)amide binding in skeletal muscle membranes from streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Vicent, D; Mérida, E; Alcántara, A I; Valverde, I

    1995-09-01

    A higher specific binding of GLP-1(7-36)amide is found in skeletal muscle plasma membranes from adult streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model) and from neonatal STZ-treated rats (non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model), as compared to that in normal controls; no apparent change in the affinity was observed, that indicating the presence in both diabetic models of an increased number of high affinity binding sites for the peptide. The maximal specific GLP-1(7-16)amide binding in the non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model was found to be significantly higher than that in the insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model. As GLP-1(7-36)amide exerts a glycogenic effect in the rat skeletal muscle, the present data suggest that the action of the peptide in the muscle glucose metabolism may be increased in states of insulin deficiency accompanied or not by insulin resistance. PMID:21153227

  9. Role of afferent input in load-dependent plasticity of rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, F.; Umemoto, S.; Higo, Y.; Kawabe, N.; Wang, X. D.; Lan, Y. B.; Ohira, Y.

    We have been studying the role of afferent input in the plasticity of skeletal muscles. The present study was performed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the deafferentation-related inhibition of the compensatory hypertrophy in rat soleus muscle. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly separated into the control, functionally overloaded (FO), and functionally overloaded + deafferentation (FO+DA) group. The tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles were transected in the FO rats. The dorsal roots of the spinal cord at the L4-5 segmental levels were additionally transected in the FO+DA rats. The sampling of the soleus was performed 2 weeks after the surgery and ambulation recovery. The single muscle fibers were isolated in low-calcium relaxing solution. Further, the myonuclei or argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were stained. Significant increase of the fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) was seen in the FO, but not in the FO+DA, rats. The myonuclear number in fiber was significantly decreased by FO. Addition of DA to FO further promoted the reduction of myonuclear number. The mean nucleus size and DNA content in single nucleus in all groups were identical. Although a single or double AgNORs were seen in ~90% of myonuclei in the control rats, their distributions were 72 and 76% in the FO and FO+DA rats, respectively (p<0.05). More myonuclei containing 3-5 AgNORs were noted in the FO and FO+DA rats. The mean number of the AgNORs per myonucleus was 1.7 in the control, 2.1 in both FO and FO+DA rats (p<0.05). It was suggested that the FO-related increase of the number of AgNORs may be responsible for the induction of compensatory hypertrophy. It was also indicated that intact afferent input plays an essential role in these phenomena.

  10. Contractile properties of rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle during reinnervation - Effects of testosterone and castration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeagle, S. P.; Mayer, R. F.; Max, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The peroneal nerve of subject rats were crushed 1 cm from the muscle in order to examine the isometric contractile properties of skeletal muscle in the recovery sequency during reinnervation of normal, castrated, and testosterone-treated rats. The particular muscle studied was the extensor digitorum longus, with functional reinnervation first observed 8-9 days after nerve crush. No evidence was found that either castration or testosterone injections altered the process of reinnervation after the nerve crush, with the conclusion being valid at the 0.05 p level. The most reliable index of reinnervation was found to be the twitch:tetanus ratio, a factor of use in future studies of the reinnervation of skeletal muscle.

  11. Immobilization induces nuclear accumulation of HDAC4 in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Toshinori; Machida, Shuichi; Kurosaka, Yuka; Kakigi, Ryo; Sugiura, Takao; Naito, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    The study described herein aimed to examine changes in HDAC4 and its downstream targets in immobilization-induced rat skeletal muscle atrophy. Eleven male Wistar rats were used, and one hindlimb was immobilized in the plantar flexion position using a plaster cast. The contralateral, non-immobilized leg served as an internal control. After 10 days, the gastrocnemius muscles were removed from both hindlimbs. Ten days of immobilization resulted in a significant reduction (-27.3 %) in gastrocnemius muscle weight. A significant decrease in AMPK phosphorylation was also observed in nuclear fractions from immobilized legs relative to the controls. HDAC4 expression was significantly increased in immobilized legs in both the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Moreover, Myogenin and MyoD mRNA levels were upregulated in immobilized legs, resulting in increased Atrogin-1 mRNA expression. Our data suggest that nuclear HDAC4 accumulation is partly related to immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. PMID:26759025

  12. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy for In vivo architectural characterization of gastrocnemius muscle from rats.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Carolina C; Resende, Celia M C; de Oliveira, Liliam F; Machado, Joao C

    2010-01-01

    This work applies the Ultrasound Biomicroscopy (UBM) technique to quantify the pennation angle (PA) and muscle thickness (MT) of rats' gastrocnemius muscle and to determine the reliability of these measurements. UBM (40MHz) images of five Wistar female rats were acquired at two ankle positions (neutral and full extension) and in two different days. A total of 320 images were processed to quantify PA and MT and a statistical analysis assessed data variability and reliability. The coefficients of variation were 9.37 and 3.97% for PA and MT, respectively, for the ankle at full extension and 15.41 and 4.99% for the ankle at neutral position. Pearson correlation between two repeated measurements in the same image were 0.93 and 0.99 for PA and MT, respectively. The results indicate that UBM is suitable for quantitative muscle architectural characterization and can be used in future muscle biomechanical studies. PMID:21096017

  13. Adaptation of rat soleus muscles to 4 wk of intermittent strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Miller, G. R.; Grimmett, J. G.; Knack, K. K.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of repeated strains on rat soleus muscles was investigated by stretching active muscles 3 times/wk for 4 wk with two different methods of stretching. The adaptation of myofibers and noncontractile tissue was followed by histochemical techniques and computer-assisted image analysis. Muscle hypertrophy was seen in the slow-stretched muscles, which increased in mass by 13% and increased in myofiber cross-sectional area by 30%. In the fast-stretched muscle, mass increased by 10% but myofiber cross-sectional area actually decreased. This decrease in mean fiber area was the result of a population of very small fibers (population A) that coexisted with slightly smaller normal-sized fibers (population B). Fibers in population A did not have the distribution expected from atrophy compared with atrophic fibers from unloaded muscles; they were much smaller. In addition, there was a 44% increase in noncontractile tissue in the fast-stretched muscles. Thus, soleus muscles subjected to repeated strains respond differently to slow and fast stretching. Slow stretching results in typical muscle hypertrophy, whereas fast stretching produces somewhat larger muscles but with a mixture of small and normal-sized myofibers accompanied by a marked proliferation of noncontractile tissue.

  14. Protective effects of lactic acid on force production in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, O B; de Paoli, F; Overgaard, K

    2001-10-01

    1. During strenuous exercise lactic acid accumulates producing a reduction in muscle pH. In addition, exercise causes a loss of muscle K(+) leading to an increased concentration of extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)). Individually, reduced pH and increased [K(+)](o) have both been suggested to contribute to muscle fatigue. 2. To study the combined effect of these changes on muscle function, isolated rat soleus muscles were incubated at a [K(+)](o) of 11 mM, which reduced tetanic force by 75 %. Subsequent addition of 20 mM lactic acid led, however, to an almost complete force recovery. A similar recovery was observed if pH was reduced by adding propionic acid or increasing the CO(2) tension. 3. The recovery of force was associated with a recovery of muscle excitability as assessed from compound action potentials. In contrast, acidification had no effect on the membrane potential or the Ca(2+) handling of the muscles. 4. It is concluded that acidification counteracts the depressing effects of elevated [K(+)](o) on muscle excitability and force. Since intense exercise is associated with increased [K(+)](o), this indicates that, in contrast to the often suggested role for acidosis as a cause of muscle fatigue, acidosis may protect against fatigue. Moreover, it suggests that elevated [K(+)](o) is of less importance for fatigue than indicated by previous studies on isolated muscles. PMID:11579166

  15. Hindlimb unloading induces a collagen isoform shift in the soleus muscle of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. A.; Lesniewski, L. A.; Muller-Delp, J. M.; Majors, A. K.; Scalise, D.; Delp, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether hindlimb unloading (HU) alters the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 0 (n = 11), 1 (n = 11), 14 (n = 13), or 28 (n = 11) days of unloading. Remodeling of the soleus and plantaris muscles was examined biochemically for collagen abundance via measurement of hydroxyproline, and the percentage of cross-sectional area of collagen was determined histologically with picrosirius red staining. Total hydroxyproline content in the soleus and plantaris muscles was unaltered by HU at any time point. However, the relative proportions of type I collagen in the soleus muscle decreased relative to control (Con) with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 68 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 53 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 53 +/- 7%). Correspondingly, type III collagen increased in soleus muscle with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 32 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 47 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 48 +/- 7%). The proportion of type I muscle fibers in soleus muscle was diminished with HU (Con 96 +/- 2%; 14 days HU 86 +/- 1%; 28 days HU 83 +/- 1%), and the proportion of hybrid type I/IIB fibers increased (Con 0%; 14 days HU 8 +/- 2%; 28 days HU 14 +/- 2%). HU had no effect on the proportion of type I and III collagen or muscle fiber composition in plantaris muscle. The data demonstrate that HU induces a shift in the relative proportion of collagen isoform (type I to III) in the antigravity soleus muscle, which occurs concomitantly with a slow-to-fast myofiber transformation.

  16. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  17. Activation of the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of cachectic rats bearing a hepatoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracos, V. E.; DeVivo, C.; Hoyle, D. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Rats implanted with Yoshida ascites hepatoma (YAH) show a rapid and selective loss of muscle protein due mainly to a marked increase (63-95%) in the rate of protein degradation (compared with rates in muscles of pair-fed controls). To define which proteolytic pathways contribute to this increase, epitrochlearis muscles from YAH-bearing and control rats were incubated under conditions that modify different proteolytic systems. Overall proteolysis in either group of rats was not affected by removal of Ca2+ or by blocking the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic system. Inhibition of lysosomal function with methylamine reduced proteolysis (-12%) in muscles from YAH-bearing rats, but not in muscles of pair-fed rats. When ATP production was also inhibited, the remaining accelerated proteolysis in muscles of tumor-bearing rats fell to control levels. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and a 27-kDa proteasome subunit in Western blot analysis. Levels of mRNA encoding components of proteolytic systems were quantitated using Northern hybridization analysis. Although their total RNA content decreased 20-38%, pale muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin mRNA (590-880%) and mRNA for multiple subunits of the proteasome (100-215%). Liver, kidney, heart, and brain showed no weight loss and no change in these mRNA species. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats also showed small increases (30-40%) in mRNA for cathepsins B and D, but not for calpain I or heat shock protein 70. Our findings suggest that accelerated muscle proteolysis and muscle wasting in tumor-bearing rats result primarily from activation of the ATP-dependent pathway involving ubiquitin and the proteasome.

  18. Three-O-methylglucose transport in soleus muscle of bacteremic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, M.V.; Sayeed, M.M.

    1987-07-01

    Basal and insulin-stimulated soleus muscle 3-O-(/sup 14/C)merhylglucose ((/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG) transport was studied in vitro and in vivo during bacteremia in rats. Fasted rats were injected with Escherichia coli to produce bacteremia (B), and controls (C) received saline. In vitro studies using soleus muscles were carried out 8 of 12 hr after bacterial injection, and transport was measured using the rate coefficient (lambda = min/sup /minus/1/). Although insulin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport was decreased in 12-h bacteremic rat muscles the basal (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport was rate coefficient was elevated. For in vivo studies, (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG with or without insulin was injected into rats 10-40 min prior to removing soleus muscles at 12 h postbacterial or postsaline injection. Transport was measured as the ratio of (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG/sub intracell//(/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG/sub extracell/. Basal ratios were not different and muscles from both control and bacteremic rats responded comparably to insulin with increased (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport during the initial 30 min. At 35-40 min postinsulin injection there was a further stimulation of (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport in control but not in 12-h bacteremic rat muscles. The changes in (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport observed in vitro and in vivo after 12 h of bacteremia may be due to circulating mediators and/or changes in membrane function.

  19. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  20. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs of a muscle disorder, tests such as an electromyogram , ...

  1. Lingual Muscle Activity Across Sleep–Wake States in Rats with Surgically Altered Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Rukhadze, Irma; Kalter, Julie; Stettner, Georg M.; Kubin, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients have increased upper airway muscle activity, including such lingual muscles as the genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), and hyoglossus (HG). This adaptation partially protects their upper airway against obstructions. Rodents are used to study the central neural control of sleep and breathing but they do not naturally exhibit OSA. We investigated whether, in chronically instrumented, behaving rats, disconnecting the GH and HG muscles from the hyoid (H) apparatus would result in a compensatory increase of other upper airway muscle activity (electromyogram, EMG) and/or other signs of upper airway instability. We first determined that, in intact rats, lingual (GG and intrinsic) muscles maintained stable activity levels when quantified based on 2 h-long recordings conducted on days 6 through 22 after instrumentation. We then studied five rats in which the tendons connecting the GH and HG muscles to the H apparatus were experimentally severed. When quantified across all recording days, lingual EMG during slow-wave sleep (SWS) was modestly but significantly increased in rats with surgically altered upper airway [8.6 ± 0.7% (SE) vs. 6.1 ± 0.7% of the mean during wakefulness; p = 0.012]. Respiratory modulation of lingual EMG occurred mainly during SWS and was similarly infrequent in both groups, and the incidence of sighs and central apneas also was similar. Thus, a weakened action of selected lingual muscles did not produce sleep-disordered breathing but resulted in a relatively elevated activity in other lingual muscles during SWS. These results encourage more extensive surgical manipulations with the aim to obtain a rodent model with collapsible upper airway. PMID:24803913

  2. Evaluation of the response of rat skeletal muscle to a model of weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Glasberg, M.; Manton, J.; Silver, P.; Sutko, J.

    1982-01-01

    Suspension of rats in a head-down tilt position such that their hind limbs are non-load bearing has been proposed as a model for weightlessness. Changes observed in metabolism, bone formation (Morey et al., 1979), and muscle catabolism (Mussachia et al., 1980) support the validity of the model. To further document this model, the effects of suspension on the mechanical, biochemical and histochemical characteristics of two hind limb skeletal muscles, the gastrocnemius and the soleus, are investigated.

  3. Overload-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy is not impaired in STZ-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Marco Aurélio S; Pinheiro, Carlos Hermano J; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Vitzel, Kaio F; Vasconcelos, Diogo A A; Curi, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of overload-induced hypertrophy on extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The overload-induced hypertrophy and absolute tetanic and twitch forces increases in EDL and soleus muscles were not different between diabetic and control rats. Phospho-Akt and rpS6 contents were increased in EDL muscle after 7 days of overload and returned to the pre-overload values after 30 days. In the soleus muscle, the contents of total and phospho-Akt and total rpS6 were increased in both groups after 7 days. The contents of total Akt in controls and total rpS6 and phospho-Akt in the diabetic rats remained increased after 30 days. mRNA expression after 7 days of overload in the EDL muscle of control and diabetic animals showed an increase in MGF and follistatin and a decrease in myostatin and Axin2. The expression of FAK was increased and of MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 decreased only in the control group, whereas Ankrd2 expression was enhanced only in diabetic rats. In the soleus muscle caused similar changes in both groups: increase in FAK and MGF and decrease in Wnt7a, MuRF-1, atrogin-1, and myostatin. Differences between groups were observed only in the increased expression of follistatin in diabetic animals and decreased Ankrd2 expression in the control group. So, insulin deficiency does not impair the overload-induced hypertrophic response in soleus and EDL muscles. However, different mechanisms seem to be involved in the comparable hypertrophic responses of skeletal muscle in control and diabetic animals. PMID:26197932

  4. Smooth muscle and purinergic contraction of the human, rabbit, rat, and mouse testicular capsule.

    PubMed

    Banks, Frederick C L; Knight, Gillian E; Calvert, Robert C; Turmaine, Mark; Thompson, Cecil S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Morgan, Robert J; Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2006-03-01

    The smooth-muscle cells of the testicular capsule (tunica albuginea) of man, rat, and mouse were examined by electron microscopy. They were characteristically flattened, elongated, branching cells and diffusely incorporated into the collagenous matrix and did not form a compact muscle layer. Contractile and synthetic smooth-muscle cell phenotypes were identified. Nerve varicosities in close apposition to smooth muscle were seen in human tissue. Contractions induced by adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), alpha, beta-methylene ATP, noradrenaline (NA), acetylcholine (ACh), and electrical field stimulation (EFS) of autonomic nerves were investigated. Nerve-mediated responses of the rabbit and human tunica albuginea were recorded. The EFS-induced human responses were completely abolished by prazosin. In the rabbit, EFS-induced contractile responses were reduced by pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid by 36% and by prazosin by 77%. Both antagonists together almost completely abolished all EFS-induced contractions. The human tunica albuginea was contracted by NA, ATP, and alpha, beta-methylene ATP, but not by ACh. The rabbit and rat tunica albuginea were contracted by NA, ATP, alpha, beta-methylene ATP, and ACh. The mouse tunica albuginea was contracted by ACh, ATP, and alpha, beta-methylene ATP, but relaxed to NA. Immunohistochemical studies showed that P2X1 (also known as P2RX1) and P2X2 (also known as P2RX2) receptors were expressed on the smooth muscle of the rodent testicular capsule, expression being less pronounced in man. The testicular capsule of the rat, mouse, rabbit, and man all contain contractile smooth muscle. ATP, released as a cotransmitter from sympathetic nerves, can stimulate the contraction of rabbit smooth muscle. Human, rat, and mouse testicular smooth muscle demonstrated purinergic responsiveness, probably mediated through the P2X1 and/or P2X2 receptors. PMID:16280417

  5. Alteration of gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle of rats exposed to microgravity during a spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Wayne E.; Bhasin, Shalender; Lalani, Rukhsana; Datta, Anuj; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F.

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting during spaceflights, we investigated whether intramuscular gene expression profiles are affected, by using DNA microarray methods. Male rats sent on the 17-day NASA STS-90 Neurolab spaceflight were sacrificed 24 hours after return to earth (MG group). Ground control rats were maintained for 17 days in flight-simulated cages (CS group). Spaceflight induced a 19% and 23% loss of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle mass, respectively, as compared to ground controls. Muscle RNA was analyzed by the Clontech Atlas DNA expression array in four rats, with two MG/ CS pairs for the tibialis anterior, and one pair for the gastrocnemius. Alterations in gene expression were verified for selected genes by reverse-transcription PCR. In both muscles of MG rats, mRNAs for 12 genes were up-regulated by over 2-fold, and 38 were down-regulated compared to controls. There was inhibition of genes for cell proliferation and growth factor cascades, including cell cycle genes and signal transduction proteins, such as p21 Cip1, retinoblastoma (Rb), cyclins G1/S, -E and -D3, MAP kinase 3, MAD3, and ras related protein RAB2. These data indicate that following exposure to microgravity, there is downregulation of genes involved in regulation of muscle satellite cell replication.

  6. Enhanced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in year-old rats adapted to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Dolkas, C. B.; Oyama, J.

    1981-01-01

    Rats induced into a hypermetabolic state by exposure to chronic (7 mo) centrifugation at 4.15 g exhibited increased glucose uptake at lower plasma insulin levels than weight-matched control animals following oral glucose administration. In order to determine the insulin sensitivity of specific tissues, the effect of exogenous insulin on glucose uptake by isolated perfused livers and hindlim skeletal muscle from rats adapted to chronic centrifugation for one year was compared with perfused tissue from 2.5 mo-old noncentrifuged control animals of equal body weight. Metabolic glucose clearance by skeletal muscle from hypergravic rats did not prove significantly greater than control muscle when perfused in the absence of insulin (10.6 vs 8.1 microliters/min-g-muscle), but was twice as fast (23.0 vs 9.5) at perfusate insulin levels of 35 micro-U/ml. Conversely, glucose uptake by hypergravic livers was significantly decreased (P is less than 0.001) compared with control livers (10.3 vs 27.8) at perfusate insulin levels of 40 micro-U/ml. Results suggest that skeletal muscle rather than liver is primarily responsible for the enhanced sensitivity to insulin and the increased energy expenditure observed in rats subjected to hypergravity.

  7. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  8. Effect of endurance exercise training on muscle glycogen supercompensation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, A; Han, D H; Hansen, P A; Nolte, L A; Host, H H; Hickner, R C; Holloszy, J O

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the rate and extent of glycogen supercompensation in skeletal muscle are increased by endurance exercise training. Rats were trained by using a 5-wk-long swimming program in which the duration of swimming was gradually increased to 6 h/day over 3 wk and then maintained at 6 h/day for an additional 2 wk. Glycogen repletion was measured in trained and untrained rats after a glycogen-depleting bout of exercise. The rats were given a rodent chow diet plus 5% sucrose in their drinking water and libitum during the recovery period. There were remarkable differences in both the rates of glycogen accumulation and the glycogen concentrations attained in the two groups. The concentration of glycogen in epitrochlearis muscle averaged 13.1 +/- 0.9 mg/g wet wt in the untrained group and 31.7 +/- 2.7 mg/g in the trained group (P < 0.001) 24 h after the exercise. This difference could not be explained by a training effect on glycogen synthase. The training induced approximately 50% increases in muscle GLUT-4 glucose transporter protein and in hexokinase activity in epitrochlearis muscles. We conclude that endurance exercise training results in increases in both the rate and magnitude of muscle glycogen supercompensation in rats. PMID:9049757

  9. Formoterol decreases muscle wasting as well as inflammation in the rat model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-SanMiguel, Ana Belén; Gomez-Moreira, Carolina; Nieto-Bona, María Paz; Fernández-Galaz, Carmen; Villanúa, Maria Ángeles; Martín, Ana Isabel; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis is an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis that is associated with body weight loss and muscle wasting. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists are powerful anabolic agents that trigger skeletal muscle hypertrophy and have been proposed as a promising treatment for muscle wasting in human patients. The aim of this work was to determine whether formoterol, a selective β2-adrenoreceptor agonist, is able to ameliorate muscle wasting in arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by intradermal injection of Freund's adjuvant. Control and arthritic rats were injected daily with 50 μg/kg sc formoterol or saline for 12 days. Body weight change, food intake, and arthritis index were analyzed. After euthanasia, in the gastrocnemius mRNA was analyzed by PCR, and proteins were analyzed by Western blotting. Arthritis decreased gastrocnemius weight, cross-sectional area, and myofiber size, whereas formoterol increased those variables in both arthritic and control rats. Formoterol decreased the external signs of arthritis as well as NF-κB(p65) activation, TNFα, and COX-2 levels in the gastrocnemius of arthritic and control rats. Those effects of formoterol were associated with a decreased expression of myostatin, atrogin-1, and MuRF1 and in LC3b lipidation. Arthritis increased the expression of MyoD, myogenin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 and -5 in the gastrocnemius. In control and in arthritic rats, treatment with formoterol increased Akt phosphorylation and myogenin levels, whereas it decreased IGFBP-3 expression in the gastrocnemius. These data suggest that formoterol has an anti-inflammatory effect and decreases muscle wasting in arthritic rats through increasing Akt activity and myogenin and decreasing myostatin, the p-NF-κB(p65)/TNF pathway, and IGFBP-3. PMID:27245339

  10. Oxidative stress participates in quadriceps muscle dysfunction during the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Wu, Po-Ting; Shen, Po-Chuan; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population. Quadriceps muscle weakness is one of the risk factors of osteoarthritis development. Oxidative stress has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of various muscle dysfunction; however, whether it is involved in osteoarthritis-associated quadriceps muscle weakness has never been investigated. The aim of the present study is to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in quadriceps muscle dysfunction in the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats. Rat osteoarthritis was initiated by conducting meniscectomy (MNX). Quadriceps muscle dysfunction was evaluated by assessing muscular interleukin-6, citrate synthase activity, and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression levels. Muscular oxidative stress was assessed by determining lipid peroxidation, Nrf2 expression, reactive oxygen species, and circulating antioxidants. Increased muscular interleukin-6 production as well as decreased citrate synthase activity and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression were observed at 7 and 14 days after MNX. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were significantly increased after MNX. Muscular free radical counts were increased while glutathione and glutathione peroxidase expression were decreased in MNX-treated rats. We conclude that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of muscle dysfunction in MNX-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:26722436

  11. Androgen-estrogen synergy in rat levator ani muscle Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of castration and hormone administration on the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the rat levator ani muscle were studied. Castration caused a decrease in enzyme activity and in wet weight of the levator ani muscle. Chronic administration of testosterone propionate increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle of castrated rats; the magnitude of the recovery of enzyme activity was related to the length of time of exposure to testosterone propionate after castration as well as to the length of time the animals were castrated. The longer the period of castration before exposure to testosterone propionate, the greater the effect. This result may be related to previously reported castration-mediated increases in androgen receptor binding in muscle. Dihydrotestosterone was less effective than testosterone propionate in enhancing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle from castrated rats; estradiol-17-beta alone was ineffective. Combined treatment with estradiol-17-beta and dihydrotestosterone, however, was as effective as testosterone alone. Thus, androgens and estrogens may exert synergistic effects on levator ani muscle.

  12. Synthesis of amino acids in weight bearing and non-weight bearing leg muscles of suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hypokinesia (HYP) for 6 days on the de novo synthesis of glutamine (GLN) and glutamate (GLU), and of alanine was tested in isolated leg muscles of intact, adrenalectomized (ADX) and ADX cortisol-treated rats. The net synthesis of GLN and GLU was lower in soleus muscles of HYP animals of these three groups of rats. The synthesis of alanine was lowered by HYP in ADX animals and apparently raised by HYP in ADX cortisol-treated rats. No HYP effect was seen in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of these animals. Although ADX lowered the synthesis of GLN and GLU in soleus muscles of control rats, while cortisol treatment restored this process to near normal, neither ADX nor cortisol treatment produced any effect in the HYP animals. However, effects of ADX and cortisol treatment on synthesis of GLN and GLU in EDL muscles and of alanine in both muscles seemed normal in HYP animals.

  13. Analgesic Effect of Intrathecal Gabapentin in a Rat Model of Persistent Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae-Wook; Sohn, Min Kyun; Park, Noh Kyoung; Ko, Sang Hyung; Cho, Kyoung Jin; Beom, Jaewon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the analgesic effect of intrathecal gabapentin therapy on secondary hyperalgesia in a rat model of persistent muscle pain. Methods Intrathecal catheters were implanted into rats. Mechanical secondary hyperalgesia was induced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic solution into the gastrocnemius muscle. Gabapentin was administrated intrathecally. Rats were allocated to control and experimental (gabapentin 30, 100, 300, and 1,000 µg) group. After gabapentin administration, mechanical withdrawal threshold was measured every 15 minutes and the motor function was measured 30 minutes later. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was evoked after the second acidic buffer injection. There was a significant improvement on the mechanical threshold after administration of 100, 300, and 1,000 µg gabapentin compared to pre-injection and the control group. The analgesic effect continued for 105, 135, and 210 minutes, respectively. To discern side effects, motor function was measured. Motor function was preserved in both groups after gabapentin administration, except for rats who received 1,000 µg gabapentin. Conclusion Intrathecal gabapentin administration produces dose-dependent improvements in mechanical hyperalgesia in a persistent muscle pain rat model. This implicates the central nervous system as having a strong influence on the development of persistent mechanical hyperalgesia. These results are helpful in understanding the pathophysiology of secondary hyperalgesia and in the treatment of patients with chronic muscle pain. PMID:25379498

  14. Metabolic and morphologic properties of single muscle fibers in the rat after spaceflight, Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miu, B.; Martin, T. P.; Roy, R. R.; Oganov, V.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.; Marini, J. F.; Leger, J. J.; Bodine-Fowler, S. C.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1990-01-01

    The adaptation of a slow (soleus, Sol) and a fast (medial gastrocnemius, MG) skeletal muscle to spaceflight was studied in five young male rats. The flight period was 12.5 days and the rats were killed approximately 48 h after returning to 1 g. Five other rats that were housed in cages similar to those used by the flight rats were maintained at 1 g for the same period of time to serve as ground-based controls. Fibers were classified as dark or light staining for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). On the average, the fibers in the Sol of the flight rats atrophied twice as much as those in the MG. Further, the fibers located in the deep (close to the bone and having the highest percentage of light ATPase and high oxidative fibers in the muscle cross section) region of the MG atrophied more than the fibers located in the superficial (away from the bone and having the lowest percentage of light ATPase and high oxidative fibers in the muscle cross-section) region of the muscle. Based on quantitative histochemical assays of single muscle fibers, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity per unit volume was unchanged in fibers of the Sol and MG. However, in the Sol, but not the MG, the total amount of SDH activity in a 10-microns-thick section of a fiber decreased significantly in response to spaceflight. Based on population distributions, it appears that the alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) activities were elevated in the dark ATPase fibers in the Sol, whereas the light fibers in the Sol and both fiber types in the MG did not appear to change. The ratio of GPD to SDH activities increased in the dark (but not light) fibers of the Sol and was unaffected in the MG. Immunohistochemical analyses indicate that approximately 40% of the fibers in the Sol of flight rats expressed a fast myosin heavy chain compared with 22% in control rats. Further, 31% of the fibers in the Sol of flight rats expressed both fast and slow myosin heavy chains compared with 8% in

  15. Effects of stretching and disuse on amino acids in muscles of rat hind limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of disuse and passive stretch on the concentrations of amino acids and ammonia in the unloaded soleus muscle was investigated in hindquarter-suspended (for six days by casting one foot in dorsiflexion) tail-casted rats. For a comparison with the condition of unloading, amino acids and ammonia were also measured in shortened extensor digitorum longus in the same casted limb and in denervated leg muscles. The results obtained suggest that passive stretch diminishes some of the characteristic alterations of amino acid concentrations due to unloading. This effect of stretch is considered to be due to the maintenance of muscle tension.

  16. Gene expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in rat papillary muscle. Rapid induction by mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Jarygin, C; Hänze, J; Lang, R E

    1994-06-13

    The effect of mechanical stretch on protein synthesis and the expression of the gene for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was examined in electrically paced, isolated papillary muscles from rat heart. Incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine into protein increased only in stretched but not in unloaded muscles. Five hours of stretching increased ANP mRNA levels more than threefold as compared to freshly excised papillary muscles. A drastic fall in ANP mRNA levels was observed in unloaded muscles over this time. These data indicate that papillary muscles similar to other ventricular tissue are capable of activating ANP gene expression in response to increased load. The effect occurs in vitro and does not depend on circulating or nervous factors. The unexpected rapid induction of ANP gene expression in such a particular structure of the heart raises the possibility of local actions of ventricular ANP. PMID:8013631

  17. Proteomic and bioinformatic analyses of spinal cord injury‑induced skeletal muscle atrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhi-Jian; Zhou, Xian-Hu; Fan, Bao-You; Lin, Wei; Ren, Yi-Ming; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) may result in skeletal muscle atrophy. Identifying diagnostic biomarkers and effective targets for treatment is an important challenge in clinical work. The aim of the present study is to elucidate potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SCI‑induced muscle atrophy (SIMA) using proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. The protein samples from rat soleus muscle were collected at different time points following SCI injury and separated by two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared with the sham group. The identities of these protein spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). MS demonstrated that 20 proteins associated with muscle atrophy were differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analyses indicated that SIMA changed the expression of proteins associated with cellular, developmental, immune system and metabolic processes, biological adhesion and localization. The results of the present study may be beneficial in understanding the molecular mechanisms of SIMA and elucidating potential biomarkers and targets for the treatment of muscle atrophy. PMID:27177391

  18. Quantitation and immunocytochemical localization of ubiquitin conjugates within rat red and white skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Haas, Arthur L.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    Solid-phase immunochemical methods were employed to probe the dynamics of ubiquitin pools within selected rat skeletal muscles. The total ubiquitin content of red muscles was greater than that of white muscles, even though the fractional conjugation was similar for both types of muscles. The specificity for conjugated ubiquitin in solid-phase applications, previously demonstrated for an affinity-purified antibody against SDS-denatured ubiquitin, was retained when used as a probe for ubiquitin-protein adducts in tissue sections. Immunohistochemical localization revealed that differences in ubiquitin pools derived from the relative content of red (oxidative) vs white (glycolytic) fibers, with the former exhibiting a higher content of ubiquitin conjugates. Subsequent immunogold labeling demonstrated statistically significant enhanced localization of ubiquitin conjugates to the Z-lines in both red and white muscle fiber types.

  19. Hypogravity-induced atrophy of rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ellis, S.; Slocum, G. R.; Satyanarayana, T.; Bain, J. L.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1987-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans to hypogravity causes weakening of their skeletal muscles. This problem was studied in rats exposed to hypogravity for 7 days aboard Spacelab 3. Hindlimb muscles were harvested 12-16 hours postflight for histochemical, biochemical, and ultrastructural analyses. The majority of the soleus and extensor digitorum longus fibers exhibited simple cell shrinkage. However, approximately 1% of the fibers in flight soleus muscles appeared necrotic. Flight muscle fibers showed increased glycogen, lower subsarcolemmal staining for mitochondrial enzymes, and fewer subsarcolemmal mitochondria. During atrophy, myofibrils were eroded by multiple focal losses of myofilaments; lysosomal autophagy was not evident. Tripeptidylaminopeptidase and calcium-activated protease activities of flight soleus fibers were significantly increased, implying a role in myofibril breakdown. Simple fiber atrophy appears to account for muscle weakening during spaceflight, but fiber necrosis is also a contributing factor.

  20. Effect of inactivity and passive stretch on protein turnover in phasic and postural rat muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughna, P.; Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in humans can occur during prolonged bed rest, plaster cast immobilization, and space flight. In the present study, the suspension model used by Musacchia et al. (1983) is employed to investigate changes in protein synthesis and degradation in fast-twitch phasic (extensor digitorum longus) and slow-twitch postural (soleus) muscles in the rat, following hypokinesia and hypodynamia. In addition, the use of passive stretch was examined as a means of preventing atrophy. The obtained results suggest that the mechanisms controlling the processes of protein synthesis and protein breakdown during muscle disuse atrophy may be independent of each other. It appears, however, that the muscle atrophy due to hypokinesia and hypodynamia can be temporarily prevented by passively stretching a muscle.

  1. Proteomic and bioinformatic analyses of spinal cord injury-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in rats

    PubMed Central

    WEI, ZHI-JIAN; ZHOU, XIAN-HU; FAN, BAO-YOU; LIN, WEI; REN, YI-MING; FENG, SHI-QING

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) may result in skeletal muscle atrophy. Identifying diagnostic biomarkers and effective targets for treatment is an important challenge in clinical work. The aim of the present study is to elucidate potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SCI-induced muscle atrophy (SIMA) using proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. The protein samples from rat soleus muscle were collected at different time points following SCI injury and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared with the sham group. The identities of these protein spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). MS demonstrated that 20 proteins associated with muscle atrophy were differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analyses indicated that SIMA changed the expression of proteins associated with cellular, developmental, immune system and metabolic processes, biological adhesion and localization. The results of the present study may be beneficial in understanding the molecular mechanisms of SIMA and elucidating potential biomarkers and targets for the treatment of muscle atrophy. PMID:27177391

  2. Exercise training, glucose transporters, and glucose transport in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodnick, K. J.; Henriksen, E. J.; James, D. E.; Holloszy, J. O.

    1992-01-01

    It was previously found that voluntary wheel running induces an increase in the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter, i.e., the GLUT4 isoform, in rat plantaris muscle (K. J. Rodnick, J. O. Holloszy, C. E. Mondon, and D. E. James. Diabetes 39: 1425-1429, 1990). The present study was undertaken to determine whether 1) the increase in muscle GLUT4 protein is associated with an increase in maximally stimulated glucose transport activity, 2) a conversion of type IIb to type IIa or type I muscle fibers plays a role in the increase in GLUT4 protein, and 3) an increase in the GLUT1 isoform is a component of the adaptation of muscle to endurance exercise. Five weeks of voluntary wheel running that resulted in a 33% increase in citrate synthase activity induced a 50% increase in GLUT4 protein in epitrochlearis muscles of female Sprague-Dawley rats. The rate of 2-deoxy-glucose transport maximally stimulated with insulin or insulin plus contractions was increased approximately 40% (P less than 0.05). There was no change in muscle fiber type composition, evaluated by myosin ATPase staining, in the epitrochlearis. There was also no change in GLUT1 protein concentration. We conclude that an increase in GLUT4, but not of GLUT1 protein, is a component of the adaptive response of muscle to endurance exercise and that the increase in GLUT4 protein is associated with an increased capacity for glucose transport.

  3. Daily in vivo neuromuscular stimulation effects on immobilized rat hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, P F; Lapointe, M A

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effects of a daily regimen of near-maximal contractions, produced via in vivo electrical stimulation of peripheral nerve, on functional and histochemical properties of rat hindlimb muscles immobilized for 28 days in a plaster cast. Rats had knee and ankle joints of one hindlimb immobilized; then while anesthetized, half of the group was subjected to a daily regimen of 480 semifused tetanic contractions (50 Hz) via fine-wire electrodes chronically implanted around the sciatic nerve. Immobilization caused significant decreases in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle weights, fiber cross-sectional areas, and twitch and tetanic strength measured in situ. In addition, immobilized soleus muscles had faster time to peak tension (TPT) and higher proportions of fast-twitch fibers, whereas immobilized gastrocnemius muscles demonstrated faster half-relaxation times (RT1/2) and total twitch durations (TPT plus RT1/2). The only significant effects of the imposed contractions were evident in the gastrocnemius in which stimulation prevented the shortening of RT1/2 and total twitch duration and resulted in significantly higher relative tensions at 50 Hz and higher fatigue resistance. Muscle activity of this type imposed on immobilized muscle is ineffective in attenuating atrophy but can, in fast muscle such as gastrocnemius, prevent changes in twitch characteristics resulting from immobilization, as well as augment contractile responses during semifused and fatiguing contractions. PMID:7153129

  4. A method to test contractility of the supraspinatus muscle in mouse, rat, and rabbit.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Ana P; Iyer, Shama R; Pratt, Stephen J P; Gilotra, Mohit N; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-02-01

    The rotator cuff (RTC) muscles not only generate movement but also provide important shoulder joint stability. RTC tears, particularly in the supraspinatus muscle, are a common clinical problem. Despite some biological healing after RTC repair, persistent problems include poor functional outcomes with high retear rates after surgical repair. Animal models allow further exploration of the sequela of RTC injury such as fibrosis, inflammation, and fatty infiltration, but there are few options regarding contractility for mouse, rat, and rabbit. Histological findings can provide a "direct measure" of damage, but the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is contractile force. However, information regarding normal supraspinatus size and contractile function is scarce. Animal models provide the means to compare muscle histology, imaging, and contractility within individual muscles in various models of injury and disease, but to date, most testing of animal contractile force has been limited primarily to hindlimb muscles. Here, we describe an in vivo method to assess contractility of the supraspinatus muscle and describe differences in methods and representative outcomes for mouse, rat, and rabbit. PMID:26586911

  5. Enhanced muscle glucose metabolism after exercise in the rat: the two phases.

    PubMed

    Garetto, L P; Richter, E A; Goodman, M N; Ruderman, N B

    1984-06-01

    Thirty minutes after a treadmill run, glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis in perfused rat skeletal muscle are enhanced due to an increase in insulin sensitivity (Richter et al., J. Clin. Invest. 69: 785-793, 1982). The exercise used in these studies was of moderate intensity, and muscle glycogen was substantially repleted at the time (30 min postexercise) that glucose metabolism was examined. When rats were run at twice the previous rate (36 m/min), muscle glycogen was still substantially diminished 30 min after the run. At this time the previously noted increase in insulin sensitivity was still observed in perfused muscle; however, glucose utilization was also increased in the absence of added insulin (1.5 vs. 4.2 mumol X g-1 X h-1). In contrast 2.5 h after the run, muscle glycogen had returned to near preexercise values, and only the insulin-induced increase in glucose utilization was evident. The data suggest that the restoration of muscle glycogen after exercise occurs in two phases. In phase I, muscle glycogen is depleted and insulin-stimulated glucose utilization and glucose utilization in the absence of added insulin may both be enhanced. In phase II glycogen levels have returned to near base-line values and only the increase in insulin sensitivity persists. It is proposed that phase I corresponds to the period of rapid glycogen repletion that immediately follows exercise and phase II to the period of supercompensation. PMID:6377909

  6. A robust neuromuscular system protects rat and human skeletal muscle from sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Pannérec, Alice; Ireland, Alex; Piasecki, Mathew; Karaz, Sonia; Jacot, Guillaume; Métairon, Sylviane; Danenberg, Esther; Raymond, Frédéric; Descombes, Patrick; McPhee, Jamie S.; Feige, Jerome N.

    2016-01-01

    Declining muscle mass and function is one of the main drivers of loss of independence in the elderly. Sarcopenia is associated with numerous cellular and endocrine perturbations, and it remains challenging to identify those changes that play a causal role and could serve as targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we uncovered a remarkable differential susceptibility of certain muscles to age-related decline. Aging rats specifically lose muscle mass and function in the hindlimbs, but not in the forelimbs. By performing a comprehensive comparative analysis of these muscles, we demonstrate that regional susceptibility to sarcopenia is dependent on neuromuscular junction fragmentation, loss of motoneuron innervation, and reduced excitability. Remarkably, muscle loss in elderly humans also differs in vastus lateralis and tibialis anterior muscles in direct relation to neuromuscular dysfunction. By comparing gene expression in susceptible and non-susceptible muscles, we identified a specific transcriptomic signature of neuromuscular impairment. Importantly, differential molecular profiling of the associated peripheral nerves revealed fundamental changes in cholesterol biosynthetic pathways. Altogether our results provide compelling evidence that susceptibility to sarcopenia is tightly linked to neuromuscular decline in rats and humans, and identify dysregulation of sterol metabolism in the peripheral nervous system as an early event in this process. PMID:27019136

  7. Biomarkers of drug-induced skeletal muscle injury in the rat: troponin I and myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Jeffrey D; Janovitz, Evan B; Wescott, Debra M; Chadwick, Chris; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the utility of fast-twitch skeletal muscle troponin I (fsTnI) and urinary myoglobin (uMB) as biomarkers of skeletal muscle injury in 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. fsTnI and uMB were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and compared with standard clinical assays including creatine kinase, aldolase, aspartate aminotransferase, and histopathological assessments. Detectable levels of uMB were normalized to urinary creatinine to control for differences in renal function. Seven compounds, including those with toxic effects on skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, or liver, were evaluated. fsTnI was typically nondetectable (< 5.9 ng/ml serum) in vehicle-treated female and male rats but increased in a dose-dependent manner to at least 300 ng/ml in cerivastatin-induced severe fast-twitch specific myotoxicity. Minimal myopathy induced by investigational compounds BMS-600149 and BMS-687453 increased serum fsTnI to about 30-50 ng/ml, suggesting a reasonable dynamic range for detecting mild to severe skeletal muscle toxicity. In direct contrast, fsTnI was only marginally increased relative to population control values in rats treated with triamcinolone acetonide, which produces muscle atrophy or the cardiotoxins isoproterenol and CoCl2. uMB was typically nondetectable (< 1.6 ng/ml urine) in vehicle-treated female and male rats but increased to approximately 140, 300, and 30 ng/mg creatinine in rats treated with cerivastatin, BMS-687453, and triamcinolone acetonide, respectively. Cardiotoxicity also increased uMB in rats treated with isoproterenol and CoCl2 with urine concentrations ranging from 20 to 30 ng/mg creatinine. Severe hepatotoxicity (coumarin) did not significantly affect serum fsTnI or uMB levels. Collectively, these data suggest that fsTnI is specific for skeletal muscle toxicity, whereas uMB is nonspecific, increasing with skeletal muscle and cardiac toxicity. Accordingly, the complement of fsTnI and u

  8. Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Improves Decreased Oxidative Capacity of Spinal Motoneurons Innervating the Soleus Muscle of Rats with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Ai; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Rats with type 2 diabetes exhibit decreased oxidative capacity, such as reduced oxidative enzyme activity, low-intensity staining for oxidative enzymes in fibers, and no high-oxidative type IIA fibers, in the skeletal muscle, especially in the soleus muscle. In contrast, there are no data available concerning the oxidative capacity of spinal motoneurons innervating skeletal muscle of rats with type 2 diabetes. This study examined the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle of non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. In addition, this study examined the effects of mild hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with 36 % oxygen for 10 weeks on the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle because mild hyperbaric oxygen improves the decreased oxidative capacity of the soleus muscle in non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. Spinal motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle were identified using nuclear yellow, a retrograde fluorescent neuronal tracer. Thereafter, the cell body sizes and succinate dehydrogenase activity of identified motoneurons were analyzed. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized alpha motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle was observed in rats with type 2 diabetes. The decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of these motoneurons was improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen. Therefore, we concluded that rats with type 2 diabetes have decreased oxidative capacity in motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle and this decreased oxidative capacity is improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen. PMID:27220333

  9. Comparison of soleus muscles from rats exposed to microgravity for 10 versus 14 days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staron, R. S.; Kraemer, W. J.; Hikida, R. S.; Reed, D. W.; Murray, J. D.; Campos, G. E.; Gordon, S. E.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of two different duration space-flights on the extent of atrophy, fiber type composition, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) content of rat soleus muscles were compared. Adult male Fisher rats (n=12) were aboard flight STS-57 and exposed to 10 days of microgravity and adult ovariectomized female Spraque-Dawley rats (n=12) were aboard flight STS-62 for 14 days. Soleus muscles were bilaterally removed from the flight and control animals and frozen for subsequent analyses. Muscle wet weights, fiber types (I, IC, IIC, and IIA), cross-sectional area, and MHC content were determined. Although a significant difference was found between the soleus wet weights of the two ground-based control groups, they were similar with regard to MHC content (ca 90% MHCI and ca 10% MHCIIa) and fiber type composition. Unloading of the muscles caused slow-to-fast transformations which included a decrease in the percentage of type I fibers and MHCI, an increase in fibers classified as type IC, and the expression of two fast myosin heavy chains not found in the control rat soleus muscles (MHCIId and MHCIIb). Although the amount of atrophy (ca 26%) and the extent of slow-to-fast transformation (decrease in the percentage of MHCI from 90% to 82.5%) in the soleus muscles were similar between the two spaceflights, the percentages of the fast MHCs differed. After 14 days of spaceflight, the percentage of MHCIIa was significantly lower and the percentages of MHCIId and MHCIIb were significantly higher than the corresponding MHC content of the soleus muscles from the 10-day animals. Indeed, MHCIId became the predominant fast MHC after 14 days in space. These data suggest fast-to-faster transformations continued during the longer spaceflight.

  10. Tolerance to low temperatures of domestic and sylvatic Trichinella spp. in rat muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Malakauskas, Alvydas; Kapel, Christian M O

    2003-08-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the tolerance to low temperatures of 9 Trichinella isolates in rat muscle tissue. Nine groups of 24 rats were infected with encapsulated Trichinella spiralis, Trichinella nativa, Trichinella britovi, Trichinella murrelli, Trichinella T6, Trichinella nelsoni, and 3 nonencapsulated Trichinella pseudospiralis strains. Six rats from each of the groups were necropsied at 5, 10, 20, and 40 wk postinfection (wpi). Muscle tissues containing Trichinella larvae were exposed to temperatures of -18, -5, and 5 C for 1 or 4 wk, and afterward the reproductive capacity index (RCI) in mice was determined for the 9 individual Trichinella isolates. Only T. nativa muscle larvae were infective after freezing at a temperature of -18 C. At 5 wpi all encapsulated isolates, except for the tropical species T. nelsoni, remained infective after exposure to a temperature of -5 C for both 1 and 4 wk, whereas nonencapsulated T. pseudospiralis survived only 1 wk of exposure. All Trichinella spp. remained infective after exposure to a temperature of 5 C. Muscle larvae for all investigated species remained infective as long as they persisted in live rats during the experiment. Analysis of variance showed a significant effect of age on the temperature tolerance of encapsulated T. spiralis and nonencapsulated T. pseudospiralis. In addition, significant interaction between age of muscle larvae and length of exposure was found. In general Trichinella muscle larvae of medium age (10 and 20 wpi) tolerated freezing better than early and late stages of infection (5 and 40 wpi). This is the first study to demonstrate such a relationship between age of infection and temperature tolerance of Trichinella spp. muscle larvae. PMID:14533685