Science.gov

Sample records for rate pulse operation

  1. Long pulse and high repetition rate operation of a relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.S.; Harteneck, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    The authors are developing an L-band (1.3 GHz) high current relativistic klystron amplifier for both long pulse ({ge} 500 ns) and high repetition rate ({ge} 200 pps) capabilities. In repetitive operation, it has produced 3.3 kW of average power in 80 ns FWHM pulses of 250 MW peak power at 200 pps. They are currently transferring this same klystron to a single-shot, long-pulse driver to demonstrate its operation with a {ge} 500 ns electrical pulse.

  2. Investigation of component failure rates for pulsed versus steady state tokamak operation

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents component failure rate data sources applicable to magnetic fusion systems, and defines multiplicative factors to adjust these data for specific use on magnetic fusion experiment designs. The multipliers address both long pulse and steady state tokamak operation. Thermal fatigue and radiation damage are among the leading reasons for large multiplier values in pulsed operation applications. Field failure rate values for graphite protective tiles are presented, and beryllium tile failure rates in laboratory testing are also given. All of these data can be used for reliability studies, safety analyses, design tradeoff studies, and risk assessments.

  3. Characteristics of a velvet cathode under high repetition rate pulse operation

    SciTech Connect

    Xun Tao; Zhang Jiande; Yang Hanwu; Zhang Zicheng; Fan Yuwei

    2009-10-15

    As commonly used material for cold cathodes, velvet works well in single shot and low repetition rate (rep-rate) high-power microwave (HPM) sources. In order to determine the feasibility of velvet cathodes under high rep-rate operation, a series of experiments are carried out on a high-power diode, driven by a {approx}300 kV, {approx}6 ns, {approx}100 {omega}, and 1-300 Hz rep-rate pulser, Torch 02. Characteristics of vacuum compatibility and cathode lifetime under different pulse rep-rate are focused on in this paper. Results of time-resolved pressure history, diode performance, shot-to-shot reproducibility, and velvet microstructure changes are presented. As the rep-rate increases, the equilibrium pressure grows hyperlinearly and the velvet lifetime decreases sharply. At 300 Hz, the pressure in the given diode exceeded 1 Pa, and the utility shots decreased to 2000 pulses for nonstop mode. While, until the velvet begins to degrade, the pulse-to-pulse instability of diode voltage and current is quite small, even under high rep-rate conditions. Possible reasons for the operation limits are discussed, and methods to improve the performance of a rep-rate velvet cathode are also suggested. These results may be of interest to the repetitive HPM systems with cold cathodes.

  4. Operation of the pulse-burst laser system for high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering on MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. S.; den Hartog, D. J.; Hurst, N. C.

    2011-10-01

    A custom pulse-burst laser system has been developed for high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering measurements on MST. The laser system is a master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) design with five flashlamp-pumped amplifier stages. A diode-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YVO4 master oscillator (1064 nm) operates at pulse repetition rates between 5-250 kHz. The first four amplifier stages are Nd:YAG; the final amplifier is Nd:glass (silicate). Amplifier flashlamp drive is extremely flexible, ranging from short (250 μs) high-power pump pulses to long (10 ms) lower-power pulses. The entire laser system is computer controlled. Single pulse energies of the laser system are up to 5.5 J. Operation of the system with a short, high-power flashlamp discharge delivers a burst of up to 25 Q-switched laser pulses at 250 kHz repetition rate. For long flashlamp discharges, the laser system can deliver a burst of up to 50 pulses at a 5 kHz repetition rate. This work is supported by the U. S. DOE and NSF.

  5. PULSE RATE DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, H.C. Jr.

    1962-12-18

    A compact pulse-rate divider circuit affording low impedance output and high input pulse repetition rates is described. The circuit features a single secondary emission tube having a capacitor interposed between its dynode and its control grid. An output pulse is produced at the anode of the tube each time an incoming pulse at the control grid drives the tube above cutoff and the duration of each output pulse corresponds to the charging time of the capacitor. Pulses incoming during the time the grid bias established by the discharging capacitor is sufficiently negative that the pulses are unable to drive the tube above cutoff do not produce output pulses at the anode; these pulses are lost and a dividing action is thus produced by the circuit. The time constant of the discharge path may be vanied to vary in turn the division ratio of the circuit; the time constant of the charging circuit may be varied to vary the width of the output pulses. (AEC)

  6. Compact Pulsed X-Ray Generator Operated At High Repetitive Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Sato, Eiichi; Kimura, Shingo; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1990-01-01

    A repetitive pulsed x-ray generator achieved with a compact diode utilizing a new type of cathode for biomedical radiography is described. This generator consisted of the following components: a high-voltage power supply, two ceramic condensers of about 850pF, a repetitive impulse switching system, a turbo molecular pump, and an x-ray tube. Since the high-voltage pulser employed a modified Marx circuit, this pulser produced twice the potential of the condenser charging voltage. The x-ray tube was of the demountable-diode type which was connected to the turbo molecular pump and consisted of the following components: a rod-shaped anode tip made of tungsten, a plane cathode made of aluminum and carbon, and a vacuum vessel made of glass with a diameter of 50mm. Two condensers were charged from 30 to 100kV, and the output of this pulser ranged from 50 to 180kV. The x-ray pulse widths primarily increased according to increases in the anode-cathode (A-C space) and their values ranged from 20 to 100ns. The repetitive rate was determined by the condenser capacity, the charging voltage, and the current capacity of the power supply, and its maximum value was about 100Hz. The time integrated x-ray intensities were less than 4.0pC/kg at 0.5m per pulse when the discharge capacity of about 430pF (Marx Circuit) was employed. The effective focal spot size was determined by the diameter of anode tip and its value ranged from 0.5 to 3.0mm in diameter.

  7. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More All About Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Apr 19,2016 ... Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure 4 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 5 How to Eat ...

  8. 3.7 GHz repetition rate operated narrow-bandwidth picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with an all-fiber multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, K. H.; Wen, R. H.; Guo, Y.

    2016-04-01

    A high power picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with a pulse repetition rate of 3.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated. The seed is a gain switched distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) structured laser diode (LD) with a pulse duration of 130 ps and a repetition rate of 460 MHz. The pulse repetition rate is increased to 3.7 GHz by introducing an all-fiber multiplier, which is composed of four 2  ×  2 structured fiber couplers. The multiplied pulse train is amplified to 81 W through two stage Yb fiber amplifiers.

  9. Nova pulse power design and operational experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, K.; Larson, D.; Merritt, B.; Christie, D.

    1987-01-01

    Nova is a 100 TW Nd++ solid state laser designed for experiments with laser fusion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The pulsed power for Nova includes a 58 MJ capacitor bank driving 5336 flashlamps with millisecond pulses and subnanosecond high voltages for electro optics. This paper summarizes the pulsed power designs and the operational experience to date.

  10. Heart-rate pulse-shift detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M.

    1974-01-01

    Detector circuit accurately separates and counts phase-shift pulses over wide range of basic pulse-rate frequency, and also provides reasonable representation of full repetitive EKG waveform. Single telemeter implanted in small animal monitors not only body temperature but also animal movement and heart rate.

  11. Diode-pumped short pulse passively Q-switched 912 nm Nd:GdVO4/Cr:YAG laser at high repetition rate operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Yu, X.; Wang, C.; Yan, R. P.; Li, X. D.; Gao, J.; Zhang, Z. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-06-01

    A diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched 912 nm Nd:GdVO4/Cr:YAG laser is demonstrated for the first time. In a concave-piano cavity, pulsed 912 nm laser performance is investigated using two kinds of Cr:YAG crystal with different unsaturated transmission ( T U) of 95% and 90% at 912 nm as the saturable absorbers. When the T U = 90% Cr:YAG is used, as much as 2.6 W average output power for short pulsed 912 nm laser is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 34.0 W, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 7.6% and a slope efficiency of 20.3%. Moreover, 10.5 ns duration pulses and up to 2.3 kW peak power is obtained at the repetition rate around 81.6 kHz.

  12. Pulsed Operation of an Ion Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard; Gamero-Castano, Manuel; Goebel, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Electronic circuitry has been devised to enable operation of an ion accelerator in either a continuous mode or a highpeak power, low-average-power pulsed mode. In the original intended application, the ion accelerator would be used as a spacecraft thruster and the pulse mode would serve to generate small increments of impulse for precise control of trajectories and attitude. The present electronic drive circuitry generates the extraction voltage in pulses. Pulse-width modulation can affect rapid, fine control of time-averaged impulse or ion flux down to a minimum level much lower than that achievable in continuous operation.

  13. Stably operating pulse combustor and method

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, Ben T.; Reiner, David

    1990-01-01

    A pulse combustor apparatus adapted to burn either a liquid fuel or a pulverized solid fuel within a preselected volume of the combustion chamber. The combustion process is substantially restricted to an optimum combustion zone in order to attain effective pulse combustion operation.

  14. Stably operating pulse combustor and method

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, B.T.; Reiner, D.

    1990-05-29

    A pulse combustor apparatus is described which is adapted to burn either a liquid fuel or a pulverized solid fuel within a preselected volume of the combustion chamber. The combustion process is substantially restricted to an optimum combustion zone in order to attain effective pulse combustion operation. 4 figs.

  15. High rate pulse processing algorithms for microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Michael; Hoover, Andrew S; Bacrania, Mnesh K; Tan, Hui; Breus, Dimitry; Henning, Wolfgang; Sabourov, Konstantin; Collins, Jeff; Warburton, William K; Dorise, Bertrand; Ullom, Joel N

    2009-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that microcalorimeter spectrometers based on superconducting transition-edge-sensor can readily achieve sub-100 eV energy resolution near 100 keV. However, the active volume of a single microcalorimeter has to be small to maintain good energy resolution, and pulse decay times are normally in the order of milliseconds due to slow thermal relaxation. Consequently, spectrometers are typically built with an array of microcalorimeters to increase detection efficiency and count rate. Large arrays, however, require as much pulse processing as possible to be performed at the front end of the readout electronics to avoid transferring large amounts of waveform data to a host computer for processing. In this paper, they present digital filtering algorithms for processing microcalorimeter pulses in real time at high count rates. The goal for these algorithms, which are being implemented in the readout electronics that they are also currently developing, is to achieve sufficiently good energy resolution for most applications while being (a) simple enough to be implemented in the readout electronics and (b) capable of processing overlapping pulses and thus achieving much higher output count rates than the rates that existing algorithms are currently achieving. Details of these algorithms are presented, and their performance was compared to that of the 'optimal filter' that is the dominant pulse processing algorithm in the cryogenic-detector community.

  16. Coupling effects of the number of pulses, pulse repetition rate and fluence during laser PMMA ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Feng, Y.; Yi, X.-S.

    2000-10-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was ablated using a 248-nm long-pulsed KrF excimer laser operating at a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 2 and 10 Hz, and fluence varying from 0.4 to 2 J/cm 2. The coupling effects of multiple shots, PRR, and fluence are found and discussed on the etching depth data and topography of PMMA. An increase in either PRR, or fluence or the number of pulses can accelerate the etching efficiency in terms of ablation rate, as a result of strengthened thermal effects. Quality of the craters such as roughness, porosity and contamination is sensitively dependent on the specific laser operating conditions. Basically, increasing the PRR and the number of pulses gives rise to a crater with smoother and less porous bottom.

  17. High Rate Pulse Processing Algorithms for Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hui; Breus, Dimitry; Hennig, Wolfgang; Sabourov, Konstantin; Collins, Jeffrey W.; Warburton, William K.; Bertrand Doriese, W.; Ullom, Joel N.; Bacrania, Minesh K.; Hoover, Andrew S.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2009-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that microcalorimeter spectrometers based on superconducting transition-edge-sensors can readily achieve sub-100 eV energy resolution near 100 keV. However, the active volume of a single microcalorimeter has to be small in order to maintain good energy resolution, and pulse decay times are normally on the order of milliseconds due to slow thermal relaxation. Therefore, spectrometers are typically built with an array of microcalorimeters to increase detection efficiency and count rate. For large arrays, however, as much pulse processing as possible must be performed at the front end of readout electronics to avoid transferring large amounts of waveform data to a host computer for post-processing. In this paper, we present digital filtering algorithms for processing microcalorimeter pulses in real time at high count rates. The goal for these algorithms, which are being implemented in readout electronics that we are also currently developing, is to achieve sufficiently good energy resolution for most applications while being: a) simple enough to be implemented in the readout electronics; and, b) capable of processing overlapping pulses, and thus achieving much higher output count rates than those achieved by existing algorithms. Details of our algorithms are presented, and their performance is compared to that of the "optimal filter" that is currently the predominantly used pulse processing algorithm in the cryogenic-detector community.

  18. Recycle Rate in a Pulsed, Optically Pumped Rubidium Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Wooddy S.; Sulham, Clifford V.; Holtgrave, Jeremy C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A pulsed, optically pumped rubidium laser operating in analogy to the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) system at pump intensities as high as 750 kW/cm{sup 2} has been demonstrated with output energies of up to 13 {mu}J/pulse. Output energy is dramatically limited by spin-orbit relaxation rates under these high intensity pump conditions. More than 250 photons are available for every rubidium atom in the pumped volume, requiring a high number of cycles per atom during the 2-8 ns duration of the pump pulse. At 550 Torr of ethane, the spin-orbit relaxation rate is too slow to effectively utilize all the incident pump photons. Indeed, a linear dependence of output energy on pump pulse duration for fixed pump energy is demonstrated.

  19. An Experiment on Repetitive Pulse Operation of Microwave Rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Shibata, Teppei; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2008-04-28

    Microwave Rocket was operated with repetitive pulses. The microwave rocket model with forced breathing system was used. The pressure history in the thruster was measured and the thrust impulse was deduced. As a result, the impulse decreased at second pulse and impulses at latter pulses were constant. The dependence of the thrust performance on the partial filling rate of the thruster was compared to the thrust generation model based on the shock wave driven by microwave plasma. The experimental results showed good agreement to the predicted dependency.

  20. High-repetition-rate short-pulse gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Tulip, J; Seguin, H; Mace, P N

    1979-09-01

    A high-average-power short-pulse gas discharge is described. This consists of a volume-preionized transverse discharge of the type used in gas lasers driven by a Blumlein energy storage circuit. The Blumlein circuit is fabricated from coaxial cable, is pulse-charged from a high-repetition-rate Marx-bank generator, and is switched by a high-repetition-rate segmented rail gap. The operation of this discharge under conditions typical of rare-gas halide lasers is described. A maximum of 900 pps was obtained, giving a power flow into the discharge of 30 kW. PMID:18699678

  1. Pulse transducer with artifact signal attenuator. [heart rate sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W. H., Jr.; Polhemus, J. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An artifact signal attenuator for a pulse rate sensor is described. The circuit for attenuating background noise signals is connected with a pulse rate transducer which has a light source and a detector for light reflected from blood vessels of a living body. The heart signal provided consists of a modulated dc signal voltage indicative of pulse rate. The artifact signal resulting from light reflected from the skin of the body comprises both a constant dc signal voltage and a modulated dc signal voltage. The amplitude of the artifact signal is greater and the frequency less than that of the heart signal. The signal attenuator circuit includes an operational amplifier for canceling the artifact signal from the output signal of the transducer and has the capability of meeting packaging requirements for wrist-watch-size packages.

  2. Comparative investigation of three dose rate meters for their viability in pulsed radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L; Pawelke, J

    2015-06-01

    Pulsed radiation fields, characterized by microsecond pulse duration and correspondingly high pulse dose rates, are increasingly used in therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Yet, dose rate meters which are used to monitor radiation protection areas or to inspect radiation shielding are mostly designed, characterized and tested for continuous fields and show severe deficiencies in highly pulsed fields. Despite general awareness of the problem, knowledge of the specific limitations of individual instruments is very limited, complicating reliable measurements. We present here the results of testing three commercial dose rate meters, the RamION ionization chamber, the LB 1236-H proportional counter and the 6150AD-b scintillation counter, for their response in pulsed radiation fields of varied pulse dose and duration. Of these three the RamION proved reliable, operating in a pulsed radiation field within its specifications, while the other two instruments were only able to measure very limited pulse doses and pulse dose rates reliably. PMID:25978117

  3. Pulse-to-pulse polarization-switching method for high-repetition-rate lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahne, Steffen; Johnston, Benjamin F.; Withford, Michael J.

    2007-02-01

    We report a method that enables dynamic switching of the pulse-to-pulse linear polarization orientation of a high-pulse-rate laser. The implications for laser micromachining, where polarization direction can be important, are also discussed.

  4. Modeling of Multi-Tube Pulse Detonation Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper explores some preliminary issues concerning the operational characteristics of multiple-tube pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The study is based on a two-dimensional analysis of the first-pulse operation of two detonation tubes exhausting through a common nozzle. Computations are first performed to assess isolated tube behavior followed by results for multi-tube flow phenomena. The computations are based on an eight-species, finite-rate transient flow-field model. The results serve as an important precursor to understanding appropriate propellant fill procedures and shock wave propagation in multi-tube, multi-dimensional simulations. Differences in behavior between single and multi-tube PDE models are discussed, The influence of multi-tube geometry and the preferred times for injecting the fresh propellant mixture during multi-tube PDE operation are studied.

  5. Photoswitches operating upon ns pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiou, A.; Lakiotaki, K.; Kalyva, M.; Georgiou, S.; Fotakis, C.

    2005-07-01

    We present a potential photoswitch, which undergoes reversible mechanical actuation induced exclusively by photons. The photoswitch is a polymer-based film doped with spiropyran photochromic molecules. It undergoes repeatable mechanical cycles controlled by ns laser pulses of specific wavelengths. The polymer matrix is mechanically activated due to particular photoisomerization processes of the incorporated photochromic molecules, resulting in its contraction and lengthening in a highly controllable manner. We present herein the way that the switching time of this novel photoswitch depends on different laser parameters such as the energy and the repetition rate.

  6. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruma, Hosseini, S. H. R.; Yoshihara, K.; Akiyama, M.; Sakugawa, T.; Lukeš, P.; Akiyama, H.

    2014-09-01

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H2O2 and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  7. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R. Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  8. Flexible operability and amplification of gray pulses.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Shumin; Han, Mengmeng; Zhang, Huaxing; Wen, Fang; Yang, Zhenjun

    2014-07-15

    We have investigated experimentally the flexible production and amplification of gray pulses for the first time to our knowledge. Switchable wavelengths, tunable pulse-widths, and adjustable contrasts have all been obtained in a fiber laser. Amplification of gray pulses was also experimentally investigated in detail. The contrast of the pulses could also be increased in an amplifier. The robust stability that results from the interactions between adjacent harmonic mode locking counterparts of gray pulses was found to last for up to ten hours. To the best of our knowledge, the gray pulses trains we have generated are the most stable achieved to date in an all-fiber laser system. This finding can be used as a guide for the establishment of robust gray pulses as laser sources. PMID:25121665

  9. Closed cycle high-repetition-rate pulsed HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael R.; Morris, A. V.; Gorton, Eric K.

    1997-04-01

    The design and performance of a closed cycle high repetition rate HF laser is described. A short pulse, glow discharge is formed in a 10 SF6:1 H2 gas mixture at a total pressure of approximately 110 torr within a 15 by 0.5 by 0.5 cm3 volume. Transverse, recirculated gas flow adequate to enable repetitive operation up to 3 kHz is imposed by a centrifugal fan. The fan also forces the gas through a scrubber cell to eliminate ground state HF from the gas stream. An automated gas make-up system replenishes spent gas removed by the scrubber. Typical mean laser output powers up to 3 W can be maintained for extended periods of operation.

  10. Working group summary report on effects of pulsed operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Ni, L.

    1996-06-01

    In a short pulsed spallation neutron source, extremely high energy ({approx_gt}1 GeV) proton beam pulses are injected into a liquid metal target in a very short period of time ({approximately}1 {mu}sec) at a high repetition rate ({approximately}50 Hertz). The beam energy will be deposited in the target materials (such as mercury or lead) and converted into heat. It causes a sudden temperature rise and resulting pressure wave. This pressure wave travels through the liquid, reaches the steel container wall and may possibly lead to material damage due to induced stress. Almost all participants agreed that the shock problem due to the short pulse operation in the liquid metal target could be serious and could present a challenging problem. It was determined that the following points need to be addressed: (1) equation of state for mercury (2) code validation and benchmark experiments (3) shock effects on the entire target system (4) two phase flow by gas injection. All these investigations should be carried out in the framework of international cooperation. Two small scaled Hg pressure pulse tests are planned at ORNL to provide insight into the pressure wave propagation and thermal shock effects. One experiment will use exploding wires to generate the pulse pressure, the other the electron beam at ORELA. Also PSI, LANL, CERN (ISOLDE facility), INR and IPPE could contribute to the experimental methods for producing shock. The necessary R&D for bubble injection might be performed at PSI, RIGA, ORNL or Ben-Gurion University. All of the above experiments can possibly yield benchmarking data which is absolutely necessary for code validation.

  11. Experience of Pseudospark Switch Operation in Pulse Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitenko, N. V.; Yudin, A. S.; Kuznetsova, N. S.; Bochkov, V. D.

    2015-11-01

    The paper demonstrates the results of TDIl-200k/25SN-P pseudospark switch (PSS) developed by Russian company "Pulsed Technologies Ltd" application. PSS was used in pulsed power unit intended for electric-discharge fracture of rocks and concrete blocks and splitting off from monolith. The pulsed power unit has a pulse current generator with the capacity of 560 μF, stored energy of up to 63 kJ, operating voltage of up to15 kV, current pulse amplitude of up to 200 kA and pulse duration more than 200 μsec. The study also shows the current waveforms determined in the short-circuit experiment of the pulse current generator and in the experiments of the electric-discharge fragmentation of concrete at the charging voltage of 13 kV. PSS was operated in ringing single-pulse mode with the exceedance of more than two maximum permissible parameters: current pulse amplitude, current pulse duration and maximum pulse energy. Internal electrode erosion of PSS is shown and possible reasons of asymmetric current feed are discussed.

  12. Robust efficient estimation of heart rate pulse from video

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuchang; Sun, Lingyun; Rohde, Gustavo Kunde

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple but robust algorithm for estimating the heart rate pulse from video sequences containing human skin in real time. Based on a model of light interaction with human skin, we define the change of blood concentration due to arterial pulsation as a pixel quotient in log space, and successfully use the derived signal for computing the pulse heart rate. Various experiments with different cameras, different illumination condition, and different skin locations were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm. Examples computed with normal illumination show the algorithm is comparable with pulse oximeter devices both in accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:24761294

  13. A gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Gao, Jing-Ming; Yang, Han-Wu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Li, Ze-Xin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor is investigated both numerically and experimentally. The device has advantages of high power level, high repetitive rate achievability, and long lifetime reliability. Importantly, dominate parameters including the saturation time, the peak voltage, and even the compression ratio can be potentially adjusted continuously and reliably, which significantly expands the applicable area of the device and generators based on it. Specifically, a two-stage adjustable magnetic pulse compressor, utilized for charging the pulse forming network of a high power pulse generator, is designed with different compression ratios of 25 and 18 through an optimized design process. Equivalent circuit analysis shows that the modification of compression ratio can be achieved by just changing the turn number of the winding. At the same time, increasing inductance of the grounded inductor will decrease the peak voltage and delay the charging process. Based on these analyses, an adjustable compressor was built and studied experimentally in both the single shot mode and repetitive rate mode. Pulses with peak voltage of 60 kV and energy per pulse of 360 J were obtained in the experiment. The rise times of the pulses were compressed from 25 μs to 1 μs and from 18 μs to 1 μs, respectively, at repetitive rate of 20 Hz with good repeatability. Experimental results show reasonable agreement with analyses.

  14. A gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Gao, Jing-Ming; Yang, Han-Wu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Li, Ze-Xin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor is investigated both numerically and experimentally. The device has advantages of high power level, high repetitive rate achievability, and long lifetime reliability. Importantly, dominate parameters including the saturation time, the peak voltage, and even the compression ratio can be potentially adjusted continuously and reliably, which significantly expands the applicable area of the device and generators based on it. Specifically, a two-stage adjustable magnetic pulse compressor, utilized for charging the pulse forming network of a high power pulse generator, is designed with different compression ratios of 25 and 18 through an optimized design process. Equivalent circuit analysis shows that the modification of compression ratio can be achieved by just changing the turn number of the winding. At the same time, increasing inductance of the grounded inductor will decrease the peak voltage and delay the charging process. Based on these analyses, an adjustable compressor was built and studied experimentally in both the single shot mode and repetitive rate mode. Pulses with peak voltage of 60 kV and energy per pulse of 360 J were obtained in the experiment. The rise times of the pulses were compressed from 25 μs to 1 μs and from 18 μs to 1 μs, respectively, at repetitive rate of 20 Hz with good repeatability. Experimental results show reasonable agreement with analyses. PMID:26329219

  15. Performance scaling of inductive pulsed plasma thrusters with coil angle and pulse rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    A circuit model for an inductive pulsed plasma thruster was developed in order to investigate the performance of thrusters with conical coils; the model can accommodate cone-angles from 0° (a straight theta-pinch coil) to 90° (a planar coil). The plasma is treated as a deformable slug that moves both radially and axially in response to the force applied by the coil. The radial equation of motion includes a restoring force due to the plasma pressure, which is derived under the assumption that the electron population is isothermal, while the ions are isothermal, adiabatic, or shock-heated depending on the magnitude and sign of the radial velocity. The inductance of the coil and the plasma slug, and their mutual inductance, was determined using QuickField. A local maximum in efficiency and specific impulse was found for angles less than 90° however the absolute maximum for both these quantities occurs at 90°. High pulse-rate operation was found to yield dynamic efficiencies (excluding ionization cost) as high as 60-70% for I SP in the range of 3000-5000 s, even for a device with modest jet-power (5 kW). This mode of operation also permits elimination of the pulsed gas valve, which would be a significant system-level simplification. An alternate mode of inductive recapture, in which the current is interrupted at the second zero-crossing, was found to result in a sacrifice of only 1-2% in efficiency, while offering other significant system-level benefits for this kind of thruster.

  16. Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

  17. Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-01-29

    Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

  18. Innovative phase shifter for pulse tube operating below 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Jean-Marc; Charles, Ivan; Daniel, Christophe; André, Jérôme

    2016-09-01

    Stirling type pulse tubes are classically based on the use of an inertance phase shifter to optimize their cooling power. The limitations of the phase shifting capabilities of these inertances have been pointed out in various studies. These limitations are particularly critical for low temperature operation, typically below about 50 K. An innovative phase shifter using an inertance tube filled with liquid, or fluid with high density or low viscosity, and separated by a sealed metallic diaphragm has been conceived and tested. This device has been characterized and validated on a dedicated test bench. Operation on a 50-80 K pulse tube cooler and on a low temperature (below 8 K) pulse tube cooler have been demonstrated and have validated the device in operation. These developments open the door for efficient and compact low temperature Stirling type pulse tube coolers. The possibility of long life operation has been experimentally verified and a design for space applications is proposed.

  19. SETI Pulse Detection Algorithm: Analysis of False-alarm Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, B. K.

    1983-01-01

    Some earlier work by the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Science Working Group (SWG) on the derivation of spectrum analyzer thresholds for a pulse detection algorithm based on an analysis of false alarm rates is extended. The algorithm previously analyzed was intended to detect a finite sequence of i periodically spaced pulses that did not necessarily occupy the entire observation interval. This algorithm would recognize the presence of such a signal only if all i-received pulse powers exceeded a threshold T(i): these thresholds were selected to achieve a desired false alarm rate, independent of i. To simplify the analysis, it was assumed that the pulses were synchronous with the spectrum sample times. This analysis extends the earlier effort to include infinite and/or asynchronous pulse trains. Furthermore, to decrease the possibility of missing an extraterrestrial intelligence signal, the algorithm was modified to detect a pulse train even if some of the received pulse powers fall below the threshold. The analysis employs geometrical arguments that make it conceptually easy to incorporate boundary conditions imposed on the derivation of the false alarm rates. While the exact results can be somewhat complex, simple closed form approximations are derived that produce a negligible loss of accuracy.

  20. Pulse-burst operation of standard Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Ambuel, J. R.; Borchardt, M. T.; Reusch, J. A.; Robl, P. E.; Yang, Y. M.

    2010-05-01

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers have been upgraded to "pulse-burst" capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to fifteen 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to study the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature.

  1. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Zhang, Jian-De; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jin Liang

    2014-05-01

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO. PMID:24880374

  2. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Zhang, Jian-De; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jin Liang

    2014-05-15

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO.

  3. Pulsed interrupter and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Joel Lawton; Kratz, Robert

    2015-06-09

    Some embodiments provide interrupter systems comprising: a first electrode; a second electrode; a piston movably located at a first position and electrically coupled with the first and second electrodes establishing a closed state, the piston comprises an electrical conductor that couples with the first and second electrodes providing a conductive path; an electromagnetic launcher configured to, when activated, induce a magnetic field pulse causing the piston to move away from the electrical coupling with the first and second electrodes establishing an open circuit between the first and second electrodes; and a piston control system comprising a piston arresting system configured to control a deceleration of the piston following the movement of the piston induced by the electromagnetic launcher such that the piston is not in electrical contact with at least one of the first electrode and the second electrode when in the open state.

  4. High-pulse-repetition-rate HF laser with plate electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Andramanov, A V; Kabaev, S A; Lazhintsev, B V; Nor-Arevyan, V A; Pisetskaya, A V; Selemir, Victor D

    2006-03-31

    A high-pulse-repetition-rate electric-discharge HF laser with inductive-capacitive discharge stabilisation in the active H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6}-He mixture is studied. The multisectional discharge gap with a total length of 250 mm is formed by pairs of anode-cathode plates arranged in a zigzag pattern. The width of the discharge gap between each pair of plates is {approx}1 mm and its height is {approx}12 mm. The laser-beam cross section at the output cavity mirror is {approx}9 mm x 11 mm. The maximum laser pulse energy and the maximum laser efficiency for the H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6} mixture are 14.3 mJ and 2.1%, respectively. The addition of He to the mixture reduced the laser pulse energy by 10%-15%. The maximum gas velocity in the gap between the electrodes achieves 20 m s{sup -1}. The limiting pulse repetition rate f{sub lim} for which a decrease in the laser pulse energy is still not observed is {approx}2kHz for the H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6} mixture and {approx}2.4kHz for the H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6}-He mixture. The average output power {approx}27 W is obtained for a pulse repetition rate of 2.4 kHz. (lasers)

  5. A Pulse Rate Estimation Algorithm Using PPG and Smartphone Camera.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Sarah Ali; Zhang, Yuan; Feng, Zhiquan; Kos, Anton

    2016-05-01

    The ubiquitous use and advancement in built-in smartphone sensors and the development in big data processing have been beneficial in several fields including healthcare. Among the basic vitals monitoring, pulse rate monitoring is the most important healthcare necessity. A multimedia video stream data acquired by built-in smartphone camera can be used to estimate it. In this paper, an algorithm that uses only smartphone camera as a sensor to estimate pulse rate using PhotoPlethysmograph (PPG) signals is proposed. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm are compared with the actual pulse rate and the maximum error found is 3 beats per minute. The standard deviation in percentage error and percentage accuracy is found to be 0.68 % whereas the average percentage error and percentage accuracy is found to be 1.98 % and 98.02 % respectively. PMID:27067432

  6. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOEpatents

    Neev, J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Glinsky, M.E.; Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.

    1998-02-24

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment. 8 figs.

  7. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOEpatents

    Neev, Joseph; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Glinsky, Michael E.; Stuart, Brent C.; Perry, Michael D.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment.

  8. High-gradient, pulsed operation of superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-02-01

    Tests performed on several Niobium TM/sub 010/ cavities at frequencies of about 2856 MHz using a high-power, pulsed method indicate that, at the end of the charging pulse, peak surface magnetic fields of up to approx. 1300 Oe, corresponding to a peak surface electric field of approx. 68 MV/m, can be reached at 4.2/sup 0/K without appreciable average losses. Further studies of the properties of superconductors under pulsed operation might shed light on fundamental properties of rf superconductivity, as well as lead to the possibility of applying the pulse method to the operation of high-gradient linear colliders. 7 references, 30 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    Heart rate; Heart beat ... The pulse can be measured at areas where an artery passes close to the skin. These areas include the: ... side of the foot Wrist To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle ...

  10. Dose rate in brachytherapy using after-loading machine: pulsed or high-dose rate?

    PubMed

    Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Peiffert, D

    2014-10-01

    Since February 2014, it is no longer possible to use low-dose rate 192 iridium wires due to the end of industrial production of IRF1 and IRF2 sources. The Brachytherapy Group of the French society of radiation oncology (GC-SFRO) has recommended switching from iridium wires to after-loading machines. Two types of after-loading machines are currently available, based on the dose rate used: pulsed-dose rate or high-dose rate. In this article, we propose a comparative analysis between pulsed-dose rate and high-dose rate brachytherapy, based on biological, technological, organizational and financial considerations. PMID:25195117

  11. Rotation operator propagators for time-varying radiofrequency pulses in NMR spectroscopy: Applications to shaped pulses and pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Rance, Mark; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2014-11-01

    The propagator for trains of radiofrequency pulses can be directly integrated numerically or approximated by average Hamiltonian approaches. The former provides high accuracy and the latter, in favorable cases, convenient analytical formula. The Euler-angle rotation operator factorization of the propagator provides insights into performance that are not as easily discerned from either of these conventional techniques. This approach is useful in determining whether a shaped pulse can be represented over some bandwidth by a sequence τ1-Rϕ(β)-τ2, in which Rϕ(β) is a rotation by an angle β around an axis with phase ϕ in the transverse plane and τ1 and τ2 are time delays, allowing phase evolution during the pulse to be compensated by adjusting time periods prior or subsequent to the pulse. Perturbation theory establishes explicit formulas for τ1 and τ2 as proportional to the average transverse magnetization generated during the shaped pulse. The Euler-angle representation of the propagator also is useful in iterative reduction of pulse-interrupted-free precession schemes. Application to Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequences identifies an eight-pulse phase alternating scheme that generates a propagator nearly equal to the identity operator.

  12. Improvement in the statistical operation of a Blumlein pulse forming line in bipolar pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Y. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents the results of studies on shot-to-shot performance of a water Blumlein pulse forming line of 1-1.2 kJ of stored energy. The experiments were carried using the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator during its operation in both unipolar pulse mode (150 ns, 250-300 kV) and bipolar-pulse mode with the first negative (300-600 ns, 100-150 kV) followed by a second positive (120 ns, 250-300 kV) pulse. The analysis was carried out for two cases when the Blumlein was terminated with a resistive load and with a self-magnetically insulated ion diode. It was found that in bipolar pulse mode the shot-to-shot variation in breakdown voltage of a preliminary spark gap is small, the standard deviation (1σ) does not exceed 2%. At the same time, the shot-to-shot variation in the breakdown voltage of the main spark gap in both bipolar-pulse and unipolar pulse mode is 3-4 times higher than that for the preliminary spark gap. To improve the statistical performance of the main spark gap we changed the regime of its operation from a self-triggered mode to an externally triggered mode. In the new arrangement the first voltage pulse at the output of Blumlein was used to trigger the main spark gap. The new trigatron-type regime of the main spark gap operation showed a good stability of breakdown voltage and thus allowed to stabilize the duration of the first pulse. The standard deviation of the breakdown voltage and duration of the first pulse did not exceed 2% for a set of 50 pulses. The externally triggered mode of the main gap operation also allowed for a decrease in the charging voltage of the Blumlein to a 0.9-0.95 of self-breakdown voltage of the main spark gap while the energy stored in Marx generator was decreased from 4 kJ to 2.5 kJ. At the same time the energy stored in Blumlein remained the same.

  13. Improvement in the statistical operation of a Blumlein pulse forming line in bipolar pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A. I. Isakova, Y. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2014-07-15

    The paper presents the results of studies on shot-to-shot performance of a water Blumlein pulse forming line of 1–1.2 kJ of stored energy. The experiments were carried using the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator during its operation in both unipolar pulse mode (150 ns, 250–300 kV) and bipolar-pulse mode with the first negative (300–600 ns, 100–150 kV) followed by a second positive (120 ns, 250–300 kV) pulse. The analysis was carried out for two cases when the Blumlein was terminated with a resistive load and with a self-magnetically insulated ion diode. It was found that in bipolar pulse mode the shot-to-shot variation in breakdown voltage of a preliminary spark gap is small, the standard deviation (1σ) does not exceed 2%. At the same time, the shot-to-shot variation in the breakdown voltage of the main spark gap in both bipolar-pulse and unipolar pulse mode is 3–4 times higher than that for the preliminary spark gap. To improve the statistical performance of the main spark gap we changed the regime of its operation from a self-triggered mode to an externally triggered mode. In the new arrangement the first voltage pulse at the output of Blumlein was used to trigger the main spark gap. The new trigatron-type regime of the main spark gap operation showed a good stability of breakdown voltage and thus allowed to stabilize the duration of the first pulse. The standard deviation of the breakdown voltage and duration of the first pulse did not exceed 2% for a set of 50 pulses. The externally triggered mode of the main gap operation also allowed for a decrease in the charging voltage of the Blumlein to a 0.9–0.95 of self-breakdown voltage of the main spark gap while the energy stored in Marx generator was decreased from 4 kJ to 2.5 kJ. At the same time the energy stored in Blumlein remained the same.

  14. Improvement in the statistical operation of a Blumlein pulse forming line in bipolar pulse mode.

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, A I; Isakova, Y I; Khaylov, I P

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents the results of studies on shot-to-shot performance of a water Blumlein pulse forming line of 1-1.2 kJ of stored energy. The experiments were carried using the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator during its operation in both unipolar pulse mode (150 ns, 250-300 kV) and bipolar-pulse mode with the first negative (300-600 ns, 100-150 kV) followed by a second positive (120 ns, 250-300 kV) pulse. The analysis was carried out for two cases when the Blumlein was terminated with a resistive load and with a self-magnetically insulated ion diode. It was found that in bipolar pulse mode the shot-to-shot variation in breakdown voltage of a preliminary spark gap is small, the standard deviation (1σ) does not exceed 2%. At the same time, the shot-to-shot variation in the breakdown voltage of the main spark gap in both bipolar-pulse and unipolar pulse mode is 3-4 times higher than that for the preliminary spark gap. To improve the statistical performance of the main spark gap we changed the regime of its operation from a self-triggered mode to an externally triggered mode. In the new arrangement the first voltage pulse at the output of Blumlein was used to trigger the main spark gap. The new trigatron-type regime of the main spark gap operation showed a good stability of breakdown voltage and thus allowed to stabilize the duration of the first pulse. The standard deviation of the breakdown voltage and duration of the first pulse did not exceed 2% for a set of 50 pulses. The externally triggered mode of the main gap operation also allowed for a decrease in the charging voltage of the Blumlein to a 0.9-0.95 of self-breakdown voltage of the main spark gap while the energy stored in Marx generator was decreased from 4 kJ to 2.5 kJ. At the same time the energy stored in Blumlein remained the same. PMID:25085130

  15. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01

    problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

  16. High voltage high repetition rate pulse using Marx topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Kashapov, N.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes Marx topology using MOSFET transistors. Marx circuit with 10 stages has been done, to obtain pulses about 5.5KV amplitude, and the width of the pulses was about 30μsec with a high repetition rate (PPS > 100), Vdc = 535VDC is the input voltage for supplying the Marx circuit. Two Ferrite ring core transformers were used to control the MOSFET transistors of the Marx circuit (the first transformer to control the charging MOSFET transistors, the second transformer to control the discharging MOSFET transistors).

  17. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  18. High-repetition-rate pulse-burst laser for Thomson scattering on the MST reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, W. C.; Morton, L. A.; Parke, E.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2013-11-01

    A new, high-repetition-rate pulse-burst laser system for the MST Thomson scattering diagnostic has operated with 2 J pulses at repetition rates up to 75 kHz within a burst. The 1064 nm laser currently employs a q-switched, diode pumped Nd:YVO4 master oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifier stages, and a Nd:glass amplifier, with plans for an additional Nd:glass amplifier. The laser can maintain 1.5-2 J pulses in two operating modes: either at a uniform repetition rate of 5-10 kHz (sustained for 5-8 ms), or reach rates of up to 75 kHz in pulse-burst operation (for 10 bursts of 15 pulses each), limited by flashlamp explosion energy and wall loading. The full system, including an additional Nd:glass amplifier, is designed to produce bursts of 2 J pulses at a repetition rate of at least 250 kHz. Custom programmable square-pulse power supplies drive the amplifier flashlamps, providing fine control of pulse timing, duration, and repetition, and allow for pulse-burst operation. The new laser system integrates with the same collection optics and detectors as used by the previous MST Thomson laser: 21 spatial points across the MST minor radius, filter polychromators with 6 to 8 channels (10 eV-5 keV range), avalanche photodiode detectors, and 1 GSample/s/channel digitization. Use of the previous pulse-burst laser continues concurrently with new laser development. Additional notes on optimization of flashlamp simmering will also be covered, showing that an increase in simmer currents can improve pulse-to-pulse energy consistency on both the new and older lasers.

  19. Effects of pulse rate on threshold and dynamic range in Clarion cochlear-implant users (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Heather A.; Donaldson, Gail S.; Nelson, David A.

    2004-05-01

    The effects of pulse rate on absolute threshold (THS), maximum acceptable loudness (MAL), and dynamic range (DR) were evaluated in 15 Clarion cochlear implant users. A wider range of pulse rates was assessed than in previous studies, and subjects with both standard and perimodiolar electrode arrays were tested. THS and MAL decreased with pulse rate, and DR increased with pulse rate, for pulse rates between 200 and 6500 pulses per second (pps). However, slopes of THS-vs-pulse rate and MAL-vs-pulse rate functions became shallower above 3250 pps. Subjects with standard electrode arrays had similar THSs as subjects with perimodiolar electrode arrays at all pulse rates. In contrast, subjects with standard arrays had significantly higher MALs and larger DRs than subjects with perimodiolar arrays, and these differences became larger with increasing pulse rate.

  20. Extended pulse-length operation of Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, S.; Irby, J.; Terry, J.; Labombard, B.; Wukitch, S.; Marmar, E.; Cochran, W.; Dekow, G.; Gwinn, D.; Maqueda, R.

    2001-10-01

    The C-Mod Advanced Tokamak program depends on the unique capability of the C-Mod facility to operate with plasma pulse lengths corresponding to multiple skin times with high performance parameters. Specifically, pulse lengths with current and toroidal field flattops of order 5 seconds, with toroidal field of 4 tesla, are proposed. In the case of the AT program, these plasmas would have current sustained non-inductively, i.e. by a combination of RF (lower hybrid) current drive and pressure-driven current. Experiments during the 2001 experimental campaign will extend the plasma pulse length to the maximum possible with only inductive current drive. The purpose of these experiments is to test and demonstrate the long-pulse capability of the coils, power system, control system, etc., and to test power and particle handling performance under long pulse conditions. In support of the latter goal, we will benchmark divertor surface heating during medium-power operation and assess the effectiveness of X-point sweeping and N2 puffing for dissipating the divertor heat loads. Results of these experiments will be presented.

  1. Pulsed operation of a high average power Yb:YAG thin-disk multipass amplifier.

    PubMed

    Schulz, M; Riedel, R; Willner, A; Düsterer, S; Prandolini, M J; Feldhaus, J; Faatz, B; Rossbach, J; Drescher, M; Tavella, F

    2012-02-27

    An Yb:YAG thin-disk multipass laser amplifier system was developed operating in a 10 Hz burst operation mode with 800 µs burst duration and 100 kHz intra-burst repetition rate. Methods for the suppression of parasitic amplified spontaneous emission are presented. The average output pulse energy is up to 44.5 mJ and 820 fs compressed pulse duration. The average power of 4.45 kW during the burst is the highest reported for this type of amplifier. PMID:22418308

  2. [Pulse rate counter with digital read-out].

    PubMed

    Katonov, E L; Roik, V V; Sherman, A M

    1977-01-01

    An all-purpose pulse rate counter with digital read-out, devised at the All-Union Research Institute of Radioelectronic Medical Equipment, is described. The counter is intended both for a separate use and also as a part of a complex set of the patients monitoring apparatus, the ones for functional diagnosis, mass examinations of the population and for research work. In combination with a commutator the device permits creation of multichannel systems of control. PMID:881969

  3. Pulsed Operation of a Compact Fusion Neutron Source Using a High-Voltage Pulse Generator Developed for Landmine Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Kunihito; Watanabe, Masato; Okino, Akitoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Hotta, Eiki; Yuura, Morimasa

    2005-05-15

    Preliminary experimental results of pulsed neutron source based on a discharge-type beam fusion called Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion (IECF) for landmine detection are presented. In Japan, a research and development project for constructing an advanced anti-personnel landmine detection system by using IECF, which is effective not only for metal landmines but also for plastic ones, is now in progress. This project consists of some R and D topics, and one of them is R and D of a high-voltage pulse generator system specialized for landmine detection, which can be used in the severe environment such as that in the field in Afghanistan. Thus a prototype of the system for landmine detection was designed and fabricated in consideration of compactness, lightness, cooling performance, dustproof and robustness. By using this prototype pulse generator system, a conventional IECF device was operated as a preliminary experiment. As a result, it was confirmed that the suggested pulse generator system is suitable for landmine detection system, and the results follow the empirical law obtained by the previous experiments. The maximum neutron production rate of 2.0x10{sup 8} n/s was obtained at a pulsed discharge of -51 kV, 7.3 A.

  4. Role of the optical pulse repetition rate in the efficiency of terahertz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reklaitis, Antanas

    2016-07-01

    Excitation of n-GaAs and p-InAs terahertz emitters by the series of optical pulses is studied by ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the spatial separation of photoexcited electrons and holes dramatically reduces the recombination intensity in n-GaAs emitter, the operation of which is based on the surface field effect. The spatial separation of carriers does not affect the recombination intensity in p-InAs emitter, the operation of which is based on the photo-Dember effect. Therefore, the recovery time of equilibrium state after optical pulse in n-GaAs emitter significantly exceeds the corresponding recovery time in p-InAs emitter. This fact leads to a substantial reduction of photocurrent amplitude in n-GaAs emitter excited by the optical pulse series at high repetition rate.

  5. Chemical sensing with pulsed QC-DFB lasers operating at 15.6 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Rochat, M.; Beck, M.; Hofstetter, D.; Faist, J.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed thermoelectrically cooled QC-DFB lasers operating at 15.6 micrometers were characterized for spectroscopic gas sensing applications. A new method for wavelength scanning based on repetition rate modulation was developed. A non-wavelength-selective pyroelectric detector was incorporated in the sensor configuration giving the advantage of room-temperature operation and low cost. Absorption lines of CO2 and H2O were observed in ambient air, providing information about the concentration of these species.

  6. Resonant microwave pulse compressor operating in two frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilin, L.; Shlapakovski, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2013-07-01

    A resonant microwave pulse compressor with a hybrid (Magic) waveguide tee as an interference switch was studied in numerical simulations and experimentally. In this compressor, the necessary condition for energy storage in the compressor cavity is frequency-independent, so that its operation in different cavity eigenmodes without mechanical tuning is possible. An S-band compressor operating in two different frequencies (neighboring modes) was investigated. Two characteristic geometries corresponding to different regimes of the microwave energy accumulation and release were tested using input pulses of 200-400 kW power, 2.4 μs duration, and variable frequency, 2.8 to 2.9 GHz. The geometries are characterized by an RF electric field in the interference switch that is higher or lower than the field in the cavity. The plasma discharge that switches the phases of compressor operation from energy storage to release was initiated by small metallic cones placed in the appropriate location. For both geometries, the nanosecond output pulses in two resonant frequencies were obtained; the maximal peak output power measured was ˜1.8 MW. The efficiency of the microwave extraction was limited by either an insufficient coupling to the tee output arm (in the case of a high field in the tee) or non-uniformity of the plasma discharge (in the case of low field in the tee).

  7. Rapid vaporization of kidney stones, ex vivo, using a Thulium fiber laser at pulse rates up to 500 Hz with a stone basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-03-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) is currently the preferred laser for fragmenting kidney stones in the clinic. However, this laser has some limitations, including operation at low pulse rates and a multimode spatial beam profile which prohibits its use with smaller, more flexible optical fibers. Our laboratory is studying the Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1908 nm) as an alternative lithotripter. The TFL has several advantages, including lower stone ablation thresholds, use with smaller and more flexible fibers, and operation at arbitrary pulse lengths and pulse rates. Previous studies have reported increased stone ablation rates with TFL operation at higher pulse rates, however, stone retropulsion remains an obstacle to even more efficient stone ablation. This study explores TFL operation at high pulse rates in combination with a stone stabilization device (e.g. stone basket) for improved efficiency. A TFL beam with pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500-μs, and pulse rates of 10-500 Hz was coupled into 100-μm-core, low-OH, silica fibers, in contact mode with uric acid and calcium oxalate monohydrate stones, ex vivo. TFL operation at 500 Hz produced UA and COM stone ablation rates up to 5.0 mg/s and 1.3 mg/s, respectively. High TFL pulse rates produced increased stone ablation rates sufficient for use in the clinic.

  8. Microcalorimeter Spectroscopy at High Pulse Rates: A Multi-pulse Fitting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, J. W.; Alpert, B. K.; Doriese, W. B.; Fischer, D. A.; Jaye, C.; Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-08-01

    Transition Edge Sensor microcalorimeters can measure X-ray and gamma-ray energies with very high energy resolution and high photon-collection efficiency. For this technology to reach its full potential in future X-ray observatories, each sensor must be able to measure hundreds or even thousands of photon energies per second. Current “optimal filtering” approaches to achieve the best possible energy resolution work only for photons that are well isolated in time, a requirement which is in direct conflict with the need for high-rate measurements. We describe a new analysis procedure to allow fitting for the pulse height of all photons even in the presence of heavy pulse pile-up. In the limit of isolated pulses, the technique reduces to standard optimal filtering with long records. We employ reasonable approximations to the noise covariance function in order to render this procedure computationally viable even for very long data records. The technique is employed to analyze X-ray emission spectra at 600 eV and 6 keV at rates up to 250 counts s-1 in microcalorimeters having exponential signal decay times of approximately 1.2 ms.

  9. High-power pulsed-current-mode operation of an overdriven tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Takase, Ken; Stockton, John K; Kasevich, Mark A

    2007-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the performance of a commercial tapered amplifier diode operating in a pulsed-current mode with a peak current that is significantly higher than the specified maximum continuous current. For a tapered amplifier rated at 500 mW of continuous power, we demonstrate 2.6 W of peak optical output power with 15 mW of injection light for 200 micros, 7 A current pulses. Different failure mechanisms for the tapered amplifier, including thermal and optical damage, are identified under these conditions. PMID:17767324

  10. Effects of frame rate and image resolution on pulse rate measured using multiple camera imaging photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2015-03-01

    Non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography uses cameras to facilitate measurements including pulse rate, pulse rate variability, respiration rate, and blood perfusion by measuring characteristic changes in light absorption at the skin's surface resulting from changes in blood volume in the superficial microvasculature. Several factors may affect the accuracy of the physiological measurement including imager frame rate, resolution, compression, lighting conditions, image background, participant skin tone, and participant motion. Before this method can gain wider use outside basic research settings, its constraints and capabilities must be well understood. Recently, we presented a novel approach utilizing a synchronized, nine-camera, semicircular array backed by measurement of an electrocardiogram and fingertip reflectance photoplethysmogram. Twenty-five individuals participated in six, five-minute, controlled head motion artifact trials in front of a black and dynamic color backdrop. Increasing the input channel space for blind source separation using the camera array was effective in mitigating error from head motion artifact. Herein we present the effects of lower frame rates at 60 and 30 (reduced from 120) frames per second and reduced image resolution at 329x246 pixels (one-quarter of the original 658x492 pixel resolution) using bilinear and zero-order downsampling. This is the first time these factors have been examined for a multiple imager array and align well with previous findings utilizing a single imager. Examining windowed pulse rates, there is little observable difference in mean absolute error or error distributions resulting from reduced frame rates or image resolution, thus lowering requirements for systems measuring pulse rate over sufficient length time windows.

  11. NOx diesel exhaust treatment using a pulsed corona discharge: the pulse repetition rate effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankelevich, Y.; Wolf, M.; Baksht, R.; Pokryvailo, A.; Vinogradov, J.; Rivin, B.; Sher, E.

    2007-05-01

    The pulsed corona offers real promise for degradation of pollutants in gas and water streams. This paper presents a study of NOx removal from diesel exhaust. Special emphasis is laid on the investigation of the dependence of the NO removal rate and efficiency on the pulse repetition rate (PRR). A nanosecond solid state power supply (45 kV, 60 ns, up to 1 kHz) was used for driving the corona reactor. A Mitsubishi 10 kW 3-cylinder diesel-generator engine with a total volume of 1300 cm3 was used as a source of exhaust gas. At an NO removal rate of 35% the NO removal efficiency was 53 g kW-1h-1 for PRR = 500 Hz and the initial NO concentration was 375 ppm. A semi-empirical expression for the corona reactor removal efficiency related both to PRR and to the residence time is presented. The removal efficiency decreases with increasing PRR at constant flow rate or constant residence time. This expression demonstrates reasonable agreement between the calculation results and the experimental data.

  12. Slow Ca2+ wave stimulation using low repetition rate femtosecond pulsed irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanaga, S.; Smith, N. I.; Fujita, K.; Kawata, S.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated stimulation of Ca2+ in living cells by near-infrared laser pulses operated at sub-MHz repetition rates. HeLa cells were exposed to focused 780 nm femtosecond pulses, generated by a titanium-sapphire laser and adjusted by an electro-optical modulator. We found that the laser-induced Ca2+ waves could be generated over three orders of magnitude in repetition rates, with required laser pulse energy varying by less than one order of magnitude. Ca2+ wave speed and gradients were reduced with repetition rate, which allows the technique to be used to modulate the strength and speed of laser-induced effects. By lowering the repetition rate, we found that the laser-induced Ca2+ release is partially mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Inhibition of ROS was successful only at low repetition rates, with the implication that ROS scavengers may in general be depleted in experiments using high repetition rate laser irradiation.

  13. Multiterawatt femtosecond laser system with kilohertz pulse repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, V V; Pestryakov, E V; Laptev, A V; Petrov, V A; Kuptsov, G V; Trunov, V I; Frolov, S A

    2014-05-30

    The basic principles, layout and components are presented for a multiterawatt femtosecond laser system with a kilohertz pulse repetition rate f, based on their parametric amplification and laser amplification of picosecond radiation that pumps the stages of the parametric amplifier. The results of calculations for a step-by-step increase in the output power from the LBO crystal parametric amplifier channel up to the multiterawatt level are presented. By using the developed components in the pump channel of the laser system, the parameters of the regenerative amplifier with the output energy ∼1 mJ at the wavelength 1030 nm and with f = 1 kHz are experimentally studied. The optical scheme of the diode-pumped multipass cryogenic Yb:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} laser ceramic amplifier is developed and its characteristics are determined that provide the output energy within the range 0.25 – 0.35 J. (lasers)

  14. Multiterawatt femtosecond laser system with kilohertz pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Laptev, A. V.; Petrov, V. A.; Kuptsov, G. V.; Trunov, V. I.; Frolov, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    The basic principles, layout and components are presented for a multiterawatt femtosecond laser system with a kilohertz pulse repetition rate f, based on their parametric amplification and laser amplification of picosecond radiation that pumps the stages of the parametric amplifier. The results of calculations for a step-by-step increase in the output power from the LBO crystal parametric amplifier channel up to the multiterawatt level are presented. By using the developed components in the pump channel of the laser system, the parameters of the regenerative amplifier with the output energy ~1 mJ at the wavelength 1030 nm and with f = 1 kHz are experimentally studied. The optical scheme of the diode-pumped multipass cryogenic Yb:Y2O3 laser ceramic amplifier is developed and its characteristics are determined that provide the output energy within the range 0.25 - 0.35 J.

  15. Effect of pulse to pulse interactions on ultra-short pulse laser drilling of steel with repetition rates up to 10 MHz.

    PubMed

    Finger, Johannes; Reininghaus, Martin

    2014-07-28

    We report on the effect of pulse to pulse interactions during percussion drilling of steel using high power ps-laser radiation with repetition rates of up to 10 MHz and high average powers up to 80 W. The ablation rate per pulse is measured as a function of the pulse repetition rate for four fluences ranging from 500 mJ/cm2 up to 1500 mJ/cm2. For every investigated fluence an abrupt increase of the ablation rate per pulse is observed at a distinctive repetition rate. The onset repetition rate for this effect is strongly dependent on the applied pulse fluence. The origin of the increase of the ablation rate is attributed to the emergence of a melt based ablation processes, as Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) images show the occurrence of melt ejected material surrounding the drilling holes. A semi empirical model based on classical heat conduction including heat accumulation as well as pulse-particle interactions is applied to enable quantitative conclusions on the origin of the observed data. In agreement with previous studies, the acquired data confirm the relevance of these two effects for the fundamental description of materials processing with ultra-short pulsed laser radiation at high repetition rates and high average power. PMID:25089496

  16. Noncontact imaging photoplethysmography to effectively access pulse rate variability.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Kalawsky, Roy; Greenwald, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Noncontact imaging photoplethysmography (PPG) can provide physiological assessment at various anatomical locations with no discomfort to the patient. However, most previous imaging PPG (iPPG) systems have been limited by a low sample frequency, which restricts their use clinically, for instance, in the assessment of pulse rate variability (PRV). In the present study, plethysmographic signals are remotely captured via an iPPG system at a rate of 200 fps. The physiological parameters (i.e., heart and respiration rate and PRV) derived from the iPPG datasets yield statistically comparable results to those acquired using a contact PPG sensor, the gold standard. More importantly, we present evidence that the negative influence of initial low sample frequency could be compensated via interpolation to improve the time domain resolution. We thereby provide further strong support for the low-cost webcam-based iPPG technique and, importantly, open up a new avenue for effective noncontact assessment of multiple physiological parameters, with potential applications in the evaluation of cardiac autonomic activity and remote sensing of vital physiological signs. PMID:23111602

  17. Noncontact imaging photoplethysmography to effectively access pulse rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Kalawsky, Roy; Greenwald, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Noncontact imaging photoplethysmography (PPG) can provide physiological assessment at various anatomical locations with no discomfort to the patient. However, most previous imaging PPG (iPPG) systems have been limited by a low sample frequency, which restricts their use clinically, for instance, in the assessment of pulse rate variability (PRV). In the present study, plethysmographic signals are remotely captured via an iPPG system at a rate of 200 fps. The physiological parameters (i.e., heart and respiration rate and PRV) derived from the iPPG datasets yield statistically comparable results to those acquired using a contact PPG sensor, the gold standard. More importantly, we present evidence that the negative influence of initial low sample frequency could be compensated via interpolation to improve the time domain resolution. We thereby provide further strong support for the low-cost webcam-based iPPG technique and, importantly, open up a new avenue for effective noncontact assessment of multiple physiological parameters, with potential applications in the evaluation of cardiac autonomic activity and remote sensing of vital physiological signs.

  18. Reliable high-power long-pulse 8XX-nm diode laser bars and arrays operating at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Cao, Chuanshun; Thaler, Gerald; Nonnemacher, Dustin; Lapinski, Feliks; Ai, Irene; Caliva, Brian; Das, Suhit; Walker, Robert; Zeng, Linfei; McElhinney, Mark; Thiagarajan, Prabhu

    2011-03-01

    We report on the high-power high-temperature long-pulse performance of the 8XX-nm diode laser bars and arrays, which were recently developed at Lasertel Inc. for diode laser pumping within high-temperature (130 °C) environment without any cooling. Since certain energy in each pulse is required, the diode laser bars have to provide both high peak power and a nice pulse shape at 130 °C. Optimizing the epi-structure of the diode laser, the laser cavity and the distribution of waste heat, we demonstrate over 40-millisecond long-pulse operation of the 8XX-nm CS bars at 130 °C and 100 A. Pumping the bar with 5-Hz frequency 15-millisecond rectangular current pulses, we generate over 60 W peak power at 100 A and 130 °C. During the pulse duration, the pulse shape of the CS bars is well-maintained and the power almost linearly decays with a rate of 1.9% peak power per millisecond at 130 °C and 100 A. Regardless of the pulse shape, this laser bar can lase at very high temperature and output pulse can last for 8 ms/2ms at 170 °C/180 °C (both driven by 60 A current pulses with 5-Hz frequency, 10 millisecond pulse width), respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest operating temperature for a long-pulse 8XX-nm laser bar. Under the condition of 130 °C and 100 A, the laser bars do not show any degradation after 310,000 10-millisecond current pulse shots. The performance of stack arrays at 130 °C and 100 A are also presented. The development of reliable high-temperature diode laser bar paves the way for diode laser long-pulse pumping within a high-temperature environment without any cooling.

  19. Pulse-Stacking Technique for Enhanced Performance of a Solid-State Laser Pumped by a High-Pulse-Rate Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Sylvia E.; Brown, Daniel J. W.; Knowles, David S.; Piper, James A.

    1998-01-01

    We report on a pulse-stacking technique in which a Cr,Nd:GSGG laser pumped by a high-pulse-rate (25 kHz) source is Q switched at lower pulse rates (submultiples of the pump rate) to achieve higher-output pulse energies and shorter pulse durations. For six pump pulses stacked, the output peak power increased by a factor of 10 compared with gain-switched output.

  20. Pulse-stacking technique for enhanced performance of a solid-state laser pumped by a high-pulse-rate source.

    PubMed

    French, S E; Brown, D J; Knowles, D S; Piper, J A

    1998-01-20

    We report on a pulse-stacking technique in which a Cr, Nd:GSGG laser pumped by a high-pulse-rate (25 kHz) source is Q switched at lower pulse rates (submultiples of the pump rate) to achieve higher-output pulse energies and shorter pulse durations. For six pump pulses stacked, the output peak power increased by a factor of 10 compared with gain-switched output. PMID:18268621

  1. Neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, A A; Kulagin, O V; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaykin, A A

    2013-07-31

    A compact neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a record-high pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz (pulse duration 30 ns) is developed. Thermally induced phase distortions are compensated using wave phase conjugation. The integral depolarisation of radiation is decreased to 0.4% by using linear compensation schemes. The second harmonic of laser radiation can be used for pumping Ti : sapphire multipetawatt complexes. (letters)

  2. The effects of pulse rate, power, width and coding on signal detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects on the signal detectability of varying the pulse repetition rate (PRF), peak pulse power (p(pk)) and pulse width (tau(p)) (tp) are examined. Both coded and uncoded pulses are considered. The following quantities are assumed to be constant; (1) antenna area, (z)echo reflectivity, (3) Doppler shift, (4) spectral width, (5) spectral resolution, (6) effective sampling rate, and (7) total incoherent spectral averagaing time. The detectability is computed for two types of targets.

  3. Operation and beam profiling of an up to 200 kHz pulse-burst laser for Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Young, W C; Den Hartog, D J

    2014-11-01

    A new, high-repetition rate laser is in development for use on the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The laser has been tested at a rate of 200 kHz in a pulse-burst operation, producing bursts of 5 pulses above 1.5 J each, while capable of bursts of 17 pulses at 100 kHz. A master oscillator-power amplifier architecture is used with a Nd:YVO4 oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifiers, and a Nd:glass amplifier. A radial profile over the pulse sequence is measured by using a set of graphite apertures and an energy meter, showing a change in beam quality over a pulsing sequence. PMID:25430221

  4. Operation and beam profiling of an up to 200 kHz pulse-burst laser for Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W. C. Den Hartog, D. J.

    2014-11-15

    A new, high-repetition rate laser is in development for use on the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The laser has been tested at a rate of 200 kHz in a pulse-burst operation, producing bursts of 5 pulses above 1.5 J each, while capable of bursts of 17 pulses at 100 kHz. A master oscillator-power amplifier architecture is used with a Nd:YVO{sub 4} oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifiers, and a Nd:glass amplifier. A radial profile over the pulse sequence is measured by using a set of graphite apertures and an energy meter, showing a change in beam quality over a pulsing sequence.

  5. Daily changes in oxygen saturation and pulse rate associated with particulate air pollution and barometric pressure.

    PubMed

    Dockery, D W; Pope, C A; Kanner, R E; Martin Villegas, G; Schwartz, J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked fine particulate air pollution with increases in morbidity and mortality rates from cardiopulmonary complications. Although the underlying biologic mechanisms responsible for this increase remain largely unknown, potential pathways include transient declines in blood oxygenation and changes in pulse rate following exposures to particulate air pollution episodes. This study evaluated potential associations between daily measures of respirable particulate matter (PM) with pulse rate and oxygen saturation of the blood. Pulse rate and oxygen saturation (Spo2) using pulse oximetry were measured daily in 90 elderly subjects living near air pollution monitors during the winter of 1995-96 in Utah Valley. We also evaluated potential associations of oxygen saturation and pulse rate with barometric pressure. Small but statistically significant positive associations between day-to-day changes in Spo2 and barometric pressure were observed. Pulse rate was inversely associated with barometric pressure. Exposure to particulate pollution was not significantly associated with Spo2 except in male participants 80 years of age or older. Increased daily pulse rate, as well as the odds of having a pulse rate 5 or 10 beats per minute (bpm) above normal (normal is defined as the individual's mean pulse rate throughout the study period), were significantly associated with exposure to particulate pollution on the previous 1 to 5 days. The medical or biologic relevance of these increases in pulse rate following exposure to particulate air pollution requires further study. PMID:10192116

  6. A short pulse (7 micros FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5 kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A; Groen, Wilhelm A; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 micros have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 microm nozzle releases about 10(16) particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10(22) particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10(-6) Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Delta v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the

  7. A short pulse (7 {mu}s FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Ende, Daan A. van den; Groen, Wilhelm A.

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 {mu}s have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 {mu}m nozzle releases about 10{sup 16} particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10{sup 22} particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow ({Delta}v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas

  8. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  9. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. High energy pulsed inductive thruster modeling operating with ammonia propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Pavlos G.; Villarreal, James K.

    2007-11-15

    Numerical modeling of the pulsed inductive thruster operating with ammonia propellant at high energy levels, utilized a time-dependent, two-dimensional, and axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics code to provide bilateral validation of experiment and theory and offer performance insights for improved designs. The power circuit model was augmented by a plasma voltage algorithm that accounts for the propellant's time-dependent resistance and inductance to properly account for plasma dynamics and was verified using available analytic solutions of two idealized plasma problems. Comparisons of the predicted current waveforms to experimental data exhibited excellent agreement for the initial half-period, essentially capturing the dominant acceleration phase. Further validation proceeded by comparisons of the impulse for three different energy levels, 2592, 4050, and 4608 J and a wide range of propellant mass values. Predicted impulse captured both trends and magnitudes measured experimentally for nominal operation. Interpretation of the modeling results in conjunction to experimental observations further confirm the critical mass phenomenon beyond which efficiency degrades due to elevated internal energy mode deposition and anomalous operation.

  11. Theory and Practice in ICRF Antennas for Long Pulse Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Bremond, S.; Mitteau, R.; Chantant, M.; Goniche, M.; Basiuk, V.; Bosia, G.; Gunn, J.P.

    2005-09-26

    Long plasma discharges on the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak were extended in 2004 towards higher powers and plasma densities by combined Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) waves. RF pulses of 20sx8MW and 60sx4MW were produced. TS is equipped with 3 ICRF antennas, whose front faces are ready for CW operation. This paper reports on their behaviour over high power long pulses, as observed with infrared (IR) thermography and calorimetric measurements. Edge parasitic losses, although modest, are concentrated on a small surface and can raise surface temperatures close to operational limits. A complex hot spot pattern was revealed with at least 3 physical processes involved : convected power, electron acceleration in the LH near field, and a RF-specific phenomenon compatible with RF sheaths. LH coupling was also perturbed in the antenna shadow. This was attributed to RF-induced DC ExB0 convection. This motivated sheath modelling in two directions. First, the 2D topology of RF potentials was investigated in relation with the RF current distribution over the antenna, via a Green's function formalism and full-wave calculation using the ICANT code. In front of phased arrays of straps, convective cells were interpreted using the RF current profiles of strip line theory. Another class of convective cells, specific to antenna box corners, was evidenced for the first time. Within 1D sheath models assuming independent flux tubes, RF and rectified DC potentials are proportional. 2D fluid models couple nearby flux tubes via transverse polarisation currents. Unexpectedly this does not necessarily smooth RF potential maps. Peak DC potentials can even be enhanced. The experience gained on TS and the numerical tools are valuable for designing steady state high power antennas for next step devices. General rules to reduce RF potentials as well as concrete design options are discussed.

  12. Radiobiological influence of megavoltage electron pulses of ultra-high pulse dose rate on normal tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Karsch, Leonhard; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Oppelt, Melanie; Pawelke, Jörg; Richter, Christian; Schürer, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Regarding the long-term goal to develop and establish laser-based particle accelerators for a future radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer, the radiobiological consequences of the characteristic short intense particle pulses with ultra-high peak dose rate, but low repetition rate of laser-driven beams have to be investigated. This work presents in vitro experiments performed at the radiation source ELBE (Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance). This accelerator delivered 20-MeV electron pulses with ultra-high pulse dose rate of 10(10) Gy/min either at the low pulse frequency analogue to previous cell experiments with laser-driven electrons or at high frequency for minimizing the prolonged dose delivery and to perform comparison irradiation with a quasi-continuous electron beam analogue to a clinically used linear accelerator. The influence of the different electron beam pulse structures on the radiobiological response of the normal tissue cell line 184A1 and two primary fibroblasts was investigated regarding clonogenic survival and the number of DNA double-strand breaks that remain 24 h after irradiation. Thereby, no considerable differences in radiation response were revealed both for biological endpoints and for all probed cell cultures. These results provide evidence that the radiobiological effectiveness of the pulsed electron beams is not affected by the ultra-high pulse dose rates alone. PMID:27193178

  13. A pulsed, high repetition rate 2-micron laser transmitter for coherent CO2 DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Bai, Y.; Petzar, P.; Petros, M.; Chen, S.; Trieu, B.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Singh, U. N.

    2009-12-01

    A Holmium solid-state 2-µm pulsed laser, end-pumped by a Thulium fiber laser, is being developed for coherent CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). It combines the advantages of high efficient fiber laser technology with the mature high energy solid state laser technology to produce desired energy levels at a high repetition rate. To obtain high beam quality that is required by coherent detection technique, the effect of “spatial hole burning” in the laser gain medium must be prevented. This is achieved by the use of ring cavity configuration in which the laser light is forced to travel in one direction, so that no standing waves are formed. The pump beam and laser beam are mode-matched in the laser crystals to improve the laser efficiency. At the pumping power of 13.25W, optical-to-optical efficiency of 52% was obtained with the pulse repetition rate of 1.25 kHz, which gives the energy per pulse of ~5.5mJ. The pulse energy can be scaled by increasing the pump power or by reducing the pulse repetition rate. The pulse length of this laser is at ~50ns. The wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are tunable over several characteristic absorption lines of CO2. The exact wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are controlled by well-controlled continuous wave (CW) seed lasers to provide the required sequential, on-and-off line wavelength pulses for DIAL applications. Three CW lasers were used to provide the accurate on-and-off wavelengths. The first CW laser is locked to the center of a characteristic CO2 absorption line through a CO2 cell by the frequency modulation technique. The frequency of the second CW laser was shifted related to the first CW laser by a few GHz to the wing of the CO2 absorption line, and used as the on-line frequency of the CO2 DIAL. This frequency shift is necessary to obtain a better weighting function for the CO2 measurement. The standard deviation of the CW on-line frequency can be controlled within 250 KHz. The third CW laser provides the off

  14. Repetitively pulsed, 70-J photolytic iodine laser with excellent optical and long-reliable operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlie, L. A.; Rathge, R. D.

    1995-06-01

    The performance of a repetitively pulsed, 70 joule, closed cycle 1.3 mu M photolytic atomic iodine laser with excellent beam quality (BQ = 1.15) is presented. This BQ was exhibited in the fundamental mode from a M = 3.1 confocal unstable resonator at a 0.5 Hz repetition rate. A closed cycle scrubber/laser fuel system consisting of a condensative-evaporative section, two Cu wool I2 reactor regions, and an internal turbo-blower enabled the laser to operate very reliably with low maintenance. The fuel system provided C3F7I gas at 10-60 torr absent of the photolytic quenching by-product I2. Using a turbo-molecular blower longitudinal flow velocities greater than 10 m/s were achieved through the 150 cm long by 7.5 x 7.5 cm(exp 2) cross sectional photolytic iodine gain region. In addition to the high laser output and excellent BQ, the resulting 8-12 mu s laser pulse had a coherence length greater than 45 meters and polarization extinction ratio better than 100:1. Projections from this pulsed photolytic atomic iodine laser technology to larger energies, higher repetition rates, and variable pulse widths are discussed.

  15. 500 MW peak power degenerated optical parametric amplifier delivering 52 fs pulses at 97 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, J; Hädrich, S; Röser, F; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2008-06-01

    We present a high peak power degenerated parametric amplifier operating at 1030 nm and 97 kHz repetition rate. Pulses of a state-of-the art fiber chirped-pulse amplification (FCPA) system with 840 fs pulse duration and 410 microJ pulse energy are used as pump and seed source for a two stage optical parametric amplifier. Additional spectral broadening of the seed signal in a photonic crystal fiber creates enough bandwidth for ultrashort pulse generation. Subsequent amplification of the broadband seed signal in two 1 mm BBO crystals results in 41 microJ output pulse energy. Compression in a SF 11 prism compressor yields 37 microJ pulses as short as 52 fs. Thus, pulse shortening of more than one order of magnitude is achieved. Further scaling in terms of average power and pulse energy seems possible and will be discussed, since both concepts involved, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier have the reputation to be immune against thermo-optical effects. PMID:18545609

  16. High power high repetition rate VCSEL array side-pumped pulsed blue laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Robert; Zhao, Pu; Chen, Tong; Xu, Bing; Watkins, Laurence; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2013-03-01

    High power, kW-class, 808 nm pump modules based on the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) technology were developed for side-pumping of solid-state lasers. Two 1.2 kW VCSEL pump modules were implemented in a dual side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 946 nm. The laser output was frequency doubled in a BBO crystal to produce pulsed blue light. With 125 μs pump pulses at a 300 Hz repetition rate 6.1 W QCW 946 nm laser power was produced. The laser power was limited by thermal lensing in the Nd:YAG rod.

  17. High-power, high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulses tunable in the visible.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, R J; Tang, C L

    1993-03-15

    We demonstrate a Ti:sapphire-pumped intracavity-doubled optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that generates a total of up to 240 mW of sub-100-fs pulses tunable in the visible. The OPO consists of a 1.5-mm-thick KTiPO(4) (KTP) crystal configured in a ring cavity that is synchronously pumped by a self-mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser operating at an 81-MHz repetition rate and 2.1-W average power, producing 115-fs pulses at lambda = 790 nm. Intracavity doubling of the OPO is accomplished by inserting a 47-microm-thick beta-BaB(2)O(4) crystal into an additional focus in the OPO cavity. We demonstrate continuous tuning of the second-harmonic output from 580 to 657 nm. The potential tuning range of this intracavity-doubled KTP OPO is approximately 500 to 800 nm. PMID:19802161

  18. High-repetition rate, picosecond-pulse, tunable, mid-IR PPLN OPG source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isyanova, Yelena; Tian, Wenyan; Moulton, Peter F.

    2016-03-01

    We report here on the performance of a narrow-line, mid-IR source based on a PPLN-crystal optical parametric generator (OPG). The crystal was pumped by a pulsed, 20-MHz-rate, 1064-nm Yb:fiber-based source operating with 20- psec pulses. The OPG produced a broad spectrum between 2027 nm and 2239 nm. By placing a band-pass filter after the OPG we were able to select a 30-nm bandwidth output, and we achieved further line reduction (0.7 nm) and 4.5 mW of average power at 2039 nm, using a reflective Volume Bragg Grating (VBG). Devices such as piezo-controlled etalons can provide rapidly tunable, narrow-linewidth power from this system.

  19. Measurement of vibration rate of manually operated percussion machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aleksandrov, Y. V.; Flavitskiy, Y. V.

    1973-01-01

    A special apparatus for measurement of accelerations of between 1 and 5000 g and shock stress pulses from 20 kg/cu cm up, with durations of 50.1 million sec and higher was designed and built. The amplitudes and shapes of the peak vibroshock pulses, arising during operation of a hammer, are obtained; the recording time of the continuous process is determined by the time of one revolution of the drum of a specially made mechanical photo attachment.

  20. Selective phonotaxis to high sound-pulse rate in the cricket Gryllus assimilis.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Gerald S; Kim, Jin Sung

    2013-04-01

    Calling song of the cricket Gryllus assimilis is unusual among Gryllus spp. in the high sound-pulse rate, ca. 80 Hz, within its chirps. We asked whether, as in other cricket species, females were able to analyze such a high pulse rate. In phonotaxis experiments, females failed to respond to stimuli with pulse rates substantially higher or lower than the species-typical value, demonstrating that they are indeed selective for this parameter. We also examined how pulse rate was represented by modulation in firing rate of the neuron AN1, the main carrier of information about cricket-song-like stimuli to the brain. For attractive stimuli, i.e. with high pulse rates, modulation of AN1 firing rate through time was surprisingly modest. This suggests that the brain circuits that analyze AN1 spike trains might be more sensitive to slight variations in AN1 firing rate than their counterparts in more slowly singing species. PMID:23322447

  1. Note: Operation of gamma-ray microcalorimeters at elevated count rates using filters with constraints.

    PubMed

    Alpert, B K; Horansky, R D; Bennett, D A; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Hoover, A S; Rabin, M W; Ullom, J N

    2013-05-01

    Microcalorimeter sensors operated near 0.1 K can measure the energy of individual x- and gamma-ray photons with significantly more precision than conventional semiconductor technologies. Both microcalorimeter arrays and higher per pixel count rates are desirable to increase the total throughput of spectrometers based on these devices. The millisecond recovery time of gamma-ray microcalorimeters and the resulting pulse pileup are significant obstacles to high per pixel count rates. Here, we demonstrate operation of a microcalorimeter detector at elevated count rates by use of convolution filters designed to be orthogonal to the exponential tail of a preceding pulse. These filters allow operation at 50% higher count rates than conventional filters while largely preserving sensor energy resolution. PMID:23742605

  2. Operation and thermal modeling of the ISIS H- source from 50 to 2 Hz repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, H.; Faircloth, D.; Lettry, J.

    2013-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 accelerator H- ion source, currently under construction, will operate at a 2 Hz repetition rate, with pulse length of 0.5 ms and a beam current of 80 mA. Its reliability must exceed 99 % with a mandatory 3 month uninterrupted operation period. A Penning ion source is successfully operated at ISIS; at 50 Hz repetition rate it reliably provides 55 mA H- pulses of 0.25 ms duration over 1 month. The discharge plasma ignition is very sensitive to the temperatures of the discharge region, especially of its cathode. The investigation by modeling and measurement of operation parameters suitable for arc ignition and H- production at 2 Hz is of paramount importance and must be understood prior to the implementation of discharge ion sources in the Linac4 accelerator. In its original configuration, the ISIS H- source delivers beam only if the repetition rate is above 12.5 Hz, this paper describes the implementation of a temperature control of the discharge region aiming at lower repetition rate operation. The experimental results of the modified source successfully operated down to 1.6 Hz and providing 30 mA H- pulses of 0.75 ms duration are presented. A thermal modeling of the ISIS ion source gives insight to the relevant parameters. The analysis demonstrates the adaptability of discharge sources for the operating conditions of the Linac4.

  3. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  4. Dynamic line rating in the operating environment

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, S.D. ); Maraio, R.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Much attention has been placed on the benefits derived by the dynamic rating of overhead conductors based on typical or single station weather data. Reported power line capacity show increases from 20 to 70% on the average over existing static rating practices. Because of the necessity of multistation monitoring and the implication with respect to critical span, Niagara Mohawk performed an extensive one year multistation power line study. The study revealed that the dynamic line rating was 20% lower than the average dynamic rating for the power line.

  5. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...— (i) Rated maximum continuous power (relating to unsupercharged operation or to operation in each supercharger mode as applicable); and (ii) Rated takeoff power (relating to unsupercharged operation or to... continuous power or thrust (augmented); (ii) Rated maximum continuous power or thrust (unaugmented);...

  6. An Operational Wake Vortex Sensor Using Pulsed Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ben C., Jr.; Koch, Grady J.; Nguyen, D. Chi

    1998-01-01

    more recently, including a system developed by the MIT Lincoln Laboratory. This lidar has been used for detailed measurements of wake vortex velocities in support of wake vortex model validation. The first measurements of wake vortices using a pulsed, lidar were made by Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) using a 2 micron solid-state, flashlamp-pumped system operating at 5 Hz. This system was first deployed at Denver's Stapleton Airport. Pulsed lidar has been selected as the baseline technology for an operational sensor due to its longer range capability.

  7. In situ tritium recovery behavior from Li 2TiO 3 pebble bed under neutron pulse operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Kikukawa, A.; Hoshino, T.; Nakamichi, M.; Yamada, H.; Yamaki, D.; Enoeda, M.; Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H.; Ito, H.; Hayashi, K.

    2004-08-01

    A binary pebble bed of lithium titanate (Li 2TiO 3) was irradiated in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), and its tritium recovery characteristics bed was studied under pulsed neutron operations. The temperature at the outside edge of the pebble bed increased from 300 to 350 °C immediately after the window of hafnium (Hf) neutron absorber was turned toward the reactor core, while the tritium recovery rate increased gradually. The ratio of tritium recovery rate to generation rate at the high-power, ( R/ G) high, approached the saturated value of unity at about 20 h of operation. Overall tritium recovery behavior under the pulsed operation was similar to that under the steady state power operation. An estimated time constant of about 3 h for the tritium recovery was much longer than the thermal time constant of about 100 s.

  8. Speech perception performance as a function of stimulus pulse rate and processing strategy preference for the Cochlear Nucleus CI24RE device: relation to perceptual threshold and loudness comfort profiles.

    PubMed

    Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Dillier, Norbert; Lai, Wai Kong; Begall, Klaus; Leypon, Elisabeth Estrada; González, Juan C Falcón; Manrique, Manuel; Morera, Constantino; Müller-Deile, Joachim; Wesarg, Thomas; Zarowski, Andrzej; Killian, Matthijs J; von Wallenberg, Ernst; Smoorenburg, Guido F

    2010-09-01

    Current cochlear implants can operate at high pulse rates. The effect of increasing pulse rate on speech performance is not yet clear. Habituation to low rates may affect the outcome. This paper presents the results of three subsequent studies using different experimental paradigms, applying the Nucleus CI24RE device, and conducted by ten European implant teams. Pulse rate per channel varied from 500 to 3500 pulses per second with ACE and from 1200 to 3500 pps with CIS strategy. The results showed that the first rate presented had little effect on the finally preferred rate. Lower rates were preferred. The effect of pulse rate on word scores of post-linguistic implantees was small; high rates tended to give lower scores. However, there were no significant differences between the word scores across subjects if collected at the individually preferred pulse rate. High pulse rates were preferred when the post-implantation threshold was low. PMID:20583945

  9. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyaningrum, A.; Ratnawati, Jos, B.

    2015-12-01

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O3) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  10. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Prasetyaningrum, A. Ratnawati,; Jos, B.

    2015-12-29

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O{sub 3}) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  11. Minimizing pattern effects in semiconductor lasers at high rate pulse modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torphammar, P.; Tell, R.; Eklund, H.; Johnston, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper deals with analytical and experimental work related to modulation of a semiconductor laser used in high bit rate communication. The approach is based upon minimizing the charge storage effect by a proper choice of the area of the modulating pulses and the bias current. The concept of using additional current pulses to probe for variations in electron density between pulses is investigated. The primary limitation on bit rate is found to be the ability to generate laser drive pulses free of ringing or similar transients. This and the 300 ps pulsewidth, an experimental constraint, limit the bit rate to about 1 Gbit/s. However, by using this approach it appears that bit rates considerably higher than 2 Gbits/s could be reached with sufficiently accurate control of drive pulse shape. It is found that the laser bias and the current pulse area had to be controlled within 1 percent and 10 percent, respectively.

  12. Using a Calculated Pulse Rate with an Artificial Neural Network to Detect Irregular Interbeats.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Bih-Chyun; Lin, Wen-Piao

    2016-03-01

    Heart rate is an important clinical measure that is often used in pathological diagnosis and prognosis. Valid detection of irregular heartbeats is crucial in the clinical practice. We propose an artificial neural network using the calculated pulse rate to detect irregular interbeats. The proposed system measures the calculated pulse rate to determine an "irregular interbeat on" or "irregular interbeat off" event. If an irregular interbeat is detected, the proposed system produces a danger warning, which is helpful for clinicians. If a non-irregular interbeat is detected, the proposed system displays the calculated pulse rate. We include a flow chart of the proposed software. In an experiment, we measure the calculated pulse rates and achieve an error percentage of < 3% in 20 participants with a wide age range. When we use the calculated pulse rates to detect irregular interbeats, we find such irregular interbeats in eight participants. PMID:26643078

  13. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  14. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data of the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  15. High-pulse-repetition-rate UV lasers with the inductance-capacitance discharge stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Andramanov, A V; Kabaev, S A; Lazhintsev, B V; Nor-Arevyan, V A; Pisetskaya, A V; Selemir, Victor D

    2009-02-28

    Compact high-pulse-repetition-rate XeF and KrF excimer lasers and an N{sub 2} laser with plate electrodes and the inductive-capacitance discharge stabilisation are studied. The composition and pressure of the active medium of lasers are optimised for obtaining the maximum output energy and maximum pulse repetition rate at comparatively low (no more than 19 m s{sup -1}) active-medium flow rates in the interelectrode gap. The pulse repetition rate achieved 4-5 kHz for the relative root-mean-square deviation of the laser pulse energy less than 2%. It is found that the energy of the N{sub 2}-laser pulses changes periodically under the action of acoustic perturbations appearing at high pulse repetition rates. It is shown that the use of the inductance-capacitance stabilisation of the discharge provides the increase in the maximum pulse repetition rate by 0.5-1.5 kHz (depending on the active medium type). It is found that the stability of the output energy and maximum pulse repetition rate depend on the location of preionisation sparks with respect to the gas flow direction. Some ways for the development of the technology of plate electrodes and inductance-capacitance discharge stabilisation are proposed. (lasers)

  16. Validation of pulse rate variability as a surrogate for heart rate variability in chronically instrumented rabbits.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Peter R; Schiller, Alicia M; Zucker, Irving H

    2014-07-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a function of cardiac autonomic tone that is widely used in both clinical and animal studies. In preclinical studies, HRV measures are frequently derived using the arterial pulse waveform from an implanted pressure telemetry device, termed pulse rate variability (PRV), instead of the electrocardiogram signal in accordance with clinical guidelines. The acceptability of PRV as a surrogate for HRV in instrumented animals is unknown. Using rabbits implanted with intracardiac leads and chronically implanted pressure transducers, we investigated the correlation and agreement of time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear indexes of HRV and PRV at baseline. We also investigated the effects of ventricular pacing and autonomic blockade on both measures. At baseline, HRV and PRV time- and frequency-domain parameters showed robust correlations and moderate to high agreement, whereas nonlinear parameters showed slightly weaker correlations and varied agreement. Ventricular pacing almost completely eliminated HRV, and spectral analysis of the PRV signal revealed a HRV-independent rhythm. After cardiac autonomic blockade with atropine or metoprolol, the changes in time- and non-normalized frequency-domain measures of PRV continued to show strong correlations and moderate to high agreement with corresponding changes in HRV measures. Blockade-induced changes in nonlinear PRV indexes correlated poorly with HRV changes and showed weak agreement. These results suggest that time- and frequency-domain measures of PRV are acceptable surrogates for HRV even in the context of changing cardiac autonomic tone, but caution should be used when nonlinear measures are a primary end point or when HRV is very low as HRV-independent rhythms may predominate. PMID:24791786

  17. Optical breakdown of multilayer thin-films induced by ultrashort pulses at MHz repetition rates.

    PubMed

    Angelov, Ivan B; von Pechmann, Maximilian; Trubetskov, Michael K; Krausz, Ferenc; Pervak, Vladimir

    2013-12-16

    Multilayer coatings composed of TiO(2), Ta(2)O(5), HfO(2), or Al(2)O(3) as high-index materials and SiO(2) as low-index material were investigated for laser-induced damage using 1 ps, 5 µJ pulses generated by a mode-locked Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator operating at a wavelength of 1030 nm and repetition rate of 11.5 MHz. Previously reported linear band gap dependence of damage threshold at kHz repetition rates was confirmed also for the MHz regime. Additionally, we studied the effect of electric field distribution inside of the layer stack. We did not observe any significant influence of thermal effects on the laser-induced damage threshold in this regime. PMID:24514719

  18. All-fiber passively mode-locked Tm-doped NOLM-based oscillator operating at 2-μm in both soliton and noisy-pulse regimes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Zuxing; Sun, Zhongyuan; Luo, Hongyu; Liu, Yong; Yan, Zhijun; Mou, Chengbo; Zhang, Lin; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2014-04-01

    A self-starting all-fiber passively mode-locked Tm(3+)-doped fiber laser based on nonlinear loop mirror (NOLM) is demonstrated. Stable soliton pulses centered at 2017.33 nm with 1.56 nm FWHM were produced at a repetition rate of 1.514 MHz with pulse duration of 2.8 ps and pulse energy of 83.8 pJ. As increased pump power, the oscillator can also operate at noise-like (NL) regime. Stable NL pulses with coherence spike width of 341 fs and pulse energy of up to 249.32 nJ was achieved at a center wavelength of 2017.24 nm with 21.33 nm FWHM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first 2 µm region NOLM-based mode-locked fiber laser operating at two regimes with the highest single pulse energy for NL pulses. PMID:24718163

  19. Comparison of heart rate variability and pulse rate variability detected with photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, Robert; Limley, Robert; Bauer, Rainer-Dieter; Radespiel-Troger, Martin; Mueck-Weymann, Michael

    2004-08-01

    This study compares ear photoplethysmography (PPG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) in providing accurate heart beat intervals for use in calculations of heart rate variability (HRV, from ECG) or of pulse rate variability (PRV, from PPG) respectively. Simultaneous measurements were taken from 44 healthy subjects at rest during spontaneous breathing and during forced metronomic breathing (6/min). Under both conditions, highly significant (p > 0.001) correlations (1.0 > r > 0.97) were found between all evaluated common HRV and PRV parameters. However, under both conditions the PRV parameters were higher than HRV. In addition, we calculated the limits of agreement according to Bland and Altman between both techniques and found good agreement (< 10% difference) for heart rate and standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), but only moderate (10-20%) or even insufficient (> 20%) agreement for other standard HRV and PRV parameters. Thus, PRV data seem to be acceptable for screening purposes but, at least at this state of knowledge, not for medical decision making. However, further studies are needed before more certain determination can be made.

  20. Fibre laser with a subterahertz repetition rate of ultrashort pulses in the telecom range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. V.; Mylnikov, V. M.; Koptev, M. Yu; Muravyev, S. V.; Kim, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated a new fibre laser configuration for the generation of ultrashort pulses at a repetition rate far exceeding the fundamental cavity frequency. The laser configuration includes a nonlinear amplifying mirror as an artificial saturable absorber for mode locking and a spectral comb filter for pulse separation stabilisation. Generation of trains and sequences of ultrashort pulses at a repetition rate tunable in the range 8 – 200 GHz has been demonstrated experimentally. The pulses generated by the laser have been shown to retain an ordered, equidistant structure on a nanosecond timescale.

  1. 14 CFR 35.5 - Propeller ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller ratings and operating limitations. 35.5 Section 35.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS General § 35.5 Propeller ratings and operating limitations. (a) Propeller ratings and...

  2. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine ratings and operating limitations. 33.7 Section 33.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES General § 33.7 Engine ratings and operating limitations. (a) Engine ratings and...

  3. NO{sub x} and CO emissions from a pulse combustor operating in a lean premixed mode

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.O.; Bramlette, T.T.; Barr, P.K.; Alvarez, J.

    1993-04-01

    Emission levels below 5.0 ppM NO{sub x}, with corresponding levels of 75 ppM CO (corrected to 3% O{sub 2}), were achieved in a pulse combustor operating in a lean premixed mode. Both NO{sub x} and CO concentrations were invariant with the total mass flow rate, but NO{sub x} and CO concentrations did vary with the rate of microscopic mixing.

  4. A pilot study on low power pulse rate detection based on compressive sampling.

    PubMed

    Huang, B Y; Wang, L; Wang, B; Lin, S J; Wu, D; Zhang, Y T

    2009-01-01

    Low power consumption is one of the key design challenges for various pervasive healthcare systems. Compressive Sampling (CS) is an emerging technique for reconstructing signals from data sampled under the Nyquist rate. CS has great potentials for low power pulse rate detection based on photoplethysmograph (PPG) signals, since by reducing the PPG data sampling rate the LEDs could be turned off for a prolonged period of time. Obviously the higher CS rate, the lower power consumption and lower pulse rate measurement accuracies. In this paper, a feasibility study of using CS for low power pulse rate detection was conducted. A miniature PPG measurement device based on our body sensor networks platform was employed for signal acquisition. Experiments for evaluation the pulse rate estimation and the power consumption were completed. Results suggested that the Gradient Projection for Sparse Reconstruction (GPSR) algorithm is a highly efficient for retrieving pulse rate from PPG signals. It was suggested that the CS rate should be approximate 3 for low power pulse rate detections with averaging estimation mean-square error being less than 5. PMID:19963730

  5. Long-pulse high-repetition-rate transversely excited CO2 laser for material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Yuji; Yasuoka, Koichi; Ishii, Akira; Tamagawa, Tohru

    1994-05-01

    Using a TE-CO2 laser, we could obtain a long-pulsed laser beam of low initial spike by controlling the discharge current by a pulse forming network and optimizing the gas composition, discharge length to resonator length ratio, and output mirror reflectivity. The maximum laser output was 1.1 J; the initial spike energy, 100 kW; the tail output, 56 kW; and the 16 (mu) sec (FWHM). The maximum repetition rate was 500 Hz. A new type of circuit with small pre-ionization current made it possible to operate the laser at a high repetition rate so as to prolong the laser life. When a 5-inch lens was used, the laser power density at the focal point was 1*108 W/cm2, making it possible to use the laser with an unusually high energy density without causing the breakdown of air insulation. In fact, we succeeded in fine- cutting a 0.5 mm thick alumina ceramic with the laser. It was found that unlike other working methods, the newly developed laser does not cause cracks in ceramic work pieces.

  6. Construction of a 400 KJ-class pulsed superconducting magnet and its operating characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, T.; Tateishi, H.; Komuro, K.; Koyama, K.; Yamada, T.

    1981-09-01

    A pulsed superconducting magnet with a stored energy of 375 KJ has been developed. The central field is 6 T at 2510 amp. The conductor is a compacted strand cable which is composed of 23 strands. Each copper-stabilized filament in the strand is separated by a hexagonal cupronickel wall. The cable is not solder filled and thus not mechanically rigid. The winding inner and outer and axial length of the magnet are respectively 220 mm, 399 mm, and 345 mm. The magnet bobbin is made of epoxy glass-fiber material. The magnet was charged up to 2600 amp after having experienced training three times. At that current the stored energy was about 402 KJ. The first quench occurred at 2460 amp, a little lower current than the design current. In pulse operations, the magnet was successfully charged up to 6 T at a ramping rate of about 1.5 T/sec and up to 5.4 T at about 3.5 T/sec and discharged to zero at a ramping rate of about 3.1 T/sec without quenching. Noticeable evaporation of liquid helium due to ac losses did not occur. The faster ramping rates were limited by the power supply, not by the coil performance. During the charges, no major conductor motions were observed. 6 refs.

  7. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Duggin, Billy W.; Widner, Melvin M.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher.

  8. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Duggin, B.W.; Widner, M.M.

    1992-06-30

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher. 2 figs.

  9. Octave-spanning OPCPA system delivering CEP-stable few-cycle pulses and 22 W of average power at 1 MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, Jan; Demmler, Stefan; Hädrich, Steffen; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    We report on an OPCPA system delivering CEP-stable pulses with a pulse duration of only 1.7 optical cycles at 880 nm wavelength. This pulse duration is achieved by the generation, optical parametric amplification and compression of a full optical octave of bandwidth. The system is pumped by a high average power Yb-fiber laser system, which allows for operation of the OPCPA at up to 1 MHz repetition rate and 22 W of average output power. Further scaling towards single-cycle pulses, higher energy and output power is discussed. PMID:22565712

  10. Pump-seed synchronization for MHz repetition rate, high-power optical parametric chirped pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Hanieh; Teisset, Catherine Yuriko; Pronin, Oleg; Sugita, Atsushi; Graf, Roswitha; Pervak, Vladimir; Gu, Xun; Metzger, Thomas; Major, Zsuzsanna; Krausz, Ferenc; Apolonski, Alexander

    2012-04-23

    We report on an active synchronization between two independent mode-locked lasers using a combined electronic-optical feedback. With this scheme, seed pulses at MHz repetition rate were amplified in a non-collinear optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier (OPCPA). The amplifier was seeded with stretched 1.5 nJ pulses from a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator, while pumped with the 1 ps, 2.9 µJ frequency-doubled output of an Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator. The residual timing jitter between the two oscillators was suppressed to 120 fs (RMS), allowing for an efficient and broadband amplification at 11.5 MHz to a pulse energy of 700 nJ and an average power of 8 W. First compression experiment with 240 nJ amplified pulse energy resulted in a pulse duration of ~10 fs. PMID:22535076

  11. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment improved the rate of autograft peripheral nerve regeneration in rat.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenli; Wang, Yuexiang; Tang, Jie; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Guo, Quanyi; Guo, Zhiyuan; Li, Pan; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been widely used in clinic for the treatment of repairing pseudarthrosis, bone fractures and of healing in various soft tissues. Some reports indicated that LIPUS accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration including Schwann cells (SCs) and injured nerves. But little is known about its appropriate intensities on autograft nerves. This study was to investigate which intensity of LIPUS improved the regeneration of gold standard postsurgical nerves in experimental rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats were made into 10 mm right side sciatic nerve reversed autologous nerve transplantation and randomly treated with 250 mW/cm(2), 500 mW/cm(2) or 750 mW/cm(2) LIPUS for 2-12 weeks after operation. Functional and pathological results showed that LIPUS of 250 mW/cm(2) significantly induced faster rate of axonal regeneration. This suggested that autograft nerve regeneration was improved. PMID:27102358

  12. Apparatus and method for tuned unsteady flow purging of high pulse rate spark gaps

    DOEpatents

    Thayer, III, William J.

    1990-01-01

    A spark gap switch apparatus is disclosed which is capable of operating at a high pulse rate which comprises an insulated housing; a pair of spaced apart electrodes each having one end thereof within a first bore formed in the housing and defining a spark gap therebetween; a pressure wave reflector in the first bore in the housing and spaced from the spark gap and capable of admitting purge flow; and a second enlarged bore contiguous with the first bore and spaced from the opposite side of the spark gap; whereby pressure waves generated during discharge of a spark across the spark gap will reflect off the wave reflector and back from the enlarged bore to the spark gap to clear from the spark gap hot gases residues generated during the discharge and simultaneously restore the gas density and pressure in the spark gap to its initial value.

  13. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment improved the rate of autograft peripheral nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenli; Wang, Yuexiang; Tang, Jie; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Guo, Quanyi; Guo, Zhiyuan; Li, Pan; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been widely used in clinic for the treatment of repairing pseudarthrosis, bone fractures and of healing in various soft tissues. Some reports indicated that LIPUS accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration including Schwann cells (SCs) and injured nerves. But little is known about its appropriate intensities on autograft nerves. This study was to investigate which intensity of LIPUS improved the regeneration of gold standard postsurgical nerves in experimental rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats were made into 10 mm right side sciatic nerve reversed autologous nerve transplantation and randomly treated with 250 mW/cm2, 500 mW/cm2 or 750 mW/cm2 LIPUS for 2–12 weeks after operation. Functional and pathological results showed that LIPUS of 250 mW/cm2 significantly induced faster rate of axonal regeneration. This suggested that autograft nerve regeneration was improved. PMID:27102358

  14. Operation of the TFTR Pellet Charge Exchange Diagnostic in the Pulse Counting Mode during H+ RF-minority Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S., PPPL

    1998-05-01

    The Pellet Charge Exchange technique on TFTR has been used primarily to obtain active charge exchange measurements using a high energy (0.5 - 4.0 MeV) neutral particle analyzer (NPA) in conjunction with impurity pellet injection (Li and B) with the scintillator-photomultiplier detector system operated in the current mode. While passive measurements using pulse counting were also obtained using this instrumentation, operation in this mode was very restrictive with pulse counting rates limited to less than {approximately}10 kHz in the absence of any significant neutron and gamma induced background signal. An upgrade to a specialized pulse counting capability which was developed by the Ioffe Institute was implemented which consisted of CsI(Tl) scintillators having features designed to minimize signals induced by background neutron and gamma rays and 16-channel pulse height analysis electronics on each of the eight NPA energy channels. Passive measurements of RF-driven energetic hydrogen minority ions which served to verify operation of the pulse counting mode are reported. It is shown that in the passive mode the main donors for the neutralization of H+ ions in this energy range are C5+ ions. The measured effective H+ tail temperatures range from 0.15 MeV at an RF power of 2 MW to 0.35 MeV at 6 MW.

  15. Self-mode-locked all-fibre erbium laser with a low repetition rate and high pulse energy

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, Vladimir I; Nyushkov, B N; Pivtsov, V S

    2010-01-31

    Self-starting mode locking is demonstrated for the first time in an all-fibre erbium laser with a cavity length above 1 km and high positive (normal) intracavity dispersion. The unconventional cavity design, with polarisation instability compensation, ensures stable operation and good frequency stability. The laser generates pulses with a record low repetition rate (82.4 kHz) and record high energy (564.3 nJ). (lasers)

  16. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    PubMed

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power. PMID:24007048

  17. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh, P. H.; Trong, V. D.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  18. Continuous operation of high bit rate quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, A. R.; Yuan, Z. L.; Dynes, J. F.; Sharpe, A. W.; Shields, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    We demonstrate a quantum key distribution with a secure bit rate exceeding 1 Mbit/s over 50 km fiber averaged over a continuous 36 h period. Continuous operation of high bit rates is achieved using feedback systems to control path length difference and polarization in the interferometer and the timing of the detection windows. High bit rates and continuous operation allows finite key size effects to be strongly reduced, achieving a key extraction efficiency of 96% compared to keys of infinite lengths.

  19. Drilling rate of five metals with picosecond laser pulses at 355, 532, and 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiro, Alex; Lowe, Mary; Pasmanik, Guerman

    2012-06-01

    Experimental results on picosecond laser processing of aluminum, nickel, stainless steel, molybdenum, and tungsten are described. Hole drilling is employed for comparative analysis of processing rates in an air environment. Drilling rates are measured over a wide range of laser fluences (0.05-20 J/cm2). Experiments with picosecond pulses at 355 nm are carried out for all five metals and in addition at 532 nm, and 1064 nm for nickel. A comparison of drilling rate with 6-ps and 6-ns pulses at 355 nm is performed. The dependence of drilling rate on laser fluence measured with picosecond pulses demonstrates two logarithmic regimes for all five metals. To determine the transition from one regime to another, a critical fluence is measured and correlated with the thermal properties of the metals. The logarithmic regime at high-fluence range with UV picosecond pulses is reported for the first time. The energy efficiency of material removal for the different regimes is evaluated. The results demonstrate that UV picosecond pulses can provide comparable quality and higher processing rate compared with literature data on ablation with near-IR femtosecond lasers. A significant contribution of two-photon absorption to the ablation process is suggested to explain high processing rate with powerful UV picosecond pulses.

  20. TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment; Part II: Pulse operation

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, I.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A. )

    1994-01-01

    Experimental results of pulse parameters and control rod worth measurements at TRIGA Mark 2 reactor in Ljubljana are presented. The measurements were performed with a completely fresh, uniform, and compact core. Only standard fuel elements with 12 wt% uranium were used. Special efforts were made to get reliable and accurate results at well-defined experimental conditions, and it is proposed to use the results as a benchmark test case for TRIGA reactors.

  1. High-repetition-rate chirped-pulse-amplification thin-disk laser system with joule-level pulse energy.

    PubMed

    Tümmler, J; Jung, R; Stiel, H; Nickles, P V; Sandner, W

    2009-05-01

    We are reporting on the development of a diode-pumped chirped-pulse-amplification (CPA) laser system based on Yb:YAG thin-disk technology with a repetition rate of 100 Hz and output pulse energy in the joule range. The focus lies with the first results of the preamplifier--a regenerative amplifier (RA) and a multipass amplifier (MP). The system consists of a front end including the CPA stretcher followed by an amplifier chain based on Yb:YAG thin-disk amplifiers and the CPA compressor. It is developed in the frame of our x-ray laser (XRL) program and fulfills all requirements for pumping a plasma-based XRL in grazing incidence pumping geometry. Of course it can also be used for other interesting applications. With the RA pulse energies of more than 165 mJ can be realized. At a repetition rate of 100 Hz a stability of 0.8% (1sigma) over a period of more than 45 min has been measured. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 14%. The following MP amplifier can increase the pulse energy to more than 300 mJ. A nearly bandwidth-limited recompression to less than 2 ps could be demonstrated. PMID:19412278

  2. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Operating Characteristics of a Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, Ashley Kristin

    The effect of inductive coil geometry on the operating characteristics of a pulsed inductive plasma thruster is investigated analytically and experimentally. Coil inductance is measured as a function of the position of a simulated current sheet and modeled using finite element analysis to develop a two-dimensional semi-empirical inductance relation that is used to expand a circuit-based acceleration model from one to two dimensions. The model includes electromagnetic and gas-dynamic forces but excludes any process to translate radial plasma motion into axial motion. Furthermore a magnetically-impermeable current sheet encompassing all the propellant for a pulse is assumed to form immediately at the start of the pulse and at the surface of the inductive coil. The two-dimensional acceleration model is nondimensionalized, yielding a set of dimensionless performance scaling parameters. Model results indicate that the introduction of radial current sheet motion caused by a conical inductive coil geometry (versus a flat circular plate) increases the axial dynamic impedance parameter at which thrust efficiency is maximized and generally decreases the overall achievable thrust efficiency. Operational characteristics of two thrusters with inductive coils of different cone angles are explored through thrust stand measurements and time-integrated, unfiltered photography. Trends in impulse bit measurements indicate that, in the present configuration, the thruster with the inductive coil possessing a smaller cone angle produced larger values of thrust, in apparent contradiction to results of the model. Areas of increased light intensity in photographs of thruster operation are assumed to qualitatively represent locations of increased current density. Light intensity is generally greater in images of the thruster with the smaller cone angle when compared to those of the thruster with the larger half cone angle for the same operating conditions, and generally decreases in both

  3. Reliability of High Power Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Reliability and lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays are greatly influenced by their thermal characteristics. This paper examines the thermal properties of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse duration regime.

  4. High-power 355 nm ultraviolet lasers operating at ultrahigh repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Liu, Q.; Yan, P.; Gong, M.

    2013-02-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate a novel 355 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser operating at ultrahigh repetition rate from 300 kHz to 1 MHz. The hybrid fiber-MOPA-bulk amplifiers based IR source exhibits a high average power of 105 W with near-diffraction-limited beam quality, narrow linewidth and high polarization extinction ratio. Two-cascaded LBO crystals are employed for high efficiency frequency tripling, and a maximum 43.7 W of average UV power is achieved at 400 kHz, corresponding to a conversion efficiency as high as 41.6%. The pulse duration of the UV pulse can be tuned from 5 to 10 ns with good pulse peak stability (better than 2.2% (RMS)).

  5. Evaluation of catalyst for closed cycle operation of high energy pulsed CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Miller, I. M.; Wood, G.; Schryer, D. R.; Hess, R. V.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    Several catalyst materials have been tested for efficiency of converting CO and O2 to CO2 for use in a high energy CO2 laser. The composition of the gas mixtures was monitored by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. A copper/copper oxide catalyst and a platinum/tin oxide catalyst were used for closed cycle operation of a CO2 laser (0.7 joules/pulse), operating at 10 pulses/sec.

  6. Blood pressure, pulse rate, and rhythm measurement using ionic polymer-metal composite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarzi, Amid; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Kim, Kwang J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    1999-05-01

    The need for more enhanced blood pressure (BP), pulse rate and rhythm senors has given rise to the possibility of using ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) sensors. In this study we propose to use the IPMC sensors to measure systolic and diastolic BP, pulse rate and rhythm. The proposed IPMC sensors take advantage of the endo-ionic mobility within the polymer- metal composite by converting normal and shear load inputs into an induced voltage output across the thickness of the IPMC sensor. The fabricated IPMC sensors are suitable to be installed on the inner surface of a cuff and, therefore, both systolic and diastolic BP, pulse rate, and rhythm can be measured. An added benefit is the ability of measuring 'pulse rhythm' which give a more amplified look at heart irregularities which a typical pulse rate sensor is unable to show. Our data shows IPMC sensors can produce consistent and reliable BP readings, pulse rate, and rhythm. Typically, a linear relationship between applied maximum load and induced maximum voltage was obtained. This result can be easily translated into good BP reading.

  7. Upgrade of Doublet III neutral beam injection to long pulse operation

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, D. W.; McColl, D. B.; Pipkins, J. F.

    1981-10-01

    Long pulse physics questions have been raised for auxiliary heated plasma discharges in Tokamaks. A one-second pulse encloses present experiments and is adequate for studying quasi-steady-state operation, whereas, a 5 to 10 second pulse may be required to examine impurity effects of plasma-wall interaction and current profile relaxation. In order to sustain heating in the multi-second pulse range, neutral beam devices must be capable of the same pulse durations. By upgrading the beam collimators, and ion source components, the Doublet III neutral beam injectors can be made to operate with pulses up to 5 seconds in duration with the interpulse period extended to maintain approximately the same duty factor. The scope of the upgrading includes (1) exchanging the accelerator section of the ion source with one having actively cooled tubular grids, and (2) removing or replacing collimators where necessary to stay below 600/sup 0/C peak temperature. An actively cooled ion dump is necessary for pulses substantially longer than 5 seconds. Effects of drift duct choking and induced eddy currents in the cryopanels were examined and found to have a negligible effect on operating the neutral beam injectors up to 5 second pulse duration.

  8. Bubble Pulse Cancelation in the Time-Frequency Domain Using Warping Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hai-Qiang; Zhang, Ren-He; Li, Zheng-Lin; Guo, Yong-Gang; He, Li

    2013-08-01

    The received shock waves produced by explosive charges are often polluted by bubble pulses in underwater acoustic experiments. A method based on warping operators is proposed to cancel the bubble pulses in the time-frequency domain. This is applied to the explosive data collected during the Yellow Sea experiment in November 2000. The original received signal is first transformed into a warped signal by warping operators. Then, the warped signal is analyzed in the time-frequency domain. Due to the different features between the shock waves and the bubble pulses in the time-frequency domain for the warped signal, the bubble pulses can be easily filtered out. Furthermore, the shock waves in the original time domain can be retrieved by the inverse warping transformation. The autocorrelation functions and the time-frequency representation show that the bubble pulses can be canceled effectively.

  9. Rate discrimination at low pulse rates in normal-hearing and cochlear implant listeners: Influence of intracochlear stimulation site.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Pierre; Macherey, Olivier; Meunier, Sabine; Roman, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Temporal pitch perception in cochlear implantees remains weaker than in normal hearing listeners and is usually limited to rates below about 300 pulses per second (pps). Recent studies have suggested that stimulating the apical part of the cochlea may improve the temporal coding of pitch by cochlear implants (CIs), compared to stimulating other sites. The present study focuses on rate discrimination at low pulse rates (ranging from 20 to 104 pps). Two experiments measured and compared pulse rate difference limens (DLs) at four fundamental frequencies (ranging from 20 to 104 Hz) in both CI and normal-hearing (NH) listeners. Experiment 1 measured DLs in users of the (Med-El CI, Innsbruck, Austria) device for two electrodes (one apical and one basal). In experiment 2, DLs for NH listeners were compared for unresolved harmonic complex tones filtered in two frequency regions (lower cut-off frequencies of 1200 and 3600 Hz, respectively) and for different bandwidths. Pulse rate discrimination performance was significantly better when stimulation was provided by the apical electrode in CI users and by the lower-frequency tone complexes in NH listeners. This set of data appears consistent with better temporal coding when stimulation originates from apical regions of the cochlea. PMID:27106306

  10. Optical pulse dynamics for quantum-dot logic operations in a photonic-crystal waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xun; John, Sajeev

    2011-11-15

    We numerically demonstrate all-optical logic operations with quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a bimodal photonic-crystal waveguide using Maxwell-Bloch equations in a slowly varying envelope approximation (SVEA). The two-level QD excitation level is controlled by one or more femtojoule optical driving pulses passing through the waveguide. Specific logic operations depend on the relative pulse strengths and their detunings from an inhomogeneouslly broadened (about 1% for QD transitions centered at 1.5 {mu}m) QD transition. This excitation controlled two-level medium then determines passage of subsequent probe optical pulses. Envelope equations for electromagnetic waves in the linear dispersion and cutoff waveguide modes are derived to simplify solution of the coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations in the waveguide. These determine the quantum mechanical evolution of the QD excitation and its polarization, driven by classical electromagnetic (EM) pulses near a sharp discontinuity in the EM density of states of the bimodal waveguide. Different configurations of the driving pulses lead to distinctive relations between driving pulse strength and probe pulse passage, representing all-optical logic and, or, and not operations. Simulation results demonstrate that such operations can be done on picosecond time scales and within a waveguide length of about 10 {mu}m in a photonic-band-gap (PBG) optical microchip.

  11. Respiratory rate derived from smartphone-camera-acquired pulse photoplethysmographic signals.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Jesús; Nam, Yunyoung; Gil, Eduardo; Laguna, Pablo; Chon, Ki H

    2015-11-01

    A method for deriving respiratory rate from smartphone-camera-acquired pulse photoplethysmographic (SCPPG) signal is presented. Our method exploits respiratory information by examining the pulse wave velocity and dispersion from the SCPPG waveform and we term these indices as the pulse width variability (PWV). A method to combine information from several derived respiration signals is also presented and it is used to combine PWV information with other methods such as pulse amplitude variability (PAV), pulse rate variability (PRV), and respiration-induced amplitude and frequency modulations (AM and FM) in SCPPG signals.Evaluation is performed on a database containing SCPPG signals recorded from 30 subjects during controlled respiration experiments at rates from 0.2 to 0.6 Hz with an increment of 0.1 Hz, using three different devices: iPhone 4S, iPod 5, and HTC One M8. Results suggest that spontaneous respiratory rates (0.2-0.4 Hz) can be estimated from SCPPG signals by the PWV- and PRV-based methods with low relative error (median of order 0.5% and interquartile range of order 2.5%). The accuracy can be improved by combining PWV and PRV with other methods such as PAV, AM and/or FM methods. Combination of these methods yielded low relative error for normal respiratory rates, and maintained good performance at higher rates (0.5-0.6 Hz) when using the iPhone 4S or iPod 5 devices. PMID:26450762

  12. Operational processing and cloud boundary detection from micro pulse lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Scott, V. Stanley., III; Turner, David D.

    1998-01-01

    Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) was developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) as the result of research on space-borne lidar techniques. It was designed to provide continuous, unattended observations of all significant atmospheric cloud and aerosol structure with a rugged, compact system design and the benefit of eye safety (Spinhirne 1993). The significant eye safety feature is achieved by using low pulse energies and high pulse repetition rates compared to standard lidar systems. MPL systems use a diode pumped 10 microj, 2500 Hz doubled Nd:YLF laser. In addition, a solid state Geiger mode avalanche photo diode (GAPD) photon counting detector is used allowing for quantum efficiencies approaching 70%. Other design features have previously been noted by Spinhirne (1995). Though a commercially available instrument, with nearly 20 systems operating around the world, the most extensive MPL work has come from those operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) (Stokes and Schwartz 1994) program. The diverse ability of the instrument relating to the measurement of basic cloud macrophysical structure and both cloud and aerosol radiative properties well suits the ARM research philosophy. MPL data can be used to yield many parameters including cloud boundary heights to the limit of signal attenuation, cloud scattering cross sections and optical thicknesses, planetary boundary layer heights and aerosol scattering profiles, including those into the stratosphere in nighttime cases (Hlavka et al 1996). System vertical resolution ranges from 30 m to 300 m (i.e. high and low resolution respectively) depending on system design. The lidar research group at GSFC plays an advisory role in the operation, calibration and maintenance of NASA and ARM owned MPL systems. Over the past three years, processing software and system correction techniques have been developed in anticipation of the increasing population of systems amongst the community. Datasets produced by three ARM

  13. Application of a nanosecond laser pulse to evaluate dynamic hardness under ultra-high strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziejewska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents results of experimental tests of plastic metals deformation generated by a shock wave induced by laser pulse. Tests were carried out on the Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and the laser pulse of 10 ns duration. The shock wave generate by the laser pulse was used to induced local plastic deformation of the material surface. The study examined the possibility of application the process to develop a new method of measuring the dynamic hardness of materials under ultra-high strain rate. It has been shown that the shock wave induced by the laser pulse with an energy of 0.35-1.22 J causes a repeatable plastic deformation of surface of commercially available metals and alloys without thermal effects on the surfaces. Based on the knowledge of an imprint geometry, it is possible to evaluate the dynamic hardness of materials at strain rate in the range of 107 s-1.

  14. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Höppner, H.; Tanikawa, T.; Schulz, M.; Riedel, R.; Teubner, U.; Faatz, B.; Tavella, F.

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to many hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.

  15. Capacitors, thermal rating/derating (ac-dc operation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borough, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Application techniques for determining performance and ratings of cased capacitors under combined operation as a function of the actual operating conditions are described. Thermal impedances between the case and external environment and between the internal hot spot and case are taken into account.

  16. Operability of an Ejector Enhanced Pulse Combustor in a Gas Turbine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Dougherty, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    A pressure-gain combustor comprised of a mechanically valved, liquid fueled pulsejet, an ejector, and an enclosing shroud, was coupled to a small automotive turbocharger to form a self-aspirating, thrust producing gas turbine engine. The system was constructed in order to investigate issues associated with the interaction of pulsed combustion devices and turbomachinery. Installed instrumentation allowed for sensing of distributed low frequency pressure and temperature, high frequency pressure in the shroud, fuel flow rate, rotational speed, thrust, and laboratory noise. The engine ran successfully and reliably, achieving a sustained thrust of 5 to 6 lbf, and maintaining a rotor speed of approximately 90,000 rpm, with a combustor pressure gain of approximately 4 percent. Numerical simulations of the system without pressure-gain combustion indicated that the turbocharger would not operate. Thus, the new combustor represented a substantial improvement in system performance. Acoustic measurements in the shroud and laboratory indicated turbine stage sound pressure level attenuation of 20 dB. This is consistent with published results from detonative combustion experiments. As expected, the mechanical reed valves suffered considerable damage under the higher pressure and thermal loading characteristics of this system. This result underscores the need for development of more robust valve systems for this application. The efficiency of the turbomachinery components did not appear to be significantly affected by unsteadiness associated with pulsed combustion, though the steady component efficiencies were already low, and thus not expected to be particularly sensitive.

  17. Pulse-by-pulse multi-beam-line operation for x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Toru; Fukami, Kenji; Inagaki, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Kinjo, Ryota; Kondo, Chikara; Otake, Yuji; Tajiri, Yasuyuki; Takebe, Hideki; Togawa, Kazuaki; Yoshino, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    The parallel operation of plural undulator beam lines is an important means of improving the efficiency and usability of x-ray free-electron laser facilities. After the installation of a second undulator beam line (BL2) at SPring-8 Angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA), pulse-by-pulse switching between two beam lines was tested using kicker and dc twin-septum magnets. To maintain a compact size, all undulator beam lines at SACLA are designed to be placed within the same undulator hall located downstream of the accelerator. In order to ensure broad tunability of the laser wavelength, the electron bunches are accelerated to different beam energies optimized for the wavelengths of each beam line. In the demonstration, the 30 Hz electron beam was alternately deflected to two beam lines and simultaneous lasing was achieved with 15 Hz at each beam line. Since the electron beam was deflected twice by 3° in a dogleg to BL2, the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects became non-negligible. Currently in a wavelength range of 4-10 keV, a laser pulse energy of 100 - 150 μ J can be obtained with a reduced peak current of around 1 kA by alleviating the CSR effects. This paper reports the results and operational issues related to the multi-beam-line operation of SACLA.

  18. Adjustable high-repetition-rate pulse trains in a passively-mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Fodil, Rachid; Amrani, Foued; Yang, Changxi; Kellou, Abdelhamid; Grelu, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate multipulse regimes obtained within a passively-mode-locked fiber laser that includes a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer. By adjusting the time delay imbalance of the MZ, ultrashort pulse trains at multi-GHz repetition rates are generated. We compare the observed dynamics with high-harmonic mode locking, and show that the multi-GHz pulse trains display an inherent instability, which has been overlooked. By using a recirculation loop containing the MZ, we demonstrate a significant improvement of the pulse train stability.

  19. High rate reactive magnetron sputter deposition of Al-doped ZnO with unipolar pulsing and impedance control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Yasutaka; Hirohata, Kento; Tsukamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yasushi; Oka, Nobuto; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2010-07-15

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films were deposited on quartz glass substrates, unheated and heated to 200 deg. C, using reactive sputtering with a special feedback system of discharge impedance combined with midfrequency pulsing. A planar Zn-Al alloy target was connected to the switching unit, which was operated in a unipolar pulse mode. The oxidation of the target surface was precisely controlled by a feedback system for the entire O{sub 2} flow ratio including ''the transition region''. The deposition rate was about 10-20 times higher than that for films deposited by conventional sputtering using an oxide target. A deposition rate of AZO films of 390 nm/min with a resistivity of 3.8x10{sup -4} {Omega} cm and a transmittance in the visible region of 85% was obtained when the films were deposited on glass substrates heated to 200 deg. C with a discharge power of 4 kW.

  20. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., ratings and operating limitations are established relating to the following: (1) Horsepower or torque, r.p.... (6) Accessory drive torque and overhang moment. (7) Component life. (8) Turbosupercharger turbine... following: (1) Horsepower, torque, or thrust, r.p.m., gas temperature, and time for— (i) Rated...

  1. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., ratings and operating limitations are established relating to the following: (1) Horsepower or torque, r.p.... (6) Accessory drive torque and overhang moment. (7) Component life. (8) Turbosupercharger turbine... following: (1) Horsepower, torque, or thrust, r.p.m., gas temperature, and time for— (i) Rated...

  2. Observation of K-dependent Reaction Rates in Pulsed Uniform Supersonic Flows by Chirped-Pulse Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Bernadette; Ariyasingha, Nuwandi; Suits, Arthur; University of Missouri Team

    Chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy was used to interrogate the reaction of Cl atoms with propyne in a pulsed uniform supersonic flow. The technique, termed ``CPUF'', utilizes broad-band microwave spectroscopy to extract structural information with MHz resolution and near universal detection, in conjunction with a Laval flow system, which offers thermalized conditions at low temperatures and high number densities. Previous studies have exploited this approach to obtain multichannel product branching fractions in a number of polyatomic systems, with isomer and often vibrational level specificity. This report highlights an additional capability of the CPUF technique: here, the state-specific reactant depletion is directly monitored on a microsecond timescale. In doing so, a clear dependence on the rotational quantum number K in the rate of the reaction between Cl atoms and propyne is revealed. Future prospects for the technique will be discussed.

  3. Smartphone-enabled pulse rate variability: an alternative methodology for the collection of heart rate variability in psychophysiological research.

    PubMed

    Heathers, James A J

    2013-09-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is widely used to assess autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. It is traditionally collected from a dedicated laboratory electrocardiograph (ECG). This presents a barrier to collecting the large samples necessary to maintain the statistical power of between-subject psychophysiological comparisons. An alternative to ECG involves an optical pulse sensor or photoplethysmograph run from a smartphone or similar portable device: smartphone pulse rate variability (SPRV). Experiment 1 determined the simultaneous accuracy between ECG and SPRV systems in n = 10 participants at rest. Raw SPRV values showed a consistent positive bias, which was successfully attenuated with correction. Experiment 2 tested an additional n = 10 participants at rest, during attentional load, and during mild stress (exercise). Accuracy was maintained, but slightly attenuated during exercise. The best correction method maintained an accuracy of +/-2% for low-frequency spectral power, and +/-5% for high-frequency spectral power over all points. Thus, the SPRV system records a pulse-to-pulse approximation of an ECG-derived heart rate series that is sufficiently accurate to perform time- and frequency-domain analysis of its variability, as well as accurately reflecting change in autonomic output provided by typical psychophysiological stimuli. This represents a novel method by which an accurate approximation of HRV may be collected for large-sample or naturalistic cardiac psychophysiological research. PMID:23751411

  4. High-power, highly stable KrF laser with a 4-kHz pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, V. M.; El'tsov, A. V.; Khristoforov, O. B.

    2015-08-01

    An electric-discharge KrF laser (248 nm) with an average output power of 300 W is developed and studied. A number of new design features are related to the use of a laser chamber based on an Al2O3 ceramic tube. A high power and pulse repetition rate are achieved by using a volume discharge with lateral preionisation by the UV radiation of a creeping discharge in the form of a homogeneous plasma sheet on the surface of a plane sapphire plate. Various generators for pumping the laser are studied. The maximum laser efficiency is 3.1%, the maximum laser energy is 160 mJ pulse-1, and the pulse duration at half maximum is 7.5 ns. In the case of long-term operation at a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz and an output power of 300 W, high stability of laser output energy (σ <= 0.7%) is achieved using an all-solid-state pump system.

  5. Accuracy of pulse oximeters in estimating heart rate at rest and during exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Iyriboz, Y; Powers, S; Morrow, J; Ayers, D; Landry, G

    1991-01-01

    Pulse oximeters are being widely used for non-invasive, simultaneous assessment of haemoglobin oxygen saturation. They are reliable, accurate, relatively inexpensive and portable. Pulse oximeters are often used for estimating heart rate at rest and during exercise. However, at present the data available to validate their use as heart rate monitors are not sufficient. We evaluated the accuracy of two oximeters (Radiometer, ear and finger probe; Ohmeda 3700, ear probe) in monitoring heart rate during incremental exercise by comparing the pulse oximeters with simultaneous ECG readings. Data were collected on eight men (713 heart rate readings) during graded cycle ergometer and treadmill exercise to volitional fatigue. Analysis by linear regression revealed that general oximeter readings significantly correlated with those of ECG (r = 0.91, P less than 0.0001). However, comparison of heart rate at each level of work showed that oximeter readings significantly (P less than 0.05) under-estimated rates above 155 beats/min. These results indicate that the use of pulse oximeters as heart rate monitors during strenuous exercise is questionable. This inaccuracy may well originate from the instability of the probes, sweating, other artefacts during exercise, and measurement of different components in the cardiovascular cycle. PMID:1777787

  6. Study on the steady operating state of a micro-pulse electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Kui, Zhou; Xing, Luo; Xiangyang, Lu; Shengwen, Quan; Jifei, Zhao; Ziqin, Yang

    2014-09-15

    Micro-pulse electron gun (MPG) employs the basic concept of multipacting to produce high-current and short-pulse electron beams from a radio-frequency (RF) cavity. The concept of MPG has been proposed for more than two decades. However, the unstable operating state of MPG vastly obstructs its practical applications. This paper presents a study on the steady operating state of a micro-pulse electron gun with theory and experiments. The requirements for the steady operating state are proposed through the analysis of the interaction between the RF cavity and the beam load. Accordingly, a MPG cavity with the frequency of 2856 MHz has been designed, constructed, and tested. Some primary experiments have been finished. Both the unstable and stable operating states of the MPG have been observed. The stable output beam current has been detected at about 3.8 mA. Further experimental study is under way now.

  7. Comparison of foot finding methods for deriving instantaneous pulse rates from photoplethysmographic signals.

    PubMed

    Hemon, Mathilde C; Phillips, Justin P

    2016-04-01

    The suitability of different methods of finding the foot point of a pulse as measured using earlobe photoplethysmography during stationary conditions was investigated. Instantaneous pulse period (PP) values from PPG signals recorded from the ear in healthy volunteer subjects were compared with simultaneous ECG-derived cardiac periods (RR interval). Six methods of deriving pulse period were used, each based on a different method of finding specific landmark points on the PPG waveform. These methods included maximum and minimum value, maximum first and second derivative, 'intersecting tangents' and 'diastole patching' methods. Selected time domain HRV variables were also calculated from the PPG signals obtained using multiple methods and compared with ECG-derived HRV variables. The correlation between PPG and ECG was greatest for the intersecting tangents method compared to the other methods (RMSE = 5.69 ms, r (2) = 0.997). No significant differences between PP and RR were seen for all PPG methods, however the PRV variables derived using all methods showed significant differences to HRV, attributable to the sensitivity of PRV parameters to pulse transients and artifacts. The results suggest that the intersecting tangents method shows the most promise for extracting accurate pulse rate variability data from PPG datasets. This work has applications in other areas where pulse arrival time is a key measurement including pulse wave velocity assessment. PMID:25902897

  8. Pulsed, room-temperature operation of a tunable NaCl color-center laser

    SciTech Connect

    Culpepper, C.F.; Carrig, T.J.; Pinto, J.F.; Georgiou, E.; Pollock, C.R.

    1987-11-01

    A room-temperature, pulsed, color-center laser using OH/sup : /-doped NaCl crystals is reported. Crystals were transversely pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 ..mu..m and produced output energies of 8.6 mJ in 20-nsec pulses. The tuning range extended from 1.37 to 1.77 ..mu..m. During 40 h of operation (>10/sup 6/ pulses), a gradual power fading was observed. Laser action is tentatively ascribed to F/sub 2//sup //sup +/ centers.

  9. Catastrophic optical mirror damage in diode lasers monitored during single-pulse operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Mathias; Tomm, Jens W.; Reeber, David; Elsaesser, Thomas; Zeimer, Ute; Larsen, Henning E.; Petersen, Paul M.; Andersen, Peter E.

    2009-05-01

    Catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) is analyzed for 808 nm emitting diode lasers in single-pulse operation in order to separate facet degradation from subsequent degradation processes. During each pulse, nearfield and thermal images are monitored. A temporal resolution better than 7 μs is achieved. The thermal runaway process is unambiguously related to the occurrence of a "thermal flash." A one-by-one correlation between nearfield, thermal flash, thermal runaway, and structural damage is observed. The single-pulse excitation technique allows for controlling the propagation of the structural damage into the cavity. We propose this technique for the analysis of early stages of COMD.

  10. Single-mode operation of a long-pulse flashlamp pumped dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mandl, A.; Klimek, D.E.; Chou, H.P.; Litzenberger, L.; Wang, Y.

    1995-02-01

    The authors describe the achievement of single-mode operation of a flashlamp pumped long-pulse, {approximately} 700 ns dye laser, with output energy of about 350 mJ using a linear optical cavity with a ``twisted mode`` configuration. Measurements indicate that the laser frequency chirps by about 40 MHz over the entire pulse. Homodyne measurements indicate that the instantaneous bandwidth is close to the transform limit. This represents a significant advance in dye laser performance.

  11. Multi-pulse operation of a super-radiant backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-08-15

    Theory of a backward-wave electron oscillator operating in the non-stationary regime of super-radiation of short powerful rf pulses is developed. It is shown that there exist multi-frequency regimes of generation of either two-peak or three-peak output signal with different characteristic frequencies in every peak. The use of such regimes allows increasing the duration, the peak power, and the total energy of the output super-radiation rf pulse.

  12. Monitoring of ultraviolet pulse rate dependent photomechanical actuation in carbon nanotubes using fiber Bragg gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Shivananju, B. N.; Suri, Ashish; Asokan, S.; Misra, Abha

    2014-01-06

    In this Letter, we present a non-contact method of controlling and monitoring photomechanical actuation in carbon nanotubes (CNT) by exposing it to ultra-violet radiation at different pulse rates (10 to 200 Hz). This is accomplished by imparting a reversible photo induced strain (5–330 με) on CNT coated fibre Bragg gratings; CNT undergoes an internal reversible structural change due to cyclic photon absorption that leads to the development of mechanical strain, which in turn allows reversible switching of the Bragg wavelength. The results also reveal an interesting pulse rate dependent rise and fall times of photomechanical actuation in CNT.

  13. Operative delivery rates following induction of labour for obstetric cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Jessica R; Chappell, Lucy; Cheng, Floria; Breeze, Andrew C G; Lucas, Nuala; Plaat, Felicity; Williamson, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether women induced for obstetric cholestasis (OC) have increased rates of operative delivery compared with women without OC who are induced. This retrospective case-control study included 64 women with OC (singleton pregnancies), who had labour induced compared with two control groups (matched for parity and gestational week at delivery). The majority of women were induced at 37 weeks. We found no significant increase in the rate of operative or assisted delivery in OC cases compared with either control group. Women with OC who are induced between 36 and 40 weeks gestation do not have increased rates of assisted or operative delivery compared with induced controls.

  14. Operative delivery rates following induction of labour for obstetric cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jessica R; Chappell, Lucy; Cheng, Floria; Breeze, Andrew C G; Lucas, Nuala; Plaat, Felicity; Williamson, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether women induced for obstetric cholestasis (OC) have increased rates of operative delivery compared with women without OC who are induced. This retrospective case-control study included 64 women with OC (singleton pregnancies), who had labour induced compared with two control groups (matched for parity and gestational week at delivery). The majority of women were induced at 37 weeks. We found no significant increase in the rate of operative or assisted delivery in OC cases compared with either control group. Women with OC who are induced between 36 and 40 weeks gestation do not have increased rates of assisted or operative delivery compared with induced controls. PMID:27582856

  15. Long Pulse Operation on Tore-Supra: Towards Steady State

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, P.; Bucalossi, J.; Brosset, C.; Dufour, E.; Loarer, T.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Pegourie, B.; Tsitrone, E.; Basiuk, V.; Bremond, S.; Chantant, M.; Colas, L.; Commaux, N.; Geraud, A.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hertout, P.; Hoang, G. T.; Kazarian, F.; Mazon, D.

    2006-01-15

    The experimental programme of Tore Supra is devoted to the study of technology and physics issues associated to long-duration high performance discharges. This new domain of operation requires simultaneously and in steady state: heat removal capability, particle exhaust, fully non-inductive current drive, advanced technology integration and real time plasma control. The long discharge allows for addressing new time scale physic such as the wall particle retention and erosion. Moreover, the physics of fully non-inductive discharges is full of novelty, namely: the MHD stability, the slow spontaneous oscillation of the central electron temperature or the outstanding inward particle pinch.

  16. A new sealed RF-excited CO2 laser for enamel ablation operating at 9.4μm with pulse duration of 26 μs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kenneth H.; Jew, Jamison M.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Several studies over the past 20 years have identified that carbon dioxide lasers operating at wavelengths between 9.3 and 9.6-μm with pulse durations near 20-µs are ideal for hard tissue ablation. Those wavelengths are coincident with the peak absorption of the mineral phase and the pulse duration is close to the thermal relaxation time of the deposited energy of a few microseconds to minimize peripheral thermal damage and long enough to minimize plasma shielding effects to allow efficient ablation at practical rates. The desired pulse duration near 20-μs has been difficult to achieve since it is too long for TEA lasers and too short for RF-excited lasers for efficient operation. Recently, Coherent Inc. (Santa Clara, CA) developed the J5-V laser for microvia drilling which can produce laser pulses greater than 100 mJ in energy at 9.4-μm with a pulse duration of 26-µs and it can achieve pulse repetition rates of 3 KHz. We report the first results using this laser to ablate enamel and dentin. The onset of plasma shielding does not occur until the fluence exceeds 100 J/cm2 allowing efficient ablation at rates exceeding 50-μm per pulse. This laser is ideally suited for the selective ablation of carious lesions.

  17. [Changes of pulse rate caused by sonic bomms during sleep (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Griefahn, B

    1975-12-01

    In two experimental series (19 resp. 53 nights, 2 different persons in each series, test-time 10.30 p.m. to 3.00 a.m.) pulse rate after sonic booms had been recorded during sleep. In the first 3 nights the subjects slept undisturbed by noise. In the following 11 resp. 30 nights sonic booms were applied alternately 2 or 4 times. In the main series after 10 more nights without any noise 4 nights with 8 and 16 sonic booms alternately followed. The last 6 undisturbed nights in both series were used as comparison phase. The interval between two sonic booms was 40 min in nights with 2 booms, 20 min in nights with 4 sonic booms and in the nights with 8 and 16 sonic booms 8.6 resp. 4.6 min. Sound level of the sonic booms ranged from 0.48 mbar to 1.45 mbar, 1 mbar [83.5 dB (A)] in the average. The first sonic boom was applied if one of the two subjects had entered the deepest stage of sleep. Sonic booms induced a biphasic reaction in pulse rate. After an initial increase in frequency with a maximum in the 4th sec pulse rate decreased below the value before sonic boom; it was followed by a slow increase towards the baseline value. This reaction was analysed with special regard to the following factors: 1. Intensity. Due to very fast increase of noise intensity there was no significant correlation between the intensity of sonic boom and the pulse reaction. 2. Exogenic variables. There is no significant connection between postboom pulse rate and noiseless time before the sonic boom, the duration of the test series and the ambient temperature. 3. Endogenic variables. No correlation could be found between the stage of sleep and the reaction. On the contrary a very significant correlation was found between the maximum of postboom increase of pulse rate and the pulse rate before boom. With increasing pulse rate the extent of reaction becomes smaller. PMID:1201745

  18. Radiation Safety Aspects for Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment Techniques in Outdoor Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Daren R. Norman; James L. Jones; Brandon W. Blackburn; Allen Fisher; Scott M. Watson; Kevin J. Haskell; Alan W. Hunt; Mark Balzer

    2007-08-01

    As many pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technologies are being developed for contraband detection within cargo container configurations, the radiation safe operation of source linacs for outdoor operations needs to be addressed. Idaho National Laboratory along with Idaho Accelerator Center are conducting field operations with high energy linacs in open outdoor configurations. The relevant information pertaining to the radiation regulations and dosimetry studies for these configurations will be presented for a prototypical 10 MeV PPA nuclear material detection system.

  19. Investigation of pulsed mode operation with the frequency tuned CAPRICE ECRIS.

    PubMed

    Maimone, F; Tinschert, K; Endermann, M; Hollinger, R; Kondrashev, S; Lang, R; Mäder, J; Patchakui, P T; Spädtke, P

    2016-02-01

    In order to increase the intensity of the highly charged ions produced by the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs), techniques like the frequency tuning and the afterglow mode have been developed and in this paper the effect on the ion production is shown for the first time when combining both techniques. Recent experimental results proved that the tuning of the operating frequency of the ECRIS is a promising technique to achieve higher ion currents of higher charge states. On the other hand, it is well known that the afterglow mode of the ECRIS operation can provide more intense pulsed ion beams in comparison with the continuous wave (cw) operation. These two techniques can be combined by pulsing the variable frequency signal driving the traveling wave tube amplifier which provides the high microwave power to the ECRIS. In order to analyze the effect of these two combined techniques on the ion source performance, several experiments were carried out on the pulsed frequency tuned CAPRICE (Compacte source A Plusiers Résonances Ionisantes Cyclotron Electroniques)-type ECRIS. Different waveforms and pulse lengths have been investigated under different settings of the ion source. The results of the pulsed mode have been compared with those of cw operation. PMID:26931930

  20. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Loebner, Keith T. K. Underwood, Thomas C.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-06-15

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  1. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebner, Keith T. K.; Underwood, Thomas C.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  2. Use of a prototype pulse oximeter for time series analysis of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Erika; López, Jehú; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Velázquez, Víctor; Del Moral, Jésica

    2015-05-01

    This work presents the development of a low cost pulse oximeter prototype consisting of pulsed red and infrared commercial LEDs and a broad spectral photodetector used to register time series of heart rate and oxygen saturation of blood. This platform, besides providing these values, like any other pulse oximeter, processes the signals to compute a power spectrum analysis of the patient heart rate variability in real time and, additionally, the device allows access to all raw and analyzed data if databases construction is required or another kind of further analysis is desired. Since the prototype is capable of acquiring data for long periods of time, it is suitable for collecting data in real life activities, enabling the development of future wearable applications.

  3. Characterization of pulse amplitude and pulse rate modulation for a human vestibular implant during acute electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; DiGiovanna, J.; Cavuscens, S.; Ranieri, M.; Guinand, N.; van de Berg, R.; Carpaneto, J.; Kingma, H.; Guyot, J.-P.; Micera, S.; Perez Fornos, A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The vestibular system provides essential information about balance and spatial orientation via the brain to other sensory and motor systems. Bilateral vestibular loss significantly reduces quality of life, but vestibular implants (VIs) have demonstrated potential to restore lost function. However, optimal electrical stimulation strategies have not yet been identified in patients. In this study, we compared the two most common strategies, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and pulse rate modulation (PRM), in patients. Approach. Four subjects with a modified cochlear implant including electrodes targeting the peripheral vestibular nerve branches were tested. Charge-equivalent PAM and PRM were applied after adaptation to baseline stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movement responses were recorded to evaluate stimulation efficacy during acute clinical testing sessions. Main results. PAM evoked larger amplitude eye movement responses than PRM. Eye movement response axes for lateral canal stimulation were marginally better aligned with PRM than with PAM. A neural network model was developed for the tested stimulation strategies to provide insights on possible neural mechanisms. This model suggested that PAM would consistently cause a larger ensemble firing rate of neurons and thus larger responses than PRM. Significance. Due to the larger magnitude of eye movement responses, our findings strongly suggest PAM as the preferred strategy for initial VI modulation.

  4. Operation of a Wideband Terahertz Superconducting Bolometer Responding to Quantum Cascade Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibella, S.; Beck, M.; Carelli, P.; Castellano, M. G.; Chiarello, F.; Faist, J.; Leoni, R.; Ortolani, M.; Sabbatini, L.; Scalari, G.; Torrioli, G.; Turcinkova, D.

    2012-06-01

    We make use of a niobium film to produce a micrometric vacuum-bridge superconducting bolometer responding to THz frequency. The bolometer works anywhere in the temperature range 2-7 K, which can be easily reached in helium bath cryostats or closed-cycle cryocoolers. In this work the bolometer is mounted on a pulse tube refrigerator and operated to measure the equivalent noise power (NEP) and the response to fast (μs) terahertz pulses. The NEP above 100 Hz equals that measured in a liquid helium cryostat showing that potential drawbacks related to the use of a pulse tube refrigerator (like mechanical and thermal oscillations, electromagnetic interference, noise) are irrelevant. At low frequency, instead, the pulse tube expansion-compression cycles originate lines at 1 Hz and harmonics in the noise spectrum. The bolometer was illuminated with THz single pulses coming either from a Quantum Cascade Laser operating at liquid nitrogen temperature or from a frequency-multiplied electronic oscillator. The response of the bolometer to the single pulses show that the device can track signals with a rise time as fast as about 450 ns.

  5. Multipass dye-cell amplifier for high-repetition-rate femtosecond optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, D.; Kuehlke, D.; von der Linde, D.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a dye-cell amplifier pumped by a copper-vapor laser at a 8.4-kHz repetition rate. This system avoids possible problems and restrictions arising from nozzle performance in commonly used jet-stream amplifiers. We obtained a nearly diffraction-limited beam with pulses of 60 fsec and energies of up to 50 ..mu..J.

  6. Effect of the pulse repetition rate on fiber-assisted tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the pulse repetition rate on ablation performance was evaluated ex vivo at various fiber sweeping speeds for an effective 532-nm laser prostatectomy. Three pulse repetition rates (7.5, 15, and 30 kHz) at 100 W were delivered to bovine liver tissue at three sweeping speeds (2, 4, and 6 mm/s) to achieve bulky tissue removal. Ablation performance was quantitatively compared in terms of the ablation volume and the coagulation thickness. The lowest pulse repetition rate of 7.5 kHz attained the highest ablation volume (101.5 ± 12.0 mm3) and the thinnest coagulation (0.7 ± 0.1 mm) along with superficial carbonization. The highest pulse repetition rate of 30 kHz was associated with the least tissue removal (65.8 ± 5.0 mm3) and the deepest thermal denaturation (1.1 ± 0.2 mm). Quantitative evaluations of laser parameters can be instrumental in facilitating ablation efficiency and maintaining hemostatic coagulation during treatment of large-sized benign prostate hyperplasia.

  7. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... turbine wheel inlet gas. (5) Pressure of— (i) Fuel at the fuel inlet; and (ii) Oil at the main oil gallery. (6) Accessory drive torque and overhang moment. (7) Component life. (8) Turbosupercharger turbine wheel r.p.m. (c) For turbine engines, ratings and operating limitations are established relating to...

  8. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    SciTech Connect

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-15

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  9. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  10. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control.

    PubMed

    Cochems, P; Kirk, A T; Bunert, E; Runge, M; Goncalves, P; Zimmermann, S

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter. PMID:26133868

  11. Efficient neutron generation from solid-nanoparticle explosions driven by DPSSL-pumped high-repetition rate femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, T.; Matsukado, K.; Sekine, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Hatano, Y.; Yoshimura, R.; Satoh, N.; Nishihara, K.; Takagi, M.; Kawashima, T.

    2016-03-01

    We propose novel neutron source using high-intensity laser based on the cluster fusion scheme. We developed DPSSL-pumped high-repetition-rate 20-TW laser system and solid nanoparticle target for neutron generation demonstration. In our neutron generation experiment, high-energy deuterons were generated from coulomb explosion of CD solid- nanoparticles and neutrons were generated by DD fusion reaction. Efficient and stable neutron generation was obtained by irradiating an intense femtosecond laser pulse of >2×1018 W/cm2. A yield of ∼105 neutrons per shot was stably observed during 0.1-1 Hz continuous operation.

  12. Petroleum mass removal from low permeability sediment using air sparging/soil vapor extraction: impact of continuous or pulsed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, Brian C.; Aelion, C. Marjorie

    2000-02-01

    Air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) are innovative remediation techniques that utilize volatilization and microbial degradation to remediate petroleum spills from soils and groundwater. This in situ study investigated the use of AS/SVE to remediate a gasoline spill from a leaking underground storage tank (UST) in the low permeability, clayey soil of the Appalachian Piedmont. The objectives of this study were to evaluate AS/SVE in low permeability soils by quantifying petroleum mass removal rates, monitoring vadose zone contaminant levels, and comparing the mass extraction rates of continuous AS/SVE to 8 and 24 h pulsed operation. The objectives were met by collecting AS/SVE exhaust gas samples and vadose zone air from multi-depth soil vapor probes. Samples were analyzed for O 2, CO 2, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), and total combustible hydrocarbon (TCH) concentrations using portable hand meters and gas chromatography. Continuous AS/SVE was effective in removing 608 kg of petroleum hydrocarbons from low permeability soil in 44 days (14.3 kg day -1). Mass removal rates ranged from 2.6 times higher to 5.1 times lower than other AS/SVE studies performed in sandy sediments. BTEX levels in the vadose zone were reduced from about 5 ppm to 1 ppm. Ten pulsed AS/SVE tests removed 78 kg in 23 days and the mean mass removal rate (17.6 kg day -1) was significantly higher than the last 15 days of continuous extraction. Pulsed operation may be preferable to continuous operation because of increased mass removal and decreased energy consumption.

  13. 1 MHz repetition rate hollow fiber pulse compression to sub-100-fs duration at 100 W average power.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Carstens, Henning; Herrick, Nicholas; Demmler, Stefan; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    We report on nonlinear pulse compression at very high average power. A high-power fiber chirped pulse amplification system based on a novel large pitch photonic crystal fiber delivers 700 fs pulses with 200 μJ pulse energy at a 1 MHz repetition rate, resulting in 200 W of average power. Subsequent spectral broadening in a xenon-filled hollow-core fiber and pulse compression with chirped mirrors is employed for pulse shortening and peak power enhancement. For the first time, to our knowledge, more than 100 W of average power are transmitted through a noble-gas-filled hollow fiber. After pulse compression of 81 fs, 93 μJ pulses are obtained at a 1 MHz repetition rate. PMID:22139257

  14. Deformation mechanism transition caused by strain rate in a pulse electric brush-plated nanocrystalline Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhonghao; Zhang, Hanzhuo; Gu, Changdong; Jiang, Qing; Lian, Jianshe

    2008-09-01

    Bulk nanocrystalline Cu was synthesized by a pulse electric brush-plating technique. A very large strength (at 2% plastic strain) increase from 644 to 1451 MPa was obtained by compression tests at room temperature and strain rates from 1×10-5 to 3×100 s-1. A transition in plastic deformation mechanism with strain rate from a combination of the thermally activated grain boundary sliding and the dislocation emission-absorption in grain boundaries to one dominated by the dislocation activity has been revealed by the significant changes in strain rate sensitivity and apparent activation volume with strain rate.

  15. Yb:YAG Innoslab amplifier: efficient high repetition rate subpicosecond pumping system for optical parametric chirped pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Schulz, M; Riedel, R; Willner, A; Mans, T; Schnitzler, C; Russbueldt, P; Dolkemeyer, J; Seise, E; Gottschall, T; Hädrich, S; Duesterer, S; Schlarb, H; Feldhaus, J; Limpert, J; Faatz, B; Tünnermann, A; Rossbach, J; Drescher, M; Tavella, F

    2011-07-01

    We report on a Yb:YAG Innoslab laser amplifier system for generation of subpicsecond high energy pump pulses for optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) at high repetition rates. Pulse energies of up to 20 mJ (at 12.5 kHz) and repetition rates of up to 100 kHz were attained with pulse durations of 830 fs and average power in excess of 200 W. We further investigate the possibility to use subpicosecond pulses to derive a stable continuum in a YAG crystal for OPCPA seeding. PMID:21725443

  16. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, C. M. Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-10

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  17. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C. M.; Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-01

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  18. Influence of the voltage pulse front shortening on the pulse repetition rate in a copper vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P A; Gugin, P P; Zakrevskii, D E; Lavrukhin, M A; Kazaryan, M A; Lyabin, N A

    2013-08-31

    The lasing characteristics of a copper vapour laser are investigated in the regime of a pulse train excited in the internalheating tube with the diameter of 2 cm and length of 48 cm. Two power supply schemes are compared: a conventional scheme with a storage capacitor discharged through a thyratron connected to a peaking capacitor and the scheme in which the peaking capacitor is connected to the laser active element through a kivotron – a fast switch based on the 'open discharge' with a turn-on time of less than 1 ns. It is shown that in the considered range of the pulse repetition rates f = 2 – 16 kHz in the first case we deal with a typical energy dependence on frequency having a maximum near 4 – 5 kHz. In the second case, the lasing energy is frequency-independent; hence, the average power in this range is proportional to f. The results obtained are explained by the neutralised influence of the initial electron concentration on energy characteristics of the copper vapour laser. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  19. Dependence of diode sensitivity on the pulse rate of delivered radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jursinic, Paul A.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: It has been reported that diode sensitivity decreases by as much as 2% when the average dose rate set at the accelerator console was decreased from 600 to 40 MU/min. No explanation was given for this effect in earlier publications. This work is a detailed investigation of this phenomenon: the change of diode sensitivity versus the rate of delivery of dose pulses in the milliseconds and seconds range. Methods: X-ray beams used in this work had nominal energies of 6 and 15 MV and were generated by linear accelerators. The average dose rate was varied from 25 to 600 MU/min, which corresponded to time between microsecond-long dose pulses of 60-2.7 ms, respectively. The dose-per-pulse, dpp, was changed by positioning the detector at different source-to-detector distance. A variety of diodes fabricated by a number of manufacturers were tested in this work. Also, diodes in three different MapCHECKs (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) were tested. Results: For all diodes tested, the diode sensitivity decreases as the average dose rate is decreased, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period, the time between radiation pulses. A sensitivity decrease as large as 5% is observed for a 60-ms pulse period. The diode sensitivity versus the pulse period is modeled by an empirical exponential function. This function has a fitting parameter, t{sub eff}, defined as the effective lifetime. The values of t{sub eff} were found to be 1.0-14 s, among the various diodes. For all diodes tested, t{sub eff} decreases as the dpp decreases and is greater for 15 MV than for 6 MV x rays. The decrease in diode sensitivity after 20 s without radiation can be reversed by as few as 60 radiation pulses. Conclusions: A decrease in diode sensitivity occurs with a decrease in the average dose rate, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period of radiation. The sensitivity decrease is modeled by an empirical exponential function that decreases with an effective lifetime, t{sub eff}, of

  20. Dose rate effect of pulsed electron beam on micronucleus frequency in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Santhosh; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Bhat, Nagesh N; Narayana, Yerol

    2010-03-01

    The micronucleus assay in human peripheral blood lymphocytes is a sensitive indicator of radiation damage and could serve as a biological dosimeter in evaluating suspected overexposure to ionising radiation. Micronucleus (MN) frequency as a measure of chromosomal damage has also extensively been employed to quantify the effects of radiation dose rate on biological systems. Here we studied the effects of 8 MeV pulsed electron beam emitted by Microtron electron accelerator on MN induction at dose rates between 35 Gy min-1 and 352.5 Gy min-1. These dose rates were achieved by varying the pulse repetition rate (PRR). Fricke dosimeter was employed to measure the absorbed dose at different PRR and to ensure uniform dose distribution of the electron beam. To study the dose rate effect, blood samples were irradiated to an absorbed dose of (4.7+/-0.2) Gy at different rates and cytogenetic damage was quantified using the micronucleus assay. The obtained MN frequency showed no dose rate dependence within the studied dose rate range. Our earlier dose effect study using 8 MeV electrons revealed that the response of MN was linear-quadratic. Therefore, in the event of an accident, dose estimation can be made using linear-quadratic dose response parameters, without adding dose rate as a correction factor. PMID:20338871

  1. 47 W, 6 ns constant pulse duration, high-repetition-rate cavity-dumped Q-switched TEM(00) Nd:YVO(4) oscillator.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Louis; Wallenstein, Richard; Knappe, Ralf

    2006-11-15

    We report on a cavity-dumped Q-switched TEM(00) Nd:YVO(4) oscillator offering a unique combination of high power, constant short pulse duration, and high repetition rate, suppressing the gain dependence of pulse duration in classical Q-switched oscillators. Its performance is compared with that of the same oscillator operated in a classical Q-switched regime, demonstrating the much higher peak powers achievable with this technique, especially at high repetition rates. Up to 31 W of 532 nm green light was generated by frequency doubling in a noncritical phase matched LBO crystal, corresponding to 70% conversion efficiency. PMID:17072404

  2. Ozone generation in a kHz-pulsed He-O2 capillary dielectric barrier discharge operated in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Brian L.; Ganguly, Biswa N.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species using nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet devices has been a subject of recent interest due to their ability to generate localized concentrations from a compact source. To date, such studies with plasma jet devices have primarily utilized radio-frequency excitation. In this work, we characterize ozone generation in a kHz-pulsed capillary dielectric barrier discharge configuration comprised of an active discharge plasma jet operating in ambient air that is externally grounded. The plasma jet flow gas was composed of helium with an admixture of up to 5% oxygen. A unipolar voltage pulse train with a 20 ns pulse risetime was used to drive the discharge at repetition rates between 2-25 kHz. Using UVLED absorption spectroscopy centered at 255 nm near the Hartley-band absorption peak, ozone was detected over 1 cm from the capillary axis. We observed roughly linear scaling of ozone production with increasing pulse repetition rate up to a "turnover frequency," beyond which ozone production steadily dropped and discharge current and 777 nm O(5P→5S°) emission sharply increased. The turnover in ozone production occurred at higher pulse frequencies with increasing flow rate and decreasing applied voltage with a common energy density of 55 mJ/cm3 supplied to the discharge. The limiting energy density and peak ozone production both increased with increasing O2 admixture. The power dissipated in the discharge was obtained from circuit current and voltage measurements using a modified parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge circuit model and the volume-averaged ozone concentration was derived from a 2D ozone absorption measurement. From these measurements, the volume-averaged efficiency of ozone production was calculated to be 23 g/kWh at conditions for peak ozone production of 41 mg/h at 11 kV applied voltage, 3% O2, 2 l/min flow rate, and 13 kHz pulse repetition rate, with 1.79 W dissipated in the discharge.

  3. Smoke detector with a radiation source operated in a pulse-like or intermittent mode

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, J.; Guttinger, H.

    1985-03-19

    A smoke detector contains a pulse-operated radiation source and a radiation receiver arranged externally of the region directly irradiated by the radiation source. The radiation receiver, in the presence of smoke in the radiation region, is impinged by scattered radiation and delivers output pulses. There is provided an evaluation circuit which generates a blocking pulse, and which inputs a resetting signal to a counter device in consequence of the difference of the blocking pulse and output pulse of the radiation receiver. The counter or counting device, in the absence of a resetting signal, is switched further and upon reaching a predetermined counter state triggers an alarm signal. High-frequency electrical disturbances which arise, as long as the radiation source delivers radiation pulses, at most can generate an additional resetting signal for the counter, so that the integrity of the smoke detector against triggering of false alarms is enhanced. If there is connected in parallel to the radiation receiver a NTC-resistor, then there is obtained a smoke detector which responds to a further combustion criterion (temperature).

  4. Reducing error rates in straintronic multiferroic nanomagnetic logic by pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munira, Kamaram; Xie, Yunkun; Nadri, Souheil; Forgues, Mark B.; Salehi Fashami, Mohammad; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo; Ghosh, Avik W.

    2015-06-01

    Dipole-coupled nanomagnetic logic (NML), where nanomagnets (NMs) with bistable magnetization states act as binary switches and information is transferred between them via dipole-coupling and Bennett clocking, is a potential replacement for conventional transistor logic since magnets dissipate less energy than transistors when they switch in a logic circuit. Magnets are also ‘non-volatile’ and hence can store the results of a computation after the computation is over, thereby doubling as both logic and memory—a feat that transistors cannot achieve. However, dipole-coupled NML is much more error-prone than transistor logic at room temperature (\\gt 1%) because thermal noise can easily disrupt magnetization dynamics. Here, we study a particularly energy-efficient version of dipole-coupled NML known as straintronic multiferroic logic (SML) where magnets are clocked/switched with electrically generated mechanical strain. By appropriately ‘shaping’ the voltage pulse that generates strain, we show that the error rate in SML can be reduced to tolerable limits. We describe the error probabilities associated with various stress pulse shapes and discuss the trade-off between error rate and switching speed in SML.The lowest error probability is obtained when a ‘shaped’ high voltage pulse is applied to strain the output NM followed by a low voltage pulse. The high voltage pulse quickly rotates the output magnet’s magnetization by 90° and aligns it roughly along the minor (or hard) axis of the NM. Next, the low voltage pulse produces the critical strain to overcome the shape anisotropy energy barrier in the NM and produce a monostable potential energy profile in the presence of dipole coupling from the neighboring NM. The magnetization of the output NM then migrates to the global energy minimum in this monostable profile and completes a 180° rotation (magnetization flip) with high likelihood.

  5. Single-pulse picking at kHz repetition rates using a Ge plasma switch at the free-electron laser FELBE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. Helm, M.; Winnerl, S.; Seidel, W.; Schneider, H.; Bauer, C.; Gensch, M.

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate a system for picking of mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) radiation pulses from the free-electron laser (FEL) FELBE operating at a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Single pulses are reflected by a dense electron-hole plasma in a Ge slab that is photoexcited by amplified near-infrared (NIR) laser systems operating at repetition rates of 1 kHz and 100 kHz, respectively. The peak intensity of picked pulses is up to 400 times larger than the peak intensity of residual pulses. The required NIR fluence for picking pulses at wavelengths in the range from 5 μm to 30 μm is discussed. In addition, we show that the reflectivity of the plasma decays on a time scale from 100 ps to 1 ns dependent on the wavelengths of the FEL and the NIR laser. The plasma switch enables experiments with the FEL that require high peak power but lower average power. Furthermore, the system is well suited to investigate processes with decay times in the μs to ms regime, i.e., much longer than the 77 ns long pulse repetition period of FELBE.

  6. Single-pulse picking at kHz repetition rates using a Ge plasma switch at the free-electron laser FELBE.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Winnerl, S; Seidel, W; Bauer, C; Gensch, M; Schneider, H; Helm, M

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a system for picking of mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) radiation pulses from the free-electron laser (FEL) FELBE operating at a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Single pulses are reflected by a dense electron-hole plasma in a Ge slab that is photoexcited by amplified near-infrared (NIR) laser systems operating at repetition rates of 1 kHz and 100 kHz, respectively. The peak intensity of picked pulses is up to 400 times larger than the peak intensity of residual pulses. The required NIR fluence for picking pulses at wavelengths in the range from 5 μm to 30 μm is discussed. In addition, we show that the reflectivity of the plasma decays on a time scale from 100 ps to 1 ns dependent on the wavelengths of the FEL and the NIR laser. The plasma switch enables experiments with the FEL that require high peak power but lower average power. Furthermore, the system is well suited to investigate processes with decay times in the μs to ms regime, i.e., much longer than the 77 ns long pulse repetition period of FELBE. PMID:26133824

  7. How to improve rate of penetration in field operations

    SciTech Connect

    Fear, M.J.

    1999-03-01

    A method has been developed to identify which factors are controlling rate of penetration (ROP) in a particular group of bit runs. The method uses foot-based mud logging data, geological information, and drill bit characteristics, to produce numerical correlations between ROP and applied drilling parameters or other attributes of drilling conditions. These correlations are then used to generate recommendations for maximizing ROP in drilling operations.

  8. Monitoring the film coating unit operation and predicting drug dissolution using terahertz pulsed imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Louise; Müller, Ronny; Gordon, Keith C; Kleinebudde, Peter; Pepper, Michael; Rades, Thomas; Shen, Yaochun; Taday, Philip F; Zeitler, J Axel

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the coating unit operation is imperative to improve product quality and reduce output risks for coated solid dosage forms. Three batches of sustained-release tablets coated with the same process parameters (pan speed, spray rate, etc.) were subjected to terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) analysis followed by dissolution testing. Mean dissolution times (MDT) from conventional dissolution testing were correlated with terahertz waveforms, which yielded a multivariate, partial least squares regression (PLS) model with an R(2) of 0.92 for the calibration set and 0.91 for the validation set. This two-component, PLS model was built from batch I that was coated in the same environmental conditions (air temperature, humidity, etc.) to that of batch II but at different environmental conditions from batch III. The MDTs of batch II was predicted in a nondestructive manner with the developed PLS model and the accuracy of the predicted values were subsequently validated with conventional dissolution testing and found to be in good agreement. The terahertz PLS model was also shown to be sensitive to changes in the coating conditions, successfully identifying the larger coating variability in batch III. In this study, we demonstrated that TPI in conjunction with PLS analysis could be employed to assist with film coating process understanding and provide predictions on drug dissolution. PMID:19367620

  9. Estimation of heart rate and heart rate variability from pulse oximeter recordings using localized model fitting.

    PubMed

    Wadehn, Federico; Carnal, David; Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate variability is one of the key parameters for assessing the health status of a subject's cardiovascular system. This paper presents a local model fitting algorithm used for finding single heart beats in photoplethysmogram recordings. The local fit of exponentially decaying cosines of frequencies within the physiological range is used to detect the presence of a heart beat. Using 42 subjects from the CapnoBase database, the average heart rate error was 0.16 BPM and the standard deviation of the absolute estimation error was 0.24 BPM. PMID:26737125

  10. The high performance readout chain for the DSSC 1Megapixel detector, designed for high throughput during pulsed operation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchgessner, M.; Soldat, J.; Kugel, A.; Donato, M.; Porro, M.; Fischer, P.

    2015-01-01

    The readout chain of the DSSC 1M pixel detector currently built at DESY, Hamburg for the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser is described. The system operates in pulsed operation mode comparable to the new ILC. Each 0.1 seconds 800 images of 1M pixels are produced and readout by the DSSC DAQ electronics. The total data production rate of the system is about 134 Gbit/s. In order to deal with the high data rates, latest technology components like the Xilinx Kintex 7 FPGA are used to implement fast DDR3-1600 image buffers, high speed serial FPGA to FPGA communication and 10 GB Ethernet links concentrated in one 40 Gbit/s QSFP+ transceiver.

  11. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Höppner, H.; Hage, A.; Tanikawa, T.; Schulz, M.; Riedel, R.; Teubner, U.; Prandolini, M. J.; Faatz, B.; Tavella, F.

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to manymore » hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.« less

  12. Ultrafast XUV Pulses at High Repetition Rate for Time Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Surface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Zhao, Peng; Li, Xinlong; Muraca, Amanda R.; Kershis, Matthew D.; White, Michael G.; Allison, Thomas K.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast photoelectron studies of surface dynamics are often limited by low repetition rates. At Stony Brook we have built a cavity-enhanced high-harmonic generation XUV source that delivers ultrafast pulses to a surface science apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy. We begin with a Ytterbium fiber laser at a repetition rate of 78 MHz and up to 90 W of average power. After compression the pulses have μJ's of energy with < 180 fs pulse width. We then use an enhancement cavity with a finesse of a few hundred to build up to the peak intensity required for high harmonic generation. The enhancement cavity is a six mirror double folded bow-tie geometry with a focus of 15 μm at a Krypton gas jet, followed by a Sapphire crystal at Brewster's angle for the fundamental to allow outcoupling of the harmonics. A single harmonic is selected using a time-preserving monochromator to maintain the short pulses, and is sent to an ultra high vacuum chamber with sample preparation and diagnostic tools as well as an electron energy spectrometer. This allows us to study the electronic dynamics of semiconductor surfaces and their interfaces with adsorbed molecules which enable various charge transfer effects. Supported by AFOSR.

  13. Rate equations for nitrogen molecules in ultrashort and intense x-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji-Cai; Berrah, Nora; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Cryan, James P.; Glownia, James M.; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Buth, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We study theoretically the quantum dynamics of nitrogen molecules (N2) exposed to intense and ultrafast x-rays at a wavelength of 1.1 {{nm}} (1100 {{eV}} photon energy) from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser. Molecular rate equations are derived to describe the intertwined photoionization, decay, and dissociation processes occurring for N2. This model complements our earlier phenomenological approaches, the single-atom, symmetric-sharing, and fragmentation-matrix models of 2012 (J. Chem. Phys. 136 214310). Our rate-equations are used to obtain the effective pulse energy at the sample and the time scale for the dissociation of the metastable dication {{{N}}}22+. This leads to a very good agreement between the theoretically and experimentally determined ion yields and, consequently, the average charge states. The effective pulse energy is found to decrease with shortening pulse duration. This variation together with a change in the molecular fragmentation pattern and frustrated absorption—an effect that reduces absorption of x-rays due to (double) core hole formation—are the causes for the drop of the average charge state with shortening LCLS pulse duration discovered previously.

  14. Rate equations for nitrogen molecules in ultrashort and intense x-ray pulses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Ji -Cai; Berrah, Nora; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Cryan, James P.; Glownia, James M.; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Buth, Christian

    2016-03-16

    Here, we study theoretically the quantum dynamics of nitrogen molecules (N2) exposed to intense and ultrafast x-rays at a wavelength ofmore » $$1.1\\;{\\rm{nm}}$$ ($$1100\\;{\\rm{eV}}$$ photon energy) from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser. Molecular rate equations are derived to describe the intertwined photoionization, decay, and dissociation processes occurring for N2. This model complements our earlier phenomenological approaches, the single-atom, symmetric-sharing, and fragmentation-matrix models of 2012 (J. Chem. Phys. 136 214310). Our rate-equations are used to obtain the effective pulse energy at the sample and the time scale for the dissociation of the metastable dication $${{\\rm{N}}}_{2}^{2+}$$. This leads to a very good agreement between the theoretically and experimentally determined ion yields and, consequently, the average charge states. The effective pulse energy is found to decrease with shortening pulse duration. This variation together with a change in the molecular fragmentation pattern and frustrated absorption—an effect that reduces absorption of x-rays due to (double) core hole formation—are the causes for the drop of the average charge state with shortening LCLS pulse duration discovered previously.« less

  15. Multi-pulse operation of a dissipative soliton fibre laser based on nonlinear polarisation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. L.; Wang, X. L.; Zhou, P.; Chen, J. B.

    2016-03-01

    We report an experimental observation of multiple dissipative soliton (DS) operation states in an all-normal-dispersion passively mode-locked Yb-doped fibre laser, including DS bound and oscillating states. In the bound state, multiple DSs up to 11 can coexist in the cavity. In the oscillating state, the DSs' movements are not purely random and three typical states are generalised and illustrated. A single-pulse mode-locked state is established at a high pump power by carefully adjusting the polarisation controllers. The broad spectrum indicates that it may be noise-like pulses, which can serve as a pump to generate a supercontinuum.

  16. Dual axis operation of a micromachined rate gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Juneau, T.; Pisano, A.P.; Smith, J.

    1997-04-01

    Since micromachining technology has raised the prospect of fabricating high performance sensors without the associated high cost and large size, many researchers have investigated micromachined rate gyroscopes. The vast majority of research has focused on single input axis rate gyroscopes, but this paper presents work on a dual input axis micromachined rate gyroscope. The key to successful simultaneous dual axis operation is the quad symmetry of the circular oscillating rotor design. Untuned gyroscopes with mismatched modes yielded random walk as low as 10{degrees}/{radical}hour with cross sensitivity ranging from 6% to 16%. Mode frequency matching via electrostatic tuning allowed performance better than 2{degrees}/{radical}hour, but at the expense of excessive cross sensitivity.

  17. Cesium dynamics in long pulse operation of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, U.; Wimmer, C.

    2012-02-01

    Large scale negative hydrogen ion sources operating stable for 1 h (cw mode) are required for the neutral beam heating system of the fusion experiment ITER. The formation of negative hydrogen ions relies on the surface effect for which cesium is evaporated into the source. In order to monitor the cesium dynamics the laser absorption spectroscopy technique is applied to the long pulse test facility MANITU. In the vacuum phase, without plasma operation the evaporation of cesium and the built-up of the cesium in the source are measured. Typical neutral cesium densities are 1015 m-3. During plasma operation and after the plasma phase a high cesium dynamics is observed, showing also depletion of cesium during long pulses with low cesium amount. The co-extracted electron current decreases with the cesium amount to a certain level whereas the ion current indicates an optimum density range.

  18. Cesium dynamics in long pulse operation of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U.; Wimmer, C.

    2012-02-15

    Large scale negative hydrogen ion sources operating stable for 1 h (cw mode) are required for the neutral beam heating system of the fusion experiment ITER. The formation of negative hydrogen ions relies on the surface effect for which cesium is evaporated into the source. In order to monitor the cesium dynamics the laser absorption spectroscopy technique is applied to the long pulse test facility MANITU. In the vacuum phase, without plasma operation the evaporation of cesium and the built-up of the cesium in the source are measured. Typical neutral cesium densities are 10{sup 15} m{sup -3}. During plasma operation and after the plasma phase a high cesium dynamics is observed, showing also depletion of cesium during long pulses with low cesium amount. The co-extracted electron current decreases with the cesium amount to a certain level whereas the ion current indicates an optimum density range.

  19. Improvements to long-pulse system performance and operational efficiency on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardalben, M. J.; Waxer, L. J.

    2011-03-01

    OMEGA EP is a petawatt-class, Nd-doped phosphate glass laser system that can be operated in both 1053-nm, short-pulse (<1- to 100-ps) and 351-nm, long-pulse (1- to 10-ns) regimes. It was completed in FY08 and began user shots in FY09 during which 350 target shots were conducted for 30 principal investigators. As of the start of FY11, over 1000 target shots have been performed. The beamline architecture consists of 40-cm, single-segment disk amplifiers in a multipass configuration to provide the necessary gain and resulting IR energy. For long-pulse operation, type-I/type-II frequency-conversion crystals are used to convert the 1053-nm fundamental wavelength to its third harmonic. An important operational goal of the Omega EP Laser Facility is to provide principal investigators with maximum UV energy on target, while maintaining UV peak fluences within an acceptable margin for safe operation. To optimize the long-pulse, on-target energy of OMEGA EP, we have pursued a threefold effort: (1) Improve the laser-induced damage threshold of beam-transport optics; (2) improve the near-field beam profile; and (3) develop simulation tools to use during shot operations that provide rapid prediction of laser-system performance. These simulation tools predict the UV near-field beam-fluence distribution and on-target energy based on measurements of the inputs to the main amplifiers and are regularly used during shot operations. They have streamlined daily system qualification, making it possible for UV energy to be maximized within current system constraints.

  20. Lead extraction by selective operation of a nanosecond-pulsed 355nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Amir; Bogdan, Stefan; Glikson, Michael; Ishaaya, Amiel A.; Love, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Lead extraction (LE) is necessary for patients who are suffering from a related infection, or in opening venous occlusions that prevent the insertion of additional lead. In severe cases of fibrous encapsulation of the lead within a vein, laser-based cardiac LE has become one of the foremost methods of removal. In cases where the laser radiation (typically at 308 nm wavelength) interacts with the vein wall rather than with the fibrotic lesion, severe injury and subsequent bleeding may occur. Selective tissue ablation was previously demonstrated by a laser operating in the UV regime; however, it requires the use of sensitizers (e.g.: tetracycline). In this study, we present a preliminary examination of efficacy and safety aspects in the use of a nanosecond-pulsed solid-state laser radiation, at 355 nm wavelength, guided in a catheter consisting of optical fibers, in LE. Specifically, we demonstrate a correlation between the tissue elasticity and the catheter advancement rate, in ex-vivo experiments. Our results indicate a selectivity property for specific parameters of the laser radiation and catheter design. The selectivity is attributed to differences in the mechanical properties of the fibrotic tissue and a normal vein wall, leading to a different photomechanical response of the tissue's extracellular matrix. Furthermore, we performed successful in-vivo animal trials, providing a basic proof of concept for using the suggested scheme in LE. Selective operation using a 355 nm laser may reduce the risk of blood vessel perforation as well as the incidence of major adverse events.

  1. Serum lipids and apolipoprotein B values, blood pressure and pulse rate in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Marcos, A; Varela, P

    1991-01-01

    Some risk factors associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) were evaluated in patients with different types of anorexia nervosa (AN). Anthropometric parameters, serum cholesterol, triglycerides and apoprotein (apo) B values, blood pressure and pulse rate were tested in 29 young female patients and 16 controls. Cholesterol, triglycerides and apo B were higher at the acute period of the illness (AN1), whereas at the chronic period the values of these parameters tended to normalize. Triglycerides were higher in patients who binge ate (bulimarexia). Systolic blood pressure decreased in all types of AN, while diastolic blood pressure decreased only in AN1; pulse rate was not altered. According to cholesterol and apo B values, AN patients may be at risk of CHD if they remain at low body weight. PMID:1855497

  2. A new multifunctional device for femtosecond pulse characterization with a wide operating range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F. J.; Zhang, S. X.; Liu, Q. F.; Zhao, G. K.; Liu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel and simple device for femtosecond pulse characterization, which combines the frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) and the self-referenced spectral interferometry (SRSI) methods in the frequency-resolved optical gating and self-referenced spectral interferometry (FASI) method. It was found that the comparative advantages of FROG and SRSI can complement each other. Therefore FASI can be used to characterize femtosecond pulses in different conditions, which may need different devices when using either the FROG or the SRSI method independently. With our multifunctional FASI device, the TG-FROG, SHG-FROG and TG-SRSI methods were used to fully characterize femtosecond pulses at 800 nm with different dispersions. The experimental results obtained by all three methods were compared with each other and also with the calculated data. These results proved the reliability and the wide operating range of our FASI device.

  3. Safety Aspects of Pulsed Dose Rate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Errors in 1,300 Treatment Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Koedooder, Kees Wieringen, Niek van; Grient, Hans N.B. van der; Herten, Yvonne R.J. van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Blank, Leo

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety of pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy by analyzing errors and technical failures during treatment. Methods and Materials: More than 1,300 patients underwent treatment with PDR brachytherapy, using five PDR remote afterloaders. Most patients were treated with consecutive pulse schemes, also outside regular office hours. Tumors were located in the breast, esophagus, prostate, bladder, gynecology, anus/rectum, orbit, head/neck, with a miscellaneous group of small numbers, such as the lip, nose, and bile duct. Errors and technical failures were analyzed for 1,300 treatment sessions, for which nearly 20,000 pulses were delivered. For each tumor localization, the number and type of occurring errors were determined, as were which localizations were more error prone than others. Results: By routinely using the built-in dummy check source, only 0.2% of all pulses showed an error during the phase of the pulse when the active source was outside the afterloader. Localizations treated using flexible catheters had greater error frequencies than those treated with straight needles or rigid applicators. Disturbed pulse frequencies were in the range of 0.6% for the anus/rectum on a classic version 1 afterloader to 14.9% for orbital tumors using a version 2 afterloader. Exceeding the planned overall treatment time by >10% was observed in only 1% of all treatments. Patients received their dose as originally planned in 98% of all treatments. Conclusions: According to the experience in our institute with 1,300 PDR treatments, we found that PDR is a safe brachytherapy treatment modality, both during and outside of office hours.

  4. Pulsed Helium Ion Beam Induced Deposition: A Means to High Growth Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Alkemade, Paul F. A.; Miro, Hozanna; Van Veldhoven, Emile; Maas, Diederick; Smith, Daryl; Rack, P. D.

    2011-01-01

    The sub-nanometer beam of a helium ion microscope was used to study and optimize helium-ion beam induced deposition of PtC nanopillars with the (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Pt(CPCH{sub 3}) precursor. The beam current, beam dwell time, precursor refresh time, and beam focus have been independently varied. Continuous beam exposure resulted in narrow but short pillars, while pulsed exposure resulted in thinner and higher ones. Furthermore, at short dwell times the deposition efficiency was very high, especially for a defocused beam. Efficiencies were measured up to 20 times the value for continuous exposure conditions. The interpretation of the experimental data was aided by a Monte Carlo simulation of the deposition. The results indicate that two regimes are operational in ion beam induced deposition (IBID). In the first one, the adsorbed precursor molecules originally present in the beam interaction region decompose. After the original precursor layer is consumed, further depletion is averted and growth continues by the supply of molecules via adsorption and surface diffusion. Depletion around the beam impact site can be distinguished from depletion on the flanges of the growing pillars. The Monte Carlo simulations for low precursor surface coverage reproduce measured growth rates, but predict considerably narrower pillars, especially at short dwell times. Both the experiments and the simulations show that the pillar width rapidly increases with increasing beam diameter. Optimal writing strategy, good beam focusing, and rapid beam positioning are needed for efficient and precise fabrication of extended and complex nanostructures by He-IBID.

  5. Feedback threshold control extends pulse rate measurements into the pileup region

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, K.H.; Kopp, M.K.; Williams, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    By using feedback control of the discrimination threshold we have added 4 to 6 decades to the useful range of otherwise conventional pulse counting systems. The additional range is obtained at the high end by retarding saturation of the output count rate with higher threshold levels. We have implemented the method with low-power microcircuits that provide a 9-decade range (10/sup -5/ to 10/sup 4/ R/h) without the need for range or mode switching.

  6. Peri-operative pulse oximetry in low-income countries: a cost–effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Peter J; Gawande, Atul A; Lilford, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the cost–effectiveness of pulse oximetry – compared with no peri-operative monitoring – during surgery in low-income countries. Methods We considered the use of tabletop and portable, hand-held pulse oximeters among patients of any age undergoing major surgery in low-income countries. From earlier studies we obtained baseline mortality and the effectiveness of pulse oximeters to reduce mortality. We considered the direct costs of purchasing and maintaining pulse oximeters as well as the cost of supplementary oxygen used to treat hypoxic episodes identified by oximetry. Health benefits were measured in disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted and benefits and costs were both discounted at 3% per year. We used recommended cost–effectiveness thresholds – both absolute and relative to gross domestic product (GDP) per capita – to assess if pulse oximetry is a cost–effective health intervention. To test the robustness of our results we performed sensitivity analyses. Findings In 2013 prices, tabletop and hand-held oximeters were found to have annual costs of 310 and 95 United States dollars (US$), respectively. Assuming the two types of oximeter have identical effectiveness, a single oximeter used for 22 procedures per week averted 0.83 DALYs per annum. The tabletop and hand-held oximeters cost US$ 374 and US$ 115 per DALY averted, respectively. For any country with a GDP per capita above US$ 677 the hand-held oximeter was found to be cost–effective if it prevented just 1.7% of anaesthetic-related deaths or 0.3% of peri-operative mortality. Conclusion Pulse oximetry is a cost–effective intervention for low-income settings. PMID:25552770

  7. High-rate dead-time corrections in a general purpose digital pulse processing system

    PubMed Central

    Abbene, Leonardo; Gerardi, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Dead-time losses are well recognized and studied drawbacks in counting and spectroscopic systems. In this work the abilities on dead-time correction of a real-time digital pulse processing (DPP) system for high-rate high-resolution radiation measurements are presented. The DPP system, through a fast and slow analysis of the output waveform from radiation detectors, is able to perform multi-parameter analysis (arrival time, pulse width, pulse height, pulse shape, etc.) at high input counting rates (ICRs), allowing accurate counting loss corrections even for variable or transient radiations. The fast analysis is used to obtain both the ICR and energy spectra with high throughput, while the slow analysis is used to obtain high-resolution energy spectra. A complete characterization of the counting capabilities, through both theoretical and experimental approaches, was performed. The dead-time modeling, the throughput curves, the experimental time-interval distributions (TIDs) and the counting uncertainty of the recorded events of both the fast and the slow channels, measured with a planar CdTe (cadmium telluride) detector, will be presented. The throughput formula of a series of two types of dead-times is also derived. The results of dead-time corrections, performed through different methods, will be reported and discussed, pointing out the error on ICR estimation and the simplicity of the procedure. Accurate ICR estimations (nonlinearity < 0.5%) were performed by using the time widths and the TIDs (using 10 ns time bin width) of the detected pulses up to 2.2 Mcps. The digital system allows, after a simple parameter setting, different and sophisticated procedures for dead-time correction, traditionally implemented in complex/dedicated systems and time-consuming set-ups. PMID:26289270

  8. A pulse-burst laser system for a high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Jiang, N.; Lempert, W. R.

    2008-10-15

    A ''pulse-burst'' laser system is being constructed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. This laser is designed to produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1 J Q-switched pulses at repetition frequencies 5-250 kHz. This laser system will operate at 1064 nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier. The master oscillator is a compact diode-pumped Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser, intermediate amplifier stages are flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG, and final stages will be flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass (silicate). Variable pulse width drive (0.3-20 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated-gate bipolar transistor switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and electron density (n{sub e}) dynamics in a single MST shot, and with ensembling, will enable correlation of T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations with other fluctuating quantities.

  9. A pulse-burst laser system for a high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Den Hartog, D J; Jiang, N; Lempert, W R

    2008-10-01

    A "pulse-burst" laser system is being constructed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. This laser is designed to produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1 J Q-switched pulses at repetition frequencies 5-250 kHz. This laser system will operate at 1064 nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier. The master oscillator is a compact diode-pumped Nd:YVO(4) laser, intermediate amplifier stages are flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG, and final stages will be flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass (silicate). Variable pulse width drive (0.3-20 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated-gate bipolar transistor switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of electron temperature (T(e)) and electron density (n(e)) dynamics in a single MST shot, and with ensembling, will enable correlation of T(e) and n(e) fluctuations with other fluctuating quantities. PMID:19044552

  10. A pulse-burst laser system for a high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering diagnostica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Jiang, N.; Lempert, W. R.

    2008-10-01

    A "pulse-burst" laser system is being constructed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. This laser is designed to produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1J Q-switched pulses at repetition frequencies 5-250kHz. This laser system will operate at 1064nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier. The master oscillator is a compact diode-pumped Nd :YVO4 laser, intermediate amplifier stages are flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG, and final stages will be flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass (silicate). Variable pulse width drive (0.3-20ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated-gate bipolar transistor switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of electron temperature (Te) and electron density (ne) dynamics in a single MST shot, and with ensembling, will enable correlation of Te and ne fluctuations with other fluctuating quantities.

  11. Single attosecond pulse generation in He+ by controlling the instant ionization rate using attosecond pulse trains combined with an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xinkui; Jia, T. Q.; Zhang, Jun; Suzuki, M.; Baba, M.; Ozaki, T.; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Kuroda, Hiroto

    2007-08-01

    High-order harmonics and single attosecond pulse generation by using an infrared laser pulse combined with attosecond pulse trains (APT) interacting with He+ have been investigated. We show that the ionization for different instant time intervals can be controlled by altering the time delay between the APT and the infrared pulse. Consequently, APT can be used as a tool to control the efficiency of high-order harmonics emitted at different times. By choosing appropriate APT and time delay, the driving pulse width for single attosecond pulse generation can be extended up to six optical cycles.

  12. Catastrophic optical mirror damage in diode lasers monitored during single pulse operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomm, Jens W.; Ziegler, Mathias; Elsaesser, Thomas; Larsen, Henning E.; Petersen, Paul M.; Andersen, Peter E.; Clausen, Sønnik; Zeimer, Ute; Fendler, David

    2010-02-01

    The catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) effect is analyzed for 808 nm emitting diode lasers in single-pulse operation. During each single pulse, both nearfield of the laser emission and thermal image of the laser facet are monitored with cameras being sensitive in the respective spectral regions. A temporal resolution in the μs-range is achieved. The COMD is unambiguously related to the occurrence of a 'thermal flash' detected by thermal imaging. A one-by-one correlation between emission nearfield, 'thermal flash', thermal runaway, and structural damage is observed. As a consequence of the single-pulse-excitation technique, the propagation of 'dark bands' as observed in photo- or cathodoluminescence maps in the plane of the active region from the front facet is halted after the first pulse. Because of the rapidness of the thermal runaway, we propose the single-pulse technique for testing the facet stability and the intentional preparation of early stages of COMD; even for diode lasers that regularly fail by other mechanisms.

  13. a Thermoacoustically-Driven Pulse Tube Cryocryocooler Operating around 300HZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, G. Y.; Zhu, S. L.; Dai, W.; Luo, E. C.

    2008-03-01

    High frequency operation of the thermoacoustic cryocooler system, i.e. pulse tube cryocooler driven by thermoacoustic engine, leads to reduced size, which is quite attractive to small-scale cryogenic applications. In this work, a no-load coldhead temperature of 77.8 K is achieved on a 292 Hz pulse tube cryocooler driven by a standing-wave thermoacoustic engine with 3.92 MPa helium gas and 1750 W heat input. To improve thermal efficiency, a high frequency thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine is also built to drive the same pulse tube cryocooler, and a no-load temperature of 109 K was obtained with 4.38 MPa helium gas, 292 Hz working frequency and 400W heating power. Ideas such as tapered resonators, acoustic amplifier tubes and simple thin tubes without reservoir are used to effectively suppress harmonic modes, amplify the acoustic pressure wave available to the pulse tube cryocooler and provide desired acoustic impedance for the pulse tube cryocooler, respectively. Comparison of systems with different thermoacoustic engines is made. Numerical simulations based on the linear thermoacoustic theory have also been done for comparison with experimental results, which shows reasonable agreement.

  14. Optical Parameter Variability in Laser Nerve Stimulation: A Study of Pulse Duration, Repetition Rate, and Wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph T.; Jansen, E. Duco; Bendett, Mark; Webb, Jim; Ralph, Heather; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed lasers can evoke neural activity from motor as well as sensory neurons in vivo. Lasers allow more selective spatial resolution of stimulation than the conventional electrical stimulation. To date, few studies have examined pulsed, mid-infrared laser stimulation of nerves and very little of the available optical parameter space has been studied. In this study, a pulsed diode laser, with wavelength between 1.844–1.873 μm, was used to elicit compound action potentials (CAPs) from the auditory system of the gerbil. We found that pulse durations as short as 35 μs elicit a CAP from the cochlea. In addition, repetition rates up to 13 Hz can continually stimulate cochlear spiral ganglion cells for extended periods of time. Varying the wavelength and, therefore, the optical penetration depth, allowed different populations of neurons to be stimulated. The technology of optical stimulation could significantly improve cochlear implants, which are hampered by a lack of spatial selectivity. PMID:17554829

  15. Evaluation of accuracy and reliability of PulseOn optical heart rate monitoring device.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Parak, Jakub; Tarniceriu, Adrian; Renevey, Philippe; Bertschi, Mattia; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2015-08-01

    PulseOn is a wrist-worn optical heart rate (HR) monitor based on photoplethysmography. It utilizes multi-wavelength technology and optimized sensor geometry to monitor blood flow at different depths of skin tissue, and it dynamically adapts to an optimal measurement depth in different conditions. Movement artefacts are reduced by adaptive movement-cancellation algorithms and optimized mechanics, which stabilize the sensor-to-skin contact. In this paper, we evaluated the accuracy and reliability of PulseOn technology against ECG-derived HR in laboratory conditions during a wide range of physical activities and also during outdoor sports. In addition, we compared the performance to another on-the-shelf wrist-worn consumer product Mio LINK(®). The results showed PulseOn reliability (% of time with error <;10bpm) of 94.5% with accuracy (100% - mean absolute percentage error) 96.6% as compared to ECG (vs 86.6% and 94.4% for Mio LINK(®), correspondingly) during laboratory protocol. Similar or better reliability and accuracy was seen during normal outdoor sports activities. The results show that PulseOn provides reliability and accuracy similar to traditional chest strap ECG HR monitors during cardiovascular exercise. PMID:26736291

  16. Reliable pulsed-operation of 1064-nm wavelength-stabilized diode lasers at high-average-power: boosting fiber lasers from the seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettiati, M.; Beuchet, G.; Pagnod-Rossiaux, P.; Garabedian, P.; Perinet, J.; Fromy, S.; Bertreux, J.; Hirtz, J.; Laruelle, F.

    2010-02-01

    Most Pulsed Fiber Lasers (FLs) are built on a Master Oscillator - Power Amplifier (MOPA) architecture, as this configuration has the advantage, among others, of exploiting direct modulation of the diode laser seed (the MO) to reach high repetition rates and high peak-power pulsed operation. To enhance the FL global performance and reliability, high power single-lateral-mode 1064 nm diodes with outstanding long-term behavior are needed. The reliability of these devices at high power has been a challenge for years, due to the high built-in strain in the Quantum Well (QW). In this paper, we present excellent reliability results obtained, in both cw and pulsed conditions, on the latest generation of 1064 nm single-lateral-mode diodes developed at 3S PHOTONICS. Aging tests in cw conditions prove the intrinsic robustness of the diode even at very high junction temperatures, while specific tests in pulsed operation at 45 °C heat-sink temperature, and high repetition rates of several hundred kHz, confirm the stability of the devices in accelerated conditions directly derived from real applications. Both free-running and wavelength stabilized (by means of a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG)) packaged devices show very stable performances under pulsed conditions. Reliable operation at higher average power than currently commercially available diode lasers seeds is demonstrated.

  17. Prototype Operational Advances for Atmospheric Radiation Dose Rate Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H. B.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Bacon, S.; Teets, E.; Sim, A.; Dominik, L.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed innovative, new space weather observations that will become part of the toolset that is transitioned into operational use. One prototype operational system for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is SET's Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system. ARMAS will provide the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Through several dozen flights the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time via Iridium satellites, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. We are extending the dose measurement domain above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere with a collaborative project organized by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) called Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX). In USEWX we will be flying on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft a micro dosimeter for

  18. Wavelet and receiver operating characteristic analysis of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffery, G.; Griffith, T. M.; Naka, K.; Frennaux, M. P.; Matthai, C. C.

    2002-02-01

    Multiresolution wavelet analysis has been used to study the heart rate variability in two classes of patients with different pathological conditions. The scale dependent measure of Thurner et al. was found to be statistically significant in discriminating patients suffering from hypercardiomyopathy from a control set of normal subjects. We have performed Receiver Operating Characteristc (ROC) analysis and found the ROC area to be a useful measure by which to label the significance of the discrimination, as well as to describe the severity of heart dysfunction.

  19. Ytterbium fiber-based, 270 fs, 100 W chirped pulse amplification laser system with 1 MHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    A 100 W Yb-doped, fiber-based, femtosecond, chirped pulse amplification laser system was developed with a repetition rate of 1 MHz, corresponding to a pulse energy of 100 µJ. Large-scale, fused-silica transmission gratings were used for both the pulse stretcher and compressor, with a compression throughput efficiency of ∼85%. A pulse duration of 270 fs was measured by second harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG). To the best of our knowledge, this is the shortest pulse duration ever achieved by a 100-W-level fiber chirped pulse amplification laser system at a repetition rate of few megahertz, without any special post-compression manipulation.

  20. Slow and Go: Pulsing slip rates on the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ryan C.; Shirzaei, Manoochehr; Nadeau, Robert M.; Bürgmann, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Rising and falling slip rates on the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault have been inferred from variations of recurrence intervals of characteristically repeating microearthquakes, but this observation has not previously been confirmed using modern geodetic data. Here we report on observations of this "pulsing" slip obtained from advanced multitemporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data, confirmed using continuous GPS sites of the Plate Boundary Observatory. The surface deformation time series show a strong correlation to the previously documented slip rate variations derived from repeating earthquakes on the fault interface, at various spatial and temporal scales. Time series and spectral analyses of repeating earthquake and InSAR data reveal a quasiperiodic pulsing with a roughly 2 year period along some sections of the fault, with the earthquakes on the fault interface lagging behind the far-field deformation by about 6 months. This suggests a temporal delay between the pulsing crustal strain generated by deep-seated shear and the time-variable slip on the shallow fault interface, and that at least in some places this process may be cyclical. There exist potential impacts for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasting in California and, as it becomes better validated in the richly instrumented natural laboratory of the central San Andreas Fault, the process used here will be even more helpful in characterizing hazard and fault zone rheology in areas without California's geodetic infrastructure.

  1. Expanded system of rate equations for solid state laser giant pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena

    2002-03-01

    For precise design and optimization of the Q-switch solid-state laser system parameters, the computer dynamic model is useful. In the past, this problem was many times solved. Nevertheless, in most cases, as a time starting point of the rate equation, the moment of Q-switch opening was taken for the simulation. Therefore many initial parameters had to be estimated. To have a more complex view on the giant pulse generation, the initial point of a calculation must be derived in the moment of a flashlamp trigger. In our scheme, the designed system of four main differential rate equations describes the energy transfer from the pumping source - a capacitor to the output giant pulse. Designed model was used for the alexandrite active medium. The alexandrite laser system was Q-switched electro-optically and four differential equations gave the computer results. On the base of the computer and physical experiment, it can be summarized that the realistic model of the giant pulse solid-state laser was completed. This model could be simply implemented for other flashlamp solid-state laser systems.

  2. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering: A method to increase deposition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Priya McLain, Jake; Ruzic, David N; Shchelkanov, Ivan A.

    2015-05-15

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) is a state-of-the-art physical vapor deposition technique with several industrial applications. One of the main disadvantages of this process is its low deposition rate. In this work, the authors report a new magnetic field configuration, which produces deposition rates twice that of conventional magnetron's dipole magnetic field configuration. Three different magnet pack configurations are discussed in this paper, and an optimized magnet pack configuration for HPPMS that leads to a higher deposition rate and nearly full-face target erosion is presented. The discussed magnetic field produced by a specially designed magnet assembly is of the same size as the conventional magnet assembly and requires no external fields. Comparison of deposition rates with different power supplies and the electron trapping efficiency in complex magnetic field arrangements are discussed.

  3. Effects of cochlear-implant pulse rate and inter-channel timing on channel interactions and thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrooks, John C.

    2004-07-01

    Interactions among the multiple channels of a cochlear prosthesis limit the number of channels of information that can be transmitted to the brain. This study explored the influence on channel interactions of electrical pulse rates and temporal offsets between channels. Anesthetized guinea pigs were implanted with 2-channel scala-tympani electrode arrays, and spike activity was recorded from the auditory cortex. Channel interactions were quantified as the reduction of the threshold for pulse-train stimulation of the apical channel by sub-threshold stimulation of the basal channel. Pulse rates were 254 or 4069 pulses per second (pps) per channel. Maximum threshold reductions averaged 9.6 dB when channels were stimulated simultaneously. Among nonsimultaneous conditions, threshold reductions at the 254-pps rate were entirely eliminated by a 1966-μs inter-channel offset. When offsets were only 41 to 123 μs, however, maximum threshold shifts averaged 3.1 dB, which was comparable to the dynamic ranges of cortical neurons in this experimental preparation. Threshold reductions at 4069 pps averaged up to 1.3 dB greater than at 254 pps, which raises some concern in regard to high-pulse-rate speech processors. Thresholds for various paired-pulse stimuli, pulse rates, and pulse-train durations were measured to test possible mechanisms of temporal integration.

  4. Detector response to high repetition rate ultra-short laser pulses. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, I. K.; Rafailov, Michael K.

    2015-05-01

    Optical nonlinearities in semiconductors and semiconductor detectors have been widely investigated and exploited for many scientific and industrial applications. The correlation of optical and electronic characteristics in these detector materials under exposure of ultra-short laser pulses at high pulse repetition rates is still not very well known. These effects may be quite beneficial for many applications ranging from chemical and biological sensing to light-induced superconductivity. In this paper, we discuss the effect of extended bleaching in order to demonstrate sensing applications of such phenomenon as an example. Pump-probe measurements in bulk semiconductors will be presented to quantify the transient absorption dynamics and relate this to the electronic response of the detector devices. This effect is not limited semiconductors and may affect other matter states and electronic structures, like dielectrics.

  5. Laser system generating 250-mJ bunches of 5-GHz repetition rate, 12-ps pulses.

    PubMed

    Agnesi, Antonio; Braggio, Caterina; Carrà, Luca; Pirzio, Federico; Lodo, Stefano; Messineo, Giuseppe; Scarpa, Daniele; Tomaselli, Alessandra; Reali, Giancarlo; Vacchi, Carla

    2008-09-29

    We report on a high-energy solid-state laser based on a master-oscillator power-amplifier system seeded by a 5-GHz repetition-rate mode-locked oscillator, aimed at the excitation of the dynamic Casimir effect by optically modulating a microwave resonator. Solid-state amplifiers provide up to 250 mJ at 1064 nm in a 500-ns (macro-)pulse envelope containing 12-ps (micro-)pulses, with a macro/micropulse format and energy resembling that of near-infrared free-electron lasers. Efficient second-harmonic conversion allowed synchronous pumping of an optical parametric oscillator, obtaining up to 40 mJ in the range 750-850 nm. PMID:18825218

  6. Injection-seeded pulsed Ti:sapphire laser with novel stabilization scheme and capability of dual-wavelength operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, Klaus; Linné, Holger; Bösenberg, Jens

    2005-08-01

    A gain-switched, single-frequency titanium-sapphire laser for atmospheric humidity measurements using the differential absorption lidar technique operating in the 820 nm wavelength region is described. The laser is pumped by a frequency-doubled, flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser at a repetition rate of 50 Hz and injection seeded by two external-cavity-diode lasers. The system yields pulses with an energy of 15 mJ and high spectral purity. We describe a novel active injection-locking technique that avoids the problems of established methods like dither-lock or ramp-and-fire. Furthermore, our method opens the possibility to switch between two wavelengths for alternating shots, in contrast to most established techniques that only allow operation at one wavelength.

  7. Performance of large aperture tapered fiber phase conjugate mirror with high pulse energy and 1-kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhigang; Dong, Yantao; Pan, Sunqiang; Liu, Chong; Chen, Jun; Tong, Lixin; Gao, Qingsong; Tang, Chun

    2012-01-16

    A large aperture fused silica tapered fiber phase conjugate mirror is presented with a maximum 70% stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) reflectivity, which is obtained with 1 kHz repetition rate, 15 ns pulse width and 38 mJ input pulse energy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest SBS reflectivity ever reported by using optical fiber as a phase conjugate mirror for such high pulse repetition rate (1 kHz) and several tens of millijoule (mJ) input pulse energy. The influences of fiber end surface quality and pump pulse widths on SBS reflectivity are investigated experimentally. The results show that finer fiber end surface quality and longer input pulse widths are preferred for obtaining higher SBS reflectivity with higher input pulse energy. Double passing amplification experiments are also performed. 52 mJ pulse energy is achieved at 1 kHz repetition rate, with a reflected SBS pulse width of 1.5 ns and a M(2) factor of 2.3. The corresponding peak power reaches 34.6 MW. Obvious beam quality improvement is observed. PMID:22274534

  8. Ultrashort pulse laser drilling of metals using a high-repetition rate high average power fiber CPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, A.; Jauregui, C.; Döring, S.; Röser, F.; Limpert, J.; Nolte, S.; Tünnermann, A.

    2009-02-01

    We present an experimental study of the drilling of metal targets with ultrashort laser pulses with pulse durations from 800 fs to 19 ps at repetition rates up to 1 MHz, average powers up to 70 Watts, using an Ytterbium-doped fiber CPA system. Particle shielding and heat accumulation have been found to influence the drilling efficiency at high repetition rates. Particle shielding causes an increase in the number of pulses for breakthrough. It occurs at a few hundred kHz, depending on the pulse energy and duration. The heat accumulation effect is noticed at higher repetition rates. Although it overbalances the particle shielding thus making the drilling process faster, heat accumulation is responsible for the formation of a large amount of molten material that limits the hole quality. The variations of the pulse duration reveal that heat accumulation starts at higher repetition rates for shorter pulse lengths. This is in agreement with the observed higher ablation efficiency with shorter pulse duration. Thus, the shorter pulses might be advantageous if highest precision and processing speed is required.

  9. Input/output pulse operation of ZnO nanowire threshold integrators.

    PubMed

    White, Richard; Colli, Alan; Li, Hongwei; Kivioja, Jani

    2011-01-14

    Integrating more functionality into individual nano-components is a key step to exploit alternative architectures for energy-efficient computation, such as, for instance, neuromorphic computing. Here, we show how to configure ZnO nanowire field-effect transistors as light pulse integrators with programmable threshold. We demonstrate that these single-component devices can be operated as both synchronous and asynchronous neuron-like structures, where the firing threshold and the form of the output signal, either step-like or spiked, can be controlled by using several operational parameters, including the environment in which the device operates. A detailed study showing how environmental variables, such as relative humidity, ambient light and temperature, affect device operation is presented. PMID:21139191

  10. 948 kHz repetition rate, picosecond pulse duration, all-PM 1.03 μm mode-locked fiber laser based on nonlinear polarization evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivinet, S.; Lecourt, J.-B.; Hernandez, Y.; Fotiadi, A.; Mégret, P.

    2014-05-01

    We present in this study a PM all-fiber laser oscillator passively mode-locked (ML) at 1.03 μm. The laser is based on Nonlinear Polarization Evolution (NPE) in polarization maintaining (PM) fibers. In order to obtain the mode-locking regime, a nonlinear reflective mirror including a fibered polarizer, a long fiber span and a fibered Faraday mirror (FM) is inserted in a Fabry-Perot laser cavity. In this work we explain the principles of operation of this original laser design that permits to generate ultrashort pulses at low repetition (lower that 1MHz) rate with a cavity length of 100 m of fiber. In this experiment, the measured pulse duration is about 6 ps. To our knowledge this is the first all-PM mode-locked laser based on the NPE with a cavity of 100m length fiber and a delivered pulse duration of few picosecondes. Furthermore, the different mode-locked regimes of the laser, i.e. multi-pulse, noise-like mode-locked and single pulse, are presented together with the ways of controlling the apparition of these regimes. When the single pulse mode-locking regime is achieved, the laser delivers linearly polarized pulses in a very stable way. Finally, this study includes numerical results which are obtained with the resolution of the NonLinear Schrodinger Equations (NLSE) with the Split-Step Fourier (SSF) algorithm. This modeling has led to the understanding of the different modes of operation of the laser. In particular, the influence of the peak power on the reflection of the nonlinear mirror and its operation are studied.

  11. Double-pulse machining as a technique for the enhancement of material removal rates in laser machining of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, A.C.; Banks, P.S.; Perry, M.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Dodell, A.L.; Armas, M.S.

    2005-08-01

    Several nanosecond 0.53-{mu}m laser pulses separated by several tens of nanoseconds have been shown to significantly enhance (three to ten times) material removal rates while minimizing redeposition and heat-affected zones. Economic, high-quality, high-aspect ratio holes (>10:1) in metals are produced as a result. A phenomenological model whereby the second laser pulse interacts with the ejecta produced by the first laser pulse and in close proximity to the material surface is consistent with the observations. Incident laser wavelengths of 1.05 and 0.35 {mu}m also benefit from this pulse format.

  12. Efforts to achieve high-performance long-pulse operations in the EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Baonian; EAST Team; Collaborators

    2016-01-01

    To achieve long-pulse tokamak operation, sufficient current drive and self-generated current are required, with the challenges of the exhaust of the heat from the divertor plates. Experiments have proven that lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) can broaden the divertor power footprint and cause the splitting of the strike point current and hence reduce the peak heat flux on the divertors. Edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation can be realized by supersonic molecule beam injection (SMBI), modulated LHCD, lithium granule and aerosol injection, as well as resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). Enhanced transport by an electrostatic edge coherent mode at the pedestal region is observed in the ELM mitigated plasmas by LHCD. Long-pulse H-mode plasmas in the small ELMy regime have been demonstrated by a combination of ELM mitigation techniques and the optimization of the plasma confinement performance. These newly achieved H-mode scenarios by using features of LHCD in the control of steady-state peak heat flux and transient heat flux due to ELMs may offer a promising regime for further EAST long-pulse high-performance operation and be applicable to ITER.

  13. Rate and Pulse Based Plasticity Governed by Local Synaptic State Variables

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Christian G.; Partzsch, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Classically, action-potential-based learning paradigms such as the Bienenstock–Cooper–Munroe (BCM) rule for pulse rates or spike timing-dependent plasticity for pulse pairings have been experimentally demonstrated to evoke long-lasting synaptic weight changes (i.e., plasticity). However, several recent experiments have shown that plasticity also depends on the local dynamics at the synapse, such as membrane voltage, Calcium time course and level, or dendritic spikes. In this paper, we introduce a formulation of the BCM rule which is based on the instantaneous postsynaptic membrane potential as well as the transmission profile of the presynaptic spike. While this rule incorporates only simple local voltage- and current dynamics and is thus neither directly rate nor timing based, it can replicate a range of experiments, such as various rate and spike pairing protocols, combinations of the two, as well as voltage-dependent plasticity. A detailed comparison of current plasticity models with respect to this range of experiments also demonstrates the efficacy of the new plasticity rule. All experiments can be replicated with a limited set of parameters, avoiding the overfitting problem of more involved plasticity rules. PMID:21423519

  14. Fiber optic based heart-rate and pulse pressure shape monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, D.; Dehipawala, S.; Holden, T.; Cheung, E.; Musa, M.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2012-01-01

    Macro-bending fiber optic based heart-rate and pulse pressure shape monitors have been fabricated and tested for non-invasive measurement. Study of fiber bending loss and its stability and variations are very important especially for sensor designs based on optical fiber bending. Wavelengths from 1300 nm to 1550 nm have been used with fabrication based on multimode fiber, single mode fiber, and photonic crystal fiber. The smallest studied curvature would demand the use of single mode standard fibers. The collected data series show high quality suitable for random series analysis. Fractal property of optically measured pulse pressure data has been observed to correlate with physical activity. Correlation to EKG signal suggests that the fabricated monitors are capable of measuring the differential time delays at wrist and leg locations. The difference in time delay could be used to formulate a velocity parameter for diagnostics. The pulse shape information collected by the fiber sensor provides additional parameters for the analysis of the fractal nature of the heart. The application to real time measurement of blood vessel stiffness with this optical non-invasive fiber sensor is discussed.

  15. Observation of self-magnetic field relaxations in Bi2223 and Y123 HTS tapes after over-current pulse and DC current operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallouli, M.; Sun, J.; Chikumoto, N.; Otabe, E. S.; Shyshkin, O.; Charfi-Kaddour, S.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2016-07-01

    The development of power transmission lines based on long-length HTS tapes requires the production of high quality tapes. Due to fault conditions, technical mistakes and human errors during the operation of a DC power transmission line, an over-current pulse, several times larger than the rated current, could occur. To study the effect of such over-current pulses on the transport current density distribution in the HTS tapes, we simulated two start-up scenarios for one BSCCO and two YBCO tapes. The first start-up scenario is an initial over-current pulse during which the transport current was turned on rapidly, rising to 900 A during the first milliseconds, then reduced to a 100 A DC current. The second start-up scenario is normal operation, and involved increasing the transport current slowly from 0 A to 100 A at a rate of 1 A/s. For both scenarios, we then measured the vertical component of the self-magnetic field by means of a Hall probe above the tape, and afterward, by solving a linear equation of the inverse problem we obtain the current density profiles. We observe a change of the self-magnetic field above the edge of the BSCCO and YBCO tapes during 30 min after the 5 ms of over-current pulse and during the normal operation. The current density profiles are peaked in the centre for over-current pulse, and more peaked around the edge of the HTS tape for normal operation, which means that the limited time over-current pulse changes the current density profiles of the HTS tapes. We observe also a loop of current for YBCO tapes and we show the role of the HTS tape stabilizer.

  16. Hour-long continuous operation of a tabletop soft x-ray laser at 50-100 Hz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Brendan A; Li, Wei; Urbanski, Lukasz; Wernsing, Keith A; Salsbury, Chase; Baumgarten, Cory; Marconi, Mario C; Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J

    2013-11-18

    We report the uninterrupted operation of an 18.9 nm wavelength tabletop soft x-ray laser at 100 Hz repetition rate for extended periods of time. An average power of about 0.1 mW was obtained by irradiating a Mo target with pulses from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Series of up to 1.8 x 10(5) consecutive laser pulses of ~1 µJ energy were generated by displacing the surface of a high shot-capacity rotating molybdenum target by ~2 µm between laser shots. As a proof-of-principle demonstration of the use of this compact ultrashort wavelength laser in applications requiring a high average power coherent beam, we lithographically printed an array of nanometer-scale features using coherent Talbot self-imaging. PMID:24514347

  17. Optimal repetition rates of excitation pulses in a Tm-vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskii, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The optimal excitation pulse repetition rates (PRRs) for a gas-discharge Tm-vapour laser with indirect population of upper laser levels are determined. It is shown that, under the same excitation conditions, the optimal PRRs increase with a decrease in the energy defect between the upper laser acceptor level and the nearest resonant donor level. The reasons for the limitation of the optimal PRRs in Tm-vapour laser are discussed. It is shown that the maximum average power of Tm-vapour laser radiation may exceed several times the Cu-vapour laser power under the same excitation conditions and in identical gas-discharge tubes.

  18. Power scaling of supercontinuum seeded megahertz-repetition rate optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Riedel, R; Stephanides, A; Prandolini, M J; Gronloh, B; Jungbluth, B; Mans, T; Tavella, F

    2014-03-15

    Optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifiers with high average power are possible with novel high-power Yb:YAG amplifiers with kW-level output powers. We demonstrate a compact wavelength-tunable sub-30-fs amplifier with 11.4 W average power with 20.7% pump-to-signal conversion efficiency. For parametric amplification, a beta-barium borate crystal is pumped by a 140 W, 1 ps Yb:YAG InnoSlab amplifier at 3.25 MHz repetition rate. The broadband seed is generated via supercontinuum generation in a YAG crystal. PMID:24690803

  19. Study on pulsed-discharge devices with high current rising rate for point spot short-wavelength source in dense plasma observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachinami, Fumitaka; Anzai, Nobuyuki; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Harada, Nob.

    2014-01-01

    A pulsed-power generator with high current rise based on a pulse-forming-network was studied toward generating intense point-spot X-ray source. To obtain the high rate of current rise, we have designed the compact discharge device with low circuit inductance. The results indicate that the inductance of the compact discharge device was dominated by a gap switch inductance. To reduce the gap switch inductance and operation voltage, the feasible gap switch inductance in the vacuum chamber has been estimated by the circuit simulation. The gap switch inductance can be reduced by the lower pressure operation. It means that the designed discharge device achieves the rate of current rise of 1012 A/s.

  20. Pulsed Capillary Discharge Operated As A Compact Soft X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Valenzuela, J. C.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze experimental results of radiation emission from a compact pulsed capillary ns discharge source, designed for soft x-ray applications, operated in Nitrogen and N/He mixtures at voltages in the range of 18-24kV. The discharge operates in an alumina capillary of length 21mm and 1.6mm inner diameter. The electrical energy stored is ~0.5 J with peak current of ~5kA. Fast charging from an IGBT based pulsed power circuit allows operation at 35-150 Hz. Characteristic time-integrated Nitrogen spectra were recorded from 10-220 Å with clear evidence of He-like Nitrogen line at 28.9 Å, which represents a possible source for a water window soft x-ray microscope. Time-evolution measurements show the influence of axial electron beams, generated by hollow cathode dynamics, on the x-ray emission. We discuss optimal frequency of operation, voltage applied, geometrical and pressure conditions for cathode and anode, for soft x-ray generation. Time-integrated MCP images of a filtered slit-wire system delivered an estimate of the maximum emission energy of our source, as well as clear evidence of full wall detachment, of ~100μm in radial size for the entire emission range.

  1. Dose rate dependence of the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector in high dose-per-pulse pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Pombar, Miguel; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Recombination effects can affect the detectors used for the dosimetry of radiotherapy fields. They are important when using ionization chambers, especially in liquid-filled ionization chambers, and should be corrected for. The introduction of flattening-filter-free accelerators increases the typical dose-per-pulse used in radiotherapy beams, which leads to more important recombination effects. Diamond detectors provide a good solution for the dosimetry and quality assurance of small radiotherapy fields, due to their low energy dependence and small volume. The group of Università di Roma Tor Vergata has developed a synthetic diamond detector, which is commercialized by PTW as microDiamond detector type 60019. In this work we present an experimental characterization of the collection efficiency of the microDiamond detector, focusing on high dose-per-pulse FFF beams. The collection efficiency decreases with dose-per-pulse, down to 0.978 at 2.2 mGy/pulse, following a Fowler-Attix-like curve. On the other hand, we have found no significant dependence of the collection efficiency on the pulse repetition frequency (or pulse period).

  2. Utilization of a cryo-prober system for operation of a pulse-driven josephson junction array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, M.; Urano, C.; Kaneko, N.; Yamamori, H.; Shoji, A.; Maezawa, M.; Hashimoto, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Nagasawa, S.; Satoh, T.; Hidaka, M.; Kiryu, S.

    2010-06-01

    We demonstrated the operation of pulse-driven Josephson junction arrays (JJAs) for AC voltage standard using a wideband cryo-prober system with a 4-K Gifford-MacMahon (GM) cooler. This unique system was originally developed for high-speed network switch applications of rapid-single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) circuits and enables wideband data transmission at bit rates of higher than 10 Gbps between room-temperature and cryogenic environments. JJA chips were fabricated using NbN-based superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) junctions. A 5-mm chip was mounted on a 16-mm chip carrier using flip-chip bonding technology for probe contact. To obtain bipolar output voltages, we tried two types of testing based on the AC coupling technique proposed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A pulse pattern generator (PPG) with a large memory of 134 Mbit was used for covering a wide frequency range of output signals. As a result, we succeeded in bipolar operation of the JJA, generating waveforms at frequencies from 60 Hz to several tens of kilo hertz. The maximum rms voltage obtained for a single array was 12.7 mV. The observed spurious level was lower than -93 dBc at 16 kHz.

  3. Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Technology: Earth Observing-1 PPT Operational and Advanced Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Benson, Scott W.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Frus, John; Hoskins, W. Andrew; Burton, Rodney

    2003-01-01

    In 2002 the pulsed plasma thruster (PPT) mounted on the Earth Observing-1 spacecraft was operated successfully in orbit. The two-axis thruster system is fully incorporated in the attitude determination and control system and is being used to automatically counteract disturbances in the pitch axis of the spacecraft. The first tests conducted in space demonstrated the full range of PPT operation, followed by calibration of control torques from the PPT in the attitude control system. Then the spacecraft was placed in PPT control mode. To date, it has operated for about 30 hr. The PPT successfully controlled pitch momentum during wheel de-spin, solar array acceleration and deceleration during array rewind, and environmental torques in nominal operating conditions. Images collected with the Advanced Landsat Imager during PPT operation have demonstrated that there was no degradation in comparison to full momentum wheel control. In addition, other experiments have been performed to interrogate the effects of PPT operation on communication packages and light reflection from spacecraft surfaces. Future experiments will investigate the possibility of orbit-raising maneuvers, spacecraft roll, and concurrent operation with the Hyperion imager. Future applications envisioned for pulsed plasma thrusters include longer life, higher precision, multiaxis thruster configurations for three-axis attitude control systems or high-precision, formationflying systems. Advanced components, such as a "dry" mica-foil capacitor, a wear-resistant spark plug, and a multichannel power processing unit have been developed under contract with Unison Industries, General Dynamics, and C.U. Aerospace. Over the last year, evaluation tests have been conducted to determine power processing unit efficiency, atmospheric functionality, vacuum functionality, thruster performance evaluation, thermal performance, and component life.

  4. A novel non-linear recursive filter design for extracting high rate pulse features in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sajedi, Salar; Kamal Asl, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R; Farahani, Mohammad H; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-06-01

    Applications in imaging and spectroscopy rely on pulse processing methods for appropriate data generation. Often, the particular method utilized does not highly impact data quality, whereas in some scenarios, such as in the presence of high count rates or high frequency pulses, this issue merits extra consideration. In the present study, a new approach for pulse processing in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy is introduced and evaluated. The new non-linear recursive filter (NLRF) performs nonlinear processing of the input signal and extracts the main pulse characteristics, having the powerful ability to recover pulses that would ordinarily result in pulse pile-up. The filter design defines sampling frequencies lower than the Nyquist frequency. In the literature, for systems involving NaI(Tl) detectors and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with a signal bandwidth considered as 15 MHz, the sampling frequency should be at least 30 MHz (the Nyquist rate), whereas in the present work, a sampling rate of 3.3 MHz was shown to yield very promising results. This was obtained by exploiting the known shape feature instead of utilizing a general sampling algorithm. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed filter enhances count rates in spectroscopy. With this filter, the system behaves almost identically as a general pulse detection system with a dead time considerably reduced to the new sampling time (300 ns). Furthermore, because of its unique feature for determining exact event times, the method could prove very useful in time-of-flight PET imaging. PMID:22964063

  5. High-pressure pulsed avalanche discharges: Formulas for required preionization density and rate for homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Brenning, N.; Axnaes, I.; Nilsson, J.O.; Eninger, J.E.

    1997-02-01

    The requirements on preionization for the formation of spatially homogeneous pulsed avalanche discharges are examined. The authors derive two formulas which apply in the case of a slowly rising electric field, one which gives the required preionization density at breakdown, and one which gives the required preionization rate. These quantities are expressed as functions of the electrochemical properties of the gas, the neutral density, and the electric field rise time. They also treat the statistical effect that the electrons tend to form groups, in contrast to being randomly distributed in space, during the prebreakdown phase. This process is found to increase the required preionization rate significantly, typically by a factor of five for a discharge at atmospheric pressure. Homogeneous high-pressure discharges have been used for laser excitation, and have also been proposed for chemical plasma processing (ozone production) because of their good scaling properties and high efficiency.

  6. Comeditation: an exploratory study of pulse and respiration rates and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Fasko, D; Osborne, M R; Hall, G; Boerstler, R W; Kornfeld, H

    1992-06-01

    To achieve deep relaxation in seriously ill persons, Tibetan medicine has employed a breathing process, known as "comeditation," which requires a caregiver to focus attention on the chest of the reclining patient while making a sound or number keyed to the patient's exhalation. This study investigated the relationship between state and trait anxiety and lowered respiratory rate, using the comeditation procedure. Ten subjects were assigned randomly to either a control or comeditation group. Anxiety was measured on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Analysis indicated a decrease in State-Anxiety scores in the comeditation group, but no differences between groups in pulse and respiration rates or trait anxiety. Implications for theory and research are discussed. PMID:1608727

  7. Diagrammatic analysis of the density operator for nonlinear optical calculations Pulsed and CW responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, T. K.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper a diagrammatic analysis of the density operator for the evaluation of nonlinear optical quantities is considered. The present approach extends earlier diagrammatic analysis by treating the time evolution of both the wave function and its complex conjugate. Time-ordered graphs result, each of which corresponds to a term in the density matrix. Examples involving the third-order susceptibility are discussed for both monochromatic and pulse excitation. In particular coherent rotational transient birefringence is discussed. The diagrams provide a convenient means by which nonlinear optical processes can be precisely defined and the susceptibility readily evaluated.

  8. Long Pulse operation with the ITER-Relevant LHCD Antenna in Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Delpech, L.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Preynas, M.; Sharma, P. K.; Achard, J.; Bae, Y. S.; Bai, X.; Balorin, C.; Baranov, Y.; Basiuk, V.; Bécoulet, A.; Belo, J.; Berger-By, G.; Brémond, S.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Cesario, R.; Corbel, E.; Courtois, X.; Decker, J.; Delmas, E.; Ding, B. J.; Ding, X.; Douai, D.; Dumont, R.; Goletto, C.; Gunn, J. P.; Hertout, P.; Hoang, G. T.; Imbeaux, F.; Kirov, K.; Litaudon, X.; Lotte, P.; Maget, P.; Magne, R.; Mailloux, J.; Mazon, D.; Mirizzi, F.; Mollard, P.; Moreau, P.; Oosako, T.; Petrzilka, V.; Peysson, Y.; Poli, S.; Prou, M.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Samaille, F.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the Tore Supra tokamak is to address physics and technology issues of long pulse discharges. For this purpose, Tore Supra is equipped with two actively cooled Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) antennas (f = 3.7GHz), designed to operate in 1000s long pulses. One of these is the recently installed passive active multijunction (PAM) antenna, whose design is chosen for an LHCD system for ITER. The first experiments with the PAM antenna in Tore Supra have shown extremely encouraging results in terms of reflection coefficient behaviour and power handling. The maximum power and energy reached on the PAM, after ~500 pulses on plasma, was 2.7MW during 78s (exceeding 200MJ injected energy). In addition, 2.7MW has been coupled at a plasma-antenna distance of 10cm. The coupling behaviour on the PAM, characterised by the fraction of reflected power (RC), shows good agreement with the predictions from the ALOHA coupling code. Full non-inductive discharges lasting 50s have been sustained with the PAM alone, exhibiting a current drive efficiency comparable to that of the full active multijunction antennas in Tore Supra, in similar experimental conditions.

  9. Recent advances in long-pulse high-confinement plasma operations in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H. Y.; Li, J.; Wan, B. N. Gong, X. Z.; Xu, G. S.; Zhang, X. D.; Ding, S. Y.; Gan, K. F.; Hu, J. S.; Hu, L. Q.; Liu, S. C.; Qian, J. P.; Sun, Y. W.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, L.; Xia, T. Y.; Xiao, B. J.; Zeng, L.; Zhao, Y. P.; and others

    2014-05-15

    A long-pulse high confinement plasma regime known as H-mode is achieved in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with a record duration over 30 s, sustained by Lower Hybrid wave Current Drive (LHCD) with advanced lithium wall conditioning and divertor pumping. This long-pulse H-mode plasma regime is characterized by the co-existence of a small Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) instability, i.e., Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and a continuous quasi-coherent MHD mode at the edge. We find that LHCD provides an intrinsic boundary control for ELMs, leading to a dramatic reduction in the transient power load on the vessel wall, compared to the standard Type I ELMs. LHCD also induces edge plasma ergodization, broadening heat deposition footprints, and the heat transport caused by ergodization can be actively controlled by regulating edge plasma conditions, thus providing a new means for stationary heat flux control. In addition, advanced tokamak scenarios have been newly developed for high-performance long-pulse plasma operations in the next EAST experimental campaign.

  10. High energy density capacitors for vacuum operation with a pulsed plasma load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guman, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Results of the effort of designing, fabricating, and testing of a 40 joules/lb (88.2 joules/Kg) high voltage energy storage capacitor suitable for operating a pulsed plasma thruster in a vacuum environment for millions of pulses are presented. Using vacuum brazing and heli-arc welding techniques followed by vacuum and high pressure helium leak tests it was possible to produce a hermetically sealed relatively light weight enclosure for the dielectric system. An energy density of 40 joules/lb was realized with a KF-polyvinylidene fluoride dielectric system. One capacitor was D.C. life tested at 4 KV (107.8 joules/lb) for 2,000 hours before it failed. Another exceeded 2,670 hours without failure at 38.3 joules/lb. Pulse life testing in a vacuum exceeded 300,000 discharges with testing still in progress. The D.C. life test data shows a small decrease in capacitance and an increase in dissipation factor with time. Heat transfer from the load to the capacitor must also be considered besides the self-heat generated by the capacitor.

  11. Recent advances in long-pulse high-confinement plasma operations in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamaka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Li, J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Liang, Y. F.; Xu, G. S.; Zhang, X. D.; Ding, S. Y.; Gan, K. F.; Hu, J. S.; Hu, L. Q.; Liu, S. C.; Qian, J. P.; Sun, Y. W.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, L.; Xia, T. Y.; Xiao, B. J.; Zeng, L.; Zhao, Y. P.; Denner, P.; Ferron, J. R.; Garofalo, A. M.; Holcomb, C. T.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jackson, G. L.; Loarte, A.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J. E.; Rack, M.; Solomon, W. M.; Xu, X. Q.; Van Zeeland, M.; Zou, X. L.

    2014-05-01

    A long-pulse high confinement plasma regime known as H-mode is achieved in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with a record duration over 30 s, sustained by Lower Hybrid wave Current Drive (LHCD) with advanced lithium wall conditioning and divertor pumping. This long-pulse H-mode plasma regime is characterized by the co-existence of a small Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) instability, i.e., Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and a continuous quasi-coherent MHD mode at the edge. We find that LHCD provides an intrinsic boundary control for ELMs, leading to a dramatic reduction in the transient power load on the vessel wall, compared to the standard Type I ELMs. LHCD also induces edge plasma ergodization, broadening heat deposition footprints, and the heat transport caused by ergodization can be actively controlled by regulating edge plasma conditions, thus providing a new means for stationary heat flux control. In addition, advanced tokamak scenarios have been newly developed for high-performance long-pulse plasma operations in the next EAST experimental campaign.

  12. Argon gas-puff radius optimiaztion for Saturn operating in the long-pulse mode.

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, John P.; Jackson, S. L.; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Mosher, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    Argon gas puff experiments using the long pulse mode of Saturn (230-ns rise time) have promise to increase the coupled energy and simplify operations because the voltage is reduced in vacuum and the forward-going energy is higher for the same Marx charge. The issue addressed in this work is to determine if the 12-cm-diameter triple nozzle used in Saturn long-pulse-mode experiments to date provides maximum K-shell yield, or if a different-radius nozzle provides additional radiation. Long-pulse implosions are modeled by starting with measured density distributions from the existing 12-cm-diameter nozzle, and then varying the outer radius in an implosion-energy-conserving self-similar manner to predict the gas-puff diameter that results in the maximum K-shell yield. The snowplow-implosions and multi-zone radiation transport models used in the analysis are benchmarked against detailed measurements from the 12-cm-diameter experiments. These calculations indicate that the maximum K-shell emission is produced with very nearly the existing nozzle radius.

  13. High-dose-rate pulse x-ray detection using a multipixel photon counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hitomi, Keitaro; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Onabe, Hideaki; Shoji, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Kawai, Toshiaki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    Detection of high-dose-rate pulse x-rays from a samarium plasma flash x-ray generator utilizing a multipixel photon counter is described. Monochromatic K-series characteristic x-rays are detected by a plastic scintillator, and fluorescent lights are lead to the photon counter through a 10-m-length plastic fiber. The reverse bias was 70.0 V, and x-ray outputs were recorded by a digital storage scope. The samarium plasma flash x-ray generator is useful for performing high-speed enhanced K-edge angiography using cone beams because K-series characteristic x-rays from the samarium target are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast media. In the flash x-ray generator, a 150 nF condenser is charged up to 80 kV by a power supply, and flash x-rays are produced by the discharging. Since the electric circuit of the high-voltage pulse generator employs a cable transmission line, the high-voltage pulse generator produces twice the potential of the condenser charging voltage. At a charging voltage of 80 kV, the estimated maximum tube voltage and current are approximately 160 kV and 40 kA, respectively. When the charging voltage was increased, the K-series characteristic x-ray intensities of samarium increased. Bremsstrahlung x-ray intensity rate decreased with increasing the charging voltage, and K lines were produced with a charging voltage of 80 kV. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 100 ns, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity had a value of approximately 500 μGy at 1.0 m from the x-ray source with a charging voltage of 80 kV. Angiography was performed using a filmless computed radiography (CR) system and iodine-based contrast media. In the angiography of nonliving animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 μm with high contrasts.

  14. High-pulse-energy passively Q-switched quasi-monolithic microchip lasers operating in the sub-100-ps pulse regime.

    PubMed

    Nodop, D; Limpert, J; Hohmuth, R; Richter, W; Guina, M; Tünnermann, A

    2007-08-01

    We present passively Q-switched microchip lasers with items bonded by spin-on-glass glue. Passive Q-switching is obtained by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. The laser medium is a Nd:YVO(4) crystal. These lasers generate pulse peak powers up to 20 kW at a pulse duration as short as 50 ps and pulse repetition rates of 166 kHz. At 1064 nm, a linear polarized transversal and longitudinal single-mode beam is emitted. To the best of our knowledge, these are the shortest pulses in the 1 microJ energy range ever obtained with passively Q-switched microchip lasers. The quasi-monolithic setup ensures stable and reliable performance. PMID:17671554

  15. Optimization of Pulsed-DEER Measurements for Gd-Based Labels: Choice of Operational Frequencies, Pulse Durations and Positions, and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Raitsimring, A.; Astashkin, A. V.; Enemark, J. H.; Kaminker, I.; Goldfarb, D.; Walter, E. D.; Song, Y.; Meade, T. J.

    2012-12-29

    In this work, the experimental conditions and parameters necessary to optimize the long-distance (≥ 60 Å) Double Electron-Electron Resonance (DEER) measurements of biomacromolecules labeled with Gd(III) tags are analyzed. The specific parameters discussed are the temperature, microwave band, the separation between the pumping and observation frequencies, pulse train repetition rate, pulse durations and pulse positioning in the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum. It was found that: (i) in optimized DEER measurements, the observation pulses have to be applied at the maximum of the EPR spectrum; (ii) the optimal temperature range for Ka-band measurements is 14-17 K, while in W-band the optimal temperatures are between 6-9 K; (iii) W-band is preferable to Ka-band for DEER measurements. Recent achievements and the conditions necessary for short-distance measurements (<15 Å) are also briefly discussed.

  16. Measurement of performance using acceleration control and pulse control in simulated spacecraft docking operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, Adam R.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Nine commercial airline pilots served as test subjects in a study to compare acceleration control with pulse control in simulated spacecraft maneuvers. Simulated remote dockings of an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) to a space station were initiated from 50, 100, and 150 meters along the station's -V-bar (minus velocity vector). All unsuccessful missions were reflown. Five way mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) with one between factor, first mode, and four within factors (mode, bloch, range, and trial) were performed on the data. Recorded performance measures included mission duration and fuel consumption along each of the three coordinate axes. Mission duration was lower with pulse mode, while delta V (fuel consumption) was lower with acceleration mode. Subjects used more fuel to travel faster with pulse mode than with acceleration mode. Mission duration, delta V, X delta V, Y delta V., and Z delta V all increased with range. Subjects commanded the OMV to 'fly' at faster rates from further distances. These higher average velocities were paid for with increased fuel consumption. Asymmetrical transfer was found in that the mode transitions could not be predicted solely from the mission duration main effect. More testing is advised to understand the manual control aspects of spaceflight maneuvers better.

  17. Multi-wave ultrasonic Doppler method for measuring high flow-rates using staggered pulse intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Ei; Murakawa, Hideki; Sugimoto, Katsumi; Asano, Hitoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Furuichi, Noriyuki

    2016-02-01

    The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler method (UDM) can obtain a velocity profile along the path of an ultrasonic beam. However, the UDM measurement volume is relatively large and it is known that the measurement volume affects the measurement accuracy. In this study, the effect of the measurement volume on velocity and flow rate measurements is analytically and experimentally evaluated. The velocities measured using UDM are considered to be ensemble-averaged values over the measurement volume in order to analyze the velocity error due to the measurement volume, while the flow rates are calculated from the integration of the velocity profile across the pipe. The analytical results show that the channel width, i.e. the spatial resolution along the ultrasonic beam axis, rather than the ultrasonic beam diameter, strongly influences the flow rate measurement. To improve the accuracy of the flow rate, a novel method using a multi-wave ultrasonic transducer consisting of two piezo-electric elements with different basic frequencies is proposed to minimize the size of the measurement volume in the near-wall region of a pipe flow. The velocity profiles in the near-wall region are measured using an 8 MHz sensor with a small diameter, while those far from the transducer are measured using a hollow 2 MHz sensor in the multi-wave transducer. The applicability of the multi-wave transducer was experimentally investigated using the water flow-rate calibration facility at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). As a result, the errors in the flow rate were found to be below  -1%, while the multi-wave method is shown to be particularly effective for measuring higher flow rates in a large-diameter pipe.

  18. The influence of the repetition rate on the nanosecond pulsed pin-to-pin microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bang-Dou; Takashima, Keisuke; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2014-10-01

    The effect of repetition rate on a nanosecond atmospheric pressure discharge is investigated. The discharge is generated between two pins in a mixture of Ne and Ar. The voltage, current, power waveforms and the temporally and spatially resolved electron density and an ‘effective’ electron temperature are measured, with a pulse interval between 1.5 and 200 µs. It is found that not only does the repetition rate have a strong influence on the breakdown voltage and the peak discharge power, but it can also affect the rise rate of the volume averaged electron density and its peak value. Temporally and spatially resolved measurement of the electron density and the effective electron temperature show that the spatial distributions of both quantities are also influenced by the repetition rate. In the initial discharge period of all cases, the sharp rise of the electron density correlates with the drastic drop of the effective electron temperature. It is suggested that the residual charges have a strong impact on the axial distribution of the electric field and energetic electrons between the electrodes during the breakdown period, as illustrated by a simple sheath model.

  19. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of a target on operation of a pulsed CO2 laser emitting microsecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. Yu; Dolgov, V. A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1987-12-01

    The profile of pulses emitted by a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable resonator changed as a result of interaction of laser radiation with the surface of a metal in the presence of a breakdown plasma. This influence of a target on laser operation and its possible applications in laser processing of materials are analyzed.

  20. Design and preliminary tests of a twin coil HTS SMES for pulse power operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badel, Arnaud; Tixador, Pascal; Berger, Kevin; Deleglise, Marc

    2011-05-01

    The design of a twin coil 2 × 200 kJ-1 MW pulse power high temperature superconductor (HTS) superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) demonstrator is presented. Its aim is to test at small scale various possibilities of electromagnetic launcher powering. The foreseen operation modes include high voltage discharge in power capacitors, sequential discharges of identical energies from two coupled coils, and XRAM current multiplication. Special attention was paid to the arrangement of the coils for the energies discharged to be equal. The coils are cooled by conduction from three cryocoolers; the thermal design was optimized in order to maintain the coils around 15 K in spite of the high number of current leads required for XRAM operation (eight). Preliminary tests of the demonstrator are also presented, showing that the thermal and electrical characteristics are in very good agreement with the design objectives.

  1. Soft X-Ray Emission Analysis Of A Pulsed Capillary Discharge Operated In Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present results from a pulsed capillary ns discharge source, operated in Nitrogen and N/He mixtures, in an alumina capillary 2.1mm long with outer diameter of 6.3mm and inner diameter of 1.6mm. The electrical energy stored is 0.5J with peak current of 6kA. Fast charging from an IGBT based pulsed power circuit allows operation at 35-600 Hz with voltages in the range of 18-24kV. Characteristic time-integrated N/He spectra were recorded and analyzed for values of 20-200 Å, with clear evidence of He-like Nitrogen emission at 28.8Å, which represents a possible source for water window soft x-ray microscopy. Filtered diode measurements reveal the influence of axial electron beams, generated by hollow cathode dynamics, on the x-ray emission in the range of 300-450 eV. We discuss optimal voltage applied and pressure conditions for soft x-ray generation. Time-integrated MCP images of a filtered slit-wire system delivered clear evidence of full wall detachment with ~500μm in radial size for the entire emission range and ~200μm for the emission in the 300-450 eV range.

  2. Contactless vision-based pulse rate detection of Infants Under Neurological Examinations.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Arindam; Behera, Santosh Kumar; Dogra, Debi Prosad; Bhaskar, Harish

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for detecting variations in the Pulse Rate (PR) of infants undergoing the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examinations (HINE) using video data. As in every other medical examination the measurement of the PR is critical to underpin the physiological state of living beings. During HINE, measuring the infant's PR is important as its variations against physical conditions, age and other factors must be studied and correlated against developmental scores. However, this becomes highly complicated with active infants where their movements often lead to inconsistent PR estimation. We propose the use of a non-linear dimensionality reduction technique, called Laplacian Eigenmap (LE), to uncover the pulse information encapsulated within the high dimensional visual manifold characterized by normalized RGB feature vectors. Furthermore, low-level image filtering is applied to accurately detect PR within a chosen region-of-interest (ROI) from different parts of the infant's body. For validation and analysis, a set of 14 video sequences of infants undergoing five important tests of HINE have been chosen. Experimental results suggest that a bi-parametrized combination of color features from the RG and GB channels provide more valuable information in comparison to the RB and RGB channels. Results have demonstrated that this contactless method of PR detection has promising prospects for its future use in other clinical examinations of infants. PMID:26736346

  3. [Design of Oxygen Saturation, Heart Rate, Respiration Rate Detection System Based on Smartphone of Android Operating System].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingshan; Zeng, Bixin

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we designed an oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiration rate monitoring system based on smartphone of android operating system, physiological signal acquired by MSP430 microcontroller and transmitted by Bluetooth module. PMID:26524782

  4. Picosecond supercontinuum light source for stroboscopic white-light interferometry with freely adjustable pulse repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Steffen; Durairaj, Vasuki; Shavrin, Igor; Lipiäinen, Lauri; Kokkonen, Kimmo; Kaivola, Matti; Ludvigsen, Hanne

    2014-06-01

    We present a picosecond supercontinuum light source designed for stroboscopic white-light interferometry. This source offers a potential for high-resolution characterization of vibrational fields in electromechanical components with frequencies up to the GHz range. The light source concept combines a gain-switched laser diode, the output of which is amplified in a two-stage fiber amplifier, with supercontinuum generation in a microstructured optical fiber. Implemented in our white-light interferometer setup, optical pulses with optimized spectral properties and below 310 ps duration are used for stroboscopic illumination at freely adjustable repetition rates. The performance of the source is demonstrated by characterizing the surface vibration field of a square-plate silicon MEMS resonator at 3.37 MHz. A minimum detectable vibration amplitude of less than 100 pm is reached. PMID:24921556

  5. Luminescence of black silicon fabricated by high-repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Tao; Si Jinhai; Hou Xun; Kanehira, Shingo; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2011-10-01

    We studied the photoluminescence (PL) from black silicon that was fabricated using an 800 nm, 250 kHz femtosecond laser in air. By changing the scan velocity and the fluence of the femtosecond laser, the formation of the PL band between the orange (600 nm) and red bands (near 680 nm) could be controlled. The red band PL from the photoinduced microstructures on the black silicon was observed even without annealing due to the thermal accumulation of high-repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses. The orange band PL was easily quenched under 532 nm cw laser irradiation, whereas the red band PL was more stable; this can be attributed to ''defect luminescence'' and ''quantum confinement'', respectively.

  6. Towards continuous monitoring of pulse rate in neonatal intensive care unit with a webcam.

    PubMed

    Mestha, Lalit K; Kyal, Survi; Xu, Beilei; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Kumar, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel method to monitor pulse rate (PR) on a continuous basis of patients in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using videos taken from a high definition (HD) webcam. We describe algorithms that determine PR from videoplethysmographic (VPG) signals extracted from multiple regions of interest (ROI) simultaneously available within the field of view of the camera where cardiac signal is registered. We detect motion from video images and compensate for motion artifacts from each ROI. Preliminary clinical results are presented on 8 neonates each with 30 minutes of uninterrupted video. Comparisons to hospital equipment indicate that the proposed technology can meet medical industry standards and give improved patient comfort and ease of use for practitioners when instrumented with proper hardware. PMID:25570823

  7. Optical-fiber pulse rate multiplier for ultralow phase-noise signal generation.

    PubMed

    Haboucha, A; Zhang, W; Li, T; Lours, M; Luiten, A N; Le Coq, Y; Santarelli, G

    2011-09-15

    In this Letter we report on an all optical-fiber approach to the synthesis of ultralow-noise microwave signals by photodetection of femtosecond laser pulses. We use a cascade of Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometers to realize stable and efficient repetition rate multiplication. This technique increases the signal level of the photodetected microwave signal by close to 18 dB. That in turn allows us to demonstrate a residual phase-noise level of -118 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz and -160 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz from a 12 GHz signal. The residual noise floor of the fiber multiplier and photodetection system alone is around -164 dBc/Hz at the same offset frequency, which is very close to the fundamental shot-noise floor. PMID:21931422

  8. Parallel Transmission Pulse Design with Explicit Control for the Specific Absorption Rate in the Presence of Radiofrequency Errors

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adrian; Schiavi, Emanuele; Eryaman, Yigitcan; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Gagoski, Borjan; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.; Guerin, Bastien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A new framework for the design of parallel transmit (pTx) pulses is presented introducing constraints for local and global specific absorption rate (SAR) in the presence of errors in the radiofrequency (RF) transmit chain. Methods The first step is the design of a pTx RF pulse with explicit constraints for global and local SAR. Then, the worst possible SAR associated with that pulse due to RF transmission errors (“worst-case SAR”) is calculated. Finally, this information is used to re-calculate the pulse with lower SAR constraints, iterating this procedure until its worst-case SAR is within safety limits. Results Analysis of an actual pTx RF transmit chain revealed amplitude errors as high as 8% (20%) and phase errors above 3° (15°) for spokes (spiral) pulses. Simulations show that using the proposed framework, pulses can be designed with controlled “worst-case SAR” in the presence of errors of this magnitude at minor cost of the excitation profile quality. Conclusion Our worst-case SAR-constrained pTx design strategy yields pulses with local and global SAR within the safety limits even in the presence of RF transmission errors. This strategy is a natural way to incorporate SAR safety factors in the design of pTx pulses. PMID:26147916

  9. MW peak-power, mJ pulse energy, multi-kHz repetition rate pulses from Yb-doped fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Teodoro, Fabio; Brooks, Christopher D.

    2006-02-01

    We report on pulsed fiber-based sources generating high peak and average powers in beams of excellent spectral/spatial quality. In the first setup, a ~10-kHz pulse repetition rate (PRR), 1ns-pulse, Q-switched microlaser seeded a dual-stage amplifier featuring a 40-μm-core Yb-doped photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) as the power amplifier. From this amplifier, we obtained diffraction-limited (M2 = 1.05), ~1ns pulses of 1.1mJ energy, ~1.1MW peak power, ~10.2W average-power, spectral linewidth ~9GHz, negligible nonlinearities, and slope efficiency >73%. In the second setup, we replaced the seed source with a shorter-pulse (<500ps) microchip laser of PRR ~13.4 kHz and obtained diffraction-limited (M2=1.05), ~450ps pulses of energy >0.7mJ, peak power in excess of 1.5 MW, average power ~9.5W, spectral linewidth <35 GHz. To show further power scaling, these pulses were amplified in a 140-μmcore Yb-doped fiber, which yielded multimode (M2 ~ 9), 2.2mJ-energy, 30-W average-power pulses of peak power in excess of 4.5MW, the highest ever obtained in a fiber source, to our knowledge. In the third setup, an Yb-doped, 70μmcore, intrinsically single-mode photonic-crystal rod was used to generate diffraction-limited (M2 ~ 1.1), ~10kHz PRR, ~1ns pulses of 2.05mJ energy, >2 MW peak-power (the highest ever reported in a diffraction-limited fiber source), ~20W average-power, ~13 GHz spectral linewidth, and spectral signal-to-noise ratio >50 dB. Finally, a single polarization large-core Yb-doped PCF was used to demonstrate high-peak-power harmonic generation. We obtained ~1ns pulses of peak powers >410 kW in the green (531nm) and >190kW in the UV (265.5 nm).

  10. Burst mode with ps- and fs-pulses: Influence on the removal rate, surface quality, and heat accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, B.; Kramer, Th.; Lauer, B.; Jaeggi, B.

    2015-03-01

    The burst mode for ps and fs pulses for steel and copper is investigated. It is found that the reduction of the energy in a single pulse (in the burst) represents the main factor for the often reported gain in the removal rate using the burst mode e.g. for steel no investigated burst sequence lead to a higher removal rate compared to single pulses at higher repetition rate. But for copper a situation was found where the burst mode leads to a real increase of the removal rate in the range of 20%. Further the burst mode offers the possibility to generate slightly melted flat surfaces with good optical properties in the case of steel. Temperature simulations indicate that the surface state during the burst mode could be responsible for the melting effect or the formation of cavities in clusters which reduces the surface quality.

  11. Modeling and optimization of single-pass laser amplifiers for high-repetition-rate laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira; Udem, Thomas; Zeitner, Uwe D.; Haensch, Theodor W.; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2010-09-15

    We propose a model for a continuously pumped single-pass amplifier for continuous and pulsed laser beams. The model takes into account Gaussian shape and focusing geometry of pump and seed beam. As the full-wave simulation is complex we have developed a largely simplified numerical method that can be applied to rotationally symmetric geometries. With the tapered-shell model we treat (focused) propagation and amplification of an initially Gaussian beam in a gain crystal. The implementation can be done with a few lines of code that are given in this paper. With this code, a numerical parameter optimization is straightforward and example results are shown. We compare the results of our simple model with those of a full-wave simulation and show that they agree well. A comparison of model and experimental data also shows good agreement. We investigate in detail different regimes of amplification, namely the unsaturated, the fully saturated, and the intermediate regime. Because the amplification process is affected by spatially varying saturation and exhibits a nonlinear response against pump and seed power, no analytical expression for the expected output is available. For modeling of the amplification we employ a four-level system and show that if the fluorescence lifetime of the gain medium is larger than the inverse repetition rate of the seed beam, continuous-wave amplification can be employed to describe the amplification process of ultrashort pulse trains. We limit ourselves to this regime, which implies that if titanium:sapphire is chosen as gain medium the laser repetition rate has to be larger than a few megahertz. We show detailed simulation results for titanium:sapphire for a large parameter set.

  12. Formation of crystalline dots and lines in lanthanum borogermanate glass by the low pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipateva, Tatiana O.; Lotarev, Sergey V.; Lipatiev, Alexey S.; Kazansky, Peter G.; Sigaev, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers have become a powerful tool for 3D space-selective crystallization of glasses. A laser-induced cumulative heating effect required for crystal growth is usually considered to take place only at pulse repetition rate over 100 or 200 kHz and 200 kHz is known as the lowest repetition rate at which femtosecond laser-induced crystallization has been reported so far. We for the first time demonstrate precipitation of LaBGeO5 crystals in lanthanum borogermanate glass using a femtosecond laser emitting 1030 nm, 300 fs, 110 μJ pulses with adjustable repetition rate below 100 kHz. For the applied laser, minimal repetition rate enabling nucleation of ferroelectric LaBGeO5 crystals inside the glass was shown to be 9 kHz at maximal pulse energy of 110 μJ and growth of a crystalline line from the formed seed crystal was obtained starting from 8 kHz though smooth homogeneous oriented line which might be regarded as quasi-single-crystalline could be grown at 25 kHz or higher and corresponding pulse energy of 18 μJ. Thus, the pulse repetition rate sufficient for a cumulative heating effect and a stable crystal growth was reduced by an order of magnitude as compared to earlier publications due to relatively high pulse energy. Possibility and efficiency of cumulative heating and crystal growth and average time required for forming the seed crystal have been studied for various combinations of the pulse energy and the repetition rate. Obtained crystalline features have been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy and Raman mapping which confirmed growth of stillwellite-like LaBGeO5 phase and orientation of its polar axis along the direction of the crystalline line.

  13. Nocturnal Light Pulses Lower Carbon Dioxide Production Rate without Affecting Feed Intake in Geese

    PubMed Central

    Huang, De-Jia; Yang, Shyi-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of nocturnal light pulses (NLPs) on the feed intake and metabolic rate in geese. Fourteen adult Chinese geese were penned individually, and randomly assigned to either the C (control) or NLP group. The C group was exposed to a 12L:12D photoperiod (12 h light and 12 h darkness per day), whereas the NLP group was exposed to a 12L:12D photoperiod inserted by 15-min lighting at 2-h intervals in the scotophase. The weight of the feed was automatically recorded at 1-min intervals for 1 wk. The fasting carbon dioxide production rate (CO2 PR) was recorded at 1-min intervals for 1 d. The results revealed that neither the daily feed intake nor the feed intakes during both the daytime and nighttime were affected by photoperiodic regimen, and the feed intake during the daytime did not differ from that during the nighttime. The photoperiodic treatment did not affect the time distribution of feed intake. However, NLPs lowered (p<0.05) the mean and minimal CO2 PR during both the daytime and nighttime. Both the mean and minimal CO2 PR during the daytime were significantly higher (p<0.05) than those during the nighttime. We concluded that NLPs lowered metabolic rate of the geese, but did not affect the feed intake; both the mean and minimal CO2 PR were higher during the daytime than during the nighttime. PMID:26950871

  14. Nocturnal Light Pulses Lower Carbon Dioxide Production Rate without Affecting Feed Intake in Geese.

    PubMed

    Huang, De-Jia; Yang, Shyi-Kuen

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of nocturnal light pulses (NLPs) on the feed intake and metabolic rate in geese. Fourteen adult Chinese geese were penned individually, and randomly assigned to either the C (control) or NLP group. The C group was exposed to a 12L:12D photoperiod (12 h light and 12 h darkness per day), whereas the NLP group was exposed to a 12L:12D photoperiod inserted by 15-min lighting at 2-h intervals in the scotophase. The weight of the feed was automatically recorded at 1-min intervals for 1 wk. The fasting carbon dioxide production rate (CO2 PR) was recorded at 1-min intervals for 1 d. The results revealed that neither the daily feed intake nor the feed intakes during both the daytime and nighttime were affected by photoperiodic regimen, and the feed intake during the daytime did not differ from that during the nighttime. The photoperiodic treatment did not affect the time distribution of feed intake. However, NLPs lowered (p<0.05) the mean and minimal CO2 PR during both the daytime and nighttime. Both the mean and minimal CO2 PR during the daytime were significantly higher (p<0.05) than those during the nighttime. We concluded that NLPs lowered metabolic rate of the geese, but did not affect the feed intake; both the mean and minimal CO2 PR were higher during the daytime than during the nighttime. PMID:26950871

  15. High discharge rate characteristics of nickel-cadmium batteries for pulse load filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gearing, G. M.; Cimino, M. B.; Fritts, D. H.; Leonard, J. F.; Terzuoli, A. J., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Several tests of specially fabricated nickel-cadmium batteries having circular disk type electrodes were considered. These batteries were evaluated as filter elements between a constant current power supply and a five hertz pulsed load demanding approximately twice the power supply current during the load on portion of the cycle. Short tests lasting 10,000 cycles were conducted at up to a 21 C rate and an equivalent energy density of over 40 Joules per pound. In addition, two batteries were subjected to 10 to the 7 charge/discharge cycles, one at a 6.5 C rate and the other at a 13 C rate. Assuming an electrode to battery weight ratio of 0.5, these tests represent an energy density of about 7 and 14 Joules per pound respectively. Energy density, efficiency, capacitance, average voltage, and available capacity were tracked during these tests. After 10 to the 7 cycles, capacity degradation was negligible for one battery and about 20% for the other. Cadmium electrode failure may be the factor limiting lifetime at extremely low depth of discharge cycling. The output was examined and a simple equivalent circuit was proposed.

  16. New conditioning procedure derived from operating experience with the Common Long-Pulse Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, B.G.; Madruga, M.; Hong, R.M.; Phillips, J.C.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D neutral beam system utilizes an 80 kV version of the Common Long-Pulse Ion Source designed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) and originally built by RCA. Eight of these ion sources are mounted on four beamlines to provide a total of 20 MW of injected deuterium neutral power to the DIII-D tokamak. To support the DIII-D one-shift operation, neutral beams must be readied in a relatively short period of time each day, typically one hour. During non-operating periods conditioning time for the ion sources is limited, due to the costs of associated support services and the need to perform corrective and preventive maintenance. The experience gained over a six year period has resulted in finely tuned procedures for the conditioning and operation of these ion sources. Recently, an ion source was conditioned which had been accidentally filled with water for several days, resulting in surface corrosion and deconditioning of the grids and surfaces. The method of successful recovery along with data, experience and procedures derived this event and normal operations will be detailed and discussed.

  17. Applying Hanford Tank Mixing Data to Define Pulse Jet Mixer Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Holton, Langdon K.

    2015-12-07

    Pulse jet mixed (PJM) process vessels are being developed for storing, blending, and chemical processing of nuclear waste slurries at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to be built at Hanford, Washington. These waste slurries exhibit variable process feed characteristics including Newtonian to non-Newtonian rheologies over a range of solids loadings. Waste feed to the WTP from the Hanford Tank Farms will be accomplished via the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) system which includes million-gallon underground storage double-shell tanks (DSTs) with dual-opposed jet mixer pumps. Experience using WFD type jet mixer pumps to mobilize actual Hanford waste in DSTs may be used to establish design threshold criteria of interest to pulse jet mixed process vessel operation. This paper describes a method to evaluate the pulse jet mixed vessel capability to process waste based on information obtained during mobilizing and suspending waste by the WFD system jet mixer pumps in a DST. Calculations of jet velocity and wall shear stress in a specific pulse jet mixed process vessel were performed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The CFD-modelled process vessel consists of a 4.9-m- (16-ft-) diameter tank with a 2:1 semi-elliptical head, a single, 10-cm (4-in.) downward facing 60-degree conical nozzle, and a 0.61-m (24-in.) inside diameter PJM. The PJM is located at 70% of the vessel radius with the nozzle stand-off-distance 14 cm (6 in.) above the vessel head. The CFD modeled fluid velocity and wall shear stress can be used to estimate vessel waste-processing performance by comparison to available actual WFD system process data. Test data from the operation of jet mixer pumps in the 23-m (75-ft) diameter DSTs have demonstrated mobilization, solid particles in a sediment matrix were moved from their initial location, and suspension, mobilized solid particles were moved to a higher elevation in the vessel than their initial location, of waste solids

  18. 486nm blue laser operating at 500 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creeden, Daniel; Blanchard, Jon; Pretorius, Herman; Limongelli, Julia; Setzler, Scott D.

    2016-03-01

    Compact, high power blue light in the 470-490nm region is difficult to generate due to the lack of laser sources which are easily convertible (through parametric processes) to those wavelengths. By using a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser as a pump source for a 2-stage second harmonic generation (SHG) scheme, we have generated ~2W of 486.5nm light at 500kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF). To our knowledge, this is the highest PRF and output power achieved in the blue region based on a frequency converted, monolithic fiber laser. This pump laser is a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser/amplifier which generates 12.8W of 1946nm power at 500kHz PRF with diffraction-limited output from a purely single-mode fiber. The output from this laser is converted to 973nm through second harmonic generation (SHG). The 973nm is then converted to 486.5nm via another SHG stage. This architecture operates with very low peak power, which can be challenging from a nonlinear conversion standpoint. However, the low peak power enables the use of a single-mode monolithic fiber amplifier without undergoing nonlinear effects in the fiber. This also eliminates the need for novel fiber designs, large-mode area fiber, or free-space coupling to rod-type amplifiers, improving reliability and robustness of the laser source. Higher power and conversion efficiency are possible through the addition of Tm-doped fiber amplification stages as well as optimization of the nonlinear conversion process and nonlinear materials. In this paper, we discuss the laser layout, results, and challenges with generating blue light using a low peak power approach.

  19. Advances in the pulse-burst laser system for high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering on MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. S.; Hurst, N. C.; den Hartog, D. J.; Ambuel, J. R.; Holly, D. J.; Robl, P. E.

    2010-11-01

    A pulse-burst laser has been installed for Thomson scattering measurements on MST. The laser design is a master-oscillator power-amplifier which is capable of Q-switching at frequencies between 5-250 kHz. Single pulses through the first (four) Nd:YAG amplifier stages give energies up to 1.5 J, and the gain for each stage has been measured. Repetitive pulsing at 10 kHz has also been performed for 2 ms bursts giving average pulse energies of 0.53 J with δE/E of 4.6%, where δE is the standard deviation between pulses. The final Nd:glass amplifier stages require flashlamps operated at 1800 V and 1800 A. At these currents, inductive turnoff spikes can become large even for small circuit inductances. The flashlamp power supplies have been modified to reduce inductance and increase snubber capacitance, and now reliably produce pulse trains (10 pulses at 1 kHz) at maximum flashlamp drive current. In addition, the beam path is being extended to the MST vacuum vessel. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  20. Studies of Operating Frequency Effects On Ejector-based Thrust Augmentation in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, K.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in order to characterize the thrust augmentation potential of an ejector in a Pulse Detonation Engine application. A 49-mm diameter tube of 0.914-m length was constructed with one open end and one closed end. Ethylene, oxygen, and nitrogen were introduced into the tube at the closed end through the implementation of a fast mixing injector. The tube was completely filled with a stoichiometric mixture containing a one to one molar ratio of nitrogen to oxygen. Ethylene was selected as the fuel due to its detonation sensitivity and the molar ratio of the oxidizer was chosen for heat transfer purposes. Detonations were initiated in the tube through the use of a spark ignition system. The PDE was operated in a multi-cycle mode at frequencies ranging from 20-Hz to 50-Hz. Baseline thrust measurements with no ejector present were performed while operating the engine at various frequencies and compared to theoretical estimates. The baseline values were observed to agree with the theoretical model at low operating frequencies and proved to be increasingly lower than the predicted values as the operating frequency was increased. The baseline thrust measurements were observed to agree within 15 percent of the model for all operating frequencies. A straight 152-mm diameter ejector was installed and thrust augmentation percentages were measured. The length of the ejector was varied while the overlap percentage (percent of the ejector length which overlapped the tube) was maintained at 25 percent for all tests. In addition, the effect of ejector inlet geometry was investigated by comparing results with a straight inlet to those of a 38-mm inlet diameter. The thrust augmentation of the straight inlet ejector proved to be independent of engine operating frequency, augmenting thrust by 40 percent for the 0.914-m length ejector. In contrast, the rounded lip ejector of the same length seemed to be highly dependent on the engine operating frequency. An optimum

  1. Architecture and operation of the Z Pulsed Power Facility vacuum system.

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, Allen Chauncey; Petmecky, Don; Weed, John Woodruff

    2010-11-01

    The Z Pulsed Power Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA is one of the world's premier high energy density physics facilities. The Z Facility derives its name from the z-pinch phenomena which is a type of plasma confinement system that uses the electrical current in the plasma to generate a magnetic field that compresses it. Z refers to the direction of current flow, the z axis in a three dimensional Cartesian coordinate system. The multiterawatt, multimegajoule electrical pulse the Facility produces is 100-400 nanoseconds in time. Research and development programs currently being conducted on the Z Facility include inertial confinement fusion, dynamic material properties, laboratory astrophysics and radiation effects. The Z Facility vacuum system consists of two subsystems, center section and load diagnostics. Dry roughing pumps and cryogenic high vacuum pumps are used to evacuate the 40,000 liter, 200 square meter center section of the facility where the experimental load is located. Pumping times on the order of two hours are required to reduce the pressure from atmospheric to 10{sup -5} Torr. The center section is cycled from atmosphere to high vacuum for each experiment. The facility is capable of conducting one to two experiments per day. Numerous smaller vacuum pumping systems are used to evacuate load diagnostics. The megajoules of energy released during an experiment causes damage to the Facility that presents numerous challenges for reliable operation of the vacuum system.

  2. Data-Rate Estimation for Autonomous Receiver Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkacenko, A.; Simon, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we present a series of algorithms for estimating the data rate of a signal whose admissible data rates are integer base, integer powered multiples of a known basic data rate. These algorithms can be applied to the Electra radio currently used in the Deep Space Network (DSN), which employs data rates having the above relationship. The estimation is carried out in an autonomous setting in which very little a priori information is assumed. It is done by exploiting an elegant property of the split symbol moments estimator (SSME), which is traditionally used to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the received signal. By quantizing the assumed symbol-timing error or jitter, we present an all-digital implementation of the SSME which can be used to jointly estimate the data rate, SNR, and jitter. Simulation results presented show that these joint estimation algorithms perform well, even in the low SNR regions typically encountered in the DSN.

  3. Optically isolated, 2 kHz repetition rate, 4 kV solid-state pulse trigger generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, D. H.; Parson, J. M.; Lynn, C. F.; Kelly, P. M.; Taylor, M.; Calico, S.; Scott, M. C.; Dickens, J. C.; Neuber, A. A.; Mankowski, J. J.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the design and operation characteristics of a solid-state high voltage pulse generator. Its primary utilization is aimed at triggering a gaseous spark gap with high repeatability. Specifically, the trigger generator is designed to achieve a risetime on the order of 0.1 kV/ns to trigger the first stage, trigatron spark gap of a 10-stage, 500 kV Marx generator. The major design components are comprised of a 60 W constant current DC-DC converter for high voltage charging, a single 4 kV thyristor, a step-up pulse transformer, and magnetic switch for pulse steepening. A risetime of <30 ns and pulse magnitude of 4 kV is achieved matching the simulated performance of the design.

  4. Optically isolated, 2 kHz repetition rate, 4 kV solid-state pulse trigger generator.

    PubMed

    Barnett, D H; Parson, J M; Lynn, C F; Kelly, P M; Taylor, M; Calico, S; Scott, M C; Dickens, J C; Neuber, A A; Mankowski, J J

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the design and operation characteristics of a solid-state high voltage pulse generator. Its primary utilization is aimed at triggering a gaseous spark gap with high repeatability. Specifically, the trigger generator is designed to achieve a risetime on the order of 0.1 kV/ns to trigger the first stage, trigatron spark gap of a 10-stage, 500 kV Marx generator. The major design components are comprised of a 60 W constant current DC-DC converter for high voltage charging, a single 4 kV thyristor, a step-up pulse transformer, and magnetic switch for pulse steepening. A risetime of <30 ns and pulse magnitude of 4 kV is achieved matching the simulated performance of the design. PMID:25832253

  5. Reirradiation of Large-Volume Recurrent Glioma With Pulsed Reduced-Dose-Rate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; Tome, Wolfgang; Seo, Songwon; Richards, Gregory M.; Robins, H. Ian; Rassmussen, Karl; Welsh, James S.; Mahler, Peter A.; Howard, Steven P.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced-dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a reirradiation technique that reduces the effective dose rate and increases the treatment time, allowing sublethal damage repair during irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with recurrent glioma underwent reirradiation using PRDR (86 considered to have Grade 4 at PRDR). PRDR was delivered using a series of 0.2-Gy pulses at 3-min intervals, creating an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 20-60) delivered in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. The mean treatment volume was 403.5 {+-} 189.4 cm{sup 3} according to T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a 2-cm margin. Results: For the initial or upgraded Grade 4 cohort (n = 86), the median interval from the first irradiation to PRDR was 14 months. Patients undergoing PRDR within 14 months of the first irradiation (n = 43) had a median survival of 21 weeks. Those treated {>=}14 months after radiotherapy had a median survival of 28 weeks (n = 43; p = 0.004 and HR = 1.82 with a 95% CI ranging from 1.25 to 3.10). These data compared favorably to historical data sets, because only 16% of the patients were treated at first relapse (with 46% treated at the second relapse, 32% at the third or fourth relapse, and 4% at the fourth or fifth relapse). The median survival since diagnosis and retreatment was 6.3 years and 11.4 months for low-grade, 4.1 years and 5.6 months for Grade 3, and 1.6 years and 5.1 months for Grade 4 tumors, respectively, according to the initial histologic findings. Multivariate analysis revealed age at the initial diagnosis, initial low-grade disease, and Karnofsky performance score of {>=}80 to be significant predictors of survival after initiation of PRDR. Conclusion: PRDR allowed for safe retreatment of larger volumes to high doses with palliative benefit.

  6. A note on traveling fronts and pulses in a firing rate model of a neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enculescu, M.

    2004-09-01

    We study the activity of a one-dimensional synaptically coupled neural network by means of a firing rate model developed by Coombes et al. [Physica D 178 (2003)]. Their approach incorporates the biologically motivated finite conduction velocity of action potentials into a neural field equation of Wilson and Cowan type [Kybernetik 13 (1973)]. The resulting integro-differential equation with a space depending delay term under the convolution may exhibit a variety of traveling and stationary patterns. In this paper we construct traveling wave solutions for the case of a firing rate given by the Heaviside step function, exponential synaptic kernel, and exponential synaptic footprint. In contrast to Coombes et al., where the model equation is first reduced to an equivalent system of partial differential equations, we make the traveling pattern ansatz into the initial integro-differential equation. We analyse two types of traveling patterns: fronts and pulses, for which we derive shape and speed. We further determine necessary conditions for the linear stability of the traveling waves.

  7. A kinetic model for estimating net photosynthetic rates of cos lettuce leaves under pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Jishi, Tomohiro; Matsuda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2015-04-01

    Time-averaged net photosynthetic rate (P n) under pulsed light (PL) is known to be affected by the PL frequency and duty ratio, even though the time-averaged photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) is unchanged. This phenomenon can be explained by considering that photosynthetic intermediates (PIs) are pooled during light periods and then consumed by partial photosynthetic reactions during dark periods. In this study, we developed a kinetic model to estimate P n of cos lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. longifolia) leaves under PL based on the dynamics of the amount of pooled PIs. The model inputs are average PPFD, duty ratio, and frequency; the output is P n. The rates of both PI accumulation and consumption at a given moment are assumed to be dependent on the amount of pooled PIs at that point. Required model parameters and three explanatory variables (average PPFD, frequency, and duty ratio) were determined for the simulation using P n values under PL based on several combinations of the three variables. The model simulation for various PL levels with a wide range of time-averaged PPFDs, frequencies, and duty ratios further demonstrated that P n under PL with high frequencies and duty ratios was comparable to, but did not exceed, P n under continuous light, and also showed that P n under PL decreased as either frequency or duty ratio was decreased. The developed model can be used to estimate P n under various light environments where PPFD changes cyclically. PMID:25736464

  8. High-average-power operation of a pulsed Raman fiber amplifier at 1686 nm.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weichao; Chen, Bihui; Zhang, Jianing; Zhao, Yongguang; Chen, Hao; Shen, Deyuan

    2015-05-01

    We report on high-average-power operation of a pulsed Raman fiber amplifier at ~1686 nm which cannot be covered by rare-earth-doped fiber lasers. The Raman fiber amplifier was pumped by a home-made 1565.2 nm Q-switched Er,Yb fiber laser and worked at a repetition frequency of 184 kHz. With 0.8 km Raman fiber, 4.4 W of average output power at the 1st order Stokes wavelength of 1686.5 nm was obtained for launched pump power of 16.2 W, corresponding to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 27.2%. Further increasing the pump power, high-order Stokes waves grew gradually, resulting in a total output power of 6.7 W at the 19.2 W launched pump power. PMID:25969195

  9. Research of narrow pulse width, high repetition rate, high output power fiber lasers for deep space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan-feng; Li, Hong-zuo; Wang, Yan; Hao, Zi-qiang; Xiao, Dong-Ya

    2013-08-01

    As human beings expand the research in unknown areas constantly, the deep space exploration has become a hot research topic all over the world. According to the long distance and large amount of information transmission characteristics of deep space exploration, the space laser communication is the preferred mode because it has the advantages of concentrated energy, good security, and large information capacity and interference immunity. In a variety of laser source, fibre-optical pulse laser has become an important communication source in deep space laser communication system because of its small size, light weight and large power. For fiber lasers, to solve the contradiction between the high repetition rate and the peak value power is an important scientific problem. General Q technology is difficult to obtain a shorter pulse widths, This paper presents a DFB semiconductor laser integrated with Electro-absorption modulator to realize the narrow pulse width, high repetition rate of the seed source, and then using a two-cascaded high gain fiber amplifier as amplification mean, to realize the fibre-optical pulse laser with pulse width 3ns, pulse frequency 200kHz and peak power 1kW. According to the space laser atmospheric transmission window, the wavelength selects for 1.06um. It is adopted that full fibre technology to make seed source and amplification, pumping source and amplification of free-space coupled into fiber-coupled way. It can overcome that fibre lasers are vulnerable to changes in external conditions such as vibration, temperature drift and other factors affect, improving long-term stability. The fiber lasers can be modulated by PPM mode, to realize high rate modulation, because of its peak power, high transmission rate, narrow pulse width, high frequency stability, all technical indexes meet the requirements of the exploration of deep space communication technology.

  10. Conceptual design of the neutral beamline for TPX long pulse operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, K.E.; Dahlgren, F.; Fan, H.M.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammersand, F.G.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Lontai, L.M.; Oldaker, M.E.; Rogoff, P.

    1993-11-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will require a minimum of 8.0 megawatts of Neutral Beam beating power to be injected into the plasma for pulse lengths up to one thousand (1000) seconds to meet the experimental objectives. The Neutral Beam Injection System (NBIS) for initial operation on TPX will consist of one neutral beamline (NBL) with three Ion sources. Provisions will be made for a total of three NBLs. The NBIS will provide S.S MW of 120 keV D{sup 0} and 2.S MW of partial-energy D{sup 0} at 60 keV and 40 keV. The system also provides for measuring the neutral beam power, limits excess cold gas from entering the torus, and provides independent power, control, and protection for each individual ion source and accelerating structure. The Neutral Beam/Torus Connecting Duct (NB/TCD) includes a vacuum valve, an electrical insulating break, alignment bellows, vacuum seals, internal energy absorbing protective elements, beam diagnostics and bakeout capability. The NBL support structure will support the NBL, which will weigh approximately 80 tons at the proper elevation and withstand a seismic event. The NBIS currently operational on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is restricted to injection pulse lengths of two (2) seconds by the limited capability of various energy absorbers. This paper describes the modifications and improvements which will be implemented for the TFTR Neutral Beamlines and the NB/TCD to satisfy the TPX requirements.

  11. Assessment of operational space for long-pulse scenarios in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polevoi, A. R.; Loarte, A.; Hayashi, N.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Koechl, F.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Leonov, V. M.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Murakami, M.; Na, Y. S.; Pankin, A. Y.; Park, J. M.; Snyder, P. B.; Snipes, J. A.; Zhogolev, V. E.; IOS ITPA TG, the

    2015-06-01

    The operational space (Ip - n) for long-pulse scenarios (Δtburn ˜ 1000 s, Q ⩾ 5) of ITER has been assessed by 1.5D core transport modelling with pedestal parameters predicted by the EPED1 code by a set of transport codes under a joint activity carried out by the Integrated Operational Scenario ITPA group. The analyses include the majority of transport models (CDBM, GLF23, Bohm/gyroBohm (BgB), MMM7.1, MMM95, Weiland, scaling-based) presently used for interpretation of experiments and ITER predictions. The EPED1 code was modified to take into account boundary conditions predicted by SOLPS4 for ITER. In contrast to standard EPED1 assumptions, EPED1 with the SOLPS boundary conditions predicts no degradation of the pedestal pressure as density is reduced. Lowering the plasma density to ne ˜ (5-6) × 1019 m-3 leads to an increased plasma temperature (similar pedestal pressure), which reduces the loop voltage and increases the duration of the burn phase to Δtburn ˜ 1000 s with Q ⩾ 5 for Ip ⩾ 13 MA at moderate normalized pressure (βN ˜ 2). These ITER plasmas require the same level of additional heating power as the reference Q = 10 inductive scenario at 15 MA (33 MW NBI and 17-20 MW EC heating and current drive power). However, unlike the ‘hybrid’ scenarios considered previously, these H-mode plasmas do not require specially shaped q profiles nor improved confinement in the core for the transport models considered in this study. Thus, these medium density H-mode plasma scenarios with Ip ⩾ 13 MA present an attractive alternative to hybrid scenarios to achieve ITER's long-pulse Q ⩾ 5 scenario and deserve further analysis and experimental demonstration in present tokamaks.

  12. A Real-Time Terahertz Time-Domain Polarization Analyzer with 80-MHz Repetition-Rate Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Yasumatsu, Naoya; Oguchi, Kenichi; Takeda, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Tachizaki, Takehiro

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a real-time terahertz time-domain polarization analyzer by using 80-MHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is based on the spinning electro-optic sensor method, which we recently proposed and demonstrated by using a regenerative amplifier laser system; here we improve the detection scheme in order to be able to use it with a femtosecond laser oscillator with laser pulses of a much higher repetition rate. This improvement brings great advantages for realizing broadband, compact and stable real-time terahertz time-domain polarization measurement systems for scientific and industrial applications. PMID:23478599

  13. UV pulse trains by α-BBO crystal stacking for the production of THz-rap-rate electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li-Xin; Hua, Jian-Fei; Du, Ying-Chao; Huang, Yuan-Fang; You, Yan; Wang, Dan; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Tang

    2012-08-01

    Ultrashort electron bunch trains can be used for plasma wake field acceleration (PWFA) to overcome the limit of transformer ratio of a single electron bunch, or high-power terahertz (Thz) radiation production by various radiation mechanisms. Basic facility for high-power THz radiation development based on ultrashort electron beam has been set up at accelerator lab of TUB. Using birefringent crystal serials, ultraviolet (UV) pulse shaping for photocathode radio frequency gun to produce THz-repetition-rate pulse train was realized. Driven by such pulses, ultrashort electron bunch train with picosecond (ps) spacing was obtained for THz production. Measurement of the stacked UV pulse trains was done by difference frequency generation (DFG), and the measured group velocity mismatch of α-BBO crystal at 266.7-nm wavelength was 0.8 ps/mm. This method may also be applied to form ramped electron bunch trains for PWFA.

  14. Advances in H-mode physics for long-pulse operation on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Baonian; Li, Jiangang; Guo, Houyang; Liang, Yunfeng; Xu, Guosheng; Wang, Liang; Gong, Xianzu; Andrea Garofalothe EAST Team; Collaborators

    2015-10-01

    Since the 2012 International Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Energy Conference (IAEA-FEC), significant advances in both physics and technology has been made on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tomakak (EAST) toward a long-pulse stable high-confinement (H-mode) plasma regime. The experimental capabilities of EAST have been technically upgraded with the power enhancement (source power up to 26 MW) of the continuous-wave heating and current drive system, replacement of the upper graphite divertor with an ITER-like W monoblock divertor, and installation of a new internal cryopump in the upper divertor and a set of 16 in-vessel resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) coils. This new upgrade enables EAST to be a unique operating device capable of investigating ITER-relevant long-pulse high-performance operations with dominant electron heating and low torque input within the next 5 years. Remarkable physics progress in controlling transient and steady-state divertor heat fluxes has been achieved on EAST, e.g. (i) edge-localized mode (ELM) mitigation/suppression with a number of attractive methods including lower hybrid wave (LHW), supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), RMPs, and real-time Li aerosol injection; and (ii) active control of steady-state power distribution by the synergy of LHW and SMBI. In the 2014 experimental campaign, a long-pulse high-performance H-mode plasma with H98 ˜ 1.2 has been obtained with a duration over 28 s (˜200 times the energy confinement time). In addition, several new experimental advances have been achieved in the last EAST campaign, including: (i) high-performance H-mode with βN ˜ 2 and stored plasma energy ˜220 kJ (ii) H-mode plasma sustained by neutral beam injection (NBI) alone or modulated NBI with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), for the first time in EAST; (iii) high current drive efficiency and nearly full noninductive plasmas maintained by the new 4.6 GHz LHCD system; (iv) demonstration of a quasi-snowflake divertor

  15. AC losses and heat removal in three-dimensional winding pack of Samsung superconducting test facility under pulsed magnetic field operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuliang; Seong Yoon, Cheon; Baang, Sungkeun; Kim, Myungkyu; Park, Hyunki; Kim, Yongjin; Lee, Sangil; Kim, Keeman

    2001-04-01

    The Samsung superconducting test facility (SSTF) will be operated under the highly pulsed field to simulate the operating conditions of KSTAR. An analysis has been performed to study the transient heat removal characteristics and temperature margin for the main, blip and compensating coils in the SSTF. This method is based on a quasi-three-dimensional model, which the thermal coupling of turn-to-turn, pancake-to-pancake and channel-to-channel is taken into account, to simulate the conductor temperature rise and the thermal expansion of supercritical helium due to the high AC losses under the pulsed field. The local AC losses, which include coupling loss, eddy current loss and hysteresis loss in the cable-in-conduit conductor, are estimated. The temperature margin, mass flow rate, distribution of AC losses are studied under the given operating scenario. The mass flow reduction and peak temperature rise depending on the inlet pressure and inlet position of CICC are studied. It is shown that the initial mass flow rate remarkably influences on the peak temperature of superconducting strands. The large mass flow rate can reduce the temperature rise when the inlet of helium is located at the high field region. By contrast, because of heat induced flow to improve the cooling condition of the superconducting strands, the small initial mass flow rate results in the low peak temperature in strands when the inlet of helium is located at the low field region.

  16. A new sealed RF-excited CO2 laser for enamel ablation operating at 9.4-μm with a pulse duration of 26-μs

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kenneth H.; Jew, Jamison M.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Several studies over the past 20 years have shown that carbon dioxide lasers operating at wavelengths between 9.3 and 9.6-μm with pulse durations near 20-μs are ideal for hard tissue ablation. Those wavelengths are coincident with the peak absorption of the mineral phase. The pulse duration is close to the thermal relaxation time of the deposited energy of a few microseconds which is short enough to minimize peripheral thermal damage and long enough to minimize plasma shielding effects to allow efficient ablation at practical rates. The desired pulse duration near 20-μs has been difficult to achieve since it is too long for transverse excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) lasers and too short for radio-frequency (RF) excited lasers for efficient operation. Recently, Coherent Inc. (Santa Clara, CA) developed the Diamond J5-V laser for microvia drilling which can produce laser pulses greater than 100-mJ in energy at 9.4-μm with a pulse duration of 26-μs and it can achieve pulse repetition rates of 3 KHz. We report the first results using this laser to ablate dental enamel. Efficient ablation of dental enamel is possible at rates exceeding 50-μm per pulse. This laser is ideally suited for the selective ablation of carious lesions. PMID:27006521

  17. Tunable, high-repetition-rate, femtosecond pulse generation in the ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, M; Esteban-Martin, A; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2008-02-15

    We report efficient generation of tunable femtosecond pulses in the ultraviolet (UV) by intracavity doubling of a visible femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The OPO, based on a 400 microm BiB3O6 crystal and pumped at 415 nm in the blue, can provide visible femtosecond signal pulses across 500-710 nm. Using a 500 microm crystal of beta-BaB2O4 internal to the OPO cavity, efficient frequency doubling of the signal pulses into the UV is achieved, providing tunable femtosecond pulses across 250-355 nm with up to 225 mW of average power at 76 MHz. Cross-correlation measurements result in UV pulses with durations down to 132 fs for 180 fs blue pump pulses. PMID:18278105

  18. A megawatt solid-state modulator for high repetition rate pulse generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Pribyl, P; Gekelman, W

    2016-02-01

    A novel solid-state modulator capable of generating rapid consecutive power pulses is constructed to facilitate experiments on plasma interaction with high power microwave pulses. The modulator is designed to output a 100 kHz tone burst, which consists of up to 10 pulses, each with 1 μs duration and 1 MW peak power. The pulses are formed by discharging a total of 480 μF capacitors through 24 synchronized MOSFETs and 6 step-up transformers. The highly modular design, as a replacement of an old single-pulse version used in earlier experiments which employs a pulse forming network, brings great flexibility and wide potential to its application. A systematic cost-effectiveness analysis is also presented. PMID:26931851

  19. A megawatt solid-state modulator for high repetition rate pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pribyl, P.; Gekelman, W.

    2016-02-01

    A novel solid-state modulator capable of generating rapid consecutive power pulses is constructed to facilitate experiments on plasma interaction with high power microwave pulses. The modulator is designed to output a 100 kHz tone burst, which consists of up to 10 pulses, each with 1 μs duration and 1 MW peak power. The pulses are formed by discharging a total of 480 μF capacitors through 24 synchronized MOSFETs and 6 step-up transformers. The highly modular design, as a replacement of an old single-pulse version used in earlier experiments which employs a pulse forming network, brings great flexibility and wide potential to its application. A systematic cost-effectiveness analysis is also presented.

  20. Spatial release from masking improves sound pattern discrimination along a biologically relevant pulse-rate continuum in gray treefrogs

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jessica L.; Buerkle, Nathan P.; Bee, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Frogs form large choruses during the mating season in which males produce loud advertisement calls to attract females and repel rival males. High background noise levels in these social aggregations can impair vocal perception. In humans, spatial release from masking contributes to our ability to understand speech in noisy social groups. Here, we tested the hypothesis that spatial separation between target signals and ‘chorus-shaped noise’ improves the ability of female gray treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis) to perform a behavioral discrimination task based on perceiving differences in the pulsatile structure of advertisement calls. We used two-stimulus choice tests to measure phonotaxis (approach toward sound) in response to calls differing in pulse rate along a biologically relevant continuum between conspecific (50 pulses s−1) and heterospecific (20 pulses s−1) calls. Signals were presented in quiet, in colocated noise, and in spatially separated noise. In quiet conditions, females exhibited robust preferences for calls with relatively faster pulse rates more typical of conspecific calls. Behavioral discrimination between calls differing in pulse rate was impaired in the presence of colocated noise but similar between quiet and spatially separated noise conditions. Our results indicate that spatial release from energetic masking facilitates a biologically important temporal discrimination task in frogs. We discuss these results in light of previous work on spatial release from masking in frogs and other animals. PMID:24055623

  1. Oil prices vs hurdle rates for upstream petroleum operations

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, T.A.

    1986-08-01

    The relationship between rising or falling oil prices and general levels of interest rates is graphically evident in the capital market moves for energy securities of 1973-1974, 1979-1980, and 1986. In turn, the resulting overall changes in the cost of capital became the determining basis for hurdle rates on new drilling exploration and exploitation. The relationships are complicated by lag time considerations in capital markets as well as by the dynamics of public policy with respect to energy and tax matters. Nevertheless, recent evidence of markedly higher volatility in commodity values suggests greater return cushions will be required by investment funds in the energy sector.

  2. Micro-processing of polymers and biological materials using high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li

    High repetition rate femtosecond laser micro-processing has been applied to ophthalmological hydrogel polymers and ocular tissues to create novel refractive and diffractive structures. Through the optimization of laser irradiation conditions and material properties, this technology has become feasible for future industrial applications and clinical practices. A femtosecond laser micro-processing workstation has been designed and developed. Different experimental parameters of the workstation such as laser pulse duration, focusing lens, and translational stages have been described and discussed. Diffractive gratings and three-dimensional waveguides have been fabricated and characterized in hydrogel polymers, and refractive index modifications as large as + 0.06 have been observed within the laser-irradiated region. Raman spectroscopic studies have shown that our femtosecond laser micro-processing induces significant thermal accumulation, resulting in a densification of the polymer network and increasing the localized refractive index of polymers within the laser irradiated region. Different kinds of dye chromophores have been doped in hydrogel polymers to enhance the two-photon absorption during femtosecond laser micro-processing. As the result, laser scanning speed can be greatly increased while the large refractive index modifications remain. Femtosecond laser wavelength and pulse energy as well as water and dye concentration of the hydrogels are optimized. Lightly fixed ocular tissues such as corneas and lenses have been micro-processed by focused femtosecond laser pulses, and refractive index modifications without any tissue-breakdown are observed within the stromal layer of the corneas and the cortex of the lenses. Living corneas are doped with Sodium Fluorescein to increase the two-photon absorption during the laser micro-processing, and laser scanning speed can be greatly increased while inducing large refractive index modifications. No evidence of cell death

  3. High-rate deposition of MgO by reactive ac pulsed magnetron sputtering in the transition mode

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, H.; Kleinhempel, R.; Richter, F.; Peters, C.; Krause, U.; Kopte, T.; Cheng, Y.

    2006-01-15

    A reactive ac pulsed dual magnetron sputtering process for MgO thin-film deposition was equipped with a closed-loop control of the oxygen flow rate (F{sub O2}) using the 285 nm magnesium radiation as input. Owing to this control, most of the unstable part of the partial pressure versus flowrate curve became accessible. The process worked steadily and reproducible without arcing. A dynamic deposition rate of up to 35 nm m/min could be achieved, which was higher than in the oxide mode by about a factor of 18. Both process characteristics and film properties were investigated in this work in dependence on the oxygen flow, i.e., in dependence on the particular point within the transition region where the process is operated. The films had very low extinction coefficients (<5x10{sup -5}) and refractive indices close to the bulk value. They were nearly stoichiometric with a slight oxygen surplus (Mg/O=48/52) which was independent of the oxygen flow. X-ray diffraction revealed a prevailing (111) orientation. Provided that appropriate rf plasma etching was performed prior to deposition, no other than the (111) peak could be detected. The intensity of this peak increased with increasing F{sub O{sub 2}}, indicating an even more pronounced (111) texture. The ion-induced secondary electron emission coefficient (iSEEC) was distinctly correlated with the markedness of the (111) preferential orientation. Both refractive index and (111) preferred orientation (which determines the iSEEC) were found to be improved in comparison with the MgO growth in the fully oxide mode. Consequently, working in the transition mode is superior to the oxide mode not only with respect to the growth rate, but also to most important film properties.

  4. Compatible operation of the power system for steady state and pulse modes in a magnetic torus KT-5D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Wang, Zhi-jiang; Xu, Min; Zhu, Zhen-hua; Lu, Rong-hua; Wen, Yi-zhi; Yu, Chang-xuan; Wan, Shu-de; Liu, Wan-dong; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiao-yuan; Hu, Ling-ying

    2006-12-01

    Compatible operation of steady state mode and pulse mode is realized in the KT-5D device. New power supplies with the operation control systems for the steady state toroidal magnetic field as well as for the vertical field are added, and the rf wave injection systems for sustaining steady state plasmas are upgraded. After the modification, the device now can work not only as a tokomak with pulsed plasma currents as it was but also as a simple magnetized torus with steady state plasma discharges. It allows more flexible and efficient experimental researches on the magnetically confined plasmas to be carried on in the same device.

  5. Warm Spitzer: Effects of Major Operational Changes on Publication Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scire, E.

    2014-05-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope transitioned from the cryogenic mission to the warm mission in 2009. The transition involved changes to observatory operations in order to run the mission on a budget totaling less than 1/3 that of the cryogenic mission. These changes included decreasing the number of approved programs and funding to the community while removing the cap in hours for any one program. This increased the maximum program size to encourage observers to think in terms of ambitious experiments that require > 500 hours to accomplish (Exploration Science (ES) Programs). After 4 years of warm operations, this paper will discuss the how these changes have affected the way observers are publishing data in refereed journal articles.

  6. Respiratory rate and pulse oximetry derived information as predictors of hospital admission in young children in Bangladesh: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Garde, Ainara; Zhou, Guohai; Raihana, Shahreen; Dunsmuir, Dustin; Karlen, Walter; Dekhordi, Parastoo; Huda, Tanvir; Arifeen, Shams El; Larson, Charles; Kissoon, Niranjan; Dumont, Guy A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypoxaemia is a strong predictor of mortality in children. Early detection of deteriorating condition is vital to timely intervention. We hypothesise that measures of pulse oximetry dynamics may identify children requiring hospitalisation. Our aim was to develop a predictive tool using only objective data derived from pulse oximetry and observed respiratory rate to identify children at increased risk of hospital admission. Setting Tertiary-level hospital emergency department in Bangladesh. Participants Children under 5 years (n=3374) presenting at the facility (October 2012–April 2013) without documented chronic diseases were recruited. 1-minute segments of pulse oximetry (photoplethysmogram (PPG), blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR)) and respiratory rate were collected with a mobile app. Primary outcome The need for hospitalisation based on expert physician review and follow-up. Methods Pulse rate variability (PRV) using pulse peak intervals of the PPG signal and features extracted from the SpO2 signal, all derived from pulse oximetry recordings, were studied. A univariate age-adjusted logistic regression was applied to evaluate differences between admitted and non-admitted children. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed using a stepwise selection of predictors and was internally validated using bootstrapping. Results Children admitted to hospital showed significantly (p<0.01) decreased PRV and higher SpO2 variability compared to non-admitted children. The strongest predictors of hospitalisation were reduced PRV-power in the low frequency band (OR associated with a 0.01 unit increase, 0.93; 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98), greater time spent below an SpO2 of 98% and 94% (OR associated with 10 s increase, 1.4; 95% CI 1.3 to 1.4 and 1.5; 95% CI 1.4 to 1.6, respectively), high respiratory rate, high HR, low SpO2, young age and male sex. These variables provided a bootstrap-corrected AUC of the receiver operating characteristic

  7. Manipulating the pulse rate and resonance scale in speech and animal calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Hideki

    2005-04-01

    A large proportion of the sound in speech and animal calls is voiced, and thus, periodic in nature. The sounds are generated by repetitive pulsive stimulations and each pulse produces a resonant response. This repetitive structure in the sounds can be interpreted as a time-frequency sampling process that provides a stream of information about the size, shape, and structure of the resonators in the vocal tract. This perspective has enabled us to develop a system, referred to as STRAIGHT, that can analyze, manipulate, and resynthesize vocal sounds. It is based on an extended pitch synchronous spectral estimation algorithm that recovers the underlying smooth time-frequency representation representing physical information on resonators. Ideally, this process removes stimulation related structure from the time-frequency representation, and thus, it should follow the same scaling laws as the physical dimensions of the resonating body. One problem is that speech sometimes contains multiple stimulations within one pitch period. This type of stimulation introduces a spectral deformation that has the same scaling laws as for the fundamental frequency (reciprocal of the repetition rate). The effects of this dual scaling and the problems of joint normalization will be discussed. [Work supported by MEXT Japan.

  8. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kristen M; Harvey, Joshua R; Chon, Ki H; Mendelson, Yitzhak

    2016-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR) measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA), limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data. PMID:26959034

  9. Electron-ion collision rates in noble gas clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, R.; Roy, A. C.

    2012-05-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of electron-ion collision rates in xenon gas clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses. The present analysis is based on the eikonal approximation (EA), the first Born approximation (FBA) and the classical (CL) methods. The calculations are performed using the plasma-screened Rogers potential introduced by Moll et al. [J. Phys. B. 43, 135103 (2010)] as well as the Debye potential for a wide range of experimental parameters. We find that the magnitudes of electron-ion collision frequency obtained in the EA do not fall as rapidly with the kinetic energy of electrons as in the FBA and CL methods for higher charge states of xenon ion (Xe8+ and Xe14+). Furthermore, EA shows that the effect of the inner structure of ion is most dominant for the lowest charge state of xenon ion (Xe1+). In the case of the present effective potential, FBA overestimates the CL results for all three different charge states of xenon, whereas for the Debye potential, both the FBA and CL methods predict collision frequencies which are nearly close to each other.

  10. Cuff-Free Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time and Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruiping; Jia, Wenyan; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sclabassi, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that the pulse transit time (PTT), the interval between the peak of the R-wave in electrocardiogram (ECG) and the fingertip photoplethysmogram (PPG), is related to arterial stiffness, and can be used to estimate the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). This phenomenon has been used as the basis to design portable systems for continuously cuff-less blood pressure measurement, benefiting numerous people with heart conditions. However, the PTT-based blood pressure estimation may not be sufficiently accurate because the regulation of blood pressure within the human body is a complex, multivariate physiological process. Considering the negative feedback mechanism in the blood pressure control, we introduce the heart rate (HR) and the blood pressure estimate in the previous step to obtain the current estimate. We validate this method using a clinical database. Our results show that the PTT, HR and previous estimate reduce the estimated error significantly when compared to the conventional PTT estimation approach (p<0.05). PMID:26213717

  11. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Kristen M.; Harvey, Joshua R.; Chon, Ki H.; Mendelson, Yitzhak

    2016-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR) measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA), limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data. PMID:26959034

  12. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  13. Influence of pressurization rate and pressure pulsing on the inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores during pressure-assisted thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Ratphitagsanti, Wannasawat; Ahn, Juhee; Balasubramaniam, V M; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2009-04-01

    Pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) is an emerging sterilization technology in which a combination of pressure (500 to 700 MPa) and temperature (90 to 120 degrees C) are used to inactivate bacterial spores. The objective of this study was to examine the role of pressurization rate and pressure pulsing in enhancing PATP lethality to the bacterial spore. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TMW 2.479 spore suspensions were prepared in deionized water at three inoculum levels (1.1 x 10(9), 1.4 x 10(8), and 1.3 x 10(6) CFU/ml), treated at two pressurization rates (18.06 and 3.75 MPa/s), and held at 600 MPa and 105 degrees C for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5 min. Experiments were carried out using custom-fabricated, high-pressure microbial kinetic testing equipment. Single and double pulses with equivalent pressure-holding times (1 to 3 min) were investigated by using the spore suspension containing 1.4 x 10(8) CFU/ml. Spore survivors were enumerated by pour plating, using Trypticase soy agar after incubation at 32 degrees C for 2 days. During short pressure-holding times (< or = 2 min), PATP treatment with the slow pressurization rate provided enhanced spore reduction over that of the fast pressurization rate. However, these differences diminished with extended pressure-holding times. After a 5-min pressure-holding time, B. amyloliquefaciens population decreased about 6 log CFU/ml, regardless of pressurization rate and inoculum level. Double-pulse treatment enhanced PATP spore lethality by approximately 2.4 to 4 log CFU/ml, in comparison to single pulse for a given pressure-holding time. In conclusion, pressure pulsing considerably increases the efficacy of PATP treatment against bacterial spores. Contribution of pressurization rate to PATP spore lethality varies with duration of pressure holding. PMID:19435226

  14. Single-frequency operation of a long-pulse e-beam excited XeF(C-A) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Klimek, D.E.; Mandl, A. )

    1994-12-01

    A 1-m gain length e-beam excited XeF(C-A) excimer laser operating in a unique re-imaging ring amplifier configuration has been used to amplify an ultranarrowband single-mode dye laser pulse. Double heterodyne detection was used to simultaneously determine the single-mode injection dye laser and the amplified XeF(C-A) laser bandwidths. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis of the pulses indicates that the amplifier output has the same bandwidth as the injected dye laser pulse. The bandwidth of the XeF(C-A) laser was line narrowed by 6 orders of magnitude, from a free running value of 16 nm (20000 GHz) to 20 MHz. Specific output energies of 0.7 J/l at 488 nm and 1.3 J/l at 476.5 nm were measured. Laser output pulse lengths up to 500 ns were observed.

  15. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) survey of the Idaho State Emergency Operating Center, Boise, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Buchanan, M.E.; Jones, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop an engineering design package to protect the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Radio System (FNARS) facilities from the effects of high- altitude electromagnetic pulses (HEMPs). This report was developed specifically for the Idaho State Emergency Operating Center (EOC) in Boise, Idaho. It is highly probable that there will be a heavy dependence upon high-frequency (hf) radio communications for long- haul communications following a nuclear attack on the continental United States, should one occur. To maintain the viability of the FEMA hf radio network during such a situation, steps must be taken to protect the FNARS facilities against the effects of HEMP that are likely to be created in a nuclear confrontation. The solution must than be to reduce HEMP-induced stresses on the system by means of tailored retrofit hardening measures using commercial protection devices when available. It is the intent of this report to define the particular hardening measures that will minimize the susceptibility of system components to HEMP effects. To the extent economically viable, protective actions have been recommended for implementation, along with necessary changes or additions, during the period of the FNARS upgrade program. This report addresses electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects only and disregards any condition in which radiation effects may be a factor. It has been established that, except for the source region of a surface burst, EMP effects of high-altitude bursts are more severe than comparable detonations in either air or surface regions. Any system hardened to withstand the more extreme EMP environment will survive the less severe EMP conditions. The threatening environment will therefore be limited to HEMP situations.

  16. Modeling transient gain dynamics in a cladding-pumped Yb-doped fiber ampliefier pulsed at low repetition rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valley, G. C.; Wright, M.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of 1-50 kHz repetition rate, pulsed Yb-fiber amplifiers show peak powers to 10 kW with half-widths < 30 ns, consistent with commercial amplifier performance. This device is a potential source for deep space-communication.

  17. Hydroxyl Radical Rate Constants: Comparing UV/H2O2 and Pulse Radiolysis for Environmental Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to measure OH radical rates using both UV/H2O2 and pulse radiolysis techniques for 13 US EPA Contaminant Candidate List compounds (2,6- and 2,4-DNT, EPTC, prometon, linuron, diuron, dyfonate, diazinon, RDX, molinate, nitrobenz...

  18. High repetition rate multi-channel source of high-power rf-modulated pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmaskulov, M. R.; Pedos, M. S.; Rukin, S. N.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Yalandin, M. I.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the results of testing a high voltage pulse generator based on parallel gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission lines filled with saturable ferrite. The generator is capable of producing almost identical stable rf-modulated nanosecond high voltage pulses in each of the two, or four, parallel output channels. The output voltage amplitude in each channel can reach -285 or -180 kV, respectively, with a rf modulation depth of up to 60%. Drive pulses were produced as the packets of duration 1-5 s at a pulse repetition frequency of 800 Hz using a driver equipped with all-solid-state switches. Splitting the driver pulse provided electric field strengths in the channels which were below the breakdown field strength of the transmission lines. As a result, the use of nonlinear transmission lines of reduced diameter made it possible to increase the center frequency of the excited rf oscillations to ˜2 GHz.

  19. 7 CFR 1430.208 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.208... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Milk Income Loss Contract Program § 1430.208 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart...

  20. 7 CFR 1430.506 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.506... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Dairy Market Loss Assistance Program § 1430.506 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart...

  1. 7 CFR 1430.506 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.506... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Dairy Market Loss Assistance Program § 1430.506 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart...

  2. 7 CFR 1430.506 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.506... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Dairy Market Loss Assistance Program § 1430.506 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart...

  3. 7 CFR 1430.506 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.506... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Dairy Market Loss Assistance Program § 1430.506 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart...

  4. 7 CFR 1430.208 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.208... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Milk Income Loss Contract Program § 1430.208 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart...

  5. 7 CFR 1430.506 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.506... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Dairy Market Loss Assistance Program § 1430.506 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart...

  6. 7 CFR 1430.208 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.208... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Milk Income Loss Contract Program § 1430.208 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart...

  7. 7 CFR 1430.208 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.208... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Milk Income Loss Contract Program § 1430.208 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart...

  8. Expanding the Capabilities of the Pulsed Plasma Thruster for In-Space and Atmospheric Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ian Kronheim

    Of all in-space propulsion systems to date, the Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) is unique in its simplicity and wide range of operational parameters. This study examined multiple uses of the thruster for in-space and atmospheric propulsion, as well as the creation of a CubeSat satellite and atmospheric airship as test beds for the thruster. The PPT was tested as a solid-propellant feed source for the High Power Helicon Thruster, a compact plasma source capable of generating order of magnitude higher plasma densities than comparable power level systems. Replacing the gaseous feed system reduced the thruster size and complexity, as well as allowing for extremely discrete discharges, minimizing the influence of wall effects. Teflon (C2F4) has been the traditional propellant for PPTs due to a high exhaust velocity and ability to ablate without surface modification over long durations. A number of alternative propellants, including minerals and metallics commonly found on asteroids, were tested for use with the PPT. Compounds with significant fractions of sulfur showed the highest performance increase, with specific thrusts double that of Teflon. A PPT with sulfur propellant designed for CubeSat operation, as well as the subsystems necessary for autonomous operation, was built and tested in the laboratory. The PPT was modified for use at atmospheric pressures where the impulse was well defined as a function of the discharge chamber volume, capacitor energy, and background pressure. To demonstrate that the air-breathing PPT was a viable concept the device was launched on two atmospheric balloon flights.

  9. 7 CFR 1430.208 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment rate and dairy operation payment. 1430.208... Contract Program § 1430.208 Payment rate and dairy operation payment. (a) Payments under this subpart may... exceeds $16.94. (b) A per-hundredweight payment rate will be determined for the applicable month by:...

  10. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Duggin, B.W.; Widner, M.M.

    1990-12-06

    In accordance with the one aspect of the invention, an electromagnetic projectile launcher is provided which comprises: a conducting projectile, a barrel that receives the projectile, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coils, a plurality of pulsed energy sources, and pulse power means for generating a sequence of pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave within the drive coil for propelling the projectile along the barrel, wherein the pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil is advanced along the barrel faster than the projectile to thereby induce a current wave in the armature of the projectile and thereby minimize electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provide nearly constant acceleration of the projectile. In accordance with another aspect of the invention, a method is provided for propelling a projectile within a pulsed induction electromagnetic coil launcher, wherein the method comprises the steps of: generating a sequence of pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave within the coil launcher, applying the pulsed magnetic wave initially at the aft end of the projectile to accelerate the projectile within the coil launcher, and advancing the position of the pulsed magnetic wave relative to the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature, such that electromagnetic heating of the projectile is minimized and acceleration is nearly constant.

  11. LN2-free Operation of the MEG Liquid Xenon Calorimeter by using a High-power Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, T.; Kasami, K.; Nishiguchi, H.; Mihara, S.; Mori, T.; Otani, W.; Sawada, R.; Maruno, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2006-04-27

    A high-power coaxial pulse tube cryocooler, originally developed in KEK and technology-transferred to Iwatani Industrial Gases Corp (IIGC), has been installed in a large liquid xenon calorimeter to evaluate liquid nitrogen-free (LN2-free) operation of the rare {mu}-particle decay experiment (MEG). Features of this pulse tube cryocooler include the cold-end heat exchanger, designed with sufficient surface area to ensure high-power cooling, and a cylindrical regenerator placed inside the pulse tube giving compact design and ease of fabrication. This production-level cryocooler provides a cooling power of {approx}200 W at 165 K, using a 6 kW Gifford-McMahon (GM)-type compressor. The paper describes the detailed configuration of the cryocooler, and the results of the continuous LN2-free operation of the large prototype liquid xenon calorimeter, which ran for more than 40 days without problems.

  12. Investigation of pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy using dynamic arc delivery techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Lin, M. H.; Dai, X. F.; Koren, Sion; Klayton, T.; Wang, L.; Li, J. S.; Chen, L.; Price, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    There has been no consensus standard of care to treat recurrent cancer patients who have previously been irradiated. Pulsed low dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while still providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates the dosimetry feasibility of PLDR treatment using dynamic arc delivery techniques. Five treatment sites were investigated in this study including breast, pancreas, prostate, head and neck, and lung. Dynamic arc plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse system and the RapidArc delivery technique with 6 and 10 MV photon beams. Each RapidArc plan consisted of two full arcs and the plan was delivered five times to achieve a daily dose of 200 cGy. The dosimetry requirement was to deliver approximately 20 cGy/arc with a 3 min interval to achieve an effective dose rate of 6.7 cGy min-1. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to calculate the actual dose delivered to the planning target volume (PTV) per arc taking into account beam attenuation/scattering and intensity modulation. The maximum, minimum and mean doses to the PTV were analyzed together with the dose volume histograms and isodose distributions. The dose delivery for the five plans was validated using solid water phantoms inserted with an ionization chamber and film, and a cylindrical detector array. Two intensity-modulated arcs were used to efficiently deliver the PLDR plans that provided conformal dose distributions for treating complex recurrent cancers. For the five treatment sites, the mean PTV dose ranged from 18.9 to 22.6 cGy/arc. For breast, the minimum and maximum PTV dose was 8.3 and 35.2 cGy/arc, respectively. The PTV dose varied between 12.9 and 27.5 cGy/arc for pancreas, 12.6 and 28.3 cGy/arc for prostate, 12.1 and 30.4 cGy/arc for H&N, and 16.2 and 27.6 cGy/arc for lung. Advanced radiation therapy can provide superior target coverage and normal tissue sparing for PLDR

  13. Design and operation of the multiple-pulse driver line on the OMEGA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosc, T. Z.; Kelly, J. H.; Hill, E. M.; Waxer, L. J.

    2016-05-01

    The multiple-pulse driver line (MPD) provides on-shot co-propagation of two separately generated pulse shapes in all 60 OMEGA beams at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), which increases the laser bandwidth, can be applied to either one of the two pulse shapes, thereby enabling dynamic bandwidth reduction. The design of the MPD required careful consideration of beam combination as well as the minimum pulse separation for two pulses generated by two separate seed sources. A new combined-pulse-shape diagnostic needed to be designed and installed after the last SSD grating. The capability of MPD to reduce dynamic bandwidth has been used on a series of campaigns on OMEGA and the performance data are presented.

  14. Integrated operations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) optical pulse generation development system

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, D.; Crane, J. K.; Dane, C. B.; Hackel; Henesian, M.; Hopps, N. W.; Martinez, M. D.; Moran, B.; Penko, F.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Wilcox, R. B.

    1998-07-31

    We describe the Optical Pulse Generation (OPG) testbed, which is the integration of the MOR and Preamplifier Development Laboratories. We use this OPG testbed to develop and demonstrate the overall capabilites of the NIF laser system front end. We will present the measured energy and power output, temporal and spatial pulse shaping capability, FM bandwidth and dispersion for beam smoothing, and measurements of the pulse-to-pulse power variation of the OPG system and compare these results with the required system performance specifications. We will discuss the models that are used to predict the system performance and how the OPG output requirements flowdown to the subordinate subsystems within the OPG system.

  15. Determining local temperatures in the structures of AlInGaP/GaAs red LEDs in a pulsed operation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Shirokov, A. A.

    2009-05-01

    The emission spectra of AlInGaP/GaAs red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on a multi-quantum-well heterostructure with distributed Bragg reflectors, operating in a pulsed mode with a pulse repetition rate within 1-10 kHz and a current of 1 × 10-3-2 × 10-1 A have been studied in the 20-100°C temperature range. In the regimes with short current pulses and large off/duty ratios, which exclude self-heating of the LED structure, the temperature dependences of the wavelength of emission peaks in the main and side bands exhibit a super-and sublinear behavior, respectively. In the quasi-linear regions of these dependences, the temperature coefficient of wavelength shift for the main peak decreases, while that for the side peak weakly increases with increasing current. The local temperatures (determined from the spectral shift of the main and side emission peaks) and their difference increase with the pulse duration. The difference of thermal resistances, which is calculated from the slope of a plot of the local temperature versus average heating power, is independent of the current and determined by the parameters of layers separating the heterostructure from the reemission region.

  16. Optical limiting of high-repetition-rate laser pulses by carbon nanofibers suspended in polydimethylsiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videnichev, Dmitry A.; Belousova, Inna M.

    2014-06-01

    The optical limiting (OL) behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was studied and compared with that of CNFs in water, and polyhedral multi-shell fullerene-like nanostructures (PMFNs) also in water. It was shown that when switching from single-shot to pulse-periodic regime of laser pulses (10 Hz), the CNF in PDMS suspension retains its OL characteristics, while in the aqueous suspensions, considerable degradation of OL characteristics is observed. It was also observed that a powerful laser pulse causes the CNF in PDMS suspension to become opaque for at least three seconds, while such a pulse brings out a bleaching effect in aqueous PMFN and CNF suspensions. The processes of OL degradation in aqueous suspensions, bleaching and darkening of the studied materials are discussed herein.

  17. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ˜47% at an output power of ˜14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ˜20% at ˜6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to <1 ns) in the delay of the output pulses' appearance with respect to the time of the beam's entrance into the switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  18. Cooling of extraction electrode of an ion source in long-pulse operation.

    PubMed

    Horiike, H; Kondoh, U; Morita, H; Shirakata, H; Sugawara, T; Tanaka, S

    1979-11-01

    Experimental studies were made on the cooling of extraction electrodes of an ion source in the case of long-pulse operation. Copper electrodes with forced water cooling pipes were tested under the condition that an ion beam of 1 to 5 A at 30 keV was extracted for up to 10 s. The average heat loading to the grid are of the electrode was as high as 130 W/cm2. This high heat flux was obtained by a set of electrodes artificially arranged to produce poor beam optics, and hence the high heat loading. Temperature of the ground electrode was measured at two points by thermocouples buried and silver brazed in it, and was kept below 230 degrees C due to a large boiling heat transfer coefficient of the cooling water. No evidences of deformation or deterioration of the electrodes was observed after repetitious beam extraction. This heat loading was still a half of that on the grid of the ion source for the JT-60 NBI. PMID:18699409

  19. Design and economic benefits from the operation of pulse-jet fabric filter pilot plants

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, R.D. ); Bustard, C.J.; Holstein, D.B. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that utility power plant flue gas particulate collection is generally accomplished by either electrostatic precipitation (ESP) or fabric filtration (FF). The majority of existing units use ESP's but an increase in the use of FF's occurred during the 1970's and 80's. This was partially due to advances in FF state-of-the-art technology and the tightening of regulatory requirements. Fabric filtration is usually accomplished by reverse gas (RGFF), shake and deflate (SDFF), or pulse jet (PJFF) methods. Regardless of the method, the efficiency and reliability of operation are of paramount importance, especially when six minute averaging (or similar) is required for opacity measurements. Many items enter into the efficiency and reliability of FF's with a primary one being the performance of the fabric itself. The fabric could possibly fail in a given situation and as a minimum would impact outlet emissions, cleaning frequency, and pressure drop. The fabric's performance is very much a function of the flue gas conditions and flyash characteristics.

  20. CFD simulation of a miniature coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler operating at 128 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yibo; Dang, Haizheng

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional axis-symmetric CFD model of a miniature coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler with an overall weight of 920 g operating at 128 Hz is established, and systematic simulations of the performance characteristics at different temperatures are conducted. Both thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium mechanisms for the porous matrix are considered, and the regenerator losses including the gas and solid conduction, the pressure drop and the imperfect interfacial heat transfer are calculated, respectively. The results indicate that the pressure drop loss is dominant during the first 85% and 78% of regenerator length for the thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium models, respectively, and it decreases monotonously from warm to cold end due to the steadily decreasing Darcy and Forchheimer terms, whereas other entropy generations share similar changing tendencies, going up gradually near the warm end, increasing dramatically from about 60% of length and then decreasing sharply near the cold end. The reasons for these entropy variations are discussed.

  1. 14C BOMB-PULSE DATING AND STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS FOR GROWTH RATE AND DIETARY INFORMATION IN BREAST CANCER?

    PubMed

    Lång, K; Eriksson Stenström, K; Rosso, A; Bech, M; Zackrisson, S; Graubau, D; Mattsson, S

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform an initial investigation of the possibility to determine breast cancer growth rate with (14)C bomb-pulse dating. Tissues from 11 breast cancers, diagnosed in 1983, were retrieved from a regional biobank. The estimated average age of the majority of the samples overlapped the year of collection (1983) within 3σ Thus, this first study of tumour tissue has not yet demonstrated that (14)C bomb-pulse dating can obtain information on the growth of breast cancer. However, with further refinement, involving extraction of cell types and components, there is a possibility that fundamental knowledge of tumour biology might still be gained by the bomb-pulse technique. Additionally, δ (13)C and δ (15)N analyses were performed to obtain dietary and metabolic information, and to serve as a base for improvement of the age determination. PMID:27179119

  2. 14C BOMB-PULSE DATING AND STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS FOR GROWTH RATE AND DIETARY INFORMATION IN BREAST CANCER?

    PubMed Central

    Lång, K.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Rosso, A.; Bech, M.; Zackrisson, S.; Graubau, D.; Mattsson, S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform an initial investigation of the possibility to determine breast cancer growth rate with 14C bomb-pulse dating. Tissues from 11 breast cancers, diagnosed in 1983, were retrieved from a regional biobank. The estimated average age of the majority of the samples overlapped the year of collection (1983) within 3σ. Thus, this first study of tumour tissue has not yet demonstrated that 14C bomb-pulse dating can obtain information on the growth of breast cancer. However, with further refinement, involving extraction of cell types and components, there is a possibility that fundamental knowledge of tumour biology might still be gained by the bomb-pulse technique. Additionally, δ 13C and δ 15N analyses were performed to obtain dietary and metabolic information, and to serve as a base for improvement of the age determination. PMID:27179119

  3. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Operating Characteristics of an Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Kimberlin, Adam C.; Perdue, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Operational characteristics of two separate inductive thrusters with conical theta pinch coils of different cone angles are explored through thrust stand measurements and time- integrated, unfiltered photography. Trends in impulse bit measurements indicate that, in the present experimental configuration, the thruster with the inductive coil possessing a smaller cone angle produced larger values of thrust, in apparent contradiction to results of a previous thruster acceleration model. Areas of greater light intensity in photographs of thruster operation are assumed to qualitatively represent locations of increased current density. Light intensity is generally greater in images of the thruster with the smaller cone angle when compared to those of the thruster with the larger half cone angle for the same operating conditions. The intensity generally decreases in both thrusters for decreasing mass flow rate and capacitor voltage. The location of brightest light intensity shifts upstream for decreasing mass flow rate of propellant and downstream for decreasing applied voltage. Recognizing that there typically exists an optimum ratio of applied electric field to gas pressure with respect to breakdown efficiency, this result may indicate that the optimum ratio was not achieved uniformly over the coil face, leading to non-uniform and incomplete current sheet formation in violation of the model assumption of immediate formation where all the injected propellant is contained in a magnetically-impermeable current sheet.

  4. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Operating Characteristics of a Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Kimberlin, Adam C.

    2012-01-01

    Operational characteristics of two separate inductive thrusters with coils of different cone angles are explored through thrust stand measurements and time-integrated, un- filtered photography. Trends in impulse bit measurements indicate that, in the present experimental configuration, the thruster with the inductive coil possessing a smaller cone angle produced larger values of thrust, in apparent contradiction to results of a previous thruster acceleration model. Areas of greater light intensity in photographs of thruster operation are assumed to qualitatively represent locations of increased current density. Light intensity is generally greater in images of the thruster with the smaller cone angle when compared to those of the thruster with the larger half cone angle for the same operating conditions. The intensity generally decreases in both thrusters for decreasing mass ow rate and capacitor voltage. The location of brightest light intensity shifts upstream for decreasing mass ow rate of propellant and downstream for decreasing applied voltage. Recognizing that there typically exists an optimum ratio of applied electric field to gas pressure with respect to breakdown efficiency, this result may indicate that the optimum ratio was not achieved uniformly over the coil face, leading to non-uniform and incomplete current sheet formation in violation of the model assumption of immediate formation where all the injected propellant is contained in a magnetically-impermeable current sheet.

  5. From cardiac to respiratory rate, from cardiac sounds to pulse velocity: a noncontact unified approach for the monitoring of vital signs by means of optical vibrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; De Melis, M.; Morbiducci, U.; Segers, P.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we report experimental data obtained using a novel, non contact and unified approach for the monitoring of some important vital parameters: Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability, Respiration Rate, Filling Time, Pulse Transit Time. The measurement approach - named optical vibrocardiography (VCG) - has been recently described by some of the authors for what concerns the assessment of a single parameter or measurement and technical aspects. Here, we discuss the experimental setup realized to operate optical VCG in order to measure the previously cited vital parameters. We present two novel configurations for the assessment of the respiration rate and the pulse transit time. The quantities measured by optical VCG have been compared with the ones measured with golden standard instrumentations; the comparison reference instruments has shown differences with no statistical and clinical significance. Optical VCG therefore can be considered a valid, fully non-contact measurement method for the assessment of vital signs, with the additional advantage that such parameters can be assessed using one single instrument instead of a set of dedicated devices.

  6. A Technique for the Assessment of Flight Operability Characteristics of Human Rated Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Alan

    2010-01-01

    In support of new human rated spacecraft development programs, the Mission Operations Directorate at NASA Johnson Space Center has implemented a formal method for the assessment of spacecraft operability. This "Spacecraft Flight Operability Assessment Scale" defines six key themes of flight operability, with guiding principles and goals stated for each factor. A standardized rating technique provides feedback that is useful to the operations, design and program management communities. Applicability of this concept across the program structure and life cycle is addressed. Examples of operationally desirable and undesirable spacecraft design characteristics are provided, as is a sample of the assessment scale product.

  7. Design and Operation of a 9-bit Single-flux-quantum Pulse-frequency Modulation Digital-to-analog Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, Yoshinao; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Maezawa, Masaaki

    We designed and operated a 9-bit single-flux-quantum (SFQ) digital-to-analog converter (DAC). SFQ pulse-frequency modulation (PFM) was employed for generation of variable quantum output voltage, where a 9-bit variable pulse number multiplier and a 100-fold voltage multiplier were the key components. Test chips were fabricated using a Nb Josephson integration technology. Arbitrary voltage waveforms were synthesized with the maximum voltage of 2.54 mV. For ac voltage standard applications, relationships between the DAC resolution and the synthesized waveform frequency are discussed.

  8. Different operation states of soliton pulses in an erbium-doped fibre ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-Min; Lü, Fu-Yun; Gong, Yan-Dong; Yang, Xiu-Feng

    2007-07-01

    We report on the experimental observation of soliton pulses in an erbium doped fibre ring laser. The passive mode-locking is achieved using the nonlinear polarization rotation technique. By adjusting the pump power and the intracavity polarization controllers, a normal soliton, a stable 8th harmonic mode-locked pulse and a noise-like pulse have been observed in our laser. The experimental results revealed that the noise-like pulse is not suitable for the optical telecommunication, and in order to obtain the stable harmonic mode-locked soliton, a strong unstable CW laser field is necessary to mediate global soliton interaction. The formation mechanism of the harmonic mode-locked pulse has also been analysed.

  9. Hybrid power system intelligent operation and protection involving distributed architectures and pulsed loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Ahmed

    Efficient and reliable techniques for power delivery and utilization are needed to account for the increased penetration of renewable energy sources in electric power systems. Such methods are also required for current and future demands of plug-in electric vehicles and high-power electronic loads. Distributed control and optimal power network architectures will lead to viable solutions to the energy management issue with high level of reliability and security. This dissertation is aimed at developing and verifying new techniques for distributed control by deploying DC microgrids, involving distributed renewable generation and energy storage, through the operating AC power system. To achieve the findings of this dissertation, an energy system architecture was developed involving AC and DC networks, both with distributed generations and demands. The various components of the DC microgrid were designed and built including DC-DC converters, voltage source inverters (VSI) and AC-DC rectifiers featuring novel designs developed by the candidate. New control techniques were developed and implemented to maximize the operating range of the power conditioning units used for integrating renewable energy into the DC bus. The control and operation of the DC microgrids in the hybrid AC/DC system involve intelligent energy management. Real-time energy management algorithms were developed and experimentally verified. These algorithms are based on intelligent decision-making elements along with an optimization process. This was aimed at enhancing the overall performance of the power system and mitigating the effect of heavy non-linear loads with variable intensity and duration. The developed algorithms were also used for managing the charging/discharging process of plug-in electric vehicle emulators. The protection of the proposed hybrid AC/DC power system was studied. Fault analysis and protection scheme and coordination, in addition to ideas on how to retrofit currently available

  10. Explosive Emission Cathode Based on a Carbon Fiber for Long-Term Pulsed-Periodic Mode of Operation and its Application in a High-Power Microwave Pulse Generator Without External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutenkov, O. P.; Pegel, I. V.; Totmeninov, E. M.

    2014-09-01

    Current characteristics and operating lifetime of the explosive emission cathode based on a carbon microfiber are investigated in the pulsed-periodic mode of operation with pulse duration of about 5 ns. Long-term (for up to 3.6 million pulses) tests of the cathode operating lifetime are carried out. Specific ablation of the fiber material equal to 2.4·10-4 g/C is obtained. Change in the morphology of the fiber surface during long-time operation caused by deposition of carbon from the cathode plasma is revealed. The microscopic electric field strength on the fiber surface is estimated taking into account the surface microrelief. The efficiency of microwave generation comparable with that of a velvet cathode in low (200 kV/cm) average electric field in the gap is obtained for the Cherenkov microwave generator with vacuum diode without external magnetic field of decimeter wavelength range based on the SINUS-7 pulsed-periodic high-current electron accelerator with current pulse duration of 50 ns. The operating lifetime no less than 105 pulses is demonstrated for the carbon fiber-based cathode of the microwave generator operating in the mode of pulse batch with duration of several seconds and pulse repetition frequency of 20-50 Hz.

  11. The midbrain central gray best suppresses chronic pain with electrical stimulation at very low pulse rates in two human cases.

    PubMed

    Hentall, Ian D; Luca, Corneliu C; Widerstrom-Noga, Eva; Vitores, Alberto; Fisher, Letitia D; Martinez-Arizala, Alberto; Jagid, Jonathan R

    2016-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation in the midbrain׳s central gray can relieve neuropathic pain in man, but for unclear reasons sometimes fails intraoperatively or in early weeks. Here we describe continuous bilateral stimulation in the central gray of two subjects with longstanding, severe neuropathic pain from spinal cord injury. Stimulation parameters were recursively adjusted over many weeks to optimize analgesia while minimizing adverse effects. In early weeks, adjustments were made in periodic office visits; subjects later selected ad libitum at home among several blinded choices while rating pain twice daily. Both subjects received significantly better pain relief when stimulus pulse rates were low. The best relief occurred with 2 Hz cycled on for 1s and off for 2s. After inferior parameters were set, pain typically climbed slowly over 1-2 days; superior parameters led to both slow and fast improvements. Over many weeks of stimulation at low pulse rates, both subjects experienced significantly less interference from pain with sleep. One subject, with major pain relief, also showed less interference with social/recreational ability and mood; the other subject, despite minor pain relief, experienced a significantly positive global impression of change. Oscillopsia, the only observed complication of stimulation, disappeared at low mean pulse rates (≤ 3/s). These subjects׳ responses are not likely to be unique even if they are uncommon. Thus daily or more frequent pain assessment, combined with slower periodic adjustment of stimulation parameters that incorporate mean pulse rates about one per second, will likely improve success with this treatment. PMID:26711853

  12. In Vivo Ultra-Fast Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry of Circulating Human Melanoma Cells Using Near-Ingrared High-Pulse Rate Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Ye, John; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The circulating tumor cells (CTCs) appear to be a marker of metastasis development, especially, for highly aggressive and epidemically growing melanoma malignancy that is often metastatic at early stages. Recently, we introduced in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for label-free detection of mouse B16F10 CTCs in melanoma-bearing mice using melanin as an intrinsic marker. Here, we significantly improve the speed of PAFC by using a high pulse repetition rate laser operating at 820 and 1064 nm wavelengths. This platform was used in preclinical studies for label-free PA detection of low pigmented human CTCs. Demonstrated label-free PAFC detection, low level of background signals, and favorable safety standards for near infrared irradiation suggest that a fiber laser operating at 1064 nm at pulse repetition rates up to 0.5 MHz could be a promising source for portable clinical PAFC devices. The possible applications can include early diagnosis of melanoma at the parallel progression of primary tumor and CTCs, detection of cancer recurrence, residual disease, and real-time monitoring of therapy efficiency by counting CTCs before, during and after therapeutic intervention. Herewith, we also address sensitivity of label-free PAFC melanoma CTCs detection and introduce in vivo CTCs targeting by magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with specific antibody and magnetic cells enrichment. PMID:21786417

  13. In vivo ultra-fast photoacoustic flow cytometry of circulating human melanoma cells using near-infrared high-pulse rate lasers.

    PubMed

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Ye, Jian-Hui; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2011-10-01

    The circulating tumor cells (CTCs) appear to be a marker of metastasis development, especially, for highly aggressive and epidemically growing melanoma malignancy that is often metastatic at early stages. Recently, we introduced in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for label-free detection of mouse B16F10 CTCs in melanoma-bearing mice using melanin as an intrinsic marker. Here, we significantly improve the speed of PAFC by using a high-pulse repetition rate laser operating at 820 and 1064 nm wavelengths. This platform was used in preclinical studies for label-free PA detection of low-pigmented human CTCs. Demonstrated label-free PAFC detection, low level of background signals, and favorable safety standards for near-infrared irradiation suggest that a fiber laser operating at 1064 nm at pulse repetition rates up to 0.5 MHz could be a promising source for portable clinical PAFC devices. The possible applications can include early diagnosis of melanoma at the parallel progression of primary tumor and CTCs, detection of cancer recurrence, residual disease and real-time monitoring of therapy efficiency by counting CTCs before, during, and after therapeutic intervention. Herewith, we also address sensitivity of label-free detection of melanoma CTCs and introduce in vivo CTC targeting by magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with specific antibody and magnetic cells enrichment. PMID:21786417

  14. Postexercise heart rates and pulse palpation as a means of determining exercising intensity in an aerobic dance class.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J M; Bassey, E J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish the accuracy of the traditional method of measuring the intensity of exercise in aerobic dance classes, that is, intermittent pulse palpation performed during a brief cessation of activity. METHODS--A short wave telemetry system was used to record heart rates during a class in a group of 12 healthy women aged 26 (SD 6) years. Subjects palpated their pulses for 10 s following high and low intensity exercise [78(8)% and 69(9)% of mean predicted maximum heart rate respectively]. Recorded exercising heart rates, averaged over 60 s preceding pulse palpation [ExHR(rec)], were compared with the recorded postexercise heart rates averaged over the 10 s palpation period [PostExHR(rec)] and with the palpated counts (PalpHR). Differences were assessed using Student's t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS--Differences between ExHR(rec) and PostExHR(rec) following high and low intensity exercise [3(6) beats.min-1 and 5(7) beats.min-1 respectively] were not significant. However, the wide variation between subjects means that a postexercise heart rate is unreliable as a measure of individual exercise intensity. PalpHR was significantly lower than ExHR(rec) (P < 0.01). Every individually palpated count underestimated the exercising heart rate (range 9 to 95 beats.min-1). CONCLUSIONS--While postexercise heart rate adequately represents the exercise heart rate for a group, the individual variation is too wide for this to be a useful measurement. PMID:8665118

  15. High pulse rate interferometry using a ruby laser and a cordin model 360 camera

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, V.A.; Epstein, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This system was originally developed in support of a dynamic diffraction moire effort, but has obvious applications to other types of imaging, interferometry, and high speed optical measurement techniques. The system includes a holographic grade Apollo ruby laser and a Cordin model 330A high speed film camera. The laser has been modified to generate a train of 1 to 100 or more pulses having individual pulse energies of about 40 mJ and a pulse width under 50 ns. The separation between pulses is currently 8 {mu}s, but is expected to soon be reduced to about 1 {mu}s. The laser pulses are synchronized with the framing sync signals from the Cordin camera, so that an individual interferogram is recorded on each of the available frames (a maximum record length of 80 frames is possible). The system is currently configured as a diffraction moire interferometer that illuminates a specimen diffraction grating with a pair of laser beams. The resulting interferograms are recorded using the Cordin camera. The system and the experimental synchronization method are described and some representative experimental data are presented. 1 ref., 5 figs.

  16. Liquid-xenon detector under the intensive pulse irradiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of intense pulsed irradiation on the operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer was studied. The ionization chamber filled with liquid xenon was irradiated by bremsstrahlung pulses of the microtron. The pulse repetition rate was 400 Hz. The absorbed dose ranged from 10-7 to 0.1 Gy per pulse. Stable operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer in the intervals between the pulses of the accelerator was shown for a long time.

  17. A heat-pulse flowmeter for measuring minimal discharge rates in boreholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, A.E.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has tested a borehole-configured heat-pulse flowmeter which has good low-velocity flow-measuring sensitivity. The flowmeter was tested in the laboratory in 51-, 102-, and 152-millimeter-diameter columns using water velocities ranging from 0.35 to 250 millimeters per second. The heat-pulse flowmeter also was tested in a 15-meter-deep granite test pit with controlled water flow, and in a 58-meter-deep borehole in sedimentary materials. The flowmeter's capability to detect and measure naturally occurring, low-velocity, thermally induced convection currents in boreholes was demonstrated. Further improvements to the heat-pulse-flowmeter system are needed to increase its reliability and improve its response through four-conductor logging cable.

  18. On the use of pulsed reduced dose rate for improvement of the therapeutic ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Karl H., V.

    This work demonstrates three related aspects of the efficacy, delivery, and verification of pulsed reduced dose rate radiotherapy (PRDR). PRDR is a method of irradiation designed to minimize radiation-related toxicities in patients undergoing reirradiation for loco-regional reoccurrence of glioblastoma. PRDR uses 0.2GyX10fx daily doses delivered over a 30-minute time span. Under PRDR treatments, a subset of patients have had an unexpectedly positive response to treatment. It was a primary goal of this project to determine if low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity was a contributor to the increased radio-response from these patients. This was done through the use of human T98G glioma and HT29 colorectal cells, and V79.379-A Chinese hamster fibroblasts with drug inhibition of the p53 and PI3K pathways. Radiation was delivered with a medical linear accelerator in either 2Gy acute doses or through PRDR. Methods used to analyze the effect of these techniques included clonogenic assay, flow cytometry, and western blots. Comparison of survival ratios demonstrated no decrease in efficacy for either the standard T98G or HT29 cell lines when using PRDR as compared to an acute dose. T98G with PI3K inhibition and V79.397-A cells demonstrated a decreased efficacy of treatment using PRDR relative to an acute dose. These results suggest an equivalency in tumor treatment with a possible improvement in normal tissue toxicities for the PRDR method. An additional method of delivering PRDR through the use of Tomotherapy was proposed and demonstrated to be accurate. Tomotherapy planning forces the short leaf open times for individual MLC projections from low dose fractionation closed, resulting in an undeliverable plan due to the loss of a large number of usable projections. Application of a virtual grid with directional blocking allows for the output from useable segments to be above this threshold, resulting in a deliverable treatment plan. Finally, analysis was performed on a proposed QA

  19. 42 CFR 412.62 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for fiscal year 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... variations in case mix among hospitals; (2) Excluding an estimate of indirect medical education costs; (3... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for... SERVICES Basic Methodology for Determining Prospective Payment Federal Rates for Inpatient Operating...

  20. Pulsed hall thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, Vladimir J. (Inventor); Pote, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gamero-Castano, Manuel (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pulsed Hall thruster system includes a Hall thruster having an electron source, a magnetic circuit, and a discharge chamber; a power processing unit for firing the Hall thruster to generate a discharge; a propellant storage and delivery system for providing propellant to the discharge chamber and a control unit for defining a pulse duration .tau.<0.1d.sup.3.rho./m, where d is the characteristic size of the thruster, .rho. is the propellant density at standard conditions, and m is the propellant mass flow rate for operating either the power processing unit to provide to the Hall thruster a power pulse of a pre-selected duration, .tau., or operating the propellant storage and delivery system to provide a propellant flow pulse of duration, .tau., or providing both as pulses, synchronized to arrive coincidentally at the discharge chamber to enable the Hall thruster to produce a discreet output impulse.

  1. Pulsed Doppler echocardiographic assessment of portal venous flow patterns in patients after the Fontan operation.

    PubMed Central

    Arisawa, J; Morimoto, S; Ikezoe, J; Naitoh, H; Yamagami, H; Kozuka, T; Sano, T; Shimazaki, Y; Matsuda, H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of the condition of the right heart after the Fontan operation on portal venous flow, and to determine whether the characteristics of portal venous flow were different when there was an atriopulmonary connection with atrial septal closure rather than an atriopulmonary or total cavopulmonary connection with intra-atrial routing. PATIENTS AND METHODS--After the Fontan operation six patients with an atriopulmonary connection (group 1), three patients with an atriosubpulmonary connection (group 2), four patients with intra-atrial routing and an atriopulmonary connection (group 3), and five patients with a total cavopulmonary connection (group 4) were studied by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. The flow signals were recorded for the pulmonary artery, hepatic vein, and intrahepatic portal vein in each patient. Postoperative cardiac catheterisation was performed in 16 of the 18 patients. The Doppler findings were compared with those of 14 controls. RESULTS--The portal flow was pulsatile in 13 patients and constant in five patients. Reversed flow was shown at or just after the QRS wave after hepatic venous regurgitation in two group 1 patients. The flow signal was interrupted in two group 1 patients and two group 2 patients. Decrease in velocity of flow was recorded in two group 1 patients, one group 2 patients, three group 3 patients, and one group 4 patient. Portal flow was constant in one group 3 patient and four group 4 patients. The pulsatility ratio ranged from -0.46 to 0.49 (mean (SD), 0.03 (0.32)) in the patients from group 1 and 2, from 0.41 to 0.76 (0.54 (0.15)) in group 3, and from 0.70 to 0.80 (0.75 (0.04)) in group 4. The ratio in the controls ranged from 0.29 to 0.83 (0.61 (0.13)). The ratio was significantly lower in groups 1 and 2 than in group 3 (p < 0.01), group 4 (p < 0.01), or the controls (p < 0.005). There was no significant difference in the ratio between group 3 and group 4 and no correlation between the pulsatility

  2. Derivation of a formula describing the saturation correction of plane-parallel ionization chambers in pulsed fields with arbitrary repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsch, Leonhard

    2016-04-01

    Gas-filled ionization chambers are widely used radiation detectors in radiotherapy. A quantitative description and correction of the recombination effects exists for two cases, for continuous radiation exposure and for pulsed radiation fields with short single pulses. This work gives a derivation of a formula for pulsed beams with arbitrary pulse rate for which the prerequisites of the two existing descriptions are not fulfilled. Furthermore, an extension of the validity of the two known cases is investigated. The temporal evolution of idealized charge density distributions within a plane parallel chamber volume is described for pulsed beams of vanishing pulse duration and arbitrary pulse repetition rate. First, the radiation induced release, movement and collection of the charge carriers without recombination are considered. Then, charge recombination is calculated basing on these simplified charge distributions and the time dependent spatial overlap of positive and negative charge carrier distributions. Finally, a formula for the calculation of the saturation correction factor is derived by calculation and simplification of the first two terms of a Taylor expansion for small recombination. The new formula of saturation correction contains the two existing cases, descriptions for exposure by single pulses and continuous irradiation, as limiting cases. Furthermore, it is possible to determine the pulse rate range for which each of the three descriptions is applicable by comparing the dependencies of the new formula with the two existing cases. As long as the time between two pulses is lower than one third of the collection time of the chamber, the formalism for a continuous exposure can be used. The known description for single pulse irradiation is only valid if the repetition rate is less than 1.2 times the inverse collection time. For all other repetition rates in between the new formula should be used. The experimental determination by Jaffe diagrams can be

  3. Study of Artifact-Resistive Technology Based on a Novel Dual Photoplethysmography Method for Wearable Pulse Rate Monitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Congcong; Feng, Jingjie; Hu, Jun; Ye, Xuesong

    2016-03-01

    Pulse rate is one of the major physiological parameters for monitoring of cardiovascular conditions or excise states during daily life. However it is difficult to precisely measure the exact pulse rates as photoplethysmography (PPG) is easy to be affected by motion artifacts. Instead of using accelerometers followed by algorithms such as least mean square (LMS), recursive least square (RLS) and independent component analysis (ICA) or other equipment such as complex laser systems to measure displacement directly, a novel motion artifact estimation method which had lower computational complexity and higher signal dynamic range was studied and implemented, where a differential channel following green and red light PPG channels was applied to reduce the motion artifact caused by displacement of light emitting diode (LED), photo diode (PD) and tissue deformation before the analog signal was converted to digital form. A miniaturized, battery powered wrist worn artifact-resistive pulse rates monitoring system (PRMS) was presented to verify the proposed method. Four kinds of motions were performed and the results showed that the differential channel improved the morphology of the PPG signal and appeared to be artifact resistive during motions through light intensity control and high gain-phase consistency circuit design here. PMID:26645320

  4. Dynamics of plasma flow formation in a pulsed accelerator operating at a constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baimbetov, F. B.; Zhukeshov, A. M.; Amrenova, A. U.

    2007-01-01

    Features in the dynamics of plasma flow formation at a constant pressure in a pulsed coaxial accelerator have been studied. The temperature and density of electrons in a plasma bunch have been determined using a probe technique.

  5. Analysis of the self-pulsing operating mode of a microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Xavier; Bauville, Gerard; Guillon, Jean; Lacour, Bernard; Puech, Vincent; Rousseau, Antoine

    2007-02-01

    The self-pulsing regime of a microhollow cathode discharge in argon is reported. The plasma is generated inside the hole drilled in an anode-dielectric-cathode device. The hole dimension ranges from 200 to 400 µm and the gas pressure ranges from 40 to 200 Torr. It is shown by optical spectroscopy and fast CCD imaging that the current pulse is related to a fast expansion of the plasma outside the microhole on the cathode backside. The pulse current duration ranges from 0.4 to 2 µs depending on the gas pressure. The self-pulsing regime occurs at medium current range (0.1-1 mA). At lower current the discharge is steady and the plasma is confined inside the hole (abnormal regime); at higher current, the plasma is steady and the plasma expands outside the hole on the cathode backside. The self-pulsing frequency is a linear function of the averaged discharge current and decreases with the device capacitance. The dependence of the self-pulsing characteristics (frequency, light emission, power deposition, etc) on the gas pressure follows a Paschen-like law; this is interpreted in considering that the fast expansion of the plasma outside the hole is similar to a gas breakdown. A simple electrical model, using a bistable voltage-controlled variable resistor to simulate the evolution of the plasma impedance, provides qualitative results in good agreement with the experiments.

  6. High-average-power 2 μm few-cycle optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier at 100 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Yariv; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Demmler, Stefan; Tschernajew, Maxim; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Sources of long wavelengths few-cycle high repetition rate pulses are becoming increasingly important for a plethora of applications, e.g., in high-field physics. Here, we report on the realization of a tunable optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier at 100 kHz repetition rate. At a central wavelength of 2 μm, the system delivered 33 fs pulses and a 6 W average power corresponding to 60 μJ pulse energy with gigawatt-level peak powers. Idler absorption and its crystal heating is experimentally investigated for a BBO. Strategies for further power scaling to several tens of watts of average power are discussed. PMID:26625047

  7. High-power sub-two-cycle mid-infrared pulses at 100 MHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupeza, I.; Sánchez, D.; Zhang, J.; Lilienfein, N.; Seidel, M.; Karpowicz, N.; Paasch-Colberg, T.; Znakovskaya, I.; Pescher, M.; Schweinberger, W.; Pervak, V.; Fill, E.; Pronin, O.; Wei, Z.; Krausz, F.; Apolonski, A.; Biegert, J.

    2015-11-01

    Powerful coherent light with a spectrum spanning the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral range is crucial for a number of applications in natural as well as life sciences, but so far has only been available from large-scale synchrotron sources. Here we present a compact apparatus that generates pulses with a sub-two-cycle duration and with an average power of 0.1 W and a spectral coverage of 6.8-16.4 μm (at -30 dB). The demonstrated source combines, for the first time in this spectral region, a high power, a high repetition rate and phase coherence. The MIR pulses emerge via difference-frequency generation (DFG) driven by the nonlinearly compressed pulses of a Kerr-lens mode-locked ytterbium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Yb:YAG) thin-disc oscillator. The resultant 100 MHz MIR pulse train is hundreds to thousands of times more powerful than state-of-the-art frequency combs that emit in this range, and offers a high dynamic range for spectroscopy in the molecular fingerprint region and an ideal prerequisite for hyperspectral imaging as well as for the time-domain coherent control of vibrational dynamics.

  8. A method towards simulating the total luminous flux of a monochromatic high power LED operated in a pulsed manner.

    PubMed

    Moolman, M C; Koek, W D; Urbach, H P

    2009-09-28

    High power light-emitting diodes (HPLEDs) are frequently being operated in a pulsed manner. The research presented here focuses on the optical, electrical and thermal behaviour of a HPLED under pulse width modulation (PWM), and has the following twofold aim. Firstly, investigating the temperature dependence of the HPLED's efficiency, where it was found that the exact method of operation and the definition of calculation is crucial when making claims. Secondly, we propose a method to simulate the absolute emitted luminous flux of a current driven HPLED under PWM. This is done by making use of experimentally determined characteristic parameters of the HPLED. This has as advantage that no further physical measurements are needed to investigate the HPLEDs behavior under numerous different PWM circumstances. PMID:19907530

  9. Nanosecond pulses in a THz gyrotron oscillator operating in a mode-locked self-consistent Q-switch regime.

    PubMed

    Alberti, S; Braunmueller, F; Tran, T M; Genoud, J; Hogge, J-Ph; Tran, M Q; Ansermet, J-Ph

    2013-11-15

    An experimental study of a nanosecond pulsed regime in a THz gyrotron oscillator operating in a self-consistent Q-switch regime has been carried out. The gyrotron is operated in the TE(7,2) transverse mode radiating at a frequency of 260.5 GHz. The 5 W nanosecond pulses are obtained in a self-consistent Q-switch regime in which the cavity diffraction quality factor dynamically varies by nearly 2 orders of magnitude on a subnanosecond time scale via the nonlinear interaction of different mode-locked frequency-equidistant sidebands. The experimental results are in good agreement with numerical simulations performed with the TWANG code based on a slow time scale formulation of the self-consistent time-dependent nonlinear wave particle interaction equations. PMID:24289692

  10. Time-resolved in vivo luminescence dosimetry for online error detection in pulsed dose-rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Claus E.; Nielsen, Soeren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present and evaluate a dose-verification protocol for pulsed dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy based on in vivo time-resolved (1 s time resolution) fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry. Methods: Five cervix cancer patients undergoing PDR brachytherapy (Varian GammaMed Plus with {sup 192}Ir) were monitored. The treatments comprised from 10 to 50 pulses (1 pulse/h) delivered by intracavitary/interstitial applicators (tandem-ring systems and/or needles). For each patient, one or two dosimetry probes were placed directly in or close to the tumor region using stainless steel or titanium needles. Each dosimeter probe consisted of a small aluminum oxide crystal attached to an optical fiber cable (1 mm outer diameter) that could guide radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from the crystal to special readout instrumentation. Positioning uncertainty and hypothetical dose-delivery errors (interchanged guide tubes or applicator movements from {+-}5 to {+-}15 mm) were simulated in software in order to assess the ability of the system to detect errors. Results: For three of the patients, the authors found no significant differences (P>0.01) for comparisons between in vivo measurements and calculated reference values at the level of dose per dwell position, dose per applicator, or total dose per pulse. The standard deviations of the dose per pulse were less than 3%, indicating a stable dose delivery and a highly stable geometry of applicators and dosimeter probes during the treatments. For the two other patients, the authors noted significant deviations for three individual pulses and for one dosimeter probe. These deviations could have been due to applicator movement during the treatment and one incorrectly positioned dosimeter probe, respectively. Computer simulations showed that the likelihood of detecting a pair of interchanged guide tubes increased by a factor of 10 or more for the considered patients when

  11. Solid-state YVO4/Nd:YVO4/KTP green laser system for the generation of subnanosecond pulses with adjustable kilohertz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijuan; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Jia; Wang, Yonggang

    2013-09-20

    A solid-state green laser generating subnanosecond pulses with adjustable kilohertz repetition rate is presented. This pulse laser system is composed of a Q-switched and mode-locked YVO(4)/Nd:YVO(4)/KTP laser simultaneously modulated by an electro-optic (EO) modulator and a central semiconductor saturable absorption mirror. Because the repetition rate of the Q-switched envelope in this laser depends on the modulation frequency of the EO modulator, so long as the pulsewidth of the Q-switched envelope is shorter than the cavity roundtrip transmit time, i.e., the time interval of two neighboring mode-locking pulses, only one mode-locking pulse exists underneath a Q-switched envelope, resulting in the generation of subnanosecond pulses with kilohertz repetition rate. The experimental results show that the pulsewidth of subnanosecond pulses decreases with increasing pump power and the shortest pulse generated at 1 kHz was 450 ps with pulse energy as high as 252 μJ, corresponding to a peak power of 560 kW. In addition, this laser was confirmed to have high stability, and the pulse repetition rate could be freely adjusted from 1 to 4 kHz. PMID:24085177

  12. [A project to improve the validity rate for nursing staff operating single door autoclave sterilizers].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hung; Li, Cheng-Chang; Chou, Chuan-Yu; Chen, Shu-Hwa

    2009-08-01

    This project was designed to improve the low validity rate for nurses responsible to operate single door autoclave sterilizers in the operating room. By investigating the current status, we found that the nursing staff validity rate of cognition on the autoclave sterilizer was 85%, and the practice operating check validity rate was only 80%. Such was due to a lack of in-service education. Problems with operation included: 1. Unsafe behaviors - not following standard procedure, lacking relevant operating knowledge and absence of a check form; 2. Unsafe environment - the conveying steam piping was typically not covered and lacked operation marks. Recommended improvement measures included: 1. holding in-service education; 2. generating an operation procedure flow chart; 3. implementing obstacle eliminating procedures; 4. covering piping to prevent fire and burns; 5. performing regular checks to ensure all procedures are followed. Following intervention, nursing staff cognition rose from 85% to 100%, while the operation validity rate rose from 80% to 100%. These changes ensure a safer operating room environment, and helps facilities move toward a zero accident rate in the healthcare environment. PMID:19634099

  13. Generation of 20 GHz, sub-40 fs pulses at 960 nm via repetition-rate multiplication.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, M S; Braje, D A; Fortier, T M; Weiner, A M; Hollberg, L; Diddams, S A

    2009-04-01

    Optical filtering of a stabilized 1 GHz optical frequency comb produces a 20 GHz comb with approximately 40 nm bandwidth (FWHM) at 960 nm. Use of a low-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity in a double-pass configuration provides a broad cavity coupling bandwidth (Deltalambda/lambda approximately 10%) and large suppression (50 dB) of unwanted modes. Pulse durations shorter than 40 fs with less than 2% residual amplitude modulation are achieved. PMID:19340155

  14. Steady slip pulses on faults with rate- and state-dependent friction and multiple thermal weakening mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Garagash, D.

    2012-12-01

    We present solutions for steadily propagating slip pulses whose underlying frictional evolution is dependent on both the rate of slip and the evolution of a state parameter (of a slip-law type), with strong velocity-dependent weakening of friction at high slip rates (via flash heating of asperity contacts). Additional weakening occurs by reduction of the effective normal stress by thermal pressurization of pore fluid within a shear zone of fixed nominal thickness. Such strong dynamic weakening mechanisms allow for rupture of faults under levels of a shear stress much lower than a nominal static strength. For decreasing levels of background shear stress, slip pulses become the favored mode as a critical point is reached where crack-like rupture modes may be inadmissible (Zheng and Rice, BSSA 1998). For even further decreases in shear stress, slip pulses may arrest shortly after nucleation, and our interest in characterizing steady pulse solutions lies partially in this precarious transition. The relative effect of the two thermal weakening mechanisms is determined by the relative size of the slip scales over which the flash heating and thermal pressurization evolve (Dc and Lachenbruch's δ c, respectively). Laboratory measurements of Dc and estimates for δ c indicate that Dc ≤ δ c: i.e., at the tip, weakening occurs as a cascade, which may be partially represented by tip solutions that neglect healing (Garagash and Viesca, AGU FM 2011). Considering the trailing edge, as state evolution of the slip-law type does not provide frictional restrengthening at zero slip velocity, the slip pulse heals asymptotically with distance behind the rupture tip in the absence of thermal pressurization. A robust, effective pulse length can be established in this case by setting a threshold value of the slip velocity. Allowing for TP provides a mechanism for stationary restrengthening and relocking of the fault at the trailing edge (Garagash, JGR 2012). We find relations between

  15. HydroPulse Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    J.J. Kolle

    2004-04-01

    Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

  16. Comparison of High Rate Laser Ablation and Resulting Structures Using Continuous and Pulsed Single Mode Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebel, T.; Streek, A.; Exner, H.

    This paper compares high rate laser ablation and resulting structures of aluminum by using both a continuous wave and a ns-pulsed single mode fiber laser of high average laser power. Two different scan technologies were applied for fast deflection of the laser beams. In this work, 2.5D laser processing was studied by using a high aperture galvanometer scanner with a maximum scan speed of 18 m/s. By contrast, considerably higher scan speeds up to 1,000 m/s were achieved by using the in-house developed polygon scanner system. The ablation rates and the processing rates per unit area were analyzed by means of the depths of line-scan ablation tracks and laser processed cavities. In addition, SEM photograph of the machining samples will be presented in order to evaluate the machining quality. Finally the feasibility of this high rate technology for industrial application is demonstrated by machining examples.

  17. Density-dependent birth rate, birth pulses and their population dynamic consequences.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sanyi; Chen, Lansun

    2002-02-01

    In most models of population dynamics, increases in population due to birth are assumed to be time-independent, but many species reproduce only during a single period of the year. We propose a single-species model with stage structure for the dynamics in a wild animal population for which births occur in a single pulse once per time period. Using the discrete dynamical system determined by the stroboscopic map, we obtain an exact periodic solution of systems which are with Ricker functions or Beverton-Holt functions, and obtain the threshold conditions for their stability. Above this threshold, there is a characteristic sequence of bifurcations, leading to chaotic dynamics, which implies that the dynamical behaviors of the single species model with birth pulses are very complex, including small-amplitude annual oscillations, large-amplitude multi-annual cycles, and chaos. This suggests that birth pulse, in effect, provides a natural period or cyclicity that allows for a period-doubling route to chaos. PMID:11942532

  18. Use of spatial time-division repetition rate multiplication of mode-locked laser pulses to generate microwave radiation from optoelectronic switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooradian, A.

    1984-09-01

    An all-optical technique is described which can substantially increase the pulse repetition rate of the output from any mode-locked laser. Multiplication of the repetition rate by a factor of 16 has been demonstrated. A mode-locked laser pulse train multiplied up to a 2-GHz repetition rate has been used to generate microwave radiation by means of a GaAs avalanche photodiode as well as an Fe:InP optoelectronic switch.

  19. Approximate Lambda-Operators working at optimum convergence rate. I - Theory and application to hydrostatic atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, J.; Herrero, A.

    1988-10-01

    In this paper the approximate Lambda-Operator (ALO) developed by Olson, Auer and Buchler (OAB, 1986) is inspected from a more mathematical standpoint and compared to presently most commonly applied ALOs. For simple model calculations,it is shown that OAB's operator which contains no arbitrary parameter always works close to the optimum convergence rate. This operator is then applied for the first time to realistic NLTE calculations for hydrostatic atmospheres of hot stars, where it turns out that OAB's operator always leads to the fastest convergence rate and that this can be attained even for the most difficult case of nearly pure resonance scattering where other ALOs fail.

  20. 39.1 μJ picosecond ultraviolet pulses at 355 nm with 1 MHz repeat rate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Li, Daijun; Liu, Qingyong; Chen, Jun; Fu, Shaojun; Shi, Peng; Du, Keming; Loosen, Peter

    2013-11-15

    Based on our reliable high-power picosecond laser source with high beam qualities, we designed a compact and efficient third harmonic generation scheme by cascading a frequency doubling and a sum frequency generation using LBO as the nonlinear material. A maximum output of 39.1 W with a repeat rate of 1 MHz at 355 nm was obtained, which implied a pulse energy of 39.1 μJ, which was the highest picosecond UV pulse energy with an all-solid-state setup so far. The total conversion efficiency from infrared to UV was up to 46%. And the output UV has excellent beam qualities with an M-square factor less than 1.1. PMID:24322114

  1. Review of critical flow rate, propagation of pressure pulse, and sonic velocity in two-phase media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y.

    1972-01-01

    For single-phase media, the critical discharge velocity, the sonic velocity, and the pressure pulse propagation velocity can be expressed in the same form by assuming isentropic, equilibria processes. In two-phase mixtures, the same concept is not valid due to the existence of interfacial transports of momentum, heat, and mass. Thus, the three velocities should be treated differently and separately for each particular condition, taking into account the various transport processes involved under that condition. Various attempts are reviewed to predict the critical discharge rate or the propagation velocities by considering slip ratio (momentum change), evaporation (mass and heat transport), flow pattern, etc. Experimental data were compared with predictions based on various theorems. The importance is stressed of the time required to achieve equilibrium as compared with the time available during the process, for example, of passing a pressure pulse.

  2. Operational Regimes in Picosecond and Femtosecond Pulse-Excited Ultrahigh Vacuum SERS.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Eric A; Gruenke, Natalie L; Chiang, Naihao; Zhdanov, Dmitry V; Jiang, Nan; Seideman, Tamar; Schatz, George C; Hersam, Mark C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-08-01

    We report a systematic study performed in ultrahigh vacuum designed to identify the laser excitation regimes in which plasmonically enhanced ultrashort pulses may be used to nondestructively probe surface-bound molecules. A nondestructive, continuous-wave spectroscopic probe is used to monitor the effects of four different femtosecond- and picosecond-pulsed beams on the SER signals emanating from molecular analytes residing within plasmonically enhanced fields. We identify the roles of plasmonic amplification and alignment with a molecular electronic transition on the observed changes in the SER signals. Our results indicate that overlap of the laser wavelength with the plasmon resonance is the dominant contributor to signal degradation. In addition, signal loss for a given irradiation condition is observed only for molecules residing in hot spots above a threshold enhancement. Identification of suitable laser energy density ranges demonstrates the importance of considering these parameters when implementing SERS in the presence of pulsed irradiation. PMID:27428724

  3. Optimal pulsed pumping for aquifer remediation when contaminant transport is affected by rate-limited sorption: A calculus of variation approach. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, R.T.

    1994-09-01

    The remediation of groundwater contamination continues to persist as a social and economic problem due to increased governmental regulations and public health concerns. Additionally, the geochemistry of the aquifer and the contaminant transport within the aquifer complicates the remediation process to restore contaminated aquifers to conditions compatible with health-based standards. Currently, the preferred method for aquifer cleanup (pump-and-treat) has several limitations including, the persistence of sorbed chemicals on soil matrix and the long term operation and maintenance expense. The impetus of this research was to demonstrate that a calculus of variations approach could be applied to a pulsed pumping aquifer remediation problem where contaminant transport was affected by rate-limited sorption and generalized to answer several management objectives. The calculus of variation approach produced criteria for when the extraction pump is turned on and off. Additionally, the analytic solutions presented in this research may be useful in verifying numerical codes developed to solve optimal pulsed pumping aquifer remediation problems under conditions of rate-limited sorption.

  4. Investigations, Experiments, and Implications for using existingPulse Magents for 'TOPOFF' Operation at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, Gregory D.; Baptiste, Kenneth Michael; Barry, Walter; Gath, William; Julian, James; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Prestemon, Soren; Schlueter, Ross; Shuman, Derek; Steier, Christoph

    2005-05-11

    ALS top-off mode of operation will require injection of the electron beam from the Booster Ring into the Storage Ring at the full ALS energy level of 1.9 GeV. Currently the Booster delivers a beam at 1.5 GeV to the Storage Ring where it is then ramped to the full energy and stored for the user operation. The higher Booster beam energy will require the pulse magnets in the Booster and Storage Rings to operate at proportionally higher magnetic gap fields. Our group studied and tested the possible design and installation modifications required to operate the magnets and drivers at ''top-off'' levels. Our results and experiments show that with minor electrical modifications all the existing pulse magnet systems can be used at the higher energy levels, and the increased operational stresses should have a negligible impact on magnet reliability. Furthermore, simple electrical modifications to the storage ring thick septum will greatly reduce the present level of septum stray leakage fields into the storage ring beam.

  5. A fast position sensitive microstrip-gas-chamber detector at high count rate operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbnya, I. P.; Alberda, H.; Hartjes, F. G.; Udo, F.; Bakker, R. E.; Konijnenburg, M.; Homan, E.; Cerjak, I.; Goedtkindt, P.; Bras, W.

    2002-11-01

    Testing of a newly developed position sensitive high count rate microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) detector at high count rate operation has been carried out at the Dutch-Belgian x-ray scattering beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France) with a high intensity x-ray beam. The measurements show local count rate capabilities up to approx4.5 x105 counts/s/channel. Experimental data taken with this detector are also shown. These tests show that both time resolution down to 1.5 ms/frame and a reliable operation at high counting rates can be achieved.

  6. Thermal Spray Using a High-Frequency Pulse Detonation Combustor Operated in the Liquid-Purge Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, T.; Obayashi, R.; Tajiri, T.; Kimura, K.; Morohashi, Y.; Johzaki, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Hanafusa, T.; Mizunari, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on thermal spray by pulsed detonations at 150 Hz were conducted. Two types of pulse detonation combustors were used, one operated in the inert gas purge (GAP) mode and the other in the liquid-purge (LIP) mode. In both modes, all gases were supplied in the valveless mode. The GAP mode is free of moving components, although the explosive mixture is unavoidably diluted with the inert gas used for the purge of the hot burned gas. In the LIP mode, pure fuel-oxygen combustion can be realized, although a liquid-droplet injector must be actuated cyclically. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a higher spraying temperature in the LIP mode. First, the temperature of CoNiCrAlY particles heated by pulsed detonations was measured. As a result, the spraying temperature in the LIP mode was higher than that in the GAP mode by about 1000 K. Second, the temperature of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) particles, whose melting point was almost 2800 °C, heated by pulsed detonations in the LIP mode was measured. As a result, the YSZ particles were heated up to about 2500 °C. Finally, a thermal spray experiment using YSZ particles was conducted, and a coating with low porosity was successfully deposited.

  7. Dynamic absorption and scattering of water and hydrogel during high-repetition-rate (>100 MHz) burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zuoming; Covarrubias, Andrés; Grindal, Alexander W.; Akens, Margarete K.; Lilge, Lothar; Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    High-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation and disruption of biological tissues depends on interaction of each pulse with the sample, but under those particular conditions which persist from previous pulses. This work characterizes and compares the dynamics of absorption and scattering of a 133-MHz repetition-rate, burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser, in agar hydrogel targets and distilled water. The differences in energy partition are quantified, pulse-by-pulse, using a time-resolving integrating-sphere-based device. These measurements reveal that high-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation is a highly dynamical process affected by the persistence of ionization, dissipation of plasma plume, neutral material flow, tissue tensile strength, and the hydrodynamic oscillation of cavitation bubbles. PMID:27375948

  8. Dynamic absorption and scattering of water and hydrogel during high-repetition-rate (>100 MHz) burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zuoming; Covarrubias, Andrés; Grindal, Alexander W; Akens, Margarete K; Lilge, Lothar; Marjoribanks, Robin S

    2016-06-01

    High-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation and disruption of biological tissues depends on interaction of each pulse with the sample, but under those particular conditions which persist from previous pulses. This work characterizes and compares the dynamics of absorption and scattering of a 133-MHz repetition-rate, burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser, in agar hydrogel targets and distilled water. The differences in energy partition are quantified, pulse-by-pulse, using a time-resolving integrating-sphere-based device. These measurements reveal that high-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation is a highly dynamical process affected by the persistence of ionization, dissipation of plasma plume, neutral material flow, tissue tensile strength, and the hydrodynamic oscillation of cavitation bubbles. PMID:27375948

  9. 10  GHz pulse repetition rate Er:Yb:glass laser modelocked with quantum dot semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

    PubMed

    Resan, B; Kurmulis, S; Zhang, Z Y; Oehler, A E H; Markovic, V; Mangold, M; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U; Hogg, R A; Weingarten, K J

    2016-05-10

    Semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) modelocked high pulse repetition rate (≥10  GHz) diode-pumped solid-state lasers are proven as an enabling technology for high data rate coherent communication systems owing to their low noise and high pulse-to-pulse optical phase-coherence. Compared to quantum well, quantum dot (QD)-based SESAMs offer potential advantages to such laser systems in terms of reduced saturation fluence, broader bandwidth, and wavelength flexibility. Here, we describe the first 10 GHz pulse repetition rate QD-SESAM modelocked laser at 1.55 μm, exhibiting 2 ps pulse width from an Er-doped glass oscillator (ERGO). The 10 GHz ERGO laser is modelocked with InAs/GaAs QD-SESAM with saturation fluence as low as 9  μJ/cm2. PMID:27168291

  10. A compact high voltage pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.; Babcock, S.R.

    1994-07-01

    A compact, easily transportable, pulse generator has been developed for a variety of applications that require a pulse duration in the range of 1 {mu} sec., voltages from 150 to 300 KV and current levels from 2,000 to 3,000 amps. The generator has a simple cylindrical configuration and modular construction to facilitate assembly and service. The generator may be operated single-pulse or repetitively at pulse repetition rates to 50 Hz in a burst mode.

  11. Designing a Better Spacecraft: Assessing Flight Operability of Human Rated Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    The design of a human rated spacecraft is a complex and costly process requiring the integrated assessment of many individual criteria. Historically, it has been difficult to include in that integrated assessment the design s full impact on the flight operations community and its costs. The unique "operability requirements" have not been well understood, nor has there been a well-defined set of criteria for assessing operability. As a result, flight operations organizations and program managers are often faced with difficult and costly operations phase implementations. In response, the Mission Operations Directorate at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center has established a formal technique to evaluate and communicate the operational characteristics of spacecraft system designs for the Constellation Program. This process is not intended to replace or replicate other critical assessments such as risk, reliability and safety assessments. Instead, this new technique adds to the assessment toolset a means to address the concerns and potential cost drivers that are unique to the operational phase of a program and the flight operations community. This paper describes the implementation and application of this "Spacecraft Flight Operability Assessment Scale" in supporting vehicle design efforts. The six key factors of flight operability are defined, with guiding principles and goals stated for each factor. A standardized rating technique provides feedback that is useful to both the operations and program management communities. Sample assessments of legacy spacecraft, including the Space Shuttle and International Space Station systems, are provided to provide real world examples of this technique s application.

  12. Reliability and concurrent validity of a peripheral pulse oximeter and health-app system for the quantification of heart rate in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Losa-Iglesias, Marta Elena; Becerro-de-Bengoa-Vallejo, Ricardo; Becerro-de-Bengoa-Losa, Klark Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    There are downloadable applications (Apps) for cell phones that can measure heart rate in a simple and painless manner. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of this type of App for a Smartphone using an Android system, compared to the radial pulse and a portable pulse oximeter. We performed a pilot observational study of diagnostic accuracy, randomized in 46 healthy volunteers. The patients' demographic data and cardiac pulse were collected. Radial pulse was measured by palpation of the radial artery with three fingers at the wrist over the radius; a low-cost portable, liquid crystal display finger pulse oximeter; and a Heart Rate Plus for Samsung Galaxy Note®. This study demonstrated high reliability and consistency between systems with respect to the heart rate parameter of healthy adults using three systems. For all parameters, ICC was > 0.93, indicating excellent reliability. Moreover, CVME values for all parameters were between 1.66-4.06 %. We found significant correlation coefficients and no systematic differences between radial pulse palpation and pulse oximeter and a high precision. Low-cost pulse oximeter and App systems can serve as valid instruments for the assessment of heart rate in healthy adults. PMID:25038201

  13. Si nanostructures grown by picosecond high repetition rate pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervolaraki, M.; Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J.; Athanasopoulos, G. I.; Giapintzakis, J.

    2013-08-01

    One-step growth of n-doped Si nanostructures by picosecond ultra fast pulsed laser deposition at 1064 nm is reported for the first time. The structure and morphology of the Si nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the shape of the Si nanostructures depends on the ambient argon pressure. Fibrous networks, cauliflower formations and Si rectangular crystals grew when argon pressure of 300 Pa, 30 Pa and vacuum (10-3 Pa) conditions were used, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistance of the vacuum made material was investigated.

  14. Comparison of Computed and Measured Performance of a Pulsed Inductive Thruster Operating on Argon Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sankaran, Kameshwaran; Ritchie, Andrew G.; Peneau, Jarred P.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma accelerators are electrodeless space propulsion devices where a capacitor is charged to an initial voltage and then discharged through a coil as a high-current pulse that inductively couples energy into the propellant. The field produced by this pulse ionizes the propellant, producing a plasma near the face of the coil. Once a plasma is formed if can be accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity by the Lorentz force arising from the interaction of an induced plasma current and the magnetic field. A recent review of the developmental history of planar-geometry pulsed inductive thrusters, where the coil take the shape of a flat spiral, can be found in Ref. [1]. Two concepts that have employed this geometry are the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT)[2, 3] and the Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge (FARAD)[4]. There exists a 1-D pulsed inductive acceleration model that employs a set of circuit equations coupled to a one-dimensional momentum equation. The model was originally developed and used by Lovberg and Dailey[2, 3] and has since been nondimensionalized and used by Polzin et al.[5, 6] to define a set of scaling parameters and gain general insight into their effect on thruster performance. The circuit presented in Fig. 1 provides a description of the electrical coupling between the current flowing in the thruster I1 and the plasma current I2. Recently, the model was upgraded to include an equation governing the deposition of energy into various modes present in a pulsed inductive thruster system (acceleration, magnetic flux generation, resistive heating, etc.)[7]. An MHD description of the plasma energy density evolution was tailored to the thruster geometry by assuming only one-dimensional motion and averaging the plasma properties over the spatial dimensions of the current sheet to obtain an equation for the time-evolution of the total energy. The equation set governing the dynamics of the coupled

  15. Effects of Treatment Duration and Cooling Rate on Pure Aluminum Solidification Upon Pulse Magneto-Oscillation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edry, Itzhak; Mordechai, Tomer; Frage, Nachum; Hayun, Shmuel

    2016-03-01

    The effect of pulse magneto-oscillation (PMO) treatment on casting grain size has been widely investigated. Nevertheless, its mechanism remains unclear, especially when PMO is applied at different periods during solidification, namely when only applied above the melting point. In the present work, the effect of PMO treatment applied at different segments during solidification was investigated. It was found that the dendrite fragmentation model may well explain the effect of PMO applied during the dendrite growth stage. However, only the cavities activation model may account for the effect when PMO is conducted above the melting point. In current study, the effect of PMO treatment on grain size was also investigated at various cooling rates. It was established that the cooling rate had only a slight effect on grain size when PMO treatment was applied. Thus, PMO treatment may provide homogeneous grain size distribution in castings with different wall thicknesses that solidified with various cooling rates.

  16. Equipment Operator 3 and 2. NAVTRA 10640-G. Rate Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    A guide for advancement and training in the Equipment Operator 3 and 2 ratings for Navy personnel is provided in this manual. The chapters outline the duties and responsibilities of the equipment operators involved with engines, fuels, lubricants, pollution control, automotive power trains and chassis, automotive vehicles, materials-handling…

  17. Effect of the vibration-translation transfer rate on laser-induced frequency chirp in a long-pulse CO sub 2 laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, H.P.; Willman, B.; Leung, K.; Theophanis, G.; Hasson, V. )

    1990-05-21

    A frequency sweeping (chirping) mechanism governed by the lasing gas pressure and composition has been observed in a long-pulse TE CO{sub 2} laser for the first time. The mechanism was detected in heterodyned data obtained from photomixing the pulsed laser output with a cw local oscillator. A theory has been developed which links this chirp-governing mechanism to the vibration-translation (V-T) transfer rate from the lower laser level to the ground state. This new theory extends the existing theories on chirp in pulsed CO{sub 2} lasers into the long-pulse regime.

  18. High-rate x-ray spectroscopy in mammography with a CdTe detector: A digital pulse processing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Principato, F.; Del Sordo, S.; Ienzi, R.; Raso, G.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose:Direct measurement of mammographic x-ray spectra under clinical conditions is a difficult task due to the high fluence rate of the x-ray beams as well as the limits in the development of high resolution detection systems in a high counting rate environment. In this work we present a detection system, based on a CdTe detector and an innovative digital pulse processing (DPP) system, for high-rate x-ray spectroscopy in mammography. Methods: The DPP system performs a digital pile-up inspection and a digital pulse height analysis of the detector signals, digitized through a 14-bit, 100 MHz digitizer, for x-ray spectroscopy even at high photon counting rates. We investigated on the response of the digital detection system both at low (150 cps) and at high photon counting rates (up to 500 kcps) by using monoenergetic x-ray sources and a nonclinical molybdenum anode x-ray tube. Clinical molybdenum x-ray spectrum measurements were also performed by using a pinhole collimator and a custom alignment device. Results: The detection system shows excellent performance up to 512 kcps with an energy resolution of 4.08% FWHM at 22.1 keV. Despite the high photon counting rate (up to 453 kcps), the molybdenum x-ray spectra, measured under clinical conditions, are characterized by a low number of pile-up events. The agreement between the attenuation curves and the half value layer values, obtained from the measured spectra, simulated spectra, and from the exposure values directly measured with an ionization chamber, also shows the accuracy of the measurements. Conclusions: These results make the proposed detection system a very attractive tool for both laboratory research and advanced quality controls in mammography.

  19. Achieving a Linear Dose Rate Response in Pulse-Mode Silicon Photodiode Scintillation Detectors Over a Wide Range of Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Lewis

    2014-02-01

    We are developing a new dose calibrator for nuclear pharmacies that can measure radioactivity in a vial or syringe without handling it directly or removing it from its transport shield “pig”. The calibrator's detector comprises twin opposing scintillating crystals coupled to Si photodiodes and current-amplifying trans-resistance amplifiers. Such a scheme is inherently linear with respect to dose rate over a wide range of radiation intensities, but accuracy at low activity levels may be impaired, beyond the effects of meager photon statistics, by baseline fluctuation and drift inevitably present in high-gain, current-mode photodiode amplifiers. The work described here is motivated by our desire to enhance accuracy at low excitations while maintaining linearity at high excitations. Thus, we are also evaluating a novel “pulse-mode” analog signal processing scheme that employs a linear threshold discriminator to virtually eliminate baseline fluctuation and drift. We will show the results of a side-by-side comparison of current-mode versus pulse-mode signal processing schemes, including perturbing factors affecting linearity and accuracy at very low and very high excitations. Bench testing over a wide range of excitations is done using a Poisson random pulse generator plus an LED light source to simulate excitations up to ˜106 detected counts per second without the need to handle and store large amounts of radioactive material.

  20. The effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser-induced damage sites at 351 nm on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Norton, M A; Liao, Z M; Cross, D A; Bude, J D; Carr, C W

    2009-10-29

    Past work in the area of laser-induced damage growth has shown growth rates to be primarily dependent on the laser fluence and wavelength. More recent studies suggest that growth rate, similar to the damage initiation process, is affected by a number of additional parameters including pulse duration, pulse shape, site size, and internal structure. In this study, we focus on the effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a significant dependence of growth rate at 351 nm on pulse duration from 1 ns to 15 ns as {tau}{sup 0.3} for sites in the 50-100 {micro}m size range.

  1. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronicmore » states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.« less

  2. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  3. Influence of selected fixed parameters on pulse-jet fabric filter operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindy, K. T.

    The effect of (a) fixing the time interval between cleaning pulses or (b) fixing the maximum pressure drop at which cleaning is started, on the performance of the fabric filter was investigated. A maximum pressure drop value of 2500 Pa: (a) minimized the effect of the filter medium resistance; (b) reduced the energy consumption by the filter; (c) minimized the dust emission from the fabric filter to the surrounding atmosphere.

  4. Complex dynamics of a fiber laser in non-stationary pulsed operation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, E; Pottiez, O; Bracamontes-Rodriguez, Y; Lauterio-Cruz, J P; Ibarra-Villalon, H E; Hernandez-Garcia, J C; Bello-Jimenez, M; Kuzin, E A

    2016-08-22

    Conventional mode locking is characterized by the generation of a stable train of optical pulses. Even in the noise-like pulsing regime of fiber lasers, sometimes described as partial mode locking, a periodic train of waveforms is still generated. In this work we study the dynamics of a figure-eight fiber laser away from the stable noise-like pulsing regime. By analyzing sequences of time-domain measurements performed with ns resolution, we reveal a wide range of puzzling dynamics, in which sub-structures emerge and drift away from the main bunch, decay or grow in a step-like manner, before vanishing abruptly. In some cases, sub-packets also concentrate in the central part of the period, forming one or multiple wide clouds that merge or split over time scales of seconds or minutes. Spontaneous transitions between these multiple states occur in a non-periodic manner, so that no quasi-stationary behavior is found over long time scales. These results provide a dramatic illustration of the extremely rich dynamics taking place in fiber lasers at the frontier of mode locking. PMID:27557173

  5. Characterization of dual-electrode CMUTs: demonstration of improved receive performance and pulse echo operation with dynamic membrane shaping.

    PubMed

    Guldiken, Rasim O; Balantekin, Mujdat; Zahorian, Jaime; Degertekin, F Levent

    2008-10-01

    A 1-D dual-electrode CMUT array for intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) with a center frequency of 8 MHz has been designed, fabricated, and used to demonstrate the potential of dual-electrode CMUTs. Using a dual-electrode CMUT, 9 dB higher receive signal level is obtained over the 6 dB fractional bandwidth as compared with a conventional CMUT with an identical center electrode biased close to its collapse voltage. Because the same device shows a 7.4 dB increase in maximum pressure output, 16.4 dB overall improvement in transduction performance has been achieved as compared with conventional CMUT. A net peak output pressure of 1.6 MPa on the dual-electrode CMUT membrane with tone burst excitation at 12 MHz is also reported. The frequency response of the dual-electrode CMUT is similar to that of a conventional CMUT with the same membrane geometry with about 15% increase in the center frequency. Monostatic operation of dual-electrode CMUTs shows that the high performance of the transducer is applicable in typical pulse-echo imaging mode of operation. With dynamic shaping of the CMUT membrane to optimize the transmit-and-receive modes of operation separately during each pulse-echo cycle, dual-electrode CMUT is a highly competitive alternative to its piezoelectric counterparts. PMID:18986882

  6. Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser by sweeping the pulse repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Joohyung; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Han, Seongheum; Jang, Heesuk; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers allow for simultaneous detection of multiple absorption lines of a specimen over a broad spectral range of infrared or visible light with a single spectroscopic measurement. Here, we present an 8-THz bandwidth, 0.5-GHz resolution scheme of Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser. A resolving power of 1.6 × 10(4) about a 1560-nm center wavelength is achieved by sweeping the pulse repetition rate of the light source on a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer configured to capture interferograms with a 0.02-fs temporal sampling accuracy through a well-stabilized 60-m unbalance arm length. A dual-servo mechanism is realized by combining a mechanical linear stage with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) within the fiber laser cavity, enabling stable sweeping control of the pulse repetition rate over a 1.0-MHz scan range with 0.4-Hz steps with reference to the Rb clock. Experimental results demonstrate that the P-branch lines of the H(13)CN reference cell can be observed with a signal-to-noise ratio reaching 350 for the most intense line. PMID:26503257

  7. Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser by sweeping the pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Joohyung; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Han, Seongheum; Jang, Heesuk; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond lasers allow for simultaneous detection of multiple absorption lines of a specimen over a broad spectral range of infrared or visible light with a single spectroscopic measurement. Here, we present an 8-THz bandwidth, 0.5-GHz resolution scheme of Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser. A resolving power of 1.6 × 104 about a 1560-nm center wavelength is achieved by sweeping the pulse repetition rate of the light source on a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer configured to capture interferograms with a 0.02-fs temporal sampling accuracy through a well-stabilized 60-m unbalance arm length. A dual-servo mechanism is realized by combining a mechanical linear stage with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) within the fiber laser cavity, enabling stable sweeping control of the pulse repetition rate over a 1.0-MHz scan range with 0.4-Hz steps with reference to the Rb clock. Experimental results demonstrate that the P-branch lines of the H13CN reference cell can be observed with a signal-to-noise ratio reaching 350 for the most intense line.

  8. Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser by sweeping the pulse repetition rate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Joohyung; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Han, Seongheum; Jang, Heesuk; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers allow for simultaneous detection of multiple absorption lines of a specimen over a broad spectral range of infrared or visible light with a single spectroscopic measurement. Here, we present an 8-THz bandwidth, 0.5-GHz resolution scheme of Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser. A resolving power of 1.6 × 104 about a 1560-nm center wavelength is achieved by sweeping the pulse repetition rate of the light source on a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer configured to capture interferograms with a 0.02-fs temporal sampling accuracy through a well-stabilized 60-m unbalance arm length. A dual-servo mechanism is realized by combining a mechanical linear stage with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) within the fiber laser cavity, enabling stable sweeping control of the pulse repetition rate over a 1.0-MHz scan range with 0.4-Hz steps with reference to the Rb clock. Experimental results demonstrate that the P-branch lines of the H13CN reference cell can be observed with a signal-to-noise ratio reaching 350 for the most intense line. PMID:26503257

  9. Effect of Buddhist meditation on serum cortisol and total protein levels, blood pressure, pulse rate, lung volume and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Sudsuang, R; Chentanez, V; Veluvan, K

    1991-09-01

    Serum cortisol and total protein levels, blood pressure, heart rate, lung volume, and reaction time were studied in 52 males 20-25 years of age practicing Dhammakaya Buddhist meditation, and in 30 males of the same age group not practicing meditation. It was found that after meditation, serum cortisol levels were significantly reduced, serum total protein level significantly increased, and systolic pressure, diastolic pressure and pulse rate significantly reduced. Vital capacity, tidal volume and maximal voluntary ventilation were significantly lower after meditation than before. There were also significant decreases in reaction time after mediation practice. The percentage decrease in reaction time during meditation was 22%, while in subjects untrained in meditation, the percentage decrease was only 7%. Results from these studies indicate that practising Dhammakaya Buddhist meditation produces biochemical and physiological changes and reduces the reaction time. PMID:1801007

  10. Continued Evaluation of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 12518

    SciTech Connect

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2012-07-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will be governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. In 2010 Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to accurately identify critical velocities in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of >50 micrometers. In 2011 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated to identify critical velocities for slurries containing fast-settling, high-density particles with a mean particle diameter of <15 micrometers. This two-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  11. Continued Evaluation of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Burns, Carolyn A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2012-04-01

    Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an extensive evaluation of the ability of three ultrasonic instruments to detect critical velocity for a broad range of simulated Hanford nuclear waste streams containing particles with mean particle sizes of >50 microns. Evaluations were perform using the pipe loop at the Process Development Laboratory – East (PDL-E) at PNNL that was designed and built to evaluate the pipeline plugging issue during slurry transfer operations at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. In 2011 the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho system to detect critical velocity continued to be evaluated using the PDL-E flow loop and new simulants containing high-density particles with a mean particle size of < 15 microns. The PDL-E flow loop was modified for the 2011 testing to include a new test section that contained 5-MHz and 10-MHz ultrasonic transducers non-invasively mounted to schedule 40 pipe. The test section also contained reference instrumentation to facilitate direct comparison of the real-time PulseEcho transducer responses with experimentally observed critical velocities. This paper presents the results from the 2011 PulseEcho evaluation using a variety of simulated Hanford nuclear waste streams that were selected to encompass the expected high-level waste feed properties.

  12. The Effect of Extremely Low Frequency Pulsed Electromagnetic Field on In Vitro Fertilization Success Rate in N MRI Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hafizi, Leili; Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Mousavifar, Nezhat; Karimi, Mohammad; Ghorbani, Saleh; Kazemi, Mohammad Reza; Emami Meibodi, Neda; Hosseini, Golkoo; Mostafavi Toroghi, Hesam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) on reproduction systems have been widely debated. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether low frequency EMF could ameliorate the in vitro fertilization success rate in Naval medical research institute (NMRI) Mice. Materials and Methods: In this randomized comparative animal study, ten NMRI mice were randomly divided into 2 equal groups (control and experimental). 10 IU of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was injected intraperitoneally to both groups in order to stimulate ovulating, and ovums were then aspirated and kept in KSOM (modified version of sequential simplex optimization medium with a higher K+ concentration) culture medium. Metaphase II ovums were separated, and sperms obtained by "swim out" method were added to metaphase II ovums in the culture medium. The experimental group was exposed to 1.3 millitesla pulsed electromagnetic field at 4 kilohertz frequency for 5 hours. To assess the efficacy, we considered the identification of two-pronuclear zygote (2PN) under microscope as fertilizing criterion. Results: Total number of collected ovums in the control and experimental groups was 191 and 173, respectively, from which 58 (30.05%) and 52 (30.36%) ovums were collected from metaphase II, respectively. In vitro fertilization (IVF) success rate was 77% in extremely low frequency- pulsed electromagnetic field (ELFPEMF) for exposed group (experimental), whereas the rate was 68% for control group. Conclusion: Despite increased percentile of IVF success rate in exposed group, there was no statistically significant difference between 2 groups, but this hypothesis has still been stated as a question. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different EMF designs are suggested. PMID:24381855

  13. Repetitive flash x-ray generator operated at low-dose rates for a medical x-ray television system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kei; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1991-04-01

    The fundamental studies for the repetitive flash x-ray generator operated at lowdose rates for a medical x-ray television system are described. This x-ray generator consisted of the following components: a high-voltage power supply, an energy storage condenser of lOOnF, a coaxial cable condenser with a capacity of l000pF, a repetitive impulse switching system, a turbo molecular pump, and an x-ray tube having a cold cathode. The condenser was charged from 40 to 70kV by a power supply, and the electric charges stored in the condenser were discharged repetitively by using a trigger electrode operated by an impulse switching system. The x-ray tube was of the triode-type which was connected to the turbo molecular pump and had a large discharge impedance in order to prevent the damped oscillations of the tube current and voltage. The maximum tube voltage was equivalent to the initial charged voltage, and the peak current was less than 70A. The durations were about 2ps, and the x-ray intensities were less than 1. OpC/kg at 0. 5m per pulse. The repetition frequency was less than 50Hz, and the effective focal spot size was equivalent to the anode diameter of 3. 0mm. For the x-ray television system used in conjunction with this repetitive pulsed x-ray generator, since the electromagnetic noise primarily caused by the high tube current was decreased, noise-free stroboscopic radiography performed by the television system could be realized.

  14. Proton acceleration by single-cycle laser pulses offers a novel monoenergetic and stable operating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. L.; Yan, X. Q.; Mourou, G.; Wheeler, J. A.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.

    2016-04-01

    Prompted by the possibility to produce high energy, single-cycle laser pulses with tens of Petawatt (PW) power, we have investigated laser-matter interactions in the few optical cycle and ultra relativistic intensity regimes. A particularly interesting instability-free regime for ion production was revealed leading to the efficient coherent generation of short (femtosecond; 10 - 15 s ) monoenergetic ion bunches with a peak energy greater than GeV. Of paramount importance, the interaction is absent of the Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities and hole boring that plague techniques such as target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration.

  15. High-energy, high-repetition-rate picosecond pulses from a quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG system.

    PubMed

    Noom, Daniel W E; Witte, Stefan; Morgenweg, Jonas; Altmann, Robert K; Eikema, Kjeld S E

    2013-08-15

    We report on a high-power quasi-CW pumped Nd:YAG laser system, producing 130 mJ, 64 ps pulses at 1064 nm wavelength with a repetition rate of 300 Hz. Pulses from a Nd:YVO(4) oscillator are first amplified by a regenerative amplifier to the millijoule level and then further amplified in quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG modules. Pulsed diode pumping enables a high gain at repetition rates of several hundred hertz, while keeping thermal effects manageable. Birefringence compensation and multiple thermal-lensing-compensated relay-imaging stages are used to maintain a top-hat beam profile. After frequency doubling, 75 mJ pulses are obtained at 532 nm. The intensity stability is better than 1.1%, which makes this laser an attractive pump source for a high-repetition-rate optical parametric amplification system. PMID:24104637

  16. Magnetic thin film deposition with pulsed magnetron sputtering: deposition rate and film thickness distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozimek, M.; Wilczyński, W.; Szubzda, B.

    2016-02-01

    The goal of conducted study was an experimental determining the relations between technological parameters of magnetron sputtering process on deposition rate (R) and thickness uniformity of magnetic thin films. Planar Ni79Fei6Mo5 target with a diameter of 100 mm was sputtered in argon (Ar) atmosphere. Deposition rate was measured in a function of gas pressure, target power and target-substrate distance. The highest value of R≈280 nmmin-1. The obtained results in deposition rate of magnetic film were compared to deposition rate of cooper (Cu), aluminum (Al), titanium (Ti) and titanium oxide (TiOx) and the deposition rate of Ni-Fe alloy were higher that Al and Ti. The film thickness distribution was measured for radial distance from the target centre ranging up to 60 mm and target-substrate distance ranging form 70 to 115 mm. Among others it was stated that for the larger value of target-substrate distance the larger uniform of film thickness are obtained.

  17. SU-E-T-34: An in Vivo Study On Pulsed Low Dose-Rate Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C; Chen, X; Zhang, P; Zhang, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Re-irradiation with conventional radiotherapy techniques (CRT) may pose significant risks due to high accumulative radiation doses. Pulsed low dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) has been used in clinical trials for recurrent cancer treatment. In our previous studies, PLDR irradiation showed significantly lower toxicity than CRT, resulting in much longer survival of mice after PLDR total body irradiation (TBI) than conventional TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate tumor control efficacy of PLDR treatment for prostate cancer with an animal model of prostate cancer LNCaP. Methods: We used an orthotopic murine model of LNCaP cell line for this study. LNCaP cells were implanted into immune-suppressed male nude mice via surgery. We monitored the tumor growth with MRI. The tumor-bearing mice were allocated into a PLDR(n=9), CRT(n=7), and control group(n=7) randomly. The mice in the PLDR and CRT groups were irradiated with 2Gy dose for one time. For the CRT treatment, the mice received 2Gy at a dose-rate of 300 MU/minute. For the PLDR treatment, the 2Gy dose was further divided into ten pulses of 0.2Gy at the same dose-rate with an interval of 3 minutes between the pulses. Results: Sizable tumor growth delays were observed for the PLDR and CRT groups through weekly MRI scans. The mean values of the normalized tumor volumes (± standard deviation of the mean) were 1.53±0.07, 1.53±0.14, and 1.81±0.09 at one week after treatment, 2.28±0.13, 2.19±0.16, and 3.04±0.25 at two weeks after treatment, and 3.31±0.23, 3.14±0.24 and 4.62±0.49 at three weeks after treatment, for the PLDR, CRT, and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: The PLDR and CRT treatments showed comparable tumor control rates in this study. Our in vivo results indicate that PLDR may be a viable option for treating recurrent prostate cancer due to its equivalent tumor control but low normal tissue toxocities.

  18. Inverse Planning Approach for 3-D MRI-Based Pulse-Dose Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chajon, Enrique; Dumas, Isabelle; Touleimat, Mahmoud B.Sc.; Magne, Nicolas; Coulot, Jeremy; Verstraet, Rodolfe; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) software for the optimization of dose distribution in patients with cervix carcinoma treated with MRI-based pulsed-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients treated with a technique using a customized vaginal mold were selected. Dose-volume parameters obtained using the IPSA method were compared with the classic manual optimization method (MOM). Target volumes and organs at risk were delineated according to the Gynecological Brachytherapy Group/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology recommendations. Because the pulsed dose rate program was based on clinical experience with low dose rate, dwell time values were required to be as homogeneous as possible. To achieve this goal, different modifications of the IPSA program were applied. Results: The first dose distribution calculated by the IPSA algorithm proposed a heterogeneous distribution of dwell time positions. The mean D90, D100, and V100 calculated with both methods did not differ significantly when the constraints were applied. For the bladder, doses calculated at the ICRU reference point derived from the MOM differed significantly from the doses calculated by the IPSA method (mean, 58.4 vs. 55 Gy respectively; p = 0.0001). For the rectum, the doses calculated at the ICRU reference point were also significantly lower with the IPSA method. Conclusions: The inverse planning method provided fast and automatic solutions for the optimization of dose distribution. However, the straightforward use of IPSA generated significant heterogeneity in dwell time values. Caution is therefore recommended in the use of inverse optimization tools with clinical relevance study of new dosimetric rules.

  19. Thermal damage suppression of a black phosphorus saturable absorber for high-power operation of pulsed fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghyun; Park, Kichul; Debnath, Pulak C; Kim, Inho; Song, Yong-Won

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of black phosphorus (BP) have shown its future potential in the field of photonics. We determined the optical damage threshold of BP at 21.8 dBm in a fiber ring laser cavity, and demonstrated the high-power operation capacity of an evanescent field interaction-based BP saturable absorber. The long-term stability of a passively mode-locked fiber laser with a saturable absorber operating at the optical power of 23.3 dBm was verified for 168 h without any significant performance degradation. The center wavelength, spectral width, and pulse width of the laser output are 1558.8 nm, 14.2 nm, and 805 fs, respectively. PMID:27479185

  20. Thermal damage suppression of a black phosphorus saturable absorber for high-power operation of pulsed fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghyun; Park, Kichul; Debnath, Pulak C.; Kim, Inho; Song, Yong-Won

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of black phosphorus (BP) have shown its future potential in the field of photonics. We determined the optical damage threshold of BP at 21.8 dBm in a fiber ring laser cavity, and demonstrated the high-power operation capacity of an evanescent field interaction-based BP saturable absorber. The long-term stability of a passively mode-locked fiber laser with a saturable absorber operating at the optical power of 23.3 dBm was verified for 168 h without any significant performance degradation. The center wavelength, spectral width, and pulse width of the laser output are 1558.8 nm, 14.2 nm, and 805 fs, respectively.

  1. Demonstrated 3600 s Integrator Operation with 5.4 μV-s Drift Error for ITER Long Pulse Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Slobodov, Ilia

    2013-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies has developed a high gain and frequency ultra-stable integrator for small scale concept experiments and long pulse ITER applications. The integrator has a 10 μs RC time with a frequency response greater than 10 MHz. The device has been operated for the 3600 s with a drift error less than 5.4 μV-s, which exceeds the ITER specification. Longer period operation has also been demonstrated (72 hours). Additionally, this integrator has an extremely large dynamic range thereby increasing the effective bit depth of a digitizer. These integrators allow for both the fast and slow magnetic/plasma dynamics to be resolved with a single diagnostic. Software has been written for fast, real-time data acquisition and processing using a field programmable gate array (FPGA). This work is supported by the DOE SBIR/STTR Program.

  2. Simulation of low-pressure inductively coupled plasmas: Non-local effects and pulsed power operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthi, Badri

    For modeling of low-pressure Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) discharges, a number of approaches have been proposed with varying degree of complexity. A self-consistent 1-D model was developed in this work to study the effects of non-local electron conductivity on power absorption and plasma density profiles in a planar inductively coupled argon discharge at low pressures (< 10 mTorr). The self-consistent kinetic description of the discharge included three modules: (1) an EEDF module to compute a non-Maxwellian EEDF, (2) a non-local electron conductivity module which predicted current distribution in the plasma as an integral over the electric field and solved Maxwell's equations to find the self-consistent electric field as well as the non-local power deposition profile and (3) a Heavy Species Transport (HST) module which solved for the ion and metastable atom density and velocity. Results from the full model were then compared with those obtained by using a local conductivity model (Ohm's law) for the RF current. For 10 mTorr, the EEDF was found to be almost Maxwellian with electron temperature ˜ 3 V. As a result, the plasma density profiles obtained from the local and non-local cases were almost identical for the same total power. Interestingly, a similar result was obtained even for a pressure of 1 mTorr where the EEDF was non-Maxwellian. This suggests that as far as species density and flux are concerned, local conductivity models, with lesser computational expense, can be employed even in the non-local regime. Comparisons between simulation and experiment for RF field and current density showed better agreement for non-local model compared with local model. A two-dimensional (r,z) continuum model was then developed to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of a pulsed power (square-wave modulated) discharge in argon (electropositive) and chlorine (electronegative) sustained in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor with a planar coil. The self

  3. Single and Multi-Pulse Low-Energy Conical Theta Pinch Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, A. K.; Martin, A. K.; Polzin, K. A.; Kimberlin, A. C.; Eskridge, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Impulse bits produced by conical theta-pinch inductive pulsed plasma thrusters possessing cone angles of 20deg, 38deg, and 60deg, were quantified for 500J/pulse operation by direct measurement using a hanging-pendulum thrust stand. All three cone angles were tested in single-pulse mode, with the 38deg model producing the highest impulse bits at roughly 1 mN-s operating on both argon and xenon propellants. A capacitor charging system, assembled to support repetitively-pulsed thruster operation, permitted testing of the 38deg thruster at a repetition-rate of 5 Hz at power levels of 0.9, 1.6, and 2.5 kW. The average thrust measured during multiple-pulse operation exceeded the value obtained when the single-pulse impulse bit is multiplied by the repetition rate.

  4. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse

    PubMed Central

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J.; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R. W.; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A. S.; Bleyenberg, Tanja E.; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Visser, Petra M.

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs. PMID:27353576

  5. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J.; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R. W.; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A. S.; Bleyenberg, Tanja E.; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Visser, Petra M.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs.

  6. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse.

    PubMed

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R W; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A S; Bleyenberg, Tanja E; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J A; Visser, Petra M

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs. PMID:27353576

  7. Monitoring cutting tool operation and condition with a magnetoelastic rate of change of torque sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Garshelis, Ivan J.; Kari, Ryan J.; Tollens, Stijn P. L.; Cuseo, James M.

    2008-04-01

    Application of a magnetoelastic rate of change of torque sensor to monitor the condition of milling cutters and operating parameters is described. Cutting tools naturally degrade with use by wear, chipping, or fracture, and the efficiency and quality of the product are highly dependent on the tool condition. The theoretical analysis is compared to experimental data in detecting changes in torque during each cutting event, and the rate of change of torque signal is investigated for a variety of cutting tool conditions.

  8. Comparison of two high-repetition-rate pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser discharge geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Faszer, W.; Tulip, J.; Seguin, H.

    1980-11-01

    Two discharge geometries are commonly used for pumping high-repetition-rate transversely excited atmosphere (TEA) lasers. One uses solid electrodes with preionization provided by downstream spark pins. The other uses a solid electrode and a screen electrode with preionization provided by an auxiliary discharge behind the screen. In this study the performance of the two systems was compared. The repetition rate at which arcing occurs was found to increase linearly with flow velocity but decrease with increasing energy density. It was also dependent on system geometry and the spark pin preionized system performed better than the auxiliary discharge preionized system. Data are given for discharges in N/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, He, and a CO/sub 2/ laser mixture.

  9. A study of angular dependence in the ablation rate of polymers by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedder, James E. A.; Holmes, Andrew S.

    2006-02-01

    Measurements of ablation rate have traditionally been carried out only at normal incidence. However, in real-world applications ablation is often carried out at oblique angles, and it is useful to have prior knowledge of the ablation rate in this case. Detailed information about the angular dependence is also important for the development of ablation simulation tools, and can provide additional insight into the ablation mechanism. Previously we have reported on the angular dependence of direct-write ablation at 266 nm wavelength in solgel and polymer materials. In this paper we present a systematic study of angular dependence for excimer laser ablation of two polymer materials of interest for microfabrication: polycarbonate and SU8 photoresist. The results are used to improve simulation models to aid in mask design.

  10. Nuclear Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) protection manual for emergency broadcast radio stations and Emergency Operations Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, R. I.; Buchanan, M. E.; Aqouridis, D. C.; Clark, D. B.; Gates, R. P., II

    1985-06-01

    This document presents the information and data required to provide retrofit electromagnetic pulse (EMP) protection for facilities included in the Federal Emergency Management Agency's protection programs. An introduction and orientation to the FEMA program are provided in Section 1. Sections 2 and 3 cover the generation of EMP and its coupling into systems. Section 4 compares natural lightning and EMP. The EMP hardening approach adopted by FEMA is presented in Section 5. Section 6 covers the protection devices, their characteristics, and applications. The facility life-support equipment protection is presented in Section 7. Sections 8, 9, and 10 cover the facility site survey, the survey report, and the protector installation. Maintenance and testing of EMP protectors are discussed in Section 11.

  11. Pulse Inversion Chirp Coded Tissue Harmonic Imaging (PI-CTHI) of Zebrafish Heart Using High Frame Rate Ultrasound Biomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhyoung; Huang, Ying; Chen, Ruimin; Lee, Jungwoo; Cummins, Thomas M.; Zhou, Qifa; Lien, Ching-Ling; Shung, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic imaging (PI-CTHI) method for visualizing small animal hearts that provides fine spatial resolution at a high frame rate without sacrificing the echo signal to noise ratio (eSNR). A 40 MHz lithium niobate (LiNbO3) single element transducer is employed to evaluate the performance of PI-CTHI by scanning tungsten wire targets, spherical anechoic voids, and zebrafish hearts. The wire phantom results show that PI-CTHI improves the eSNR by 4 dB from that of conventional pulse inversion tissue harmonic imaging (PI-THI), while still maintaining a spatial resolution of 88 and 110 μm in the axial and lateral directions, respectively. The range side lobe level of PI-CTHI is 11 dB lower than that of band-pass filtered CTHI (or F-CTHI). In the anechoic sphere phantom study, the contrast-to-noise ratio of PI-CTHI is found to be 2.7, indicating a 34% enhancement over conventional PI-THI. Due to such improved eSNR and contrast resolution, blood clots in zebrafish hearts can be readily visualized throughout heart regeneration after 20% of the ventricle is removed. Disappearance of the clots in the early stages of the regeneration has been observed for 7 days without sacrificing the fish. PMID:22930467

  12. Spectral broadening measurement of the lower hybrid waves during long pulse operation in Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Berger-By, G.; Decampy, J.; Goniche, M.; Ekedahl, A.; Delpech, L.; Leroux, F.; Antar, G. Y.; Collaboration: Tore Supra Team

    2014-02-12

    On many tokamaks (C-Mod, EAST, FTU, JET, HT-7, TS), a decrease in current drive efficiency of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves is observed in high electron density plasmas. The cause of this behaviour is believed to be: Parametric Instabilities (PI) and Scattering from Density Fluctuations (SDF). For the ITER LH system, our knowledge must be improved to avoid such effects and to maintain the LH current drive efficiency at high density. The ITPA IOS group coordinates this effort [1] and all experimental data are essential to validate the numerical codes in progress. Usually the broadening of the LH wave frequency spectrum is measured by a probe located in the plasma edge. For this study, the frequency spectrum of a reflected power signal from the LH antenna was used. In addition, the spectrum measurements are compared with the density fluctuations observed on RF probes located at the antenna mouth. Several plasma currents (0.6 to 1.4 MA) and densities up to 5.2 × 10{sup 19} m−3 have been realised on Tore Supra (TS) long pulses and with high injected RF power, up to 5.4 MW-30s. This allowed using a spectrum analyser to make several measurements during the plasma pulse. The side lobe amplitude, shifted by 20-30MHz with respect to the main peak, grows with increasing density. Furthermore, for an increase of plasma current at the same density, the spectra broaden and become asymmetric. Some parametric dependencies are shown in this paper.

  13. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  14. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  15. Magneto-impedance sensor for quasi-noncontact monitoring of breathing, pulse rate and activity status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corodeanu, S.; Chiriac, H.; Radulescu, L.; Lupu, N.

    2014-05-01

    Results on the development and testing of a novel magnetic sensor based on the detection of the magneto-impedance variation due to changes in the permeability of an amorphous wire are reported. The proposed application is the quasi-noncontact monitoring of the breathing frequency and heart rate for diagnosing sleep disorders. Patient discomfort is significantly decreased by transversally placing the sensitive element onto the surface of a flexible mattress in order to detect its deformation associated with cardiorespiratory activity and body movements. The developed sensor has a great application potential in monitoring the vital signs during sleep, with special advantages for children sleep monitoring.

  16. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenchley, D. L.; Bomelburg, H. J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  17. 29 CFR 780.314 - Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture That Is Exempted From the Minimum Wage and Overtime... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *. 780.314 Section 780.314 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR...

  18. 29 CFR 780.314 - Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture That Is Exempted From the Minimum Wage and Overtime... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *. 780.314 Section 780.314 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR...

  19. 29 CFR 780.314 - Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture That Is Exempted From the Minimum Wage and Overtime... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *. 780.314 Section 780.314 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR...

  20. 29 CFR 780.314 - Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture That Is Exempted From the Minimum Wage and Overtime... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *. 780.314 Section 780.314 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR...

  1. 29 CFR 780.314 - Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture That Is Exempted From the Minimum Wage and Overtime... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operations customarily * * * paid on a piece rate basis * * *. 780.314 Section 780.314 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR...

  2. Various Income-Weighted Operating Tax Rates and Illinois State Aid to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Warren B.; Hou, J. Dan

    The equalization formula used by 81 percent of Illinois school districts to compute their state aid was designed to meet the requirement of fiscal neutrality established in Serrano v. Priest. However, the inclusion of the operating tax rate in the resource equalizer formula tends to help income-rich school districts more than income-poor…

  3. The effects of perceiving color in living environment on QEEG, oxygen saturation, pulse rate, and emotion regulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Sroykham, Watchara; Wongsathikun, J; Wongsawat, Y

    2014-01-01

    Light and color have been shown to have substantial physical, psychological and sociological effects on humans. Hence, an investigation on the effect of changes in light and color to the biological signals is a challenging problem. Five participants were measured the oxygen saturation (SpO2), pulse rate, and quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) in six colors (white, blue, green, yellow, red and black) of living environment for 5 minutes per color. Then all participants were asked to answer the emotional questionnaire of BRUMS and color performance for each color environment. The results showed brain activity of high beta wave (25-30 Hz) that associated with alertness, agitation, mental activity, and general activation of mind and body functions (at frontal lobes and temporal lobes) in red and yellow colored rooms were higher than blue, green, white and black colored rooms, respectively. It also had the relationship with the psychological effect (BRUMS). The amplitude asymmetry of beta wave (12-25 Hz) was highly attenuated in warm color (red and yellow colored rooms), moderately attenuated in cool color (green and blue colored room) and little attenuated in white and black colored rooms. The BRUMS showed that red and yellow yielded significant effect on anger (F = 4.966, p = 0.002) and confusion (F=3.853, p=0.008). Red and green color yielded high effect on vigor. Green color did not affect the depression. Blue color yielded moderate effect on confusion, tension and fatigue. White and black colors yielded low effect on any mood, but black color had no effect on vigor. In addition, we cannot observe any significant changes of pulse rate and blood oxygen saturation in each color. The results can possibly be used as the recommendation to design the room for either normal people or patients. PMID:25571419

  4. Retrospective dosimetric comparison of low-dose-rate and pulsed-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy using a tandem and mini-ovoids.

    PubMed

    Mourtada, Firas; Gifford, Kent A; Berner, Paula A; Horton, John L; Price, Michael J; Lawyer, Ann A; Eifel, Patricia J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dose distribution of Iridium-192 ((192)Ir) pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy to that of Cesium-137 ((137)Cs) low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy around mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. Ten patient treatment plans were selected from our clinical database, all of which used mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. A commercial treatment planning system using AAPM TG43 formalism was used to calculate the dose in water for both the (137)Cs and (192)Ir sources. For equivalent system loadings, we compared the dose distributions in relevant clinical planes, points A and B, and to the ICRU bladder and rectal reference points. The mean PDR doses to points A and B were 3% +/- 1% and 6% +/- 1% higher than the LDR doses, respectively. For the rectum point, the PDR dose was 4% +/- 3% lower than the LDR dose, mainly because of the (192)Ir PDR source anisotropy. For the bladder point, the PDR dose was 1% +/- 4% higher than the LDR dose. We conclude that the PDR and LDR dose distributions are equivalent for intracavitary brachytherapy with a tandem and mini-ovoids. These findings will aid in the transfer from the current practice of LDR intracavitary brachytherapy to PDR for the treatment of gynecologic cancers. PMID:17707197

  5. Retrospective Dosimetric Comparison of Low-Dose-Rate and Pulsed-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy Using a Tandem and Mini-Ovoids

    SciTech Connect

    Mourtada, Firas Gifford, Kent A.; Berner, Paula A.; Horton, John L.; Price, Michael J.; Lawyer, Ann A.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dose distribution of Iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy to that of Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy around mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. Ten patient treatment plans were selected from our clinical database, all of which used mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. A commercial treatment planning system using AAPM TG43 formalism was used to calculate the dose in water for both the {sup 137}Cs and {sup 192}Ir sources. For equivalent system loadings, we compared the dose distributions in relevant clinical planes, points A and B, and to the ICRU bladder and rectal reference points. The mean PDR doses to points A and B were 3% {+-} 1% and 6% {+-} 1% higher than the LDR doses, respectively. For the rectum point, the PDR dose was 4% {+-} 3% lower than the LDR dose, mainly because of the {sup 192}Ir PDR source anisotropy. For the bladder point, the PDR dose was 1% {+-} 4% higher than the LDR dose. We conclude that the PDR and LDR dose distributions are equivalent for intracavitary brachytherapy with a tandem and mini-ovoids. These findings will aid in the transfer from the current practice of LDR intracavitary brachytherapy to PDR for the treatment of gynecologic cancers.

  6. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  7. Numerical studies of startup scenarios in a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron operating in short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas, Jr.; Tax, David; Temkin, Richard; Ireap, University Of Maryland Collaboration; Psfc, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Megawatt class gyrotrons operate in very high-order modes which form a very dense spectrum. In order to excite the operating mode in the presence of many competitors and drive it to the nominal operating point, careful control of the gyrotron's startup is necessary. Our studies are focused on the startup scenarios of the 110 GHz MIT gyrotron designed for operation at 1.5 MW power level in short pulses. Nominal parameters of the electron beam are: 96 kV, 42 A and orbital-to-axial velocity ratio α = 1.4. Previous numerical studies of the startup of this gyrotron had shown that at low voltages (at about 62 kV), first, the high-frequency TE23,6 mode was excited and then, at higher voltages (at about 74 kV), it was replaced by the desired TE22,6 mode. However, during a series of recent experiments at MIT it was shown that instead of the TE23,6 mode a low-frequency TE21,6 mode was excited during the voltage rise and persisted up to a voltage of 70 kV. In this work the authors make an attempt to simulate and explain this result with the help of self-consistent time-dependent code MAGY.

  8. Influence of impactor operating flow rate on particle size distribution of four jet nebulizers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Brasel, Trevor L; Kracko, Dean; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Ahuja, Amitkumar; Norenberg, Jeffrey P; Kelly, H William

    2007-01-01

    When a nebulizer is evaluated by the Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI), the flow rate is generally maintained at 28.3 L/min, as recommended by the manufacturer. However, the nebulizer flow rate that a patient inhales is only around 18 L/min. Because the drive flow of a nebulizer is approximately 6-8 L/min, the nebulized drug is mixed with outside air when delivered. Evaluating impactor performance at the 28.3 L/min flow rate is less than ideal because an additional 10 L/min of outside air is mixed with the drug, thereby affecting the drug size distribution and dose before inhalation and deposition in the human lung. In this study we operated the ACI at an 18.0 L/min flow rate to test whether the effect of the changing ambient humidity was being exaggerated by the 28.3 L/min flow rate. The study was carried out at three different relative humidity levels and two different impactor flow rates with four commercially available nebulizers. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and the geometric standard deviation (GSD) of the droplets were found to increase when the impactor was operated at a flow rate of 18 L/min compared to that of 28.3 L/min. The higher MMAD and GSD could cause the patient to inhale less of the drug than expected if the nebulizer was evaluated by the ACI at the operating flow rate of 28.3 L/min. PMID:17763140

  9. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operation for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-01

    Dynamic pricing electricity tariffs, now the default for large customers in California (peak demand of 200 kW and higher for PG&E and SCE, and 20 kW and higher for SDG&E), are providing Federal facilities new opportunities to cut their electricity bills and help them meet their energy savings mandates. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has created this fact sheet to help California federal facilities take advantage of these opportunities through “rate-responsive building operation.” Rate-responsive building operation involves designing your load management strategies around your facility’s variable electric rate, using measures that require little or no financial investment.

  10. Replication of the Association of the 6q22.31c Locus near GJA1 with Pulse Rate in the Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, Young Jin; Oh, Ji Hee; Cho, Yoon Shin

    2012-06-01

    Pulse rate is known to be related to diverse phenotypes, such as cardiovascular diseases, lifespan, arrhythmia, hypertension, lipids, diabetes, and menopause. We have reported two genomewide significant genetic loci responsible for the variation in pulse rate as a part of the Korea Association Resource (KARE) project, the genomewide association study (GWAS) that was conducted with 352,228 single nucleoride polymorphisms typed in 8,842 subjects in the Korean population. GJA1 was implied as a functionally causal gene for pulse rate from the KARE study, but lacked evidence of replication. To re-evaluate the association of a locus near GJA1 with pulse rate, we looked up this signal in another GWAS conducted in a Health Examinee-shared cohort of 3,703 samples. Not only we were able to confirm two pulse rate loci (1q32.2a near CD46 and 6q22.13c near LOCL644502) identified in the KARE GWAS, we also replicated a locus (6q22.31c) near GJA1 by the lookup in the Health Examinee GWAS. Considering that the GJA1-encoded protein is a major component of cardiac gap junctions, a functional study might be necessary to validate its genuine molecular biological role in the synchronized contraction of the heart. PMID:23105937

  11. Operating modes of a hydrogen ion source based on a hollow-cathode pulsed Penning discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, E. M.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Vizir, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    An ion source based on a hollow-cathode Penning discharge was switched to a high-current pulsed mode (tens of amperes and tens of microseconds) to produce an intense hydrogen ion beam. With molecular hydrogen (H2), the ion beam contained three species: H+, H2+, and H3+. For all experimental conditions, the fraction of H2+ ions in the beam was about 10 ÷ 15% of the total ion beam current and varied little with ion source parameters. At the same time, the ratio of H+ and H3+ depended strongly on the discharge current, particularly on its distribution in the gap between the hollow and planar cathodes. Increasing the discharge current increased the H+ fraction in ion beam. The maximum fraction of H+ reached 80% of the total ion beam current. Forced redistribution of the discharge current in the cathode gap for increasing the hollow cathode current could greatly increase the H3+ fraction in the beam. At optimum parameters, the fraction of H3+ ions reached 60% of the total ion beam current.

  12. Influence of operating parameters on cake formation in pilot scale pulse-jet bag filter.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mahmood; Krammer, Gernot; Khan, Rafi Ullah; Tahir, M Suleman

    2012-07-01

    Bag filters are commonly used for fine particles removal in off-gas purification. There dust laden gas pervades through permeable filter media starting at a lower pressure drop limit leaving dust (called filter cake) on the filter media. The filter cakeformation is influenced by many factors including filtration velocity, dust concentration, pressure drop limits, and filter media resistance. Effect of the stated parameters is investigated experimentally in a pilot scale pulse-jet bag filter test facility where lime stone dust is separated from air at ambient conditions. Results reveal that filtration velocity significantly affects filter pressure drop as well as cake properties; cake density and specific cake resistance. Cake density is slightly affected by dust concentration. Specific resistance of filter cake increases with velocity, slightly affected by dust concentration, changes inversely with the upper pressure drop limit and decreases over a prolonged use (aging). Specific resistance of filter media is independent of upper pressure drop limit and increases linearly over a prolonged use. PMID:24415802

  13. A single-stage GM-type pulse tube cryocooler operating at 10.6 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Z. H.; Dong, W. Q.; Qiu, L. M.; Zhang, X. B.; Sun, H.; He, Y. L.; Radebaugh, R.

    2009-05-01

    In order to explore the lowest attainable refrigeration temperature and improve cooling performance at temperatures around 20 K for a single-stage G-M type pulse tube cryocooler (PTC), numerical and experimental studies were performed. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) numerical model known as REGEN was applied to the simulation of a G-M type PTC for the first time. Based on the calculation results, a single-stage G-M type PTC was designed, fabricated and tested. The performance improvement of the regenerator in the temperature range of 10-80 K was investigated. The calculations predicted a lowest temperature of 10 K. A lowest temperature of 10.6 K was achieved experimentally with an input power of 7.5 kW, which is the lowest temperature ever achieved by a single-stage PTC. Further more, the cryocooler can provide a cooling power of 20 W at 20.6 K and 39.5 W at 30 K, respectively.

  14. Thyratron characteristics under high di/dt and high-repetition-rate operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.; Hill, J.; Kan, T.

    1981-05-11

    Power conditioning systems for high peak and average power, high repetition rate discharge excited lasers involve operation of modulator components in unconventional regimes. Reliable operation of switches and energy storage elements under high voltage and high di/dt conditions is a pacing item for laser development at the present time. To test and evaluate these components a Modulator Component Test Facility (MCTF) was constructed. The MCTF consists of a command charge system, energy storage capacitors, thyratron switch with inverse thyratron protection, and a resistive load. The modulator has initially been operated at voltages up to 60 kV at 600 Hz. Voltage, current, and calorimetric diagnostics are provided for major modulator components. Measurements of thyratron characteristics under high di/dt operation are presented. Commutation energy loss and di/dt have been measured as functions of the tube hydrogen pressure.

  15. Design and implementation of a bluetooth-based band-aid pulse rate sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashanth S.; Oh, Sechang; Rai, Pratyush; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Banerjee, Nilanjan; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    Remote patient monitoring systems capable of collecting vital patient data such as blood pressure readings, Electrocardiograph (ECG) waveforms, and heart rate can obviate the need for repeated visits to the hospital. Moreover, such systems that continuously monitor the human physiology can provide valuable data to prognosticate the onset of critical health problems. The key to such remote health diagnostics is the design of minimally intrusive, low cost sensors that do not impede a patient's quotidian life but at the same time collect reliable noise free data. To this end, in this paper, we design and implement a Bluetooth-based wireless sensor system with a disposable sensor element and a reusable wireless component that can be worn as a "band-aid". The sensor is a piezoelectric polymer film placed on the wrist in proximity to the radial artery. The band-aid sized sensor allows non-intrusive monitoring of the pulsatile flow of blood in the artery. The sensor, using the Bluetooth module, can communicate with any Bluetooth enabled computer, mobile phone, or PDA. The data collected from the patient can be remotely viewed and analyzed by a physician.

  16. Hairpin resonator probes with frequency domain boxcar operation for time resolved density measurements in pulsed RF discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Kummerer, Theresa; Coumou, David; Shannon, Steven

    2014-10-01

    In this work, microsecond time resolved electron density measurements in pulsed RF discharges are shown using an automated hairpin resonance probe using relatively low cost electronics, on par with normal Langmuir probe boxcar mode operation. A low cost signal generator is used to produce the applied microwave frequency and the reflected waveform is filtered to remove the RF component. The signal is then heterodyned with a simple frequency mixer to produce a dc signal read by an oscilloscope to determine the electron density. The applied microwave frequency is automatically shifted in small increments in a frequency boxcar routine through a Labview™program to determine the resonant frequency. A simple dc sheath correction is then easily applied since the probe is fully floating, producing low cost, high fidelity, and highly reproducible electron density measurements. The measurements are made in a capacitively coupled, parallel plate configuration in a 13.56 MHz, 50--200 W RF discharge pulsed at 500 Hz, 200 W, 50% duty cycle. The gas input ranged from 50--100 mTorr pure Ar or with 5--10% O/He mixtures.

  17. Pulsed and continuous-wave laser operation of TGT-grown Nd,Y-codoped :SrF2 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav; Su, Liangbi; Jiang, Dapeng; Ma, Fengkai; Zhang, Qian; Cao, Yuexin; Xu, Jun

    2014-05-01

    In this letter we present laser properties of temperature gradient technique (TGT) grown Nd,Y : SrF2 crystals with Nd3+ concentrations of 0.4, 0.65 and 0.8 at% and Y3+ concentration of 10 at%. The noncoated crystal samples, 3.1 or 5 mm long, were pumped by the 796 nm laser diode matching the Nd,Y : SrF2 absorption peak. In the pulsed pumping regime (pulse-duration 2 ms, frequency 10 Hz), maximum average output power of 75 mW (corresponding to peak power of 3.75 W) was obtained with slope efficiency as high as 51% and optical-to-optical efficiency of 42% with respect to the absorbed pump power. The output beam spatial profile was nearly Gaussian in both axes, oscillations started at the wavelength of 1057 nm. At higher pumping levels, the second emission line at 1051 nm appears corresponding to our fluorescence measurements. Wavelength tuning using a birefringent filter from 1048 to 1070 nm is probably given by the crystal-field splitting of the 4F3/2 manifold in Nd3+. True-continuous-wave laser operation was also successfully obtained at lower pumping levels with maximum output power of 380 mW and slope efficiency of 28% at the wavelength of 1057 nm.

  18. Generation of 287 W, 5.5 ps pulses at 78 MHz repetition rate from a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG amplifier seeded by a fiber chirped-pulse amplification system.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung-Han; Siddiqui, Aleem; Moses, Jeffrey; Gopinath, Juliet; Hybl, John; Ilday, F Omer; Fan, Tso Yee; Kärtner, Franz X

    2008-11-01

    We generate linearly polarized, 287 W average-power, 5.5 ps pulses using a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG amplifier at a repetition rate of 78 MHz. An optical-to-optical efficiency of 41% is obtained at 700 W pump power. A 6 W, 0.4 nm bandwidth picosecond seed source at 1029 nm wavelength is constructed using a chirped-pulse fiber amplification chain based on chirped volume Bragg gratings. The combination of a fiber amplifier system and a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG amplifier results in good spatial beam quality at large average power. Low nonlinear phase accumulation as small as 5.1 x 10(-3) rad in the bulk Yb:YAG amplifier supports power scalability to a > 10 kW level without being affected by self-phase modulation. This amplification system is well suited for pumping high-power high-repetition-rate optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifiers. PMID:18978891

  19. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  20. Repetitively pulsed plasma illumination sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, Robert G.; Falkos, Paul

    1997-12-01

    The acoustic environment created by turbulence in aircraft flight tests demands that illumination sources for high speed photography of munitions drops be extremely rugged. A repetitive pulsed surface discharge system has been developed to provide wide angle illumination in a bomb bay for photography at 250 - 500 Hertz. The lamp has a simple construction suitable for adverse environments and produces 100 mJ of visible light per pulse. The discharge parameters were selected to minimize the size and complexity of the power supply. The system is also capable of operating at high repetition rates; preliminary tests demonstrated 1000 pulses at 1 kHz, 200 pulses at 1.5 kHz, and 13 pulses at 2 kHz. A simple power supply capable of providing several amperes at 450 V is being completed; it will be used to extend the run times and to explore extensions to higher repetition rate.

  1. Influence of cloth structure on operational characteristics of pulse-jet cleaned filter bags

    SciTech Connect

    Hindy, K.T.; Sievert, J.; Loeffler, F.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation on the effect of the surface properties and the cloth structure of a filter medium on the operation of a filter bag was conducted using a pilot-scale testing device. The collection properties and the increase in the residual drop, as well as the mass of the residual dust embedded within the filter medium, were measured. Three filter media were investigated: a singed filter medium, a calendered filter medium, and one with a membrane-laminated surface. The experimental results obtained show that the operational characteristics of a filter bag is greatly influenced by the surface properties and the cloth structure of the filter medium. The calendered filter bag has an unfavorable operational quality concerning both the collection properties and the residual pressure drop. The hard thickening of the filter medium drives to the rapid clogging of the filter bag. In contrast, the other two filter media have favorable characteristics concerning the above two criteria. At the same time, it was found that after tests conducted for about 70 h each, the singed filter bag, compared with the membrane-laminated one, exhibits a lower residual pressure drop, although more particles are deposited inside. The lowest filtration cycle duration was recorded by the calendered medium, whereas the cleaning frequency by the other two media was nearly in the same range.

  2. High-rate activated sludge communities have a distinctly different structure compared to low-rate sludge communities, and are less sensitive towards environmental and operational variables.

    PubMed

    Meerburg, Francis A; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Roume, Hugo; Seuntjens, Dries; Pieper, Dietmar H; Jauregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Boon, Nico

    2016-09-01

    High-rate activated sludge processes allow for the recovery of organics and energy from wastewaters. These systems are operated at a short sludge retention time and high sludge-specific loading rates, which results in a higher sludge yield and better digestibility than conventional, low-rate activated sludge. Little is known about the microbial ecology of high-rate systems. In this work, we address the need for a fundamental understanding of how high-rate microbial communities differ from low-rate communities. We investigated the high-rate and low-rate communities in a sewage treatment plant in relation to environmental and operational variables over a period of ten months. We demonstrated that (1) high-rate and low-rate communities are distinctly different in terms of richness, evenness and composition, (2) high-rate community dynamics are more variable and less shaped by deterministic factors compared to low-rate communities, (3) sub-communities of continuously core and transitional members are more shaped by deterministic factors than the continuously rare members, both in high-rate and low-rate communities, and (4) high-rate community members showed a co-occurrence pattern similar to that of low-rate community members, but were less likely to be correlated to environmental and operational variables. These findings provide a basis for further optimization of high-rate systems, in order to facilitate resource recovery from wastewater. PMID:27183209

  3. In-pile test of Li 2TiO 3 pebble bed with neutron pulse operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Nakamichi, M.; Kikukawa, A.; Nagao, Y.; Enoeda, M.; Osaki, T.; Ioki, K.; Kawamura, H.

    2002-12-01

    Lithium titanate (Li 2TiO 3) is one of the candidate materials as tritium breeder in the breeding blanket of fusion reactors, and it is necessary to show the tritium release behavior of Li 2TiO 3 pebble beds. Therefore, a blanket in-pile mockup was developed and in situ tritium release experiments with the Li 2TiO 3 pebble bed were carried out in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor. In this study, the relationship between tritium release behavior from Li 2TiO 3 pebble beds and effects of various parameters were evaluated. The ( R/ G) ratio of tritium release ( R) and tritium generation ( G) was saturated when the temperature at the outside edge of the Li 2TiO 3 pebble bed became 300 °C. The tritium release amount increased cycle by cycle and saturated after about 20 pulse operations.

  4. Smoking increases failure rate of operation for established non-union of the scaphoid bone

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, R. H.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of smoking on the operative treatment of established non-union of the carpal scaphoid. Case notes and radiographs of patients undergoing bone grafting and screw fixation of scaphoid non-unions were reviewed. There were 34 patients that had undergone 37 operations for established non-union of the carpal scaphoid bone. There were two female patients, and the average age was 26.8 years (range 13.4 years to 52.9 years). The median delay to operation was 11.9 months. The overall success rate of the operation (internal fixation and autologous bone grafting) was 59.5% (22/37), but there was a significant association between non-union and smoking (P=0.02 for Fisher’s exact test). In non-smokers (n=17) the success rate was 82.4%, but this dropped to 40.0% among smokers (P<0.01). We concluded that smoking was significantly associated with failure of operative treatment of established non-union of the scaphoid bone. PMID:16947049

  5. Design, Development and Operation of a Laboratory Pulsed Plasma Thruster for the First Time in West Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeiha, Abdolrahim; Anbarloui, Mehdi; Farshchi, Mohammad

    Although the pulsed plasma thruster (PPT) was first utilized on a space mission in 1964, after more than four decades, it is still a space-rated technology which has performed various propulsion tasks, from station-keeping to three-axis attitude control for a variety of former missions. With respect to the rapid growth in the small satellite community and the growing interest for smaller satellites in recent years, the PPT is one of the promising electric propulsion devices for small satellites (e.g., CubeSats) due to the following advantages: simplicity, lightweight, robustness, low power consumption, low production cost and small dimensions. Therefore, a laboratory benchmark rectangular breech-fed pulsed plasma thruster using a self-inductor as a coupling element was designed, developed and successfully tested in a bell-type vacuum chamber at 10-4 Pa for the first time in west Asia (Iran). The PPT has been tested using a 35 μF, 2.5 kV oil-filled capacitor, producing an impulse bit varying from 300 μN-s to 1.3 mN-s at a maximum specific impulse of 1100 s. As a result a research program in Iran was initiated for working on PPTs and the miniaturization of PPTs while increasing the performance parameters. The present paper briefly reviews the PPT design and development.

  6. Anthropogenic seismicity rates and operational parameters at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Emily E; Lajoie, Lia J

    2013-08-01

    Geothermal power is a growing energy source; however, efforts to increase production are tempered by concern over induced earthquakes. Although increased seismicity commonly accompanies geothermal production, induced earthquake rate cannot currently be forecast on the basis of fluid injection volumes or any other operational parameters. We show that at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the total volume of fluid extracted or injected tracks the long-term evolution of seismicity. After correcting for the aftershock rate, the net fluid volume (extracted-injected) provides the best correlation with seismicity in recent years. We model the background earthquake rate with a linear combination of injection and net production rates that allows us to track the secular development of the field as the number of earthquakes per fluid volume injected decreases over time. PMID:23845943

  7. System design and operation of a 100 kilovolt, 2 kilohertz pulse modulator for plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W.A.

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes the electrical design and operation of a high power modulator system implemented for the Los Alamos Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) facility. To test the viability of the PSII process for various automotive components, the modulator must accept wide variations of load impedance. Components have varying area and composition which must be processed with different plasmas. Additionally, the load impedance may change by large factors during the typical 20 uS pulse, due to plasma displacement currents and sheath growth. As a preliminary design to test the system viability for automotive component implantation, suitable for a manufacturing environment, circuit topology must be able to directly scale to high power versions, for increased component through-put. We have chosen an evolutionary design approach with component families of characterized performance, which should Ion result in a reliable modulator system with component lifetimes. The modulator utilizes a pair of Litton L-3408 hollow beam amplifier tubes as switching elements in a ``hot-deck`` configuration. Internal to the main of planar triode hot deck, an additional pair decks, configured in a totem pole circuit, provide input drive to the L-3408 mod-anodes. The modulator can output over 2 amps average current (at 100 kV) with 1 kW of modanode drive. Diagnostic electronics monitor the load and stops pulses for 100 mS when a load arcs occur. This paper, in addition to providing detailed engineering design information, will provide operational characteristics and reliability data that direct the design to the higher power, mass production line capable modulators.

  8. Local Tumor Control and Normal Tissue Toxicity of Pulsed Low-Dose Rate Radiotherapy for Recurrent Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Bin; Chen, Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Chen, Lili; Lang, Jinyi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates (1) local tumor control and (2) normal tissue toxicity of pulsed low-dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) for recurrent lung cancer. Methods: For study 1, nude mice were implanted with A549 tumors and divided into the following 3 groups: (1) control (n = 10), (2) conventional radiotherapy (RT; n = 10), and (3) PLDR (n = 10). Tumor-bearing mice received 2 Gy daily dose for 2 consecutive days. Weekly magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumor growth monitoring. For study 2, 20 mice received 8 Gy total body irradiation either continuously (n = 10) or 40 × 0.2 Gy pulses with 3-minute intervals (n = 10). Results: For study 1, both conventional RT and PLDR significantly inhibited the growth of A549 xenografts compared with the control group (>35% difference in the mean tumor volume; P < .05). The PLDR results were slightly better than conventional RT (8% difference in the mean tumor volume; P > .05). For study 2, the average weight was 20.94 ± 1.68 g and 25.69 ± 1.27 g and the survival time was 8 days and 12 days for mice treated with conventional RT and PLDR (P < .05), respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that PLDR could control A549 tumors as effectively as conventional RT, and PLDR induced much less normal tissue toxicity than conventional RT. Thus, PLDR would be a good modality for recurrent lung cancers. Advances in Knowledge: This article reports our results of an in vivo animal investigation of PLDR for the treatment of recurrent cancers, which may not be eligible for treatment because of the dose limitations on nearby healthy organs that have been irradiated in previous treatments. This was the first in vivo study to quantify the tumor control and normal tissue toxicities of PLDR using mice with implanted tumors, and our findings provided evidence to support the clinical trials that employ PLDR treatment techniques. PMID:26675811

  9. 100-kHz-rate gas-phase thermometry using 100-ps pulses from a burst-mode laser.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sukesh; Hsu, Paul S; Jiang, Naibo; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Gord, James R

    2015-11-01

    Temperature measurements based on gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy are demonstrated in reacting flows at a rate of 100 kHz employing a burst-mode laser with a pulse duration of ∼100  ps. The recently developed picosecond-duration, high-energy burst-mode laser is used to pump an optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier that produces broadband light centered at ∼680  nm to provide the Stokes beams for excitation of the rovibrational Raman transitions of H(2). The 532-nm output of the picosecond burst-mode laser is then utilized as a pump beam for the CARS process that generates 100 single-shot spectra at a rate of 100 kHz during the 1-ms duration burst. Coherent spectroscopy-based temperature measurements at 100 kHz will significantly aid the understanding of transient and unsteady flow phenomena related to turbulent combustion, transonic and hypersonic flows, high-enthalpy flows, and the dynamics of energetic materials. PMID:26512535

  10. High-repetition-rate, recirculating hydrogen fluoride/deuterium fluoride laser

    SciTech Connect

    Rudko, R.I.; Drozdowicz, Z.; Linhares, S.; Bua, D.

    1982-04-01

    A compact, gas-efficient, pulsed chemical laser operated with HF, DF, or HF and DF simultaneously, is described. This laser produced over 1 mJ/pulse up to over 4000 pps repetition rates with maximum average power over 4.5 W. Maximum repetition rate was 10 000 pulse/s.

  11. Repetition rate operation of an improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Yuwei; Zhong Huihuang; Li Zhiqiang; Shu Ting; Yang Hanwu; Zhou Heng; Yuan Chengwei; Zhou Weihong; Luo Ling

    2008-08-15

    In order to investigate the performances of repetition rate (rep-rate) operation of an improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO), a series of experiments are carried out on the improved MILO device, which is driven by a 40 {omega}, 50 ns rep-rate pulser, TORCH-01. Polymer velvet and graphite cathodes are tested, respectively, in the experiments, whose diameters and lengths are the same. The results of experimental comparison between them are presented in the paper. Both cathodes are tested at electric field strengths of about 300 kV/cm. The applied voltage has 60 ns duration with a rise time of 10 ns. This paper focuses on the performance of the voltage and current characteristics, the shot-to-shot reproducibility, the pressure evolution of the diode, and the lifetime of the cathodes, not upon the radiated microwave power. The experimental results show that the graphite cathode is superior to the velvet cathode in the lifetime and the shot-to-shot reproducibility during the rep-rate operation, and it is a promising cathode for the MILO device under the rep-rate conditions.

  12. Kinetic Rate Kernels via Hierarchical Liouville-Space Projection Operator Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hou-Dao; Yan, YiJing

    2016-05-19

    Kinetic rate kernels in general multisite systems are formulated on the basis of a nonperturbative quantum dissipation theory, the hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) formalism, together with the Nakajima-Zwanzig projection operator technique. The present approach exploits the HEOM-space linear algebra. The quantum non-Markovian site-to-site transfer rate can be faithfully evaluated via projected HEOM dynamics. The developed method is exact, as evident by the comparison to the direct HEOM evaluation results on the population evolution. PMID:26757138

  13. Nonlinear acoustic pulse propagation in dispersive sediments using fractional loss operators.

    PubMed

    Maestas, Joseph T; Collis, Jon M

    2016-03-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain formulation of the Euler fluid equations designed to model low-angle wave propagation using a wave-following computational domain. The wave-following frame of reference permits the simulation of long-range propagation and is useful in modeling blast wave effects in the ocean waveguide. Existing models do not take into account frequency-dependent sediment attenuation, a feature necessary for accurately describing sound propagation over, into, and out of the ocean sediment. Sediment attenuation is addressed in this work by applying lossy operators to the governing equation that are based on a fractional Laplacian. These operators accurately describe frequency-dependent attenuation and dispersion in typical ocean sediments. However, dispersion within the sediment is found to be a secondary process to absorption and effectively negligible for ranges of interest. The resulting fractional NPE is benchmarked against a Fourier-transformed parabolic equation solution for a linear case, and against the analytical Mendousse solution to Burgers' equation for the nonlinear case. The fractional NPE is then used to investigate the effects of attenuation on shock wave propagation. PMID:27036279

  14. A survey of quality control practices for high dose rate (HDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Bidmead, Margaret; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A survey of quality control (QC) currently undertaken in UK radiotherapy centres for high dose rate (HDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy has been conducted. The purpose was to benchmark current accepted practice of tests, frequencies and tolerances to assure acceptable HDR/PDR equipment performance. It is 20 years since a similar survey was conducted in the UK and the current review is timed to coincide with a revision of the IPEM Report 81 guidelines for quality control in radiotherapy. Material and methods All radiotherapy centres in the UK were invited by email to complete a comprehensive questionnaire on their current brachytherapy QC practice, including: equipment type, patient workload, source calibration method, level of image guidance for planning, prescribing practices, QC tests, method used, staff involved, test frequencies, and acceptable tolerance limits. Results Survey data was acquired between June and August 2012. Of the 64 centres invited, 47 (73%) responded, with 31 centres having brachytherapy equipment (3 PDR) and fully completing the survey, 13 reporting no HDR/PDR brachytherapy, and 3 intending to commence HDR brachytherapy in the near future. All centres had comprehensive QC schedules in place and there was general agreement on key test frequencies and tolerances. Greatest discord was whether source strength for treatment planning should be derived from measurement, as at 58% of centres, or from the certified value, at 42%. IPEM Report 81 continues to be the most frequently cited source of QC guidance, followed by ESTRO Booklet No. 8. Conclusions A comprehensive survey of QC practices for HDR/PDR brachytherapy in UK has been conducted. This is a useful reference to which centres may benchmark their own practice. However, individuals should take a risk-assessment based approach, employing full knowledge of local equipment, clinical procedures and available test equipment in order to determine individual QC needs. PMID:23378853

  15. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80-90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  16. High energy pulses generation with giant spectrum bandwidth and submegahertz repetition rate from a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser in all normal dispersion cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-H.; Wang, D.; Lin, K.-H.

    2011-01-01

    Robust passively mode-locked pulse generation with low pulse repetition rate and giant spectrum bandwidth in an all-fiber, all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber laser has been experimentally demonstrated using nonlinear polarization evolution technique. The highest pulse energy over 20 nJ with spectrum bandwidth over 50 nm can be experimentally obtained at 175 mW pump power. The mode-locked pulses reveal broadened 3-dB pulsewidth about several nanosecond and widened pedestal in time trace that is resulted from enormous dispersion in laser cavity and gain dynamics. At certain mode-locking state, a spectrum gap around 1056 nm are observed between the three and four energy levels of Yb-doped fiber laser. By properly rotating the polarization controller, the gap can be eliminated due to four-wave mixing to produce more flattened spectrum output.

  17. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Krastelev, E. G. Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  18. Continuous high-repetition-rate operation of collisional soft-x-ray lasers with solid targets.

    PubMed

    Weith, A; Larotonda, M A; Wang, Y; Luther, B M; Alessi, D; Marconi, M C; Rocca, J J; Dunn, J

    2006-07-01

    We have generated a laser average output power of 2 microW at a wavelength of 13.9 nm by operating a tabletop laser-pumped Ni-like Ag laser at a 5 Hz repetition rate, using a solid helicoidal target that is continuously rotated and advanced to renew the target surface between shots. More than 2 x 10(4) soft-x-ray laser shots were obtained by using a single target. Similar results were obtained at 13.2 nm in Ni-like Cd with a Cd-coated target. This scheme will allow uninterrupted operation of laser-pumped tabletop collisional soft-x-ray lasers at a repetition rate of 10 Hz for a period of hours, enabling the generation of continuous high average soft-x-ray powers for applications. PMID:16770410

  19. Emission rate modeling and risk assessment at an automobile plant from painting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Shrivastava, A.; Kulkarni, A.

    1999-07-01

    Pollution from automobile plants from painting operations has been addressed in the Clean Act Amendments (1990). The estimation of pollutant emissions from automobile painting operation were done mostly by approximate procedures than by actual calculations. The purpose of this study was to develop a methodology for calculating the emissions of the pollutants from painting operation in an automobile plant. Five scenarios involving an automobile painting operation, located in Columbus (Ohio), were studied for pollutant emission and concomitant risk associated with that. In the study of risk, a sensitivity analysis was done using Crystal Ball{reg{underscore}sign} on the parameters involved in risk. This software uses the Monte Carlo principle. The most sensitive factor in the risk analysis was the ground level concentration of the pollutants. All scenarios studied met the safety goal (a risk value of 1 x 10{sup {minus}6}) with different confidence levels. The highest level of confidence in meeting the safety goal was displayed by Scenario 1 (Alpha Industries). The results from the scenarios suggest that risk is associated with the quantity of released toxic pollutants. The sensitivity analysis of the various parameter shows that average spray rate of paint is the most important parameter in the estimation of pollutants from the painting operations. The entire study is a complete module that can be used by the environmental pollution control agencies for estimation of pollution levels and estimation of associated risk. The study can be further extended to other operations in an automobile industry or to different industries.

  20. Demonstration knowledge base to aid building operators in responding to real-time-pricing electricity rates

    SciTech Connect

    Norford, L.K. |; Englander, S.L.; Wiseley, B.J.

    1998-10-01

    The objective of ASHRAE Research Project 833, the results of which are summarized in this paper, was to develop a knowledge base, tested in demonstration software, that would assist building operators in assessing the benefits of controlling electrical equipment in response to electricity rates that vary hourly. The software combines a knowledge base with computations, both of which are controlled by the user via a graphical interface. Major electrical end uses of commercial buildings are considered. The knowledge base is used to assess the trade-off of service and cost that is implicit in establishing a threshold price, above which lighting is reduced or space temperatures are allowed to deviate from setpoint. The software also evaluates thermal storage systems and on-site generation, in which occupant comfort is not affected and the systems are operated to minimize operating costs. The thermal storage and generator control algorithms have proved to be optimal under limiting cases by comparison with mixed-integer programming.