Science.gov

Sample records for rate nanosecond laser

  1. All-fiberized SBS-based high repetition rate sub-nanosecond Yb fiber laser for supercontinuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Dacheng; Su, Jianjia; Cui, Wei; Yan, Yaxi; Jiang, Peipei

    2014-12-01

    We report an all-fiberized SBS-based high repetition rate sub-nanosecond Yb fiber laser for supercontinuum generation. The high repetition rate ns laser pulses were produced from a fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-constructed fiber laser cavity consisting of a piece of double cladding Yb fiber as the gain medium and a short piece of Bi/Cr-doped fiber as a saturable absorber (SA). By optimizing the fiber length of the Bi/Cr-doped fiber and the reflectivity of the FBG, the Q-switching state of the fiber laser can be adjusted so that the energy storing condition within the fiber cavity can assure the start of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and as a result, compress the laser pulse duration. The fiber laser had an average laser power output of 1.2 W at 1064 nm with pulse repetition rate of about 80 kHz, almost four times the reported results. The pulse duration was about 1 ns with peak power of about 15 kW. After one stage of amplification, the laser power was raised to about 3 W and was used to pump a 20 m long photonic crystal fiber (PCF). Supercontiuum (SC) laser output was obtained with average power up to 1.24 W and spectrum spanning from 550 to 2200 nm.

  2. Application of a nanosecond laser pulse to evaluate dynamic hardness under ultra-high strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziejewska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents results of experimental tests of plastic metals deformation generated by a shock wave induced by laser pulse. Tests were carried out on the Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and the laser pulse of 10 ns duration. The shock wave generate by the laser pulse was used to induced local plastic deformation of the material surface. The study examined the possibility of application the process to develop a new method of measuring the dynamic hardness of materials under ultra-high strain rate. It has been shown that the shock wave induced by the laser pulse with an energy of 0.35-1.22 J causes a repeatable plastic deformation of surface of commercially available metals and alloys without thermal effects on the surfaces. Based on the knowledge of an imprint geometry, it is possible to evaluate the dynamic hardness of materials at strain rate in the range of 107 s-1.

  3. Nanosecond component in a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Semak, V. V.; Zhang Zhili

    2012-11-15

    Experimental and computational results show that the coherent microwave scattering from a laser-induced plasma can be used for measuring the quality of a fs laser pulse. The temporal dynamics of the microwave scattered signal from the fs-laser induced plasma can be related to the effect of nanosecond tail of the fs laser pulse.

  4. In vivo near-realtime volumetric optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a high-repetition-rate nanosecond fiber-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Hajireza, Parsin; Shao, Peng; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is capable of achieving optical-absorption-contrast images with micron-scale spatial resolution. Previous OR-PAM systems have been frame-rate limited by mechanical scanning speeds and laser pulse repetition rate (PRR). We demonstrate OR-PAM imaging using a diode-pumped nanosecond-pulsed Ytterbium-doped 532-nm fiber laser with PRR up to 600 kHz. Combined with fast-scanning mirrors, our proposed system provides C-scan and 3D images with acquisition frame rate of 4 frames per second (fps) or higher, two orders of magnitude faster than previously published systems. High-contrast images of capillary-scale microvasculature in a live Swiss Webster mouse ear with ~6-μm optical lateral spatial resolution are demonstrated.

  5. Nanosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser

    SciTech Connect

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Vadimova, O L; Palashov, O V

    2014-05-30

    A cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser is modernised to increase its average and peak power. The master oscillator unit of the laser is considerably modified so that the pulse duration decreases to several nanoseconds with the same pulse energy. A cryogenic disk laser head with a flow-through cooling system is developed. Based on two such laser heads, a new main amplifier is assembled according to an active multipass cell scheme. The total small-signal gain of cryogenic cascades is ∼10{sup 8}. (lasers)

  6. Nanosecond laser ablation for pulsed laser deposition of yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sucharita

    2013-09-01

    A thermal model to describe high-power nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of yttria (Y2O3) has been developed. This model simulates ablation of material occurring primarily through vaporization and also accounts for attenuation of the incident laser beam in the evolving vapor plume. Theoretical estimates of process features such as time evolution of target temperature distribution, melt depth and ablation rate and their dependence on laser parameters particularly for laser fluences in the range of 6 to 30 J/cm2 are investigated. Calculated maximum surface temperatures when compared with the estimated critical temperature for yttria indicate absence of explosive boiling at typical laser fluxes of 10 to 30 J/cm2. Material ejection in large fragments associated with explosive boiling of the target needs to be avoided when depositing thin films via the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique as it leads to coatings with high residual porosity and poor compaction restricting the protective quality of such corrosion-resistant yttria coatings. Our model calculations facilitate proper selection of laser parameters to be employed for deposition of PLD yttria corrosion-resistive coatings. Such coatings have been found to be highly effective in handling and containment of liquid uranium.

  7. Nanosecond pulsed laser blackening of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guang; Hourd, Andrew C.; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-12-01

    Nanosecond (12 ns) pulsed laser processing of copper at 532 nm resulted in the formation of homogenously distributed, highly organized microstructures. This led to the fabrication of large area black copper substrates with absorbance of over 97% in the spectral range from 250 nm to 750 nm, and a broadband absorbance of over 80% between 750 nm and 2500 nm. Optical and chemical analyses of the fabricated black metal are presented and discussed. The employed laser is an industrially adaptable source and the presented technique for fabrication of black copper could find applications in broadband thermal radiation sources, solar energy absorbers, irradiative heat transfer devices, and thermophotovoltaics.

  8. Texturing of polypropylene (PP) with nanosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Soto, R.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Quintero, F.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a biocompatible and biostable polymer, showing good mechanical properties that has been recently introduced in the biomedical field for bone repairing applications; however, its poor surface properties due to its low surface energy limit their use in biomedical applications. In this work, we have studied the topographical modification of polypropylene (PP) laser textured with Nd:YVO4 nanosecond lasers emitting at λ = 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm. First, optical response of this material under these laser wavelengths was determined. The application of an absorbing coating was also studied. The influence of the laser processing parameters on the surface modification of PP was investigated by means of statistically designed experiments. Processing maps to tailor the roughness, and wettability, the main parameters affecting cell adhesion characteristics of implants, were also determined. Microhardness measurements were performed to discern the impact of laser treatment on the final mechanical properties of PP.

  9. Hybrid micromachining using a nanosecond pulsed laser and micro EDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanha; Kim, Bo Hyun; Chung, Do Kwan; Shin, Hong Shik; Chu, Chong Nam

    2010-01-01

    Micro electrical discharge machining (micro EDM) is a well-known precise machining process that achieves micro structures of excellent quality for any conductive material. However, the slow machining speed and high tool wear are main drawbacks of this process. Though the use of deionized water instead of kerosene as a dielectric fluid can reduce the tool wear and increase the machine speed, the material removal rate (MRR) is still low. In contrast, laser ablation using a nanosecond pulsed laser is a fast and non-wear machining process but achieves micro figures of rather low quality. Therefore, the integration of these two processes can overcome the respective disadvantages. This paper reports a hybrid process of a nanosecond pulsed laser and micro EDM for micromachining. A novel hybrid micromachining system that combines the two discrete machining processes is introduced. Then, the feasibility and characteristics of the hybrid machining process are investigated compared to conventional EDM and laser ablation. It is verified experimentally that the machining time can be effectively reduced in both EDM drilling and milling by rapid laser pre-machining prior to micro EDM. Finally, some examples of complicated 3D micro structures fabricated by the hybrid process are shown.

  10. High repetition nanosecond Ti:sapphire laser for photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Timothy K.; Kim, Min Ju; Choi, Seul Ki; Bae, Sung Chul

    2015-03-01

    High resolution optical imaging technologies, such as optical coherence tomography or multiphoton microscopy has given us an opportunity to do in vivo imaging noninvasively. However, due to the high laser scattering, these optical imaging techniques were prohibited from obtaining high resolution in the diffusive regime. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can overcome this soft depth limit and maintain high resolution at the same time. In the past, PAM was limited to using an Nd:YAG laser, which requires an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to obtain wavelengths selectively other than the second harmonic. However, OPO is unstable and cumbersome to control. We replaced the Nd:YAG laser and the OPO with a nanosecond pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser to give PAM more flexibility in the speed and the input wavelength while reducing the footprint of our system. This also increased our stability by removing OPO. Using a Ti:Sapphire laser allowed us to increase the pulse repetition rate to 100-500 kHz. Normally, micro-lasers with this pulse repetition rate will suffer from a significant decrease in pulse energy, but we were able to maintain stable pulses with a few hundreds nJ. Also, a well-known advantage of a Ti:Sapphire laser is its tunability from 650 to 1100 nm. For our PAM application, we used a range from 700 to 900 nm to obtain significant functional images. This added flexibility can help acquire functional images such as the angiogenesis process with better contrast. Here, we present a nanosecond Ti:Sapphire laser designated for PAM applications with increased contrast imaging.

  11. Hydrocarbon level detection with nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidin, Noriah; Hosseinian S, Raheleh; Nugroho, Waskito; Mohd Marsin, Faridah; Zainal, Jasman

    2013-12-01

    Nanosecond laser induced breakdown in liquid is used as a technique to detect hydrocarbon levels in water. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was focused to generate optical breakdown associated with shock wave generation. The shock wave was propagated at the speed of sound in the medium after travelling 1 μs outward from the center of optical breakdown. Different amplitudes of sound were traced with the aid of an ultrasonic probe. The optical properties of the hydrocarbon solution were quantified via fundamental refractive index measurement (the Snell law). A continuous mode diode pumped solid state laser with second harmonic generation was used as the illumination light source. A CCD video camera with Matrox version 4.2 software was utilized to analyze the recording image. Option line analysis was performed to analyze the intensity of optical breakdown at different input energies. Gray level analysis was also conducted on the scattering light after passing through the hydrocarbon solution at different concentrations. The hydrocarbon solution comprised impurities or particles that varied according to the concentration. The average of the gray level is assumed to present the size of the particle. Inherently, as the acoustic wave propagates outward, it transports the mass (particles or impurities) and impacts on the ultrasonic probe. As a result a higher concentration of hydrocarbons reveals a larger amplitude of sound waves. This phenomenon is identified as a finger print for hydrocarbon levels between 100 and 1000 ppm. The transient detection, without complicated sampling preparation and no hazardous chemical involvement, makes laser ablation a promising technique to detect in situ hydrocarbon levels in water.

  12. Laser micro-drilling with nanoseconds: parametrical influences and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Reiner; Moser, Tobias; Liebers, Rene; Holtz, Ronald

    2008-06-01

    Drilling holes with pulsed Nd:YAG lasers is well researched and state-of-the-art within a variety of industrial applications. Surgical needles in the medical field, turbine blades for the aviation industry, and gas filter for the automotive industry are just some examples that come to mind. Similar to other industrial developments over the last century this market asks for higher throughput, smaller diameter, higher aspect ratios, and of course within a minimum of tolerances. New laser sources and specially developed processes are entering the market to move the mere drilling to the next level of micro drilling. It is crucial to understand the application and the influence of the process parameters to develop a suitable, stable, and repeatable work process. Commonly used pulses within the microsecond-regime show a significant thermal side effect which is unacceptable if used e.g. in combustion nozzles. Reducing the thermal load by shortening the pulse length into the nanosecond-regime could be a compromise to bridge the gap between quality and production speed in high precision laser drilling. However, depending on the relation between pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and "helical speed" a reduced, but existent, thermal effect is inevitable. The scope of this paper is to show the influences of the process parameters in helical drilling with a new developed nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. A variation of drilling-optic principles in different materials are studied and the advantages as much as the disadvantages are discussed.

  13. Multicolor multiphoton microscopy based on a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P; Blanquet, Véronique; Magnol, Laetitia; Kano, Hideaki; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Multicolor multiphoton microscopy is experimentally demonstrated for the first time on a spectral bandwidth of excitation of 300 nm (full width half maximum) thanks to the implementation a nanosecond supercontinuum (SC) source compact and simple with a low repetition rate. The interest of such a wide spectral bandwidth, never demonstrated until now, is highlighted in vivo: images of glioma tumor cells stably expressing eGFP grafted on the brain of a mouse and its blood vessels network labelled with Texas Red(®) are obtained. These two fluorophores have a spectral bandwidth covering the whole 300 nm available. In parallel, a similar image quality is obtained on a sample of mouse muscle in vitro when excited with this nanosecond SC source or with a classical high rate, femtosecond and quasi monochromatic laser. This opens the way for (i) a simple and very complete biological characterization never performed to date with multiphoton processes, (ii) multiple means of contrast in nonlinear imaging allowed by the use of numerous fluorophores and (iii) other multiphoton processes like three-photon ones. PMID:26872004

  14. Comparative study of femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation for propulsion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Makarov, S. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2012-07-01

    Dependences of absolute vapor/plasma pressure on femtosecond and nanosecond laser intensities were obtained for graphitic materials using a non-contact broadband ultrasonic technique, and propulsion prospects of femtosecond and nanosecond laser launching approaches are discussed.

  15. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanesue, T.; Kumaki, M.; Ikeda, S.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target.

  16. Nanosecond square pulse generation in fiber lasers with normal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. M.; Tang, D. Y.; Cheng, T. H.; Lu, C.

    2007-04-01

    We report on the generation of nanosecond square pulses in a passively mode-locked fiber ring laser made of purely normal dispersive fibers. Different to the noise-like pulse operation of the laser, the generated square pulses are stable and have no internal structures. We show that the formation of the square pulse is due to the combined action of the pulse peak clamping effect caused by the cavity and the almost linear pulse propagation in the normal dispersive fibers.

  17. Intense Nanosecond-Pulsed Cavity-Dumped Laser Radiation at 1.04 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We report first results of intense far-infrared (FIR) nanosecond-pulsed laser radiation at 1.04 THz from a previously described[2] cavity-dumped, optically-pumped molecular gas laser. The gain medium, methyl fluoride, is pumped by the 9R20 line of a TEA CO2 laser[3] with a pulse energy of 200 mJ. The THz laser pulses contain of 30 kW peak power in 5 nanosecond pulse widths at a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. The line width, measured by a scanning metal-mesh FIR Fabry-Perot interferometer, is 100 MHz. The novel THz laser is being used in experiments to resonantly excite coherent ns-pulsed 1.04 THz longitudinal acoustic phonons in silicon doping-superlattices. The research is supported by NASA EPSCoR NNX11AM04A and AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0100 awards.

  18. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Veiko, V P; Lednev, V N; Pershin, S M; Samokhvalov, A A; Yakovlev, E B; Zhitenev, I Yu; Kliushin, A N

    2016-06-01

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential "opening" radio pulses with a delay of 0.2-1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode. PMID:27370433

  19. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.; Samokhvalov, A. A.; Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential "opening" radio pulses with a delay of 0.2-1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  20. Nanosecond and femtosecond laser spectroscopy of molecules of biological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, P.; Orlando, S.; Santagata, A.; De Bonis, A.; Veronesi, S.; Giardini, A.

    2007-07-01

    This paper mainly concerns on nanosecond and femtosecond laser spectroscopy of aromatic organic compounds as neurotransmitters, and plume diagnostics of the ablated species, in order to characterize the plasma dynamics, i.e. the temporal and spatial evolution of the plume. Optical emission spectroscopy has been applied to characterize the transient species produced in the femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) regimes. The laser sources employed for optical emission spectroscopy are a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG Handy ( λ = 532 nm, τ = 5 ns) and a frequency-doubled Nd:glass ( λ = 527 nm, τ = 250 fs). These studies aim to detect and give information on the photoexcitation and photodissociation of these biological molecules and to compare the plasma characteristics in the two ablation regimes.

  1. Nanosecond time transfer via shuttle laser ranging experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Premo, D. A.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.; Wardrip, S. C.; Cervenka, P. O.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described to use a proposed shuttle laser ranging experiment to transfer time with nanosecond precision. All that need be added to the original experiment are low cost ground stations and an atomic clock on the shuttle. It is shown that global time transfer can be accomplished with 1 ns precision and transfer up to distances of 2000 km can be accomplished with better than 100 ps precision.

  2. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ˜1010 K/s for temperature increases of ˜100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (˜5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ˜±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ˜±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  3. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J; Petrik, Nikolay G; Smith, R Scott; Joly, Alan G; Tonkyn, Russell G; Kay, Bruce D; Kimmel, Greg A

    2016-04-28

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ∼10(10) K/s for temperature increases of ∼100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (∼5 × 10(9) K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ∼±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ∼±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces. PMID:27131543

  4. Morphological effects of nanosecond- and femtosecond-pulsed laser ablation on human middle ear ossicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, Justus F. R.; Wehner, Martin M.; Lorenzen, Johann; Bovi, Manfred; Westhofen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of nanosecond-pulsed and femtosecond-pulsed lasers for otologic surgery. The outcome parameters are cutting precision (in micrometers), ablation rate (in micrometers per second), scanning speed (in millimeters per second), and morphological effects on human middle ear ossicles. We examine single-spot ablations by a nanosecond-pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser (355 nm, beam diameter 10µm, pulse rate 2 kHz, power 250 mW) on isolated human mallei. A similar system (355 nm, beam diameter 20µm, pulse rate 10 kHz, power 160-1500 mW) and a femtosecond-pulsed CrLi:SAF-Laser (850 nm, pulse duration 100 fs, pulse energy 40 µJ, beam diameter 36 µm, pulse rate 1 kHz) are coupled to a scanner to perform bone surface ablation over a defined area. In our setups 1 and 2, marginal carbonization is visible in all single-spot ablations of 1-s exposures and longer: With an exposure time of 0.5 s, precise cutting margins without carbonization are observed. Cooling with saline solution result is in no carbonization at 1500 mW and a scan speed of 500 mm/s. Our third setup shows no carbonization but greater cutting precision, although the ablation volume is lower. Nanosecond- and femtosecond-pulsed laser systems bear the potential to increase cutting precision in otologic surgery.

  5. Laser ablation characteristics of yttria-doped zirconia in the nanosecond and femtosecond regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiroth, S.; Koch, J.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A.; Günther, D.; Garrelie, F.; Guillermin, M.

    2010-01-01

    The laser ablation characteristics of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have been investigated as a function of the target microstructure and dopant level for different nanosecond- [ArF, KrF, and XeCl excimers; Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) (fourth harmonic)] and femtosecond-laser sources [Ti:sapphire (fundamental and third harmonic)]. Particle ejection, which compromises the quality of coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD), was analyzed in detail. Nanosecond-laser pulses cause a severe thermomechanical surface cracking and exfoliation of micron-sized fragments on a microsecond to millisecond time scale in the case of 8-9.5 mol % Y2O3-doped, fully stabilized zirconia (8YSZ and 9.5YSZ) targets. As a consequence of the intrinsic material brittleness, fully stabilized YSZ coatings deposited by PLD contained particles for all tested conditions. Lower doped partially stabilized zirconia (3YSZ) exhibits a superior fracture toughness attributed to a laser-induced partial transition to the monoclinic phase, detected by Raman spectroscopy, which enables the deposition of particle-free dense thin films by conventional PLD using nanosecond-UV laser radiation at moderate fluences of 1.2-1.5 J/cm2. The ablation dynamics of ultrashort laser pulses differ fundamentally from the nanosecond regime as evidenced, e.g., by time-resolved shadowgraphy and light scattering experiments. Femtosecond pulses prevent the exfoliation of micron-sized fragments but result invariably in a pronounced ejection of submicron particles. The resulting PLD coatings are porous and reveal a large surface roughness as they consist of an agglomeration of nanoparticles. Femtosecond-NIR pulses provide a factor of 2.5-10 higher material removal rates compared to nanosecond- and femtosecond-UV pulses. The ablation metrics, i.e., threshold fluence and effective absorptivity, mainly depend on the laser wavelength while the pulse duration, target microstructure, and dopant level are of minor

  6. High on/off ratio nanosecond laser pulses for a triggered single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Gang; Liu, Bei; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    An 852 nm nanosecond laser pulse chain with a high on/off ratio is generated by chopping a continuous-wave laser beam using a Mach–Zehnder-type electro-optic intensity modulator (MZ-EOIM). The detailed dependence of the MZ-EOIM’s on/off ratio on various parameters is characterized. By optimizing the incident beam polarization and stabilizing the MZ-EOIM temperature, a static on/off ratio of 12600:1 is achieved. The dynamic on/off ratios versus the pulse repetition rate and the pulse duty cycle are measured and discussed. The high-on/off-ratio nanosecond pulsed laser system was used in a triggered single-photon source based on a trapped single cesium atom, which reveals clear antibunching.

  7. EUV nanosecond laser ablation of silicon carbide, tungsten and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Choukourov, Andrei; Kasuya, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present results of study interaction of nanosecond EUV laser pulses at wavelength of 46.9 nm with silicon carbide (SiC), tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo). As a source of laser radiation was used discharge-plasma driver CAPEX (CAPillary EXperiment) based on high current capillary discharge in argon. The laser beam is focused with a spherical Si/Sc multilayer-coated mirror on samples. Experimental study has been performed with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 laser pulses ablation of SiC, W and Mo at various fluence values. Firstly, sample surface modification in the nanosecond time scale have been registered by optical microscope. And the secondly, laser beam footprints on the samples have been analyzed by atomic-force microscope (AFM). This work supported by the Czech Science Foundation under Contract GA14-29772S and by the Grant Agency of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under Contract LG13029.

  8. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target. PMID:26931977

  9. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  10. Direct modification of silicon surface by nanosecond laser interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Wang, Zuobin; Zhang, Ziang; Yue, Yong; Li, Dayou; Maple, Carsten

    2013-10-01

    Periodic and quasi-periodic structures on silicon surface have numerous significant applications in photoelectronics and surface engineering. A number of technologies have been developed to fabricate the structures in various research fields. In this work, we take the strategy of direct nanosecond laser interference lithography technology, and focus on the silicon material to create different well-defined surface structures based on theoretical analysis of the formation of laser interference patterns. Two, three and four-beam laser interference systems were set up to fabricate the grating, regular triangle and square structures on silicon surfaces, respectively. From the AFM micrographs, the critical features of structures have a dependence on laser fluences. For a relative low laser fluence, grating and dot structures formed with bumps due to the Marangoni Effect. With the increase of laser fluences, melt and evaporation behaviors can be responsible for the laser modification. By properly selecting the process parameters, well-defined grating and dot structures can been achieved. It can be demonstrated that direct laser interference lithography is a facile and efficient technology with the advantage of a single process procedure over macroscale areas for the fabrication of micro and nano structures.

  11. Biocompatibility Evaluation of Nanosecond Laser Treated Titanium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Ryo; Mizutani, Masayoshi; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Komotori, Jun

    We developed surface modification technologies for dental implants in this study. The study contributes to shortening the time required for adhesion between alveolar bone and fixtures which consist of dental implants. A Nd:YVO4 nanosecond laser was used to modify the surfaces of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) disks, and their biocompatibility was evaluated cytocompatibility and bioactivity. First, rows of 200 µm spaced rectilinear laser treatments were performed on surfaces of CP Ti disks. Osteoblasts derived from rat mesenchymal stem cells were then cultured on the treated surfaces. Cytocompatibility on the laser treated area was evaluated by observing adhesion behavior of cells on these surfaces. The results indicated that the micro-order structure formed by the laser treatment promoted adhesion of osteoblasts and that traces of laser treatment without microstucture didn't affect the adhesion. Second, surfaces of CP Ti disks were completely covered by traces of laser treatment, which created complex microstructures of titania whose crystal structure is rutile and anatase. This phenomenon allowed the creation of hydroxyapatite on the surface of the disks in 1.5-times simulated body fluid (1.5SBF) while no hydroxyapatite was observed on conventional polished surfaces in the same conditions. This result indicates that bioactivity was enabled on CP Ti by the laser treatment. From these two results, laser treatment for CP Ti surfaces is an effective method for enhancing adhesion of osteoblasts and promoting bioactivity, which are highly appreciated properties for dental implants.

  12. Single-frequency linearly-polarized 1083 nm all fiber nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rongtao; Xu, Jiangmin; Zhou, Pu; Ji, Xiang; Xu, Xiaojun

    2012-12-01

    Single-frequency linearly-polarized 1083 nm all fiber nanosecond master-oscillator power amplifier laser system is demonstrated. A ring laser, whose key components are one saturable absorber and two polarization controllers, delivers a single-frequency continuous wave laser. Using an electro-optic modulator as the modulator, the pulse laser seed is obtained by modulating the CW laser. By amplifying the pulse seed to the average power of 61.6 W in three stages, a single-frequency linearly-polarized laser with pulse duration of 16 ns, repetition rate of 10 MHz and pulse energy of 6.16 μJ is obtained. No nonlinear effect is observed in our experiment. Higher output power can be obtained by increasing LDs of the main amplifier.

  13. Over 0.5 MW green laser from sub-nanosecond giant pulsed microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihe; Taira, Takunori

    2016-03-01

    A sub-nanosecond green laser with laser head sized 35 × 35 × 35 mm3 was developed from a giant pulsed microchip laser for laser processing on organic superconducting transistor with a flexible substrate. A composite monolithic Y3Al5O12 (YAG) /Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG crystal was designed for generating giant pulsed 1064 nm laser. A fibercoupled 30 W laser diode centered at 808 nm was used with pump pulse duration of 245 μs. The 532 nm green laser was obtained from a LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with output energy of 150 μJ and pulse duration of 268 ps. The sub-nanosecond green laser is interesting for 2-D ablation patterns.

  14. Acceleration of neutrals in a nanosecond laser produced nickel plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Philip, Reji

    2014-12-15

    Time of flight dynamics of slow neutrals, fast neutrals, and ions from a nanosecond laser produced nickel (Ni) plasma are investigated. Species arrival times confirm the hypothesis that fast neutrals are formed by the recombination of fast ions with free electrons. Both neutrals and ions are found to accelerate for a short interval immediately after ablation, which is attributed to internal Coulomb forces which create electrostatic potentials resulting in the charged particle acceleration. This process is further enhanced by laser-plasma energy coupling. Emission from neutrals could be measured for longer axial distances in the plume compared to that of ions confirming that the ions recombine to form neutrals as they move away from the target surface.

  15. Possibility of methane conversion into heavier hydrocarbons using nanosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navid, H. A.; Irani, E.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2016-03-01

    Effect of nanosecond lasers on the methane dissociation is experimentally studied by using three different laser wavelengths at 248 nm, 355 nm and 532 nm. C2H2 generation is measured as a major reaction product in experiments and the energy consumptions in production of this component are measured as 5.8 MJ/mol, 3.1 MJ/mol and 69.0 MJ/mol, for 355 nm, 532 nm and 248 nm wavelengths, respectively. The mechanism of conversion and production of new stable hydrocarbons is also theoretically investigated. It is found that in theoretical calculations, the ion-molecule reactions should be included and this leads to a unique approach in proper explanation of the experimental measurements.

  16. Possibility of methane conversion into heavier hydrocarbons using nanosecond lasers.

    PubMed

    Navid, H A; Irani, E; Sadighi-Bonabi, R

    2016-03-01

    Effect of nanosecond lasers on the methane dissociation is experimentally studied by using three different laser wavelengths at 248 nm, 355 nm and 532 nm. C2H2 generation is measured as a major reaction product in experiments and the energy consumptions in production of this component are measured as 5.8 MJ/mol, 3.1 MJ/mol and 69.0 MJ/mol, for 355 nm, 532 nm and 248 nm wavelengths, respectively. The mechanism of conversion and production of new stable hydrocarbons is also theoretically investigated. It is found that in theoretical calculations, the ion-molecule reactions should be included and this leads to a unique approach in proper explanation of the experimental measurements. PMID:26655072

  17. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: New nanosecond polymer passive switch for neodymium lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrodnyi, V. I.; Vovk, L. V.; Derevyanko, Nadezhda A.; Ishchenko, Aleksandr A.; Karabanova, L. V.; Mushkalo, I. L.

    1995-03-01

    A new nanosecond passive switch for neodymium lasers was developed on the basis of a highly elastic polyurethane matrix with an optical strength of 1200 MW cm-2, containing a photostable organic dye NOK. The switch was investigated under various Q-switching conditions in YAG, GSGG : Cr : Nd, and yttrium aluminate crystal lasers. Nanosecond single giant pulses and bursts of pulses were generated. The service life was 2×106 pulses at a single point of the switch. The energy of giant single pulses was 0.9 J. Repetition of single pulses at 50 Hz was possible.

  18. Nanosecond-laser plasma-assisted ultradeep microdrilling of optically opaque and transparent solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Stanley; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, Susan D.

    2007-02-01

    A mechanism of ultradeep (up to tens of microns per pulse, submillimeter total hole depths) plasma-assisted ablative drilling of optically opaque and transparent materials by high-power nanosecond lasers has been proposed and verified experimentally using optical transmission and contact photoacoustic techniques to measure average drilling rates per laser shot versus laser intensity at constant focusing conditions. The plots of average drilling rates versus laser intensity exhibit slopes which are in good agreement with those predicted by the proposed model and also with other experimental studies. The proposed ultradeep drilling mechanism consists of a number of stages, including ultradeep "nonthermal" energy delivery into bulk solids by the short-wavelength radiation of the hot ablative plasma, bulk heating and melting, accompanied by subsurface boiling in the melt pool, and resulting melt expulsion from the target.

  19. Cluster ion control by simultaneous irradiations of femtosecond laser and nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, H.; Hiratani, Y.; Toyoda, K.

    2002-09-01

    Generation of multiply charged ions and molecular ions have been investigated using simultaneous irradiation of high intensity and ultrashort pulse of Ti:sapphire laser and fourth harmonics of Q-switched nanosecond pulse of Nd:YAG laser on carbon targets [Morimoto et al., in: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on High-Power Particles Beams (BEAMS2000),Vol. PB-89, Nagaoka, 2000, p. 359; Toyoda et al., in: Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Gas Flow and Chemical Lasers and High-Power Laser Conference (GCL-HPL2000), Vol. P1.60, 2000, p. 101]. The ion current waveforms have been analyzed by means of time-of-flight (tof) mass measurement. Simultaneous irradiation of high intensity and ultrashort pulse of Ti:sapphire laser and fourth harmonics of Q-switched nanosecond pulse of Nd:YAG laser on carbon targets was found to generate molecular ions of carbon.

  20. Fluorescence of silicon nanoparticles prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyang Sui, Xin; Yang, Fang; Ma, Wei; Li, Jishun; Xue, Yujun; Fu, Xing

    2014-03-15

    A pulsed laser fabrication method is used to prepare fluorescent microstructures on silicon substrates in this paper. A 355 nm nanosecond pulsed laser micromachining system was designed, and the performance was verified and optimized. Fluorescence microscopy was used to analyze the photoluminescence of the microstructures which were formed using the pulsed laser processing technique. Photoluminescence spectra of the microstructure reveal a peak emission around 500 nm, from 370 nm laser irradiation. The light intensity also shows an exponential decay with irradiation time, which is similar to attenuation processes seen in porous silicon. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the microstructure in the fabricated region was also analyzed with multifunction scanning electron microscopy. Spherical particles are produced with diameters around 100 nm. The structure is compared with porous silicon. It is likely that these nanoparticles act as luminescence recombination centers on the silicon surface. The small diameter of the particles modifies the band gap of silicon by quantum confinement effects. Electron-hole pairs recombine and the fluorescence emission shifts into the visible range. The chemical elements of the processed region are also changed during the interaction between laser and silicon. Oxidation and carbonization play an important role in the enhancement of fluorescence emission.

  1. Sub-nanosecond optical diagnostics of laser-material interaction and dynamic microstructure of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.

    1993-03-01

    Several optical diagnostic techniques are used to evaluate the dynamic response of materials to intense dynamic loading and unloading, high stress and strain, and pressure. Velocity interferometry and electronic streak photography, each with sub-nanosecond time resolution, are used to record dynamic material response. Laser-launched flat plates are accelerated to 10{sup 12} m/s{sup 2} with terminal velocities >5 km/s. By impacting these plates into target samples, high strain rates (10{sup 8} sec{sup {minus}1}) and pressures >100 GPa have been generated for a duration of 0.8--5 nanoseconds. The efficacy and limitations of each technique are detailed and applications to other fields discussed.

  2. Sub-nanosecond optical diagnostics of laser-material interaction and dynamic microstructure of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    Several optical diagnostic techniques are used to evaluate the dynamic response of materials to intense dynamic loading and unloading, high stress and strain, and pressure. Velocity interferometry and electronic streak photography, each with sub-nanosecond time resolution, are used to record dynamic material response. Laser-launched flat plates are accelerated to 10[sup 12] m/s[sup 2] with terminal velocities >5 km/s. By impacting these plates into target samples, high strain rates (10[sup 8] sec[sup [minus]1]) and pressures >100 GPa have been generated for a duration of 0.8--5 nanoseconds. The efficacy and limitations of each technique are detailed and applications to other fields discussed.

  3. Control of optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanocrystals by nanosecond-laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogaki, T.; Ofuji, T.; Tetsuyama, N.; Kawahara, H.; Higashihata, M.; Ikenoue, H.; Nakamura, D.; Okada, T.

    2014-03-01

    Effects of laser annealing on electrical and optical properties of Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals, which are expected as building blocks for optoelectronic devices, have been investigated in this study. In the case of fabricating p-n junction in single one-dimensional ZnO nanocrystal, phosphorus-ions implanted p-type ZnO nanocrystals were recrystallized and recovered in the optical properties by nanosecond-laser annealing using a KrF excimer laser. Antimony-doped p-type ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by irradiating laminated structure which antimony thin film were deposited on ZnO nanocrystals with the laser beam. Additionally, it is possible to control the growth rate of ZnO nanowires by using laser annealing. Irradiating with pulsed laser a part of ZnO buffer layer deposited on the a-cut sapphire substrate, then ZnO nanowires were grown on the ZnO buffer layer by the nanoparticle assisted pulsed laser deposition method. As a result, the clear boundary of the laser annealed and non-laser annealed area was appeared. It was observed that ZnO nanowires were grown densely at non-laser annealed area, on the other hand, sparse ones were grown at the laser-annealed region. In this report, the possibility of laser annealing techniques to establish the stable and reliable fabrication process of ZnO nanowires-based LD and LED are discussed on the basis of experimental results.

  4. Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-04-22

    We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

  5. 100  J-level nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Mason, Paul D; Ertel, Klaus; Jonathan Phillips, P; De Vido, Mariastefania; Chekhlov, Oleg; Divoky, Martin; Pilar, Jan; Smith, Jodie; Butcher, Thomas; Lintern, Andrew; Tomlinson, Steph; Shaikh, Waseem; Hooker, Chris; Lucianetti, Antonio; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Mocek, Tomas; Edwards, Chris; Collier, John L

    2016-05-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of a 100 J-level, diode pumped solid state laser based on cryogenic gas cooled, multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG amplifier technology. When operated at 175 K, the system delivered a pulse energy of 107 J at a 1 Hz repetition rate and 10 ns pulse duration, pumped by 506 J of diode energy at 940 nm, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 21%. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the highest energy obtained from a nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser. This demonstration confirms the energy scalability of the diode pumped optical laser for experiments laser architecture. PMID:27128081

  6. Mechanism study of skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms in laser tissue ablation is essential to improve clinical laser applications by reducing collateral damage and laser pulse energy requirement. The motive of this dissertation is to study skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses in a wide spectral region from near-infrared to ultraviolet for a clear understanding of the mechanism that can be used to improve future design of the pulsed lasers for dermatology and plastic surgery. Multiple laser and optical configurations have been constructed to generate 9 to 12ns laser pulses with similar profiles at 1064. 532, 266 and 213nm for this study of skin tissue ablation. Through measurements of ablation depth as a function cf laser pulse energy, the 589nm spectral line in the secondary radiation from ablated skin tissue samples was identified as the signature of the occurrence of ablation. Subsequently, this spectral signature has been used to investigate the probabilistic process of the ablation near the threshold at the four wavelengths. Measurements of the ablation probability were conducted as a function of the electrical field strength of the laser pulse and the ablation thresholds in a wide spectral range from 1064nm to 213nm were determined. Histology analysis and an optical transmission method were applied in assessing of the ablation depth per pulse to study the ablation process at irradiance levels higher than threshold. Because more than 70% of the wet weight of the skin tissue is water, optical breakdown and backscattering in water was also investigated along with a nonlinear refraction index measurement using a z-scan technique. Preliminary studies on ablation of a gelatin based tissue phantom are also reported. The current theoretical models describing ablation of soft tissue ablation by short laser pulses were critically reviewed. Since none of the existing models was found capable of explaining the experimental results, a new plasma-mediated model was developed

  7. Millisecond laser machining of transparent materials assisted by a nanosecond laser with different delays.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunxiang; Lv, Xueming; Zhang, Hongchao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2016-06-15

    A millisecond laser combined with a nanosecond laser was applied to machining transparent materials. The influences of delay between the two laser pulses on processing efficiencies and modified sizes were studied. In addition, a laser-supported combustion wave (LSCW) was captured during laser irradiation. An optimal delay corresponding to the highest processing efficiency was found for cone-shaped cavities. The modified size as well as the lifetime and intensity of the LSCW increased with the delay decreasing. Thermal cooperation effects of defects, overlapping effects of small modified sites, and thermal radiation from LSCW result in all the phenomena. PMID:27304294

  8. Nanosecond laser textured superhydrophobic metallic surfaces and their chemical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Duong V.; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates superhydrophobic behavior on nanosecond laser patterned copper and brass surfaces. Compared with ultrafast laser systems previously used for such texturing, infrared nanosecond fiber lasers offer a lower cost and more robust system combined with potentially much higher processing rates. The wettability of the textured surfaces develops from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity over time when exposed to ambient conditions. The change in the wetting property is attributed to the partial deoxidation of oxides on the surface induced during laser texturing. Textures exhibiting steady state contact angles of up to ∼152° with contact angle hysteresis of around 3-4° have been achieved. Interestingly, the superhydrobobic surfaces have the self-cleaning ability and have potential for chemical sensing applications. The principle of these novel chemical sensors is based on the change in contact angle with the concentration of methanol in a solution. To demonstrate the principle of operation of such a sensor, it is found that the contact angle of methanol solution on the superhydrophobic surfaces exponentially decays with increasing concentration. A significant reduction, of 128°, in contact angle on superhydrophobic brass is observed, which is one order of magnitude greater than that for the untreated surface (12°), when percent composition of methanol reaches to 28%.

  9. Oh Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements in Nanosecond Pulse Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Inchul; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2010-06-01

    We present recent results of laser-induced fluorescence measurements of hydroxyl radical density in repetitively pulsed nanosecond plasmas, created using 10-20 nsec duration, high (up to 20 kV) voltage pulsers, capable of operation at repetition rates as high as 40-50 kHz. OH mole fraction as a function of time with respect to discharge creation is determined, with absolute calibration performed using a Hencken flat flame burner. This paper will focus on a series of low temperature, non-equilibrium kinetics measurements in hydrogen and hydrocarbon-air mixtures, with results compared to predictions of a recently developed plasma chemical oxidation model.

  10. Bubble formation induced by nanosecond laser ablation in water and its diagnosis by optical transmission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, M. H.; Akbari Jafarabadi, M.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, bubble formation and ablation rate in laser ablation of a thin-film aluminum target are studied. The target was an aluminum thin-film coated on a quartz substrate and interacted by a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam in ambient air and distilled water. Measuring optical transmission of a He-Ne beam through the ablation region shows that the ablation rate in water is higher than that in ambient air. The results also show that an initial peak appears in the transmission signal which is an evidence for bubble formation in water. Analyzing the data is useful for monitoring the bubble formation in water and relatively estimating the ablation rate.

  11. Retinal threshold studies for nanosecond and picosecond visible laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Smith, Audrey B.; Rogers, Mark E.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for Minimum Visible Lesions (MVL) at the retina are reported for 60 picoseconds (ps) and 4 nanoseconds (ns), single laser pulses in rhesus monkey eyes using a visible wavelength of 532 nanometers (nm) from a doubled Nd:YAG laser. The 50% probability for damage (ED50) dosages are calculated for 1 hour and 24 hour post exposures using 95% fiducial limits. For both pulsewidths, the threshold values calculated by probit analysis decrease between the 1 hour and 24 hour ophthalmoscopic evaluations. The ED50 value determined for the 60 ps pulsewidth was less than half the value at 4 ns (0.43 (mu) J/60 ps vs. 0.90 (mu) J/4 ns at 24 hours) for both readings. Of the 136 exposures for pulse energies ranging from 0.03 to 5.0 (mu) J no hemorrhagic lesions were produced for either pulsewidth studied. However, at 6.6 (mu) J one intraretinal hemorrhagic lesion was observed for 60 ps. The slope of the probit curve was higher for 60 ps when compared with the 4 ns value (3.03 at 60 ps vs. 2.68 at 4 ns). MVL threshold doses calculated are comparable with those reported in the literature. However, the 4 ns MVL values is less than one order of magnitude (a factor 4.7) above the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) level as defined by the 'American National Standard For The Safe Use Of Lasers', ANSI Z136.1-19932. We present the current MVL data as it compares with previous data obtained for picosecond and femtosecond laser pulse thresholds and provide a preliminary assessment of how the ANSI MPE standard might be amended.

  12. Synthesis of silicon-based nanoparticles by 10.6 μm nanosecond CO2 laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, D. M.; Chai, J. S.; Zekic, A. A.; Trtica, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Maletic, S.

    2013-02-01

    Silicon-based nanoparticles were produced by irradiating a single-crystal silicon target with 10.6 μm nanosecond transverse excited atmospheric (TEA) pulsed CO2 laser in de-ionized water. The effects of the laser pulse energies and repetition rate were studied. To reveal the role of thermal effects, a low laser repetition rate has been applied, excluding the interaction of the laser beam with the previously generated cavitation bubble. The analysis of the influence of the laser pulse energies and the laser repetition rate showed that the increase of the laser pulse energies leads to an increase of the nanoparticle size. An explanation of such results was proposed and the importance of the role of the target surface temperature in the ablation process is discussed.

  13. Numerical simulation of impurity desorption induced by nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Yinsheng; Lin Xiaohui; Chen Minhua; Chen Yunfei

    2006-08-01

    A model based on a stochastic process was developed to study the impurity molecule desorption from a substrate induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers. The dynamics of adsorbed molecules irradiated by the laser pulses can be considered to be a Brownian motion in the bath of excited energy carriers. A two-step model was used to describe the nonequilibrium heating process induced by the femtosecond laser pulses. The difference between the desorption processes induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers was discussed based on the numerical results for the desorption of CO molecules from a Ru surface. Results indicate that the femtosecond laser is a much better tool for desorption than the nanosecond laser.

  14. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, N.; Strader, J.; Kumar, Amit; Vincent, A.; Zhang, P.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Cho, H-J.; Seal, Sudipta; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2011-01-23

    Fast, sensitive and discriminating detection of hydrogen at room temperature is crucial for storage, transportation, and distribution of hydrogen as an energy source. One dimensional nanowires of SnO2 are potential candidates for improved H2 sensor performance. The single directional conducting continuous nanowires can decrease electrical noise, and their large active surface area could improve the response and recovery time of the sensor. In this work we discuss synthesis and characterization of nanowire arrays made using nanosecond ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm) laser interference processing of ultrathin SnO2 films on SiO2 substrates. The laser energy was chosen to be above the melting point of the films. The results show that the final nanowire formation is dominated by preferential evaporation as compared to thermocapillary flow. The nanowire height (and hence wire aspect ratio) increased with increasing initial film thickness ho and with increasing laser energy density Eo. Furthermore, a self-limiting effect was observed where-in the wire formation ceased at a specific final remaining thickness of SnO2 that was almost independent of ho for a given Eo. To understand these effects, finite element modeling of the nanoscale laser heating was performed. This showed that the temperature rise under laser heating was a strong non-monotonic function of film thickness. As a result, the preferential evaporation rate varies as wire formation occurs, eventually leading to a shut-off of evaporation at a characteristic thickness. This results in the stoppage of wire formation. This combination of nanosecond pulsed laser experiments and thermal modeling shows that several unique synthesis approaches can be utilized to control the nanowire characteristics.

  15. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  16. Ablation efficiency of α-Al2O3 in liquid phase and ambient air by nanosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajti, Csaba László; Sattari, Ramin; Chichkov, Boris; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2010-07-01

    Ablation efficiency and influences of laser parameters on a material removal rate by a nanosecond laser irradiation of α-Al2O3 are studied in gas and liquid phases. The laser ablation in the air yields maximum material removal rate of 12 ng/pulse using a 4.6-mJ pulse energy at 4-kHz repetition rate, compared to 88 ng/pulse in the water flow. Using a specific interpulse distance and a laser repetition rate further increase material removal rate by factor of 3 and 65, respectively, owing to an optimized lattice temperature and laser pulse interactions with the generated cavitation bubble. For the ablation in the air, these parameters do not significantly affect the ablation efficiency.

  17. Ambient Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanosecond Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of <100 fs to enable matrix-free laser vaporization with little or no fragmentation. When coupled to electrospray ionization, femtosecond laser vaporization provides a universal, rapid mass spectral analysis method requiring no sample workup. Remarkably, laser pulses with intensities exceeding 1013 W cm-2 desorb intact macromolecules, such as proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  18. Laser induced damage of sapphire and titanium doped sapphire crystals under femtosecond to nanosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussière, B.; Utéza, O.; Sanner, N.; Sentis, M.; Riboulet, G.; Vigroux, L.; Commandré, M.; Wagner, F.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Chambaret, J.-P.

    2009-10-01

    The use of large Ti:Sapphire crystals in ultra fast high peak power laser amplifiers makes crucial the problem of crystal laser induced damage. These works aim to quantify the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of Sapphire and Ti:Sapphire crystals under femtosecond, picosecond and nanosecond laser pulse irradiations, which are typically encountered in such laser chains. Furthermore, a study of the influence of cryogenic conditions on the LIDT of Ti:Sapphire crystals and of their anti-reflection coating has been performed. The results are important to understand the mechanisms leading to the damage, and to reveal the key parameters which will have to be optimized in future high peak power laser chains.

  19. Nanosecond laser texturing of aluminium for control of wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Martin C.; Rosowski, Adam P.; French, Paul W.

    2015-07-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of lasers to modify the wettability of surfaces. Here we report on the use of a 20W nS pulsed IR fibre laser to create strong hydrophobicity on the surface of aluminium sheets. This is unexpected, hydrophobicity is usually associated solely with femto- or pico- second laser processing. At a 20W average power level the area coverage rate is too small for many industrial applications. Further trials using a 800W DPSS laser are described and the ability of this system to change surface wettability at a much higher production rate are indicated. There is little reported literature on surface texturing at higher average power levels. Indications of the productivity, or surface coverage rate, are given.

  20. Studies on laser material processing with nanosecond and sub-nanosecond and picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser ablation of widely used metal (Al, Cu. stainless-steel), semiconductor (Si), transparent material (glass, sapphire), ceramic (Al2O3, AlN) and polymer (PI, PMMA) in industry were systematically studied with pulse width from nanosecond (5-100ns), picosecond (6-10ps) to sub-picosecond (0.8-0.95ps). A critical damage zone (CDZ) of up to 100um with ns laser, <=50um with ps laser, and <=20um with sub-ps laser, respectively was observed as a criteria of selecting the laser pulse width. The effects of laser processing parameters on speed and efficiency were also investigated. This is to explore how to provide industry users the best laser solution for device micro-fabrication with best price. Our studies of cutting and drilling with ns, ps, and sub-ps lasers indicate that it is feasible to achieve user accepted quality and speed with cost-effective and reliable laser by optimizing processing conditions.

  1. Material micromachining using a pulsed fiber laser platform with fine temporal nanosecond pulse shaping capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deladurantaye, Pascal; Gay, David; Cournoyer, Alain; Roy, Vincent; Labranche, Bruno; Levesque, Marc; Taillon, Yves

    2009-02-01

    We report on recent advances in laser material processing using a novel pulsed fiber laser platform providing pulse shape agility at the nanosecond time scale and at high repetition rates. The pulse shapes can be programmed with a time resolution of 2.5 ns and with an amplitude resolution of 10 bits. Depending on the desired laser performances, the pulses are generated either by directly modulating the drive current of a seed laser diode or by modulating the output of a seed laser diode operated in CW with electro-optic modulators. The pulses are amplified in an amplifier chain in a MOPA configuration. Advanced polarization maintaining LMA fiber designs enable output energy per pulse up to 60 μJ at 1064 nm at a repetition rate of 200 kHz with excellent beam quality (M2< 1.1) and narrow line widths suitable for efficient frequency conversion. Micro-milling experiments were carried out with stainless steel, in which processing microstructures of a few tens of microns in size usually represents a challenge, and aluminum, whose thermal conductivity is about 20 times higher than stainless steel. The results obtained with two metals having very different thermal properties using different pulse shapes with durations varying between 3 ns and 80 ns demonstrate the benefits of using lasers offering flexible pulse durations and controllable pulse intensity profiles for rapidly optimizing a process in different applications while using the same laser with respect to conventional methods based on pulsed laser with fixed pulse shapes. Numerous applications are envisioned in a near future, like the micromachining of multi-layered structures, in particular when working with the harmonics of the laser.

  2. High Intensity Mirror-Free Nanosecond Ytterbium Fiber Laser System in Master Oscillator Power Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-Lin, Louis Chang

    Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers and amplifiers are relatively easy to efficiently produce a stable and high quality laser beam in a compact, robust, and alignment-free configuration. Recently, high power fiber laser systems have facilitated wide spread applications in academics, industries, and militaries in replacement of bulk solid-state laser systems. The master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) composed of a highly-controlled seed, high-gain preamplifiers, and high-efficiency power amplifiers are typically utilized to scale up the pulse energy, peak power, or average power. Furthermore, a direct-current-modulated nanosecond diode laser in single transverse mode can simply provide a compact and highly-controlled seed to result in the flexible output parameters, such as repetition rate, pulse duration, and even temporal pulse shape. However, when scaling up the peak power for high intensity applications, such a versatile diode-seeded nanosecond MOPA laser system using rare-earth-doped fibers is unable to completely save its own advantages compared to bulk laser systems. Without a strong seeding among the amplifiers, the guided amplified spontaneous amplification is easy to become dominant during the amplification, leading to the harmful self-lasing or pulsing effects, and the difficulty of the quantitative numerical comparison. In this dissertation, we study a high-efficiency and intense nanosecond ytterbium fiber MOPA system with good beam quality and stability for high intensity applications. The all-PM-fiber structure is achieved with the output extinction ratio of >12 dB by optimizing the interconnection of high power optical fibers. The diode-seeded MOPA configuration without parasitic stimulated amplification (PAS) is implemented using the double-pass scheme to extract energy efficiently for scaling peak power. The broadband PAS was studied experimentally, which matches well with our numerical simulation. The 1064-nm nanosecond seed was a direct

  3. Micro-processing of NiMnGa shape memory alloy by using a nanosecond fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, C. A.; Tuissi, A.

    2016-04-01

    The interest on Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys (FSMAs), such as NiMnGa, is growing up, thanks to their functional properties to be employed in a new class of micro-devices. The most evident critical issue, limiting the use of these systems in the production of industrial devices, is the brittleness of the bulk material; its workability by using convectional processing methods is very limited. Thus, alternative processing methods, including laser processing, are encouraged for the manufacture of FSMAs based new devices. In this work, the effect of the nanosecond laser microprocessing on Ni45Mn33Ga22 [at%] has been studied. Linear grooves were realized by a nanosecond 30 W fiber laser; the machined surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, coupled with energetic dispersion spectroscopy for the composition analysis. The morphology of the grooves was affected by the laser scanning velocity and the number of laser pulses while the measured material removal rate appeared to be influenced mainly by the number of laser pulses. Compositional modification, associated to the loss of Ga content, was detected only for the lower scanning velocity, because of the high fluence. On the contrary, by increasing the velocity up to 1000 mm/s no Ga loss can be seen, making possible the laser processing of this functional alloy without its chemical modification. The use of short pulses allowed also to reduce the amount of recast material and the compositional change with respect to long pulses. Finally, the calorimetric analysis indicated that laser nanosecond microprocessing could affect the functional properties of this alloy: a larger decrease of the characteristic temperatures of the martensitic transformation was observed in correspondence of the low scanning velocity.

  4. Development of a nanosecond-laser-pumped Raman amplifier for short laser pulses in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Y.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Wang, T.-L.; Clark, D. S.; Wilks, S. C.; Meezan, N.; Berger, R. L.; Wurtele, J.; Fisch, N. J.; Malkin, V. M.; Valeo, E. J.; Martins, S. F.; Joshi, C.

    2009-12-01

    Progress on developing a plasma amplifier/compressor based on stimulated Raman scattering of nanosecond laser pulses is reported. Generation of a millijoule seed pulse at a wavelength that is redshifted relative to the pump beam has been achieved using an external Raman gas cell. By interacting the shifted picosecond seed pulse and the nanosecond pump pulse in a gas jet plasma at a density of ˜1019 cm-3, the upper limit of the pump intensity to avoid angular spray of the amplified seed has been determined. The Raman amplification has been studied as a function of the pump and seed intensities. Although the heating of plasma by the nanosecond pump pulse results in strong Landau damping of the plasma wave, an amplified pulse with an energy of up to 14 mJ has been demonstrated, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest output energy so far by Raman amplification in a plasma. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations indicate that the saturation of amplification is consistent with onset of particle trapping, which might be overcome by employing a shorter seed pulse.

  5. Development of a nanosecond-laser-pumped Raman amplifier for short laser pulses in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Y.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Clark, D. S.; Wilks, S. C.; Meezan, N.; Berger, R. L.; Wang, T.-L.; Martins, S. F.; Joshi, C.; Wurtele, J.; Fisch, N. J.; Malkin, V. M.; Valeo, E. J.

    2009-12-15

    Progress on developing a plasma amplifier/compressor based on stimulated Raman scattering of nanosecond laser pulses is reported. Generation of a millijoule seed pulse at a wavelength that is redshifted relative to the pump beam has been achieved using an external Raman gas cell. By interacting the shifted picosecond seed pulse and the nanosecond pump pulse in a gas jet plasma at a density of approx10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, the upper limit of the pump intensity to avoid angular spray of the amplified seed has been determined. The Raman amplification has been studied as a function of the pump and seed intensities. Although the heating of plasma by the nanosecond pump pulse results in strong Landau damping of the plasma wave, an amplified pulse with an energy of up to 14 mJ has been demonstrated, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest output energy so far by Raman amplification in a plasma. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations indicate that the saturation of amplification is consistent with onset of particle trapping, which might be overcome by employing a shorter seed pulse.

  6. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protectivemore » thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.« less

  7. Catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Frank R. Natoli, Jean-Yves; Akhouayri, Hassan; Commandré, Mireille; Duchateau, Guillaume

    2014-06-28

    Due to its high effective nonlinearity and the possibility to produce periodically poled crystals, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}, KTP) is still one of the economically important nonlinear optical materials. In this overview article, we present a large study on catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in this material and the very similar RbTiOPO{sub 4} (RTP). Several different systematic studies are included: multiple pulse laser damage, multi-wavelength laser damage in KTP, damage resistance anisotropy, and variations of the laser damage thresholds for RTP crystals of different qualities. All measurements were carried out in comparable experimental conditions using a 1064 nm Q-switched laser and some were repeated at 532 nm. After summarizing the experimental results, we detail the proposed model for laser damage in this material and discuss the experimental results in this context. According to the model, nanosecond laser damage is caused by light-induced generation of transient laser-damage precursors which subsequently provide free electrons that are heated by the same nanosecond pulse. We also present a stimulated Raman scattering measurement and confront slightly different models to the experimental data. Finally, the physical nature of the transient damage precursors is discussed and similarities and differences to laser damage in other crystals are pointed out.

  8. High Intensity Mirror-Free Nanosecond Ytterbium Fiber Laser System in Master Oscillator Power Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-Lin, Louis Chang

    Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers and amplifiers are relatively easy to efficiently produce a stable and high quality laser beam in a compact, robust, and alignment-free configuration. Recently, high power fiber laser systems have facilitated wide spread applications in academics, industries, and militaries in replacement of bulk solid-state laser systems. The master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) composed of a highly-controlled seed, high-gain preamplifiers, and high-efficiency power amplifiers are typically utilized to scale up the pulse energy, peak power, or average power. Furthermore, a direct-current-modulated nanosecond diode laser in single transverse mode can simply provide a compact and highly-controlled seed to result in the flexible output parameters, such as repetition rate, pulse duration, and even temporal pulse shape. However, when scaling up the peak power for high intensity applications, such a versatile diode-seeded nanosecond MOPA laser system using rare-earth-doped fibers is unable to completely save its own advantages compared to bulk laser systems. Without a strong seeding among the amplifiers, the guided amplified spontaneous amplification is easy to become dominant during the amplification, leading to the harmful self-lasing or pulsing effects, and the difficulty of the quantitative numerical comparison. In this dissertation, we study a high-efficiency and intense nanosecond ytterbium fiber MOPA system with good beam quality and stability for high intensity applications. The all-PM-fiber structure is achieved with the output extinction ratio of >12 dB by optimizing the interconnection of high power optical fibers. The diode-seeded MOPA configuration without parasitic stimulated amplification (PAS) is implemented using the double-pass scheme to extract energy efficiently for scaling peak power. The broadband PAS was studied experimentally, which matches well with our numerical simulation. The 1064-nm nanosecond seed was a direct

  9. Modeling the effect of nanosecond laser conditioning on the femtosecond laser-induced damage of optical films.

    PubMed

    Li, Zehan; Du, Juan; Zhao, Yuanan; Wang, Yueliang; Leng, Yuxin; Shao, Jianda

    2015-06-01

    The effect of nanosecond laser conditioning on the femtosecond laser-induced damage behaviors of Al2O3, HfO2, SiO2 single layers and Al2O3/SiO2 high reflectors (HR) are explored. During femtosecond laser damage test, negative effects on enhancing the femtosecond laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of optical films after the nanosecond laser conditioning is found, which is opposite to the LIDT improvement in the nanosecond range. To explain the mechanism after nanosecond laser conditioning, a theoretical model including multiphoton ionization (MPI), avalanche ionization (AI) and decays of electrons with one defect state is built to simulate the evolution of electron density in the conduction band. A permanent mid-gap defect state resulting from the process of laser conditioning is introduced in our model, which is found to contribute seed electrons to conduction band and hence accelerate the final breakdown. Both the experimental result and theoretical calculation agree very well with each other. PMID:26072836

  10. Explosive boiling of metals upon irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Mazhukin, V I; Demin, M M; Shapranov, A V; Samokhin, A A

    2014-04-28

    A repeated effect of explosive boiling has been found in metals exposed to a nanosecond laser pulse in the framework of molecular dynamic simulations combined with a continuum description of a conduction band electrons system. This effect can be used, in particular, as a marker of approaching critical parameters of the region in the irradiated matter. (letters)

  11. Gene transfer into mammalian cells by use of a nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Ogura, Makoto; Sato, Shunichi; Wakisaka, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Uenoyama, Maki; Masaki, Yoshinori; Obara, Minoru

    2004-06-01

    Plasmid DNA has been successfully delivered to mammalian cells by applying a nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress wave (LISW). Cells exposed to a LISW were selectively transfected with plasmids coding for green fluorescent protein. It was also shown that transient, mild cellular heating (~43 °C) was effective in improving the transfection efficiency.

  12. Lead extraction by selective operation of a nanosecond-pulsed 355nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Amir; Bogdan, Stefan; Glikson, Michael; Ishaaya, Amiel A.; Love, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Lead extraction (LE) is necessary for patients who are suffering from a related infection, or in opening venous occlusions that prevent the insertion of additional lead. In severe cases of fibrous encapsulation of the lead within a vein, laser-based cardiac LE has become one of the foremost methods of removal. In cases where the laser radiation (typically at 308 nm wavelength) interacts with the vein wall rather than with the fibrotic lesion, severe injury and subsequent bleeding may occur. Selective tissue ablation was previously demonstrated by a laser operating in the UV regime; however, it requires the use of sensitizers (e.g.: tetracycline). In this study, we present a preliminary examination of efficacy and safety aspects in the use of a nanosecond-pulsed solid-state laser radiation, at 355 nm wavelength, guided in a catheter consisting of optical fibers, in LE. Specifically, we demonstrate a correlation between the tissue elasticity and the catheter advancement rate, in ex-vivo experiments. Our results indicate a selectivity property for specific parameters of the laser radiation and catheter design. The selectivity is attributed to differences in the mechanical properties of the fibrotic tissue and a normal vein wall, leading to a different photomechanical response of the tissue's extracellular matrix. Furthermore, we performed successful in-vivo animal trials, providing a basic proof of concept for using the suggested scheme in LE. Selective operation using a 355 nm laser may reduce the risk of blood vessel perforation as well as the incidence of major adverse events.

  13. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-11-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated.

  14. Nanosecond laser-induced phase transitions in pulsed laser deposition-deposited GeTe films

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xinxing Thelander, Erik; Lorenz, Pierre; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Decker, Ulrich; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-10-07

    Phase transformations between amorphous and crystalline states induced by irradiation of pulsed laser deposition grown GeTe thin films with nanosecond laser pulses at 248 nm and pulse duration of 20 ns are studied. Structural and optical properties of the Ge-Te phase-change films were studied by X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity measurements as a function of the number of laser pulses between 0 and 30 pulses and of the laser fluence up to 195 mJ/cm². A reversible phase transition by using pulse numbers ≥ 5 at a fluence above the threshold fluence between 11 and 14 mJ/cm² for crystallization and single pulses at a fluence between 162 and 182 mJ/cm² for amorphization could be proved. For laser fluences from 36 up to 130 mJ/cm², a high optical contrast of 14.7% between the amorphous and crystalline state is measured. A simple model is used that allows the discussion on the distribution of temperature in dependency on the laser fluence.

  15. Increase of bone volume by a nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation is caused by a decreased osteoclast number and an activated osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Tadashi; Hosoya, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Sano, Kazuo; Nishisaka, Tsuyoshi; Ozawa, Hidehiro

    2007-01-01

    The biostimulatory effects of laser irradiation focus not only in the field of soft tissue but also bone formation. Studies have shown that the light of a nanosecond pulsed laser which has a high peak power can produce stress waves in tissue. We have hypothesized that nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation stimulates bone formation. Our aim was to clarify the mechanism of increased bone volume by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation. Rat femur was irradiated with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which has a wavelength of 1064 nm. The quantification of trabecular architecture using three-dimensional morphometric analysis and measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) using pQCT was performed on day 1, day 3, day 5, and day 7 after laser irradiation. The laser effects on bone cells were also investigated using histological and immunohistochemical analysis. On day 1 after laser irradiation, bone volume (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), and other parameters of the irradiated group did not significantly differ from the non-irradiation group (control). However, the mean BV/TV, Tb.Th, mineral apposition rate, and BMD of the laser group on day 7 after laser irradiation were significantly greater than those of the control. On histological analysis, the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts was lower on day 3 after laser irradiation. Osteoblasts with activated clearance were seen in the laser irradiated group on day 1 and day 3. These data reveal that the increased bone volume by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation causes an increase in osteoblast activity and a decrease in osteoclast number. PMID:16978938

  16. Damage to dry plasmid DNA induced by nanosecond XUV-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Eva; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Ludék; Burian, Tomáš; Grisham, Michael E.; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J.; Juha, Libor

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugar and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. The complexity of lesions produced in DNA by ionizing radiations is thought to depend on the amount of energy deposited at the site of each lesion. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9 nm radiation provided by a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Different surface doses were delivered with a repetition rate of a few Hz and an average pulse energy ~ 1 μJ. A simple model DNA molecule, i.e., dried closed-circular plasmid DNA (pBR322), was irradiated. The agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. Results are compared with a previous study of plasmid DNA irradiated with a single sub-nanosecond 1-keV X-ray pulse produced by a large-scale, double-stream gas puff target, illuminated by sub-kJ, near-infrared (NIR) focused laser pulses at the PALS facility (Prague Asterix Laser System).

  17. A comparison of the characteristics of nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond lasers generated Ag, TiO2 and Au nanoparticles in deionised water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Abubaker; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu

    2015-09-01

    Although there have been large quantities of published work in laser generation of nanoparticles, it is still unclear on the comparative role of laser wavelengths and pulse widths in controlling the nanoparticle sizes, morphology and production rate. In this investigation, Ag, Au and TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesised by nanosecond ( λ = 532 nm, τ = 5 ns), picosecond ( λ = 1064 nm, τ = 10 ps) and femtosecond ( λ = 800 nm, τ = <100 fs) pulse lasers in deionised water. They are compared, in terms of their optical absorption spectra, morphology, size distribution and production rates, characterised by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ablation rates of both Ag and Ti samples were shown as a function of laser pulse energy and water level above the samples. The average size of nanoparticles (10-50 nm) was found to be smaller for the shorter wavelength (532 nm) nanosecond pulsed laser compared with those of picosecond and femtosecond lasers, demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than pulse width in particle size control. The ps laser generated more spherical Ag nanoparticles than those with the ns and fs lasers. Under the same laser processing conditions, Au nanoparticles are smaller than Ag and TiO2, with the latter, the largest. The nanoparticle production rate is relatively independent upon laser types, wavelengths and pulse lengths, but largely determined by the laser fluence and energy deposited.

  18. Investigation of UV Laser Triggered, Nanosecond, Surface Flashover Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W C; Neurath, R; Holmes, C; Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G

    2003-06-03

    Triggered, multi-channel, surface discharges or surface flashover switching have been investigated as a low inductance, low pulse rate switch for conducting large currents. This paper discusses the investigation of UV (355 nm) laser triggered, single channel, low inductance, ns closure and sub-ns jitter switches for applications in switching high dielectric constant, compact pulse forming lines into accelerator loads. The experimental arrangement for evaluating the switch performance and for measuring the high field dielectric constant of the pulse forming lines is presented. Experimental results of delay and jitter measurements versus optical energy on the flashover surface and dc electric field charge.

  19. Morphological effects of nanosecond- and femtosecond-pulsed laser ablation on human middle ear ossicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, Justus F.; Wehner, Martin; Lorenzen, Johann; Bovi, Manfred; Westhofen, Martin

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Since the early 1980's, a considerable number of different laser systems have been introduced into reconstructive middle ear surgery. Depending on the ablation mode, however, pressure transients or thermal load to inner ear structures continue to be subject to discussion. Material and methods: We examined single spot ablations by a nanosecond-pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG-Laser (355 nm, beam diameter 10 μm, pulse rate 2 kHz, power 250 mW) on isolated human mallei. In a second set-up, a similar system (355 nm, beam diameter 20 μm, pulse rate 10 kHz, power 160-1500 mW) was coupled to a scanner to examine the morphology of bone surface ablation over an area of 1mm2. A third set-up employed a femtosecond-pulsed CrLiSAF-Oscillator (850 nm, pulse duration 100 fs, pulse energy 40μJ, beam diameter 36 μm, pulse rate 1 kHz) to compare these results with the former and with those obtained from a commercially available Er:YAG laser for ear surgery (Zeiss ORL E, 2940 nm, single pulse, energy 10-25 mJ). Results: In set-up 1 and 2, thermal effects in terms of marginal carbonization were visible in all single spot ablations of 1 s and longer. With ablations of 0.5 seconds, precise cutting margins with preservation of surrounding tissue could be observed. Cooling with saline solution resulted in no carbonization at 1500 mW and a scan speed of 500 mm/s. Set-up 3 equally showed no carbonization, although scanning times were longer and ablation less pronounced. Conclusion: Ultrashort pulsed laser systems could potentially aid further refinement of reconstructive microsurgery of the middle ear.

  20. Graphite to ultrafine nanocrystalline diamond phase transition model and growth restriction mechanism induced by nanosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2015-10-01

    To have a clear insight into nanocrystal growth from graphite to diamond upon high energy pulsed laser irradiation of graphite suspension, synthesis of ultrafine nanocrystalline diamonds with laser energy set up from 0.3 J to 12 J, repetition rate of 10 Hz has been studied. The method allows synthesizing ultrafine nanocrystalline particles continuously at the ambient temperature and normal pressure. The particle size is shown independent of laser energy, which is ultrafine and ranges in 2-6 nm. The theoretical grown size of nano-diamonds is found in well agreement with the experiment results. Four kinds of production were found: nano-diamond, spherical carbon nano-particles, flocculent amorphous carbon, and graphene nano-ribbon rolls. A solid-vapor-plasma-liquid coexistence model describing phase transition from graphite to diamond induced by nanosecond laser processing was proposed. Graphene nano-ribbon rolls might be the intermediate phase in the conversion from graphite to diamond.

  1. Dependence of multiply charged ions on the polarization state in nanosecond laser-benzene cluster interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiguo; Zhao, Wuduo; Hua, Lei; Hou, Keyong; Li, Haiyang

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigated the dependence of multiply charged ions on the laser polarization state when benzene cluster was irradiated with 532 and 1064 nm nanosecond laser. A circle, square and flower distribution for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed with 532 nm laser respectively, while flower petals for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed at 1064 nm as the laser polarization varied. A theoretical calculation was performed to interpret the polarization state and wavelength dependence of the multiply charged ions. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental observation with considering the contribution from the cluster disintegration.

  2. Membrane electroporation: The absolute rate equation and nanosecond time scale pore creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilkoski, Zlatko; Esser, Axel T.; Gowrishankar, T. R.; Weaver, James C.

    2006-08-01

    The recent applications of nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter electric field pulses to biological systems show striking cellular and subcellular electric field induced effects and revive the interest in the biophysical mechanism of electroporation. We first show that the absolute rate theory, with experimentally based parameter input, is consistent with membrane pore creation on a nanosecond time scale. Secondly we use a Smoluchowski equation-based model to formulate a self-consistent theoretical approach. The analysis is carried out for a planar cell membrane patch exposed to a 10ns trapezoidal pulse with 1.5ns rise and fall times. Results demonstrate reversible supraelectroporation behavior in terms of transmembrane voltage, pore density, membrane conductance, fractional aqueous area, pore distribution, and average pore radius. We further motivate and justify the use of Krassowska’s asymptotic electroporation model for analyzing nanosecond pulses, showing that pore creation dominates the electrical response and that pore expansion is a negligible effect on this time scale.

  3. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using nanosecond laser desorption/femtosecond ionization laser mass spectrometry (FLMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, L.; Tasker, A. D.; Hankin, S. M.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Singhal, R. P.; Fang, X.; McCanny, T.; Kosmidis, C.; Tzallas, P.; Langley, A. J.; Taday, P. F.; Divall, E. J.

    2001-08-01

    Nanosecond laser desorption/femtosecond ionization laser mass spectrometry (LD/FLMS) allows ultra-sensitive detection and trace analysis of atoms and molecules. In this study, we have applied the LD/FLMS technique to the characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using high intensity femtosecond laser pulses (1013-1015 W/cm2) at λ˜395 nm and 790nm coupled to a reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer a series of PAHs have been investigated. In particular, anthracene, tetracene and pentacene are discussed. The spectra presented show intact parent ion at both wavelengths, with little fragmentation at lower ionization laser intensities. This initial data suggests that the optimum wavelength to operate FLMS for PAHs may be 395 nm and not 790 nm for maximum parent ion production. Comparative studies adopting nanosecond ionization are also discussed.

  4. Far-Field Patterns from Dye-Doped Planar-Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystals Under nanosecond Laser Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lukishova, S.G.; Lepeshkin, N.; Boyd, R.W.; Marshall, K.L.

    2006-08-18

    High-definition patterns were observed under 10-Hz-pulse-repetition-rate, nanosecond laser irradiation of azodye-doped planar-nematic liquid crystal layers at incident intensities I ~ 5-10 MW/cm^2 in a single beam configuration and without any feedback involved. An incident polarization parallel to the nematic director was used. Under periodic pulsed laser irradiation, far-field beam patterns at the output of a dye-doped liquid crystal layer changed kaleidoscopically from rings and stripes to multiple hexagons. This pattern-formation regime had a buildup time of several seconds to minutes. We explain the observed effect by diffraction of the laser beam on light-induced micrometer-size inhomogeneities inside the liquid crystal layer with absorption and refraction properties different from the surrounding area. Possible mechanisms of the formation of the inhomogeneities are discussed.

  5. Angular emission of ions and mass deposition from femtosecond and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the angular distribution of ions and atoms emanating from femto- and nanosecond laser-produced metal plasmas under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, aluminum targets are ablated in vacuum employing pulses from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) and an Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). The angular distribution of ion emission as well as the kinetic energy distribution is characterized by a Faraday cup, while a quartz microbalance is used for evaluating deposited mass. The ion and deposited mass features showed that fs laser ablated plasmas produced higher kinetic energy and more mass per pulse than ns plumes over all angles. The ion flux and kinetic energy studies show fs laser plasmas produce narrower angular distribution while ns laser plasmas provide narrower energy distribution.

  6. Production of picosecond, kilojoule, and petawatt laser pulses via Raman amplification of nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Trines, R M G M; Fiúza, F; Bingham, R; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Cairns, R A; Norreys, P A

    2011-09-01

    Raman amplification in plasma has been promoted as a means of compressing picosecond optical laser pulses to femtosecond duration to explore the intensity frontier. Here we show for the first time that it can be used, with equal success, to compress laser pulses from nanosecond to picosecond duration. Simulations show up to 60% energy transfer from pump pulse to probe pulse, implying that multikilojoule ultraviolet petawatt laser pulses can be produced using this scheme. This has important consequences for the demonstration of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion. PMID:21981507

  7. Laser-induced damage threshold of silicon in millisecond, nanosecond, and picosecond regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Shen, Z. H.; Lu, J.; Ni, X. W.

    2010-08-15

    Millisecond, nanosecond, and picosecond laser pulse induced damage thresholds on single-crystal are investigated in this study. The thresholds of laser-induced damage on silicon are calculated theoretically for three pulse widths based on the thermal damage model. An axisymmetric mathematical model is established for the transient temperature field of the silicon. Experiments are performed to test the damage thresholds of silicon at various pulse widths. The results indicate that the damage thresholds obviously increase with the increasing of laser pulse width. Additionally, the experimental results agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulation results.

  8. Mono-energetic ions emission by nanosecond laser solid target irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muoio, A.; Tudisco, S.; Altana, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Trifirò, A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in nanosecond domain has been carried out at the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS, Catania. Pure Al targets were irradiated by 6 ns laser pulses at different pumping energies, up to 2 J. Advanced diagnostics tools were used to characterize the plasma plume and ion production. We show the preliminary results of this experimental campaign, and especially the ones showing the production of multicharged ions having very narrow energy spreads.

  9. Controlled oxide films formation by nanosecond laser pulses for color marking.

    PubMed

    Veiko, Vadim; Odintsova, Galina; Ageev, Eduard; Karlagina, Yulia; Loginov, Anatoliy; Skuratova, Alexandra; Gorbunova, Elena

    2014-10-01

    A technology of laser-induced coloration of metals by surface oxidation is demonstrated. Each color of the oxide film corresponds to a technologic chromacity coefficient, which takes into account the temperature of the sample after exposure by sequence of laser pulses with nanosecond duration and effective time of action. The coefficient can be used for the calculation of laser exposure regimes for the development of a specific color on the metal. A correlation between the composition of the films obtained on the surface of stainless steel AISI 304 and commercial titanium Grade 2 and its color and chromacity coordinates is shown. PMID:25322009

  10. Escherichia coli identification and strain discrimination using nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Jonathan; Rehse, Steven J.; Palchaudhuri, Sunil

    2007-04-01

    Three strains of Escherichia coli, one strain of environmental mold, and one strain of Candida albicans yeast have been analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using nanosecond laser pulses. All microorganisms were analyzed while still alive and with no sample preparation. Nineteen atomic and ionic emission lines have been identified in the spectrum, which is dominated by calcium, magnesium, and sodium. A discriminant function analysis has been used to discriminate between the biotypes and E. coli strains. This analysis showed efficient discrimination between laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra from different strains of a single bacteria species.

  11. Nonlinear-optical transformation of nanosecond laser pulses and controlled supercontinuum generation in photonic-crystal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, I. V. Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2007-11-15

    Photonic-crystal fibers are shown to allow efficient spectral transformation of nanosecond laser pulses through parametric four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman scattering. Regimes providing highly efficient transformation of nanosecond laser pulses into white-light broadband radiation (supercontinuum) are identified. A strong parametric coupling between Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman sidebands around the wavelength of zero group-velocity dispersion is shown to increase the bandwidth and to improve the spectral quality of supercontinuum radiation.

  12. Laser breakdown in alcohols and water induced by λ = 1064 nm nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalchuk, Tatiana; Toker, Gregory; Bulatov, Valery; Schechter, Israel

    2010-11-01

    Laser breakdown, induced by nanosecond pulses of 1064 nm wavelength, was studied in four alcohols and in water. The time dependent structure and physical properties of the breakdown were measured at high temporal and spatial resolutions, using Mach-Zehnder interferometry, shadow and Schlieren diagnostic techniques. The results indicate that just after the laser pulse the spark column has essentially discrete character and in all liquids it consists of a train of plasma micro-balls, triggered by microscopic inclusion particles. At longer times, namely in a few nanoseconds, micro-bubbles and associated micro-spherical shockwaves appear. These structures and their time-evolution were measured. Warmed channels were observed in the focal volume in all studied liquids.

  13. Short and long-term phototoxicity in cells expressing genetic reporters under nanosecond laser exposure.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Sven; Estrada, Héctor; Degtyaruk, Oleksiy; Rebling, Johannes; Klymenko, Olena; Rosemann, Michael; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Nanosecond-duration laser pulses are exploited in a plethora of therapeutic and diagnostic applications, such as optoacoustic imaging. However, phototoxicity effects of pulsed radiation in living cells, in particular those expressing genetic reporters, are not well understood. We established a three-dimensional fluorescent protein expressing cellular model in order to reliably investigate the extent and major exposure parameters responsible for both photobleaching and phototoxicity under pulsed laser exposure, unveiling a variety of possible effects on living cells, from reversible photobleaching to cytotoxicity and cell death. Significant losses of fluorescence levels were identified when exposing the cells to illumination conditions considered safe under common standards for skin exposure in diagnostic imaging applications. Thus, the use of photolabile fluorescent proteins and their in vivo exposure parameters have to be designed carefully for all applications using pulsed nanosecond radiation. In particular, loss of signal due to bleaching may significantly alter signals in longitudinal measurements, making data quantification challenging. PMID:26280948

  14. Laser-induced damage of hafnia coatings as a function of pulse duration in the femtosecond to nanosecond range

    SciTech Connect

    Gallais, Laurent; Mangote, Benoit; Zerrad, Myriam; Commandre, Mireille; Melninkaitis, Andrius; Mirauskas, Julius; Jeskevic, Maksim; Sirutkaitis, Valdas

    2011-03-20

    Laser-damage thresholds and morphologies of hafnia single layers exposed under femtosecond, picosecond, and nanosecond single pulses (1030/1064nm) are reported. The samples were made with different deposition parameters in order to study how the damage behavior of the samples evolves with the pulse duration and how it is linked to the deposition process. In the femtosecond to picosecond regime, the scaling law of the laser-induced damage threshold as a function of pulse duration is in good agreement with the models of photo and avalanche ionization based on the rate equation for free electron generation. However, differences in the damage morphologies between samples are shown. No correlation between the nanosecond and femtosecond/picosecond laser-damage resistance of hafnia coatings could be established. We also report evidence of the transition in damage mechanisms for hafnia, from an ablation process linked to intrinsic properties of the material to a defect-induced process, that exists between a few picoseconds and a few tens of picoseconds.

  15. Micromachining of Ti-3Al-2.5V tubes by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yaomin; Gupta, Mool C.

    2013-03-01

    Laser micromachining is one of many laser material processing technologies employed in scientific research and engineering applications. It involves the deposition of photon energy and the material interaction. The intense photothermal energy is transported into the target material causing melting and evaporation. The material is removed layer by layer by melting and flowing away or by direct vaporization / ablation. It is due to the focused small spot size that the laser micromachining can remove material in small quantity at a time, thus precise control of geometrical dimension is possible. In this work, a nanosecond pulsed Nd:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was employed to generate relatively long notch of different dimensions (25.4 mm-length × 0.1 mm-width × 0.051/0.102/0.152 mmdepth) on Ti-3Al-2.5V seamless tubes for fatigue life study. Cyclic hydraulic impulse pressure test was conducted to find out the fatigue limits of the titanium tube containing the laser micromachined notch. The results of fatigue lives, crack profile and pattern of crack propagation are presented and discussed in this paper. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to characterize the fatigue crack profile and the laser micronotch. The capability of generating sharper notch root and consistent pre-crack on the surface of materials makes nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser a great choice in preparing for fatigue test samples for crack growth life study.

  16. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  17. Time resolved optical methods for investigation of phase transformations in materials exposed to nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martan, J.; Semmar, N.; Cibulka, O.

    2011-06-01

    Infrared (IR) radiometry and time resolved reflectivity (TRR) methods can be used for investigation of laser pulse effects on materials in nanosecond time scale. The methods in combination are capable to quantify object temperature and detect phase transformations in the solid state, melting and plasma formation from vapour. Measurements with different laser pulse energy densities provide threshold of the transformation. The melt duration can be also determined. The experimental system is described. It contains KrF excimer laser with homogenizer and variable attenuator, fast IR detector for radiometry, continuous probing laser with Si photodiode for reflectivity measurement and UV detector for pump laser pulse reflection measurement. The system was applied to investigation of responses to laser light of silicon and different pure metals and alloys. The range of energy densities used was 1-5500 mJ.cm-2 and measurements were done with temporal resolution of 6 ns for radiometry and 1 ns for reflectivity.

  18. Low-order harmonic generation in metal ablation plasmas in nanosecond and picosecond laser regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Arias, M.; Oujja, M.; Sanz, M.; Castillejo, M.; Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Satlikov, N. Kh.; Tugushev, R. I.; Usmanov, T.

    2012-02-15

    Low-order harmonics, third and fifth, of IR (1064 nm) laser emission have been produced in laser ablation plasmas of the metals manganese, copper and silver. The harmonics were generated in a process triggered by laser ablation followed by frequency up-conversion of a fundamental laser beam that propagates parallel to the target surface. These studies were carried out in two temporal regimes by creating the ablation plasma using either nanosecond or picosecond pulses and then probing the plasma plume with pulses of the same duration. The spatiotemporal behavior of the generated harmonics was characterized and reveals the distinct composition and dynamics of the plasma species that act as nonlinear media, allowing the comparison of different processes that control the generation efficiency. These results serve to guide the choice of laser ablation plasmas to be used for efficient high harmonic generation of laser radiation.

  19. Optical properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) during nanosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankova, N. E.; Atanasov, P. A.; Nikov, Ru. G.; Nikov, R. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Stoyanchov, T. R.; Fukata, N.; Kolev, K. N.; Valova, E. I.; Georgieva, J. S.; Armyanov, St. A.

    2016-06-01

    This article presents experimental investigations of effects of the process parameters on the medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer processed by laser source with irradiation at UV (266 and 355 nm), VIS (532 nm) and NIR (1064 nm). Systematic experiments are done to characterize how the laser beam parameters (wavelength, fluence, and number of pulses) affect the optical properties and the chemical composition in the laser treated areas. Remarkable changes of the optical properties and the chemical composition are observed. Despite the low optical absorption of the native PDMS for UV, VIS and NIR wavelengths, successful laser treatment is accomplished due to the incubation process occurring below the polymer surface. With increasing of the fluence and the number of the pulses chemical transformations are revealed in the entire laser treated area and hence decreasing of the optical transmittance is observed. The incubation gets saturation after a certain number of pulses and the laser ablation of the material begins efficiently. At the UV and VIS wavelengths the number of the initial pulses, at which the optical transmittance begins to reduce, decreases from 16 up to 8 with increasing of the laser fluence up to 1.0, 2.5 and 10 J cm-2 for 266, 355 and 532 nm, respectively. In the case of 1064 nm the optical transmittance begins to reduce at 11th pulse incident at a fluence of 13 J cm-2 and the number of the pulses decreases to 8 when the fluence reaches value of 16 J cm-2. The threshold laser fluence needed to induce incubation process after certain number of pulses of 8 is different for every wavelength irradiation as the values increase from 1.0 for 266 nm up to 16 J cm-2 for 1064 nm. The incubation and the ablation processes occur in the PDMS elastomer material during its pulsed laser treatment are a complex function of the wavelength, fluence, number of pulses and the material properties as well.

  20. Effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on the surface nanostructure of Au thin films on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ruixuan; Meng, Xuan; Takayanagi, Shinya; Shibayama, Tamaki Yatsu, Shigeo; Ishioka, Junya; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-04-14

    Ion irradiation and short-pulsed laser irradiation can be used to form nanostructures on the surfaces of substrates. This work investigates the synergistic effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on surface nanostructuring of Au thin films deposited under vacuum on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates. Gold nanoparticles are randomly formed on the surface of the substrate after nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation under vacuum at a wavelength of 532 nm with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and laser energy density of 0.124 kJ/m{sup 2}. Gold nanoparticles are also randomly formed on the substrate after 100-keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiation at doses of up to 3.8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and nearly all of these nanoparticles are fully embedded in the substrate. With increasing ion irradiation dose (number of incident laser pulses), the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles decreases (increases). However, Au nanoparticles are only formed in a periodic surface arrangement after co-irradiation with 6000 laser pulses and 3.8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The periodic distance is ∼540 nm, which is close to the wavelength of the nanosecond-pulsed laser, and the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles remains at ∼20 nm with a relatively narrow distribution. The photoabsorption peaks of the ion- or nanosecond-pulsed laser-irradiated samples clearly correspond to the mean diameter of Au nanoparticles. Conversely, the photoabsorption peaks for the co-irradiated samples do not depend on the mean nanoparticle diameter. This lack of dependence is likely caused by the periodic nanostructure formed on the surface by the synergistic effects of co-irradiation.

  1. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS. PMID:26695078

  2. Nanosecond Carbon-Dioxide Laser Interaction with a Dense Helium Z-Pinch Plasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, David Frederick

    A short pulse CO(,2) laser system was constructed to investigate the interaction of intense electromagnetic radiation with dense plasma. The laser was focused perpendicular to the axis of a linear helium Z-pinch plasma and properties of the transmitted beam were monitored. Transmitted beam intensity and spatial distribution were measured as functions of incident intensity and interaction time. The short pulse laser system consisted of a single -mode oscillator, pulse switch, amplifiers, and focusing optics. The oscillator was a transversely-excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) discharge module having an intracavity CW gain tube for single-mode operation. The pulse selector was a germanium semiconductor reflection switch controlled by a pulse-transmission model (PTM) ruby laser. Switched 10.6 micron pulses were preamplified in a triple-pass double -discharge TEA module and boosted to maximum power in a commercial large aperture amplifier. The laser beam from the final amplifier was focused onto the plasma by a modified Newtonian telescope. The system was capable of producing 4 nanosecond (full width at half maximum) pulses containing up to 2.7 joules. The focused intensity on target is greater than 10('12) W/cm('2) in a 125 micron diameter focal spot. The plasma was a pulsed linear Z-pinch having a peak density of 4 x 10('19)/cm('3) in a 3 mm column at a temperature of 20 eV. The plasma density is known from holographic interferometry, and the temperature was inferred from visible wavelength spectroscopy and x-ray diagnostics. Depending on the time of laser incidence, the highly collisional plasma provided either an overdense or an underdense target. Previous work with 40 nanosecond pulses revealed penetration of the critical region of the plasma. The transmitted pulse was strongly modified, and the transmitted spatial distribution was characteristic of diffraction through a hard, circular aperture. No penetration was observed with the 4 nanosecond pulses incident on

  3. 105 W ultra-narrowband nanosecond pulsed laser at 2 μm based on monolithic Tm-doped fiber MOPA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Jin, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Hu; Liu, Zejin

    2015-02-23

    We present a high power ultra-narrowband pulsed fiber amplifier at 2 μm. A single frequency fiber laser was modulated by a phase modulator and an intensity modulator to serve as the ultra-narrowband pulsed seed laser with a bandwidth of 307 MHz. The pulsed seed laser was amplified by a monolithic Tm-doped fiber master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA). The average output power reaches 105 W with a slope efficiency of 0.41. The output pulse train has a repetition rate of 1 MHz and a pulse width of 66 ns. The output power is limited by the onset of stimulated Brillouin scattering. Higher output power can be achieved by further broadening the linewidth or narrowing the pulse width to several nanoseconds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration on a monolithic ultra-narrowband nanosecond pulsed MOPA at 2 μm with an average power exceeding 100 W. PMID:25836461

  4. Role of suprathermal electrons during nanosecond laser energy deposit in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Grua, P.; Hébert, D.; Lamaignère, L.; Rullier, J.-L.

    2014-08-25

    An accurate description of interaction between a nanosecond laser pulse and a wide band gap dielectric, such as fused silica, requires the understanding of energy deposit induced by temperature changes occurring in the material. In order to identify the fundamental processes involved in laser-matter interaction, we have used a 1D computational model that allows us to describe a wide set of physical mechanisms and intended for comparison with specially designed “1D experiments.” We have pointed out that suprathermal electrons are very likely implicated in heat conduction, and this assumption has allowed the model to reproduce the experiments.

  5. Fabrication of three-dimensional microfluidic channels inside glass using nanosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changning; Liao, Yang; He, Fei; Shen, Yinglong; Chen, Danping; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2012-02-13

    We show that fabrication of three-dimensional microfluidic channels embedded in glass can be achieved by using a Q-switched, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The processing mainly consists of two steps: (1) formation of hollow microfluidic channels in porous glass immersed in Rhodamine 6G dissolved in water by nanosecond laser ablation; and (2) postannealing of the fabricated porous glass sample at 1120 °C for consolidation of the sample. In particular, a bilayer microfluidic structure is created in glass substrate using this technique for showcasing its capability of three-dimensional structuring. PMID:22418188

  6. Escherichia coli identification and strain discrimination using nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehse, Steven; Diedrich, Jonathan; Palchaudhuri, Sunil

    2007-06-01

    Three strains of Escherichia coli, one strain of black mold and one strain of Candida albicans yeast have been analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using nanosecond laser pulses. All microorganisms were analyzed while still alive and with no sample preparation. Nineteen atomic and ionic emission lines have been identified in the spectrum, which is dominated by calcium, magnesium and sodium. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) has been used to discriminate between the bio-types and E. coli strains. This is the first demonstration of the ability of the LIBS technique to differentiate between different strains of a single species.

  7. 200 Hz repetition frequency joule-level high beam quality Nd:YAG nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jisi; Tang, Xiongxin; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Haocheng

    2016-06-01

    A joule-level Nd:YAG nanosecond laser of high repetition frequency and high beam quality is developed out. The laser is designed as a MOPA system mainly including single longitudinal mode seed, pre-amplifier unit an d power amplifier unit. In order to obtain the high-quality laser beam output, phase conjugation is adopted to compensate the laser beam distortion. Under the condition of 200 Hz high repetition frequency and 8.19 μJ single pulse energy injected by the single longitudinal mode seed, 1.53 J output energy is gained. The output laser beam is of 9 mm diameter, 7.41 ns pulse width, the far field beam spot 1.32 times the value of the diffraction limit, 1.2% energy stability (RMS) and less than 13 μrad far field beam spot angle shift.

  8. UV laser removal of varnish on tempera paints with nanosecond and femtosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Oujja, Mohamed; García, Ana; Romero, Carolina; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Moreno, Pablo; Castillejo, Marta

    2011-03-14

    Two laser cleaning approaches based on ablation by ultraviolet laser pulses of femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) durations for the removal of shellac varnish from egg-yolk based tempera paints are investigated. Laser irradiation effects, induced on the varnish layer and on the underlying temperas by multiple pulses in the fs domain at 398 and 265 nm and single pulses in the ns domain at 213 nm, were examined following a spectroanalytical approach. By using optical microscopy, colorimetry and laser induced fluorescence it was found that irradiation of the varnished temperas with fs pulses changes the texture of the varnish surface and results in degradation of the underlying coloured paint. In contrast, operating with pulses of 15 ns at the highly absorbed wavelength of 213 nm, controlled micrometric layer removal of the varnish is possible without noticeable modification of the coloured temperas. These results widen the choice of laser conditions for painting restoration. PMID:21264373

  9. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10-6%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon-acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  10. Microfabrication of Polyethylene Using Femtosecond Ti:sapphire Laser and Nanosecond ArF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoshi, Masayuki; Inoue, Narumi

    2003-09-01

    We used a 790 nm, 130 fs Ti:sapphire laser, its second harmonics and a 193 nm, 23 ns ArF laser to ablate polyethylene. The 790 nm fs laser could yield a pattern of etched holes in the exposed areas, and no traces of molten material could be observed in the etched areas. Moreover, the fs laser did not change the chemical composition of the ablated surface. We also mixed a faint beam of the second harmonics (395 nm) with the 790 nm fs laser, thus increasing the etching rate. The second harmonics led to the formation of a modified layer in polyethylene, and it absorbed the subsequent 790 nm fs laser effectively. The chemical composition of the ablated surface in this case too, remained unchanged. Using the 193 nm ns laser, aluminum films could be formed selectively only on the ablated areas, by a combination of vacuum evaporation and ultrasonic washing.

  11. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Cikhardt, J.; Rezac, K.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Sila, O.

    2015-09-15

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 8} at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 9} with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 8 }n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 10{sup 14} deuterons in the 0.5–2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 10{sup 9} at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 10{sup 6 }n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  12. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    PubMed

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power. PMID:24007048

  13. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh, P. H.; Trong, V. D.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  14. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis. PMID:21950944

  15. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  16. Bipolar high-repetition-rate high-voltage nanosecond pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Fuqiang; Wang Yi; Shi Hongsheng; Lei Qingquan

    2008-06-15

    The pulser designed is mainly used for producing corona plasma in waste water treatment system. Also its application in study of dielectric electrical properties will be discussed. The pulser consists of a variable dc power source for high-voltage supply, two graded capacitors for energy storage, and the rotating spark gap switch. The key part is the multielectrode rotating spark gap switch (MER-SGS), which can ensure wider range modulation of pulse repetition rate, longer pulse width, shorter pulse rise time, remarkable electrical field distortion, and greatly favors recovery of the gap insulation strength, insulation design, the life of the switch, etc. The voltage of the output pulses switched by the MER-SGS is in the order of 3-50 kV with pulse rise time of less than 10 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1-3 kHz. An energy of 1.25-125 J per pulse and an average power of up to 10-50 kW are attainable. The highest pulse repetition rate is determined by the driver motor revolution and the electrode number of MER-SGS. Even higher voltage and energy can be switched by adjusting the gas pressure or employing N{sub 2} as the insulation gas or enlarging the size of MER-SGS to guarantee enough insulation level.

  17. Spatial and temporal dependence of interspark interactions in femtosecond-nanosecond dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scaffidi, Jon; Pearman, William; Lawrence, Marion; Carter, J Chance; Colston, Bill W; Angel, S Michael

    2004-09-20

    A femtosecond air spark has recently been combined with a nanosecond ablative pulse in order to map the spatial and temporal interactions of the two plasmas in femtosecond-nanosecond orthogonal preablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Good spatial and temporal correlation was found for reduced atomic emission from atmospheric species (nitrogen and oxygen) and increased atomic emission from ablated species (copper and aluminum) in the femtosecond-nanosecond plasma, suggesting a potential role for atmospheric pressure or nitrogen/oxygen concentration reduction following air spark formation in generating atomic emission enhancements in dual-pulse LIBS. PMID:15473246

  18. Spatial and Temporal Dependence of Interspark Interactions in Femtosecond-Nanosecond Dual-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaffidi, Jon; Pearman, William; Lawrence, Marion; Chance Carter, J.; Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Angel, S. Michael

    2004-09-01

    A femtosecond air spark has recently been combined with a nanosecond ablative pulse in order to map the spatial and temporal interactions of the two plasmas in femtosecond-nanosecond orthogonal preablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Good spatial and temporal correlation was found for reduced atomic emission from atmospheric species (nitrogen and oxygen) and increased atomic emission from ablated species (copper and aluminum) in the femtosecond-nanosecond plasma, suggesting a potential role for atmospheric pressure or nitrogen/oxygen concentration reduction following air spark formation in generating atomic emission enhancements in dual-pulse LIBS.

  19. Amplitude decay of photoacoustic signals in biological tissue when irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, Richard J.; Li, Teng; Gondek, Grzegorz

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we report on sequential decreases in the amplitude of photoacoustic (PA) signals from nanosecond laser pulse irradiation of various samples. These samples include biological tissues, such as dental-enamel and chicken/turkey breast as well as some non-biological samples. Laser energy densities in the range of 80mJ/cm2 to 300mJ/cm2 were used in our experiments, typical of those used in PA imaging regimes. Induced temperature rises are modelled to show that the average temperature rise for each pulse in those biological tissues is less than one degree centigrade. Measurements reveal a rapid decay of photoacoustic signals within the first few laser pulses absorbed by the sample and this decay is irreversible in the short term. The phenomenon indicates that laser irradiation interacts with biological samples, causing long-term physical changes that can be attributed to a reduction of optical absorption within the samples.

  20. Anomalous self-generated electrostatic fields in nanosecond laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lancia, L.; Antici, P.; Grech, M.; Weber, S.; Marques, J.-R.; Romagnani, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Bellue, A.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaie, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Grismayer, T.; Lin, T.; Nkonga, B.; Kodama, R.

    2011-03-15

    Electrostatic (E) fields associated with the interaction of a well-controlled, high-power, nanosecond laser pulse with an underdense plasma are diagnosed by proton radiography. Using a current three-dimensional wave propagation code equipped with nonlinear and nonlocal hydrodynamics, we can model the measured E-fields that are driven by the laser ponderomotive force in the region where the laser undergoes filamentation. However, strong fields of up to 110 MV/m measured in the first millimeter of propagation cannot be reproduced in the simulations. This could point to the presence of unexpected strong thermal electron pressure gradients possibly linked to ion acoustic turbulence, thus emphasizing the need for the development of full kinetic collisional simulations in order to properly model laser-plasma interaction in these strongly nonlinear conditions.

  1. Effect of nanosecond pulse laser ablation on the surface morphology of Zr-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunhu; Fu, Jie; Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the ripple patterns formation on the surface of Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (vit1) bulk metallic glass using a nanosecond pulse laser ablation in air with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The strong thermal ablation phenomenon could be observed on vit1 BMG surface at laser energy of 200 mJ as a result of the adhibition of confining overlay. Many periodic ripples had formed on the edge of the ablated area at laser energy of 400 mJ because of the high intensity pulsed laser beam. The underlying mechanism of the periodic ripples formation could be explained by the K-H hydrodynamic instability theory. It had been shown that laser ablation with 600 mJ and 200 pulses results in the formation of many micro-cracks on the ablated area. Further analysis showed that the spatial occupation of the laser ablated area and the spacing between two adjacent ripples increased as the laser energy and the number of incident laser pulses increasing. The surface ripples feature on the edge of ablated area became more obvious with increasing laser pulses, but it was not correlated closely with the laser energies variation.

  2. Simulation of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of copper samples: A focus on laser induced plasma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, M.; Mehrabian, S.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2008-09-01

    A thermal model for nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Cu in one dimension and in ambient gas, He at 1 atm, is proposed in which equations concerning heat conduction in the target and gas dynamics in the plume are solved. These equations are coupled to each other through the energy and mass balances at interface between the target and the vapor and also Knudsen layer conditions. By assumption of local thermal equilibrium, Saha-Eggert equations are used to investigate plasma formation. The shielding effect of the plasma, due to photoionization and inverse bremsstrahlung processes, is considered. Bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation and spectral emissions of the plasma are also investigated. Spatial and temporal distribution of the target temperature, number densities of Cu and He, pressure and temperature of the plume, bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation, and also spectral emissions of Cu at three wavelengths (510, 516, and 521 nm) are obtained. Results show that the spectral power of Cu lines has the same pattern as CuI relative intensities from National Institute of Standard and Technology. Investigation of spatially integrated bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation, and also Cu spectral emissions indicates that although in early times the bremsstrahlung radiation dominates the two other radiations, the Copper spectral emission is the dominant radiation in later times. It should be mentioned that the blackbody radiation has the least values in both time intervals. The results can be used for prediction of the optimum time and position of the spectral line emission, which is applicable in some time resolved spectroscopic techniques such as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Furthermore, the results suggest that for distinguishing between the spectral emission and the bremsstrahlung radiation, a spatially resolved spectroscopy can be used instead of the time resolved one.

  3. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  4. In vivo imaging rhodopsin distribution in the photoreceptors with nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Liu, Xiaojing; Wen, Rong; Lam, Byron L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhodopsin is a biomarker for the function of rod photoreceptors, the dysfunction of which is related to many blinding diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Imaging rhodopsin quantitatively may provide a powerful clinical tool for diagnosis of these diseases. To map rhodopsin distribution accurately in the retina, absorption by rhodopsin intermediates need to be minimized. Methods and materials We developed nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) to image rhodopsin distribution in the retina. The system takes advantage of the light-induced shift of rhodopsin absorption spectra, which in turn affects the fundus spectral reflection before and after photo-bleaching. By imaging the retina twice, one in the dark-adapted state and the other one in the light-adapted state, the rhodopsin absorption change can be calculated from the differential image, which is a function of the rhodopsin concentration in the rod photoreceptors. Results The system was successfully applied to in vivo imaging of rat retina in different bleaching conditions to verify its feasibility. Our studies showed that the differential image between the dark- and light-adapted states represents rhodopsin distribution in the retina. We also conducted a dynamic bleaching experiment to prove the importance of reducing light absorption of rhodopsin intermediates. Conclusions The preliminary results showed that our nano-second pulsed-light SLO is promising in imaging the functional biomarker of the rod photoreceptors. By using nanosecond pulsed laser, in which one laser pulse generates one pixel of the image, the absorption of rhodopsin intermediates can be reduced. PMID:25694955

  5. Nanosecond pulse passively Q-switched Yb-doped fiber laser with Cr4+: YAG as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Pu

    2011-06-01

    We report a passively Q-switched Yb-doped fiber laser with Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber and get stable nanosecond pulse trains. Three kinds of laser cavity configurations, including a cladding-pumped ring cavity, a cladding-pumped linear cavity and a core-pumped linear cavity were studied, and they all can effectively restrain the generation of Stimulated Brillouin scattering and the generation of self-pulse. Cladding-pumped ring-avity fiber laser with Cr4+:YAG as saturable absorber inside is established for the first time to obtain stable 1 μs pulse trains. The amplitude fluctuation and timing jitter are below 5% (rms). Further more, we can also get stable pulse trains by using a high reflective fiber Bragging grating as a resonator mirror in a cladding-pumped linear cavity and a core-pumped linear cavity fiber laser respectively. In the cladding-pumped linear cavity fiber laser, the tunable pulse repetition rate is from 9.1 kHz to 30.3 kHz and the minimum pulse duration is 156 ns. And in the core-pumped linear cavity fiber laser, the tunable pulse repetition rate is from 15 kHz to 33 kHz and the minimum pulse duration is 24 ns which much less than those reported before. Although the average output power is only hundreds milli-Watts now, the laser uses a fiber coupler as the output of pulse trains, it is convinient to boost the power with a stage of fiber amplifier. This kind of pulse laser can be used as a seed source, and amplified to tens of Watts for practical applications in the future.

  6. Sub-500-nm patterning of glass by nanosecond KrF excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekesi, J.; Meinertz, J.; Simon, P.; Ihlemann, J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of flint glass of type F2 is patterned by nanosecond KrF excimer laser ablation. Strong UV absorption provides a comparatively low ablation threshold and precise ablation contours. By using a two-grating interferometer, periodic surface patterns with 330 nm period and 100 nm modulation depth are obtained. This method enables the fabrication of 7 mm×13 mm wide grating areas with perfectly aligned grooves without the need of high-precision sample positioning. By double exposure, crossed gratings with adjustable depths in the two orthogonal directions can be generated.

  7. Evaluation of explosive sublimation as the mechanism of nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten under vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Farid, Nazar; Sun, Liying; Fu, Cailong; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    A non-equilibrium mechanism for nanosecond laser ablation is suggested herein, and its predictions are compared to the results of W experiments performed under vacuum conditions. A mechanism of particle formation is explained via this model, with partial sublimation of the superheated irradiated zone of the target considered to be the mechanism of laser ablation. In this study, a mixture of vapor and particles was explosively generated and subsequently prevented the rest of a laser pulse from reaching its intended target. This mechanism was found to play an essential role in the ablation of W under vacuum conditions, and it provides a theoretical justification for particle formation. Moreover, special considerations were taken into account for the expansion of plasma into a vacuum. The model was evaluated by measuring the mass of ablated particles using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The results of this model were found to be in good agreement with experimental values.

  8. Thermodynamics of nanosecond nanobubble formation at laser-excited metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siems, A.; Weber, S. A. L.; Boneberg, J.; Plech, A.

    2011-04-01

    The nonlinear thermal behavior of laser-heated gold nanoparticles in aqueous suspension is determined by time-resolved optical spectroscopy and x-ray scattering. The nanoparticles can be excited transiently to high lattice temperatures owing to their large absorption cross-section and slow heat dissipation to the surrounding. A consequence is the observation of lattice expansion, changed optical transmission, vapor bubble formation or particle melting. The heat transfer equations are solved for two limiting cases of heat pulses shorter and longer than the characteristic cooling time. The results of pulsed excitation with femtosecond and nanosecond lasers are explained by the theoretical prediction, and the bubble formation is interpreted by a spinodal decomposition at the particle-liquid interface. It is shown that both the laser spectroscopy and x-ray scattering results agree qualitatively and quantitatively, underlining the validity of the comprehensive model.

  9. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  10. Picosecond and nanosecond laser annealing and simulation of amorphous silicon thin films for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakos, I.; Zergioti, I.; Vamvakas, V.; Tsoukalas, D.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a picosecond diode pumped solid state laser and a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser have been used for the annealing and the partial nano-crystallization of an amorphous silicon layer. These experiments were conducted as an alternative/complementary to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method for fabrication of micromorph tandem solar cell. The laser experimental work was combined with simulations of the annealing process, in terms of temperature distribution evolution, in order to predetermine the optimum annealing conditions. The annealed material was studied, as a function of several annealing parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, fluence), as far as it concerns its structural properties, by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and micro-Raman techniques.

  11. Nanosecond near-spinodal homogeneous boiling of water superheated by a pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, Susan D.

    2007-03-01

    The fast boiling dynamics of superheated surface layers of bulk water cavitating under near-spinodal conditions during nanosecond CO2 laser heating pulses was studied using contact broad-band photoacoustic spectroscopy. Characteristic pressure-tension cycles recorded by an acoustic transducer at different incident laser fluences represent (a) weak random oscillations of transient nanometer-sized near-critical bubbles-precursors and (b) well-defined stimulated oscillations of micron-sized supercritical bubbles and their submicrosecond coalescence products. These findings provide an important insight into basic thermodynamic parameters, spatial and temporal scales of bubble nucleation during explosive liquid/vapor transformations in absorbing liquids ablated by short laser pulses in the thermal confinement regime.

  12. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  13. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daiem, A. M.; Ansari, M. Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S.; Salah, Numan A.; Al-Mujtaba, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  14. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadeethi, Y; Al-Jedani, S; Razvi, M A N; Saeed, A; Abdel-Daiem, A M; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S; Salah, Numan A; Al-Mujtaba, A

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  15. Surface morphological modification of crosslinked hydrophilic co-polymers by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primo, Gastón A.; Alvarez Igarzabal, Cecilia I.; Pino, Gustavo A.; Ferrero, Juan C.; Rossa, Maximiliano

    2016-04-01

    This work reports an investigation of the surface modifications induced by irradiation with nanosecond laser pulses of ultraviolet and visible wavelengths on crosslinked hydrophilic co-polymeric materials, which have been functionalized with 1-vinylimidazole as a co-monomer. A comparison is made between hydrogels differing in the base co-monomer (N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide) and in hydration state (both swollen and dried states). Formation of craters is the dominant morphological change observed by ablation in the visible at 532 nm, whereas additional, less aggressive surface modifications, chiefly microfoams and roughness, are developed in the ultraviolet at 266 nm. At both irradiation wavelengths, threshold values of the incident laser fluence for the observation of the various surface modifications are determined under single-pulse laser irradiation conditions. It is shown that multiple-pulse irradiation at 266 nm with a limited number of laser shots can be used alternatively for generating a regular microfoam layer at the surface of dried hydrogels based on N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate. The observations are rationalized on the basis of currently accepted mechanisms for laser-induced polymer surface modification, with a significant contribution of the laser foaming mechanism. Prospective applications of the laser-foamed hydrogel matrices in biomolecule immobilization are suggested.

  16. Modeling of nanosecond-laser ablation: calculations based on a nonstationary averaging technique (spatial moments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, N. D.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris S.; Bityurin, Nikita M.; Baeuerle, D.

    1998-09-01

    Semi-analytical approach to a quantitative analysis of thermal ns laser ablation is presented. It permits one to take into account: (1) Arbitrary temperature dependences of material parameters, such as the specific heat, thermal conductivity, absorptivity, absorption coefficient, etc. (2) Arbitrary temporal profiles of the laser pulse. (3) Strong (Arrhenius- type) dependence of the ablation velocity on the temperature of the ablation front, which leads to a non-steady movement of the ablation boundary during the (single) pulse. (4) Screening of the incoming radiation by the ablated products. (5) Influence of the ablation (vaporization) enthalpy on the heating process. (6) Influence of melting and/or other phase transformations. The nonlinear heat conduction equation is reduced to three ordinary differential equations which describe the evolution of the surface temperature, spatial width of the enthalpy distribution, and the ablated depth. Due to its speed and flexibility, the method provides powerful tool for the fast analysis of the experimental data. The influence of different factors onto ablation curves (ablated depth h vs. fluence (phi) ) is studied. Analytical formulas for (phi) th and h((phi) ) dependences are derived and discussed. The ablation curves reveal three regions of fluence: Arrhenius region, linear region, and screening region. Threshold fluence (phi) th and Arrhenius tails at (phi) less than (phi) th, are affected heavily by the temperature dependences in material parameters, surface evaporation rate, and pulse duration and shape. In contrast, the slope of the ablation curves at (phi) greater than (phi) th, is determined almost exclusively by the latent heat of vaporization, high temperature dependence of absorptivity, and, in the case of screening, by the absorption coefficient of the plume (alpha) g. In the screening region ablated depth increases logarithmically with fluence and its qualitative behavior is weakly affected by the temperature

  17. Observations in collinear femtosecond-nanosecond dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scaffidi, J; Pearman, W; Carter, J C; Angel, S M

    2006-01-01

    In the work reported herein, we have combined a short-lived femtosecond laser-induced plasma (LIP) and a longer-lived nanosecond LIP in a collinear pulse configuration to examine the source(s) of atomic emission and signal-to-noise enhancement in dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Initial studies indicate that the primary source of dual-pulse LIBS enhancement in the collinear configuration may in large part be a matter of pulse focus; focusing on the sample surface, for example, yields atomic emission enhancements whose lifetime correlates reasonably well with the femtosecond LIP emissive lifetime, suggesting that plasma-plasma coupling may play an important role at that pulse focus. At a second "optimal" focal position above the sample surface, alternatively, atomic emission and signal-to-noise enhancements correlate quite well with the nitrogen and oxygen atomic emission reductions previously seen following use of a femtosecond air spark and a nanosecond ablative pulse in the orthogonal dual-pulse configuration, suggesting that pressure or number density reductions due to femtosecond LIP formation in air may be significant at that pulse focus. PMID:16454914

  18. Nanosecond laser surface modification of AISI 304L stainless steel: Influence the beam overlap on pitting corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacquentin, Wilfried; Caron, Nadège; Oltra, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Surface modifications of AISI 304L stainless steel by laser surface melting (LSM) were investigated using a nanosecond pulsed laser-fibre doped by ytterbium at different overlaps. The objective was to study the change in the corrosion properties induced by the treatment of the outer-surface of the stainless steel without modification of the bulk material. Different analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) were used to characterize the laser-melted surface. The corrosion resistance was evaluated in a chloride solution at room temperature by electrochemical tests. The results showed that the crystallographic structure, the chemical composition, the properties of the induced oxide layer and consequently the pitting corrosion resistance strongly depend on the overlap rate. The most efficient laser parameters led to an increase of the pitting potential by more than 300 mV, corresponding to a quite important improvement of the corrosion resistance. This latter was correlated to chromium enrichment (47 wt.%) at the surface of the stainless steel and the induced absence of martensite and ferrite phases. However, these structural and chemical modifications were not sufficient to explain the change in corrosion behaviour: defects and adhesion of the surface oxide layer must have been taken into consideration.

  19. Graphite to ultrafine nanocrystalline diamond phase transition model and growth restriction mechanism induced by nanosecond laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2015-10-05

    To have a clear insight into nanocrystal growth from graphite to diamond upon high energy pulsed laser irradiation of graphite suspension, synthesis of ultrafine nanocrystalline diamonds with laser energy set up from 0.3 J to 12 J, repetition rate of 10 Hz has been studied. The method allows synthesizing ultrafine nanocrystalline particles continuously at the ambient temperature and normal pressure. The particle size is shown independent of laser energy, which is ultrafine and ranges in 2–6 nm. The theoretical grown size of nano-diamonds is found in well agreement with the experiment results. Four kinds of production were found: nano-diamond, spherical carbon nano-particles, flocculent amorphous carbon, and graphene nano-ribbon rolls. A solid-vapor-plasma-liquid coexistence model describing phase transition from graphite to diamond induced by nanosecond laser processing was proposed. Graphene nano-ribbon rolls might be the intermediate phase in the conversion from graphite to diamond.

  20. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protective thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.

  1. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas. PMID:24699286

  2. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: Micro iron-oxide zones generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Morales, M.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Acosta-Ortiz, S. E.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  3. Laser-induced damage morphology in fused silica at 1064 nm in the nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambonneau, Maxime; Diaz, Romain; Duchateau, Guillaume; Grua, Pierre; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Rullier, Jean-Luc; Lamaignère, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    The morphology of laser-induced damage sites at the exit surface of fused silica is tightly correlated to the mode composition of the nanosecond laser pulses at 1064 nm. In the single longitudinal mode (SLM) configuration, a molten and fractured central zone is surrounded by a funnel-shaped surface modification. Ring patterns surround the damage sites when these are initiated by multiple longitudinal modes (MLM) laser pulses. In this last mode configuration, the pulses temporal profiles as well as the damage ring patterns differ from pulse to pulse. The appearance chronology of the rings is found to be closely related to the temporal shape of the laser pulses. This supports that the damage morphology originates from the coupling of a laser-supported detonation wave propagating in air with an ablation mechanism in silica. In our experiments, the propagation speed of the detonation wave reaches about 20 km/s and scales as the cube root of the laser intensity, in good agreement with theory.

  4. Numerical study of nanosecond laser interactions with micro-sized single droplets and sprays of xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Auguste, T.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de; Ceccotti, T.; Hergott, J. F.; Sublemontier, O.; Descamps, D.; Schmidt, M.

    2007-02-15

    We present a thorough numerical study on interactions of a nanosecond laser with micro-sized xenon droplets. We developed a code which allows simulation of laser interactions with a single droplet as well as a spray. We give a detailed description of the code, and we present results on the dynamics of a microplasma produced by irradiation of a single xenon droplet with a laser focused at peak vacuum intensity in the 5x10{sup 10}-5x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} range. We find that the heating of the plasma depends dramatically on the laser parameters (duration, pulse shape, and intensity) on one hand, and on the droplet diameter on the other. We also present results obtained with a spray which show that the dynamics of the microplasmas is very sensitive to the position of the droplets in the interaction volume. The predictions of our model agree well with recent experimental observations performed on laser-produced plasma sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography. In particular, the postprocessing of our data with a sophisticated atomic physics code has allowed us to reproduce quite well the spectrum emitted in the extreme ultraviolet range by a xenon plasma generated by laser irradiation of a spray of droplets.

  5. One-step fabrication of near superhydrophobic aluminum surface by nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdheesh, R.; García-Ballesteros, J. J.; Ocaña, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the micro and nano structures of biological surface such as lotus leaf, rice leaves, etc. a functional near superhydrophobic surface of pure aluminum has been fabricated using one-step nanosecond laser processing. Thin aluminum sheets are micro-patterned with ultraviolet laser pulses to create near superhydrophobic surface in one-step direct laser writing technique. The impact of number of pulses/microhole with respect to the geometry and static contact angle measurements has been investigated. The microstructure shows the formation of blind microholes along with the micro-wall by laser processing, which improves the composite interface between the three phases such as water, air and solid, thus enhance the wetting property of the surface. The geometrical changes are supported by the chemical changes induced on the surface for improving the degree of hydrophobicity. Laser processed microholes exhibited near superhydrophobic surface with SCA measurement of 148 ± 3°. The static contact angle values are very consistent for repeated measurement at same area and across the laser patterned surface.

  6. Rapid Laser Induced Crystallization of Amorphous NiTi Films Observed by Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy (DTEM)

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrange, T; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D; Reed, B W; Grummon, D S

    2010-03-01

    The crystallization processes of the as-deposited, amorphous NiTi thin films have been studied in detail using techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry and, in-situ TEM. The kinetic data have been analyzed in terms of Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolomogrov (JMAK) semi-empirical formula. The kinetic parameters determined from this analysis have been useful in defining process control parameters for tailoring microstructural features and shape memory properties. Due to the commercial push to shrink thin film-based devices, unique processing techniques have been developed using laser-based annealing to spatially control the microstructure evolution down to sub-micron levels. Nanosecond, pulse laser annealing is particularly attractive since it limits the amount of peripheral heating and unwanted microstructural changes to underlying or surrounding material. However, crystallization under pulsed laser irradiation can differ significantly from conventional thermal annealing, e.g., slow heating in a furnace. This is especially true for amorphous NiTi materials and relevant for shape memory thin film based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications. There is little to no data on the crystallization kinetics of NiTi under pulsed laser irradiation, primarily due to the high crystallization rates intrinsic to high temperature annealing and the spatial and temporal resolution limits of standard techniques. However, with the high time and spatial resolution capabilities of the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the rapid nucleation events occurring from pulsed laser irradiation can be directly observed and nucleation rates can be quantified. This paper briefly explains the DTEM approach and how it used to investigate the pulsed laser induced crystallization processes in NiTi and to determine kinetic parameters.

  7. Simultaneous high crystallinity and sub-bandgap optical absorptance in hyperdoped black silicon using nanosecond laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Franta, Benjamin Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Aziz, Michael J.; Mazur, Eric; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Gradečak, Silvija

    2015-12-14

    Hyperdoped black silicon fabricated with femtosecond laser irradiation has attracted interest for applications in infrared photodetectors and intermediate band photovoltaics due to its sub-bandgap optical absorptance and light-trapping surface. However, hyperdoped black silicon typically has an amorphous and polyphasic polycrystalline surface that can interfere with carrier transport, electrical rectification, and intermediate band formation. Past studies have used thermal annealing to obtain high crystallinity in hyperdoped black silicon, but thermal annealing causes a deactivation of the sub-bandgap optical absorptance. In this study, nanosecond laser annealing is used to obtain high crystallinity and remove pressure-induced phases in hyperdoped black silicon while maintaining high sub-bandgap optical absorptance and a light-trapping surface morphology. Furthermore, it is shown that nanosecond laser annealing reactivates the sub-bandgap optical absorptance of hyperdoped black silicon after deactivation by thermal annealing. Thermal annealing and nanosecond laser annealing can be combined in sequence to fabricate hyperdoped black silicon that simultaneously shows high crystallinity, high above-bandgap and sub-bandgap absorptance, and a rectifying electrical homojunction. Such nanosecond laser annealing could potentially be applied to non-equilibrium material systems beyond hyperdoped black silicon.

  8. Simultaneous high crystallinity and sub-bandgap optical absorptance in hyperdoped black silicon using nanosecond laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franta, Benjamin; Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Gradečak, Silvija; Aziz, Michael J.; Mazur, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Hyperdoped black silicon fabricated with femtosecond laser irradiation has attracted interest for applications in infrared photodetectors and intermediate band photovoltaics due to its sub-bandgap optical absorptance and light-trapping surface. However, hyperdoped black silicon typically has an amorphous and polyphasic polycrystalline surface that can interfere with carrier transport, electrical rectification, and intermediate band formation. Past studies have used thermal annealing to obtain high crystallinity in hyperdoped black silicon, but thermal annealing causes a deactivation of the sub-bandgap optical absorptance. In this study, nanosecond laser annealing is used to obtain high crystallinity and remove pressure-induced phases in hyperdoped black silicon while maintaining high sub-bandgap optical absorptance and a light-trapping surface morphology. Furthermore, it is shown that nanosecond laser annealing reactivates the sub-bandgap optical absorptance of hyperdoped black silicon after deactivation by thermal annealing. Thermal annealing and nanosecond laser annealing can be combined in sequence to fabricate hyperdoped black silicon that simultaneously shows high crystallinity, high above-bandgap and sub-bandgap absorptance, and a rectifying electrical homojunction. Such nanosecond laser annealing could potentially be applied to non-equilibrium material systems beyond hyperdoped black silicon.

  9. Visible and near infrared resonance plasmonic enhanced nanosecond laser optoporation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    St-Louis Lalonde, Bastien; Boulais, Étienne; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Meunier, Michel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report a light driven, non-invasive cell membrane perforation technique based on the localized field amplification by a nanosecond pulsed laser near gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The optoporation phenomena is investigated with pulses generated by a Nd:YAG laser for two wavelengths that are either in the visible (532 nm) or near infrared (NIR) (1064 nm). Here, the main objective is to compare on and off localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR) to introduce foreign material through the cell membrane using nanosecond laser pulses. The membrane permeability of human melanoma cells (MW278) has been successfully increased as shown by the intake of a fluorescent dye upon irradiation. The viability of this laser driven perforation method is evaluated by propidium iodide exclusion as well as MTT assay. Our results show that up to 25% of the cells are perforated with 532 nm pulses at 50 mJ/cm2 and around 30% of the cells are perforated with 1064 nm pulses at 1 J/cm2. With 532 nm pulses, the viability 2 h after treatment is 64% but it increases to 88% 72 h later. On the other hand, the irradiation with 1064 nm pulses leads to an improved 2 h viability of 81% and reaches 98% after 72 h. Scanning electron microscopy images show that the 5 pulses delivered during treatment induce changes in the AuNPs size distribution when irradiated by a 532 nm beam, while this distribution is barely affected when 1064 nm is used. PMID:23577284

  10. Cluster-assisted generation of multi-charged ions in nanosecond laser ionization of pulsed hydrogen sulfide beam at 1064 and 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Dong-Mei; Li, Hai-Yang; Luo, Xiao-Lin; Liang, Feng; Cheng, Shuang; Li, An-Lin

    2006-07-01

    The multi-charged sulfur ions of Sq+ (q<= 6) have been generated when hydrogen sulfide cluster beams are irradiated by a nanosecond laser of 1064 and 532 nm with an intensity of 1010~ 1012W.cm-2. S6+ is the dominant multi-charged species at 1064 nm, while S4+, S3+ and S2+ ions are the main multi-charged species at 532 nm. A three-step model (i.e., multiphoton ionization triggering, inverse bremsstrahlung heating, electron collision ionizing) is proposed to explain the generation of these multi-charged ions at the laser intensity stated above. The high ionization level of the clusters and the increasing charge state of the ion products with increasing laser wavelength are supposed mainly due to the rate-limiting step, i.e., electron heating by absorption energy from the laser field via inverse bremsstrahlung, which is proportional to λ2, λ being the laser wavelength.

  11. Dynamics of femto- and nanosecond laser ablation plumes investigated using optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Freeman, J. R.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and electron density associated with femto- and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas (LPP) from brass under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, brass targets were ablated in vacuum employing pulses either from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) or from a Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). Optical emission spectroscopy is used to infer the density and temperature of the plasmas. The electron density (n{sub e}) was estimated using Stark broadened profiles of isolated lines while the excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) was estimated using the Boltzmann plot method. At similar fluence levels, continuum and ion emission are dominant in ns LPP at early times (<50 ns) followed by atomic emission, while the fs LPP provided an atomic plume throughout its visible emission lifetime. Though both ns and fs laser-plasmas showed similar temperatures ({approx}1 eV), the fs LPP is found to be significantly denser at shorter distances from the target surface as well as at early phases of its evolution compared to ns LPP. Moreover, the spatial extension of the plume emission in the visible region along the target normal is larger for fs LPP in comparison with ns LPP.

  12. Ultra-deep plasma-assisted drilling of solids by high-power nanosecond lasers: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Stanley; Lyon, Kevin; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Allen, Susan D.

    2006-02-01

    A new mechanism of ultra-deep (up to tens of microns per pulse, sub-mm total hole depths) plasma-assisted ablative drilling of optically opaque and transparent materials by high-power nanosecond lasers proposed by Kudryashov et al. has been studied experimentally using average drilling rate and photoacoustic measurements. In the drilling experiments, average multi-micron crater depth per laser shot and instantaneous recoil pressure of ablated products have been measured as a function of laser energy at constant focusing conditions using optical transmission and contact photo acoustic techniques, respectively. Experimental results of this work support the theoretical explanation of the ultra-deep drilling mechanism as a number of stages including ultra-deep "non-thermal" energy delivery by a short-wavelength radiation of the surface high-temperature ablative plasma, bulk heating and melting of these materials, accompanied by the following subsurface boiling in the melt pool and resulting melt expulsion off of the target.

  13. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1-10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He-Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm-2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  14. A scheme for recording a fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Jiang, Biqiang

    2015-04-01

    A scheme for recording fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave (CW) laser is described and demonstrated experimentally, which employs delayed-time fibers and angular multiplexing technique and can realize the variable temporal resolution at nanosecond scale and different measured depths of object field at certain temporal resolution. The actual delay-time is controlled by two delayed-time fibers with different lengths. The object field information in two different states can be simultaneously recorded in a composite hologram. This scheme is also suitable for recording fast process at picosecond scale, by using an electro-optic modulator.

  15. Surface modification induced by UV nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser structuring on biometals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, M. Paula; López, Ana J.; Ramil, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Laser surface texturing is a promising tool for improving metallic biomaterials performance in dental and orthopedic bone-replacing applications. Laser ablation modifies the topography of bulk material and might alter surface properties that govern the interactions with the surrounding tissue. This paper presents a preliminary evaluation of surface modifications in two biometals, stainless steel 316L and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V by UV nanosecond Nd:YVO4. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface textured by parallel micro-grooves reveals a thin layer of remelted material along the grooves topography. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction allowed us to appreciate a grain refinement of original crystal structure and consequently induced residual strain. Changes in the surface chemistry were determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; in this sense, generalized surface oxidation was observed and characterization of the oxides and other compounds such hydroxyl groups was reported. In case of titanium alloy, oxide layer mainly composed by TiO2 which is a highly biocompatible compound was identified. Furthermore, laser treatment produces an increase in oxide thickness that could improve the corrosion behavior of the metal. Otherwise, laser treatment led to the formation of secondary phases which might be detrimental to physical and biocompatibility properties of the material.

  16. Mechanisms governing the interaction of metallic particles with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Negres, Raluca A; Raman, Rajesh N; Shen, Nan; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Matthews, Manyalibo J

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of nanosecond laser pulses at 1064- and 355-nm with micro-scale, nominally spherical metallic particles is investigated in order to elucidate the governing interaction mechanisms as a function of material and laser parameters. The experimental model used involves the irradiation of metal particles located on the surface of transparent plates combined with time-resolved imaging capable of capturing the dynamics of particle ejection, plume formation and expansion along with the kinetics of the dispersed material from the liquefied layer of the particle. The mechanisms investigated in this work are informative and relevant across a multitude of materials and irradiation geometries suitable for the description of a wide range of specific applications. The experimental results were interpreted using physical models incorporating specific processes to assess their contribution to the overall observed behaviors. Analysis of the experimental results suggests that the induced kinetic properties of the particle can be adequately described using the concept of momentum coupling introduced to explain the interaction of plane metal targets to large-aperture laser beams. The results also suggest that laser energy deposition on the formed plasma affects the energy partitioning and the material modifications to the substrate. PMID:27137063

  17. NANOSECOND INTERFEROMETRIC STUDIES OF SURFACE DEFORMATIONS OF DIELECTRICS INDUCED BY LASER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. GREENFIELD; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    Transient surface deformations in dielectric materials induced by laser irradiation were investigated with time-resolved interferometry. Deformation images were acquired at various delay times after exposure to single pulses (100 ps at 1.064 {micro}m) on fresh sample regions. Above the ablation threshold, we observe prompt ejection of material and the formation of a single unipolar compressional surface acoustic wave propagating away from the ablation crater. For calcite, no deformation--either transient or permanent--is discernable at laser fluences below the threshold for material ejection. Above and below-threshold behavior was investigated using a phosphate glass sample with substantial near infrared absorption (Schott filter KG3). Below threshold, KG3 exhibits the formation of a small bulge roughly the size of the laser spot that reaches its maximum amplitude by {approx}5 ns. By tens of nanoseconds, the deformations become quite complex and very sensitive to laser fluence. The above-threshold behavior of KG3 combines the ablation-induced surface acoustic wave seen in calcite with the bulge seen below threshold in KG3. A velocity of 2.97 {+-} 0.03 km/s is measured for the KG3 surface acoustic wave, very close to the Rayleigh wave velocity calculated from material elastic parameters. Details of the transient interferometry system will also be given.

  18. High-adhesion Cu patterns fabricated by nanosecond laser modification and electroless copper plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Ming; Liu, Jianguo; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Du, Qifeng; Ai, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Adhesion strength is a crucial factor for the performance and reliability of metallic patterns on insulator substrates. In this study, we present an efficient technique for selective metallization of alumina ceramic with high adhesion strength by using nanosecond laser modification and electroless copper plating. Specifically, a 355 nm Nd:YVO4 ultraviolet (UV) laser was employed not only to decompose palladium chloride film locally for catalyzing the electroless reaction, but also to modify the ceramic surface directly using its high fluence. An orthogonal experiment was undertaken to study the effects of processing parameters including laser fluence, scanning speed and scanning line interval on adhesion strength. The adhesion strength was measured by pulling a metallic wire soldered into the copper coating perpendicular to the substrate using a pull tester. The results have shown that a strong adhesion between the copper coating and the alumina ceramic, higher than the tensile strength of tin-lead solder was obtained. Surface and interface characteristics were investigated to understand that, whose results have shown that the high-aspect-ratio microstructures formed by the laser modification is the major reason for the improvement of adhesion.

  19. Nanosecond multi-pulse laser milling for certain area removal of metal coating on plastics surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Jia, Zhenyuan; Ma, Jianwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Metal coating with functional pattern on engineering plastics surface plays an important role in industry applications; it can be obtained by adding or removing certain area of metal coating on engineering plastics surface. However, the manufacturing requirements are improved continuously and the plastic substrate presents three-dimensional (3D) structure-many of these parts cannot be fabricated by conventional processing methods, and a new manufacturing method is urgently needed. As the laser-processing technology has many advantages like high machining accuracy and constraints free substrate structure, the machining of the parts is studied through removing certain area of metal coating based on the nanosecond multi-pulse laser milling. To improve the edge quality of the functional pattern, generation mechanism and corresponding avoidance strategy of the processing defects are studied. Additionally, a prediction model for the laser ablation depth is proposed, which can effectively avoid the existence of residual metal coating and reduces the damage of substrate. With the optimal machining parameters, an equiangular spiral pattern on copper-clad polyimide (CCPI) is machined based on the laser milling at last. The experimental results indicate that the edge of the pattern is smooth and consistent, the substrate is flat and without damage. The achievements in this study could be applied in industrial production.

  20. Spectroscopic alterations on enamel and dentin after nanosecond Nd:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, A.; de Rossi, W.; Zezell, D. M.

    2006-08-01

    Laser irradiation on hard tissue has produced a resistant surface that is likely to prevent caries. In this study, human enamel and dentine were exposed to nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser with energy densities of 20-40 J/cm 2 and pulse width of 6 ns inducing chemical changes in these tissues. Infrared analysis of human dental enamel and dentine was performed using the KBr method (2 mg sample/300 mg KBr). A correlation between non-lased and lased spectra was performed that gives an indication of the changes in organic and inorganic compounds after laser-tissue interaction. Spectra of teeth simultaneously show the inorganic and organic parts of the tissue. The principal bands: amide bands A, I, II, and III from the collagen-matrix, phosphate from the mineral content, and carbonate bands were identified. The normalized area of peak versus peak position was determined. Changes of the bands attributed to the collagen matrix were verified after Nd:YAG irradiation. The present results suggest a chemical modification of organic and mineral compounds by laser. The spectral results indicated an alteration in the absorption bands relative to, essentially, organic compounds.

  1. Observation of nanosecond laser induced fluorescence of in vitro seawater phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Bensky, Thomas J.; Clemo, Lisa; Gilbert, Chris; Neff, Bryan; Moline, Mark A.; Rohan, Dov

    2008-08-01

    Seawater has been irradiated using a train of 70 ns flashes from a 440 nm laser source. This wavelength is on resonance with the blue absorption peak of Chlorophyll pigment associated with the photosystem of in vitro phytoplankton. The resulting fluorescence at 685 nm is instantaneously recorded during each laser pulse using a streak camera. Delayed fluorescence is observed, yielding clues about initiation of the photosynthetic process on a nanosecond time scale. Further data processing allows for determination of the functional absorption cross section, found to be 0.0095 ?{sup 2}, which is the first reporting of this number for in vitro phytoplankton. Unlike other flash-pump studies of Chlorophyll, using a LED or flashlamp-based sources, the short laser pulse used here does not reveal any pulse-to-pulse hysteresis (i.e., variable fluorescence), indicating that the laser pulses used here are not able to drive the photosynthetic process to completion. This is attributed to competition from a back reaction between the photoexcited photosystem II and the intermediate electron acceptor. The significance of this work as a new type of deployable ocean fluorimeter is discussed, and it is believed the apparatus will have applications in thin-layer phytoplankton research.

  2. High power burst-mode operated sub-nanosecond fiber laser based on 20/125 μm highly doped Yb fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kaihua; Wu, Pinghui; Wen, Ruhua; Song, Jiangxin; Guo, Yan; Lai, Xiaomin

    2016-02-01

    A master oscillator power amplification (MOPA) structured high power sub-nanosecond fiber laser with pulse bunch output is experimentally demonstrated. The seed was a figure-of-eight structured mode-locked fiber laser with a pulse duration of 700 ps and a repetition rate of 2.67 MHz. The seed pulse via two cascaded fiber couplers was multiplied to a pulse bunch, which was composed of 6 sub-pulses. The multiplied pulses were pre-amplified to an average power of 1.5 W through a cladding-pumping fiber amplifier. The pre-amplified laser was further amplified using a 20/125 μm large mode area (LMA) Yb-doped fiber. The laser emitted from the power-amplifier had an average power of 36 W, and a slope efficiency of 72%.

  3. Damage caused by a nanosecond UV laser on a heated copper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henč-Bartolić, V.; Bončina, T.; Jakovljević, S.; Panjan, P.; Zupanič, F.

    2016-08-01

    This work studied the effect of thin copper plate temperature on its surface morphology after irradiation using a pulsed nanosecond UV laser. The surface characteristics were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, focused ion beam and stylus profilometry. When a target was at room temperature, a crater and the radial flow of molten Cu from the crater was observed. When the thin target was warm (about 360 °C ± 20 °C), a crater was smaller, and quasi-semicircular waves with the periodicity of around 3 μm appeared in its vicinity. The origin of the waves is Marangoni effect, causing thermocapillary waves, which in same occasions had a structure of final states of chaos in Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  4. Nanosecond laser pulse induced stress waves enhanced magnetofection of human carcinoma cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdík, Š.; Babincová, M.; Bergemann, C.; Babinec, P.

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a novel platform for efficient gene delivery into cells using magnetic force for pre-concentration of gene-magnetic nanoparticle complex on the surface of cells with subsequent nanosecond laser pulse for generation of stress waves in transfection chamber which is able to permeabilize cell membrane for the facilitated delivery of gene into the cell interior. Combination of these two physical factors increased the efficiency of three different human carcinoma cells transfection with plasmid coding green fluorescence protein from 43% to 67%, from 35% to 54%, and from 23% to 39%, for HeLa (cervical carcinoma), MCF-7 (breast carcinoma), and UCI-107 (ovarian carcinoma) cells, respectively, as compared with using only magnetofection. Proposed fast, simple, and efficient method may have far reaching applications for cancer gene therapy.

  5. A mass quadrupole spectrometry investigation on proton emission by nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Caridi, F.

    2015-02-15

    A nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm and at an intensity of about 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} was employed to irradiate hydrogenated polymers in vacuum. The produced plasma was characterized in terms of thermal and Coulomb interactions evaluating the equivalent temperature and the acceleration voltage developed in the non-equilibrium plasma core. Particles emission along the normal to the target surface was investigated by measuring, with the Hiden EQP 300 mass quadrupole spectrometer, ion energy distributions and fitting experimental data with the “Coulomb-Boltzmann-shifted” function. Time-of-flight technique was employed in order to measure the proton energy and yield. A comparison between experimental results is presented and discussed, with a special regard to the protons emission.

  6. Micrometric rods grown by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Quintas, Ignacio; Oujja, Mohamed; Sanz, Mikel; Benitez-Cañete, Antonio; Chater, Richard J.; Cañamares, Maria Vega; Marco, José F.; Castillejo, Marta

    2015-02-01

    Micrometric size rods have been fabricated via pulsed laser deposition in vacuum from boron carbide targets using nanosecond pulses of 1064 and 266 nm and room temperature Si (1 0 0) substrates. Morphological, structural and chemical characterization of the microrods was made by applying scanning electron microscopy, focussed ion beam microscopy coupled to secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Ablation at 1064 nm favours the formation of microrods with high aspect ratio, sharp edges and pyramidal tips, typically 10 μm long with a cross section of around 2 μm × 2 μm. Differently, at 266 nm the microrods are of smaller size and present a more globular aspect. The analyses of the microrods provide information about their crystalline nature and composition, based on a mixture which includes boron, boron oxide and boron carbide, and allows discussion of the wavelength dependent growth mechanisms involved.

  7. Explosive boiling of a metallic glass superheated by nanosecond pulse laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M. Q.; Wei, Y. P.; Wilde, G.; Dai, L. H.

    2015-01-01

    We report an explosive boiling in a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1) bulk metallic glass irradiated by a nanosecond pulse laser with a single shot. This critical phenomenon is accompanied by the ejection of high-temperature matter from the target and the formation of a liquid-gas spinodal pattern on the irradiated area. An analytical model reveals that the glassy target experiences the normal heating (melting) and significant superheating, eventually culminating in explosive boiling near the spinodal limit. Furthermore, the time lag of nucleation and the critical radius of vapor bubbles are theoretically predicted, which are in agreement with the experimental observations. This study provides the investigation on the instability of a metallic glass liquid near the thermodynamic critical temperature.

  8. Explosive boiling of a metallic glass superheated by nanosecond pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, M. Q. E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn; Wei, Y. P.; Wilde, G.; Dai, L. H. E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn

    2015-01-12

    We report an explosive boiling in a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1) bulk metallic glass irradiated by a nanosecond pulse laser with a single shot. This critical phenomenon is accompanied by the ejection of high-temperature matter from the target and the formation of a liquid-gas spinodal pattern on the irradiated area. An analytical model reveals that the glassy target experiences the normal heating (melting) and significant superheating, eventually culminating in explosive boiling near the spinodal limit. Furthermore, the time lag of nucleation and the critical radius of vapor bubbles are theoretically predicted, which are in agreement with the experimental observations. This study provides the investigation on the instability of a metallic glass liquid near the thermodynamic critical temperature.

  9. A mass quadrupole spectrometry investigation on proton emission by nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caridi, F.

    2015-02-01

    A nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm and at an intensity of about 1010 W/cm2 was employed to irradiate hydrogenated polymers in vacuum. The produced plasma was characterized in terms of thermal and Coulomb interactions evaluating the equivalent temperature and the acceleration voltage developed in the non-equilibrium plasma core. Particles emission along the normal to the target surface was investigated by measuring, with the Hiden EQP 300 mass quadrupole spectrometer, ion energy distributions and fitting experimental data with the "Coulomb-Boltzmann-shifted" function. Time-of-flight technique was employed in order to measure the proton energy and yield. A comparison between experimental results is presented and discussed, with a special regard to the protons emission.

  10. Photo-dissociation quantum yields of mammalian oxyhemoglobin investigated by a nanosecond laser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ningli; Zhang Shuyi . E-mail: zhangsy@nju.edu.cn; Kuo Paokuang; Qu Min; Fang Jianwen; Li Jiahuang; Hua Zichun

    2007-02-23

    The photo-dissociations of oxyhemoglobin of several mammals, such as human, bovine, pig, horse, and rabbit, have been studied. By means of optical pump-probe technique, the quantum yields for photo-dissociation of these oxyhemoglobin have been determined at pH 7 and 20 {sup o}C. A nanosecond laser at 532 nm is used as the pumping source, and a xenon lamp through a monochrometer provides a probe light at 432 nm. The experimental results show that the quantum yields of these mammalian oxyhemoglobin are different from each other, especially for that of rabbit. By analyzing the amino acid sequences and tetramer structures as well as the flexibility and hydrophobicity of the different hemoglobin, possible explanations for the differences are proposed.

  11. Low-density plasma formation in aqueous biological media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, Suzanne L.; Ma, Huan; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate the formation of low- and high-density plasmas in aqueous media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses delivered at low numerical aperture (NA = 0.25). We observe two distinct regimes of plasma formation in deionized water, phosphate buffered saline, Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), and MEM supplemented with phenol red. Optical breakdown is first initiated in a low-energy regime and characterized by bubble formation without plasma luminescence with threshold pulse energies in the range of Ep ≈ 4-5 μJ, depending on media formulation. The onset of this regime occurs over a very narrow interval of pulse energies and produces small bubbles (Rmax = 2-20 μm) due to a tiny conversion (η < 0.01%) of laser energy to bubble energy EB. The lack of visible plasma luminescence, sharp energy onset, and low bubble energy conversion are all hallmarks of low-density plasma (LDP) formation. At higher pulse energies (Ep = 11-20 μJ), the process transitions to a second regime characterized by plasma luminescence and large bubble formation. Bubbles formed in this regime are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger in size ( R max ≳ 100 μ m ) due to a roughly two-order-of-magnitude increase in bubble energy conversion (η ≳ 3%). These characteristics are consistent with high-density plasma formation produced by avalanche ionization and thermal runaway. Additionally, we show that supplementation of MEM with fetal bovine serum (FBS) limits optical breakdown to this high-energy regime. The ability to produce LDPs using sub-nanosecond pulses focused at low NA in a variety of cell culture media formulations without FBS can provide for cellular manipulation at high throughput with precision approaching that of femtosecond pulses delivered at high NA.

  12. Low-density plasma formation in aqueous biological media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Suzanne L.; Ma, Huan; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the formation of low- and high-density plasmas in aqueous media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses delivered at low numerical aperture (NA = 0.25). We observe two distinct regimes of plasma formation in deionized water, phosphate buffered saline, Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), and MEM supplemented with phenol red. Optical breakdown is first initiated in a low-energy regime and characterized by bubble formation without plasma luminescence with threshold pulse energies in the range of Ep ≈ 4–5 μJ, depending on media formulation. The onset of this regime occurs over a very narrow interval of pulse energies and produces small bubbles (Rmax = 2–20 μm) due to a tiny conversion (η < 0.01%) of laser energy to bubble energy EB. The lack of visible plasma luminescence, sharp energy onset, and low bubble energy conversion are all hallmarks of low-density plasma (LDP) formation. At higher pulse energies (Ep = 11–20 μJ), the process transitions to a second regime characterized by plasma luminescence and large bubble formation. Bubbles formed in this regime are 1–2 orders of magnitude larger in size (Rmax≳100 μm) due to a roughly two-order-of-magnitude increase in bubble energy conversion (η ≳ 3%). These characteristics are consistent with high-density plasma formation produced by avalanche ionization and thermal runaway. Additionally, we show that supplementation of MEM with fetal bovine serum (FBS) limits optical breakdown to this high-energy regime. The ability to produce LDPs using sub-nanosecond pulses focused at low NA in a variety of cell culture media formulations without FBS can provide for cellular manipulation at high throughput with precision approaching that of femtosecond pulses delivered at high NA. PMID:25278618

  13. Low-density plasma formation in aqueous biological media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Genc, Suzanne L; Ma, Huan; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate the formation of low- and high-density plasmas in aqueous media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses delivered at low numerical aperture (NA = 0.25). We observe two distinct regimes of plasma formation in deionized water, phosphate buffered saline, Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), and MEM supplemented with phenol red. Optical breakdown is first initiated in a low-energy regime and characterized by bubble formation without plasma luminescence with threshold pulse energies in the range of E p ≈ 4-5 μJ, depending on media formulation. The onset of this regime occurs over a very narrow interval of pulse energies and produces small bubbles (R max = 2-20 μm) due to a tiny conversion (η < 0.01%) of laser energy to bubble energy E B. The lack of visible plasma luminescence, sharp energy onset, and low bubble energy conversion are all hallmarks of low-density plasma (LDP) formation. At higher pulse energies (E p = 11-20 μJ), the process transitions to a second regime characterized by plasma luminescence and large bubble formation. Bubbles formed in this regime are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger in size [Formula: see text] due to a roughly two-order-of-magnitude increase in bubble energy conversion (η ≳ 3%). These characteristics are consistent with high-density plasma formation produced by avalanche ionization and thermal runaway. Additionally, we show that supplementation of MEM with fetal bovine serum (FBS) limits optical breakdown to this high-energy regime. The ability to produce LDPs using sub-nanosecond pulses focused at low NA in a variety of cell culture media formulations without FBS can provide for cellular manipulation at high throughput with precision approaching that of femtosecond pulses delivered at high NA. PMID:25278618

  14. Plasma Membrane Integrity and Survival of Melanoma Cells After Nanosecond Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G.; Camacho-López, Santiago; Evans, Rodger; Guillén, Gabriel; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) photoacoustic detection systems can aid clinical decision-making in the treatment of cancer. Interaction of melanin within melanoma cells with nanosecond laser pulses generates photoacoustic waves that make its detection possible. This study aims at: (1) determining melanoma cell survival after laser pulses of 6 ns at λ = 355 and 532 nm; (2) comparing the potential enhancement in the photoacoustic signal using λ = 355 nm in contrast with λ = 532 nm; (3) determining the critical laser fluence at which melanin begins to leak out from melanoma cells; and (4) developing a time-resolved imaging (TRI) system to study the intracellular interactions and their effect on the plasma membrane integrity. Monolayers of melanoma cells were grown on tissue culture-treated clusters and irradiated with up to 1.0 J/cm2. Surviving cells were stained with trypan blue and counted using a hemacytometer. The phosphate buffered saline absorbance was measured with a nanodrop spectrophotometer to detect melanin leakage from the melanoma cells post-laser irradiation. Photoacoustic signal magnitude was studied at both wavelengths using piezoelectric sensors. TRI with 6 ns resolution was used to image plasma membrane damage. Cell survival decreased proportionally with increasing laser fluence for both wavelengths, although the decrease is more pronounced for 355 nm radiation than for 532 nm. It was found that melanin leaks from cells equally for both wavelengths. No significant difference in photoacoustic signal was found between wavelengths. TRI showed clear damage to plasma membrane due to laser-induced bubble formation. PMID:20589533

  15. Graphene patterning by nanosecond laser ablation: the effect of the substrate interaction with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mas, Ana M.; Álvarez, Patricia; Campos, Nuria; Gómez, David; Menéndez, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on the development of patterned graphene/substrate by means of green nanosecond pulse laser irradiation. Monolayer graphene samples supported on a Si/SiO2 substrate were patterned using 532 nm laser irradiation under fluence conditions ranging from 31 mJ cm‑2 to 4240 mJ cm‑2. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the graphene. It was found that at 356 mJ cm‑2 selective ablation of the graphene occurs. However, at fluence values above 1030 mJ cm‑2 (when damage to the substrate is observed) no ablation of the graphene takes place. In contrast, its graphenic structure was found to have been modified. Only at fluence values where the ablation of the substrate occurs, is graphene eliminated in an area almost equivalent to that of the ablated substrate. In this case, additional damage to the graphene sheet edges is produced. The increment in the number of oxygenated functional groups in these regions, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), suggests that this damage is probably caused by thermal phenomena during the ablation of the substrate.

  16. Thermal and microstructural effects of nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation on tooth root surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Grill, G.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Berns, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    Plaque, calculus and altered cementum removal by scaling and root planing is a fundamental procedure in periodontal treatment. However, the residual smear layer contains cytotoxic and inflammatory mediators which adversely affect healing. Chemical smear layer removal is also problematic. In previous investigations effective smear layer removal was achieved using long pulsed irradiation at 1.06 (mu) . However, laser irradiation was not adequate as an alternative to scaling and root planing procedures and concurrent temperature rises exceeded thermal thresholds for pulpal and periodontal safety. It was the aim of this study to determine whether nanosecond pulsed irradiation at 1.06 (mu) could be used as an alternative or an adjunct to scaling and root planing. Sixty freshly extracted teeth were divided as follows: 5 control, 5 root planed only, 25 irradiated only, 25 root planed and irradiated. Irradiation was performed at fluences of 0.5 - 2.7 J/cm2, total energy densities of 12 - 300 J/cm2, frequencies of 2 - 10 Hz using the Medlite (Continuum) laser. Irradiation-induced thermal events were recorded using a thermocouple within the root canal and a thermal camera to monitor surface temperatures. SEM demonstrated effective smear layer removal with minimal microstructural effects. Surface temperatures increased minimally (< 3 C) at all parameters, intrapulpal temperature rises remained below 4 C at 2 and 5 Hz, F < 0.5 J/cm2. Without prior scaling and root planing, laser effects did not provide an adequately clean root surface.

  17. Evidence of water reorientation on model electrocatalytic surfaces from nanosecond-laser-pulsed experiments.

    PubMed

    García-Aráez, Nuria; Climent, Víctor; Feliu, Juan M

    2008-03-26

    The behavior of water at the interface formed between a quasi-perfect Pt(111) single-crystal electrode and an aqueous electrolyte solution is studied by means of the laser-induced temperature jump method. This method is based on the use of nanosecond laser pulses to suddenly increase the temperature at the interface. The measurement of the response of the interface toward the laser heating under coulostatic conditions provides evidence on the net orientation of water at the interface. Especially interesting is the study of the effect on the interfacial water caused by the selective deposition of foreign metal adatoms, because these bimetallic systems usually exhibit appealing electrocatalytic properties. The T-jump methodology shows that the surface composition strongly affects the interaction of water with the surface. The most representative parameter to characterize this interaction is the potential where water reorientation occurs; this potential shifts in different directions, depending on the relative values of the electronegativity of the adatom and the substrate. These results are discussed in the light of available information about the effect of adatom deposition on the work function and the surface potential of the modified surface. Finally, some implications on the enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity are briefly discussed. PMID:18321095

  18. 1 mJ nanosecond all-fiber thulium-doped fiber laser at 2.05 μm.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Yin, Ke; Yang, Linyong; Hou, Jing

    2015-07-13

    A high energy all-fiber format nanosecond thulium-doped fiber laser at 2050 nm with a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration is presented in this paper. The seed oscillator is a linearly polarized gain-switched fiber laser pumped by a 1550 nm fiber laser. The output pulse of the seed has a polarization extinction ratio (PER) better than 16 dB with a maximal output power of 470 mW. After two-stage double- cladding fiber amplifiers, the average power at 40 kHz was boosted up to 40.5 W. The output pulse has a maximum pulse energy of 1 mJ with a pulse width of 100 ns, which corresponds to a peak power of 10 kW. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest single pulse energy ever reported for a nanosecond thulium-doped all-fiber MOPA system at 2050 nm. PMID:26191869

  19. Bombyx mori silk protein films microprocessing with a nanosecond ultraviolet laser and a femtosecond laser workstation: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazare, S.; Sionkowska, A.; Zaborowicz, M.; Planecka, A.; Lopez, J.; Dijoux, M.; Louména, C.; Hernandez, M.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Laser microprocessing of several biopolymers from renewable resources is studied. Three proteinic materials were either extracted from the extracellular matrix like Silk Fibroin/Sericin and collagen, or coming from a commercial source like gelatin. All can find future applications in biomedical experimentation, in particular for cell scaffolding. Films of ˜hundred of microns thick were made by aqueous solution drying and laser irradiation. Attention is paid to the properties making them processable with two laser sources: the ultraviolet and nanosecond (ns) KrF (248 nm) excimer and the infrared and femtosecond (fs) Yb:KGW laser. The UV radiation is absorbed in a one-photon resonant process to yield ablation and the surface foaming characteristics of a laser-induced pressure wave. To the contrary, resonant absorption of the IR photons of the fs laser is not possible and does not take place. However, the high field of the intense I>˜1012 W/cm2 femtosecond laser pulse ionizes the film by the multiphoton absorption followed by the electron impact mechanism, yielding a dense plasma capable to further absorb the incident radiation of the end of the pulse. The theoretical model of this absorption is described in detail, and used to discuss the presented experimental effects (cutting, ablation and foaming) of the fs laser. The ultraviolet laser was used to perform simultaneous multiple spots experiments in which energetic foaming yields melt ejection and filament spinning. Airborne nanosize filaments "horizontally suspended by both ends" (0.25 μm diameter and 10 μm length) of silk biopolymer were observed upon irradiation with large fluences.

  20. A method for the formation of Pt metal nanoparticle arrays using nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu-Ansah, Ebenezer; Horwood, Corie A.; El-Sayed, Hany A.; Birss, Viola I.; Shi, Yujun J.

    2015-05-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films, deposited on a dimpled Ta (DT) surface, has been studied here in order to form ordered Pt nanoparticle (NP) arrays. The DT substrate was fabricated via a simple electrochemical anodization process in a highly concentrated H2SO4 and HF solution. Pt thin films (3-5 nm) were sputter coated on DT and then dewetted under vacuum to generate NPs using a 355 nm laser radiation (6-9 ns, 10 Hz). The threshold laser fluence to fully dewet a 3.5 nm thick Pt film was determined to be 300 mJ/cm2. Our experiments have shown that shorter irradiation times (≤60 s) produce smaller nanoparticles with more uniform sizes, while longer times (>60 s) give large nanoparticles with wider size distributions. The optimum laser irradiation time of 1 s (10 pulses) has led to the formation of highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays with an average nanoparticle size of 26 ± 3 nm with no substrate deformation. At the optimum condition of 1 s and 500 mJ/cm2, as many as 85% of the dewetted NPs were found neatly in the well-defined dimples. This work has demonstrated that pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films on a pre-patterned dimpled substrate is an efficient and powerful technique to produce highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays. This method can thus be used to produce arrays of other high-melting-point metal nanoparticles for a range of applications, including electrocatalysis, functionalized nanomaterials, and analytical purposes.

  1. A method for the formation of Pt metal nanoparticle arrays using nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting

    SciTech Connect

    Owusu-Ansah, Ebenezer; Horwood, Corie A.; Birss, Viola I.; Shi, Yujun J.; El-Sayed, Hany A.

    2015-05-18

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films, deposited on a dimpled Ta (DT) surface, has been studied here in order to form ordered Pt nanoparticle (NP) arrays. The DT substrate was fabricated via a simple electrochemical anodization process in a highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HF solution. Pt thin films (3–5 nm) were sputter coated on DT and then dewetted under vacuum to generate NPs using a 355 nm laser radiation (6–9 ns, 10 Hz). The threshold laser fluence to fully dewet a 3.5 nm thick Pt film was determined to be 300 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our experiments have shown that shorter irradiation times (≤60 s) produce smaller nanoparticles with more uniform sizes, while longer times (>60 s) give large nanoparticles with wider size distributions. The optimum laser irradiation time of 1 s (10 pulses) has led to the formation of highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays with an average nanoparticle size of 26 ± 3 nm with no substrate deformation. At the optimum condition of 1 s and 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}, as many as 85% of the dewetted NPs were found neatly in the well-defined dimples. This work has demonstrated that pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films on a pre-patterned dimpled substrate is an efficient and powerful technique to produce highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays. This method can thus be used to produce arrays of other high-melting-point metal nanoparticles for a range of applications, including electrocatalysis, functionalized nanomaterials, and analytical purposes.

  2. Nanosecond pulse generation in a passively Q-switched Nd:GGG laser at 1331 nm by CVD graphene saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Yongjie; Yang, Han; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2015-10-01

    We report on a nanosecond pulse generation in a diode end-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:GGG laser at the low-gain transition line of 1331 nm. A three-layer CVD graphene thin film was transferred from Cu foil to a BK7 glass substrate for the use of saturable absorber. A stable Q-switching laser operation was obtained with maximum average output power of 0.69 W and slope efficiency of about 11.0% with respect to the absorbed pump power. The shortest pulse duration and the maximum repetition rate of the pulse trains were registered to be 556 ns and 166.7 kHz with corresponding maximum pulse energy 4.14 μJ and pulse peak power 7.45 W. This is the first demonstration of CVD-graphene-based Q-switched laser operation at 1.3 μm, to the best of our knowledge.

  3. Enhanced mass removal due to phase explosion during high irradiance nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jong Hyun

    2000-05-20

    mechanism for high irradiance laser ablation. Laser processing parameters were also investigated for nanosecond laser ablation of silicon. Longer incident wavelengths and larger laser beam sizes were associated with higher values of a threshold irradiance.

  4. Analysis of wavelength influence on a-Si crystallization processes with nanosecond laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O.; García-Ballesteros, J. J.; Munoz-Martin, David; Núñez-Sánchez, S.; Morales, M.; Carabe, J.; Torres, I.; Gandía, J. J.; Molpeceres, C.

    2013-08-01

    In this work we present a detailed study of the wavelength influence in pulsed laser annealing of amorphous silicon thin films, comparing the results for material modification at different fluence regimes in the three fundamental harmonics of standard DPSS (diode pumped solid state) nanosecond laser sources, UV (355 nm), visible (532 nm) and IR (1064 nm). The crystalline fraction (% crystalline silicon) profiles resulted from irradiation of amorphous silicon thin film samples are characterized with MicroRaman techniques. A finite element numerical model (FEM) is developed in COMSOL to simulate the process. The crystalline fraction results and the local temperature evolution in the irradiated area are presented and analyzed in order to establish relevant correlation between theoretical and experimental results. For UV (355 nm) and visible (532 nm) wavelengths, the results of the numerical model are presented together with the experimental results, proving that the process can be easily predicted with an essentially physical model based on heat transport at different wavelengths and fluence regimes. The numerical model helps to establish the optimal operation fluence regime for the annealing process.

  5. Breakdown in a bulk of transparent solids under irradiation of a nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Z. U.; Grigorov, Y. V.; Tran, K. A.; Janulewicz, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    A single pulse of a nanosecond laser was tightly focused in the bulk of transparent materials (soda lime glass, borosilicate glass, fused silica , sapphire and Gorilla Glass) to a beam spot diameter of ~ 2.1μm. A value of the total energy absorbed in the materials was measured with corrections for the transmitted, scattered and reflected components of the incident energy. It was found that 3-11% of the incident radiation was scattered but the total absorption still achieved a very high level of up to 88%. Absorptance dependence on the incident fluence was reasonably approximated by the sigmoidal Hill function. Here we suggest using this analytical description to identify empirical intrinsic laser-induced breakdown threshold (LIBT). Optical damage threshold (ODT) was identified by optical inspection. The results for some materials suggest significantly lower breakdown threshold than that reported earlier for more loosely focused beams. A study of the damage area morphology with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high resolution transmission microscope (HRTEM) revealed existence of the shock waves-affected area with a localized nano-crystallization. Spectroscopic study of the light emission accompanying breakdown showed typical quasi-continuum emission with temperature as high as 8917K (0.8 eV).

  6. Heat Transfer And Vapor Dynamics Induced By Nanosecond Laser Ablation Of Titanium Target

    SciTech Connect

    Hamadi, F.; Amara, E. H.; Mezaoui, D.

    2008-09-23

    A numerical modelling describing a pulsed nanosecond laser interaction with a titanium target is presented, resulting in the study of the plume expansion in vacuum or in background gas, using the species transport model available in Fluent computational fluid dynamics code. The heat transfers in the solid target and the molten material are modeled using an enthalpy formulation for the solid-liquid phase changing. The effect of laser fluences is investigated, and results are presented as a function of time. Moreover, the plasma or the vapour dynamics is calculated by solving a set of Navier-Stokes equations. The plasma absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung, the ionization states and the density profiles of the Titanium ions and electrons in the plume are interactively included in the Fluent calculation process by the mean of User Defined Functions (UDFs) used in order to take into account the specificity of our problem. The ionization is computed by solving the Saha-Eggert equation assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions.

  7. Fabrication of functional fibronectin patterns by nanosecond excimer laser direct write for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Grigorescu, S; Hindié, M; Axente, E; Carreiras, F; Anselme, K; Werckmann, J; Mihailescu, I N; Gallet, O

    2013-07-01

    Laser direct write techniques represent a prospective alternative for engineering a new generation of hybrid biomaterials via the creation of patterns consisting of biological proteins onto practically any type of substrate. In this paper we report on the characterization of fibronectin features obtained onto titanium substrates by UV nanosecond laser transfer. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements evidenced no modification in the secondary structure of the post-transferred protein. The molecular weight of the transferred protein was identical to the initial fibronectin, no fragment bands being found in the transferred protein's Western blot migration profile. The presence of the cell-binding domain sequence and the mannose groups within the transferred molecules was revealed by anti-fibronectin monoclonal antibody immunolabelling and FITC-Concanavalin-A staining, respectively. The in vitro tests performed with MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells and Swiss-3T3 fibroblasts showed that the cells' morphology and spreading were strongly influenced by the presence of the fibronectin spots. PMID:23615786

  8. Interdiffusion studies in Bi-based layered systems with nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missana, T.; Afonso, C. N.; da Silva, M. F.

    1994-12-01

    Interdiffusion processes are induced by nanosecond laser pulses from an excimer laser. The Bi-based systems studied are formed by a Bi layer and a Sb or Ge layer. Configurations with Bi at the surface layer or at the innermost layer are both studied. Real-time reflectivity measurements are performed during the irradiation to determine the process kinetics and times and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry is used to obtain the concentration depth profiles. It will be shown that there is an interfacially initiated diffusion process in the Bi-Sb system and that the diffusion coefficients of this system within the liquid phase are in the 10-5 10-6 cm2/s range. The Bi-Ge system shows instead little mixing, the diffusion coefficients of the system within the liquid phase being at least two orders of magnitude lower. The differences observed when Bi is the surface layer or the innermost one are related to the different thermal responses of the system.

  9. The influence of the repetition rate on the nanosecond pulsed pin-to-pin microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bang-Dou; Takashima, Keisuke; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2014-10-01

    The effect of repetition rate on a nanosecond atmospheric pressure discharge is investigated. The discharge is generated between two pins in a mixture of Ne and Ar. The voltage, current, power waveforms and the temporally and spatially resolved electron density and an ‘effective’ electron temperature are measured, with a pulse interval between 1.5 and 200 µs. It is found that not only does the repetition rate have a strong influence on the breakdown voltage and the peak discharge power, but it can also affect the rise rate of the volume averaged electron density and its peak value. Temporally and spatially resolved measurement of the electron density and the effective electron temperature show that the spatial distributions of both quantities are also influenced by the repetition rate. In the initial discharge period of all cases, the sharp rise of the electron density correlates with the drastic drop of the effective electron temperature. It is suggested that the residual charges have a strong impact on the axial distribution of the electric field and energetic electrons between the electrodes during the breakdown period, as illustrated by a simple sheath model.

  10. Laser ablation in a liquid-confined environment using a nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ho; Welch, Ashley J.

    2008-04-01

    Laser ablation of aluminum metal with 1ns, 800nm pulse at low radiant exposures was investigated in air (dry) and water (wet) environments. Compared to dry ablation, an approximately eight times increase in material removal rate was associated with wet ablation. Based on optical reflectance and scanning electron microscope images, bubble formation/collapse was responsible for augmented acoustic pressure and ablation performance. Numerically simulated temperature distributions during wet ablation were consistent with the occurrence of explosive water vaporization near the critical temperature of water. Strong pressure emission during liquid vaporization and jet formation can account for enhanced ablation process. Radial expansion of bubbles minimized the redeposition of debris, leading to improvements in energy coupling to the target and ablation performance.

  11. Rhodamine B as an optical thermometer in cells focally exposed to infrared laser light or nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Burke, Ryan; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2015-01-01

    The temperature-dependent fluorescence property of Rhodamine B was used to measure changes in temperature at the cellular level induced by either infrared laser light exposure or high intensity, ultrashort pulsed electric fields. The thermal impact of these stimuli were demonstrated at the cellular level in time and contrasted with the change in temperature observed in the extracellular bath. The method takes advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine B which has a quantum yield linearly dependent on temperature. The thermal effects of different temporal pulse applications of infrared laser light exposure and of nanosecond pulsed electric fields were investigated. The temperature increase due to the application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields was demonstrated at the cellular level. PMID:26504658

  12. Rhodamine B as an optical thermometer in cells focally exposed to infrared laser light or nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Burke, Ryan; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2015-10-01

    The temperature-dependent fluorescence property of Rhodamine B was used to measure changes in temperature at the cellular level induced by either infrared laser light exposure or high intensity, ultrashort pulsed electric fields. The thermal impact of these stimuli were demonstrated at the cellular level in time and contrasted with the change in temperature observed in the extracellular bath. The method takes advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine B which has a quantum yield linearly dependent on temperature. The thermal effects of different temporal pulse applications of infrared laser light exposure and of nanosecond pulsed electric fields were investigated. The temperature increase due to the application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields was demonstrated at the cellular level. PMID:26504658

  13. In situ observation of self-organizing nanodot formation under nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation on Si surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Kayashima, S.; Yatsu, S.; Kawai, M.; Kato, T.

    2010-11-01

    An in situ observation of the formation of a laser-irradiation-induced nanodot array on a Si surface was performed using a pulsed-laser-equipped high-voltage electron microscope (laser-HVEM). Under multiple nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser irradiation shots, atomic clusters were first formed and distributed on the surface in order to grow them epitaxially into protruded dots with diameters of ten nanometers or less. This is followed by their diffusion induced by successive laser shots to cannibalize and merge them into a ripple line with aligned, larger dots. We conclude that the present subwavelength two-dimensionally-ordered nanodot array is formed by self-organization under pulsed laser irradiation.

  14. Non-contact acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation: Generation of a pulse sound source with a small amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, Naoki; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Inoue, Tatsuo; Umenai, Koh

    2014-09-01

    A method to generate a pulse sound source for acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation with a plasma plume is discussed. Irradiating a solid surface with a laser beam expands a high-temperature plasma plume composed of free electrons, ionized atoms, etc. at a high velocity throughout ambient air. The shockwave generated by the plasma plume becomes the pulse sound source. A laser ablation sound source has two features. Because laser ablation is induced when the laser fluence reaches 1012-1014 W/m2, which is less than that for laser-induced breakdown (1015 W/m2), laser ablation can generate a lower sound pressure, and the sound source has a hemispherical radiation pattern on the surface where laser ablation is generated. Additionally, another feature is that laser-induced breakdown sound sources can fluctuate, whereas laser ablation sound sources do not because laser ablation is produced at a laser beam-irradiation point. We validate this laser ablation method for acoustic tests by comparing the measured and theoretical resonant frequencies of an impedance tube.

  15. Double-pulse machining as a technique for the enhancement of material removal rates in laser machining of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, A.C.; Banks, P.S.; Perry, M.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Dodell, A.L.; Armas, M.S.

    2005-08-01

    Several nanosecond 0.53-{mu}m laser pulses separated by several tens of nanoseconds have been shown to significantly enhance (three to ten times) material removal rates while minimizing redeposition and heat-affected zones. Economic, high-quality, high-aspect ratio holes (>10:1) in metals are produced as a result. A phenomenological model whereby the second laser pulse interacts with the ejecta produced by the first laser pulse and in close proximity to the material surface is consistent with the observations. Incident laser wavelengths of 1.05 and 0.35 {mu}m also benefit from this pulse format.

  16. Stoichiometric analysis of ammonium nitrate and ammonium perchlorate with nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, S.; Rao, S. Venugopal; Kiran, P. Prem; Tewari, Surya P.; Kumar, G. Manoj

    2010-04-01

    We present our results on the stoichiometric analysis of ammonium nitrate (AN) and ammonium Perchlorate (AP) studied using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with nanosecond pulses. The LIBS spectra collected for AP and AN, without any gating and using a high resolution spectrometer, exhibited characteristic lines corresponding to O, N, H, C, and K. The Oxygen line at 777.38 nm and three Nitrogen lines (N1, N2, N3) at 742.54 nm, 744.64 nm, 747.12 nm were used for evaluating the Oxygen/Nitrogen ratios. The intensities were calculated using area under the peaks and normalized to their respective transition probabilities and statistical weights. The O/N1 ratios estimated from the LIBS spectra were ~4.94 and ~5.11 for AP and O/N3 ratios were ~1.64 and ~1.47 for AN obtained from two independent measurements. The intensity ratios show good agreement with the actual stoichiometric ratios - four for AP and one for AN.

  17. Temperature dependence of nanosecond laser pulse thresholds of melanosome and microsphere microcavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanosome microcavitation is the threshold-level retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage mechanism for nanosecond (ns) pulse exposures in the visible and near-infrared (NIR). Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes were determined as a function of temperature (20 to 85°C) using single ns laser pulses at 532 and 1064 nm. Melanosomes were irradiated using a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG (doubled for 532-nm irradiation). For comparison to melanosome data, a similar temperature (20 to 65°C) dependence study was also performed for 532 nm, ns pulse exposures of black polystyrene microbeads. Results indicated a decrease in the microcavitation average radiant exposure threshold with increasing sample temperature for both 532- and 1064-nm single pulse exposures of melanosomes and microbeads. Threshold data and extrapolated nucleation temperatures were used to estimate melanosome absorption coefficients in the visible and NIR, and microbead absorption coefficients in the visible, indicating that melanin is a better absorber of visible light than black polystyrene. The NIR melanosome absorption coefficients ranged from 3713 cm-1 at 800 nm to 222 cm-1 at 1319 nm. These data represent the first temperature-dependent melanosome microcavitation study in the NIR and provide additional information for understanding melanosome microcavitation threshold dependence on wavelength and ambient temperature.

  18. Fiber grating compression of giant-chirped nanosecond pulses from an ultra-long nanotube mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Woodward, R I; Kelleher, E J R; Runcorn, T H; Loranger, S; Popa, D; Wittwer, V J; Ferrari, A C; Popov, S V; Kashyap, R; Taylor, J R

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that the giant chirp of coherent, nanosecond pulses generated in an 846 m long, all-normal dispersion, nanotube mode-locked fiber laser can be compensated using a chirped fiber Bragg grating compressor. Linear compression to 11 ps is reported, corresponding to an extreme compression factor of ∼100. Experimental results are supported by numerical modeling, which is also used to probe the limits of this technique. Our results unequivocally conclude that ultra-long cavity fiber lasers can support stable dissipative soliton attractors and highlight the design simplicity for pulse-energy scaling through cavity elongation. PMID:25680054

  19. Experimental investigation of the structure and the dynamics of nanosecond laser-induced plasma in 1-atm argon ambient gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Bai, Xueshi; Yu, Jin

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated the structure and the dynamics of the plasma induced on a metallic target in 1-atm argon ambient by a nanosecond laser pulse with irradiance in the range of 10 GW/cm2. The structure is revealed to be sensitively dependent on the laser wavelength. A layered structure of different species characterizes the plasma induced by ultraviolet 355 nm pulse, while an effective mixing between the ablation vapor and the shocked ambient gas is observed with infrared 1064 nm pulse. The absorption property of the shocked gas is found to be crucial for determining the structure of the plasma.

  20. White-light emission from solid carbon in aqueous solution during hydrogen generation induced by nanosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Shota; Maeda, Kosuke

    2016-07-01

    We previously discovered a novel method of hydrogen generation from high-grade charcoal in an aqueous solution using nanosecond laser pulse irradiation. In this paper, white-light emission during this reaction is reported: A broad spectrum over the visible range is observed above a threshold excitation energy density. The white-light emission is a simultaneous product of the hydrogen generation reaction and is attributed to blackbody radiation in accordance with Planck's Law at a temperature above 3800 K. Consequently, we propose that hydrogen generation induced by laser irradiation proceeds similarly to classical coal gasification, which features reactions at high pressure and high temperature.

  1. On the formation of nanostructures on a CdTe surface, stimulated by surface acoustic waves under nanosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasenko, A. I.; Baidullaeva, A.; Veleschuk, V. P. Mozol, P. E.; Boiko, N. I.; Litvin, O. S.

    2015-02-15

    The formation of nanoscale structures in the unirradiated part of a p-CdTe crystal surface irradiated by a nanosecond ruby laser is revealed and investigated. It is shown that their formation is caused by the effect of the long-range action of a laser pulse with an intensity of I = 20 MW/cm{sup 2}. Nanoscale-structure formation is explained by the influence of the pressure gradient of the surface acoustic wave, in particular, within the “vacancy-pump” mechanism on the surface.

  2. Laser-assisted vacuum arc extreme ultraviolet source: a comparison of picosecond and nanosecond laser triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyene, Girum A.; Tobin, Isaac; Juschkin, Larissa; Hayden, Patrick; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Sokell, Emma; Zakharov, Vassily S.; Zakharov, Sergey V.; O’Reilly, Fergal

    2016-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light generation by hybrid laser-assisted vacuum arc discharge plasmas, utilizing Sn-coated rotating-disc-electrodes, was investigated. The discharge was initiated by localized ablation of the liquid tin coating of the cathode disc by a laser pulse. The laser pulse, at 1064 nm, was generated by Nd:YAG lasers with variable energy from 1 to 100 mJ per pulse. The impact of shortening the laser pulse from 7 ns to 170 ps on the EUV generation has been investigated in detail. The use of ps pulses resulted in an increase in emission of EUV radiation. With a fixed discharge energy of ~4 J, the EUV conversion efficiency tends to plateau at ~2.4  ±  0.25% for the ps laser pulses, while for the ns pulses, it saturates at ~1.7  ±  0.3%. Under similar discharge and laser energy conditions, operating the EUV source with the ps-triggering resulted also in narrower spectral profiles of the emission in comparison to ns-triggering. The results indicate an advantage in using ps-triggering in laser-assisted discharges to produce brighter plasmas required for applications such as metrology.

  3. Time-resolved analysis of thickness-dependent dewetting and ablation of silver films upon nanosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dongfeng; Paeng, Dongwoo; Yeo, Junyeob; Kim, Eunpa; Wang, Letian; Chen, Songyan; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting and ablation of thin silver films is investigated by time-resolved imaging. Laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength and 5 ns temporal width are irradiated on silver films of different thicknesses (50 nm, 80 nm, and 350 nm). Below the ablation threshold, it is observed that the dewetting process does not conclude until 630 ns after the laser irradiation for all samples, forming droplet-like particles in the spot central region. At higher laser intensities, ablative material removal occurs in the spot center. Cylindrical rims are formed in the peripheral dewetting zone due to the solidification of transported matter at about 700 ns following the laser pulse exposure. In addition to these features, droplet fingers are superposed upon irradiation of 350-nm thick silver films with higher intensity.

  4. Study of micro/nanostructures formed by a nanosecond laser in gaseous environments for stainless steel surface coloring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Fangfang; Ong, Weili; Guan, Yingchun; Li, Fengping; Sun, Shufeng; Lim, G. C.; Hong, Minghui

    2015-02-01

    Micro/nanostructures are fabricated on the stainless steel surfaces by a nanosecond laser in different gaseous environments, including air, O2, N2 and Ar. Our results indicate that the dimensional feature of the micro/nanostructures is greatly affected by laser scanning speed as well as gaseous environment. The chemical composition of the structures can be flexibly adjusted by laser processing parameters. Oxygen-rich environment is found to boost the growth of the nanostructures. The coloring by the laser processing can be achieved on the laser treated stainless steel surfaces. The multicolor effect on the surfaces is found to be attributed to both feature dimension and chemical composition of the structures. The coloring of the metal surfaces has promising applications in surface marking and code identifying.

  5. Permeabilisation de membranes cellulaires a l'aide d'un laser nanoseconde amplifie par nanoparticules plasmoniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Louis Lalonde, Bastien

    The plasmic membrane of eukaryot cells provides a selective permeability between the cytoplasm and the external environment. It regulates the passage of ions (O2, N 2, K, etc...) and molecules (H2 O, C2H6 O, etc...) by mechanisms like passive diffusion and active transport. In various fields like molecular biology or drug development, it is sometimes needed to bypass this selective permeability to introduce external molecules that are normally impermeable to cell membrane. Examples of external molecules may be DNA plasmid, RNA segment or drugs. We propose a method based on laser amplification by plasmonic nanoparticles to overcome this biological barrier. This non invasive method increases the membrane permeability of a large number of cells in a short time. Optoporation by laser amplified with plasmonic nanoparticles consists of pulsed laser irradiation on cells that have been previously incubated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The laser-AuNPs interactions will create a cavitation bubble which in turn will decrease the membrane permeability by disrupting the bilipid layer arrangement. Molecules in the external medium may then penetrate inside the cells and under the right experimental conditions, the cells will rapidly reseal their membrane and continue living without nefast effects. The feasibility of high throughput optical perforation amplified by plasmonic nanoparticles have been tested with a nanosecond pulsed laser working at 532 nm and 1064 nm. The plasma membrane of cancerous human fibroblast (melanoma wm278) have been successfully perforated while keeping an excellent viability rate. Up to 30% of cells are perforated in which the Lucifer Yellow fluorophore have been incorporated. The viability 2 h after the treatment was evaluated by PI exclusion and the long term vitality was tested by MTT essay. Under optimal conditions at 532 nm, the 2 h viability is 84% and the vitality start at 64% for 2h and reaches 88% after 72 h. With 1064 nm pusles, the 2 h

  6. Performance enhancement of sub-nanosecond diode-pumped passively Q-switched Yb:YAG microchip laser with diamond surface cooling.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, W Z; Chen, Yi-Fan; Su, K W; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2012-09-24

    We experimentally confirm that diamond surface cooling can significantly enhance the output performance of a sub-nanosecond diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser. It is found that the pulse energy obtained with diamond cooling is approximately 1.5 times greater than that obtained without diamond cooling, where a Cr(4+):YAG absorber with the initial transmission of 84% is employed. Furthermore, the standard deviation of the pulse amplitude peak-to-peak fluctuation is found to be approximately 3 times lower than that measured without diamond cooling. Under a pump power of 3.9 W, the passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser can generate a pulse train of 3.3 kHz repetition rate with a pulse energy of 287 μJ and with a pulse width of 650 ps. PMID:23037409

  7. On the mechanism of deformation of an yttrium-aluminum garnet crystal surface under the action of a nanosecond broadband laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskii, N. E.; Zavedeev, E. V.; Senatskii, Yu. V.

    2015-04-01

    Craters on the surface of an yttrium-aluminum garnet crystal plate under irradiation by nanosecond laser pulses with an intensity of 109-1010 W/cm2 and a wide (˜500Å) spectrum have been studied. The mechanism of crater formation as a result of plastic deformation of the surface during the laser action has been discussed. The proposed mechanism takes into account specific features of nonlinear effects under the action of a broadband radiation on the medium. In the stimulated Brillouin scattering of pumping radiation, acoustic waves transform into shock waves, on the fronts of which stimulated Raman scattering develops. As a result, crystal lattice defects formed on the shock-wave fronts are dragged in the direction of pumping, which leads to a high-rate deformation of the crystal surface.

  8. Influence of cerium on the pulsed UV nanosecond laser processing of photostructurable glass ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, F. E.; Adams, P. M.; Helvajian, H.

    2005-07-01

    Photostructurable glass ceramic (PSGC) materials contain a sensitizer that is used to facilitate the optical exposure process. The primary role of the sensitizer is to absorb incident radiation and generate photoelectrons. With thermal treatment, these photoelectrons can then interact with nascent metal ions to induce the formation of metallic clusters and the precipitation of a soluble crystalline phase in the glass matrix. The photo-ionization efficiency of the sensitizer species is strongly dependent on its spectral absorption and oxidation state in the base glass. Stabilizing compounds are typically added to the glass matrix to maintain the photo-active oxidation state and promote efficient exposure. To investigate the effectiveness of the photo-initiator, we have conducted experiments in which sample coupons of a commercial PSGC material (Foturan™, Schott Corp., Germany) were carefully exposed to various photon doses by pulsed UV nanosecond lasers at λ = 266 nm and 355 nm. Foturan is a lithium aluminosilicate glass that contains trace amounts of cerium as the photosensitive agent (0.01-0.04 wt.% admixture Ce 2O 3). The photo-initiator efficiency was investigated by using samples with cerium and without cerium. The irradiation wavelengths were selected because they lie above and below the primary absorption band of the cerium photo-initiator. Optical transmission spectroscopy (OTS) was employed to identify and monitor the population density of the photo-induced trapped electron state as a function of incident laser irradiance. The irradiated samples were thermally processed and then analyzed again with OTS to measure the quenching of the trapped electron state and the concurrent growth of a spectral band associated with the formation of nanometer-scale metallic clusters. The growth of metallic clusters signifies the "fixing" of the exposure and permanent image formation in the glass. The OTS results reveal that for λ = 266 nm laser irradiation, at least two

  9. All-fiber-integrated linearly polarized fiber laser delivering 476  μJ, 50  kHz, nanosecond pulses for ultrasonic generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Xu, Xiaodong; Yu, Hailong; Su, Rongtao; Wang, Xiaolin; Yang, Lijia

    2016-05-10

    We demonstrate a high-energy linearly polarized pulsed fiber laser for ultrasonic generation based on a master oscillator power amplification (MOPA) scheme, which delivers nanosecond pulses with duration of 4.8 ns and pulse energy of 476 μJ at the repetition rate of 50 kHz. The MOPA is seeded by a gain switch semiconductor laser diode at 1064 nm. In the pre-amplification stages, a double-pass amplification structure is designed and successfully applied to amplify the low-power seed laser for the consideration of suppressing amplified spontaneous emission, decreasing the number of amplification stages, and reducing the nonlinear effects. A highly ytterbium-doped fiber is utilized in the main amplifier to shorten the fiber length and reduce the fiber nonlinearity. The average power is finally boosted to 23.8 W with corresponding optical-to-optical efficiency of 66.9% and a polarization extinction rate of ∼10.5  dB. The corresponding peak power is calculated to be 87.1 kW. Finally, the established laser system is successfully used for ultrasonic generation based on a line excitation configuration and grating excitation configuration, and clear surface acoustic wave signals are detected. Many potential applications in laser ultrasonics can be foreseen. PMID:27168281

  10. Calcium detection of human hair and nail by the nanosecond time-gated spectroscopy of laser-ablation plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruna, Masamitsu; Ohmi, Masato; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Morimoto, Shigeto

    2000-04-01

    We demonstrate the nanosecond time-gated spectroscopy of plume in laser ablation of biological tissue, which allows us to detect calcium (Ca) with high sensitivity by the use of either a UV or a near-IR laser pulse. Clear and sharp peaks of Ca+ appear in the luminescence spectrum of laser-ablation plume although the Ca content is only 0.1 percent in human hair and nail. Luminescence peaks of sodium atom (Na) and ionized carbon are also detectable. This specific spectroscopy is low invasive because a single low-energy laser pulse illuminates the tissue sample, and it does not require any poisonous sensititizers like fluorescence dye. This method, therefore, is a promising candidate for optical biopsy in the near future. In particular, Ca detection of human hair may lead to new diagnosis, including monitor of daily intake of Ca and a screening diagnosis of osteoporosis.

  11. Magneto-absorption effects in magnetic-field assisted laser ablation of silicon by UV nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhi, H.; Gruzdev, V.; Zheng, H. Y.; Rawat, R. S.; Zhou, W.

    2016-06-01

    A constant magnetic field can significantly improve the quality and speed of ablation by nanosecond laser pulses. These improvements are usually attributed to the confinement of laser-produced plasma by the magnetic field and specific propagation effects in the magnetized plasma. Here we report a strong influence of constant axial magnetic field on the ablation of silicon by 20-ns laser pulses at wavelength 355 nm, which results in an increase of ablation depth by a factor of 1.3 to 69 depending on laser parameters and magnitude of the magnetic field. The traditional plasma effects do not explain this result, and magneto-absorption of silicon is proposed as one of the major mechanisms of the significant enhancement of ablation.

  12. Comparative study of the ablation of materials by femtosecond and pico- or nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, Taras V; Konov, Vitalii I; Garnov, Sergei V; Danielius, R; Piskarskas, A; Tamosauskas, G; Dausinger, F

    1999-08-31

    A series of studies was carried out on the ablation of steel, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic, and diamond in air by femtosecond (200 and 900 fs) pulses of different wavelengths (532 and 266 nm) and in a wide energy density range (1 - 10{sup 3} J cm{sup -2}). The ablation rates were measured for different geometries of the irradiation surface [a shallow crater and a channel with a high (up to 10) aspect ratio]. The ablation rates (in a shallow crater) and the morphologies of the irradiated surface were compared for femtosecond and longer (220 ps, 7 ns) pulses. The role of the laser-generated plasma in the ablation of materials by subpicosecond pulses as well as the prospects for the practical application of ultrashort laser pulses in the processing of materials are analysed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  13. Generation of high-power nanosecond pulses from laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kinpui

    1988-01-01

    Simulation results are used to compare the pulse energy levels and pulse energy widths that can be achieved with LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers for both the pulse-transmission mode (PTM) and pulse-reflection mode (PRM) Q-switching methods for pulse energy levels up to hundreds of microjoules and pulse widths as short as 1 ns. It is shown that high-power pulses with pulse widths as short as 1 ns can be generated with PTM Q-switched in LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers. With the PRM Q-switching method, pulse widths as short as 2 ns and pulse energy at the level of a few hundred microjoules can also be achieved but require pumping with 8-10-mJ AlGaAs laser diode arrays.

  14. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength λ= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  15. Complete characterization of damage threshold in titanium doped sapphire crystals with nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canova, F.; Chambaret, J.-P.; Mourou, G.; Sentis, M.; Uteza, O.; Delaporte, P.; Itina, T.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Commandre, M.; Amra, C.

    2005-12-01

    The major bottleneck for the development of robust and cost-effective femtosecond amplification systems is the uncertainty concerning the damage threshold of Ti: Sapphire crystals. Up to now, Ti: Sapphire is the only material that supports the generation of temporally short pulses (few femtosecond) at high repetition rates, and overcoming this bottleneck will represent a major advance in laser performance for all the femtosecond community. Currently, when pumped at 532nm, the uncertainty on Ti:Sapphire damage threshold, is about a factor of ten. The empirically estimated threshold is 10J/cm2 but for safety reasons the femtosecond laser community (especially the companies producing the lasers) uses the conservative value of 1J/cm2. Such a low pumping fluency means low extraction efficiency during the amplification process and a great waste of pumping energy, the most expensive part of a Ti:Sapphire amplifier. In order to remove this bottleneck, we launch a complete analysis of all the factors that influence the damage threshold in Ti:Sapphire Crystals. Our program is to first measure the bulk threshold to define the upper threshold limit, and the influence of Ti ion concentration in the crystal garnet. Then, we will analyze all the surface effects that influence the value of the threshold. These effects depend on the polishing, on the cleaning process, as well as the type of anti-reflective coating. Only a complete understanding of all the mechanisms involved in threshold limitation will allow us to produce Ti:Sa crystals with the best performances. The study of the characteristics of the Ti:Sapphire damage threshold will not be complete and reliable without a complete characterization of the pump beams (temporal and spatial modulations), and this analysis will be done with nanosecond and picosecond pulses at 532nm. Finally, to complete the exploration of the the behavior of the titanium doped sapphire crystal, we will characterize the damage threshold with

  16. Efficient Intracellular Delivery of Molecules with High Cell Viability Using Nanosecond-Pulsed Laser-Activated Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5–9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. PMID:24547946

  17. Heating and ablation of tokamak graphite by pulsed nanosecond Nd-YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Semerok, A.; Fomichev, S. V.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Brygo, F.; Thro, P.-Y.; Grisolia, C.

    2007-04-15

    The results on laser heating and ablation of graphite tiles of thermonuclear tokamaks are presented. Two pulsed Nd-YAG lasers (20 Hz repetition rate, 5 ns pulse duration and 10 kHz repetition rate, 100 ns pulse duration) were applied for ablation measurements. The ablation thresholds (1.0{+-}0.5 J/cm{sup 2} for 5 ns and 2.5{+-}0.5 J/cm{sup 2} for 100 ns laser pulses) were determined for the Tore Supra tokamak graphite tiles (backside) nonexposed to plasma. The high repetition rate Nd-YAG laser (10 kHz, 100 ns pulse duration) and the developed pyrometer system were applied for graphite heating measurements. Some unexpected features of laser heating of the graphite surface were observed. They were explained by the presence of a thin surface layer with the properties different from those of the bulk graphite. The theoretical models of laser heating and near-threshold ablation of graphite with imperfectly adhered layer were developed to interpret the experimental results.

  18. A unified model to determine the energy partitioning between target and plasma in nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Galasso, G.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Tomaselli, A.; Scarpa, D.

    2015-03-28

    In semiconductor industry, pulsed nanosecond lasers are widely applied for the separation of silicon wafers. Here, the high intensities employed activate a cascade of complex multi-physical and multi-phase mechanisms, which finally result in the formation of a laser induced plasma, shielding the target from the incoming laser beam. Such induced plasma plume, by preventing the laser to effectively reach the target, reduces the overall efficiency and controllability of the ablation process. Modelling can be a useful tool in the optimization of industrial laser applications, allowing a deeper understanding of the way the laser energy distributes between target and induced plasma. Nevertheless, the highly multi-physical character of laser ablation poses serious challenges on the implementation of the various mechanisms underlying the process within a common modelling framework. A novel strategy is here proposed in order to simulate in a simplified, yet physically consistent way, a typical industrial application as laser ablation of silicon wafers. Reasonable agreement with experimental findings is obtained. Three fundamental mechanisms have been identified as the main factors influencing the accuracy of the numerical predictions: the transition from evaporative to volumetric mass removal occurring at critical temperature, the collisional and radiative processes underlying the initial plasma formation stage and the increased impact of the liquid ejection mechanism when a sub-millimeter laser footprint is used.

  19. A unified model to determine the energy partitioning between target and plasma in nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galasso, G.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Tomaselli, A.; Scarpa, D.

    2015-03-01

    In semiconductor industry, pulsed nanosecond lasers are widely applied for the separation of silicon wafers. Here, the high intensities employed activate a cascade of complex multi-physical and multi-phase mechanisms, which finally result in the formation of a laser induced plasma, shielding the target from the incoming laser beam. Such induced plasma plume, by preventing the laser to effectively reach the target, reduces the overall efficiency and controllability of the ablation process. Modelling can be a useful tool in the optimization of industrial laser applications, allowing a deeper understanding of the way the laser energy distributes between target and induced plasma. Nevertheless, the highly multi-physical character of laser ablation poses serious challenges on the implementation of the various mechanisms underlying the process within a common modelling framework. A novel strategy is here proposed in order to simulate in a simplified, yet physically consistent way, a typical industrial application as laser ablation of silicon wafers. Reasonable agreement with experimental findings is obtained. Three fundamental mechanisms have been identified as the main factors influencing the accuracy of the numerical predictions: the transition from evaporative to volumetric mass removal occurring at critical temperature, the collisional and radiative processes underlying the initial plasma formation stage and the increased impact of the liquid ejection mechanism when a sub-millimeter laser footprint is used.

  20. Optimization of the dynamic wavefront control of a pulsed kilojoule/nanosecond-petawatt laser facility.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ji-Ping; Sautivet, Anne-Marie; Fils, Jérôme; Martin, Luc; Abdeli, Kahina; Sauteret, Christian; Wattellier, Benoit

    2008-02-10

    The wavefront aberrations in a large-scale, flash-lamp-pumped, high-energy, high-power glass laser system can degrade considerably the quality of the final focal spot, and limit severely the repetition rate. The various aberrations induced on the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), laser facility (LULI2000) throughout the amplification are identified and analyzed in detail. Based on these analyses, an optimized procedure for dynamic wavefront control is then designed and implemented. The lower-order Zernike aberrations can be effectively reduced by combining an adaptive-optics setup, comprising a bimorph deformable mirror and a four-wave lateral shearing interferometer, with a precise alignment system. This enables the laser chain to produce a reproducible focal spot close to the diffraction limit (Strehl ratio approximately 0.7). This allows also to increase the repetition rate, initially limited by the recovery time of the laser amplifiers, by a factor of 2 (one shot per hour). The proposed procedure provides an attractive alternative for dynamic correction of the wavefront aberrations of a laser facility as complex as the LULI2000. PMID:18268782

  1. Optimization of the dynamic wavefront control of a pulsed kilojoule/nanosecond-petawatt laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ji-Ping; Sautivet, Anne-Marie; Fils, Jérôme; Martin, Luc; Abdeli, Kahina; Sauteret, Christian; Wattellier, Benoit

    2008-02-01

    The wavefront aberrations in a large-scale, flash-lamp-pumped, high-energy, high-power glass laser system can degrade considerably the quality of the final focal spot, and limit severely the repetition rate. The various aberrations induced on the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), laser facility (LULI2000) throughout the amplification are identified and analyzed in detail. Based on these analyses, an optimized procedure for dynamic wavefront control is then designed and implemented. The lower-order Zernike aberrations can be effectively reduced by combining an adaptive-optics setup, comprising a bimorph deformable mirror and a four-wave lateral shearing interferometer, with a precise alignment system. This enables the laser chain to produce a reproducible focal spot close to the diffraction limit (Strehl ratio ~0.7). This allows also to increase the repetition rate, initially limited by the recovery time of the laser amplifiers, by a factor of 2 (one shot per hour). The proposed procedure provides an attractive alternative for dynamic correction of the wavefront aberrations of a laser facility as complex as the LULI2000.

  2. Parameter optimization of nanosecond laser for microdrilling on PVC by Taguchi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canel, Timur; Kaya, A. Uğur; Çelik, Bekir

    2012-11-01

    Formation of cavities having maximum aspect ratio (depth-to-width (D/W) ratio) on PVC during laser drilling has several undesirable outcomes with regard to cavity quality. Hence it is essential to select optimum drilling process parameters to maximize aspect ratio and minimize Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and circularity. This paper presents application of the Taguchi optimization method to obtain cavities possessing maximum aspect ratio influenced by drilling conditions such as wavelength, fluence and frequency. In the present work, the effects of laser processing parameters, including laser fluence, laser frequency and wavelength were investigated in relation to the aspect ratio, HAZ and circularity. Then the optimal values of wavelength, fluence and frequency were determined. According to the result of the confirmation experiment using optimum parameters, it was observed that experimental results were compatible with Taguchi method with 93% rate. The details of experimentation analysis and analysis of variance are presented in this paper.

  3. Characterization of binary silver based alloys by nanosecond-infrared-laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Ciro; Sobral, Hugo

    2013-11-01

    A nanosecond infrared laser ablation (LA) system was examined to determine the composition of several silver-copper alloys through an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Samples with different concentrations were prepared and analyzed by atomic absorption, and ICP-OES after sample digestion, and compared with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer-scanning electron microscopy (EDX-SEM). Elemental fractionation during the ablation process and within the ICP was investigated for different laser frequencies and fluences. Samples were used for optimizing and calibrating the coupling between LA to the ICP-OES system. Results obtained from the samples analysis were in agreement with those obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy, ICP-OES and EDX-SEM, showing that fractionation was not significant for laser fluences higher than 55 J cm-2.

  4. The influence of magnetised electron transport on thermal self-focusing and channelling of nanosecond laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Martin; Kingham, Robert; Bissell, John

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of a nanosecond IR laser pulse through an under-dense (0.01 — 0.1ncr) magnetised laser-plasma is considered. The interplay between magnetised transport, B-field evolution and plasma hydrodynamics in the presence of a dynamically evolving beam are investigated by means of a paraxial wave solving module coupled to CTC, a 2D MHD code including Braginskii electron transport and IMPACT, a 2D implicit Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) code with magnetic fields. Magnetic fields have previously been shown to improve density channel formation for plasma waveguides however fluid simulations presented here indicate that Nernst advection can result in the rapid cavitation of magnetic field in the laser-heated region resulting in beam defocusing. Kinetic simulations indicate that strong non-local transport is present leading to the fluid code overestimating heat-flow and magnetic field advection and resulting in the recovery of beam channelling for the conditions considered.

  5. Rear surface spallation on single-crystal silicon in nanosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jun; Orlov, Sergei S.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2005-05-01

    Rear surface spallation of single-crystal silicon under 5-ns laser pulse ablation at intensities of 0.6-60GW/cm2 is studied through postablation examination of the ablated samples. The spallation threshold energy and the spallation depth's dependences on the energy and target thickness are measured. From the linear relation between the spallation threshold energy and the target thickness, an estimation of the material spall strength around 1.4GPa is obtained, in reasonable agreement with the spall strength estimation of 0.8-1.2GPa at a strain rate of 107s-1 using Grady's model for brittle materials. The experiment reveals the internal fracturing process over an extended zone in silicon, which is controlled by the competition between the shock pressure load and the laser ablation rate. The qualities of the laser microstructuring and micromachining results are greatly improved by using an acoustic impedance matching approach.

  6. Nanosecond laser damage resistance of differently prepared semi-finished parts of optical multimode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Guido; Vogel, Jens; Preuß, Rüdiger; Vaziri, Pouya; Zoheidi, Mohammadali; Eberstein, Markus; Krüger, Jörg

    2007-12-01

    Optical multimode fibers are applied in materials processing (e.g. automotive industry), defense, aviation technology, medicine and biotechnology. One challenging task concerning the production of multimode fibers is the enhancement of laser-induced damage thresholds. A higher damage threshold enables a higher transmitted average power at a given fiber diameter or the same power inside a thinner fiber to obtain smaller focus spots. In principle, different material parameters affect the damage threshold. Besides the quality of the preform bulk material itself, the drawing process during the production of the fiber and the preparation of the fiber end surfaces influence the resistance. Therefore, the change of the laser-induced damage threshold of preform materials was investigated in dependence on a varying thermal treatment and preparation procedure. Single and multi-pulse laser-induced damage thresholds of preforms (F300, Heraeus) were measured using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm wavelength emitting pulses with a duration of 15 ns, a pulse energy of 12 mJ and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The temporal and spatial shape of the laser pulses were controlled accurately. Laser-induced damage thresholds in a range from 150 J cm -2 to 350 J cm -2 were determined depending on the number of pulses applied to the same spot, the thermal history and the polishing quality of the samples, respectively.

  7. A high repetition rate passively Q-switched microchip laser for controllable transverse laser modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Bai, Sheng-Chuang; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; Kaminskii, Alexander A.

    2016-05-01

    A Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 microchip laser for versatile controllable transverse laser modes has been demonstrated by adjusting the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal along the tilted pump beam direction. The pump beam diameter-dependent asymmetric saturated inversion population inside the Nd:YVO4 crystal governs the oscillation of various Laguerre-Gaussian, Ince-Gaussian and Hermite-Gaussian modes. Controllable transverse laser modes with repetition rates over 25 kHz and up to 183 kHz, depending on the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal, have been achieved. The controllable transverse laser beams with a nanosecond pulse width and peak power over hundreds of watts have been obtained for potential applications in optical trapping and quantum computation.

  8. Convoluted effect of laser fluence and pulse duration on the property of a nanosecond laser-induced plasma into an argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xueshi; Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Yu Jin; Sabourdy, David; Nguyen, Luc; Jalocha, Alain

    2013-01-07

    We studied the behavior of the plasma induced by a nanosecond infrared (1064 nm) laser pulse on a metallic target (Al) during its propagation into argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure and especially over the delay interval ranging from several hundred nanoseconds to several microseconds. In such interval, the plasma is particularly interesting as a spectroscopic emission source for laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIBS). We show a convoluted effect between laser fluence and pulse duration on the structure and the emission property of the plasma. With a relatively high fluence of about 160 J/cm{sup 2} where a strong plasma shielding effect is observed, a short pulse of about 4 ns duration is shown to be significantly more efficient to excite the optical emission from the ablation vapor than a long pulse of about 25 ns duration. While with a lower fluence of about 65 J/cm{sup 2}, a significantly more efficient excitation is observed with the long pulse. We interpret our observations by considering the post-ablation interaction between the generated plume and the tailing part of the laser pulse. We demonstrate that the ionization of the layer of ambient gas surrounding the ablation vapor plays an important role in plasma shielding. Such ionization is the consequence of laser-supported absorption wave and directly dependent on the laser fluence and the pulse duration. Further observations of the structure of the generated plume in its early stage of expansion support our explanations.

  9. Comparison of nanosecond and picosecond excitation for interference-free two-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of atomic hydrogen in flames.

    PubMed

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Patterson, Brian D; Frank, Jonathan H; Settersten, Thomas B

    2008-09-10

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TP-LIF) line imaging of atomic hydrogen was investigated in a series of premixed CH4/O2/N2, H2/O2, and H2/O2/N2 flames using excitation with either picosecond or nanosecond pulsed lasers operating at 205 nm. Radial TP-LIF profiles were measured for a range of pulse fluences to determine the maximum interference-free signal levels and the corresponding picosecond and nanosecond laser fluences in each of 12 flames. For an interference-free measurement, the shape of the TP-LIF profile is independent of laser fluence. For larger fluences, distortions in the profile are attributed to photodissociation of H2O, CH3, and/or other combustion intermediates, and stimulated emission. In comparison with the nanosecond laser, excitation with the picosecond laser can effectively reduce the photolytic interference and produces approximately an order of magnitude larger interference-free signal in CH4/O2/N2 flames with equivalence ratios in the range of 0.5< or =Phi< or =1.4, and in H2/O2 flames with 0.3< or =Phi< or =1.2. Although photolytic interference limits the nanosecond laser fluence in all flames, stimulated emission, occurring between the laser-excited level, H(n=3), and H(n=2), is the limiting factor for picosecond excitation in the flames with the highest H atom concentration. Nanosecond excitation is advantageous in the richest (Phi=1.64) CH4/O2/N2 flame and in H2/O2/N2 flames. The optimal excitation pulse width for interference-free H atom detection depends on the relative concentrations of hydrogen atoms and photolytic precursors, the flame temperature, and the laser path length within the flame. PMID:18784770

  10. Comparison of nanosecond and picosecond excitation for interference-free two-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of atomic hydrogen in flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Patterson, Brian D.; Frank, Jonathan H.; Settersten, Thomas B

    2008-09-10

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TP-LIF) line imaging of atomic hydrogen was investigated in a series of premixed CH4/O2/N2, H2/O2, and H2/O2/N2 flames using excitation with either picosecond or nanosecond pulsed lasers operating at 205 nm. Radial TP-LIF profiles were measured for a range of pulse fluences to determine the maximum interference-free signal levels and the corresponding picosecond and nanosecond laser fluences in each of 12 flames. For an interference-free measurement, the shape of the TP-LIF profile is independent of laser fluence. For larger fluences, distortions in the profile are attributed to photodissociation of H2O, CH3, and/or other combustion intermediates, and stimulated emission. In comparison with the nanosecond laser, excitation with the picosecond laser can effectively reduce the photolytic interference and produces approximately an order of magnitude larger interference-free signal in CH4/O2/N2 flames with equivalence ratios in the range of 0.5{<=}{phi}{<=}1.4, and in H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flames with 0.3{<=}{phi}{<=}1.2. Although photolytic interference limits the nanosecond laser fluence in all flames, stimulated emission, occurring between the laser-excited level, H(n=3), and H(n=2), is the limiting factor for picosecond excitation in the flames with the highest H atom concentration. Nanosecond excitation is advantageous in the richest ({phi}=1.64) CH4/O2/N2 flame and in H2/O2/N2 flames. The optimal excitation pulse width for interference-free H atom detection depends on the relative concentrations of hydrogen atoms and photolytic precursors, the flame temperature, and the laser path length within the flame.

  11. Industrial applications of high-average power high-peak power nanosecond pulse duration Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Paul M.; Ellwi, Samir

    2009-02-01

    Within the vast range of laser materials processing applications, every type of successful commercial laser has been driven by a major industrial process. For high average power, high peak power, nanosecond pulse duration Nd:YAG DPSS lasers, the enabling process is high speed surface engineering. This includes applications such as thin film patterning and selective coating removal in markets such as the flat panel displays (FPD), solar and automotive industries. Applications such as these tend to require working spots that have uniform intensity distribution using specific shapes and dimensions, so a range of innovative beam delivery systems have been developed that convert the gaussian beam shape produced by the laser into a range of rectangular and/or shaped spots, as required by demands of each project. In this paper the authors will discuss the key parameters of this type of laser and examine why they are important for high speed surface engineering projects, and how they affect the underlying laser-material interaction and the removal mechanism. Several case studies will be considered in the FPD and solar markets, exploring the close link between the application, the key laser characteristics and the beam delivery system that link these together.

  12. Dependence of optimal initial density on laser parameters for multi-keV x-ray radiators generated by nanosecond laser-produced underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shao-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Hu, Guang-yue; Miao, Wen-yong; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun

    2016-01-01

    Efficient multi-keV x-ray sources can be produced using nanosecond laser pulse-heated middle-Z underdense plasmas generated using gas or foam. Previous experimental results show that an optimal initial target density exists for efficient multi-keV x-ray emission at which the laser ionization wave is supersonic. Here we explore the influence of the laser intensity and the pulse duration on this optimal initial target density via a one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The simulation shows that the optimal initial density is sensitive to both the laser intensity and the pulse duration. However, the speed of the supersonic ionization wave at the end of the laser irradiation is always maintained at 1.5 to 1.7 times that of the ion acoustic wave under the optimal initial density conditions.

  13. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T. Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  14. Measurement of OH, O, and NO densities and their correlations with mouse melanoma cell death rate treated by a nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Ippei; Shirakawa, Yuki; Hirakata, Kenta; Akiyama, Taketoshi; Yonemori, Seiya; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2015-10-01

    Mouse melanoma cells in a culture medium are treated using a nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge plasma and the correlations between the rate of cell death and the densities of reactive species (OH, O, and NO) in the plasma are measured. The plasma is irradiated onto the culture medium surface with a vertical gas flow of an O2/N2 mixture from a glass tube at various gas flow rates and O2 concentrations. The densities of the reactive species are measured very close to the culture medium surface, where the reactive species interact with the culture medium, using laser-induced fluorescence. In the case of the N2 discharge (O2 = 0%), an increase in gas flow rate decreases OH density because it lowers the water vapor concentration by diluting the vapor, which is required for OH production. The increase in gas flow rate also leads to a decreased cell death rate. In the case of the O2/N2 discharge, on the other hand, an increase in O2 concentration at a fixed flow rate does not affect the rate of cell death, although it considerably changes the O and NO densities. These findings indicate that some reactive species derived from water vapor such as OH are responsible for the melanoma cell death, whereas those from O2, such as O and NO, are less likely responsible. They also indicate the importance of water evaporation from the culture medium surface in cell treatment.

  15. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts accumulate differentially on titanium surfaces treated with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Radmanesh, Mitra; Ektesabi, Amin M; Wyatt, Rachael A; Crawford, Bryan D; Kiani, Amirkianoosh

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial engineering, specifically in bone implant and osseointegration, is currently facing a critical challenge regarding the response of cells to foreign objects and general biocompatibility of the materials used in the production of these implants. Using the developing technology of the laser surface treatment, this study investigates the effects of the laser repetition rate (frequency) on cell distribution across the surface of the titanium substrates. The main objective of this research is building a fundamental understanding of how cells interact with treated titanium and how different treatments affect cell accumulation. Cells respond differently to surfaces treated with different frequency lasers. The results of this research identify the influence of frequency on surface topography properties and oxidation of titanium, and their subsequent effects on the pattern of cell accumulation on its surface. Despite increased oxidation in laser-treated regions, the authors observe that fibroblast cells prefer untreated titanium to laser-treated regions, except the regions treated with 25 kHz pulses, which become preferentially colonized after 72 h. PMID:27581527

  16. Formation of crownlike and related nanostructures on thin supported gold films irradiated by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kulchin, Yu N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A; Emel'yanov, V I; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V

    2014-08-01

    A type of laser-induced surface relief nanostructure-the nanocrown-on thin metallic films was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The nanocrowns, representing a thin corrugated rim of resolidified melt and resembling well-known impact-induced water-crown splashes, were produced by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses on thin gold films of variable thickness on low-melting copper and high-melting tungsten substrates, providing different transient melting and adhesion conditions for these films. The proposed model of the nanocrown formation, based on a hydrodynamical (thermocapillary Marangoni) surface instability and described by a Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, envisions key steps of the nanocrown appearance and gives qualitative predictions of the acquired nanocrown parameters. PMID:25215830

  17. Heat and Momentum Transfer on the Rapid Phase Change of Liquid Induced by Nanosecond-Pulsed Laser Irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Kuwon

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the physics of the liquid -vapor phase transition phenomenon induced by nanosecond -pulsed ultraviolet laser irradiation. This work is concerned with the science and technological applications of the phenomenon of rapid nucleation and explosive vaporization of a liquid in contact with a pulsed-laser heated solid surface. The thermodynamics of the phase transition, the kinetics of collective bubble growth and collapse, and the transient development of pressure field have been investigated experimentally by various fast optical sensing techniques. The purpose of this study is to provide new insight into the physics of the liquid-vapor transition and the interaction between laser and liquid-solid interface. A detailed study on the practical aspects of a novel technological application, the laser cleaning technology, is also included. A model system investigated throughout this work is pure water, methanol, or isopropanol in contact with a solid chromium surface that is heated by ultraviolet KrF excimer laser pulses of nanosecond duration. The dynamics of bubble nucleation, growth, and collapse is studied by optical specular reflectance and scattering probe, which isolates the onset of phase transformation with great accuracy. The thermodynamics of phase transition and metastability of liquid matter have been studied by transient photothermal reflectance probe, which monitors the transient temperature field non-intrusively with nanosecond time resolution. The transient response from the photothermal reflectance probe which utilizes temperature-dependent optical properties of an embedded thin film sensor are coupled with heat transfer modeling results in order to predict the thermodynamic condition for the vaporization in nanosecond time scale. The generation of transient pressure pulses by bubble growth and the effect of static pressure on the phase transition are studied by the piezoelectric transducer probe, photoacoustic probe beam deflection

  18. Possibility of applying a hydrodynamic model to describe the laser erosion of metals irradiated by high-intensity nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kozadaev, K V

    2014-04-28

    We report the results of experimental investigations of the production and development of plasma-vapour plumes upon irradiation of metal targets by nanosecond (10–100 ns) pulses with a high (10{sup 8}–10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) power density under atmospheric conditions. The transition from a quasi-stationary thermal mechanism of metal erosion to an explosion hydrodynamic one takes place when the radiation power density increases from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. The resultant experimental information is extremely important for the laser deposition of metal nanostructures under atmospheric conditions, which is possible only for power densities of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  19. Influence of irradiation parameters in nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser micro-machining of stainless steel for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, M. Paula; López, Ana J.; Ramil, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of the working parameters in the micro-machining process of stainless steel 316L by means of 355 nm Nd:YVO4 nanosecond laser. Our target is the surface modification of metallic bioimplants to favour osseointegration. Well organized structures, like a matrix of drilling holes or a pattern of grooves, were created in the metallic surface by means of different treatments in which both laser parameters and irradiation schemes were varied. Processed metal surfaces were characterized by confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy SEM. The results allowed us to establish the most adequate processing parameters to generate textured micro-features in a range suitable for biomedical applications

  20. Multiscale analysis: a way to investigate laser damage precursors in materials for high power applications at nanosecond pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natoli, J. Y.; Wagner, F.; Ciapponi, A.; Capoulade, J.; Gallais, L.; Commandré, M.

    2010-11-01

    The mechanism of laser induced damage in optical materials under high power nanosecond laser irradiation is commonly attributed to the presence of precursor centers. Depending on material and laser source, the precursors could have different origins. Some of them are clearly extrinsic, such as impurities or structural defects linked to the fabrication conditions. In most cases the center size ranging from sub-micrometer to nanometer scale does not permit an easy detection by optical techniques before irradiation. Most often, only a post mortem observation of optics permits to proof the local origin of breakdown. Multi-scale analyzes by changing irradiation beam size have been performed to investigate the density, size and nature of laser damage precursors. Destructive methods such as raster scan, laser damage probability plot and morphology studies permit to deduce the precursor densities. Another experimental way to get information on nature of precursors is to use non destructive methods such as photoluminescence and absorption measurements. The destructive and non destructive multiscale studies are also motivated for practical reasons. Indeed LIDT studies of large optics as those used in LMJ or NIF projects are commonly performed on small samples and with table top lasers whose characteristics change from one to another. In these conditions, it is necessary to know exactly the influence of the different experimental parameters and overall the spot size effect on the final data. In this paper, we present recent developments in multiscale characterization and results obtained on optical coatings (surface case) and KDP crystal (bulk case).

  1. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of brass in a dry and liquid-confined environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Shazia; Vaheed, Hamza; Mahmood, Khaliq

    2013-02-01

    The effect of ambient environment (dry or wet) and overlapping laser pulses on the laser ablation performance of brass has been investigated. For this purpose, a Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm, pulse energy of 150 mJ, pulse width of 6 ns and repetition rate of 10 Hz is employed. In order to explore the effect of ambient environments, brass targets have been exposed in deionized water, methanol and air. The targets are exposed for 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 succeeding pulses in each atmosphere. The surface morphology and chemical composition of ablated targets have been characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) techniques. In case of liquid environment, various features like nano- and micro-scale laser-induced periodic surface structures with periodicity 500 nm-1 μm, cavities of size few micrometers with multiple ablative layers and phenomenon of thermal stress cracking are observed. These features are originated by various chemical and thermal phenomena induced by laser heating at the liquid-solid interfaces. The convective bubble motion, explosive boiling, pressure gradients, cluster and colloid formation due to confinement effects of liquids are possible cause for such kind of features. The metal oxides and alcohol formed on irradiated surface are also playing the significant role for the formation of these kinds of structure. In case of air one huge crater is formed along with the redeposition of sputtered material and is ascribed to laser-induced evaporation and oxide formation.

  2. A simple highly stable and temporally synchronizable Nd:glass laser oscillator delivering laser pulses of variable pulse duration from sub-nanosecond to few nanoseconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. K.; Joshi, R. A.; Patidar, R. K.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2007-04-01

    A simple flash lamp pumped Nd:phosphate glass laser oscillator has been designed and set up delivering laser pulses of variable duration from ˜800 ps to 6 ns. It is based on Q-switching and full-wavelength cavity dumping and provides single laser pulse energy of 5 mJ and 11 mJ corresponding to pulse duration of ˜800 ps and 6 ns respectively at an electrical pump energy of 50 J. While the maximum pulse duration is governed by the cavity round trip time, the lower limit is decided by the switching speed of the high voltage pulse to the Pockels cell of the cavity dumper. Output laser pulses have shown enhanced pulse energy stability by dumping the cavity four round trips after the peak buildup. The laser pulses were synchronized with 250 ps positively chirped laser pulse train derived from an independent commercial cw mode locked Nd:fluorophosphate glass laser oscillator. The temporal jitter between these two pulses was measured to be ˜200 ps, limited by the speed of the electronics used.

  3. A study of angular dependence in the ablation rate of polymers by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedder, James E. A.; Holmes, Andrew S.

    2006-02-01

    Measurements of ablation rate have traditionally been carried out only at normal incidence. However, in real-world applications ablation is often carried out at oblique angles, and it is useful to have prior knowledge of the ablation rate in this case. Detailed information about the angular dependence is also important for the development of ablation simulation tools, and can provide additional insight into the ablation mechanism. Previously we have reported on the angular dependence of direct-write ablation at 266 nm wavelength in solgel and polymer materials. In this paper we present a systematic study of angular dependence for excimer laser ablation of two polymer materials of interest for microfabrication: polycarbonate and SU8 photoresist. The results are used to improve simulation models to aid in mask design.

  4. Fibre laser with a subterahertz repetition rate of ultrashort pulses in the telecom range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. V.; Mylnikov, V. M.; Koptev, M. Yu; Muravyev, S. V.; Kim, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated a new fibre laser configuration for the generation of ultrashort pulses at a repetition rate far exceeding the fundamental cavity frequency. The laser configuration includes a nonlinear amplifying mirror as an artificial saturable absorber for mode locking and a spectral comb filter for pulse separation stabilisation. Generation of trains and sequences of ultrashort pulses at a repetition rate tunable in the range 8 – 200 GHz has been demonstrated experimentally. The pulses generated by the laser have been shown to retain an ordered, equidistant structure on a nanosecond timescale.

  5. Analysis of material modifications caused by nanosecond pulsed UV laser processing of SiC and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Olaf; Wernicke, Tim; Würfl, Joachim; Hergenröder, Roland; Tränkle, Günther

    2008-10-01

    The effects of direct UV laser processing on single crystal SiC in ambient air were investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and measurements of the electrical resistance using the transfer length method (TLM). Scanning electron microscopy was applied to study the morphology and dimensions of the laser-treated regions. After laser processing using a nanosecond pulsed solid-state laser the debris consisting of silicon oxide was removed by etching in buffered hydrofluoric acid. A layer of resolidified material remains at the surface indicating the thermal impact of the laser process. The Si/C ratio is significantly disturbed at the surface of the resolidified layer and approaches unity in a depth of several tens of nanometers. A privileged oxidation of carbon leaves elementary resolidified silicon at the surface, where nanocrystalline silicon was detected. Oxygen and nitrogen were detected near the surface down to a depth of some tens of nanometers. A conductive surface film is formed, which is attributed to the thermal impact causing the formation of the silicon-rich surface layer and the incorporation of nitrogen as dopant. No indications for microcrack or defect formation were found beneath the layer of resolidified material.

  6. Ultraviolet nanosecond laser-assisted micro-modifications in lithium niobate monitored by Nd3+ luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, A.; Jaque, D.; Molpeceres, C.; Lauzurica, S.; Ocaña, J. L.; Torchia, G. A.; Agulló-Rueda, F.

    2007-04-01

    This work reports on the microstructural modifications produced by nanosecond ultraviolet ablation in neodymium doped lithium niobate crystals. The neodymium ions have been used as optical probes to determine the extension and nature of the modified bulk material. From micro-luminescence experiments we have been able to determine the spatial distribution of the UV ablation induced material densification, local disorder and defect creation. Results have been compared to those previously obtained from femtosecond irradiated lithium niobate crystals.

  7. Interaction Of CO2 Laser Nanosecond Pulse Train With The Metallic Targets In Optical Breakdown Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Firsov, K. N.; Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Silenok, A. S.; Sorochenko, V. R.

    1986-11-01

    In the present paper the electric field and currents in the air-breakdown plasma, produced by the train of nanosecond pulses of TEA-002 - regenerative amplifier near the un-charged targets are studied. The breakdown thresholds and the efficiency of plasma-target heat transmission are also measured. The results of numerical calculations made for increasing of the pulse train contrast with respect to the background in a regenerative amplifier are advanced.

  8. Selective removal of carious human dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at a wavelength of 5.85 μ m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-05-01

    Less invasive methods for treating dental caries are strongly desired. However, conventional dental lasers do not always selectively remove caries or ensure good bonding to the composite resin. According to our previous study, demineralized dentin might be removed by a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at wavelengths of around 5.8 μm. The present study investigated the irradiation effect of the light on carious human dentin classified into "remove," "not remove," and "unclear" categories. Under 5.85-μm laser pulses, at average power densities of 30 W/cm2 and irradiation time of 2 s, the ablation depth of "remove" and "not remove," and also the ablation depth of "unclear" and "not remove," were significantly different (p<0.01). The ablation depth was correlated with both Vickers hardness and Ca content. Thus, a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at 5.85 μm proved an effective less-invasive caries treatment.

  9. Active photo-physical processes in the pulsed UV nanosecond laser exposure of photostructurable glass ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, Frank E.; Adams, Paul M.; Helvajian, Henry

    2004-10-01

    We have performed experiments in which sample coupons of a commercial photostructurable glass ceramic (PSGC) material have been carefully exposed to various photon doses by pulsed UV nanosecond lasers at λ = 266 nm and λ = 355 nm. Following UV laser irradiation, the samples were analyzed by optical transmission spectroscopy to investigate the latent image and identify the photo-induced trapped (defect) state. The irradiated samples were thermally processed and the quenching of this trapped state and the concurrent growth of a spectral band associated with the formation of nanometer-scale metallic clusters was then observed using optical transmission spectroscopy. The results show that exposure at λ = 266 nm generates a defect state distribution that is markedly broader compared with the defect state distribution that is generated via λ = 355 nm excitation. The defect concentration formed with λ = 266 nm radiation is also much larger compared with the defect concentration associated with λ = 355 nm exposure. The results reveal that the metallic cluster concentration saturates with increasing laser irradiance, while the defect state concentration does not saturate. These studies have identified two precursor states of the exposed PSGC material that are tractable via spectroscopic techniques and could be used to refine the laser exposure and thermal processing of PSGC materials.

  10. Identification of the formation phases of filamentary damage induced by nanosecond laser pulses in bulk fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Zhongjie; Chambonneau, Maxime E-mail: jiangtian198611@163.com; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Jiang, Tian E-mail: jiangtian198611@163.com

    2015-09-14

    Employing a pump-probe polarization-based two-frame shadowgraphy setup, the formation of filamentary damage induced in bulk fused silica by a nanosecond pulse at 1064 nm is investigated with a picosecond probe. Three different phases are exhibited in the damage experiments. The first phase is the formation of a micrometric plasma channel along the laser direction during the beginning of the pulse likely caused by multi-photon ionization. This channel exhibits growth during ∼400 ps, and the newly grown plasma is discrete. Then, during the end of the pulse, this channel evolves into a tadpole-like morphology showing an elliptical head upstream the laser flux followed by a thin tail. This observed asymmetry is attributed to shielding effects caused by both the plasma and hot modified silica. Once the damage shows its almost final morphology, a last phase consists in the launch of a pressure wave enlarging it after the laser pulse. The physical mechanisms that might be involved in the formation of plasma channels are discussed. The experimental data are first confronted to the moving breakdown model which overestimates the filamentary damage length. Finally, taking into account the temporal shape of the laser pulses, the coupling between Kerr-induced self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin scattering is discussed to interpret the observations.

  11. Influence of vacuum on nanosecond laser-induced surface damage morphology in fused silica at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, R.; Chambonneau, M.; Grua, P.; Rullier, J.-L.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Lamaignère, L.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of vacuum on nanosecond laser-induced damage at the exit surface of fused silica components is investigated at 1064 nm. In the present study, as previously observed in air, ring patterns surrounding laser-induced damage sites are systematically observed on a plane surface when initiated by multiple longitudinal modes laser pulses. Compared to air, the printed pattern is clearly more concentrated. The obtained correlation between the damage morphology and the temporal structure of the pulses suggests a laser-driven ablation mechanism resulting in a thorough imprint of energy deposit. The ablation process is assumed to be subsequent to an activation of the surface by hot electrons related to the diffusive expansion of a plasma formed from silica. This interpretation is strongly reinforced with additional experiments performed on an optical grating in vacuum on which damage sites do not show any ring pattern. Qualitatively, in vacuum, the intensity-dependent ring appearance speed V ∝ I1/2 is shown to be different than in air where V ∝ I1/3. This demonstrates that the mechanisms of formation of ring patterns are different in vacuum than in air. Moreover, the mechanism responsible of the propagation of the activation front in vacuum is shown to be outdone when experiments are performed in air.

  12. Identification of the formation phases of filamentary damage induced by nanosecond laser pulses in bulk fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Chambonneau, Maxime; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Xu, Zhongjie; Jiang, Tian

    2015-09-01

    Employing a pump-probe polarization-based two-frame shadowgraphy setup, the formation of filamentary damage induced in bulk fused silica by a nanosecond pulse at 1064 nm is investigated with a picosecond probe. Three different phases are exhibited in the damage experiments. The first phase is the formation of a micrometric plasma channel along the laser direction during the beginning of the pulse likely caused by multi-photon ionization. This channel exhibits growth during ˜400 ps, and the newly grown plasma is discrete. Then, during the end of the pulse, this channel evolves into a tadpole-like morphology showing an elliptical head upstream the laser flux followed by a thin tail. This observed asymmetry is attributed to shielding effects caused by both the plasma and hot modified silica. Once the damage shows its almost final morphology, a last phase consists in the launch of a pressure wave enlarging it after the laser pulse. The physical mechanisms that might be involved in the formation of plasma channels are discussed. The experimental data are first confronted to the moving breakdown model which overestimates the filamentary damage length. Finally, taking into account the temporal shape of the laser pulses, the coupling between Kerr-induced self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin scattering is discussed to interpret the observations.

  13. Nanosecond-laser-induced damage in potassium titanyl phosphate: pure 532 nm pumping and frequency conversion situations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Frank R.; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

    2011-08-01

    Nanosecond-laser-induced damage measurements in the bulk of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystals are reported using incident 532 nm light or using incident 1064 nm light, which pumps more or less efficient second harmonic generation. No damage threshold fatigue effect is observed with pure 532 nm irradiation. The damage threshold of Z-polarized light is higher than the one for X- or Y-polarized light. During frequency doubling, the damage threshold was found to be lower than for pure 1064 or 532 nm irradiation. More data to quantify the cooperative damage mechanism were generated by performing fluence ramp experiments with varying conditions and monitoring the conversion efficiency. All damage thresholds plotted against the conversion efficiency align close to a characteristic curve.

  14. Nucleation dynamics around single microabsorbers in water heated by nanosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, Joerg; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2007-06-01

    Suspensions containing micro- and nanoabsorbers, which are irradiated by short laser pulses, are used for a manifold of procedures in medicine, biotechnology, and other fields. Detailed knowledge of the bubble nucleation and dynamics, which is induced by the heat transfer from the absorber to the surrounding transparent water, is essential for understanding the underlying processes occurring on a microscopic scale. We investigated the rapid phase change phenomena including temperature, heating rates, pressure generation, bubble nucleation, and initial bubble growth around absorbing micron-sized melanin particles (retinal pigment epithelial melanosomes) during irradiation with 12 ns (full width at half maximum) laser pulses at a wavelength of 532 nm. The melanosomes were heated at rates in the order of 10{sup 10} K/s. A mean bubble nucleation temperature of 136 deg. C was found. The initial bubble expansion was observed by time-resolved microscopy. The expansion velocities range from 10 m/s at 1.5-fold to 85 m/s at 8.5-fold threshold radiant exposure for bubble formation, respectively. The expansion velocity increases in the investigated range almost linearly with the applied radiant exposure.

  15. Fabrication of a micro-hole array on metal foil by nanosecond pulsed laser beam machining using a cover plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Se Won; Kim, Janggil; Jee, Won Young; Chu, Chong Nam

    2015-02-01

    A novel laser beam machining (LBM) method is proposed to achieve higher precision and better quality beyond the limits of a commercialized nanosecond pulsed laser system. The use of a cover plate is found to be effective for the precision machining of a thin metal foil at micro scale. For verifying the capability of cover plate laser beam machining (c-LBM) technology, a 30 by 30 array of micro-holes was fabricated on 8 µm-thick stainless steel 304 (STS) foil. As a result, thermal deformation and cracks were significantly reduced in comparison with the results using LBM without a cover plate. The standard deviation of the inscribed and circumscribed circle of the holes with a diameter of 12 µm was reduced to 33% and 81%, respectively and the average roundness improved by 77%. Moreover, the smallest diameter obtainable by c-LBM in the given equipment was found to be 6.9 µm, which was 60% less than the minimum size hole by LBM without a cover plate.

  16. Darkening effect on AZ31B magnesium alloy surface induced by nanosecond pulse Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Y. C.; Zhou, W.; Zheng, H. Y.; Li, Z. L.

    2013-09-01

    Permanent darkening effect was achieved on surface of AZ31B Mg alloy irradiated with nanosecond pulse Nd:YAG laser, and special attention was made to examine how surface structure as well as oxidation affect the darkening effect. Experiments were carried out to characterize morphological evolution and chemical composition of the irradiated areas by optical reflection spectrometer, Talysurf surface profiler, SEM, EDS, and XPS. The darkening effect was found to be occurred at the surface under high laser energy. Optical spectra showed that the induced darkening surface was uniform over the spectral range from 200 nm to 1100 nm. SEM and surface profiler showed that surface morphology of darkening areas consisted of large number of micron scale cauliflower-like clusters and protruding particles. EDS and XPS showed that compared to non-irradiated area, oxygen content at the darkening areas increased significantly. It was proposed a mechanism that involved trapping of light in the surface morphology and chemistry variation of irradiated areas to explain the laser-induced darkening effect on AZ31B Mg alloy.

  17. Real-time measurement of temperature variation during nanosecond pulsed-laser-induced contamination deposition.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Dimitrios; Gailly, Patrick; Georges, Marc P; Tzeremes, Georgios; Rochus, Pierre; Fleury-Frenette, Karl

    2015-12-20

    In this paper, a study of heat generation during UV laser-induced contamination (LIC) and potentially resulting subsequent thermal damage are presented. This becomes increasingly interesting when optics with delicate coatings are involved. During LIC, radiation can interact with outgassing molecules, both in the gas phase and at the surface, thus triggering chemical and photo-fixation reactions. This is a major hazard, in particular for laser units operating under vacuum conditions such as in space applications. The intense photon flux not only affects the contaminant deposition rate but also alters their chemical structure, which can increase their absorption coefficient. Over cumulative irradiation shots, these molecules formed deposits that increasingly absorb photons and produce heat as a by-product of de-excitation, eventually leading to thermal damage. One could better assess the risk of the latter with the knowledge of temperature during the contamination process. For this purpose, a thermoreflectance technique is used here to estimate the temperature variation from pulse to pulse during contamination deposition through the analysis of a temperature-dependent surface reflectance signal. PMID:26837020

  18. On the applicability of arbitrarily shaped nanosecond laser pulses for high-quality, high-efficiency micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselen, Sasia; Riedel, Sebastian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Progressive developments in temporal shaping of short laser pulses offer entirely new approaches at influence and investigate laser-matter-interactions. Commonly used parameters for describing the behavior of short or ultrashort pulses or pulse trains are fluence and intensity. However, fluence does not imply any information about the temporal behavior of energy input during specific pulse duration τ while using the pulse intensity as describing parameter is more meaningful. Nevertheless it still is an averaging over pulse duration and no change in intensity can be determined if the temporal pulse shape changes within a certain combination of pulse duration and pulse energy. Using a flexible programmable MOPA fiber laser experimental studies on the impact of temporal energy distribution within one single laser pulse in micro machining applications were therefore carried out. With this laser source a direct modulation of the temporal pulse shape in the nanosecond regime can easily be controlled. Experiments were carried out with moved as well as with un-moved beam resulting in areas and dimples respectively drilling holes. The presented results clearly show that any averaging over pulse duration results in missing information about time-dependent interactions but can at the same time lead to significant differences in ablation results. Thus, resulting surface roughness Sa can be decreased up to 25 % when changing the pulse shape at constant parameters of fluence and pulse peak power at a pulse duration of 30 ns. It can be observed that the combination of an intensity peak and a lower edge within one pulse can lead to increasing ablation efficiency as well as higher ablation quality compared to the commonly used Gaussian-like temporal pulse shape.

  19. Spatio-temporal characterization of pulses obtained from a high-energy sub-nanosecond laser system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chengyong; Xu, Xiaozhen; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-01

    Spatio-temporal profiles of laser pulses, obtained from each stage of a high-energy sub-nanosecond laser system, are investigated. The laser system is composed of a Q-switched Nd:YAG unstable oscillator, a chain of Nd:YAG amplifiers, a second-harmonic generator, and a high-energy pulse compressor based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). A curved energy front, i.e., the pulses emerging away from the beam center being gradually delayed from the center pulse, is shown to originate from the unstable oscillator. Our comparative study shows that injection seeding will enlarge the energy front curvature, via reduction of the effective gain. After the laser amplifiers, the energy front curvature is more than doubled due to the gain saturation effect. The latter also modifies the spatial pulse width distribution. While there is a negligible pulse duration spread across the oscillator beam, the amplified pulses are found to have gradually reduced pulse duration away from the beam center. More interestingly, after the SBS pulse compression, not only the pulse width but also the delay is compressed down. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study of the spatio-temporal profile of the SBS compressed pulse. To compare with the experiments, two numerical models are developed to simulate the evolution of spatio-temporal profiles within the Nd:YAG laser system and during the SBS pulse compression, respectively. The first model is demonstrated to reproduce the experimental results very well, while the second model predicts part of the features of the SBS compressed pulse. The limitation on the latter is discussed. PMID:26974618

  20. Formation of plasma channels in the interaction of a nanosecond laser pulse at moderate intensities with helium gas jets.

    PubMed

    De Wispelaere, E; Malka, V; Hüller, S; Amiranoff, F; Baton, S; Bonadio, R; Casanova, M; Dorchies, F; Haroutunian, R; Modena, A

    1999-06-01

    We report on a detailed study of channel formation in the interaction of a nanosecond laser pulse with a He gas jet. A complete set of diagnostics is used in order to characterize the plasma precisely. The evolution of the plasma radius and of the electron density and temperature are measured by Thomson scattering, Schlieren imaging, and Mach-Zehnder interferometry. In gas jets, one observes the formation of a channel with a deep density depletion on axis. Because of ionization-induced defocusing which increases the size of the focal spot and decreases the maximum laser intensity, no channel is observed in the case of a gas-filled chamber. The results obtained in various gas-jet and laser conditions show that the channel radius, as well as the density along the propagation axis, can be adjusted by changing the laser energy and gas-jet pressure. This is a crucial issue when one wants to adapt the channel parameters in order to guide a subsequent high-intensity laser pulse. The experimental results and their comparison with one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations show that the main mechanism for channel formation is the hydrodynamic evolution behind a supersonic electron heat wave propagating radially in the plasma. It is also shown from 2D simulations that a fraction of the long pulse can be self-guided in the channel it creates. The preliminary results and analyses on this subject have been published before [V. Malka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2979 (1997)]. PMID:11969699

  1. High repetition rate femtosecond laser forming sub-10 µm diameter interconnection vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B; Panchatsharam, S; Venkatakrishnan, K

    2009-03-01

    Laser ablative microvia formation has been widely accepted as an effective manufacturing method for interconnect via formation. Current conventional nanosecond laser microvia formation has reached its limit in terms of minimum via diameter and machining quality. Femtosecond laser has been investigated intensively for its superior machining quality and capability of producing much smaller features. However, the traditional femtosecond laser has very low power and is thus unable to meet the throughput requirement. In this paper we report ablative microvia formation using femtosecond lasers at megahertz repetition rates. Laser ablation was demonstrated for the first time for sub-10 µm interconnection via drilling at a throughput of 10 000 vias per second. A systematic study of the influence of a high repetition rate in femtosecond laser micromachining of silicon was carried out. The experiments were performed using an Yb-doped fibre amplified/oscillator laser with 1030 nm wavelength in an air environment. The effects of a high repetition rate on microvia formation were observed at ~300 fs for silicon substrates. Laser parameters along with threshold energy, via diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and via quality were studied in detail to accentuate the need of femtosecond lasers for forming sub-10 µm diameter microvias. The experimental results show that femtosecond laser pulses with high repetition rates show unequivocally the advantages of short-pulse laser ablation for high-precision applications in micrometre-scale dimensions.

  2. Formation of micron and submicron structures on a zirconium oxide surface exposed to nanosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ganin, D V; Mikolutskiy, S I; Khomich, V Yu; Yamshchikov, V A; Tokarev, V N; Shmakov, V A

    2014-04-28

    Possibility of forming quasi-periodic structures of micron and submicron dimensions on a surface of zirconium dioxide under the action of eximer ArF laser radiation is shown experimentally and theoretically. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  3. High-peak-power sub-nanosecond intracavity KTiOPO4 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a dual-loss modulated laser with acousto-optic modulator and single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Junpeng; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao; Lu, Jianren; Wang, Yonggang; Chu, Hongwei; Luan, Chao

    2016-08-01

    A high-peak-power low-repetition-rate sub-nanosecond intracavity KTiOPO4 (KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a doubly Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) YVO4/Nd:YVO4 laser with an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA) has been demonstrated. A maximum output power of 373 mW at a signal wavelength of 1570 nm was obtained. The smallest pulse width, highest pulse energy, and greatest peak power of mode-locking pulses were estimated to be 119 ps, 124 µJ, and 1.04 MW, respectively, under a maximum incident pump power of 8.3 W and an AOM repetition rate of 2 kHz. This OPO operation paves a simple way to produce eye-safe laser sources at 1570 nm with low repetition rates, small pulse widths, and high peak powers.

  4. Quantitative measurement of electron number in nanosecond and picosecond laser-induced air breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Sawyer, Jordan C.; Su, Liu; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-05-01

    Here we present quantitative measurements of total electron numbers in laser-induced air breakdown at pressures ranging from atmospheric to 40 barg by 10 ns and 100 ps laser pulses. A quantifiable definition for the laser-induced breakdown threshold is identified by a sharp increase in the measurable total electron numbers via dielectric-calibrated coherent microwave scattering. For the 10 ns laser pulse, the threshold of laser-induced breakdown in atmospheric air is defined as the total electron number of ˜106. This breakdown threshold decreases with an increase of pressure and laser photon energy (shorter wavelength), which is consistent with the theory of initial multiphoton ionization and subsequent avalanche processes. For the 100 ps laser pulse cases, a clear threshold is not present and only marginal pressure effects can be observed, which is due to the short pulse duration leading to stronger multiphoton ionization and minimal collisional avalanche ionization.

  5. Sub-ten nanosecond laser pulse shaping using lithium niobate modulators and a double-passed tapered amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. E., III; Gould, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    We present progress on developing a laser pulse shaping system capable of generating pulses shorter than ten nanoseconds and frequency chirps of up to about 5 GHz in 2.5 ns. Shaped control of phase and amplitude on this timescale may prove useful for producing ultracold molecules and controlling atomic hyperfine state populations. The pulses are generated by passing 780 nm light from an external cavity diode laser through a fiber-coupled lithium niobate (LN) phase modulator (PM) in series with an LN intensity modulator (IM). The modulators are driven with a single-channel 8 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator configured with an RF delay line for quasi-two channel pulsed operation. The optical pulses are then amplified in a double-pass tapered amplifier (TA). The TA's intrinsic mode structure leads to an etalon effect that modulates the pulse amplitude during a frequency chirp. To reduce this unwanted effect, a compensating intensity modulation can be programmed onto the seed pulse. This work is supported by DOE.

  6. Growth and characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films by nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, CuIn1 - x Ga x Se2 (CIGS) thin films were prepared by nanosecond (ns)- and femtosecond (fs)-pulsed laser deposition (PLD) processes. Different film growth mechanisms were discussed in perspective of the laser-produced plasmas and crystal structures. The fs-PLD has successfully improved the inherent flaws, Cu2 - x Se, and air voids ubiquitously observed in ns-PLD-derived CIGS thin films. Moreover, the prominent antireflection and excellent crystalline structures were obtained in the fs-PLD-derived CIGS thin films. The absorption spectra suggest the divergence in energy levels of radiative defects brought by the inhomogeneous distribution of elements in the fs-PLD CIGS, which has also been supported by comparing photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ns- and fs-PLD CIGS thin films at 15 K. Finally, the superior carrier transport properties in fs-PLD CIGS were confirmed by fs pump-probe spectroscopy and four-probe measurements. The present results indicate a promising way for preparing high-quality CIGS thin films via fs-PLD. PMID:24959108

  7. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using the nanosecond pulsed laser in 5.8-μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of human carious dentin.

  8. Computational study of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation and the application to momentum coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Hong; Tong Huifeng; Li Mu; Sun Chengwei

    2012-07-15

    During the evaporation and ablation of a matter induced by intensive laser radiation, the vapor plasma is ejected from the surface of the target which induces the recoil pressure and impulse in the target. Impulse coupling of laser beams with matter has been extensively studied as the basis of laser propulsion and laser clearing space debris. A one-dimensional (1D) bulk absorption model to simulate the solid target ablated directly by the laser beam is presented; numerical calculation of impulse acting on the target in vacuum with different laser parameters is performed with fluid dynamics theory and 1D Lagrange difference scheme. The calculated results of the impulse coupling coefficients are in good agreement with the experimental results and Phipps' empirical value. The simulated results show that the mechanical coupling coefficients decrease with the increment of laser intensity when the laser pulses generate plasma. The present model can be applied when the laser intensity is 10{sup 8} - 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}, which will provide a guide to the study of momentum coupling of laser beams with matter.

  9. Ion acceleration with a narrow energy spectrum by nanosecond laser-irradiation of solid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altana, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-02-01

    In laser-driven plasma, ion acceleration of aluminum with the production of a quasi-monoenergetic beam has occurred. A useful device to analyze the ions is the Thomson parabolas spectrometer, a well-known diagnostic that is able to obtain information on charge-to-mass ratio and energy distribution of the charged particles. At the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania, experimental measures were carried out; the features of LENS are: Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2 J laser energy, 1064 nm fundamental wavelengths, and 6 ns pulse duration.

  10. Multi-diagnostic comparison of femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; VanRompay, P. A.; Nees, J. A.; Pronko, P. P.

    2002-09-01

    Understanding and fully characterizing highly dynamic and rapidly streaming laser ablation plasmas requires multiple techniques for monitoring effects at different stages. By combining multiple diagnostic methods, it is possible to analyze the broad time window over which these ablation plasmas develop and to learn more about the related physical processes that occur. Two laser sources, an 80 fs Ti:Sapphire laser (780 nm) and a 6 ns Nd:YAG laser (1.06 mum), are used in this work in order to compare pulse duration effects at similar wavelengths. Characteristics of the plasma produced by these two lasers are compared under conditions of comparable ablation flux. Results are presented involving correlation of time-resolved Langmuir probe data and electrostatic energy analysis for aluminum plasmas as a representative investigation for metallic systems. In addition, continuous-wave refractive index laser beam deflection is used to characterize the plasma and hot gas generated from boron nitride targets in terms of their ion and neutral atom densities. A self-similarity plasma expansion model is used to analyze the plumes under various conditions. Fundamental data obtained in this way can be relevant to laser micro-machining, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and pulsed laser deposition.

  11. Amplification of picosecond pulses in F{sub 2}{sup -}:LiF crystals synchronously pumped by picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Karasik, Aleksandr Ya; Konyushkin, V A; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Papashvili, A G; Chunaev, D S

    2005-04-30

    A method for amplification of picosecond pulses in F{sub 2}{sup -}:LiF crystals synchronously pumped by picosecond and nanosecond pulses is proposed and demonstrated. Due to two-stage amplification of a train of 22-ps, 1150-nm SRS pulses generated by a PbMoO{sub 4} crystal, a power gain of (2-4)x 10{sup 3} is achieved and single 6-ps, 0.88-mJ pulses are obtained. (lasers)

  12. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Duvillaret, L; Andreoli, P L; Cipriani, M; Cristofari, G; Di Giorgio, G; Ingenito, F; Verona, C

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation. PMID:27301704

  13. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime

    PubMed Central

    Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Duvillaret, L.; Andreoli, P. L.; Cipriani, M.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Verona, C.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation. PMID:27301704

  14. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, F.; de Angelis, R.; Duvillaret, L.; Andreoli, P. L.; Cipriani, M.; Cristofari, G.; di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Verona, C.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation.

  15. Nanosecond laser pulse stimulation of the inner ear—a wavelength study

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Michael; Baumhoff, Peter; Maier, Hannes; Teudt, Ingo U.; Krüger, Alexander; Lenarz, Thomas; Kral, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    Optical stimulation of the inner ear, the cochlea, is discussed as a possible alternative to conventional cochlear implants with the hypothetical improvement of dynamic range and frequency resolution. In this study nanosecond-pulsed optical stimulation of the hearing and non-hearing inner ear is investigated in vivo over a wide range of optical wavelengths and at different beam delivery locations. Seven anaesthetized guinea pigs were optically stimulated before and after neomycin induced destruction of hair cells. An optical parametric oscillator was tuned to different wavelengths (420 nm–2150 nm, ultraviolet to near-infrared) and delivered 3–5 ns long pulses with 6 µJ pulse energy via a multimode optical fiber located either extracochlearly in front of the intact round window membrane or intracochlearly within the scala tympani. Cochlear responses were measured using registration of compound action potentials (CAPs). With intact hair cells CAP similar to acoustic stimulation were measured at both locations, while the neomycin treated cochleae did not show any response in any case. The CAP amplitudes of the functional cochleae showed a positive correlation to the absorption coefficient of hemoglobin and also to moderate water absorption. A negative correlation of CAP amplitude with a water absorption coefficient greater than 5.5 cm−1 indicates additional phenomena. We conclude that in our stimulation paradigm with ns-pulses the most dominant stimulation effect is of optoacoustic nature and relates to functional hair cells. PMID:23243582

  16. Experimental investigation of the spectro-temporal dynamics of the light pulses of Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers and nanosecond optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anstett, G.; Wallenstein, R.

    2004-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the spectro-temporal dynamics of the pulse formation in Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers and in nanosecond optical parametric oscillators (OPOs). The temporal evolution of the spectral intensity distribution of the light pulses was measured with a 1-m Czerny Turner spectrometer in combination with a fast streak camera. This detection system allows the analysis of temporal changes in the spectrum of single nanosecond pulses. The measurements were performed for a flashlamp-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and for an unseeded as well as for a seeded singly-resonant nanosecond OPO. The laser output spectrum varies strongly from pulse to pulse and even within a single pulse due to mode beating. In an unseeded OPO, individual spectral modes start to oscillate statistically from the parametric noise for pump powers close to the OPO threshold. With increasing pump power a strong modulation in the spectral formation of the pulse is observed, resulting from a strong interaction of parametric conversion and back conversion of signal and idler radiation into pump radiation. By means of injection seeding, the starting condition was controlled for a single mode. Due to the seed radiation, the seeded mode starts sooner than the unseeded modes. These are suppressed completely in the case of sufficient seed power and moderate pump power. The observations are in good agreement with results of corresponding numerical simulations.

  17. Direct generation of superhydrophobic microstructures in metals by UV laser sources in the nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Jose L.; Jagdheesh, R.; García-Ballesteros, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    The current availability of new advanced fiber and DPSS lasers with characteristic pulse lengths ranging from ns to fs has provided a unique frame in which the development of laser-generated microstructures has been made possible for very diverse kinds of materials and applications. At the same time, the development of the appropriate laser-processing workstations granting the appropriate precision and repeatability of the respective laser interaction processes in line with the characteristic dimension features required in the microstructured samples has definitively consolidated laser surface microstructuring as a reference domain, nowadays, unavoidable for the design and manufacturing of current use microsystem: MEMSs, fluidic devices, advanced sensors, biomedical devices and instruments, etc., are all among the most well-known developments of the micromanufacturing technology. Completing the broad spectrum of applications developed mostly involving the generation of geometrical features on a subtrate with specific functional purposes, a relatively new, emerging class of laser-microstructuring techniques is finding an important niche of application in the generation of physically structured surfaces (particularly of metallic materials) with specific contact, friction, and wear functionalities, for whose generation the concourse of different types of laser sources is being found as an appropriate tool. In this paper, the application of laser sources with emission in the UV and at ns time regime to the surface structuration of metal surfaces (specifically Al) for the modification of their wettability properties is described as an attractive application basis for the generation of self-cleaning properties of extended functional surfaces. Flat aluminum sheets of thickness 100 μm were laser machined with ultraviolet laser pulses of 30 ns with different laser parameters to optimize the process parameters. The samples produced at the optimum conditions with respect to

  18. Laser Pyro System Standardization and Man Rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher W.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews an X-38 laser pyro system standardization system designed for a new manned rated program. The plans to approve this laser initiation system and preliminary ideas for this system are also provided.

  19. Study of superalloy topography during ultrahigh intensity nanosecond ultraviolet laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qihong; Jie, Jiansheng; Ma, Yurong; Yu, Qingxuan; Miao, Bin; Wang, Guanzhong; Liao, Yuan; Fang, Rongchuan; Chen, Xiangli; Wang, Kelvin

    2002-05-01

    We report on the topography of holes ablated by an ultrahigh intensity 355 and 266 nm laser with 8 ns pulse width in Ni-base superalloy Inconel 718. The origin of droplets, micropores, and microcracks on the surface of hole is identified. Qualitative differences in the characteristics of microcracks indicate that the dominant continuous microcracks result from thermal effects in 355 nm laser ablation, and the dominant island-chain microcrack result from photochemical effects in 266 nm laser ablation. In ultrahigh intensity laser ablation (>200 GW/cm2), the mechanical load on the surface is very significant to the resulting topography, and the grain boundary plays an important role in the origin of the micropores.

  20. Thermal denaturation of egg protein under nanosecond pulsed laser heating of gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Lapin, I N; Svetlichnyi, Valery A

    2011-08-31

    Thermal denaturation of egg protein in the presence of gold nanoparticles via their heating at the plasmon resonance wavelength by the pulsed radiation of the second harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) is investigated. The experimental dependence of the protein denaturation time on the mean laser power is obtained. The heating temperature of the medium with gold nanoparticles is calculated. The numerical estimates of the temperature of the heated medium containing protein and gold nanoparticles (45.3 deg. C at the moment of protein denaturation) are in good agreement with the literature data on its thermal denaturation and with the data of pyrometric measurements (42.0 {+-} 1.5 deg. C). The egg protein may be successfully used to investigate the specific features of laser heating of proteins in the presence of metal nanoparticles under their excitation at the plasmon resonance wavelength. (laser methods in biology)

  1. Synergistic Effect of Superhydrophobicity and Oxidized Layers on Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloy Surface Textured by Nanosecond Laser Treatment.

    PubMed

    Boinovich, Ludmila B; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Modestov, Alexander D; Domantovsky, Alexandr G; Emelyanenko, Kirill A

    2015-09-01

    We report a new efficient method for fabricating a superhydrophobic oxidized surface of aluminum alloys with enhanced resistance to pitting corrosion in sodium chloride solutions. The developed coatings are considered very prospective materials for the automotive industry, shipbuilding, aviation, construction, and medicine. The method is based on nanosecond laser treatment of the surface followed by chemisorption of a hydrophobic agent to achieve the superhydrophobic state of the alloy surface. We have shown that the surface texturing used to fabricate multimodal roughness of the surface may be simultaneously used for modifying the physicochemical properties of the thick surface layer of the substrate itself. Electrochemical and wetting experiments demonstrated that the superhydrophobic state of the metal surface inhibits corrosion processes in chloride solutions for a few days. However, during long-term contact of a superhydrophobic coating with a solution, the wetted area of the coating is subjected to corrosion processes due to the formation of defects. In contrast, the combination of an oxide layer with good barrier properties and the superhydrophobic state of the coating provides remarkable corrosion resistance. The mechanisms for enhancing corrosion protective properties are discussed. PMID:26271017

  2. Numerical investigation of heating of a gold nanoparticle and the surrounding microenvironment by nanosecond laser pulses for nanomedicine applications.

    PubMed

    Sassaroli, E; Li, K C P; O'Neill, B E

    2009-09-21

    We have modeled, by finite element analysis, the process of heating of a spherical gold nanoparticle by nanosecond laser pulses and of heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding medium, with no mass transfer. In our analysis, we have included thermal conductivity changes, vapor formation, and changes of the dielectric properties as a function of temperature. We have shown that such changes significantly affect the temperature reached by the particle and surrounding microenvironment and therefore the thermal and dielectric properties of the medium need to be known for a correct determination of the temperature elevation. We have shown that for sufficiently low intensity and long pulses, it is possible to establish a quasi-steady temperature profile in the medium with no vapor formation. As the intensity is increased, a phase-change with vapor formation takes place around the gold nanoparticle. As phase-transition starts, an additional increase in the intensity does not significantly increase the temperature of the gold nanoparticle and surrounding environment. The temperature starts to rise again above a given intensity threshold which is particle and environment dependent. The aim of this study is to provide useful insights for the development of molecular targeting of gold nanoparticles for applications such as remote drug release of therapeutics and photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:19717888

  3. Activity of retinal ganglion cells following intense, nanosecond laser flashes. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of intense, but nonlesion-producing, laser exposures of 20-ns duration were determined on the light responses and spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells recorded in situ from the rhesus monkey. (Following a single, 20-ns exposure centered on its receptive field, a ganglion cell produced an 'afterdischarge' of maintained action potentials). The duration of the afterdischarge depended on the diameter of the laser beam on the retina and on the beam's intensity. Laser exposures subtending 0.5 to 2.0 deg, and delivering 45 to 60% of the maximum permissible exposure, elicited afterdischarges that lasted up to 80 s. When the beam diameter was decreased to 0.25 deg, the afterdischarge was reduced to 30 s, and to less than 5 s with the 0.12-deg beam. Light sensitivity after the laser exposure recovered rapidly during the first 10 s and then more slowly, but exponentially, until it reached the preflash level. Color-opponent ganglion cells exhibited a phenomenon called 'response-reversal' after the laser exposure, presumably due to selective adaptation of a mid-wavelength cone-input. Because a 20-ns exposure, regardless of intensity, is likely to photoregenerate more than half of the available visual pigment, the effects of ganglion cell response described here are not likely to be due solely to pigment bleaching.

  4. Nanosecond laser micro- and nanotexturing for the design of a superhydrophobic coating robust against long-term contact with water, cavitation, and abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanenko, Alexandre M.; Shagieva, Farida M.; Domantovsky, Alexandr G.; Boinovich, Ludmila B.

    2015-03-01

    Existing and emerging applications of laser-driven methods make an important contribution to advancement in nanotechnological approaches for the design of superhydrophobic surfaces. In this study, we describe a superhydrophobic coating on stainless steel, designed by nanosecond IR laser treatment with subsequent chemisorption of fluorooxysilane for use in heavily loaded hydraulic systems. Coating characterization reveals extreme water repellency, chemical stability on long-term contact with water, and excellent durability of functional properties under prolonged abrasive wear and cavitation loads. The coating also demonstrates self-healing properties after mechanical damage.

  5. Damage threshold and focusability of mid-infrared free-electron laser pulses gated by a plasma mirror with nanosecond switching pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaolong; Nakajima, Takashi; Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-11-04

    The presence of a pulse train structure of an oscillator-type free-electron laser (FEL) results in the immediate damage of a solid target upon focusing. We demonstrate that the laser-induced damage threshold can be significantly improved by gating the mid-infrared FEL pulses with a plasma mirror. Although the switching pulses we employ have a nanosecond duration which does not guarantee the clean wavefront of the gated FEL pulses, the high focusability is experimentally confirmed through the observation of spectral broadening by a factor of 2.1 when we tightly focus the gated FEL pulses onto the Ge plate.

  6. Predictive modeling techniques for nanosecond-laser damage growth in fused silica optics.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhi M; Abdulla, Ghaleb M; Negres, Raluca A; Cross, David A; Carr, Christopher W

    2012-07-01

    Empirical numerical descriptions of the growth of laser-induced damage have been previously developed. In this work, Monte-Carlo techniques use these descriptions to model the evolution of a population of damage sites. The accuracy of the model is compared against laser damage growth observations. In addition, a machine learning (classification) technique independently predicts site evolution from patterns extracted directly from the data. The results show that both the Monte-Carlo simulation and machine learning classification algorithm can accurately reproduce the growth of a population of damage sites for at least 10 shots, which is extremely valuable for modeling optics lifetime in operating high-energy laser systems. Furthermore, we have also found that machine learning can be used as an important tool to explore and increase our understanding of the growth process. PMID:22772252

  7. Nitrogen optical emission during nanosecond laser ablation of metals: prompt electrons or photo-ionization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Dilecce, G.; Tolias, P.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments on the interaction of metal targets with a Nd:YAG laser beam ( = 1,064 nm, intensity -) are carried out in a finite Nitrogen pressure environment. The observed spectra are unambiguous evidence of the existence of an ionization and excitation source, arriving at the observation volume prior to the plume. Such a source can be either prompt electrons or VUV radiation. The analysis reveals that the prompt electron interpretation requires energies in excess of 1 keV, incompatible with any acceleration mechanisms relevant for such laser intensities. On the other hand, VUV radiation is sufficiently strong to explain the observed spectra.

  8. Equation of state for simulation of nanosecond laser ablation aluminium in water and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, R.; Antonov, V.; Kalinin, N.

    2015-11-01

    To analyze the physical processes at high energy densities, when laser is used, an adequate description the thermodynamic property of matter over a broad region of states including the normal conditions and plasma at high pressures and temperatures is required. For describing the thermodynamic properties of metals in nanoparticles production using laser ablation a semi-empirical equation of state model is proposed. To verify this model, an equation of state of aluminum was constructed. Using this equation was calculated ablation depths and crater profile for aluminum and compared with experimental data. Received results are in a good match with experiment.

  9. Effect of advanced nanowire-based targets in nanosecond laser-matter interaction (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Malferrari, L.; Odorici, F.; Malandrino, G.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the effects of innovative nanostructured targets based on Ag nanowires on laser energy absorption in the ns time domain has been carried out at the Laser Energy for Nuclear Science laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania. The tested targets were realized at INFN-Bologna by anodizing aluminium sheets in order to obtain layers of porous Al2O3 of different thicknesses, on which nanowires of various metals are grown by electro-deposition with different heights. Targets were then irradiated by using a Nd:YAG laser at different pumping energies. Advanced diagnostic tools were used for characterizing the plasma plume and ion production. As compared with targets of pure Al, a huge enhancement (of almost two order of magnitude) of the X-ray flux emitted by the plasma has been observed when using the nanostructured targets, with a corresponding decrease of the "optical range" signal, pointing out that the energetic content of the laser produced plasma was remarkably increased. This analysis was furthermore confirmed from time-of-flight spectra.

  10. Characterization Of Nano-Second Laser Induced Plasmas From Al Target In Air At Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, H.; Abdel-Rahim, F. M.; Nossair, A. M. A.; Allam, S. H.; El-Sherbini, Th. M.

    2008-09-23

    In the present work we study the effect of the laser beam energy on the properties of the plasma generated by focusing an intense laser beam on Al solid target in air at atmospheric pressure. Plasma is generated using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm wavelength, 6 ns pulse duration with a maximum pulse energy of 750mJ. The emission spectrum is collected using an Echelle spectrometer equipped with ICCD camera Andor type. The measurements were performed at several delay times between 0 to 9 {mu}s. Measurements of temperature and electron density of the produced plasmas at different laser energies and at different delay times are described using different emission spectral lines. Based on LTE assumption, excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot using O I spectral lines at 777.34, 794.93, and 848.65 nm and the electron density is determined from Stark width of Al II at 281.6 and 466.3 nm. The determined density is compared with the density determined from H{sub {alpha}} spectral line.

  11. Effect of advanced nanowire-based targets in nanosecond laser-matter interaction (invited).

    PubMed

    Lanzalone, G; Altana, C; Mascali, D; Muoio, A; Malferrari, L; Odorici, F; Malandrino, G; Tudisco, S

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the effects of innovative nanostructured targets based on Ag nanowires on laser energy absorption in the ns time domain has been carried out at the Laser Energy for Nuclear Science laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania. The tested targets were realized at INFN-Bologna by anodizing aluminium sheets in order to obtain layers of porous Al2O3 of different thicknesses, on which nanowires of various metals are grown by electro-deposition with different heights. Targets were then irradiated by using a Nd:YAG laser at different pumping energies. Advanced diagnostic tools were used for characterizing the plasma plume and ion production. As compared with targets of pure Al, a huge enhancement (of almost two order of magnitude) of the X-ray flux emitted by the plasma has been observed when using the nanostructured targets, with a corresponding decrease of the "optical range" signal, pointing out that the energetic content of the laser produced plasma was remarkably increased. This analysis was furthermore confirmed from time-of-flight spectra. PMID:26932052

  12. Tungsten carbide precursors as an example for influence of a binder on the particle formation in the nanosecond laser ablation of powdered materials.

    PubMed

    Holá, Markéta; Mikuska, Pavel; Hanzlíková, Renáta; Kaiser, Jozef; Kanický, Viktor

    2010-03-15

    A study of LA-ICP-MS analysis of pressed powdered tungsten carbide precursors was performed to show the advantages and problems of nanosecond laser ablation of matrix-unified samples. Five samples with different compositions were pressed into pellets both with silver powder as a binder serving to keep the matrix unified, and without any binder. The laser ablation was performed by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser working at 213 nm. The particle formation during ablation of both sets of pellets was studied using an optical aerosol spectrometer allowing the measurement of particle concentration in two size ranges (10-250 nm and 0.25-17 microm) and particle size distribution in the range of 0.25-17 microm. Additionally, the structure of the laser-generated particles was studied after their collection on a filter using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the particle chemical composition was determined by an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS). The matrix effect was proved to be reduced using the same silver powdered binder for pellet preparation in the case of the laser ablation of powdered materials. The LA-ICP-MS signal dependence on the element content present in the material showed an improved correlation for Co, Ti, Ta and Nb of the matrix-unified samples compared to the non-matrix-unified pellets. In the case of W, the ICP-MS signal of matrix-unified pellets was influenced by the changes in the particle formation. PMID:20152424

  13. 1.1 MW peak power in doubly QML composite Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/KTP sub-nanosecond green laser with EO and Bi-GaAs.

    PubMed

    Li, Shixia; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Xiangyang; Qiao, Hui

    2016-02-22

    By simultaneously employing electro-optic (EO) modulator and Bi-doped GaAs, dual-loss-modulated Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) multi-segment composite Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/KTP sub-nanosecond green laser is demonstrated with low repetition rate and high peak power. When the incident pump power is up to 6.93 W, only one mode-locking pulse underneath a Q-switching envelope is generated with sub-nanosecond pulse duration at one kilohertz repetition rate. An average output power of 445 mW and a pulse duration of 399 ps are obtained with the incident pump power of 11.13 W, corresponding to a peak power of 1.115 MW which is the highest one in doubly QML sub-nanosecond green laser by now. The laser characteristics are better than those obtained with EO and GaAs. The experimental results indicate that Bi-GaAs is a promising saturable absorber for dual-loss-modulated QML laser. PMID:26907054

  14. Sub-nanosecond Yb:KLu(WO4)2 microchip laser.

    PubMed

    Loiko, P; Serres, J M; Mateos, X; Yumashev, K; Yasukevich, A; Petrov, V; Griebner, U; Aguiló, M; Díaz, F

    2016-06-01

    A diode-pumped Yb:KLu(WO4)2 microchip laser passively Q-switched by a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber generated a maximum average output power of 590 mW at 1031 nm with a slope efficiency of 55%. The pulse characteristics were 690 ps/47.6 μJ at a pulse repetition frequency of 12.4 kHz. The output beam had an excellent circular profile with M2<1.05. Yb:KLu(WO4)2 is very promising for ultrathin sub-ns microchip lasers. PMID:27244429

  15. Oxidation of silicon nanoparticles produced by nanosecond laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, L.; Camarda, P.; Messina, F.; Buscarino, G.; Agnello, S.; Gelardi, F. M.; Cannas, M.; Boscaino, R.

    2014-10-01

    We investigated nanoparticles produced by laser ablation of silicon in water by the fundamental harmonic (1064 nm) of a ns pulsed Nd:YAG. The silicon oxidation is evidenced by IR absorption features characteristic of amorphous SiO2 (silica). This oxide is highly defective and manifests a luminescence activity under UV excitation: two emission bands at 2.7 eV and 4.4 eV are associated with the twofold coordinated silicon, =SiO••.

  16. FM-to-AM conversion measurement for high power nanosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PENNINCKX, Denis

    2016-03-01

    Through numerical simulations we show that the spectral content of amplitude modulations induced by a transfer function converting frequency modulations required for high-power lasers may be very broad. Hence, measurement of FM-to-AM conversion should be first done in the spectral domain to remove unwanted transfer functions at low frequency scale and then in the time domain to obtain an accurate value.

  17. High brightness sub-nanosecond Q-switched laser using volume Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian M.; Hale, Evan; Venus, George; Ott, Daniel; Divliansky, Ivan; Glebov, Leonid

    2016-03-01

    The design of Q-switched lasers capable of producing pulse widths of 100's of picoseconds necessitates the cavity length be shorter than a few centimeters. Increasing the amount of energy extracted per pulse requires increasing the mode area of the resonator that for the same cavity length causes exciting higher order transverse modes and decreasing the brightness of the output radiation. To suppress the higher order modes of these multimode resonators while maintaining the compact cavity requires the use of intra-cavity angular filters. A novel Q-switched laser design is presented using transmitting Bragg gratings (TBGs) as angular filters to suppress the higher order transverse modes. The laser consists of a 5 mm thick slab of Nd:YAG, a 3 mm thick slab of Cr:YAG with a 20% transmission, one TBG aligned to suppress the higher order modes along the x-axis, and a 40% output coupler. The gratings are recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass, which has a high damage threshold that can withstand both the high peak powers and high average powers present within the resonator. Using a 4.1 mrad TBG in a 10.8 mm long resonator with an 800μm x 400 μm pump beam, a nearly diffraction limited beam quality of M2 = 1.3 is obtained in a 0.76 mJ pulse with a pulse width of 614 ps.

  18. Nanosecond laser induced ignition thresholds and reaction velocities of energetic bimetallic nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, Yoosuf N.; Yalisove, Steven M.; McDonald, Joel P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.; Adams, David P.

    2008-09-08

    Thresholds for optically igniting self-propagating reactions are quantified for energetic Ni/Ti, Co/Al, and Al/Pt nanolaminates, where smaller enthalpy material pairs required larger laser ignition fluences. The threshold fluences (J/cm{sup 2}) for ignition by 30 ns laser pulses focused to {approx}8 {mu}m spot size varied from 720 to 15 000 J/cm{sup 2} for Ni/Ti, 8.6 to 380 J/cm{sup 2} for Co/Al, and 3.2 to 27 J/cm{sup 2} for Al/Pt. Conversely, smaller enthalpy nanolaminates exhibited reduced steady-state propagation speeds ranging from 0.05 to 0.9 m/s for Ni/Ti, 0.6 to 8.5 m/s for Co/Al, and 24 to 73 m/s for Al/Pt. Increasing the laser spot diameter tenfold reduced the ignition threshold fluence by as much as two orders of magnitude.

  19. Characteristics of plasma plume expansion from Al target induced by oblique incidence of 1064 and 355 nm nanosecond Nd : YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianhang; Gao, Xun; Hao, Zuoqiang; Liu, Zehao; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-12-01

    Evolution of a plasma plume from an Al target ablated with a nanosecond 1064 and 355 nm laser respectively under oblique incidence in air is studied using the time-resolved shadowgraph imaging technique. The characteristics of plasma plume expansion with different focusing conditions (focal point on, ahead of and after the target surface) are experimentally investigated. Experimental results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is strongly influenced by air breakdown which occurs prior to the laser beam reaching the target. Without the occurrence of air breakdown, the temporal evolution of the Al plasma plume with both UV and IR ablation laser wavelengths shows the plume expansion with an ellipsoid-shaped plume front travelling mainly against the incoming laser beam due to the formation of a laser-supported detonation wave at the initial stage of laser ablation, and then the shape of the plume front turns into a sphere. Experimental results also show that a higher portion of the laser pulse energy reaches the target surface at UV laser wavelength than that of an IR laser due to the higher penetrating ability of the UV laser wavelength to the plasma.

  20. Nanosecond laser-induced shock propagation in and above organic liquid and solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, S. M.; Zinderman, B.; Schoeffling, J.; Jimenez, R.; Naddeo, J. J.; Bubb, D. M.

    2014-11-01

    The study of shock propagation in air and liquid can play an important role in understanding light-matter interactions during laser processing experiments. In this work, we perform plume shadowgraphy experiments on liquid and solid targets of acetone and toluene and calculate the velocity and pressure at the leading edge of the shock front. Our results are compared to recent work in which early blast wave dynamics are studied and the applicability of the classical Taylor-Sedov model is assessed for our data. We observe an enhanced vertical expansion in the shockwave that is attributable to absorption and heating above the surface.

  1. Spectroscopic analysis of element concentrations in aluminum alloy using nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wenfeng; Tang, Jie; Gao, Cunxiao; Wang, Haojing; Zhao, Wei

    2010-06-01

    A plasma generated by 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation of aluminum alloy in air at atmospheric pressure was studied spectroscopically. The electron density was inferred by measuring the Stark broadened line profile of Cu(I) 324.75 nm, while the electron temperature was determined using the Boltzmann plot method with ten neutral iron lines. Based on the results, local thermodynamic equilibrium was studied. Moreover, calibration curves were presented for samples containing Si, Fe, Cu, Mn, Mg, Ni, Zn and Ti, and the limit of detection of trace elements was calculated based on experimental results.

  2. Emission features and expansion dynamics of nanosecond laser ablation plumes at different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S. Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2014-01-21

    The influence of ambient pressure on the spectral emission features and expansion dynamics of a plasma plume generated on a metal target has been investigated. The plasma plumes were generated by irradiating Cu targets using 6 ns, 1064 nm pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The emission and expansion dynamics of the plasma plumes were studied by varying air ambient pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric pressure. The ambient pressure levels were found to affect both the line intensities and broadening along with the signal to background and signal to noise ratios and the optimum pressure conditions for analytical applications were evaluated. The characteristic plume parameters were estimated using emission spectroscopy means and noticed that the excitation temperature peaked ∼300 Torr, while the electron density showed a maximum ∼100 Torr. Fast-gated images showed a complex interaction between the plume and background air leading to changes in the plume geometry with pressure as well as time. Surface morphology of irradiated surface showed that the pressure of the ambient gas affects the laser-target coupling significantly.

  3. Self-consistent modeling of jet formation process in the nanosecond laser pulse regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mezel, C.; Hallo, L.; Breil, J.; Souquet, A.; Guillemot, F.; Hebert, D.

    2009-12-15

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct printing technique. Because of its high application potential, interest continues to increase. LIFT is routinely used in printing, spray generation and thermal-spike sputtering. Biological material such as cells and proteins have already been transferred successfully for the creation of biological microarrays. Recently, modeling has been used to explain parts of the ejection transfer process. No global modeling strategy is currently available. In this paper, a hydrodynamic code is utilized to model the jet formation process and estimate the constraints obeyed by the bioelements during the transfer. A self-consistent model that includes laser energy absorption, plasma formation via ablation, and hydrodynamic processes is proposed and confirmed with experimental results. Fundamental physical mechanisms via one-dimensional modeling are presented. Two-dimensional (2D) simplified solutions of the jet formation model equations are proposed. Predicted results of the model are jet existence and its velocity. The 2D simulation results are in good agreement with a simple model presented by a previous investigator.

  4. Pump-probe imaging of nanosecond laser-induced bubbles in distilled water solutions: Observations of laser-produced-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R.; Camacho-López, S.

    2010-11-01

    This article presents the analysis of the laser-produced-plasma (LPP) formed by the focusing of a 9 ns laser pulse, λ =532 nm, with a NA=0.6 aspherical lens using energies between 100-1500 μJ, into distilled water with varying solutions of table salt. Observations of the filamentation plasma were made, which are explained by self-focusing of the laser pulse by the LPP through ponderomotive cavitation of the electron plasma in the center of the beam. The filamentation of the beam through a low density plasma wave guide explains why the transmission of the pump laser through the interaction region was notably higher on previous experiments that we performed [R. Evans et al., Opt. Express 16, 7481 (2008)], than a very similar set of experiments performed by Noack and Vogel [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35, 1156 (1999)].

  5. Pump-probe imaging of nanosecond laser-induced bubbles in distilled water solutions: Observations of laser-produced-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.; Camacho-Lopez, S.

    2010-11-15

    This article presents the analysis of the laser-produced-plasma (LPP) formed by the focusing of a 9 ns laser pulse, {lambda}=532 nm, with a NA=0.6 aspherical lens using energies between 100-1500 {mu}J, into distilled water with varying solutions of table salt. Observations of the filamentation plasma were made, which are explained by self-focusing of the laser pulse by the LPP through ponderomotive cavitation of the electron plasma in the center of the beam. The filamentation of the beam through a low density plasma wave guide explains why the transmission of the pump laser through the interaction region was notably higher on previous experiments that we performed [R. Evans et al., Opt. Express 16, 7481 (2008)], than a very similar set of experiments performed by Noack and Vogel [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35, 1156 (1999)].

  6. Material properties of lithium fluoride for predicting XUV laser ablation rate and threshold fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blejchař, Tomáś; Nevrlý, Václav; Vašinek, Michal; Dostál, Michal; Pečínka, Lukáś; Dlabka, Jakub; Stachoň, Martin; Juha, Libor; Bitala, Petr; Zelinger, Zdeněk.; Pira, Peter; Wild, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with prediction of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser ablation of lithium fluoride at nanosecond timescales. Material properties of lithium fluoride were determined based on bibliographic survey. These data are necessary for theoretical estimation of surface removal rate in relevance to XUV laser desorption/ablation process. Parameters of XUV radiation pulses generated by the Prague capillary-discharge laser (CDL) desktop system were assumed in this context. Prediction of ablation curve and threshold laser fluence for lithium fluoride was performed employing XUV-ABLATOR code. Quasi-random sampling approach was used for evaluating its predictive capabilities in the means of variance and stability of model outputs in expected range of uncertainties. These results were compared to experimental data observed previously.

  7. Spectra of plasmas of Ru, Rh, Pd and Mo produced with nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokasani, Ragava; Long, Elaine; Sheridan, Paul; Hayden, Patrick; O'Reilly, Fergal; Dunne, Padraig; Endo, Akira; Limpouch, Jiri; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray emission recorded in the 2-12 nm region from Mo, Ru, Rh and Pd ions present in the laser produced plasmas. The spectra were found to be dominated by 3p-3d transitions in the 5-8 nm region, which shift slowly to shorter wavelengths with the increasing atomic number, and by 3d-4p and 3d-4f transitions at shorter wavelengths. These transitions, in a number of neighbouring ion stages, were distinguished by comparison with Cowan code calculations and previously reported data. The experimental results show that strong emission can be observed at the 6.X nm region for Ru, Rh and Pd plasmas.

  8. Thyratron-choke switch for high-current nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Vizir, V.A.; Chervyakov, V.V.; Laier, A.V.; Shubkin, N.G.

    1986-06-01

    Electric-discharge excimer lasers and high-current nanosecond accelerators, i.e., linear induction accelerators, require highcurrent nanosecond pulse (HCNP) generators with high repetition frequencies. This paper describes a design and some formulas for a thyratron-choke assembly for switching high-current nanosecond pulses, which consists of a thyratron and a single turn nonlinear choke connected in series with it; these are enclosed in a coaxial shield. The operation of a thyratronchoke assembly with a TGI1-1000/25 thyratron in switching pulses of up to 10kA with a duration of 250 nsec is studied. The current rise rate is 200 kA/usec, the pulse repetition frequency is 200 Hz, and the average switched power is 5kW.

  9. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Comparative study of the ablation of materials by femtosecond and pico- or nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, Taras V.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Garnov, Sergei V.; Danielius, R.; Piskarskas, A.; Tamosauskas, G.; Dausinger, F.

    1999-08-01

    A series of studies was carried out on the ablation of steel, Si3N4 ceramic, and diamond in air by femtosecond (200 and 900 fs) pulses of different wavelengths (532 and 266 nm) and in a wide energy density range (1 — 103 J cm-2 ). The ablation rates were measured for different geometries of the irradiation surface [a shallow crater and a channel with a high (up to 10) aspect ratio]. The ablation rates (in a shallow crater) and the morphologies of the irradiated surface were compared for femtosecond and longer (220 ps, 7 ns) pulses. The role of the laser-generated plasma in the ablation of materials by subpicosecond pulses as well as the prospects for the practical application of ultrashort laser pulses in the processing of materials are analysed.

  10. Nanosecond laser irradiation synthesis of CdS nanoparticles in a PVA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Krüger, Tjaart P. J.; Oluwatobi, Oluwafemi S.; Strydom, Christien A.

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a modified, in situ photolytic process for the nucleation and growth of cadmium sulphide nanoparticles in the presence of an optically transparent and semicrystalline polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer matrix. The laser causes a localized decomposition of the precursor species in the immediate vicinity of the polymer leading to highly confined nanocrystals. The as-synthesized PVA-CdS nanocomposite were characterized using UV-vis absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD). Strong blue shift in the band gap was observed in UV visible absorption spectrum indicating the size confinement. The influence of deposition temperature (25-200 °C) on the optical properties, microstructure, and thermal stability was also investigated. Thermal decomposition behaviors of these composites exhibit decreased thermal stability as indicated by the shift in the decomposition temperature of the pure PVA. XRD patterns revealed a reduction in the crystallinity of the polymer due to the entrapped particles. The nanocomposites showed the existence of both cubic and hexagonal phases.

  11. Angular Distribution of Tungsten Material and Ion Flux during Nanosecond Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. S.; Dogar, A. H.; Qayyum, A.; Abbasi, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten thin films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on glass substrates placed at the angles of 0∘ to 70∘ with respect to the target surface normal. Rutherford backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) analysis of the films indicated that about 90% of tungsten material flux is distributed in a cone of 40∘ solid angle while about 54% of it lies even in a narrower cone of 10∘ solid angle. Significant diffusion of tungsten in glass substrate has been observed in the films deposited at smaller angles with respect to target surface normal. Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements performed using Langmuir probe indicated that the most probable ion energy decreases from about 600 to 91eV for variation of θ from 0∘ to 70∘. In general ion energy spread is quite large at all angles investigated here. The enhanced tungsten diffusion in glass substrate observed at smaller angles is most probably due to the higher ion energy and ion assisted recoil implantation of already deposited tungsten.

  12. Estimation of excited-state absorption and photobleaching in Fe²⁺-doped lithium sodium silicate glass under exposure to high-power nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Ehrmann, Paul R; Qiu, S Roger; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Suratwala, Tayyab I

    2015-04-01

    Fe-doped lithium sodium silicate glasses codoped with Sn and C to promote the Fe²⁺ redox state are investigated under simultaneous excitation at the first and third harmonics of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser. The aim is to evaluate critical parameters associated with the potential use of this material as an optical filter that transmits the third harmonic but blocks the fundamental frequency. Estimations of the excited-state absorption coefficient and photobleaching (reduction of absorption at the fundamental) are provided. The results provide insight on the design and expected operational parameters of this type of Fe-doped materials. PMID:25967187

  13. Ablation of human carious dentin with a nanosecond pulsed laser at a wavelength of 5.85 μm: relationship between hardness and ablation depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-02-01

    Less invasive treatment and preservation of teeth, referred to as minimal intervention, are strong requirements in dentistry. In our previous study, the fundamental ablation properties of human dentin at wavelengths around 5.8 μm were investigated, and the results indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm was optimal for selective removal of carious dentin with less damage to normal dentin. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the ablation depth and hardness of human dentin including carious lesion. A nanosecond pulsed laser produced by difference-frequency generation was used for irradiations to human carious dentin. It was observed that correlation between ablation depth and Vickers hardness after 2 s laser irradiation at the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2. On the other hand, ablations did not depend on Vickers hardness at the wavelength of 6.00 μm. A nanosecond pulsed laser with the wavelength at 5.85 μm is useful for selective ablation of human carious dentin in accordance with the hardness.

  14. Measurements of preheat and shock melting in Be ablators during the first few nanoseconds of a National Ignition Facility ignition drive using the Omega laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. K.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Page, R. H.; Braun, D. G.; Edwards, M. J.; Hibbard, R.; Moreno, K. A.; Mauldin, M. P.; Nikroo, A.

    2009-04-15

    A scaled Hohlraum platform was used to experimentally measure preheat in ablator materials during the first few nanoseconds of a radiation drive proposed for ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. The platform design approximates the radiation environment of the pole of the capsule by matching both the laser spot intensity and illuminated Hohlraum wall fraction in scaled halfraums driven by the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Back surface motion measured via VISAR reflecting from the rear surface of the sample was used to measure sample motion prior to shock breakout. The experiments show that the first {approx}20 {mu}m of a Be ablator will be melted by radiation preheat, with subsequent material melted by the initial shock, in agreement with simulations. The experiments also show no evidence of anomalous heating of buried high-Z doped layers in the ablator.

  15. Highest-speed dicing of thin silicon wafers with nanosecond-pulse 355nm q-switched laser source using line-focus fluence optimization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovatsek, James M.; Patel, Rajesh S.

    2010-02-01

    Due to current and future anticipated widespread use of thin silicon wafers in the microelectronics industry, there is a large and growing interest in laser-based wafer dicing solutions. As the wafers become thinner, the laser advantage over saw dicing increases in terms of both the speed and yield of the process. Furthermore, managing the laser heat input during the dicing process becomes more important with increasingly thin wafers and with increasingly narrow saw streets. In this work, shaped-beam laser-cutting of thin (100 μm and below) silicon is explored with Newport / Spectra- Physics Pulseo 20-W nanosecond-pulse 355-nm DPSS q-switched laser system. Optimal process conditions for cutting various depths in silicon are determined, with particular emphasis on fluence optimization for a narrow-kerf cutting process. By shaping the laser beam into a line focus, the optimal fluence for machining the silicon can be achieved while at the same time utilizing the full output power of the laser source. In addition, by adjusting the length of the laser line focus, the absolute fastest speed for various cutting depths is realized. Compared to a circular beam, a dramatic improvement in process efficiency is observed.

  16. DiPOLE: a 10 J, 10 Hz cryogenic gas cooled multi-slab nanosecond Yb:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Ertel, Klaus; Mason, Paul D; Phillips, P Jonathan; De Vido, Mariastefania; Smith, Jodie M; Butcher, Thomas J; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Greenhalgh, R Justin S; Collier, John L

    2015-07-27

    The Diode Pumped Optical Laser for Experiments (DiPOLE) project at the Central Laser Facility aims to develop a scalable, efficient high pulse energy diode pumped laser amplifier system based on cryogenic gas cooled, multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG technology. We present recent results obtained from a scaled down prototype laser system designed for operation at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate. At 140 K, the system generated 10.8 J of energy in a 10 ns pulse at 1029.5 nm when pumped by 48 J of diode energy at 940 nm, corresponding to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 22.5%. To our knowledge, this represents the highest pulse energy obtained from a cryo cooled Yb laser to date and the highest efficiency achieved by a multi-Joule diode pumped solid state laser system. Additionally, we demonstrated shot-to-shot energy stability of 0.85% rms for the system operated at 7 J, 10 Hz during several runs lasting up to 6 hours, with more than 50 hours in total. We also demonstrated pulse shaping capability and report on beam, wavefront and focal spot quality. PMID:26367612

  17. Luminescence in the fluoride-containing phosphate-based glasses: a possible origin of their high resistance to nanosecond pulse laser-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Lu, Min; Gao, Fei; Guo, Haitao; Xu, Yantao; Hou, Chaoqi; Zhou, Zhiwei; Peng, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Fusion power offers the prospect of an almost inexhaustible source of energy for future generations. It was reported that fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were achieved, but so far great deal of scientific and engineering challenges have to be overcome for realizing fusion power generation. There is a bottleneck for color-separation gratings in NIF and other similar inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers. Here we show a series of high performance phosphate-based glasses that can transmit the third harmonic frequency (3ω) laser light with high efficiency meanwhile filter the fundamental (1ω) and the second harmonic frequency (2ω) laser lights through direct absorption, and especially they exhibit excellent damage threshold induced by nanosecond pulse laser compared with that of the fused silica used in NIF. Yellowish-orange fluorescence emits during the laser-material interaction process, and it can be tailored through regulating the glass structure. Study on its structural origin suggests that the fluorescence emission is a key factor that conduces to the high laser-induced damage resistance of these glasses. The results also indicated the feasibility of utilizing these high performance glasses in novel color separation optics, allowing novel design for the final optics assembly in ICF lasers. PMID:25716328

  18. Luminescence in the fluoride-containing phosphate-based glasses: A possible origin of their high resistance to nanosecond pulse laser-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei; Lu, Min; Gao, Fei; Guo, Haitao; Xu, Yantao; Hou, Chaoqi; Zhou, Zhiwei; Peng, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Fusion power offers the prospect of an almost inexhaustible source of energy for future generations. It was reported that fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were achieved, but so far great deal of scientific and engineering challenges have to be overcome for realizing fusion power generation. There is a bottleneck for color-separation gratings in NIF and other similar inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers. Here we show a series of high performance phosphate-based glasses that can transmit the third harmonic frequency (3ω) laser light with high efficiency meanwhile filter the fundamental (1ω) and the second harmonic frequency (2ω) laser lights through direct absorption, and especially they exhibit excellent damage threshold induced by nanosecond pulse laser compared with that of the fused silica used in NIF. Yellowish-orange fluorescence emits during the laser-material interaction process, and it can be tailored through regulating the glass structure. Study on its structural origin suggests that the fluorescence emission is a key factor that conduces to the high laser-induced damage resistance of these glasses. The results also indicated the feasibility of utilizing these high performance glasses in novel color separation optics, allowing novel design for the final optics assembly in ICF lasers.

  19. Enhanced photocatalytic efficiency in zirconia buffered n-NiO/p-NiO single crystalline heterostructures by nanosecond laser treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Molaei, R.; Bayati, M. R.; Alipour, H. M.; Nori, S.; Narayan, J.

    2013-06-21

    We report the formation of NiO based single crystalline p-n junctions with enhanced photocatalytic activity induced by pulsed laser irradiation. The NiO epilayers were grown on Si(001) substrates buffered with cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (c-YSZ) by using pulsed laser deposition. The NiO/c-YSZ/Si heterostructures were subsequently laser treated by 5 pulses of KrF excimer laser (pulse duration = 25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} s) at lower energies. Microstructural studies, conducted by X-ray diffraction ({theta}-2{theta} and {phi} techniques) and high resolution transmission electron microscope, showed a cube-on-cube epitaxial relationship at the c-YSZ/Si interface; the epitaxial relationship across the NiO/c-YSZ interface was established as NiO<111 > Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line c-YSZ<001> and in-plane NiO<110> Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line c-YSZ<100>. Electron microscopy studies showed that the interface between the laser annealed and the pristine region as well as the NiO/c-YSZ interface was atomically sharp and crystallographically continuous. The formation of point defects, namely oxygen vacancies and NiO, due to the coupling of the laser photons with the NiO epilayers was confirmed by XPS. The p-type electrical characteristics of the pristine NiO epilayers turned to an n-type behavior and the electrical conductivity was increased by one order of magnitude after laser treatment. Photocatalytic activity of the pristine (p-NiO/c-YSZ/Si) and the laser-annealed (n-NiO/p-NiO/c-YSZ/Si) heterostructures were assessed by measuring the decomposition rate of 4-chlorophenol under UV light. The photocatalytic reaction rate constants were determined to be 0.0059 and 0.0092 min{sup -1} for the as-deposited and the laser-treated samples, respectively. The enhanced photocatalytic efficiency was attributed to the suppressed charge carrier recombination in the NiO based p-n junctions and higher electrical conductivity. Besides, the oxygen vacancies

  20. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Nanosecond (ns) laser transfer of silver nanoparticles from silver-exchanged soda-lime glass to transparent soda-lime glass and shock waves formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, Mohamed Chérif; Blondeau, Jean-Philippe; Sagot, Nadine; Ollier, Nadège; Tite, Teddy

    2015-05-01

    In this contribution, we showed for the first time in our knowledge a single-step process for silver clusters and nanoparticles growth and transfer from silver-exchanged soda-lime glass to un-exchanged soda-lime glass (transparent glass in visible and NIR domain) by nanosecond (ns) laser irradiation. The transferred silver nanoparticles in transparent glass are strongly linked to the glass surface. In addition, we point out the formation of shock waves, with selective silver clustering on the top wave. This technique provides an alternative and simple way to obtain metallic nanoparticles in different media which can be traversed by laser wavelength used. Moreover, this experiment is made at room temperature and air environment. It is worth noting that our technique requires a glass previously doped with the corresponding silver ions.

  2. Influence of water content on the ablation of skin with a 532 nm nanosecond Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soogeun; Eom, Tae Joong; Jeong, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    This work reports that the ablation volume and rate of porcine skin changed significantly with the change of skin water content. Under the same laser irradiation conditions (532 nm Nd:YAG laser, pulse width = 11.5 ns, pulse energy = 1.54 J, beam radius = 0.54 mm), the ablation volume dropped by a factor of 4 as the skin water content decreased from 40 wt. % (native) to 19 wt. % with a change in the ablation rate below and above around 25 wt. %. Based on the ablation characteristics observed by in situ shadowgraph images and the calculated tissue temperatures, it is considered that an explosive rupture by rapid volumetric vaporization of water is responsible for the ablation of the high water content of skin, whereas thermal disintegration of directly irradiated surface layer is responsible for the low water content of skin. PMID:25581397

  3. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: Emission of fluorescence from chlorophyll a in vivo due to nanosecond pulsed laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunin, D. K.; Gorbunov, M. Yu; Fadeev, V. V.; Chekalyuk, A. M.

    1992-05-01

    A model was proposed and tested experimentally to describe the emission of fluorescence by chlorophyll a in vivo as a result of pulsed laser excitation. This model takes into account the migration of excitons between various photosynthetic units, singlet-singlet annihilation of excitons, pigment bleaching, and also the influence of various states of the photosystem II reaction centers. A method was developed to measure the average number of excitons reaching a photosystem II reaction center during a pulse. This involved two-pulse laser excitation. It was found that the rates of exciton capture by the reaction centers were the same for the PIQ and P +IQ - states of the photosystem II reaction centers, whereas the rate of exciton capture in the P +I -Q - state was half that for the PIQ - state.

  4. Post-processing of fused silica and its effects on damage resistance to nanosecond pulsed UV lasers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Li, Yaguo; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2016-04-10

    HF-based (hydrofluoric acid) chemical etching has been a widely accepted technique to improve the laser damage performance of fused silica optics and ensure high-power UV laser systems at designed fluence. Etching processes such as acid concentration, composition, material removal amount, and etching state (etching with additional acoustic power or not) may have a great impact on the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of treated sample surfaces. In order to find out the effects of these factors, we utilized the Taguchi method to determine the etching conditions that are helpful in raising the LIDT. Our results show that the most influential factors are concentration of etchants and the material etched away from the viewpoint of damage performance of fused silica optics. In addition, the additional acoustic power (∼0.6  W·cm-2) may not benefit the etching rate and damage performance of fused silica. Moreover, the post-cleaning procedure of etched samples is also important in damage performances of fused silica optics. Different post-cleaning procedures were, thus, experiments on samples treated under the same etching conditions. It is found that the "spraying + rinsing + spraying" cleaning process is favorable to the removal of etching-induced deposits. Residuals on the etched surface are harmful to surface roughness and optical transmission as well as laser damage performance. PMID:27139869

  5. Improved patterning of ITO coated with gold masking layer on glass substrate using nanosecond fiber laser and etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Nguyen Ngoc; Hung, Duong Thanh; Anh, Vo Tran; BongChul, Kang; HyunChul, Kim

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, an indium-tin oxide (ITO) thin-film patterning method for higher pattern quality and productivity compared to the short-pulsed laser direct writing method is presented. We sputtered a thin ITO layer on a glass substrate, and then, plated a thin gold layer onto the ITO layer. The combined structure of the three layers (glass-ITO-gold) was patterned using laser-induced plasma generated by an ytterbium pulsed fiber laser (λ = 1064 nm). The results showed that the process parameters of 50 mm/s in scanning speed, 14 ns pulse duration, and a repetition rate of 7.5 kHz represented optimum conditions for the fabrication of ITO channels. Under these conditions, a channel 23.4 μm wide and 20 nm deep was obtained. However, built-up spikes (∼15 nm in height) resulted in a decrease in channel quality, and consequently, short circuit occurred at some patterned positions. These built-up spikes were completely removed by dipping the ITO layer into an etchant (18 wt.% HCl). A gold masking layer on the ITO surface was found to increase the channel surface quality without any decrease in ITO thickness. Moreover, the effects of repetition rate, scanning speed, and etching characteristics on surface quality were investigated.

  6. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronicmore » states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.« less

  7. A simple method for experimental determination of electron temperature and electron density in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge used for excitation of high-power atomic and ionic metal and metal halide vapour lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    A simple method based on the time-resolved measurement of electrical discharge parameters, such as tube voltage and discharge current, is developed and applied for determination of electron temperature and electron density in the discharge period of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge, exciting high-power DUV Cu+ Ne-CuBr, He-Hg+ and He-Sr+ lasers.

  8. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  9. 2D numerical modelling of the gas temperature in a high-temperature high-power strontium atom laser excited by nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in a He-SrBr2 mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2014-05-01

    Assuming axial symmetry and a uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed numerically for determination of the gas temperature in the case of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in He-SrBr2 formed in a newly-designed large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge-free zone, in order to find the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. The model determines the gas temperature of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  10. Nanosecond laser-induced selective removal of the active layer of CuInGaSe2 solar cells by stress-assisted ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzás, András; Geretovszky, Zsolt

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that laser pulses of nanosecond duration (λ=1064 nm, τ=25 ns, PRR =5 kHz) are capable of the clean removal of the CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) and ZnO:Al layers in the layer structure of chalcogenide-based solar cells, leaving the underlying Mo layer undamaged and producing excellent crater morphology. Our results prove that the material removal process is governed by the thermomechanical stress developing in the CIGS layer due to rapid laser heating. In the mechanical ablation of the active layer, three phenomena play a crucial role, namely, delamination, buckling, and fracture. Morphological and compositional analysis of the laser-processed areas is used to identify the experimental parameters where clean mechanical ablation can be achieved. Numerical calculations, performed in the comsol software environment, are also presented to complement the experimental tendencies and verify the proposed model. Our calculation proves the development of a stress distribution that drives the delamination of the CIGS and Mo layers. As the delamination front proceeds radially outward, the separation of the layers ceases in the colder outer regions according to the Griffith's criterion and defines the size of the craters produced afterwards. The free-standing chalcogenide layer continues to deform, and buckling results in a growing tensile stress at the perimeter of the delaminated area, where ultimately fracture will finalize the removal process and facilitate the clean ablation of the laser-irradiated area.

  11. Optimization of graffiti removal on natural stone by means of high repetition rate UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, M. P.; López, A. J.; Ramil, A.; Pozo, S.; Rivas, T.

    2013-08-01

    The use of laser for graffiti removal is a promising alternative to conventional cleaning methods, though irradiation parameters must be carefully selected in order to achieve the effective cleaning without damaging the substrate, especially when referring to natural stone. From a practical point of view, once a safe working window is selected, it is necessary to determine the irradiation conditions to remove large paint areas, with minimal time consumption. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic procedure to select the optimum parameters for graffiti removal by means of the 3rd harmonic of a high repetition rate nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser. Ablation thresholds of four spray paint colors were determined and the effect of pulse repetition frequency, beam diameter and line scan separation was analyzed, obtaining a set of values which optimize the ablation process.

  12. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca; Margot, Joëlle E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca

    2015-11-15

    The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure) and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium) on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  13. Hybrid master oscillator power amplifier high-power narrow-linewidth nanosecond laser source at 257 nm.

    PubMed

    Délen, Xavier; Deyra, Loïc; Benoit, Aurélien; Hanna, Marc; Balembois, François; Cocquelin, Benjamin; Sangla, Damien; Salin, François; Didierjean, Julien; Georges, Patrick

    2013-03-15

    We report on a high-power narrow-linewidth pulsed laser source emitting at a wavelength of 257 nm. The system is based on a master oscillator power amplifier architecture, with Yb-doped fiber preamplifiers, a Yb:YAG single crystal fiber power amplifier used to overcome the Brillouin limitation in glass fiber and nonlinear frequency conversion stages. This particularly versatile architecture allows the generation of Fourier transform-limited 15 ns pulses at 1030 nm with 22 W of average power and a diffraction-limited beam (M(2)<1.1). At a repetition rate of 30 kHz, 106 μJ UV pulses are generated corresponding to an average power of 3.2 W. PMID:23503285

  14. Nanosecond laser switching of surface wettability and epitaxial integration of c-axis ZnO thin films with Si(111) substrates.

    PubMed

    Molaei, R; Bayati, M R; Alipour, H M; Estrich, N A; Narayan, J

    2014-01-01

    We have achieved integration of polar ZnO[0001] epitaxial thin films with Si(111) substrates where cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (c-YSZ) was used as a template on a Si(111) substrate. Using XRD (θ-2θ and φ scans) and HRTEM techniques, the epitaxial relationship between the ZnO and the c-YSZ layers was shown to be [0001]ZnO || [111]YSZ and [21¯1¯0]ZnO || [1¯01](c-YSZ), where the [21¯1¯0] direction lies in the (0001) plane, and the [1¯01] direction lies in the (111) plane. Similar studies on the c-YSZ/Si interface revealed epitaxy as (111)YSZ || (111)Si and in-plane (110)YSZ || (110)Si. HRTEM micrographs revealed atomically sharp and crystallographically continuous interfaces. The ZnO epilayers were subsequently laser annealed by a single pulse of a nanosecond excimer KrF laser. It was shown that the hydrophobic behavior of the pristine sample became hydrophilic after laser treatment. XPS was employed to study the effect of laser treatment on surface stoichiometry of the ZnO epilayers. The results revealed the formation of oxygen vacancies, which are envisaged to control the observed hydrophilic behavior. Our AFM studies showed surface smoothing due to the coupling of the high energy laser beam with the surface. The importance of integration of c-axis ZnO with Si(111) substrates is emphasized using the paradigm of domain matching epitaxy on the c-YSZ[111] buffer platform along with their out-of-plane orientation, which leads to improvement of the performance of the solid-state devices. The observed ultrafast response and switching in photochemical characteristics provide new opportunities for application of ZnO in smart catalysts, sensors, membranes, DNA self-assembly and multifunctional devices. PMID:24275059

  15. Compact sources for the generation of high-peak power wavelength-stabilized laser pulses in the picoseconds and nanoseconds ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, H.; Klehr, A.; Schwertfeger, S.; Liero, A.; Hoffmann, Th.; Brox, O.; Thomas, M.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers are ideally suited for the generation of optical pulses in the nanoseconds and picoseconds ranges by gainswitching, Q-switching or mode-locking. We have developed diode-laser based light sources where the pulses are spectrally stabilized and nearly-diffraction limited as required by many applications. Diffraction limited emission is achieved by a several microns wide ridge waveguide (RW), so that only the fundamental lateral mode should lase. Spectral stabilization is realized with a Bragg grating integrated into the semiconductor chip, resulting in distributed feedback (DFB) or distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers. We obtained a peak power of 3.8W for 4ns long pulses using a gain-switched DFB laser and a peak power of more than 4W for 65ps long pulses using a three-section DBR laser. Higher peak powers of several tens of Watts can be reached by an amplification of the pulses with semiconductor optical amplifiers, which can be either monolithically or hybrid integrated with the master oscillators. We developed compact modules with a footprint of 4×5cm2 combining master oscillator, tapered power amplifier, beam-shaping optical elements and high-frequency electronics. In order to diminish the generation of amplified spontaneous emission between the pulses, the amplifier is modulated with short-pulses of high amplitude, too. Beyond the amplifier, we obtained a peak power of more than 10W for 4ns long pulses, a peak power of about 35W for 80ps long pulses and a peak power of 70W for 10ps long pulses at emission wavelengths around 1064nm.

  16. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80-90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  17. Clinical count rate performance of an LSO PET/CT scanner utilizing a new front-end electronics architecture with sub-nanosecond intrinsic timing resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, J. P. J.; Townsend, D. W.

    2006-12-01

    A new front-end electronics architecture with sub-nanosecond intrinsic timing resolution has recently been incorporated into a 16 slice LSO PET/CT scanner for imaging applications in oncology. The new electronics are designed to work optimally with the lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillator. Clinical performance of the LSO PET/CT is examined before and after upgrading to the new PICO 3D electronics, and compared with results using the NEMA NU 2 standard for evaluating scanner performance. Improved noise-equivalent count rates are seen in clinical studies, and reduced scatter fractions are observed, consistent with the increased lower-level energy threshold used to reject scatter events in the upgraded configuration.

  18. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Krastelev, E. G. Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  19. High energy, low repetition rate, photonic crystal fiber generated supercontinuum for nanosecond to millisecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, Julie L. H.; Rohde, Charles A.; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Cather Simpson, M.

    2013-05-01

    High energy density per pulse (-15 dBm nm-1) supercontinuum (SC) source has been developed as a probe for transient absorption (TrA) spectroscopy of systems with lifetimes from nanoseconds to a few milliseconds. We have generated a 600-1600 nm, broadband SC by pumping a 15 m photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with relatively high power, 7 ns, 1064 nm pulses. The SC generated at peak pump power of 7.1 kW was randomly polarized and maintained a stable output (6.5% rms average power; 9.1% rms shot-to-shot power). Co-pumping with both 1064 and 532 nm light extended the wavelength range of the SC by about 20%, to 500-1700 nm. Power conversion efficiency and spectral flatness were improved as well. In the visible range, the single-pump SC shows a flatness of 5 dB while the dual-pump SC exhibits 3 dB. In the NIR (1100-1600 nm), the flatness in single- and dual-pump configurations were 3 and 2 dB, respectively. Optically induced fiber breakdown was characterized.

  20. Nanosecond laser-induced damage at different initial temperatures of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} films prepared by dual ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Cheng Jia, Jiaojiao; Fan, Heliang; Qiang, Yinghuai; Liu, Jiongtian; Yang, Di; Hu, Guohang; Li, Dawei

    2014-08-07

    Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} films were deposited by dual ion beam sputtering method. The nanosecond laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) at different initial temperatures and time of the films was investigated by an in situ high temperature laser-induced damage testing platform. It was shown that, when the initial temperature increased from 298 K to 383 K, the LIDT at 1064 nm and 12 ns significantly decreased by nearly 14%. Then the LIDT at 1064 nm and 12 ns decreased slower with the same temperature increment. Different damage morphologies were found at different initial temperatures. At low initial temperatures, it was the defects-isolated damage while at high initial temperatures it was the defects-combined damage. The theoretical calculations based on the defect-induced damage model revealed that both the significant increase of the highest temperature and the duration contributed to the different damage morphologies. With the initial temperature being increased, the thermal-stress coupling damage mechanism transformed gradually to the thermal dominant damage mechanism.

  1. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 5.85 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-06-01

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, the wavelength of 5.85 μm could realize the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but it was necessary to evaluate the stage of caries progression in order to control the ablation property.

  2. Efficient multi-keV x-ray source generated by nanosecond laser pulse irradiated multi-layer thin foils target

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Shao-yong; Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 ; Hu, Guang-yue Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian; Miao, Wen-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Zhan, Xia-yu; Hou, Li-fei; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun

    2014-04-15

    A new target configuration is proposed to generate efficient multi-keV x-ray source using multiple thin foils as x-ray emitters. The target was constructed with several layers of thin foils, which were placed with a specific, optimized spacing. The thin foils are burned though one by one by a nanosecond-long laser pulse, which produced a very large, hot, underdense plasma. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations show that the emission region and the multi-keV x-ray flux generated by multi-layer thin foil target are similar to that of the low-density gas or foam target, which is currently a bright multi-keV x-ray source generated by laser heating. Detailed analysis of a range of foil thicknesses showed that a layer-thickness of 0.1 μm is thin enough to generate an efficient multi-keV x-ray source. Additionally, this type of target can be easily manufactured, compared with the complex techniques for fabrication of low-density foam targets. Our preliminary experimental results also verified that the size of multi-keV x-ray emission region could be enhanced significantly by using a multi-layer Ti thin foil target.

  3. Two-photon microscopy using fiber-based nanosecond excitation.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Sebastian; Eibl, Matthias; Sauer, Benjamin; Reinholz, Fred; Hüttmann, Gereon; Huber, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a powerful technique for sensitive tissue imaging at depths of up to 1000 micrometers. However, due to the shallow penetration, for in vivo imaging of internal organs in patients beam delivery by an endoscope is crucial. Until today, this is hindered by linear and non-linear pulse broadening of the femtosecond pulses in the optical fibers of the endoscopes. Here we present an endoscope-ready, fiber-based TPEF microscope, using nanosecond pulses at low repetition rates instead of femtosecond pulses. These nanosecond pulses lack most of the problems connected with femtosecond pulses but are equally suited for TPEF imaging. We derive and demonstrate that at given cw-power the TPEF signal only depends on the duty cycle of the laser source. Due to the higher pulse energy at the same peak power we can also demonstrate single shot two-photon fluorescence lifetime measurements. PMID:27446680

  4. Two-photon microscopy using fiber-based nanosecond excitation

    PubMed Central

    Karpf, Sebastian; Eibl, Matthias; Sauer, Benjamin; Reinholz, Fred; Hüttmann, Gereon; Huber, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a powerful technique for sensitive tissue imaging at depths of up to 1000 micrometers. However, due to the shallow penetration, for in vivo imaging of internal organs in patients beam delivery by an endoscope is crucial. Until today, this is hindered by linear and non-linear pulse broadening of the femtosecond pulses in the optical fibers of the endoscopes. Here we present an endoscope-ready, fiber-based TPEF microscope, using nanosecond pulses at low repetition rates instead of femtosecond pulses. These nanosecond pulses lack most of the problems connected with femtosecond pulses but are equally suited for TPEF imaging. We derive and demonstrate that at given cw-power the TPEF signal only depends on the duty cycle of the laser source. Due to the higher pulse energy at the same peak power we can also demonstrate single shot two-photon fluorescence lifetime measurements. PMID:27446680

  5. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  6. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  7. Comparative study of CW, nanosecond- and femtosecond-pulsed laser microcutting of AZ31 magnesium alloy stents.

    PubMed

    Gökhan Demir, Ali; Previtali, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys constitute an interesting solution for cardiovascular stents due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability in human body. Laser microcutting is the industrially accepted method for stent manufacturing. However, the laser-material interaction should be well investigated to control the quality characteristics of the microcutting process that concern the surface roughness, chemical composition, and microstructure of the final device. Despite the recent developments in industrial laser systems, a universal laser source that can be manipulated flexibly in terms of process parameters is far from reality. Therefore, comparative studies are required to demonstrate processing capabilities. In particular, the laser pulse duration is a key factor determining the processing regime. This work approaches the laser microcutting of AZ31 Mg alloy from the perspective of a comparative study to evaluate the machining capabilities in continuous wave (CW), ns- and fs-pulsed regimes. Three industrial grade machining systems were compared to reach a benchmark in machining quality, productivity, and ease of postprocessing. The results confirmed that moving toward the ultrashort pulse domain the machining quality increases, but the need for postprocessing remains. The real advantage of ultrashort pulsed machining was the ease in postprocessing and maintaining geometrical integrity of the stent mesh after chemical etching. Resultantly, the overall production cycle time was shortest for fs-pulsed laser system, despite the fact that CW laser system provided highest cutting speed. PMID:24985208

  8. Nanosecond Nd-YAG laser induced plasma emission characteristics in low pressure CO2 ambient gas for spectrochemical application on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Pardede, Marincan; Tjia, May On; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study is conducted on the possibility and viability of performing spectrochemical analysis of carbon and other elements in trace amount in Mars, in particular, the clean detection of C, which is indispensible for tracking the sign of life in Mars. For this study, a nanosecond Nd-YAG laser is employed to generate plasma emission from a pure copper target in CO2 ambient gas of reduced pressure simulating the atmospheric condition of Mars. It is shown that the same shock wave excitation mechanism also works this case while exhibiting remarkably long cooling stage. The highest Cu emission intensities induced by 4 mJ laser ablation energy is attained in 600 Pa CO2 ambient gas. Meanwhile the considerably weaker carbon emission from the CO2 gas appears relatively featureless over the entire range of pressure variation, posing a serious problem for sensitive trace analysis of C contained in a solid sample. Our time resolved intensity measurement nevertheless reveals earlier appearance of C emission from the CO2 gas with a limited duration from 50 ns to 400 ns after the laser irradiation, well before the initial appearance of the long lasting C emission from the solid target at about 1 μs, due to the different C-releasing processes from their different host materials. The unwanted C emission from the ambient gas can thus be eliminated from the detected spectrum by a proper time gated detection window. The excellent spectra of carbon, aluminum, calcium, sodium, hydrogen, and oxygen obtained from an agate sample are presented to further demonstrate and verify merit of this special time gated LIBS using CO2 ambient gas and suggesting its viability for broad ranging in-situ applications in Mars.

  9. Nanosecond Nd-YAG laser induced plasma emission characteristics in low pressure CO{sub 2} ambient gas for spectrochemical application on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-08-28

    An experimental study is conducted on the possibility and viability of performing spectrochemical analysis of carbon and other elements in trace amount in Mars, in particular, the clean detection of C, which is indispensible for tracking the sign of life in Mars. For this study, a nanosecond Nd-YAG laser is employed to generate plasma emission from a pure copper target in CO{sub 2} ambient gas of reduced pressure simulating the atmospheric condition of Mars. It is shown that the same shock wave excitation mechanism also works this case while exhibiting remarkably long cooling stage. The highest Cu emission intensities induced by 4 mJ laser ablation energy is attained in 600 Pa CO{sub 2} ambient gas. Meanwhile the considerably weaker carbon emission from the CO{sub 2} gas appears relatively featureless over the entire range of pressure variation, posing a serious problem for sensitive trace analysis of C contained in a solid sample. Our time resolved intensity measurement nevertheless reveals earlier appearance of C emission from the CO{sub 2} gas with a limited duration from 50 ns to 400 ns after the laser irradiation, well before the initial appearance of the long lasting C emission from the solid target at about 1 μs, due to the different C-releasing processes from their different host materials. The unwanted C emission from the ambient gas can thus be eliminated from the detected spectrum by a proper time gated detection window. The excellent spectra of carbon, aluminum, calcium, sodium, hydrogen, and oxygen obtained from an agate sample are presented to further demonstrate and verify merit of this special time gated LIBS using CO{sub 2} ambient gas and suggesting its viability for broad ranging in-situ applications in Mars.

  10. High-power laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regimes ‘at a glance’ using proton deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, P.; Castan, A.; Marquès, J.-R.; Lancia, L.; Gangolf, T.; Fuchs, J.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Teychenné, D.; Debayle, A.; Monteil, M.-C.; Casanova, M.; Rousseaux, C.; Lemaire, S.; Riz, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recent experiments indicate that controlling the propagation of high-power laser beams through millimeter long and low-density plasmas still remains challenging. In such plasma conditions, it is equally important to consider the impact of the plasma on laser propagation and laser properties, and the impact of the laser on plasma conditions. These complex phenomena are still difficult to implement in fluid models owing to the highly non-linear physics at play. Yet, electromagnetic fields prove to be good signatures of most of these low frequency phenomena. In particular, local pressure gradients and electron transport can be inferred from the electric fields. Such in-depth plasma characterization can be achieved through proton deflectometry. For that purpose, we have developed a three-dimensional simulation capability in order to compute protons’ trajectories modified by the local electric fields.

  11. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  12. Raman spectroscopic analysis of iron chromium oxide microspheres generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Soto-Bernal, J J; Frausto-Reyes, C; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2015-06-15

    Iron chromium oxide microspheres were generated by pulsed laser irradiation on the surface of two commercial samples of stainless steel at room temperature. An Ytterbium pulsed fiber laser was used for this purpose. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the microspheres, whose size was found to be about 0.2-1.7 μm, as revealed by SEM analysis. The laser irradiation on the surface of the stainless steel modified the composition of the microspheres generated, affecting the concentration of the main elemental components when laser power was increased. Furthermore, the peak ratio of the main bands in the Raman spectra has been associated to the concentration percentage of the main components of the samples, as revealed by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. These experiments showed that it is possible to generate iron chromium oxide microspheres on stainless steel by laser irradiation and that the concentration percentage of their main components is associated with the laser power applied. PMID:25797225

  13. Nanosecond high-power dense microplasma switch for visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Bataller, A. Koulakis, J.; Pree, S.; Putterman, S.

    2014-12-01

    Spark discharges in high-pressure gas are known to emit a broadband spectrum during the first 10 s of nanoseconds. We present calibrated spectra of high-pressure discharges in xenon and show that the resulting plasma is optically thick. Laser transmission data show that such a body is opaque to visible light, as expected from Kirchoff's law of thermal radiation. Nanosecond framing images of the spark absorbing high-power laser light are presented. The sparks are ideal candidates for nanosecond, high-power laser switches.

  14. Femtosecond time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection and identification of bacteria: A comparison to the nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudelet, Matthieu; Guyon, Laurent; Yu, Jin; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Amodeo, Tanguy; Fréjafon, Emeric; Laloi, Patrick

    2006-04-01

    Bacterial samples (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) have been analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using femtosecond pulses. We compare the obtained spectra with those resulting from the classical nanosecond LIBS. Specific features of femtosecond LIBS have been demonstrated, very attractive for analyzing biological sample: (i) a lower plasma temperature leading to negligible nitrogen and oxygen emissions from excited ambient air and a better contrast in detection of trace mineral species; and (ii) a specific ablation regime that favors intramolecular bonds emission with respect to atomic emission. A precise kinetic study of molecular band head intensities allows distinguishing the contribution of native CN bonds released by the sample from that due to carbon recombination with atmospheric nitrogen. Furthermore a sensitive detection of trace mineral elements provide specific spectral signature of different bacteria. An example is given for the Gram test provided by different magnesium emissions from Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. An entire spectrum consists of hundred resolved lines belonging to 13 atomic or molecular species, which provides an ensemble of valuable data to identify different bacteria.

  15. Fluorescence Detection of H5N1 Virus Gene Sequences Based on Optical Tweezers with Two-Photon Excitation Using a Single Near Infrared Nanosecond Pulse Laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Cao, Di; Kang, Ya-Feng; Lin, Yi; Cui, Ran; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-04-19

    We present an analytical platform by combining near-infrared optical tweezers with two-photon excitation for fluorescence detection of H5N1 virus gene sequences. A heterogeneous enrichment strategy, which involved polystyrene (PS) microsphere and quantum dots (QDs), was adopted. The final hybrid-conjugate microspheres were prepared by a facile one-step hybridization procedure by using PS microspheres capturing target DNA and QDs tagging, respectively. Quantitative detection was achieved by the optical tweezers setup with a low-cost 1064 nm nanosecond pulse laser for both optical trapping and two-photon excitation for the same hybrid-conjugate microsphere. The detection limits for both neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences and hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences are 16-19 pM with good selectivity for one-base mismatch, which is approximately 1 order of magnitude lower than the most existing fluorescence-based analysis method. Besides, because of the fact that only signal from the trapped particle is detected upon two-photon excitation, this approach showed extremely low background in fluorescence detection and was successfully applied to directly detect target DNA in human whole serum without any separation steps and the corresponding results are very close to that in buffer solution, indicating the strong anti-interference ability of this method. Therefore, it can be expected to be an emerging alternative for straightforward detecting target species in complex samples with a simple procedure and high-throughput. PMID:27023254

  16. Time-resolved imaging of filamentary damage on the exit surface of fused silica induced by 1064 nm nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shen; Xiang'ai, Cheng; Tian, Jiang; Zhiwu, Zhu; Yifan, Dai

    2015-04-01

    Laser-induced damage on the exit surface of fused silica with a filament was observed. The filament has a central hollow core surrounded by molten materials and no obvious cracks could be observed. The critical intensity for the transition from pure surface damage (SD) to filamentary damage (FD) was measured. Time-resolved shadowgraphic microscopy with nanosecond time resolution was employed to compare the propagation of shock wave and material response in the SD and FD process. The main different features during the material response process include: (i) thermoelastic shock waves launched in FD were multiple and a column envelope was observed in the lateral direction; (ii) more energy is deposited in the bulk for FD resulting to a lower speed of shock wave in air; (iii) the overall time for establishing the main character of the damage site for FD was shorter because of the absence of crack expansion. Self-focusing and temperature-activated optical absorption enhancement of the bulk material are discussed to explain the morphology difference between SD and FD and the evolution of filament length under different incident intensities.

  17. Two dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of high pressures induced by high power nanosecond laser-matter interactions under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Benxin; Shin, Yung C.

    2007-05-01

    In laser shock peening (LSP) under a water-confinement regime, laser-matter interaction near the coating-water interface can induce very high pressures in the order of gigapascals, which can impart compressive residual stresses into metal workpieces to improve fatigue and corrosion properties. For axisymmetric laser spots with finite size, the pressure generation near the water-coating interface is a two dimensional process in nature. This is in particular the case for microscale LSP performed with very small laser spots, which is a very promising technique to improve the reliability performance of microdevices. However, models capable of predicting two dimensional (2D) spatial distributions of the induced pressures near the coating-water interface in LSP have rarely been reported in literature. In this paper, a predictive 2D axisymmetric model is developed by numerically solving the hydrodynamic equations, supplemented with appropriate equations of state of water and the coating material. The model can produce 2D spatial distributions of material responses near the water-coating interface in LSP, and is verified through comparisons with experimental measurements. The model calculation shows that the effect of radial release wave on pressure spatial distributions becomes more significant as the laser spot size decreases, indicating the importance of a 2D model, particularly for microscale LSP.

  18. Two dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of high pressures induced by high power nanosecond laser-matter interactions under water

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Benxin; Shin, Yung C.

    2007-05-15

    In laser shock peening (LSP) under a water-confinement regime, laser-matter interaction near the coating-water interface can induce very high pressures in the order of gigapascals, which can impart compressive residual stresses into metal workpieces to improve fatigue and corrosion properties. For axisymmetric laser spots with finite size, the pressure generation near the water-coating interface is a two dimensional process in nature. This is in particular the case for microscale LSP performed with very small laser spots, which is a very promising technique to improve the reliability performance of microdevices. However, models capable of predicting two dimensional (2D) spatial distributions of the induced pressures near the coating-water interface in LSP have rarely been reported in literature. In this paper, a predictive 2D axisymmetric model is developed by numerically solving the hydrodynamic equations, supplemented with appropriate equations of state of water and the coating material. The model can produce 2D spatial distributions of material responses near the water-coating interface in LSP, and is verified through comparisons with experimental measurements. The model calculation shows that the effect of radial release wave on pressure spatial distributions becomes more significant as the laser spot size decreases, indicating the importance of a 2D model, particularly for microscale LSP.

  19. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  20. Comparison of 265 nm Femtosecond and 213 nm Nanosecond Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for Pb Isotope Ratio Measurements.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Nonose, Naoko; Dorta, Ladina; Günther, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The analytical performance of 265 nm femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) and 213 nm nanosecond laser ablation (ns-LA) systems coupled with multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) for Pb isotope ratio measurements of solder were compared. Although the time-resolved signals of Pb measured by fs-LA-MC-ICPMS showed smoother signals compared to those obtained by ns-LA-MC-ICPMS, similar precisions on Pb isotope ratio measurements were obtained between them, even though their operating conditions were slightly different. The mass bias correction of the Pb isotope ratio measurement was carried out by a comparison method using a Pb standard solution prepared from NIST SRM 981 Pb metal isotopic standard, which was introduced into the ICP by a desolvation nebulizer (DSN) via a dual-sample introduction system, and it was successfully demonstrated for Pb isotope ratio measurements for either NIST 981 metal isotopic standard or solder by fs-LA-MC-ICPMS since the analytical results agreed well with the certified value as well as the determined value within their standard deviations obtained and the expanded uncertainty of the certified or determined value. The Pb isotope ratios of solder obtained by ns-LA-MC-ICPMS also showed agreement with respect to the determined value within their standard deviations and expanded uncertainty. From these results, it was evaluated that the mass bias correction applied in the present study was useful and both LA-MC-ICPMS could show similar analytical performance for the Pb isotope ratio microanalysis of metallic samples such as solder. PMID:26656823

  1. The Influence of spot size on the expansion dynamics of nanosecond-laser-produced copper plasmas in atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xingwen; Wei, Wenfu; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-06-28

    Laser produced copper plasmas of different spot sizes in air were investigated using fast photography and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The laser energy was 33 mJ. There were dramatic changes in the plasma plume expansion into the ambient air when spot sizes changed from {approx}0.1 mm to {approx}0.6 mm. A stream-like structure and a hemispherical structure were, respectively, observed. It appeared that the same spot size resulted in similar expansion dynamics no matter whether the target was located in the front of or behind the focal point, although laser-induced air breakdown sometimes occurred in the latter case. Plasma plume front positions agree well with the classic blast wave model for the large spot-size cases, while an unexpected stagnation of {approx}80 ns occurred after the laser pulse ends for the small spot size cases. This stagnation can be understood in terms of the evolution of enhanced plasma shielding effects near the plasma front. Axial distributions of plasma components by OES revealed a good confinement effect. Electron number densities were estimated and interpreted using the recorded Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) images.

  2. Ablation of (GeS{sub 2}){sub 0.3}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 0.7} glass with an ultra-violet nano-second laser

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, P.; Navesnik, J.; Cernohorsky, T.; Kincl, M.; Vlcek, M.; Tichy, L.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The interaction of (GeS{sub 2}){sub 0.3}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 0.7} bulk glass and film with UV nanosecond laser. • Ablation process, topography of crater and structure of the material were studied. • Ablation threshold fluencies changed with the spot diameter and number of pulses. • The photo-thermal expansion of the material occurred for low laser fluency. • Laser direct writing process applicable for fabrication of passive optical elements. - Abstract: The results of an experimental study of the laser ablation of bulk and thin films of a GeSbS chalcogenide glass using UV nanosecond pulses are reported. The response of the samples to illumination conditions was studied through the use of atomic force spectroscopy, digital holographic microscopy, Raman scattering and scanning electron microscopy. The multi-pulse ablation thresholds were determined for both the bulk and thin film samples for varying number of pulses and illuminated spot diameter. The possible application of direct laser writing into the bulk and thin films of this material is presented.

  3. Process and application of shock compression by nanosecond pulses of frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuji; Kimura, Motohiko; Mukai, Naruhiko; Yoda, Masaki; Obata, Minoru; Ogisu, Tatsuki

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed a new process of laser-induced shock compression to introduce a residual compressive stress on material surface, which is effective for prevention of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and enhancement of fatigue strength of metal materials. The process developed is unique and beneficial. It requires no pre-conditioning for the surface, whereas the conventional process requires that the so-called sacrificial layer is made to protect the surface from damage. The new process can be freely applied to water- immersed components, since it uses water-penetrable green light of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The process developed has the potential to open up new high-power laser applications in manufacturing and maintenance technologies. The laser-induced shock compression process (LSP) can be used to improve a residual stress field from tensile to compressive. In order to understand the physics and optimize the process, the propagation of a shock wave generated by the impulse of laser irradiation and the dynamic response of the material were analyzed by time-dependent elasto-plastic calculations with a finite element program using laser-induced plasma pressure as an external load. The analysis shows that a permanent strain and a residual compressive stress remain after the passage of the shock wave with amplitude exceeding the yield strength of the material. A practical system materializing the LSP was designed, manufactured, and tested to confirm the applicability to core components of light water reactors (LWRs). The system accesses the target component and remotely irradiates laser pulses to the heat affected zone (HAZ) along weld lines. Various functional tests were conducted using a full-scale mockup facility, in which remote maintenance work in a reactor vessel could be simulated. The results showed that the system remotely accessed the target weld lines and successfully introduced a residual compressive stress. After sufficient training

  4. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  5. Overview of the Lucia laser program: toward 100-Joules, nanosecond-pulse, kW averaged power based on ytterbium diode-pumped solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteloup, J.-C.; Yu, H.; Bourdet, G.; Dambrine, C.; Ferre, S.; Fulop, A.; Le Moal, S.; Pichot, A.; Le Touze, G.; Zhao, Z.

    2005-04-01

    We present the current status of the Lucia laser being built at the LULI laboratory, the national civil facility for intense laser matter interaction in France. This diode pumped laser will deliver a 100 Joules, 10 ns, 10 Hz pulse train from Yb:YAG using 4400 power diode laser bars. We first focus on the amplifier stage by describing the reasons for selecting our extraction architecture. Thermal issues and solutions for both laser and pumping heads are then described. Finally, we emphasize more specifically the need for long-lifetime high-laser-damage-threshold coatings and optics.

  6. High-peak-power optically pumped AlGaInAs eye-safe laser at 500-kHz repetition rate with an intracavity diamond heat spreader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-F.; Su, K. W.; Chen, W. L.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2012-08-01

    We report on a compact efficient high-repetition-rate (>100 kHz) optically pumped AlGaInAs nanosecond eye-safe laser at 1525 nm. A diamond heat spreader bonded to the gain chip is employed to improve the heat removal. At a pump power of 13.3 W, the average output power at a repetition rate 200 kHz is up to 3.12 W, corresponding to a peak output power of 560 W. At a repetition rate 500 kHz, the maximum average power and peak power are found to be 2.32 W and 170 W, respectively.

  7. Comparison of plasma temperature and electron density on nanosecond laser ablation of Cu and nano-Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Jiang, Yuanfei; Wang, Tingfeng; Shao, Junfeng; Jin, Mingxing

    2015-03-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is performed through the collection of spectra by spectral detection equipment at different delay times and distances from targets composed of Cu and nano-Cu, which are ablated using a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) in our experiments. The measured wavelength range is from 475 nm to 525 nm. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium model, we analyze the characteristics of the plasma temperature and the electron number density for different distances between the target surface and the lens. The results show that when compared with the nano-Cu plasma case, the temperature of the Cu plasma is higher, while its electron number density is lower.

  8. Characterization of 1064nm nanosecond laser-induced damage on antireflection coatings grown by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhichao; Chen, Songlin; Ma, Ping; Wei, Yaowei; Zheng, Yi; Pan, Feng; Liu, Hao; Tang, Gengyu

    2012-01-16

    Damage tests are carried out at 1064nm to measure the laser resistance of TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) and HfO(2)/Al(2)O(3) antireflection coatings grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The damage results are determined by S-on-1 and R-on-1 tests. Interestingly, the damage performance of ALD coatings is similar to those grown by conventional e-beam evaporation process. A decline law of damage resistance under multiple irradiations is revealed. The influence of growth temperature on damage performance has been investigated. Result shows that the crystallization of TiO(2) layer at higher temperature could lead to numerous absorption defects that reduce the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT). In addition, it has been found that using inorganic compound instead of organic compound as precursors for ALD process maybe effectively prevent carbon impurities in films and will increase the LIDT obviously. PMID:22274431

  9. Space-resolved analysis of trace elements in fresh vegetables using ultraviolet nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvé, Vincent; Portelli, Richard; Boueri, Myriam; Baudelet, Matthieu; Yu, Jin

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to analyze trace elements contained in fresh vegetables. A quadrupled Nd:YAG laser is used in the experiments for ablation. Analyzed samples come from local markets and represent frequently consumed vegetables. For a typical root vegetable, such as potato, spectral analysis of the plasma emission reveals more than 400 lines emitted by 27 elements and 2 molecules, C 2 and CN. Among these species, one can find trace as well as ultra-trace elements. A space-resolved analysis of several trace elements with strong emissions is then applied to typical root, stem and fruit vegetables. The results from this study demonstrate the potential of an interesting tool for botanical and agricultural studies as well for food quality/safety and environment pollution assessment and control.

  10. Absolute energy distributions of Al, Cu, and Ta ions produced by nanosecond laser-generated plasmas at 1013 Wcm-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comet, M.; Versteegen, M.; Gobet, F.; Denis-Petit, D.; Hannachi, F.; Meot, V.; Tarisien, M.

    2016-01-01

    The charge state and energy distributions of ions produced by a pulsed 1 J, 9 ns Nd:YAG laser focused onto solid aluminum, copper, and tantalum targets were measured with an electrostatic analyzer coupled with a windowless electron multiplier detector. Special attention was paid to the detector response function measurements and to the determination of the analyzer transmission. Space charge effects are shown to strongly affect this transmission. Measured absolute energy distributions are presented for several charge states. They follow Boltzmann-like functions characterized by an effective ion temperature and an equivalent accelerating voltage. These parameters exhibit power laws as a function of I λ 2 which open the possibility to predict the expected shape of the relative energy distributions of ions on a large range of laser intensities (106-1016 Wcm-2 μm2).

  11. Study on deposition rate and laser energy efficiency of Laser-Induction Hybrid Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DengZhi; Hu, QianWu; Zheng, YinLan; Xie, Yong; Zeng, XiaoYan

    2016-03-01

    Laser-Induction Hybrid Cladding (LIHC) was introduced to prepare metal silicide based composite coatings, and influence of different factors such as laser type, laser power, laser scan speed and induction preheating temperature on the coating deposition rate and laser energy efficiency was studied systematically. Compared with conventional CO2 laser cladding, fiber laser-induction hybrid cladding improves the coating deposition rate and laser energy efficiency by 3.7 times. When a fiber laser with laser power of 4 kW was combined with an induction preheating temperature of 850 °C, the maximum coating deposition rate and maximum laser energy efficiency reaches 71 g/min and 64% respectively.

  12. Study of hydrogen states in a-Si:H films, dehydrogenization treatments and influence of hydrogen on nanosecond pulse laser crystallization of a-Si:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, V. A.; Galkov, M. S.; Safronova, N. A.; Kamaev, G. N.; Antonenko, A. H.; Kochubey, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Structures based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films deposited on various substrates (including not refractory ones) are widely applied in giant microelectronics devices, such as flat panel displays based on active matrix thin-film transistors and solar cells. The a-Si:H films produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) methods, contain up to 40% atoms of hydrogen. The influence of hydrogen on the optical and electrical properties of the films and their degradation is important. Therefore, the development of express and non-destructive methods for control of the hydrogen concentration in thin films continues to be an actual task to date. Previously, from a comparative analysis of infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy, the ratios of the integral intensities of Raman peaks due to scattering by vibrations of the Si-H and Si-H2 bonds to the intensity of Raman peak of the Si-Si bonds were experimentally determined. Knowing these ratios, it is possible to measure the hydrogen concentration, moreover, separately in Si-H and Si-H2 states. Proposed quantitative method for determining of the hydrogen concentration from analysis of the Raman spectra is an express, non-destructive method and can be used for "in situ" monitoring of the hydrogen. The aim of this work was to determine the polarization dependence of Raman scattering by stretching vibrations of Si-H bonds and find the form of the corresponding Raman tensors. From analysis of Raman intensities in different polarizations the Raman tensors for Si-H and Si-H2 bonds were determined. The regimes for dehydrogenization of thick (up to 1 micron) a-Si:H films were found. The nanosecond pulse XeCl laser with wavelength of 308 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns was used for pulse crystallization of as-deposited and dehydrogenated films. As it was studied earlier, for a-Si:H films with high hydrogen concentration, the threshold for crystallization is very close to threshold of

  13. Efficient multiline nanosecond pulse amplification in planar waveguide CO₂ amplifier for extreme UV laser-produced plasma source.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Ohta, Takeshi; Suganuma, Takashi; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Sumitani, Akira; Endo, Akira

    2014-04-01

    In this Letter, we report on recent experimental results of a short pulse amplification at 10.6 μm wavelength required to drive a tin laser-produced plasma (LPP) extreme ultraviolet (UV) source. We report for the first time, to our best knowledge, a highly efficient pulsed amplification in a multipass amplifier built on RF-discharge-excited, diffusion-cooled CO2, planar waveguide industrial CO2 laser. About 2 kW of output average power was obtained from about 100 W input average power in ∼15  ns pulses at 100 kHz pulse repetition frequency. As much as 60% relative extraction efficiency, as compared to continuous-wave amplification in similar conditions, and 5.8% wall-plug efficiency was recorded and believed to be the highest reported so far. An improvement of extraction efficiency by ∼10% is reported when driving the amplifier with two lines of CO2 regular band in good agreement with expectations. PMID:24686647

  14. Detection of laser-induced nanosecond ultrasonic pulses in metals using a pancake coil and a piezoelectric sensor.

    PubMed

    Kozhushko, Victor V; Krenn, Heinz

    2012-06-01

    A piezoelectric sensor and a pancake coil sensor were used for broadband detection of laser-induced ultrasound in single-crystal aluminum and polycrystalline nickel. Pressure pulses with pronounced compression phases were induced by laser pulses of 5 ns duration from one side of the specimens and detected from the opposite side. A coupling layer of water was required for the piezoelectric method, whereas the pancake coil placed in the biasing permanent field of a cylindrical magnet ~0.25 T allowed noncontact detection. The signals detected by a piezoelectric transducer showed bipolar form and their spectra covered the range from 5 to 90 MHz. The signal measured in aluminum by a pancake coil was assigned to the eddy current sources and had single polarity. The peak-to-peak value of the signal in nickel was higher and had bipolar form because of the inverse magnetostrictive effect. The high-frequency limit detected by the pancake coil approached 200 MHz. PMID:22718873

  15. A high-energy cladding-pumped 80 nanosecond Q-switched fiber laser using a tapered fiber saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Sean W.; Soh, Daniel B. S.; Bisson, Scott E.; Patterson, Brian D.; Hsu, Wen L.

    2013-02-01

    We report a passively Q-switched all-fiber laser using a large mode area (LMA) Yb3+-doped fiber cladding-pumped at 915 nm and an unpumped single-mode Yb3+-doped fiber as the saturable absorber (SA). The saturable absorber and gain fibers were first coupled with a free-space telescope to better study the composite system, and then fusion spliced with fiber tapers to match the mode field diameters. ASE generated in the LMA gain fiber preferentially bleaches the SA fiber before depleting the gain, thereby causing the SA fiber to act as a passive saturable absorber. Using this scheme we first demonstrate a Q-switched oscillator with 40 μJ 79 ns pulses at 1026 nm using a free-space taper, and show that pulses can be generated from 1020 nm to 1040 nm. We scale the pulse energy to 0.40 mJ using an Yb3+-doped cladding pumped fiber amplifier. Experimental studies in which the saturable absorber length, pump times, and wavelengths are independently varied reveal the impact of these parameters on laser performance. Finally, we demonstrate 60 μJ 81 ns pulses at 1030 nm in an all fiber architecture using tapered mode field adaptors to match the mode filed diameters of the gain and SA fibers.

  16. Fabrication of micro-pin array with high aspect ratio on stainless steel using nanosecond laser beam machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Se Won; Shin, Hong Shik; Chu, Chong Nam

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a micro-pin array with a high aspect ratio was fabricated on AISI 304 using laser beam ablation for attachment to a vertical wall. In recent times, there has been research in various fields, including robotics and bio-MEMS, regarding attachment to vertical walls, and micro-pin arrays may offer the best solution. For vertical wall attachment, the micro-pin should have a high aspect ratio, long length, and sharp tip. The recast layer could be piled due to the chromium oxide with high surface tension and viscosity of chromium oxide, and it composed the micro-pins with high aspect ratio. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to identify the characteristics of the piled recast layer. The machining characteristics for a high aspect ratio micro-pin array were investigated according to laser beam machining parameters. In addition, experiments for attaching force relative to the surface roughness of the subject plane were carried out.

  17. 188 W nanosecond pulsed fiber amplifier at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zebiao; Guo, Chao; Li, Qi; Zhao, Pengfei; Li, Chengyu; Huang, Zhihua; Tang, Xuan; Lin, Honghuan; Xu, Shanhui; Yang, Zhongmin; Wang, Jianjun; Jing, Feng

    2016-07-01

    We report an all-fiber high power nanosecond pulsed laser at a center wavelength of 1064 nm. Optimizing the coiling diameter of the active fiber, 188 W average power is achieved at a repetition rate of 40 kHz. The pulse width is measured as 101 ns, while the peak power can be estimated to 46.5 kW.

  18. Nanosecond laser-induced ablation and laser-induced shockwave structuring of polymer foils down to sub-μm patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.; Engisch, L.

    2015-03-01

    Micro- and nanostructures exhibit a growing commercial interest where a fast, cost-effective, and large-area production is attainable. Laser methods have a great potential for the easy fabrication of surface structures into flexible polymer foils like polyimide (PI). In this study two different concepts for the structuring of polymer foils using a KrF excimer laser were tested and compared: the laser-induced ablation and the laser-induced shock wave structuring. The direct front side laser irradiation of these polymers allows the fabrication of different surface structures. For example: The low laser fluence treatment of PI results in nano-sized cone structures where the cone density can be controlled by the laser parameters. This allows inter alia the laser fabrication of microscopic QR code and high-resolution grey-tone images. Furthermore, the laser treatment of the front side of the polymer foil allows the rear side structuring due to a laserinduced shock wave. The resultant surface structures were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as white light interferometry (WLI).

  19. Ultrastructural imaging and molecular modeling of live bacteria using soft x-ray contact microscopy with nanoseconds laser plasma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kado, M.; Richardson, M.C.; Gabel, K.; Torres, D.; Rajyaguru, J.; Muszynski, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Detection for clinical diagnosis and study of microbial cell is performed by a combination of low magnification optical microscopy and direct and indirect labeling techniques. Visual ultrastructural studies on subcellular organelles are possible with variations of electron microscopy (thin section, scanning and freeze fracture), although specimen preparation steps such as fixation, dehydration, resin embedding, ultra-thin sectioning, coating and staining are very specialized, extensive and may introduce artifacts in the original sample. The development of high resolution x-ray microscopy is a new technique well suited to observe the intact structure of a biological specimen at high resolution without any artifacts. Here, x ray images of the various live bacteria, such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, and micromolecule such as chromosomal DNA from Escherichia coli, and Lipopolysaccharide from Burkholderia cepacia, are obtained with soft x-ray contact microscopy. A compact tabletop type glass laser system is used to produce x rays from Al, Si, and Au targets. The PMMA photoresists are used to record x-ray images. An AFM (atomic force microscope) is used to reproduce the x-ray images from the developed photoresists. The performance of the 50 nm spatial resolutions are achieved and images are able to be discussed on the biological view.

  20. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad; Margot, Joëlle

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon) and pressure (from ˜5 × 10-7 Torr up to atmosphere) is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  1. Spatial characterization of red and white skin potatoes using nano-second laser induced breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehan, Imran; Rehan, Kamran; Sultana, S.; Haq, M. Oun ul; Niazi, Muhammad Zubair Khan; Muhammad, Riaz

    2016-01-01

    We presents spectroscopic study of the plasma generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser irradiation of the flesh of red and white skin potatoes. From the spectra recorded with spectrometer (LIBS2500+, Ocean Optics, USA) 11 elements were identified in red skin potato, whereas, the white skin potato was found to have nine elements. Their relative concentrations were estimated using CF-LIBS method for the plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The target was placed in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The electron temperature and number density were calculated from Boltzmann plot and stark broadened line profile methods, respectively using Fe I spectral lines. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters were also studied which show a decreasing trend of 6770 K-4266 K and (3-2.0) × 1016 cm-3. Concentrations of the detected elements were monitored as a function of depth of the potatoes. Our study reveals a decreasing tendency in concentration of iron from top to the centre of potato's flesh, whereas, the concentrations of other elements vary randomly.

  2. Nanosecond frame cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A M; Wilkins, P R

    2001-01-05

    The advent of CCD cameras and computerized data recording has spurred the development of several new cameras and techniques for recording nanosecond images. We have made a side by side comparison of three nanosecond frame cameras, examining them for both performance and operational characteristics. The cameras include; Micro-Channel Plate/CCD, Image Diode/CCD and Image Diode/Film; combinations of gating/data recording. The advantages and disadvantages of each device will be discussed.

  3. Picosecond-nanosecond laser photolysis studies on the photochemical reaction of excited benzophenone with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane in acetonitrile solution: proton abstraction of the free benzophenone anion radical from the ground state amine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Morita, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kenji; Mataga, Noboru

    1991-04-01

    Picosecond and nanosecond dynamics of the ion pair produced by the electron transfer reaction between the triplet state benzophenone ( 3BP*) and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) was investigated by means of transient absorption spectroscopy and laser-induced photoconductivity measurement. It has been revealed that the solvated free anion radical of BP, produced by the rapid ionic dissociation of the ion pair within 2 ns, abstracts proton from the neutral DABCO giving benzophenone ketyl radical, competing with the charge recombination reaction at encounter with DABCO +, decomposition and/or impurity scavenging processes.

  4. Behaviour of metals at ultra-high strain rate by using femtosecond laser shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, J.-P.; Boustie, M.; Berthe, L.; De Rességuier, T.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanical behavior of materials under extreme conditions can be investigated by using laser driven shocks. Actually, femtosecond (fs) technologies allow to reach strong pressures over a very fast duration. This work is dedicated to characterize metals behavior in this ultra-short mode, (aluminum, tantalum), leading to an extreme dynamic solicitation in the target (>107s-1). The study includes the validation of experimental results obtained on the LULI 100TW facility by comparison with numerical model. Three modeling steps are considered. First, we characterize the pressure loading resulting from the fs laser-matter interaction, different from what happens in the classical nanosecond regime. Then, the shock wave propagation is observed through the target and particularly its pressure decay, strong in this regime. The elastic-plastic influence on the shock attenuation is discussed, particularly for tantalum which has a high elastic limit. Dynamic damage appears with spallation. Experimentally, spallation is characterized by VISAR measurements and post-test observations. Shots with different thicknesses have been carried out to determine the damage properties in function of strain rate. We show in this work that a simple instantaneous rupture criterion is not sufficient to reproduce the damage induced in the sample. Only the Kanel model, which includes damage kinetics, is able to reproduce experimental data (VISAR measurements, spall thickness). A generalization of this model to any strain rate can be performed by confronting these results to other shock generators data (ns laser driven shocks, plate impacts). One remarkable result is that every Kanel parameters follows a power law with strain rate in dynamic regime (105 to 108s-1) for both aluminum and tantalum.

  5. Megawatt peak power, 1 kHz, 266 nm sub nanosecond laser source based on single-crystal fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyra, Loïc; Martial, Igor; Balembois, François; Diderjean, Julien; Georges, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    We report the realization of a UV source based on the fourth harmonic generation with LBO/BBO of a Nd:YAG passively Q-switched oscillator amplified in a single-crystal fiber. With careful optimization of the nonlinear components and parameters, we obtain 530 mW average power at 266 nm with pulses of 540 ps at the repetition rate of 1 kHz, which represents a 22.7 % total conversion efficiency from IR to UV and nearly 1 MW peak power. The beam quality M 2 is measured to be below 2.

  6. Short-cavity high-repetition-rate CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopper, Wouter; Bagrova, Kalina; du Pisanie, Johan; Ronander, Einar; Meyer, Jan A.; von Bergmann, Hubertus M.

    1994-09-01

    We report on the construction and optimization of a TEA CO2 laser with a discharge volume of 15 cm3 and cavity length of 20 cm. Such a short cavity facilitates single longitudinal mode operation. A roots blower is employed to achieve the necessary gas flow rate for high-repetition-frequency operation in a compact design. Output has been obtained at 1 kHz and a stable discharge to a repetition rate of 2 kHz has been demonstrated. The laser is part of a program aimed at the development of an efficient laser system for molecular laser isotope separation. Additional applications in materials processing are envisioned.

  7. Effect of defocusing distance on the contaminated surface of brass ring with nanosecond laser in a 3D laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mali; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Meng

    2014-08-01

    Defocusing distance plays a key role in laser cleaning result and can be either positive or negative, depending on the focus position relative to the sample surface. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the defocusing distance on the cleaning efficiency of oxidized brass surface. The oxide layer from the surface of a brass ring was processed with a three dimensional (3-D) dynamically focused laser galvanometer scanning system. The relationship between removal efficiency of the oxide layer and the defocusing distance was analyzed. The sample surface topography, element content before and after the laser cleaning were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), the surface quality after laser cleaning was analyzed by a Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), the chemical constituents of the oxide layer on the sample surface after being processed with different defocusing distances were examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results show that the ratios of Cu/O and Zn/O reach the maximum of 53.2 and 27.78 respectively when the defocusing distance is +0.5 mm. The laser pulses will lose the ability to remove the oxide layer from the substrate surface when the defocusing distance is larger than ±2 mm.

  8. High-energy sub-nanosecond optical pulse generation with a semiconductor laser diode for pulsed TOF laser ranging utilizing the single photon detection approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huikari, Jaakko; Avrutin, Eugene; Ryvkin, Boris; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2016-06-01

    Bulk and quantum well laser diodes with a large equivalent spot size of d a /Γ a ≈ 3 µm and stripe width/cavity length of 30 µm/3 mm were realized and tested. They achieved a pulse energy and pulse length of the order of ~1 nJ and ~100 ps, respectively, with a peak pulse current of 6-8 A and a current pulse width of 1 ns. The 2D characteristics of the optical output power versus wavelength and time were also analyzed with a monochromator/streak camera set-up. The far-field characteristics were studied with respect to the time-homogeneity and energy distribution. The feasibility of a laser diode with a large equivalent spot size in single photon detection based laser ranging was demonstrated to a non-cooperative target at a distance of a few tens of meters.

  9. Effects of water depth and laser pulse numbers on size properties of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammd Hossein; Fattahi, Behzad

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, pulsed laser ablation method was used for synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles of aluminum and titanium in a distilled water medium. The interaction was performed in a water cell in which the target was placed at different depths of water. The effects of the number of laser pulses and the water depth in which the interaction occurred on average size and size distribution of prepared colloidal nanoparticles were investigated. A UV-vis absorption spectrophotometer and a scanning electron microscope were used for the characterization of the produced nanoparticles. Using image processing techniques and analyzing the SEM images, nanoparticles size properties were achieved. According to the results, position of the target in different water depths has strong effect on size properties of the synthesized nanoparticles. Our results also showed that higher number of laser pulses produces smaller mean size nanoparticles with narrower size distribution.

  10. Size properties of colloidal nanoparticles produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation and studying the effects of liquid medium and laser fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Fattahi, Behzad

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, pulsed laser ablation method was used for synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles of aluminum and titanium targets in distilled water, ethanol, and acetone as liquid environments. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for characterization of produced nanoparticles. Using image processing technique and analyzing the SEM images, nanoparticles' mean size and size distribution were achieved. The results show that liquid medium has strong effect on size properties of produced nanoparticles. From the results, it was found that ablation of both metal targets in ethanol medium leads to formation of smaller size nanoparticles with narrower size distributions. The influence of laser fluence was also investigated. According to the results, higher laser fluence produces larger mean size nanoparticles with broader size distribution.

  11. Laser-driven flat plate impacts to 100 GPA with sub-nanosecond pulse duration and resolution for material property studies

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Warnes, R.H.; Kopp, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Miniature laser-driven flat plates (<1-mm diam {times} 0.5--10{mu}m thick, typical) of aluminum, cooper, tungsten, and other materials are accelerated to {le}5 km/s. These miniature plates are used to generate one-dimensional shock waves in solids, liquids, and crystals. Dynamic measurements of spall strength at strain rates {le}10{sup 7} s{sup {minus}1}, elastic-plastic shock wave profiles in 10-{mu}m-thick targets, shocked free-surface acceleration of 10{sup 12} m/s{sup 2}, and laser-driven plate launch accelerations of 10{sup 10} m/s{sup 2} are routinely obtained. The small size of the sample of and projectile mass permits recovery of targets without additional unintended damage or energy deposited into the test specimen. These miniature plates can be launched with conventional 1-J laboratory lasers. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  12. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Brendan A.; Berrill, Mark; Wernsing, Keith A.; Baumgarten, Cory; Woolston, Mark; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at λ = 13.9 nm and 20 μW at λ = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  13. Generation of nanosecond and subnanosecond laser pulses by AlGaAs/GaAs laser-thyristor with narrow mesa stripe contact.

    PubMed

    Slipchenko, Sergey O; Podoskin, Aleksandr A; Soboleva, Olga S; Pikhtin, Nikita A; Bagaev, Timur A; Ladugin, Maxim A; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Simakov, Vladimir A; Tarasov, Il'ya S

    2016-07-25

    Lasers-thyristors with a narrow (20 μm) mesa stripe contact have been studied. It was shown that the laser peak power reaches a value of 2.5 W in the long-pulse mode at a pulse width of 13 ns. It was demonstrated that generation of a controlled train of laser pulses with peak power of 1.6 W and width of 90 ps is possible in the short-pulse mode. The maximum value of the pulse repetition frequency was 470 kHz at the following working characteristics of the laser-thyristor: blocking voltage 5.8 V, control current pulse 25 mA. A number of specific features were observed in the short-pulse mode. It was found that the blocking voltage and amplitude of the control current pulse affect the lasing process. We observed that in short pulse mode the lasing spectra have a two-band structure and the lateral near field may degenerate into a single spot with size substantially smaller than the mesa stripe width. It was shown that the main reason for the observed specific features of lasing is the clearly pronounced effect of the spatial localization of the current. PMID:27464105

  14. High-repetition-rate CF/sub 4/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Telle, J.

    1981-01-01

    A 16 ..mu..m CF/sub 4/ laser oscillator has operated at 1 kHz in a cooled static cell. Threshold pump energies required from the low pressure, Q-switched, cw discharge CO/sub 2/ laser were as low as 60 ..mu..J. The laser cavity employed the multiple-pass off-axis path resonator in a ring configuration. CF/sub 4/ laser power at 615 cm/sup -1/ and a 1 kHz repetition rate exceeded 300 ..mu..W.

  15. High energy pulses generation with giant spectrum bandwidth and submegahertz repetition rate from a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser in all normal dispersion cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-H.; Wang, D.; Lin, K.-H.

    2011-01-01

    Robust passively mode-locked pulse generation with low pulse repetition rate and giant spectrum bandwidth in an all-fiber, all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber laser has been experimentally demonstrated using nonlinear polarization evolution technique. The highest pulse energy over 20 nJ with spectrum bandwidth over 50 nm can be experimentally obtained at 175 mW pump power. The mode-locked pulses reveal broadened 3-dB pulsewidth about several nanosecond and widened pedestal in time trace that is resulted from enormous dispersion in laser cavity and gain dynamics. At certain mode-locking state, a spectrum gap around 1056 nm are observed between the three and four energy levels of Yb-doped fiber laser. By properly rotating the polarization controller, the gap can be eliminated due to four-wave mixing to produce more flattened spectrum output.

  16. Laser nanoablation of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. D.; Pivovarov, P. A.; Zavedeeev, E. V.; Komlenok, M. S.; Kononenko, V. V.; Konov, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data on laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite by nanosecond pulsed UV ( nm) and green ( nm) lasers are presented. It was found that below graphite vaporization threshold 1 J/cm, the nanoablation regime can be realized with material removal rates as low as 10 nm/pulse. The difference between physical (vaporization) and physical-chemical (heating + oxidation) ablation regimes is discussed. Special attention is paid to the influence of laser fluence and pulse number on ablation kinetics. Possibility of laser-induced graphite surface nanostructuring has been demonstrated. Combination of tightly focused laser beam and sharp tip of scanning probe microscope was applied to improve material nanoablation.

  17. Gold nanorods as the saturable absorber for a diode-pumped nanosecond Q-switched 2  μm solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haitao; Li, Min; Liu, Pian; Jin, Lin; Wang, Hui; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-06-15

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) with an average aspect ratio of 15 were experimentally exploited as the 2 μm saturable absorber in a laser diode pumped Tm:YAG laser for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Q-switched pulses with a maximum average output power of 380 mW, a minimum pulse width of 796 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of 77 kHz were achieved under the LD pump power of 6.2 W. Our results indicate that GNRs with a large aspect ratio are promising saturable absorbers in the 2 μm wavelength region. PMID:27304267

  18. High-pulse-repetition-rate HF laser with plate electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Andramanov, A V; Kabaev, S A; Lazhintsev, B V; Nor-Arevyan, V A; Pisetskaya, A V; Selemir, Victor D

    2006-03-31

    A high-pulse-repetition-rate electric-discharge HF laser with inductive-capacitive discharge stabilisation in the active H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6}-He mixture is studied. The multisectional discharge gap with a total length of 250 mm is formed by pairs of anode-cathode plates arranged in a zigzag pattern. The width of the discharge gap between each pair of plates is {approx}1 mm and its height is {approx}12 mm. The laser-beam cross section at the output cavity mirror is {approx}9 mm x 11 mm. The maximum laser pulse energy and the maximum laser efficiency for the H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6} mixture are 14.3 mJ and 2.1%, respectively. The addition of He to the mixture reduced the laser pulse energy by 10%-15%. The maximum gas velocity in the gap between the electrodes achieves 20 m s{sup -1}. The limiting pulse repetition rate f{sub lim} for which a decrease in the laser pulse energy is still not observed is {approx}2kHz for the H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6} mixture and {approx}2.4kHz for the H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6}-He mixture. The average output power {approx}27 W is obtained for a pulse repetition rate of 2.4 kHz. (lasers)

  19. Laser balancing system for high material removal rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Georgalas, G.; Ortiz, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser technique to remove material in excess of 10 mg/sec from a spinning rotor is described. This material removal rate is 20 times greater than previously reported for a surface speed of 30 m/sec. Material removal enhancement was achieved by steering a focused laser beam with moving optics to increase the time of laser energy interaction with a particular location on the circumferential surface of a spinning rotor. A neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) pulse laser was used in this work to evaluate material removal for carbon steel, 347 stainless steel, Inconal 718, and titanium 6-4. This technique is applicable to dynamic laser balancing.

  20. Multiterawatt femtosecond laser system with kilohertz pulse repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, V V; Pestryakov, E V; Laptev, A V; Petrov, V A; Kuptsov, G V; Trunov, V I; Frolov, S A

    2014-05-30

    The basic principles, layout and components are presented for a multiterawatt femtosecond laser system with a kilohertz pulse repetition rate f, based on their parametric amplification and laser amplification of picosecond radiation that pumps the stages of the parametric amplifier. The results of calculations for a step-by-step increase in the output power from the LBO crystal parametric amplifier channel up to the multiterawatt level are presented. By using the developed components in the pump channel of the laser system, the parameters of the regenerative amplifier with the output energy ∼1 mJ at the wavelength 1030 nm and with f = 1 kHz are experimentally studied. The optical scheme of the diode-pumped multipass cryogenic Yb:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} laser ceramic amplifier is developed and its characteristics are determined that provide the output energy within the range 0.25 – 0.35 J. (lasers)

  1. Strain rate dependency of laser sintered polyamide 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. E. T.; Goodridge, R. D.; Siviour, C. R.

    2015-09-01

    Parts processed by Additive Manufacturing can now be found across a wide range of applications, such as those in the aerospace and automotive industry in which the mechanical response must be optimised. Many of these applications are subjected to high rate or impact loading, yet it is believed that there is no prior research on the strain rate dependence in these materials. This research investigates the effect of strain rate and laser energy density on laser sintered polyamide 12. In the study presented here, parts produced using four different laser sintered energy densities were exposed to uniaxial compression tests at strain rates ranging from 10-3 to 10+3 s-1 at room temperature, and the dependence on these parameters is presented.

  2. Rate equations for ruby and alexandrite Q-switched lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena

    2003-07-01

    To have a complex view on giant pulse generation, a more precise computer model of the build up Q-switch pulse in solid-state laser was realized. As a time starting point of the rate equation calculation, the moment of a flashlamp trigger was chosen. A system of three or four main differential rate equations describes the energy transfer from a pumping source - capacitor to an output giant pulse. Two laser active media, i.e. ruby and alexandrite, were examined with this model. A passive Q-switch ruby laser needs solving of the system of four differential equations; three differential equations gave the computer results for electro-optically Q-switched alexandrite laser.

  3. Computer simulated rate processes in copper vapor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    A computer model for metal vapor lasers has been developed which places emphasis on the change of excited state populations of the lasant through inelastic collisions and radiative interaction. Also included are an energy equation for the pumping electrons and rate equations for laser photon densities. Presented are results of calculations for copper vapor with a neon buffer over a range of conditions. General agreement with experiments was obtained.

  4. High removal rate laser-based coating removal system

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Dennis L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Hackel, Lloyd; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Dane, C. Brent; Mrowka, Stanley

    1999-11-16

    A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

  5. Multiterawatt femtosecond laser system with kilohertz pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Laptev, A. V.; Petrov, V. A.; Kuptsov, G. V.; Trunov, V. I.; Frolov, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    The basic principles, layout and components are presented for a multiterawatt femtosecond laser system with a kilohertz pulse repetition rate f, based on their parametric amplification and laser amplification of picosecond radiation that pumps the stages of the parametric amplifier. The results of calculations for a step-by-step increase in the output power from the LBO crystal parametric amplifier channel up to the multiterawatt level are presented. By using the developed components in the pump channel of the laser system, the parameters of the regenerative amplifier with the output energy ~1 mJ at the wavelength 1030 nm and with f = 1 kHz are experimentally studied. The optical scheme of the diode-pumped multipass cryogenic Yb:Y2O3 laser ceramic amplifier is developed and its characteristics are determined that provide the output energy within the range 0.25 - 0.35 J.

  6. Exploration of pulse timing for multiple laser hits within a combined heat transfer, phase change, and gas dynamics model for laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullenix, Nathan; Povitsky, Alex

    2007-05-01

    Laser ablation involves heat transfer, phase changes and/or chemical reactions, and gas dynamics. All three of these processes are tightly coupled with each other. A model has previously been developed to simulate the nanosecond scale laser ablation of carbon. This model has been extended to accommodate longer term simulations and multiple laser pulses. The effects of varying the timing of a second laser pulse by tens of nanoseconds are explored. It is shown that by changing this interval one can control the total mass ablated and the mass transfer rate.

  7. Photoinduced laser etching of a diamond surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, V V; Komlenok, M S; Pimenov, S M; Konov, V I

    2007-11-30

    Nongraphitising ablation of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by nanosecond UV laser pulses is studied experimentally. For laser fluences below the diamond graphitisation threshold, extremely low diamond etching rates (less than 1nm/1000 pulses) are obtained and the term nanoablation is used just for this process. The dependence of the nanoablation rate on the laser fluence is studied for samples irradiated both in air and in oxygen-free atmosphere. The effect of external heating on the nanoablation rate is analysed and a photochemical mechanism is proposed for describing it. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  8. High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

    2013-01-10

    High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a

  9. Plasma erosion rate diagnostics using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, C. J.; Turley, R. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    An optical technique for measuring the sputtering rate of a molybdenum surface immersed in a xenon plasma has been developed and demonstrated. This approach, which may be useful in real-time wear diagnostics for ion thrusters, relies on laser-induced fluorescence to determine the density of sputtered molybdenum atoms.

  10. Lateral growth rates in laser CVD of microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzoldt, F.; Piglmayer, K.; Kräuter, W.; Bäuerle, D.

    1984-11-01

    Lateral growth rates of Ni spots deposited on absorbing substrates by decomposition of Ni(CO)4 with visible Kr+ laser light have been measured. The experimental data are consistent with the calculated temperature distributions. The mechanism of decomposition is thermal with an apparent chemical activation energy of 22±3 kcal/mole for the temperature range 350 K≦ T≦500 K.

  11. 1-kHz-repetition-rate femtosecond Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Losev, L. L.; Pazyuk, V. S.; Tenyakov, S. Yu

    2016-07-01

    A femtosecond Raman laser utilising compressed hydrogen is experimentally investigated under pumping by radiation from a 1-kHz-repetition-rate Ti : sapphire laser. In the regime of double-pulse pumping, the conditions are determined, which correspond to the minimal energy dispersion of Stokes pulses. The optical scheme is realised, which is capable of ensuring the long-term stability of the average power of the first Stokes component with a variation of less than 2%. The Stokes pulses are produced with a pulse duration of 60 fs and energy of 0.26 mJ at a conversion efficiency of 14%.

  12. Flexible high-repetition-rate ultrafast fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dong; Liu, Xueming; Sun, Zhipei; Lu, Hua; Han, Dongdong; Wang, Guoxi; Wang, Fengqiu

    2013-01-01

    High-repetition-rate pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber communications, frequency comb, and optical sensing. Here, we have demonstrated high-repetition-rate ultrashort pulses in an all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) as a comb filter. The repetition rate of the laser can be tuned flexibly from about 7 to 1100 GHz by controlling the optical path difference between the two arms of the MZI. The pulse duration can be reduced continuously from about 10.1 to 0.55 ps with the spectral width tunable from about 0.35 to 5.7 nm by manipulating the intracavity polarization controller. Numerical simulations well confirm the experimental observations and show that filter-driven four-wave mixing effect, induced by the MZI, is the main mechanism that governs the formation of the high-repetition-rate pulses. This all-fiber-based laser is a simple and low-cost source for various applications where high-repetition-rate pulses are necessary. PMID:24226153

  13. Rate-equation approach to atomic-laser light statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chusseau, Laurent; Arnaud, Jacques; Philippe, Fabrice

    2002-11-01

    We consider three- and four-level atomic lasers that are either incoherently (unidirectionally) or coherently (bidirectionally) pumped, the single-mode cavity being resonant with the laser transition. The intracavity Fano factor and the photocurrent spectral density are evaluated on the basis of rate equations. According to that approach, fluctuations are caused by jumps in active and detecting atoms. The algebra is simple. Whenever a comparison is made, the expressions obtained coincide with the previous results. The conditions under which the output light exhibits sub-Poissonian statistics are considered in detail. Analytical results, based on linearization, are verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. An essentially exhaustive investigation of sub-Poissonian light generation by three- and four-level lasers has been performed. Only special forms were reported earlier.

  14. Nanosecond image processing using stimulated photon echoes.

    PubMed

    Xu, E Y; Kröll, S; Huestis, D L; Kachru, R; Kim, M K

    1990-05-15

    Processing of two-dimensional images on a nanosecond time scale is demonstrated using the stimulated photon echoes in a rare-earth-doped crystal (0.1 at. % Pr(3+):LaF(3)). Two spatially encoded laser pulses (pictures) resonant with the (3)P(0)-(3)H(4) transition of Pr(3+) were stored by focusing the image pulses sequentially into the Pr(3+):LaF(3) crystal. The stored information is retrieved and processed by a third read pulse, generating the echo that is the spatial convolution or correlation of the input images. Application of this scheme to high-speed pattern recognition is discussed. PMID:19768008

  15. Nanosecond fluorescence microscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Susan M.; Wensel, Theodore G.

    1990-05-01

    A microscope based time-correlated single photon counting instrument has been used to measure nanosecond fluorescence decays from single cells. The excitation source for the instrument is a frequency doubled train of picosecond pulses from the cavity dumped output of a synchronously pumped dye laser. The dye laser is pumped by a mode-locked argon ion laser. In the microscope, the sample is excited and the emission collected using epi-illumination optics before being transmitted through an adjustable diaphragm, which can be closed to 10 μm in diameter. A Hamamatsu R928 photomultiplier is used to collect the fluorescence which is then analyzed using a non-linear least squares procedure. The microscope has been used to measure the intensity decays of model probes to determine the instrument performance and sensitivity. In addition, intensity and anisotropy decays collected from fura-2 loaded into single adherent rat basophilic leukemia cells were measured to demonstrate that the nanosecond fluorescence microscope can be used to obtain information about the environment and mobility of fluorescent probes in single cells.

  16. Sub-nanosecond laser-induced structural changes in the phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 measured by an optical pump/x-ray probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fons, P.; Brewe, D.; Stern, E.; Kolobov, A.V.; Fukaya, T.; Suzuki, M.; Uruga, T.; Kawamura, N.; Takagaki, M.; Ohsawa, H.; Tanida, H.; Tominaga, J.

    2007-12-12

    Phase-change alloys are characterized by reversible switching between amorphous and crystalline phases either by laser irradiation or by an electric programming current; the resulting changes in material properties can be used for non-volatile data storage. Switching typically occurs on nanosecond or less time scales. Considering the conflicting requirements for high-speed switching, yet long term data storage integrity, a deeper understanding of the switching processes in these materials is essential for insightful application development. Although, high-speed optical pump/probe observations have been made of reflectivity changes during the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} switching process, due to the nanosecond order time scales involved little is known about the corresponding changes in structure. In addition as the amorphous phase does not diffract, its structural analysis is not amenable to analysis by high-speed diffraction techniques. We have used synchrotron-based time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), a technique equally suitable for amorphous and crystalline phases to elaborate details in structural changes in the phase-change process. We report on two experiments using high-speed pulsed lasers that serve as optical pumps to induced material changes followed by synchrotron produced x-ray burst that serve as a time resolved structural probe. The first experiment carried out at the Advanced Photon source focuses on changes due to heating in the amorphous phase. Our experimental results indicate that the maximum temperature reached during the re-amorphization process are less than the melting point indicated in the bulk phase diagram of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} reaching a maximum temperature of 620 C and in addition, do not share the same bond length distribution of a true melt. These findings strongly suggest the possibility of non-thermal melting. In the second experiment, we have obtained near-edge x-ray absorption data for a Ge

  17. Analysis of output surface damage resulting from single 351 nm, 3 ns pulses on sub-nanosecond laser conditioned KD2PO4 crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, J; Adams, J J; Hackel, R

    2007-10-31

    We observe that by conditioning DKDP using 500 ps laser pulses, the bulk damage threshold becomes essentially equivalent to the surface damage threshold. We report here the findings of our study of laser initiated output surface damage on 500 ps laser conditioned DKDP for test pulses at 351 nm, 3 ns. The relation between surface damage density and damaging fluence (r(f)) is presented for the first time and the morphologies of the surface sites are discussed. The results of this study suggest a surface conditioning effect resulting from exposure to 500 ps laser pulses.

  18. Laser stimulation of auditory neurons at high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Agnella D.; Littlefield, Philip; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.; Webb, Jim; Ralph, Heather; Bendett, Mark; Jansen, E. Duco; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2007-02-01

    Pulsed, mid-infrared lasers can evoke neural activity from motor as well as sensory neurons in vivo. Lasers allow more selective spatial resolution of stimulation than the conventional electrical stimulation. To date, few studies have examined pulsed, mid-infrared neural stimulation and very little of the available optical parameter space has been studied. We found that pulse durations as short as 20 ?s elicit a compound action potential from the gerbil cochlea. Moreover, stimulation thresholds are not a function of absolute energy or absolute power deposited. Compound action potential peak-to-peak amplitude remained constant over extended periods of stimulation. Stimulation occurred up six hours continuously and up to 50 Hz in repetition rate. Single fiber experiments were made using repetition rates of up to 1 kHz. Action potentials occurred 2.5-4 ms after the laser pulse. Maximum rates of discharge were up to 250 action potentials per second. With increasing stimulation rate (300 Hz), the action potentials did not respond strictly after the light pulse. The results from these experiments are important for designing the next generation of neuroprostheses, specifically cochlear implants.

  19. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Kodambaka, S.; Ghoniem, N.; Gupta, V.

    2013-02-28

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>10{sup 7} s{sup -1}), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars ({approx}1.20 {mu}m in tall and {approx}0.45 {mu}m in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars.

  20. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Ghoniem, N.; Kodambaka, S.; Gupta, V.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>107 s−1), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars (∼1.20 μm in tall and ∼0.45 μm in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars. PMID:23526837

  1. Direct Comparison of Full-Scale Vlasov-Fokker-Planck and Classical Modeling of Megagauss Magnetic Field Generation in Plasma Near Hohlraum Walls From Nanosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Archis; Thomas, Alexander; Read, Martin; Kingham, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Here, we present 2D numerical modeling of near critical density plasma using a fully implicit Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) code, IMPACTA, with the addition of a ray tracing package. In certain situations, such as those at the critical surface at the walls of a hohlraum, magnetic fields are generated through the crossed temperature and electron density gradients. Modeling shows 0.3 MG fields and the strong heating also results in magnetization of the plasma up to ωτ ~ 5 . In the case without magnetic field generation, the heat flows from the laser heating region are isotropic. Including magnetic fields causes the heat flow to form jets along the wall due to the Righi-Leduc effect. The heating of the wall region causes steeper temperature gradients. This serves as a positive feedback mechanism for the field generation rate resulting in nearly twice the amount of field generated in comparison to the case without magnetic fields over 1 ns. The heat conduction, field generation, and the calculation of other transport quantities, is performed ab-initio due to the nature of the VFP equation set. In order to determine the importance of the kinetic effects from IMPACTA, we perform direct comparison with a classical (Braginskii) transport code with hydrodynamic motion (CTC+). The authors would like to acknowledge DOE Grant #DESC0010621 and Advanced Research Computing, UM-AA.

  2. High-energy, diode-pumped, nanosecond Yb:YAG MOPA system.

    PubMed

    Siebold, M; Hein, J; Wandt, C; Klingebiel, S; Krausz, F; Karsch, S

    2008-03-17

    Diode-pumped nanosecond multi-pass laser amplification to the joule level using an Yb:YAG slab crystal has been demonstrated. A maximum output pulse energy of 2.9 J at an optical-to-optical efficiency of 10% has been achieved. The seed pulses with a pulse duration of 6.4 ns were generated in a Q-switched Yb:YAG laser and amplified up to a pulse energy of 200mJ in a multi-pass booster amplifier. A maximum average output power of 15W at a repetition rate of 10 Hz has been measured. We also present a relay imaging semi-stable cavity for multi-pass amplification and a diode-pumping scheme employing horizontally stacked high-power laser diodes. PMID:18542461

  3. High removal rate laser-based coating removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Celliers, P.M.; Hackel, L.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B.; Mrowka, S.

    1999-11-16

    A compact laser system is disclosed that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1,000 ft{sup 2}/hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

  4. Recycle Rate in a Pulsed, Optically Pumped Rubidium Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Wooddy S.; Sulham, Clifford V.; Holtgrave, Jeremy C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A pulsed, optically pumped rubidium laser operating in analogy to the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) system at pump intensities as high as 750 kW/cm{sup 2} has been demonstrated with output energies of up to 13 {mu}J/pulse. Output energy is dramatically limited by spin-orbit relaxation rates under these high intensity pump conditions. More than 250 photons are available for every rubidium atom in the pumped volume, requiring a high number of cycles per atom during the 2-8 ns duration of the pump pulse. At 550 Torr of ethane, the spin-orbit relaxation rate is too slow to effectively utilize all the incident pump photons. Indeed, a linear dependence of output energy on pump pulse duration for fixed pump energy is demonstrated.

  5. High rate PLD of diamond-like-carbon utilizing high repetition rate visible lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, W. II; Fehring, E.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1994-09-15

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) has been shown to be an effective method for producing a wide variety of thin films of high-value-added materials. The high average powers and high pulse repetition frequencies of lasers under development at LLNL make it possible to scale-up PLD processes that have been demonstrated in small systems in a number of university, government, and private laboratories to industrially meaningful, economically feasible technologies. A copper vapor laser system at LLNL has been utilized to demonstrate high rate PLD of high quality diamond-like-carbon (DLC) from graphite targets. The deposition rates for PLD obtained with a 100 W laser were {approx} 2000 {mu}m{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/h, or roughly 100 times larger than those reported by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods. Good adhesion of thin (up to 2 pm) films has been achieved on a small number of substrates that include SiO{sub 2} and single crystal Si. Present results indicate that the best quality DLC films can be produced at optimum rates at power levels and wavelengths compatible with fiber optic delivery systems. If this is also true of other desirable coating systems, this PLD technology could become an extremely attractive industrial tool for high value added coatings.

  6. Generation of 6.05J nanosecond pulses at a 1Hz repetition rate from a cryogenic cooled diode-pumped Yb:YAG MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaojin; Wang, Jianlei; Yang, Zhongguo; Liu, Jin; Li, Lei; Shi, Xiangchun; Huang, Wenfa; Wang, Jiangfeng; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    Diode-pumped solid state laser system based on cryogenic Yb:YAG active-mirror scheme are presented with recent energy output. With improved optical design, 6.05J/1Hz pulse energy is achieved and a conceptual design with 30J output energy is theoretical simulated. The doubling efficiency of YCa4O (BO3)(YCOB) crystal is also discussed in this paper.

  7. Effects of argon gas flow rate on laser-welding.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the rate of argon gas flow on joint strength in the laser-welding of cast metal plates and to measure the porosity. Two cast plates (Ti and Co-Cr alloy) of the same metal were abutted and welded together. The rates of argon gas flow were 0, 5 and 10 L/min for the Co-Cr alloy, and 5 and 10 L/min for the Ti. There was a significant difference in the ratio of porosity according to the rate of argon gas flow in the welded area. Argon shielding had no significant effect on the tensile strength of Co-Cr alloy. The 5 L/min specimens showed greater tensile strength than the 10 L/min specimens for Ti. Laser welding of the Co-Cr alloy was influenced very little by argon shielding. When the rate of argon gas flow was high, joint strength decreased for Ti. PMID:22447067

  8. Laser-enhanced dynamics in molecular rate processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. F.; Zimmerman, I. H.; Devries, P. L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Lam, K.-S.; Bellum, J. C.; Lee, H.-W.; Slutsky, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    The present discussion deals with some theoretical aspects associated with the description of molecular rate processes in the presence of intense laser radiation, where the radiation actually interacts with the molecular dynamics. Whereas for weak and even moderately intense radiation, the absorption and stimulated emission of photons by a molecular system can be described by perturbative methods, for intense radiation, perturbation theory is usually not adequate. Limiting the analysis to the gas phase, an attempt is made to describe nonperturbative approaches applicable to the description of such processes (in the presence of intense laser radiation) as electronic energy transfer in molecular (in particular atom-atom) collisions; collision-induced ionization and emission; and unimolecular dissociation.

  9. Closed cycle high-repetition-rate pulsed HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael R.; Morris, A. V.; Gorton, Eric K.

    1997-04-01

    The design and performance of a closed cycle high repetition rate HF laser is described. A short pulse, glow discharge is formed in a 10 SF6:1 H2 gas mixture at a total pressure of approximately 110 torr within a 15 by 0.5 by 0.5 cm3 volume. Transverse, recirculated gas flow adequate to enable repetitive operation up to 3 kHz is imposed by a centrifugal fan. The fan also forces the gas through a scrubber cell to eliminate ground state HF from the gas stream. An automated gas make-up system replenishes spent gas removed by the scrubber. Typical mean laser output powers up to 3 W can be maintained for extended periods of operation.

  10. Selective excavation of decalcified dentin using a mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser: wavelength dependency in the 6 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2011-07-01

    Selective caries treatment has been anticipated as an essential application of dentistry. In clinic, some lasers have already realized the optical drilling of dental hard tissue. However, conventional lasers lack the selectivity, and still depend on the dentist's ability. Based on the absorption property of carious dentin, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for excavation. The objective of this study is to develop a selective excavation of carious dentin by using the laser ablation with 6 μm wavelength range. A mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The wavelength was tuned around the absorption bands called amide 1 and amide 2. In the wavelength range from 5.75 to 6.60 μm, the difference of ablation depth between demineralized and normal dentin was observed. The wavelength at 6.02 μm and the average power density of 15 W/cm2, demineralized dentin was removed selectively with less-invasive effect on normal dentin. The wavelength at 6.42 μm required the increase of average power density, but also showed the possibility of selective ablation. This study provided a valuable insight into a wavelength choice for a novel dental laser device under development for minimal intervention dentistry.

  11. Dynamics of a gain-switched distributed feedback ridge waveguide laser in nanoseconds time scale under very high current injection conditions.

    PubMed

    Klehr, A; Wenzel, H; Brox, O; Schwertfeger, S; Staske, R; Erbert, G

    2013-02-11

    We present detailed experimental investigations of the temporal, spectral and spatial behavior of a gain-switched distributed feedback (DFB) laser emitting at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Gain-switching is achieved by injecting nearly rectangular shaped current pulses having a length of 50 ns and a very high amplitude up to 2.5 A. The repetition frequency is 200 kHz. The laser has a ridge waveguide (RW) for lateral waveguiding with a ridge width of 3 µm and a cavity length of 1.5 mm. Time resolved investigations show, depending on the amplitude of the current pulses, that the optical power exhibits different types of oscillatory behavior during the pulses, accompanied by changes in the lateral near field intensity profiles and optical spectra. Three different types of instabilities can be distinguished: mode beating with frequencies between 25 GHz and 30 GHz, switching between different lateral intensity profiles with a frequency of 0.4 GHz and self-sustained oscillations with a frequency of 4 GHz. The investigations are of great relevance for the utilization of gain-switched DFB-RW lasers as seed lasers for fiber laser systems and in other applications, which require a high optical power. PMID:23481734

  12. High-efficiency and compact semiconductor lasers with monolithically integrated switches for generation of high-power nanosecond pulses in time-of-flight (TOF) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipchenko, Sergey; Podoskin, Aleksandr; Soboleva, Olga; Zakharov, Maxim S.; Bakhvalov, Kirill; Romanovich, Dmitrii; Pikhtin, Nikita; Tarasov, Il`ya; Bagaev, Timur; Ladugin, Maxim; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr; Simakov, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    We present a new approach based on the integration of the functions of a high-efficiency current switch and a laser emitter into a single heterostructure as elements of time-of-flight (TOF) systems. The approach being developed employs the effect of an electrical bistability, which occurs in the general case in thyristor structures. We report recent results obtained in a study of the dynamic electrical and optical characteristics of the pulsed sources we developed. An effective generation of 2- to 100-ns laser pulses at a wavelength of 905 nm is demonstrated. The possibility of generating laser pulses shorter than 1 ns is considered. The maximum peak power reached values of 7 and 50 W for 10- and 100-ns pulses, respectively.

  13. Exact solution to laser rate equations: three-level laser as a Morse-like oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León-Montiel, R. de J.; Moya-Cessa, Héctor M.

    2016-08-01

    It is shown how the rate equations that model a three-level laser can be cast into a single second-order differential equation, whose form describes a time-dependent harmonic oscillator. Using this result, we demonstrate that the resulting equation can be identified as a Schrödinger equation for a Morse-like potential, thus allowing us to derive exact closed-form expressions for the dynamics of the number of photons inside the laser cavity, as well as the atomic population inversion.

  14. Nanosecond pulser thyratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, S.

    1982-08-01

    A modified version of the HY-3013L thyratron has demonstrated substantially greater voltage holdoff and reduced triggering requirements. New recovery measurements, with circuitry designed to eliminate false triggering of the pulsed voltage sources, have yielded de-ionization times well within the 50 microsec required for 20kHz operation, at voltages and pressures well beyond those needed to meet the load voltage rise time and pulse width requirements. An instant-start dispenser cathode suitable for use with HY-3013L-type thyratrons has been developed and tested successfully in similar tubes. An ultra low inductance PFN/load combination has been constructed, and has produced a smooth 3.5ns FWHM multi-kilovolt pulse across a nominal 50pf load capacitance when switched via a short air gap. The kapton capacitors and ceramic resistor load shunt are theoretically capable of operating at around 200 watts average power. Three saturable reactor materials have been evaluated theoretically: orthonol, metglas and ferrite. Of these, only ferrite appears usable on a 10ns time scale, metglas and orthonol being unsuitable because of their low resistivity. Finally, a 20kHz kit has been constructed for high prr testing of the assembled nanosecond pulser circuit.

  15. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Weng, Yuxiang; Wu, Xianyou; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-05-15

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm{sup −1} as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I′ region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser.

  16. Effect of Cumulative Nanosecond Laser Pulses on the Plasma Emission Intensity and Surface Morphology of Pt- and Ag-Ion Deposited Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurram, Siraj; Muhammad Zakria, Butt; Muhammad, Khaleeq-Urrahman; Muhammad Shahid, Rafique; Saima, Rafique; Fakhar-Un-Nisa

    2012-04-01

    In this work, the laser induced plasma plume characteristics and surface morphology of Pt- and Ag-ion deposited silicon were studied. The deposited silicon was exposed to cumulative laser pulses. The plasma plume images produced by each laser shot were captured through a computer controlled image capturing system and analyzed with image-J software. The integrated optical emission intensity of both samples showed an increasing trend with increasing pulses. Ag-ion deposited silicon showed higher optical emission intensity as compared to Pt-ion deposited silicon, suggesting that more damage occurred to the silicon by Ag ions, which was confirmed by SRIM/TRIM simulations. The surface morphologies of both samples were examined by optical microscope showing thermal, exfoliational and hydrodynamical sputtering processes along with the re-deposition of the material, debris and heat affected zones' formation. The crater of Pt-ion deposited silicon was deeper but had less lateral damage than Ag- ion deposited silicon. The novel results clearly indicated that the ion deposited silicon surface produced incubation centers, which led to more absorption of incident light resulting into a higher emission intensity from the plasma plume and deeper crater formation as compared to pure silicon. The approach can be effectively utilized in the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique, which endures poor limits of detection.

  17. Table-top instrumentation for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of solids excited by nanosecond pulse of soft X-ray source and/or UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brůža, Petr; Fidler, Vlastimil; Nikl, Martin

    2011-09-01

    The practical applicability of the rare-earth doped scintillators in high-speed detectors is limited by the slow decay components in the temporal response of a scintillator. The study of origin and properties of material defects that induce the slow decay components is of major importance for the development of new scintillation materials. We present a table-top, time-domain UV-VIS luminescence spectrometer, featuring extended time and input sensitivity ranges and two excitation sources. The combination of both soft X-ray/XUV and UV excitation source allows the comparative measurements of luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of scintillators to be performed under the same experimental conditions. The luminescence of emission centers of a doped scintillator can be induced by conventional N2 laser pulse, while the complete scintillation process can be initiated by a soft X-ray/XUV pulse excitation from the laser-produced plasma in gas puff target of 4 ns duration. In order to demonstrate the spectrometer, the UV-VIS luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of cerium doped Lu3Al5O12 single crystal (LuAG:Ce) scintillator excited by XUV and UV radiation were acquired. Luminescence of the doped Ce3+ ions was studied under 2.88 nm (430 eV) XUV excitation from the laser-produced nitrogen plasma, and compared with the luminescence under 337 nm (3.68 eV) UV excitation from nitrogen laser. In the former case the excitation energy is deposited in the LuAG host, while in the latter the 4f-5d2 transition of Ce3+ is directly excited. Furthermore, YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce single crystals luminescence decay profiles are compared and discussed.

  18. Mode locking of fiber lasers at high repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usechak, Nicholas G.

    Mode-locked fiber lasers have become indispensable tools in many fields as their use is no longer relegated to the optics community. In the future, their size will decrease and their applications will become far more prevalent than they are today. At present, the field is undergoing a cardinal shift as these devices have become commercially available in the last decade. This has put an emphasis on long-term performance and reliability as these devices are beginning to be integrated into complex systems in areas as diverse as medical optics, micro-machining, forensics, and tracking as well as their obvious use as laboratory tools or sources in telecommunications. This is also resulting in a transition from research to engineering. Since the field of mode-locked lasers has been extensively studied for over forty years, one may expect that little has been overlooked. However, since the mode-locking phenomena is governed by nonlinear partial differential equations, a rich degree of effects exist and the field has not yet been exhausted. During the past two decades, the main emphasis has been on short-pulse generation; however, the main thrust of research is likely to change to producing high-power devices, which will result in limiting effects and thermal issues that are currently ignored for low-power sources. Finally, detailed studies have generally been performed numerically as analytic solutions only exist in limiting cases. In this thesis, mode-locked fiber lasers are studied experimentally, numerically, and theoretically. The experimental work focuses on high-repetition rate, mode-locked cavities, which are then modeled numerically. A semi-analytic tool, which goes beyond the prior theories and includes all of the effects experienced by steady-state, mode-locked pulses as they propagate in a laser cavity, is also derived. The only caveats to this approach are an assumption of the pulse shape and the requirement that it not change during propagation through the

  19. Comparison of High Rate Laser Ablation and Resulting Structures Using Continuous and Pulsed Single Mode Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebel, T.; Streek, A.; Exner, H.

    This paper compares high rate laser ablation and resulting structures of aluminum by using both a continuous wave and a ns-pulsed single mode fiber laser of high average laser power. Two different scan technologies were applied for fast deflection of the laser beams. In this work, 2.5D laser processing was studied by using a high aperture galvanometer scanner with a maximum scan speed of 18 m/s. By contrast, considerably higher scan speeds up to 1,000 m/s were achieved by using the in-house developed polygon scanner system. The ablation rates and the processing rates per unit area were analyzed by means of the depths of line-scan ablation tracks and laser processed cavities. In addition, SEM photograph of the machining samples will be presented in order to evaluate the machining quality. Finally the feasibility of this high rate technology for industrial application is demonstrated by machining examples.

  20. Influence of nanosecond pulsed laser irradiance on the viability of nanoparticle-loaded cells: implications for safety of contrast-enhanced photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Carolyn L.; Kelvekar, Juili; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2013-11-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, a promising new diagnostic medical imaging modality, can provide high contrast images of molecular features by introducing highly-absorbing plasmonic nanoparticles. Currently, it is uncertain whether the absorption of low fluence pulsed light by plasmonic nanoparticles could lead to cellular damage. In our studies we have shown that low fluence pulsed laser excitation of accumulated nanoparticles at low concentration does not impact cell growth and viability, while we identify thresholds at which higher nanoparticle concentrations and fluences produce clear evidence of cell death. The results provide insights for improved design of photoacoustic contrast agents and for applications in combined imaging and therapy.

  1. Influence of nanosecond pulsed laser irradiance on the viability of nanoparticle-loaded cells: implications for safety of contrast-enhanced photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Carolyn L.; Kelvekar, Juili; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, a promising new diagnostic medical imaging modality, can provide high contrast images of molecular features by introducing highly-absorbing plasmonic nanoparticles. Currently, it is uncertain whether the absorption of low fluence pulsed light by plasmonic nanoparticles could lead to cellular damage. In our studies we have shown that a low fluence pulsed laser excitation of accumulated nanoparticles at low concentration does not impact cell growth and viability, while we identify thresholds at which higher nanoparticle concentrations and fluences produce clear evidence of cell death. The results provide insights for improved design of photoacoustic contrast agents and for applications in combined imaging and therapy. PMID:24150862

  2. Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelet, Yohann; Houard, Aurélien; Arantchouk, Leonid; Forestier, Benjamin; Liu, Yi; Prade, Bernard; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2012-04-01

    A Tesla coil generator was designed to produce high voltage pulses oscillating at 100 kHz synchronisable with a nanosecond temporal jitter. Using this compact high voltage generator, we demonstrate reproducible meter long discharges in air at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Triggering and guiding of the discharges are performed in air by femtosecond laser filaments.

  3. Pulse-to-pulse polarization-switching method for high-repetition-rate lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahne, Steffen; Johnston, Benjamin F.; Withford, Michael J.

    2007-02-01

    We report a method that enables dynamic switching of the pulse-to-pulse linear polarization orientation of a high-pulse-rate laser. The implications for laser micromachining, where polarization direction can be important, are also discussed.

  4. High Repetition Rate Table-Top Soft X-Ray Lasers in Capillary Discharges and Laser-Created Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, J.J.; Luther, B.M.; Heinbuch, S.; Larotonda, M.A.; Wang, Y.; Alessi, D.; Berrill, M.; Marconi, M.C.; Menoni, C.S.; Shlyaptsev, V.N.

    2006-01-05

    We discuss very recent advances in high repetition rate soft x-ray lasers resulting from the use of two different types of hot dense plasmas: fast capillary discharges and laser-created plasmas. We have demonstrated a new high repetition rate 46.9 nm capillary discharge laser that fits onto the surface area of a small desk and that operates at a relatively low voltage, therefore not requiring a Marx generator. Laser pulses with an energy of {approx} 13 {mu}J are generated at repetition rates up to 12 Hz. About (2-3)x104 laser shots can be generated with a single capillary. This new type of portable laser is an easily accessible source of intense short wavelength laser light for applications. We also discuss the demonstration of 5 Hz repetition rate table-top soft x-ray lasers producing microwatt average powers at wavelengths ranging from 13.2 to 33 nm. The results were obtained by collisional electron excitation of Ni-like and Ne-like ions in plasmas efficiently heated with a picosecond optical laser pulse impinging at grazing incidence onto a pre-created plasma. Efficient deposition of the pump beam into the gain region allows for the excitation of soft x-ray lasers in this wavelength range with a short pulse pump energy of only 1 J.

  5. Multiphoton imaging with a nanosecond supercontinuum source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P.; Blanquet, Véronique; Baraige, Fabienne; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a well-established technique for biological imaging of several kinds of targets. It is classically based on multiphoton processes allowing two means of contrast simultaneously: two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Today, the quasi exclusive laser technology used in that aim is femtosecond titanium sapphire (Ti: Sa) laser. We experimentally demonstrate that a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source (STM-250-VIS-IR-custom, Leukos, France; 1 ns, 600-2400 nm, 250 kHz, 1 W) allows to obtain the same kind of image quality in the case of both TPF and SHG, since it is properly filtered. The first set of images concerns the muscle of a mouse. It highlights the simultaneous detection of TPF and SHG. TPF is obtained thanks to the labelling of alpha-actinin with Alexa Fluor® 546 by immunochemistry. SHG is created from the non-centrosymmetric organization of myosin. As expected, discs of actin and myosin are superimposed alternatively. The resulting images are compared with those obtained from a standard femtosecond Ti: Sa source. The physical parameters of the supercontinuum are discussed. Finally, all the interest of using an ultra-broadband source is presented with images obtained in vivo on the brain of a mouse where tumor cells labeled with eGFP are grafted. Texas Red® conjugating Dextran is injected into the blood vessels network. Thus, two fluorophores having absorption wavelengths separated by 80 nm are imaged simultaneously with a single laser source.

  6. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C.; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, the system is demonstrated for the in vivo study of bone regeneration. Image-guided creation of a bone defect and longitudinal evaluation of cellular injury response in the defect provides insight into the bone regeneration process. PMID:25657872

  7. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Luke J; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, the system is demonstrated for the in vivo study of bone regeneration. Image-guided creation of a bone defect and longitudinal evaluation of cellular injury response in the defect provides insight into the bone regeneration process. PMID:25657872

  8. An all-fiber high-energy cladding-pumped 93 nanosecond Q-switched fiber laser using an Y 3+-doped fiber saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Sean W.; Patterson, Brian D.; Soh, Daniel B.; Bisson, Scott E.

    2014-03-01

    We report an all-fiber passively Q-switched laser using a large mode area (LMA) Yb3+ -doped fiber claddingpumped at 915 nm and an unpumped single-mode (SM) Yb3+-doped fiber as the saturable absorber (SA). The saturable absorber SM fiber and LMA gain fiber were coupled with a fiber taper designed to match the fundamental spatial mode of the LMA fiber and the expanded LP01 mode of the single mode fiber. The amplified spontaneous (ASE) intensity propagating in the single mode SA saturates the absorption before the onset of gain depletion in the pumped fiber, switching the fiber cavity to a high Q-state and producing a pulse. Using this scheme we demonstrate a Q-switched all-fiber oscillator with 32 μJ 93 ns pulses at 1030 nm. The associated peak power is nearly two orders of magnitude larger than that reported in previous experimental studies using a single Yb+3 saturable absorber fiber. The pulse energy was amplified to 0.230 mJ using an Yb3+-doped cladding pumped fiber amplifier fusion spliced to the fiber oscillator, increasing the energy by eight fold while preserving the all-fiber architecture.

  9. An All-Solid-State High Repetiton Rate Titanium:Sapphire Laser System For Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattolat, C.; Rothe, S.; Schwellnus, F.; Gottwald, T.; Raeder, S.; Wendt, K.

    2009-03-01

    On-line production facilities for radioactive isotopes nowadays heavily rely on resonance ionization laser ion sources due to their demonstrated unsurpassed efficiency and elemental selectivity. Powerful high repetition rate tunable pulsed dye or Ti:sapphire lasers can be used for this purpose. To counteract limitations of short pulse pump lasers, as needed for dye laser pumping, i.e. copper vapor lasers, which include high maintenance and nevertheless often only imperfect reliability, an all-solid-state Nd:YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system has been constructed. This could complement or even replace dye laser systems, eliminating their disadvantages but on the other hand introduce shortcomings on the side of the available wavelength range. Pros and cons of these developments will be discussed.

  10. Optimal repetition rates of excitation pulses in a Tm-vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskii, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The optimal excitation pulse repetition rates (PRRs) for a gas-discharge Tm-vapour laser with indirect population of upper laser levels are determined. It is shown that, under the same excitation conditions, the optimal PRRs increase with a decrease in the energy defect between the upper laser acceptor level and the nearest resonant donor level. The reasons for the limitation of the optimal PRRs in Tm-vapour laser are discussed. It is shown that the maximum average power of Tm-vapour laser radiation may exceed several times the Cu-vapour laser power under the same excitation conditions and in identical gas-discharge tubes.

  11. High-repetition-rate high-power variable-bandwidth dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lavi, S.; Amit, M.; Bialolanker, G.; Miron, E.; Levin, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    An efficient high-repetition-rate dye laser is described which has a bandwidth that can be tailored to match typical atomic inhomogeneous linewidths. The dye laser is pumped by a 4-kHz 2--6 mJ/pulse copper vapor laser. The total efficiency of the dye laser (oscillator and amplifier) is 45% for rhodamine 6G and 30% for rhodamine B.

  12. Wear rate control of peek surfaces modified by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouti, S.; Pascale-Hamri, A.; Faure, N.; Beaugiraud, B.; Guibert, M.; Mauclair, C.; Benayoun, S.; Valette, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser texturing on the tribological properties of PEEK surfaces under a ball-on-flat contact configuration. Thus, surfaces with circular dimples of various diameters and depth were created. Tests were conducted with a normal load of 5 N and a sliding velocity of 0.01 m s-1, using bovine calf serum at 37.5 °C as a lubricant. The tribological conditions including the sliding frequency and the lubricant viscosity indicate that tests were performed under boundary lubrication regime. Results showed that discs with higher dimple depth exhibited higher friction coefficient and caused more abrasive wear on the ball specimen. Nevertheless, tribosystems (ball and disc) with dimpled disc surfaces showed a higher wear resistance. In the frame of our experiments, wear rates obtained for tribosystems including dimpled surfaces were 10 times lower than tribosystems including limited patterned or untextured surfaces. Applications such as design of spinal implants may be concerned by such a surface treatment to increase wear resistance of components.

  13. Non-contact Laser-based Human Respiration Rate Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; Marchionni, P.; Ercoli, I.

    2011-08-01

    At present the majority of the instrumentation, used in clinical environments, to measure human respiration rate are based on invasive and contact devices. The gold standard instrument is considered the spirometer which is largely used; it needs a direct contact and requires a collaboration by the patient. Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDVi) is an optical, non-contact measurement system for the assessment of a surface velocity and displacement. LDVi has already been used for the measurement of the cardiac activity and for the measurement of the chest-wall displacements. The aims of this work are to select the best measurement point on the thoracic surface for LDVi monitoring of the respiration rate (RR) and to compare measured data with the RR valued provided by the spirometer. The measurement system is composed by a LDV system and a data acquisition board installed on a PC. Tests were made on 10 different point of the thorax for each patient. Patients population was composed by 33 subjects (17 male and 16 female). The optimal measurement point was chosen considering the maximum peak-to-peak value of the displacement measured by LDV. Before extracting RR we have used a special wavelet decomposition for better selection of the expiration peaks. A standard spirometer was used for the validation of the data. From tests it results that the optimal measurement point, namely is located on the inferior part of the thoracic region (left, front side). From our tests we have obtained a close correlation between the RR values measured by the spirometer and those measured by the proposed method: a difference of 14±211 ms on the RR value is reported for the entire population of 33 subjects. Our method allows a no-contact measurement of lungs activity (respiration period), reducing the electric and biological risks. Moreover it allows to measure in critical environment like in RMN or in burned skin where is difficult or impossible to apply electrodes.

  14. On mechanism of explosive boiling in nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, Serap

    2016-06-01

    Today laser-based machining is used to manufacture vital parts for biomedical, aviation and aerospace industries. The aim of the paper is to report theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations of explosive boiling under nanosecond pulsed ytterbium fiber laser irradiation. Experiments were performed in an effective peak power density range between 1397 and 1450 MW/cm2 on pure titanium specimens. The threshold laser fluence for phase explosion, the pressure and temperature at the target surface and the velocity of the expulsed material were reported. A narrow transition zone was realized between the normal vaporization and phase explosion fields. The proof of heterogeneous boiling was given with detailed micrographs. A novel thermal model was proposed for laser-induced splashing at high fluences. Packaging factor and scattering arc radius terms were proposed to state the level of the melt ejection process. Results of the present investigation explain the explosive boiling during high-power laser interaction with metal.

  15. The effects of He on ablation and inductively coupled plasma environment in ultra-violet, nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Lance M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of helium gas on ablation and ICP processes were investigated. Differences in the size, shape, and abundance of aerosol particles generated in argon and helium atmosphere were studied off-line using SEM imaging of aerosol particles impacted on polycarbonate filter disks. In general, ablation in helium generated fewer large particles, and larger, more densely-packed soft agglomerates. However, corresponding changes in the ion densities in the ICP, observed in high-resolution images obtained using LIF, were not always predictable. In all cases, higher He/Ar ratios led to lower ion densities in the ICP. This effect was attributed to increased rates of off-axis diffusion at higher He/Ar ratios. Differences in the ion densities produced during ablation in argon vs helium were highly dependent on sample type, the axial position of vaporization, and the He/Ar ratio. There was evidence that vaporization efficiencies of soft agglomerates were less affected than micron-sized particles by particle acceleration at higher He/Ar ratios.

  16. Laser shock compression of copper and copper-aluminum alloys: The slip to twinning transition in high-strain-rate deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Matthew Scott

    Laser shock experiments are a relatively new approach to achieving extreme strain rates and pressures at time durations of nanoseconds. Copper and copper-aluminum alloys (2 and 6 weight percent) were subjected to laser pulses with durations of nanoseconds and energies between 70 J to 300 J. These conditions resulted in strain rates from 107--109 s -1 and pressures between 10--60 GPa. A quantitative, predictive understanding of plastic deformation (slip and twinning) and failure (void nucleation and growth) under these extreme regimes was developed through experiments, characterization and analysis. The mechanistic understanding this provided successfully incorporates effects of pressure, crystal orientation and stacking fault energy. There were four thrusts to this research: (1) Two orientations, [001] and [1¯34] were examined under various experimental conditions providing quantitative insight into the deformation behavior as a function of orientation, stacking-fault energy, and distance from impacted surface. Advanced characterization techniques were used to examine the lattice behavior and defects that form as a result of shock compression. The experimentally observed slip-twinning transition was quantified experimentally. (2) The formation of defects during the movement of the shock front through these specimens was analytically studied. Loop formation is explained in terms of thermal activation in shock loading. The dynamic yield strength at the shock front was determined by using data obtained by dynamic x-ray diffraction. Dislocation densities were calculated as a function of shock pressure and compared to experimentally obtained values. (3) The slip-twinning transition pressure was calculated using a modified Mechanical Threshold Stress (NITS) constitutive description and the Swegle-Grady equation relating pressure to strain rate. These analytical results were compared to the experimental results. Orientation, stacking fault energy, grain size, and

  17. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  18. High-repetition-rate, recirculating hydrogen fluoride/deuterium fluoride laser

    SciTech Connect

    Rudko, R.I.; Drozdowicz, Z.; Linhares, S.; Bua, D.

    1982-04-01

    A compact, gas-efficient, pulsed chemical laser operated with HF, DF, or HF and DF simultaneously, is described. This laser produced over 1 mJ/pulse up to over 4000 pps repetition rates with maximum average power over 4.5 W. Maximum repetition rate was 10 000 pulse/s.

  19. A High Power and High Repetition Rate Modelocked Ti-Sapphire Laser for Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker

    2001-07-01

    A high power cw mode-locked Ti-sapphire laser has been constructed to drive the Jefferson Lab polarized photoinjector and provide > 500 mW average power with 50 ps pulsewidths at 499 MHz or 1497 MHz pulse repetition rates. This laser allows efficient, high current synchronous photoinjection for extended periods of time before intrusive steps must be taken to restore the quantum efficiency of the strained layer GaAs photocathode. The use of this laser has greatly enhanced the maximum high polarization beam current capability and operating lifetime of the Jefferson Lab photoinjector compared with previous performance using diode laser systems. A novel modelocking technique provides a simple means to phase-lock the optical pulse train of the laser to the accelerator and allows for operation at higher pulse repetition rates to {approx} 3 GHz without modification of the laser cavity. The laser design and characteristics are described below.

  20. Nanosecond electric pulses trigger actin responses in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berghoefer, Thomas; Eing, Christian; Flickinger, Bianca; Hohenberger, Petra; Wegner, Lars H.; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2009-09-25

    We have analyzed the cellular effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields on plant cells using fluorescently tagged marker lines in the tobacco cell line BY-2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. We observe a disintegration of the cytoskeleton in the cell cortex, followed by contraction of actin filaments towards the nucleus, and disintegration of the nuclear envelope. These responses are accompanied by irreversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane manifest as uptake of Trypan Blue. By pretreatment with the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin, the detachment of transvacuolar actin from the cell periphery can be suppressed, and this treatment can also suppress the irreversible perforation of the plasma membrane. We discuss these findings in terms of a model, where nanosecond pulsed electric fields trigger actin responses that are key events in the plant-specific form of programmed cell death.

  1. Cavity-Dumped Communication Laser Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Cavity-dumped lasers have significant advantages over more conventional Q-switched lasers for high-rate operation with pulse position modulation communications, including the ability to emit laser pulses at 1- to 10-megahertz rates, with pulse widths of 0.5 to 5 nanoseconds. A major advantage of cavity dumping is the potential to vary the cavity output percentage from pulse to pulse, maintaining the remainder of the energy in reserve for the next pulse. This article presents the results of a simplified cavity-dumped laser model, establishing the requirements for cavity efficiency and projecting the ultimate laser efficiency attainable in normal operation. In addition, a method of reducing or eliminating laser dead time is suggested that could significantly enhance communication capacity. The design of a laboratory demonstration laser is presented with estimates of required cavity efficiency and demonstration potential.

  2. Nanosecond pulse pumped, narrow linewidth all-fiber Raman amplifier with stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rongtao; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Lü, Haibin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    We report on a narrow linewidth nanosecond all-fiber Raman amplifier core pumped by a pulsed laser at approximately 1030 nm. The Raman amplifier was based on a standard single-mode fiber with a length of ∼1 km, and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) was suppressed by employing pulses with a short pulse width. 1083 nm pulses with an average power of 32.6 mW, a repetition rate of 2 MHz, and pulse widths of ∼7.2 ns were achieved. A maximum slope efficiency of 46.1% and a gain of 31 dB were obtained. The output Raman power can be scaled further by using fiber with shorter lengths and pump pulses with a higher power.

  3. Comment on "Nanosecond laser textured superhydrophobic metallic surfaces and their chemical sensing applications" by Duong V. Ta, Andrew Dunn, Thomas J. Wasley, Robert W. Kay, Jonathan Stringer, Patrick J. Smith, Colm Connaughton, Jonathan D. Shephard (Appl. Surf. Sci. 357 (2015) 248-254)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boinovich, L. B.; Emelyanenko, A. M.; Emelyanenko, K. A.; Domantovsky, A. G.; Shiryaev, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays the problem of design of durable ecologically friendly superhydrophobic surfaces is of great importance for science and technology. A recent paper in Applied Surface Science reports the method of fabricating the superhydrophobic metallic surfaces by infrared nanosecond laser surface texturing without using hydrophobic agents. Since this method of surface texturing can be considered as one of the most suitable for various industrial applications, the nature of superhydrophobic state of surfaces produced by laser texturing in the abovementioned paper deserves to be analyzed in detail. Authors of the commented paper attributed the change in wettability to the partial deoxidation of CuO into Cu2O on the surface during storage in atmosphere. However, such interpretation of the results contradicts to the basic notions in the theory of wetting and to more accurate and detailed data. In our Comment we discuss these contradictions point by point.

  4. Modeling and optimization of single-pass laser amplifiers for high-repetition-rate laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira; Udem, Thomas; Zeitner, Uwe D.; Haensch, Theodor W.; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2010-09-15

    We propose a model for a continuously pumped single-pass amplifier for continuous and pulsed laser beams. The model takes into account Gaussian shape and focusing geometry of pump and seed beam. As the full-wave simulation is complex we have developed a largely simplified numerical method that can be applied to rotationally symmetric geometries. With the tapered-shell model we treat (focused) propagation and amplification of an initially Gaussian beam in a gain crystal. The implementation can be done with a few lines of code that are given in this paper. With this code, a numerical parameter optimization is straightforward and example results are shown. We compare the results of our simple model with those of a full-wave simulation and show that they agree well. A comparison of model and experimental data also shows good agreement. We investigate in detail different regimes of amplification, namely the unsaturated, the fully saturated, and the intermediate regime. Because the amplification process is affected by spatially varying saturation and exhibits a nonlinear response against pump and seed power, no analytical expression for the expected output is available. For modeling of the amplification we employ a four-level system and show that if the fluorescence lifetime of the gain medium is larger than the inverse repetition rate of the seed beam, continuous-wave amplification can be employed to describe the amplification process of ultrashort pulse trains. We limit ourselves to this regime, which implies that if titanium:sapphire is chosen as gain medium the laser repetition rate has to be larger than a few megahertz. We show detailed simulation results for titanium:sapphire for a large parameter set.

  5. High energy lasers as a stability rating device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.; Liou, Larry

    1994-01-01

    A very cursory test program was performed to evaluate the feasibility of using a 100W CO2 laser to initiate resonant oscillations in a test combustor. GOX/RP-1 were selected as propellants due to the absorption characteristics of RP-1 and due to test facility capabilities. Very low amplitude oscillations were initiated during laser pulsing that correspond to the first longitudinal mode of the test engine.

  6. Burst-mode-operated, sub-nanosecond fiber MOPA system incorporating direct seed-packet shaping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Liu, Hao; Kong, Wei; Shu, Rong

    2016-09-01

    We report a novel burst-mode-operated sub-nanosecond fiber Master Oscillator, Power Amplifier (MOPA) system incorporating direct seed-packet shaping without external modulators. A fast digital-to-analog converter with 1 Gsps sampling rate and 16 bit resolution was developed to control the pulse amplitudes and sequences of a distributed feedback semiconductor seed laser to realize packet-shaped burst mode operation. Optical pulses with durations as short as 700 ps and peak power as high as 1 W can be generated from the seed by applying proper reverse voltages after positive electrical pulses to the laser driver to cancel the residual charges at its gate electrode. The average power of the laser can be amplified to nearly 40 W with FWHM spectral linewidth of ~0.12 nm after three stages of polarization maintaining fiber amplifiers. Different packet shapes including ramp-off, Gaussian, square and double rectangle can be produced from the fiber MOPA by finely pre-shaping the seed pulse bursts. It is believed that such a laser has provided a cost-effective solution to the generation of pulse bursts with arbitrary packet shapes for different practical applications including material micromachining and nonlinear frequency conversion. PMID:27607699

  7. Thermal oxidation rates of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As in H(2)O vapor and oxide-defined vertical cavity surface emitting laser characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Mari

    The incorporation of oxides into semiconductor structures formed by the thermal oxidation of Alsb{x}Gasb{1-x}As in water vapor has resulted in a marked improvement in device performance. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL's), in particular, have benefited from this technology, demonstrating record operating characteristics. This study focuses on the following areas with respect to oxide defined VCSEL's: the establishment of rate laws for the lateral oxidation of AlAs, the fabrication of VCSEL's, and the characterization of VCSEL's designed for high speed operation. An oxidation rate study was conducted on structures with AlAs oxidation layers. At low temperatures and short oxidation times, oxidation was found to be reaction rate limited. Conversely, diffusion across the oxide was determined to be the rate limiting mechanism at high temperature or long oxidation times. The observed rates can be modeled by rate equations by which the two component mechanisms can be separated. An activation energy of 1.6 eV and 0.8 eV was determined for the reaction and diffusion limited mechanism, respectively. A reduction in oxidation rates was observed with decreasing oxidation layer thickness and increasing doping concentration. The thickness dependence can be incorporated into the rate equations by assuming an oxidation reaction rate which is inhibited by the presence of strain in thin layers. The reaction rate can be characterized by a threshold thickness for which a value of 20 nm was determined for Alsb{x}Gasb{1-x}As. Oxide defined GaAs VCSEL's varying in size and oxidation layer composition were fabricated. Threshold currents of 450 muA and external differential quantum efficiencies of 0.5 were obtained. Finally, the large signal modulation characteristics of oxide defined VCSEL's were investigated. A threshold carrier lifetime of 1.6 nanoseconds VCSEL's was determined from laser turn-on delay measurements. The laser turn-on delay was also measured under various

  8. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser. PMID:19404369

  9. Optimized LWIR enhancement of nanosecond and femtosecond LIBS uranium emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpovo, Codjo A.; Ford, Alan; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-05-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) transverse electrical breakdown in atmosphere (TEA), pulsed laser was used to enhance the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectral signatures of uranium under nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) ablation. The peak areas of both ionic and neutral species increased by one order of magnitude for ns-ablation and two orders of magnitude for fs-ablation over LIBS when the CO2 TEA laser was used with samples of dried solutions of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO2(NO3)2·6H2O) on silicon wafers. Electron temperature and density measurements show that the spectral emission improvement from using the TEA laser comes from plasma reheating.

  10. The effects of laser repetition rate on femtosecond laser ablation of dry bone: a thermal and LIBS study.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ruby K; Smith, Zachary J; Lee, Changwon; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the effect of varying laser repetition rate on thermal energy accumulation and dissipation as well as femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (fsLIBS) signals, which may help create the framework for clinical translation of femtosecond lasers for surgical procedures. We study the effect of repetition rates on ablation widths, sample temperature, and LIBS signal of bone. SEM images were acquired to quantify the morphology of the ablated volume and fsLIBS was performed to characterize changes in signal intensity and background. We also report for the first time experimentally measured temperature distributions of bone irradiated with femtosecond lasers at repetition rates below and above carbonization conditions. While high repetition rates would allow for faster cutting, heat accumulation exceeds heat dissipation and results in carbonization of the sample. At repetition rates where carbonization occurs, the sample temperature increases to a level that is well above the threshold for irreversible cellular damage. These results highlight the importance of the need for careful selection of the repetition rate for a femtosecond laser surgery procedure to minimize the extent of thermal damage to surrounding tissues and prevent misclassification of tissue by fsLIBS analysis. PMID:26260774

  11. Single Longitudinal Mode, High Repetition Rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF Laser for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petzar, Paul; Petros, M.; Chen, Songsheng; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Nyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    Ho:YLF/LuLiF lasers have specific applications for remote sensing such as wind-speed measurement and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement in the atmosphere because the operating wavelength (around 2 m) is located in the eye-safe range and can be tuned to the characteristic lines of CO2 absorption and there is strong backward scattering signal from aerosol (Mie scattering). Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ [1]. For highly precise CO2 measurements with coherent detection technique, a laser with high repetition rate is required to averaging out the speckle effect [2]. In addition, laser efficiency is critically important for the air/space borne lidar applications, because of the limited power supply. A diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser is difficult to efficiently operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. However, a Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can be operated at high repetition rates efficiently [3]. No matter whether wind-speed or carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement is the goal, a Ho:YLF/LuLiF laser as the transmitter should operate in a single longitudinal mode. Injection seeding is a valid technique for a Q-switched laser to obtain single longitudinal mode operation. In this paper, we will report the new results for a single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. In order to avoid spectral hole burning and make injection seeding easier, a four mirror ring cavity is designed for single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. The ramp-fire technique is chosen for injection seeding.

  12. Demonstration of a desk-top size high repetition rate soft x-ray laser.

    PubMed

    Heinbuch, S; Grisham, M; Martz, D; Rocca, J J

    2005-05-30

    We have demonstrated a new type of high repetition rate 46.9 nm capillary discharge laser that fits on top of a small desk and that it does not require a Marx generator for its excitation. The relatively low voltage required for its operation allows a reduction of nearly one order of magnitude in the size of the pulsed power unit relative to previous capillary discharge lasers. Laser pulses with an energy of ~ 13 microJ are generated at repetition rates up to 12 Hz. About (2-3) x 10 4 laser shots can be generated with a single capillary. This new type of portable laser is an easily accessible source of intense short wavelength laser light for applications. PMID:19495315

  13. Continuous high-repetition-rate operation of collisional soft-x-ray lasers with solid targets.

    PubMed

    Weith, A; Larotonda, M A; Wang, Y; Luther, B M; Alessi, D; Marconi, M C; Rocca, J J; Dunn, J

    2006-07-01

    We have generated a laser average output power of 2 microW at a wavelength of 13.9 nm by operating a tabletop laser-pumped Ni-like Ag laser at a 5 Hz repetition rate, using a solid helicoidal target that is continuously rotated and advanced to renew the target surface between shots. More than 2 x 10(4) soft-x-ray laser shots were obtained by using a single target. Similar results were obtained at 13.2 nm in Ni-like Cd with a Cd-coated target. This scheme will allow uninterrupted operation of laser-pumped tabletop collisional soft-x-ray lasers at a repetition rate of 10 Hz for a period of hours, enabling the generation of continuous high average soft-x-ray powers for applications. PMID:16770410

  14. Theory of absorption rate of carriers in fused silica under intense laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hongxiang; Xiang, Xia; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Wu, SY; Jiang, XD; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Sun, Kai

    2010-11-15

    A quantum non-perturbation theory for phonon-assisted photon absorption of conduction band electron in intense laser was developed. By carrying out the calculation in fused silica at wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared in terawatt intensity laser, we show that the Non-perturbation approach can make a uniform description of energy absorption rate at both short wavelengths and long wavelengths on TW / cm2 intensity laser.

  15. Effects of low-intensity laser therapy over mini-implants success rate in pigs.

    PubMed

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S; Suzuki, Selly Sayuri; Martinez, Elisabeth Ferreira; Iemini, Mylene Garcez; Suzuki, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    The success rate of miniscrews when used as temporary orthodontic anchorage is relatively high, but some factors could affect its clinical success such as inflammation around the miniscrew. Low-intensity laser therapy has been widely used for biostimulation of tissue and wound healing specially for its anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-intensity laser therapy over the miniscrew success rate. Five Landrace's pigs received 50 miniscrews on the buccal side of the mandible and on the palate of the maxilla. All the miniscrews were immediately loaded with 250 gf. The laser group were irradiated with a 780-nm diode laser with 70 mWs for 1 min (dose = 34 J/cm(2)); the contralateral side was used as the control group. The miniscrews were photographed and analyzed clinically every week to determine their stability and presence of local inflammation. After 3 weeks, histological analysis and fluorescent microscopy were performed to compare the laser and the control side. Clinical results showed a success rate of 60% for the control group and 80% for the laser-treated group. The histological analysis and fluorescent microscopy demonstrated that the laser group had less inflammatory cells than the control group and the bone neoformation around the miniscrew was more intense. Low-intensity laser therapy increased the success rate of orthodontic miniscrews, probably due to anti-inflammatory effect and bone stimulation. PMID:23929562

  16. Evaluation of a laser scanning sensor for variable-rate tree sprayer development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate canopy measurement capabilities are prerequisites to automate variable-rate sprayers. A 270° radial range laser scanning sensor was tested for its scanning accuracy to detect tree canopy profiles. Signals from the laser sensor and a ground speed sensor were processed with an embedded comput...

  17. Multi-gigahertz repetition rate ultrafast waveguide lasers mode-locked with graphene saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obraztsov, P. A.; Okhrimchuk, A. G.; Rybin, M. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Garnov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of an approach to build compact waveguide lasers that operate in the stable fundamental mode-locking regime with multigigahertz repetition rates. The approach is based on the use of depressed cladding multi- or single-mode waveguides fabricated directly in the active laser crystal using the femtosecond laser inscription method and a graphene saturable absorber. Using this approach we achieve the stable self-starting mode-locking operation of a diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser that delivers picosecond pulses at a repetition rate of up to 11.5 GHz with an average power of 12 mW at a central wavelength of 1064 nm. The saturable absorbers are formed through the chemical vapor deposition of single-layer graphene on the output coupler mirror or directly on the end facet of the laser crystal. The stable self-starting mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with an intracavity interferometer. The method developed for the creation of compact ultrashort pulse laser generators with gigahertz repetition rates can be extended further and applied for the development of compact high-repetition rate lasers that operate at a wide range of IR wavelengths.

  18. Noise-like pulses generated at high harmonics in a partially-mode-locked km-long Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucon, A.; Barviau, B.; Fatome, J.; Finot, C.; Sylvestre, T.; Lee, M. W.; Grelu, P.; Millot, G.

    2012-02-01

    We present a 5-km-long Raman fiber laser that delivers pulses at high harmonics of the fundamental cavity repetition rate, up to 1 GHz. The observed nanosecond pulses that propagate in an anomalous dispersion regime possess a complex noise-like structure with a coherence time of around 1 picosecond.

  19. High-pulse-repetition-rate UV lasers with the inductance-capacitance discharge stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Andramanov, A V; Kabaev, S A; Lazhintsev, B V; Nor-Arevyan, V A; Pisetskaya, A V; Selemir, Victor D

    2009-02-28

    Compact high-pulse-repetition-rate XeF and KrF excimer lasers and an N{sub 2} laser with plate electrodes and the inductive-capacitance discharge stabilisation are studied. The composition and pressure of the active medium of lasers are optimised for obtaining the maximum output energy and maximum pulse repetition rate at comparatively low (no more than 19 m s{sup -1}) active-medium flow rates in the interelectrode gap. The pulse repetition rate achieved 4-5 kHz for the relative root-mean-square deviation of the laser pulse energy less than 2%. It is found that the energy of the N{sub 2}-laser pulses changes periodically under the action of acoustic perturbations appearing at high pulse repetition rates. It is shown that the use of the inductance-capacitance stabilisation of the discharge provides the increase in the maximum pulse repetition rate by 0.5-1.5 kHz (depending on the active medium type). It is found that the stability of the output energy and maximum pulse repetition rate depend on the location of preionisation sparks with respect to the gas flow direction. Some ways for the development of the technology of plate electrodes and inductance-capacitance discharge stabilisation are proposed. (lasers)

  20. Rate equations analysis of phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays under steady state conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Kapon, E.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1984-01-01

    Rate equations analysis of phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays has been carried out. It was found that for given (laser) current densities, the photon density distribution in the array elements is that particular one which maximizes the total photon density. The results of this analysis were then combined with the waveguide properties of the laser array waveguide, yielding a basic model of phase-locked diode laser arrays. This model explains the effects of the variation of the current combination through the array elements on its mode structure that were observed recently.

  1. Investigation of defect rate of lap laser welding of stainless steel railway vehicles car body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxiao

    2015-02-01

    In order to resolve the disadvantages such as poor appearance quality, poor tightness, low efficiency of resistance spot welding of stainless steel rail vehicles, partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated widely. But due to the limitation of processing technology, there will be local incomplete fusion in the lap laser welding seam. Defect rate is the ratio of the local incomplete fusion length to the weld seam length. The tensile shear strength under different defect rate and its effect on the car body static strength are not clear. It is necessary to find the biggest defect rate by numerical analysis of effects of different defect rates on the laser welding stainless steel rail vehicle body structure strength ,and tests of laser welding shear tensile strength.

  2. Fast Laser Excitation and Ultrahigh Strain-Rate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Averback

    2007-06-03

    Phase evolution induced by single or repeated excitation with energetic femtosecond laser pulses is examined. Of primary interest is the solidification behavior of pure metals at deep undercoolings and self-organization in simple eutectic alloys. Time resolved measurements using third harmonic generation (THG) of light and ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) are employed to elucidate several issues related to fast laser excitation, including heat transport by ballistic and diffusional electrons through multilayer films, the dependence of crystallization velocities on materials properties, mechanisms controlling the transport of heat away from the crystal-liquid interface, and the possibility for quenching pure metals, such as Cu, Ni, and Fe, into the amorphous state. Special samples designed to maximize the quenching speed are developed. The properties of such pure metallic glasses, such as glass and crystallization temperatures, will be measured, if such samples are successfully produced. The measurements are complemented by molecular dynamics computer simulations of the solidification process. The second interest of this research is mesoscopic, self-organization of materials under repeated laser melting, with diffusional relaxation between pulses. We select binary alloys that are immiscible in the solid state but miscible in the liquid state, such as Ag-Cu. Femtosecond laser irradiation is employed to induce melting and to vary the melting time over a wide range, from a few ps to hundreds of ps. This enables us to perform critical experimental tests of key theoretical predictions self-organization in alloys under external forcing, in particular the existence of a threshold value of the forced mixing length for patterning to take place.

  3. Tunable 975 nm nanosecond diode-laser-based master-oscillator power-amplifier system with 16.3 W peak power and narrow spectral linewidth below 10 pm.

    PubMed

    Vu, Thi Nghiem; Klehr, Andreas; Sumpf, Bernd; Wenzel, Hans; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2014-09-01

    A spectrally tunable, narrow linewidth master oscillator power amplifier system emitting ns pulses with high peak power is presented. The master oscillator is a distributed feedback ridge waveguide (DFB-RW) laser, which is operated in continuous wave (CW) mode and emits at about 975 nm with a spectral line width below 10 pm. The oscillator can be tuned over a range of 0.9 nm by varying the injection current. The tapered amplifier (TA) consists of an RW section and a flared gain-guided section. The RW section of the amplifier acts as an optical gate and converts the CW input beam emitted by the DFB-RW laser into a train of short optical pulses, which are subsequently amplified by the tapered section. The width of the pulses is 8 ns at a repetition rate of 25 kHz. The peak power is 16.3 W. The TA preserves the spectral properties of the emission of the DBR-RW laser. The amplified spontaneous emission is suppressed by about 40 dB. PMID:25166093

  4. Long-pulse high-repetition-rate transversely excited CO2 laser for material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Yuji; Yasuoka, Koichi; Ishii, Akira; Tamagawa, Tohru

    1994-05-01

    Using a TE-CO2 laser, we could obtain a long-pulsed laser beam of low initial spike by controlling the discharge current by a pulse forming network and optimizing the gas composition, discharge length to resonator length ratio, and output mirror reflectivity. The maximum laser output was 1.1 J; the initial spike energy, 100 kW; the tail output, 56 kW; and the 16 (mu) sec (FWHM). The maximum repetition rate was 500 Hz. A new type of circuit with small pre-ionization current made it possible to operate the laser at a high repetition rate so as to prolong the laser life. When a 5-inch lens was used, the laser power density at the focal point was 1*108 W/cm2, making it possible to use the laser with an unusually high energy density without causing the breakdown of air insulation. In fact, we succeeded in fine- cutting a 0.5 mm thick alumina ceramic with the laser. It was found that unlike other working methods, the newly developed laser does not cause cracks in ceramic work pieces.

  5. 115 kHz tuning repetition rate ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser

    PubMed Central

    Oh, W. Y.; Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser using a polygon-based wavelength scanning filter. With a polygon rotational speed of 900 revolutions per second, a continuous wavelength tuning rate of 9200 nm/ms and a tuning repetition rate of 115 kHz were achieved. The wavelength tuning range of the laser was 80 nm centered at 1325 nm, and the average polarized output power was 23 mW. PMID:16350273

  6. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  7. High power high repetition rate VCSEL array side-pumped pulsed blue laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Robert; Zhao, Pu; Chen, Tong; Xu, Bing; Watkins, Laurence; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2013-03-01

    High power, kW-class, 808 nm pump modules based on the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) technology were developed for side-pumping of solid-state lasers. Two 1.2 kW VCSEL pump modules were implemented in a dual side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 946 nm. The laser output was frequency doubled in a BBO crystal to produce pulsed blue light. With 125 μs pump pulses at a 300 Hz repetition rate 6.1 W QCW 946 nm laser power was produced. The laser power was limited by thermal lensing in the Nd:YAG rod.

  8. High-power high-repetition-rate copper-vapor-pumped dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.; Dasgupta, K.; Kumar, S.; Manohar, K.G.; Nair, L.G.; Chatterjee, U.K. . Laser and Plasma Technology Div.)

    1994-06-01

    The design and development of an efficient high average power dye laser oscillator-amplifier system developed at the Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, is reported. The dye laser is pumped by a 6.5-kHz repetition rate copper vapor laser. The signal beam to the dye amplifier is obtained from an efficient narrow-band grazing incidence grating (GIG) dye laser oscillator incorporating a multiple prism beam expander. Amplifier extraction efficiency up to 40% was obtained in a single amplifier stage, using rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in ethanol. The authors have also demonstrated simultaneous amplification of two laser beams at different wavelengths in the same dye amplifier cell.

  9. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  10. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research. PMID:27250457

  11. New high repetition rate, high energy 308 nm excimer laser for material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Ludolf; Klaft, Ingo; Schmidt, Kai; Bragin, Igor; Albrecht, Hans-Stephan

    2007-02-01

    High power excimer lasers are well established as work horses for various kinds of micro material processing. The applications are ranging from drilling holes, trench formation, thin film ablation to the crystallization of amorphous-Si into polycrystalline-Si. All applications use the high photon energy and large pulse power of the excimer technology. The increasing demand for micro scale products has let to the demand for UV lasers which support high throughput production. We report the performance parameters of a newly developed XeCl excimer laser with doubled repetition rate compared to available lasers. The developed laser system delivers up to 900 mJ stabilized pulse energy at 600 Hz repetition rate. The low jitter UV light source operates with excellent energy stability. The outstanding energy stability was reached by using a proprietary solid-state pulser discharge design.

  12. High-repetition-rate tunable dye lasers pumped by copper vapor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zherikin, A.N.; Letokhov, V.S.; Mishin, V.I.; Belyaev, V.P.; Evtyunin, A.N.; Lesnoi, M.A.

    1981-06-01

    A study was made of stimulated emission and amplification of light in lasers with active media consisting of alcohol solutions of rhodamines 110, 6G, and B, and of oxazine 17. The pulse repetition frequency was 10 kHz and pumping was provided by a mass-produced copper vapor laser of the ILGI-101 type. The dye lasers emitted in the range 530--720 nm. The efficiency of the oxazine 17 laser was 20% and the efficiency of the rhodamine 6G amplifier was 30% when the width of the laser emission spectrum was 0.8 cm/sup -1/. A Fabry--Perot interferometer was used to reduce the width of the spectrum to 0.04 cm/sup -1/, but this reduced the efficiency to 7%. The maximum output power was 0.6 W. The radiation was transformed to the second harmonic in the 265--360 nm range with an efficiency of 5%.

  13. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: High-repetition-rate tunable dye lasers pumped by copper vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherikin, A. N.; Letokhov, V. S.; Mishin, V. I.; Belyaev, V. P.; Evtyunin, A. N.; Lesnoĭ, M. A.

    1981-06-01

    A study was made of stimulated emission and amplification of light in lasers with active media consisting of alcohol solutions of rhodamines 110, 6G, and B, and of oxazine 17. The pulse repetition frequency was 10 kHz and pumping was provided by a mass-produced copper vapor laser of the ILGI-101 type. The dye lasers emitted in the range 530-720 nm. The efficiency of the oxazine 17 laser was 20% and the efficiency of the rhodamine 6G amplifier was 30% when the width of the laser emission spectrum was 0.8 cm-1. A Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to reduce the width of the spectrum to 0.04 cm-1, but this reduced the efficiency to 7%. The maximum output power was 0.6 W. The radiation was transformed to the second harmonic in the 265-360 nm range with an efficiency of 5%.

  14. High repetition rate sealed CO2 TEA lasers using heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. T.; Shaw, S. R.

    1987-01-01

    The significant operational advantages offered by CO2 lasers, operating in the 10.6 micron region of the spectrum, over current solid state lasers, emitting in the near IR region, have prompted increased interest in the development of compact, reliable, rugged CO2 laser sources. Perhaps the most critical aspect associated with achieving a laser compatible with military use is the development of lasers which require no gas replenishment. Sealed, single shot, CO2 TEA lasers have been available for a number of years. Stark et al were first to demonstrate reliable sealed operation in single shot CO2 TEA lasers in 1975 using gas catalysis. GEC Avionics reported the compact, environmentally qualified, MKIII CO2 TEA laser with a pulse life of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses in 1980. A sealed laser lifetime of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses is acceptable for single shot cases, such as direct detection rangefinders for tank laser sights. However, in many other applications, such as tracking of fast moving targets, it is essential that a repetition rate of typically 30Hz to 100Hz is employed. In such cases, a pulse lifetime of 10 to the 6th power pulses is no longer sufficient and a minimum pulse lifetime 10 to the 7th power pulses is essential to ensure a useful service life. In 1983 Stark el al described a sealed, 100Hz CO2 TEA laser, with a life of greater than 2.6 x 10 to the 6th power, which employed heterogeneous catalysis. Following this pioneering work, GEC Avionics has been engaged in the development of sealed high repetition rate lasers with a pulse lifetime of 20 million pulses.

  15. Nitric Oxide Studies in Low Temperature Plasmas Generated with a Nanosecond Pulse Sphere Gap Electrical Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, David Dean

    This dissertation presents studies of NO kinetics in a plasma afterglow using various nanosecond pulse discharges across a sphere gap. The discharge platform is developed to produce a diffuse plasma volume large enough to allow for laser diagnostics in a plasma that is rich in vibrationally-excited molecules. This plasma is characterized by current and voltage traces as well as ICCD and NO PLIF images that are used to monitor the plasma dimensions and uniformity. Temperature and vibrational loading measurements are performed via coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). Absolute NO concentrations are obtained by laser-induce fluorescence (LIF) measurements, and N and O densities are found using two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). For all dry air conditions studied, the NO behavior is characterized by a rapid rate of formation consistent with an enhanced Zeldovich process involving electronically-excited nitrogen species that are generated within the plasma. After several microseconds, the NO evolution is entirely controlled by the reverse Zeldovich process. These results show that under the chosen range of conditions and even in extreme instances of vibrational loading, there is no formation channel beyond ~2 musec. Both the NO formation and consumption mechanisms are strongly affected by the addition of fuel species, producing much greater NO concentrations in the afterglow.

  16. High-average-power 100-Hz repetition rate table-top soft x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Jorge J.; Reagan, Brendan A.; Wernsing, Keith; Wang, Yong; Yin, Liang; Wang, Shoujun; Berrill, Mark; Woolston, Mark R.; Curtis, Alden H.; Furch, Federico J. A.; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Luther, Brad M.; Patel, Dinesh; Marconi, Mario C.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2013-09-01

    The table-top generation of high average power coherent soft x-ray radiation in a compact set up is of high interest for numerous applications. We have demonstrated the generation of bright soft x-ray laser pulses at 100 Hz repetition rate with record-high average power from compact plasma amplifiers excited by an ultrafast diode-pumped solid state laser. Results of compact λ=18.9nm Ni-like Mo and λ=13.9nm Ni-like Ag lasers operating at 100 Hz repetition rate are discussed.

  17. A pulsed, high repetition rate 2-micron laser transmitter for coherent CO2 DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Bai, Y.; Petzar, P.; Petros, M.; Chen, S.; Trieu, B.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Singh, U. N.

    2009-12-01

    A Holmium solid-state 2-µm pulsed laser, end-pumped by a Thulium fiber laser, is being developed for coherent CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). It combines the advantages of high efficient fiber laser technology with the mature high energy solid state laser technology to produce desired energy levels at a high repetition rate. To obtain high beam quality that is required by coherent detection technique, the effect of “spatial hole burning” in the laser gain medium must be prevented. This is achieved by the use of ring cavity configuration in which the laser light is forced to travel in one direction, so that no standing waves are formed. The pump beam and laser beam are mode-matched in the laser crystals to improve the laser efficiency. At the pumping power of 13.25W, optical-to-optical efficiency of 52% was obtained with the pulse repetition rate of 1.25 kHz, which gives the energy per pulse of ~5.5mJ. The pulse energy can be scaled by increasing the pump power or by reducing the pulse repetition rate. The pulse length of this laser is at ~50ns. The wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are tunable over several characteristic absorption lines of CO2. The exact wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are controlled by well-controlled continuous wave (CW) seed lasers to provide the required sequential, on-and-off line wavelength pulses for DIAL applications. Three CW lasers were used to provide the accurate on-and-off wavelengths. The first CW laser is locked to the center of a characteristic CO2 absorption line through a CO2 cell by the frequency modulation technique. The frequency of the second CW laser was shifted related to the first CW laser by a few GHz to the wing of the CO2 absorption line, and used as the on-line frequency of the CO2 DIAL. This frequency shift is necessary to obtain a better weighting function for the CO2 measurement. The standard deviation of the CW on-line frequency can be controlled within 250 KHz. The third CW laser provides the off

  18. Expectation to feel more pain disrupts the habituation of laser-pain rating and laser-evoked potential amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, Costanza; Testani, Elisa; Giordano, Rocco; Padua, Luca; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2016-10-01

    Increased pain perception due to the expectation to feel more pain is called nocebo effect. The present study aimed at investigating whether: (1) the mere expectation to feel more pain after the administration of an inert drug can affect the laser-pain rating and the laser-evoked potential (LEP) amplitude, and (2) the learning potentiates the nocebo effect. Eighteen healthy volunteers were told that an inert cream, applied on the right hand, would increase the laser pain and LEP amplitude to right hand stimulation. They were randomly assigned to either "verbal session" or "conditioning session". In the "verbal session", LEPs to both right and left hand stimulation were recorded at the same intensity before (baseline) and after cream application. In the "conditioning session", after an initial cream application the laser stimulus intensity was increased surreptitiously to make the subjects believe that the treatment really increased the pain sensation. Then, the cream was reapplied, and LEPs were recorded at the same stimulus intensity as at the baseline. It was found that the verbal suggestion to feel more pain disrupted the physiological habituation of the laser-pain rating and LEP amplitude to treated (right) hand stimulation. Unlike previously demonstrated for the placebo effect, the learning did not potentiate the nocebo effect. PMID:27461877

  19. Pulsed laser micromachining of Mg-Cu-Gd bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsuan-Kai; Lee, Ching-Jen; Hu, Ting-Ting; Li, Chun-Han; Huang, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    Micromachining of Mg-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is performed using two kinds of pulsed nanosecond lasers: a 355 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser and a 1064 nm infrared (IR) laser. Precision machining on the micrometer scale and the preservation of amorphous or short-range order characteristics are important for the application of BMGs in micro-electro-mechanical systems. A higher micromachining rate is achieved using the UV laser than using the IR laser due to a better absorption rate of the former by Mg-based BMGs and a higher photon energy. The cutting depth of Mg-based BMGs ranges from 1 to 80 μm depending on the laser parameters. By appropriate adjustment of the laser power and scan speed, successful machining of the Mg-based BMG with preservation of the amorphous phase is achieved after the laser irradiation process. Short-pulse laser cutting represents a suitable alternative for machining of micro components.

  20. The determination of energy transfer rates in the Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG laser material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koker, Edmond B.

    1988-01-01

    Energy transfer processes occurring between atomic, ionic, or molecular systems are very widespread in nature. The applications of such processes range form radiation physics and chemistry to biology. In the field of laser physics, energy transfer processes have been used to extend the lasing range, increase the output efficiency, and influence the spectral and temporal characteristics of the output pulses of energy transfer dye lasers or solid-state laser materials. Thus in the development of solid state lasers, it is important to investigate the basic energy transfer (ET) mechanisms and processes in order to gain detailed knowledge so that successful technical utilization can be achieved. The aim of the present research is to measure the ET rate from a given manifold associated with the chromium sensitizer atom to a given manifold in the holmium activator atom via the thulium transfer atom, in the Ho:Cr:YAG laser material.