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Sample records for rate tensile tests

  1. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert; George, Easo P

    2007-11-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

  2. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  3. Tensile testing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Ellingsworth, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved mechanical extensometer is described for use with a constant load creep test machine. The dead weight of the extensometer is counterbalanced by two pairs of weights connected through a pulley system and to rod extension and leading into the furnace where the test sample is undergoing elevated temperature (above 500 F.) tensile testing. Novel gripper surfaces, conical tip and flat surface are provided in each sampling engaging platens to reduce the grip pressure normally required for attachment of the extensometer to the specimen and reduce initial specimen bending normally associated with foil-gage metal testing.

  4. Tensile testing apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Ellingsworth, J. R.

    1985-08-01

    An improved mechanical extensometer is described for use with a constant load creep test machine. The dead weight of the extensometer is counterbalanced by two pairs of weights connected through a pulley system and to rod extension and leading into the furnace where the test sample is undergoing elevated temperature (above 500 F.) tensile testing. Novel gripper surfaces, conical tip and flat surface are provided in each sampling engaging platens to reduce the grip pressure normally required for attachment of the extensometer to the specimen and reduce initial specimen bending normally associated with foil-gage metal testing.

  5. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  6. Mechanical characterization of sub-100-nm-thick Au thin films by electrostatically actuated tensile testing with several strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyun-Jin; Kawase, Shinya; Hanasaki, Itsuo; Isono, Yoshitada

    2014-02-01

    We have developed the tensile testing device based on MEMS technology and applied it to the Au thin films with thickness in the sub-100-nm regime. The specimen was fabricated by thermal deposition and sputtering processes in the course of device fabrication. This technique of device fabrication in combination with the specimen realizes the precise loading direction without preloading before tensile tests. The loads were applied electrostatically by the comb-drive actuator. The obtained Young’s modulus was 28 ± 3 GPa and was insensitive to the strain rate. The 0.2% yield strength was in the range from 192 to 519 MPa with a trend of decrease with decreasing strain rate in the range from 5 × 10-5 to 5 × 10-2 s-1.

  7. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  8. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  9. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  10. Rapid heating tensile tests of hydrogen-charged high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1989-05-19

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. Proper design of the equipment will require an understanding of how tritium and its decay product helium affect mechanical properties. This memorandum describes results of rapid heating tensile testing of hydrogen-charged specimens of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) 316L stainless steel. These results provide a data base for comparison with uncharged and tritium-charged-and-aged specimens to distinguish the effects of hydrogen and helium. Details of the experimental equipment and procedures and results for uncharged specimens were reported previously. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Tensile Testing: A Simple Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

  12. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  13. Tensile Test For Arboform Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavanescu (Mazurchevici), Simona; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Nedelcu, Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Petroleum-based plastic materials constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is received particular attention. Our studied material, "Liquid wood" produced from lignin, natural fibres and natural additives, is completely biodegradable in natural environment, in normal conditions. This paper presents the behaviour of Arboform and Arboform reinforced with Aramidic Fibers tensile test analysis. Experimental data show that the tensile strength reached an average value of 15.8 MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3513.3MPA for Arboform and for the reinforcement the tensile strength is 23.625MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3411.5MPA, the materials present a brittle behaviour. The high mechanical properties of newly developed material, better than of other ordinary plastics, recommend it as a potential environment-friendly substituent for synthetic plastics, which are present in all fields of activity.

  14. Elongation Transducer For Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.; Stokes, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Extensometer transducer measures elongation of tensile-test specimen with negligible distortion of test results. Used in stress-versus-strain tests of small specimens of composite materials. Clamping stress distributed more evenly. Specimen clamped gently between jaw and facing surface of housing. Friction force of load points on conical tips onto specimen depends on compression of spring, adjusted by turning cover on housing. Limp, light nylon-insulated electrical leads impose minimal extraneous loads on measuring elements.

  15. Manual for LDEF tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    One of the experiments aboard the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) consists of a tray of approximately one hundred tensile specimens of several candidate space structure composite materials. During the LDEF flight the materials will be subjected to the space environment and to possible contamination during launch and recovery. Tensile tests of representative samples were made before the LDEF flight to obtain baseline data. Similar tests will be made on control specimens stored on earth for the length of the LDEF flight and on recovered flight specimens. This manual codifies the details of testing, data acquisition, and handling used in obtaining the baseline data so that the same procedures and equipment will be used on the subsequent tests.

  16. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2006-01-10

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  17. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-08-21

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  18. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-07-17

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  19. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  20. Effect of Load Rate on Tensile Strength of Various CFCCs at Elevated Temperatures: An Approach to Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Strength of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-11, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, was determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 - 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law tyw of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for the composite materials at least for the short range of lifetime.

  1. Temperature increase of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes due to plastic heat dissipation during tensile tests at 0.1-10 s-1 strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellouin de Menibus, Arthur; Auzoux, Quentin; Besson, Jacques; Crépin, Jérôme

    2014-11-01

    This study is focused on the impact of rapid Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) representative strain rates (about 1 s-1 NEA, 2010) on the behavior and fracture of unirradiated cold work stress relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes. Uniaxial ring tests (HT) and plane strain ring tensile tests (PST) were performed in the 0.1-10 s-1 strain rate range, at 25 °C. The local temperature increase due to plastic dissipation was measured with a high-speed infrared camera. Limited temperature increases were measured at 0.1 s-1 strain rate. Limited but not strongly localized temperature increases were measured at 1 s-1. Large temperature increase were measured at 5 and 10 s-1 (142 °C at 5 s-1 strain rate in HT tests). The local temperature increase induced heterogeneous temperature fields, which enhanced strain localization and resulted in a reduction of the plastic elongation at fracture.

  2. High-speed tensile test instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, P. H.; Twigg, J. N.; Roland, D. F.; Schrader, H. S.; Pathak, J. A.; Roland, C. M.

    2007-04-01

    A novel high-speed tensile test instrument is described, capable of measuring the mechanical response of elastomers at strain rates ranging from 10 to 1600 s-1 for strains through failure. The device employs a drop weight that engages levers to stretch a sample on a horizontal track. To improve dynamic equilibrium, a common problem in high speed testing, equal and opposite loading was applied to each end of the sample. Demonstrative results are reported for two elastomers at strain rates to 588 s-1 with maximum strains of 4.3. At the higher strain rates, there is a substantial inertial contribution to the measured force, an effect unaccounted for in prior works using the drop weight technique. The strain rates were essentially constant over most of the strain range and fill a three-decade gap in the data from existing methods.

  3. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  4. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  5. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-12-31

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  6. In Situ Radiography During Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory system for testing specimens of metal-, ceramic-, and intermetallic-matrix composite materials incorporates both electromechanical tensile-testing subsystem and either of two imaging subsystems that take x-ray photographs of specimens before, during, and after tensile tests. Used to test specimens of reaction-bonded silicon nitride reinforced with silicon carbide fibers (SiC/RBSN) considered for high-temperature service in advanced aircraft turbine engines. Provides data on effects of preexisting flaws (e.g., high-density impurities and local variations of density) on fracture behavior. Accumulated internal damage monitored during loading. X-ray source illuminates specimen in load frame while specimen is pulled. X-ray images on film correlated with stress-vs.-strain data from tensile test.

  7. Pressure reversal study through tensile tests

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Wright, A.L.; Yahr, G.T.; Robertson, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a summary of the results from a study of the variables related to pressure reversal and was sponsored by the US Department of Transportation, Office of Pipeline Safety. The circumferential pipe stress, which is the most significant variable in pressure reversal, was examined by using tensile specimens and then relating the results to pressurized pipe. A model is proposed that gives some insight into how pressure reversal can be minimized when a section of pipe is being hydrotested. Twenty tensile specimens from X-42 electric resistance welded (ERW) pipe and twenty specimens from X-52 ERW pipe were tested. Each specimen had a machined flaw. The flaw regions were monitored using strain gages and photoelasticity. These tensile tests represent the first phase of a research effort to examine and understand the variables related to pressure reversal. The second phase of this effort will be with pipe specimens and presently is in progress.

  8. Approaches for Tensile Testing of Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Martin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    For angleply composites, lamina tension and compression strengths are commonly determined by applying classical lamination theory to test data obtained from testing of angleply composite specimens. For textile composites such as 2D triaxial braids, analysis is more complex and standard test methods do not always yield reliable strength measurements. This paper describes recent research focused on development of more reliable tensile test methods for braided composites and presents preliminary data for various approaches. The materials investigated in this work have 0deg+/-60 2D triaxial braid architecture with nearly equal fiber volume fraction in each of the three fiber directions. Flat composite panels are fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) using six layers of the braided preform aligned along the 0deg fiber direction. Various epoxy resins are used as matrix materials. Single layer panels are also fabricated in order to examine local variations in deformation related to the braid architecture. Specimens are cut from these panels in the shape of standard straight-sided coupons, an alternative bowtie geometry, and an alternative notched geometry. Axial tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded along the 0deg fiber direction. Transverse tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded perpendicular to the 0deg fibers. Composite tubes are also fabricated by RTM. These tubes are tested by internal pressurization using a soft rubbery material sealed between the inside diameter of the tube and the load fixtures. The ends of the tube are unconstrained, so the primary load is in the hoop direction. Tubes are fabricated with the 0deg fibers aligned along the tube axis by overbraiding the preform on a mandrel. Since the loading is in the hoop direction, testing of the overbraided tube provides a measure of transverse tensile strength. Previous work has indicated that straight-sided coupons yield a transverse tensile strength that is much lower

  9. Tensile-strength apparatus applies high strain-rate loading with minimum shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotrill, H. E., Jr.; Mac Glashan, W. F., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Tensile-strength testing apparatus employs a capillary bundle through which a noncompressible fluid is extruded and a quick-release valve system. This apparatus applies the test loads at relatively constant very high strain rates with minimal shock and vibration to the tensile specimen and apparatus.

  10. Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Epoxy-Impregnated Bundle Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    The tensile tests for high tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) carbon fiber epoxy-impregnated bundle composite at various strain rates ranging from 3.33 × 10-5 to 6.0 × 102 s-1 (various crosshead speeds ranging from 8.33 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 101 m/s) were investigated. The statistical distributions of the tensile strength were also evaluated. The results clearly demonstrated that the tensile strength of bundle composite slightly increased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed) and the Weibull modulus of tensile strength for the bundle composite decreased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed), there is a linear relation between the Weibull modulus and the average tensile strength on log-log scale.

  11. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  12. Experimental and numerical study on tensile strength of concrete under different strain rates.

    PubMed

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10(-7) s(-1) to 10(-4) s(-1) in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  13. Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10−7 s−1 to 10−4 s−1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  14. Effect of strain rate on formability in warm deep drawing of high tensile strength steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihara, Shoichiro; Iwamatsu, Go

    2014-10-01

    In tensile test of the high tensile strength steel, tensile strength isdrastically decreased as the temperature is raised. Then, the strain rate sensitivity exponent of high tensile strength steel (SUS631) in this study is high at 800 degrees especially. Also, elongation is increased as the temperature is raised. In deep drawing, the maximum punch load of the high tensile strength steel is examined on difference punch speed at 600 and 800 degrees. On the other hand, finite element (FE) simulation was used for the possibility to evaluate the forming load on difference punch speed in warm deep drawing. In FE simulation, we have considered both the strain hardening exponent and the strain rate sensitivity exponent (m-value) because we cannot neglect m-value 0.184 at 800 degrees. The tendency of the forming load in the experiments agrees the results in FE simulation.

  15. Graphite/Polyimide Tabs For High-Temperature Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1993-01-01

    Delamination from ceramic composite specimens prevented. Tabs made from composite of graphite and PMR-15 polyimide enable high-temperature tensile testing of flat coupons of ceramic-matrix composites. Also used in high-temperature tensile testing of flat coupons of ceramics, metals, and metal-matrix composites.

  16. Apparatus facilitates high-temperature tensile testing in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, P. F.

    1964-01-01

    An apparutus for heating refractory materials to high temperatures during tensile testing includes a water-cooled stainless steel vacuum chamber. This contains a resistance heater consisting of a slit tube of tantalum or tungsten to enclose the tensile test rod.

  17. In situ tensile and creep testing of lithiated silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, Steven T.; Kraft, Oliver; Thompson, Carl V.; Mönig, Reiner

    2013-12-23

    We present experimental results for uniaxial tensile and creep testing of fully lithiated silicon nanowires. A reduction in the elastic modulus is observed when silicon nanowires are alloyed with lithium and plastic deformation becomes possible when the wires are saturated with lithium. Creep testing was performed at fixed force levels above and below the tensile strength of the material. A linear dependence of the strain-rate on the applied stress was evident below the yield stress of the alloy, indicating viscous deformation behavior. The observed inverse exponential relationship between wire radius and strain rate below the yield stress indicates that material transport was controlled by diffusion. At stress levels approaching the yield strength of fully lithiated silicon, power-law creep appears to govern the strain-rate dependence on stress. These results have direct implications on the cycling conditions, rate-capabilities, and charge capacity of silicon and should prove useful for the design and construction of future silicon-based electrodes.

  18. Polystyrene cryostat facilitates testing tensile specimens under liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogan, R. P.; Skalka, R. J.

    1967-01-01

    Lightweight cryostat made of expanded polystyrene reduces eccentricity in a tensile system being tested under liquid nitrogen. The cryostat is attached directly to the tensile system by a special seal, reducing misalignment effects due to cryostat weight, and facilitates viewing and loading of the specimens.

  19. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  20. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  1. Strain rate effects on tensile strength of iron green bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Kuroyanagi, Yuki; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Gustafsson, Gustaf

    2015-09-01

    Impact tensile strength of iron green bodies with densities of 7.2 and 7.4 g/cm3 was examined by Brazilian test using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky bar) method. The powder material used for the experiments was a press-ready premix containing Distaloy AE, graphite, and lubricant. During dynamic compression, the failure behavior of specimens was observed using a high-speed video camera. The failure stress and failure behavior of dynamic compressive tests were compared with those of static compressive tests.

  2. Improved Flat Specimens For Tensile And Fatigue Testing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthem, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    Improved shape proposed for flat, reduced-gauge-section specimens for tensile and fatigue testing of advanced composite materials at ambient and high temperatures. Typical specimen consists of flat bar 15.2 centimeters long, 1.27 centimeters wide, and 0.318 centimeters thick, with full-width tab regions at ends, 3.81-centimeters-long gauge section of reduced width in middle, and two transition regions where width tapers between tab and gauge widths along 6.35-centimeters-radius circular arc tangent to edge of gauge section. Specimen gripped by squeezing between tabs in tab regions, and tensile test load applied via tab grips. Configuration reduces undesired concentrations of stresses in transition and tab regions, forcing tensile failure to occur in gauge section and ensuring more-consistent results in tensile tests.

  3. New experimental protocols for tensile testing of abdominal aortic analogues.

    PubMed

    Bailly, L; Deplano, V; Lemercier, A; Boiron, O; Meyer, C

    2014-06-01

    This work proposes an in vitro tensile testing protocol that is able to characterize abdominal aortic (AA) analogues under physiologically inspired mechanical loadings. Kinematic parameters are defined in agreement with in vivo measurements of aortic dynamics. A specific focus is given to the choice of the applied loading rates, deriving from the knowledge of aortic Peterson modulus and blood pressure variations from diastolic to systolic instants. The influence of physiological elongation rates has been tested on both porcine AAs and a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) material used to elaborate AA analogues. The diastolic and systolic elongation rates estimates vary between orders of magnitude O(10(-2)) and O(10(-1))s(-1). Negligible differences are obtained when comparing stress-elongation responses between both physiological elongation rates. In contrast, a noticeable stiffening of the TPU mechanical response is observed compared to that obtained under the common low traction rate of O(10(-3))s(-1). This work shows how relevant physiological elongation rates can be evaluated as a function of age, gender and pathological context. PMID:24613685

  4. Modified ring stretch tensile testing of Zr-1Nb cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.B.; Majumdar, S.; Ruther, W.E.; Billone, M.C.; Chung, H.M.; Neimark, L.A.

    1998-03-01

    In a round robin effort between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire in France, and the Russian Research Centre-Kurchatov Institute, Argonne National Laboratory conducted 16 modified ring stretch tensile tests on unirradiated samples of zr-1Nb cladding, which is used in Russian VVER reactors. Test were conducted at two temperatures (25 and 400 C) and two strain rates (0.001 and 1 s{sup {minus}1}). At 25 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), uniform elongation (UE), and total elongation (TE) were 201 MPa, 331 MPa, 18.2%, and 57.6%, respectively. At 400 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 109 MPa, 185 MPa, 15.4%, and 67.7%, respectively. Finally, at 400 C and 1 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 134 MPa, 189 MPa, 18.9%, and 53.4%, respectively. The high strain rate tests at room temperature were not successful. Test results proved to be very sensitive to the amount of lubrication used on the inserts; because of the large contact area between the inserts and specimen, too little lubrication leads to significantly higher strengths and lower elongations being reported. It is also important to note that only 70 to 80% of the elongation takes place in the gauge section, depending on specimen geometry. The appropriate percentage can be estimated from a simple model or can be calculated from finite-element analysis.

  5. Modified ring stretch tensile testing of Zr-1Nb cladding.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M. C.; Chung, H. M.; Cohen, A. B.; Majumdar, S.; Neimark, L. A.; Ruther, W. E.

    1997-12-05

    In a round robin effort between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire in France, and the Russian Research Centre-Kurchatov Institute, Argonne National Laboratory conducted 16 modified ring stretch tensile tests on unirradiated samples of Zr-1Nb cladding, which is used in Russian VVER reactors. Tests were conducted at two temperatures (25 and 400 C) and two strain rates (0.001 and 1 s{sup {minus}1}). At 25 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), uniform elongation (UE), and total elongation (TE) were 201 MPa, 331 MPa, 18.2%, and 57.6%, respectively. At 400 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 109 MPa, 185 MPa, 15.4%, and 67.7%, respectively. Finally, at 400 C and 1 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 134 MPa, 189 MPa, 18.9%, and 53.4%, respectively. The high strain rate tests at room temperature were not successful. Test results proved to be very sensitive to the amount of lubrication used on the inserts; because of the large contact area between the inserts and specimen, too little lubrication leads to significantly higher strengths and lower elongations being reported. It is also important to note that only 70 to 80% of the elongation takes place in the gauge section, depending on specimen geomeq. The appropriate percentage can be estimated from a simple model or can be calculated from finite-element analysis.

  6. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber; Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber; and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 C to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  7. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber, Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) Nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber, and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  8. Demonstration of concurrent tensile testing and magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Brinker, Spencer; Klatt, Dieter

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a technique used to measure the mechanical properties of soft tissues and has already shown its diagnostic potential for pathologies involving fibrogenesis and neurodegeneration. Experimental investigation of loading during MRE is fairly unexplored and may help to better understand changing mechanical properties in relation to organ function. Tensile testing is a common technique for examining mechanical properties of materials and is used as the simultaneous comparison method with MRE in this study. 3D MRE data was acquired during quasistatic uniaxial tensile loading of an Ecoflex 0010 cylindrical specimen. Individual MRE scans at 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5kHz where performed on engineering strain increments of 20% from 0% to 140% while tensile reaction force was recorded using a load cell attached to an adjustable elongation slide. Tensile stress-strain relation resembled the Fung hyperelastic strain energy model. We observe that the MRE shear storage modulus is related to the state of tensile deformation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous tensile testing during MRE and the new design can potentially be used for MRE calibration using pre-tension. PMID:27429072

  9. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzar, B.; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 104 to 4 × 104 s-1. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  10. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Erzar, B. Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-12-28

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 10{sup 4} to 4 × 10{sup 4} s{sup −1}. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  11. Method and apparatus for tensile testing of metal foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, O. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method for obtaining accurate and reproducible results in the tensile testing of metal foils in tensile testing machines is described. Before the test specimen are placed in the machine, foil side edges are worked until they are parallel and flaw free. The specimen are also aligned between and secured to grip end members. An aligning apparatus employed in the method is comprised of an alignment box with a longitudinal bottom wall and two upright side walls, first and second removable grip end members at each end of the box, and a means for securing the grip end members within the box.

  12. Effects of Sample Geometry and Loading Rate onTensile Ductility of TRIP800 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Guzman, O.; Chen, Weinong W.

    2012-04-15

    The effects of sample geometry and loading rate on the tensile ductility of a commercial grade Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel are examined in this paper. Quasistatic tensile tests were performed for the 1.2mm gauge TRIP800 steel sheets with two geometries: sub-sized ASTM E-8 and a custom designed miniature tensile sample. Sample geometry effects on post-uniform elongation are discussed together with other experimental data reported in the open literature. Further discussions on the effects of sample geometry are cast in the context of mesh-size dependent ductility in finite element-based engineering simulations. The quasi-static tensile curve for the miniature sample is then compared with the split Hopkinson bar results at the loading rates of 1700-S-1 and 2650-S-1 with the same sample design. In contrary to the typical strain rate sensitivity results for mild steel where the dynamic strength increase at high strain rate usually occurs at the price of ductility reduction, our results show that the TRIP800 under examination has positive strain rate sensitivity on both strength and ductility. Images of the deformation process captured by high speed camera together with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) near the fracture zone are also used to elucidate the different deformation modes at different loading rates.

  13. Mechanical properties of gold twinned nanocubes under different triaxial tensile rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zailin; Zhang, Guowei; Luo, Gang; Sun, Xiaoqing; Zhao, Jianwei

    2016-08-01

    The gold twinned nanocubes under different triaxial tensile rates are explored by molecular dynamics simulation. Hydrostatic stress and Mises stress are defined in order to understand triaxial stresses. Twin boundaries prevent dislocations between twin boundaries from developing and dislocation angles are inconspicuous, which causes little difference between triaxial stresses. The mechanical properties of the nanocubes under low and high tensile rates are different. The curves of nanocubes under high tensile rates are more abrupt than those under low tensile rates. When the tensile rate is extremely big, the loadings are out of the nanocubes and there are not deformation and fracture in the internal nanocubes.

  14. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in static lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Yan, Wei; Sha, Wei; Wang, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2016-05-01

    In order to assess the susceptibility of candidate structural materials to liquid metal embrittlement, this work investigated the tensile behaviors of ferritic-martensitic steel in static lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). The tensile tests were carried out in static lead bismuth eutectic under different temperatures and strain rates. Pronounced liquid metal embrittlement phenomenon is observed between 200 °C and 450 °C. Total elongation is reduced greatly due to the liquid metal embrittlement in LBE environment. The range of ductility trough is larger under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test.

  15. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.

  16. Polymer deformation gage measures thickness change in tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.; Broyles, H. H.

    1966-01-01

    Lightweight deformation gage attached to a polymer specimen determines the thickness changes undergone by the specimen during the testing of its tensile and elongation properties. Mechanical noise from outside sources is dampened when the assembly is hung on a light rubber band.

  17. Tensile testing grips are easily assembled under liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalka, R. J.; Vandergrift, E. F.

    1967-01-01

    Split-screw grips for tensile testing provide uniform loading on the specimen shoulders. Holes in the heads enable the screws and specimen to be threaded as an assembly into a grip body, closely controlled guides and seats afford positive seating, and precision machining of mating surfaces minimizes misalignment effects.

  18. Tensile testing grips ensure uniform loading of bimetal tubing specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscol, S. D.; Hunt, V.

    1968-01-01

    Tensile testing grip uniformly distributes stresses to the internal and external tube of bimetal tubing specimens. The grip is comprised of a slotted external tube grip, a slotted internal tube grip, a machine bolt and nut, an internal grip expansion cone, and an external grip compression nut.

  19. Biaxial tensile tests of the porcine ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Deplano, Valérie; Boufi, Mourad; Boiron, Olivier; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Alimi, Yves; Bertrand, Eric

    2016-07-01

    One of the aims of this work is to develop an original custom built biaxial set-up to assess mechanical behavior of soft tissues. Stretch controlled biaxial tensile tests are performed and stereoscopic digital image correlation (SDIC) is implemented to measure the 3D components of the generated displacements. Using this experimental device, the main goal is to investigate the mechanical behavior of porcine ascending aorta in the more general context of human ascending aorta pathologies. The results highlight that (i) SDIC arrangement allows accurate assessment of displacements and so stress strain curves, (ii) porcine ascending aorta has a nearly linear and anisotropic mechanical behavior until 30% of strain, (iii) porcine ascending aorta is stiffer in the circumferential direction than in the longitudinal one, (iv) the material coefficient representing the interaction between the two loading directions is thickness dependent, (v) taking into account the variability of the samples the stress values are independent of the stretch rate in the range of values from 10(-3) to 10(-1)s(-1) and finally, (vi) unlike other segments of the aorta, 4-month-old pigs ascending aorta is definitely not a relevant model to investigate the mechanical behavior of the human ascending aorta. PMID:27211783

  20. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1993-08-24

    Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

  1. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  2. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both

  3. On the off-axis tensile test for unidirectional composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, M. P.; Herakovich, C. T.; Post, D.

    1982-01-01

    The off axis tensile test was examined experimentally to obtain actual displacement fields over the surface of graphite polyimide coupon specimens. The experimental results were compared with approximate analytical solutions and generated finite element results. An optical method of high sensitivity moire interferometry was used to determine the actual displacements to high precision. The approximate analytical solution and the finite element results compare very favorably with the measured centerline displacements in the test section, and the finite element displacement fields provide excellent agreement with the moire displacements throughout the specimen. A 15 degree fiber orientation and coupon aspect ratios of 5 and 15 are presented.

  4. Tensile adhesion testing of thermal spray coatings on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, S.H.; Berndt, C.C.; Wu, C.L.; Nakamura, T.

    1994-12-31

    The standard tensile adhesion test (TAT), ASTM C633, has been modified to perform multiple tests on flat and wide substrates. The TAT geometry which specifies a 25.4 mm (1 in.) diameter cylindrical substrate has been employed as the pull-off bar. Two renditions of this test were implemented and the Weibull moduli and characteristics tresses for both test methods obtained. The modified TAT, termed as the single bar (SB) method, yields a higher Weibull modulus and characteristic strength than the other method which is termed as the double bar (DB) method. It is expected that the different test results between the two methods arise from different stress distributions near the interface of the coating and substrate. Finite element analysis was used to obtain the stress distribution near the interface of the coating and substrate, and the relationship between the adhesion strength of the SB and DB methods were derived.

  5. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Strength of Laurentian Granite Using Brazilian Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tubing; Li, Xibing; Cao, Wenzhuo; Xia, Kaiwen

    2015-11-01

    The effect of thermal treatment on several physical properties and the tensile strength of Laurentian granite (LG) are measured in this study. Brazilian disc LG specimens are treated at temperatures of up to 850 °C. The physical properties such as grain density, relative volume change per degree, and P-wave velocity are investigated under the effect of heat treatment. The results indicate that both the density and the P-wave velocity decrease with the increase in heating temperature. However, the relative volume change per degree is not sensitive below 450 °C, while a remarkable increase appears from 450 to 850 °C. All cases are explained by the increase in both number and width of the thermally induced microcracks with the heating temperature. Brazilian tests are carried out statically with an MTS hydraulic servo-control testing system and dynamically with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system to measure both static and dynamic tensile strength of LG. The relationship between the tensile strength and treatment temperatures shows that static tensile strength decreases with temperature while the dynamic tensile strength first increases and then decreases with a linear increase in the loading rate. However, the increase in dynamic tensile strength with treatment temperatures from 25 to 100 °C is due to slight dilation of the grain boundaries as the initial thermal action, which leads to compaction of rock. When the treatment temperature rises above 450 °C, the quartz phase transition results in increased size of microcracks due to the differential expansion between the quartz grains and other minerals, which is the main cause of the sharp reduction in tensile strength.

  6. Compressive tensile and shear testing of melt-foamed aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Von Hagen, H.; Bleck, W.

    1998-12-31

    For construction purposes it is utterly important to get detailed information on the possible influence of the foam thickness on the mechanical properties and on the deformation behavior of metallic foams. The effect of compressive, tensile and shear loads on aluminium foam samples has been examined with the testing methods for sandwich material as described in German and ASTM-standards. The aim is to provide more data on these mechanical properties varying the sample density and thickness. Regarding the results the most reliable material parameters as well as steps towards a relationship between the different strength parameters can be obtained.

  7. Effect of strain rate on the tensile material properties of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Manoogian, Sarah J; Bisplinghoff, Jill A; McNally, Craig; Kemper, Andrew R; Santago, Anthony C; Duma, Stefan M

    2009-09-01

    Automobile crashes are the largest cause of injury death for pregnant females and the leading cause of traumatic fetal injury mortality in the United States. Computational models, useful tools to evaluate the risk of fetal loss in motor vehicle crashes, are based on a limited number of quasistatic material tests of the placenta. This study presents a total of 64 uniaxial tensile tests on coupon specimens from six human placentas at three strain rates. Material properties of the placental tissue were evaluated at strain rates of 0.07/s, 0.70/s, and 7.00/s. The test data have average failure strains of 0.34, 0.36, and 0.37, respectively. Failure stresses of 10.8 kPa, 11.4 kPa, and 18.6 kPa correspond to an increase in strain rate from 0.07/s to 7.0/s. The results indicate rate dependence only when comparing the highest strain rate of 7.0/s to either of the lower rates. There is no significant rate dependence between 0.07/s and 0.70/s. When compared with previous testing of placental tissue, the current study addresses the material response to more strain rates as well as provides a much larger set of available data. In summary, tensile material properties for the placenta have been determined for use in computational modeling of pregnant occupant kinematics in events ranging from low impact activities to severe impacts such as in motor vehicle crashes. PMID:19725697

  8. Evaluation of ultimate tensile strength using Miniature Disk Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kundan; Pooleery, Arun; Madhusoodanan, K.; Singh, R. N.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Shriwastaw, R. S.; Dutta, B. K.; Sinha, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    Correlations for evaluation of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) using Miniature Disk Bend Test (MDBT) or Small Punch Test (SPT) has been an open issue since the development of the techniques. The larger plastic strains, in tri-axial state of stress during SPT, make the translation to the equivalent uniaxial parameter less certain. Correlations based on Pmax of load-displacement curve are also in disagreement as the point corresponding to Pmax does not represent a necking situation as in case of UTS, in a uniaxial tensile test. In present work, an attempt has been made for locating necking zone, which appears prior to Pmax, through experiments and FEM analyses. Experimental results on disk specimens from 20MnMoNi55, CrMoV ferritic steel and SS304LN materials along with FEM analyses found that load corresponding to 0.48 mm displacement is to be very close to the necking zone, and gives best fit for a UTS correlation.

  9. Tensile testing of ultra-thin films on water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Han; Nizami, Adeel; Hwangbo, Yun; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Woo, Chang-Su; Hyun, Seungmin; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2013-10-01

    The surface of water provides an excellent environment for gliding movement, in both nature and modern technology, from surface living animals such as the water strider, to Langmuir-Blodgett films. The high surface tension of water keeps the contacting objects afloat, and its low viscosity enables almost frictionless sliding on the surface. Here we utilize the water surface as a nearly ideal underlying support for free-standing ultra-thin films and develop a novel tensile testing method for the precise measurement of mechanical properties of the films. In this method, namely, the pseudo free-standing tensile test, all specimen preparation and testing procedures are performed on the water surface, resulting in easy handling and almost frictionless sliding without specimen damage or substrate effects. We further utilize van der Waals adhesion for the damage-free gripping of an ultra-thin film specimen. Our approach can potentially be used to explore the mechanical properties of emerging two-dimensional materials.

  10. Method and device for tensile testing of cable bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Lawrence M; Ardelean, Emil V; Goodding, James C; Babuska, Vit

    2012-10-16

    A standard tensile test device is improved to accurately measure the mechanical properties of stranded cables, ropes, and other composite structures wherein a witness is attached to the top and bottom mounting blocks holding the cable under test. The witness is comprised of two parts: a top and a bottom rod of similar diameter with the bottom rod having a smaller diameter stem on its upper end and the top rod having a hollow opening in its lower end into which the stem fits forming a witness joint. A small gap is present between the top rod and the larger diameter portion of the bottom rod. A standard extensometer is attached to the top and bottom rods of the witness spanning this small witness gap. When a force is applied to separate the mounting blocks, the gap in the witness expands the same length that the entire test specimen is stretched.

  11. ROLE OF SCALE FACTOR DURING TENSILE TESTING OF SMALL SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N; Busby, Jeremy T; Field, Kevin G; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Gray, Mr. Sean

    2014-01-01

    The influence of scale factor (tensile specimen geometry and dimensions) on mechanical test results was investigated for different widely used types of small specimens (SS-1, SS-2, SS-3, and SS-J3) and a set of materials. It was found that the effect of scale factor on the accurate determination of yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and uniform elongation values was weak; however, clear systematic differences were observed and should be accounted for during interpretation of results. In contrast, total elongation values were strongly sensitive to variations in specimen geometry. Modern experimental methods like digital image correlation allow the impact of scale factor to be reduced. Using these techniques, it was shown that true stress true strain curves describing strain-hardening behavior were very close for different specimen types. The limits of miniaturization are discussed, and an ultra-miniature specimen concept was suggested and evaluated. This type of specimen, as expected, may be suitable for SEM and TEM in situ testing.

  12. Tensile material properties of human tibia cortical bone effects of orientation and loading rate.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Manoogian, Sarah J; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify effects of both specimen orientation and loading rate on the tensile material properties for human tibia cortical bone in a controlled study. This study presents 25 human tibia cortical bone coupon tests obtained from the mid-diaphysis of two fresh frozen male human cadavers: 11 axial and 14 lateral. The primary component for the tension coupon testing was a high rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor. The specimen were loaded at a constant strain rate of approximately 0.05 strains/s, 0.5 strains/s, or 5.0 strains/s. Axial specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress and ultimate strain compared to lateral specimens for all loading rates, and a significantly larger modulus for low and high loading rates. This finding illustrates the anisentropic behavior of bone over a range of strain rates, which is attributed to the microstructure of the bone and the osteon orientation along the long axis of the bone. With respect to loading rate, both axial and lateral specimens showed significant increases in the modulus and significant decreases in ultimate strain with increased loading rate. Although not significant, axial specimens showed another traditional viscoelastic trend, with ultimate stress increasing with increased loading rate. PMID:19141952

  13. A microdynamic version of the tensile test machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Very large space structures require structural reactions to control forces associated with nanometer-level displacements; JPL has accordingly built a tensile test machine capable of mN-level force measurements and nm-level displacement measurements, with a view to the study of structural linear joining technology at the lower limit of its resolution. The tester is composed of a moving table that is supported by six flexured legs and a test specimen cantilevered off the table to ground. Three vertical legs contain piezoactuators allowing changes in length up to 200 microns while generating axial load and bending moments. Displacements between ground and table are measured by means of three laser-interferometric channels.

  14. Tensile adhesion testing methodology for thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Christopher C.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of thermally sprayed coatings consists of lamellae which are oriented parallel to the substrate surface. The lamellae separate and fracture by distinctive mechanisms which are reflected in the failure morphology, and these may be described as adhesive (between the coating and substrate), cohesive (within the coating), or mixed mode. There is a large variability in the failure stress for any nominally identical group of coatings. A lower bound for the fracture toughness of alumina coatings can be calculated as 0.2 MNm exp -3/2. The coating strength values may also be treated as belonging to the statistical distribution of the Weibull function. The Weibull modulus of the coating strength varied from 1.4 to 3.8. This analysis infers that the flaw size within coatings is highly variable and that the flaws are nonuniformly dispersed. The present work focuses on the question of whether tensile adhesion tests are an appropriate testing method for thermally sprayed materials.

  15. Novel approach to tensile testing of micro- and nanoscale fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E. P. S.; Lim, C. T.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the strength and size of the micro- and nanoscale fibers, larger conventional universal testing machines are not suitable in performing stretch test of such fibers. Existing microtensile testing machines are custom-made and are complex and expensive to construct. Here, a novel method of using an existing atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindenation system for the tensile testing of microscale or bundled nanoscale fibers is proposed. The microscale poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber (˜25 μm diameter) was used as an example to illustrate this technique. The microfiber was first attached to a nanoindenter tip and the base via a custom-made holder to ensure that the microfiber was taut and vertically aligned. The force transducer of the nanoindenter was used to measure the tensile force required to stretch the microfiber. The microfiber was stretched using the stepper motor of the AFM system. The elongation of the microfiber was measured by subtracting the elongation of the transducer spring from the total elongation of the microfiber and transducer spring. A plot of the load against elongation of the microfiber was then obtained. The stress and strain of the microfiber was measured by subtracting the elongation of the transducer spring from the total elongation of the microfiber was then obtained. The stress and strain of the microfiber was obtained by dividing the load and elongation by cross-sectional area and gauge length, respectively. With this data, the mechanical behavior of the sample at small strains can be studied. This system is able to provide a high load resolution of 80 nN and displacement resolution of 0.5 nm. However, maximum load and sample elongation is limited and handling of the sample still remains a challenge.

  16. Influence of strain rate on the quasi-static tensile strength of Kevlar 29 narrow fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Increasing the strain rate from 3 x 10/sup -4/ min/sup -1/ to 1.4 min/sup -1/ resulted in a 20% increase in fabric strength. Similar changes in strength with strain rate were obtained for warp yarns removed from the fabrics. Static and sliding loop yarn tests, and tests in which yarn was interwoven through wires, were used to determine effect of abrasion, bending and lateral compression as a function of strain rate. Results eliminated yarn damage by abrasion and demonstrated that unwoven yarn strength, in presence of bending or lateral compression, was dependent on strain rate. Yarn and fiber pullout tests showed that increasing strain rate caused a transition from stick-slip to smooth curves. Results suggested a mechanism whereby strain-rate dependent frictional behavior of Kevlar influences woven fabric strength. It appears that friction restrains highly loaded fibers in a fabric from adjusting their position to relieve stress concentrations. Yarn tensile strength is influenced by strain rate when the fiber arrangement has been altered by weaving or when bending or lateral compressive forces are also present.

  17. Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotubes Under Realistic Temperature and Strain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chen-Yu; Cho, Kyeong-Jae; Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Strain rate and temperature dependence of the tensile strength of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. The tensile failure or yield strain is found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and strain rate. A transition state theory based predictive model is developed for the tensile failure of nanotubes. Based on the parameters fitted from high-strain rate and temperature dependent molecular dynamics simulations, the model predicts that a defect free micrometer long single-wall nanotube at 300 K, stretched with a strain rate of 1%/hour, fails at about 9 plus or minus 1% tensile strain. This is in good agreement with recent experimental findings.

  18. Tensile tests of ITER TF conductors jacket materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anashkin, O. P.; Kеilin, V. E.; Krivykh, A. V.; Diev, D. N.; Dinisilov, A. S.; Shcherbakov, V. I.; Tronza, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    The set of very tough requirements has been formulated for TF jacket materials with extremely high plasticity at liquid helium temperature. The stainless steel 316LN-IG is recommended to be used for TF jacket tubes. Samples of 316LN-IG tubes (whole tubes and sub-size samples) made of the material from the same electro slag remelt have been tested in different conditions - as received tubes and tubes after prescribed compaction, 2.5% deformation at room temperature and heat treatment at 650 0C, 200 hours. The tensile tests were carried out at room, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperatures down to 4.2 K, meeting corresponding ASME and ASTM requirements. The low temperature testing devices are described. The tests results for sub-size samples and whole tubes show that the latter tests are considerably more representative and important for butt weld qualification at LHe temperature. It was observed that the ferromagnetic properties of all samples and especially of butt welds increase with lowering the temperature and increasing the degree of deformation. At LHe temperature a non-uniform and highly localized serrated deformations were observed.

  19. The effectiveness of combined gripping method in tensile testing of UHMWPE single yarn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. X.; Hazell, P. J.; Shankar, K.; Morozov, E. V.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the experimental study on the effectiveness of combined gripping method employed in the tensile testing of UHMWPE (Dyneema® SK75) single yarn. Seven different solutions including epoxy, acrylic, and ethyl cyanoacrylate adhesives were tested under quasi-static loadings in order to determine the most effective adhesive for bonding UHMWPE single yarn to aluminium sheets. The ethyl cyanoacrylate adhesive combined with polyolefin surface primer was found to be the best choice which could prevent yarn slippage and ensure the failure of yarn occurs in the gauge section. The single yarns were then tested at three strain rates of 3.3×10-5, 3.3×10-3, and 0.33 s-1. The tensile strength, maximum strain, and Young's modulus were determined from the measured stress-strain curves and compared with the values from literature; the results showed these tensile properties of single yarn depend on strain rate over the range tested.

  20. TENSILE TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A; Thad Adams, T; Ps Lam, P

    2007-05-02

    An infrastructure of new and existing pipelines and systems will be required to carry and to deliver hydrogen as an alternative energy source under the hydrogen economy. Carbon and low alloy steels of moderate strength are currently used in hydrogen delivery systems as well as in the existing natural gas systems. It is critical to understand the material response of these standard pipeline materials when they are subjected to pressurized hydrogen environments. The methods and results from a testing program to quantify hydrogen effects on mechanical properties of carbon steel pipeline and pipeline weld materials are provided. Tensile properties of one type of steel (A106 Grade B) in base metal, welded and heat affected zone conditions were tested at room temperature in air and high pressure (10.34 MPa or 1500 psig) hydrogen. A general reduction in the materials ability to plastically deform was noted in this material when specimens were tested in hydrogen. Furthermore, the primary mode of fracture was changed from ductile rupture in air to cleavage with secondary tearing in hydrogen. The mechanical test results will be applied in future analyses to evaluate service life of the pipelines. The results are also envisioned to be part of the bases for construction codes and structural integrity demonstrations for hydrogen service pipeline and vessels.

  1. Direct laboratory tensile testing of select yielding rock bolt systems

    SciTech Connect

    VandeKraats, J.D.; Watson, S.O.

    1996-08-01

    Yielding rock bolt support systems have been developed to accommodate ground movement in shifting ground such as in coal operations; in creeping ground such as salt, trona, and potash; and in swelling ground associated with some clays. These systems, designed to remain intact despite ground movement, should enhance mine safety and help contain costs in areas where rebolting of rigid non-yielding systems is typically required. Four such systems were tested in straight tensile pulls in the laboratory. They include the Slip Nut System from Dywidag Systems International USA, Inc., Ischebeck`s bolt mounted Titan Load Indicator, Rocky Mountain Bolt Company`s Yielding Cable Bolt, and a rock bolt installed variation of the yielding steel post developed by RE/SPEC Inc. The first two systems are currently marketed products and the latter two are prototype systems. Each system responds to load and displacement by yielding in an unique manner. All are designed to yield at predetermined loads. A description of each system and its yield function is provided. Each system was tested over its prescribed yield range in a test machine. At least five tests were performed on each system. Each system yielded and continued to provide support according to its design. Each shows promise for ground control use in shifting or creeping rock. This work helps to illustrate the comparative differences in performance between these specialized systems and the applications where they may be most useful.

  2. A Constitutive Model of 6111-T4 Aluminum Alloy Sheet Based on the Warm Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Lin; Meng, Fanzhi; Song, Yanli; Liu, Jianing; Qin, Xunpeng; Suo, Lianbing

    2014-03-01

    As main light-weight material, aluminum alloy sheets have been widely applied to produce auto body panels. In order to predict the formability and springback of aluminum alloy sheets, a precise constitutive model is a necessity. In this article, a series of warm tensile tests were conducted on Gleeble-1500D thermal mechanical simulator for 6111-T4 aluminum alloy sheets. The corresponding strain rate ranged from 0.015 to 1.5 s-1, and the temperature ranged from 25 to 350 °C. The relationship between the temperature, the strain rate, and the flow stress were discussed. A constitutive model based on the updated Fields-Backofen equation was established to describe the flow behavior of 6111-T4 aluminum alloy during the warm tensile tests. Subsequently, the average absolute relative error (AARE) was introduced to verify the predictability of the constitutive model. The value of AARE at the uniform plastic deformation stage was calculated to be 1.677%, which demonstrates that the predicted flow stress values were in accordance with the experimental ones. The constitutive model was validated by the fact that the simulated results of the warm tensile tests coincided with the experimental ones.

  3. Calibration of DEM simulation: Unconfined Compressive Test and Brazilian Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yucang; Alonso-Marroquín, Fernando

    2009-06-01

    We simulate rock fracture using ESyS_Particle, which is a 3-D Discrete Element Model developed for modeling geological materials. Two types of simulations are carried out: Unconfined Compressive Test (UCT) and Brazilian Tensile Test (BTT). The results are compared to laboratory tests. Model parameters are determined on the basis of theoretical studies on the elastic properties of regular lattices and dimensionless analysis. The fracture patterns and realistic macroscopic strength are well reproduced. Also the ratio of the macroscopic strength of compression to the tensile strength is obtained numerically.

  4. Effect of cantilever nonlinearity in nanoscale tensile testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Weiqiang; Guo, Zaoyang; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2007-02-01

    Microcantilevers are widely used in micro-/nanoscale mechanics studies. The nonlinear response of a cantilever at large deflection is sometimes overlooked. A general study of cantilever beam nonlinearity under a variety of loading conditions was performed with analytical and finite element analyses. Analytical equations for the applied load and the cantilever deflection were obtained. The cantilever nonlinearity was found to increase with increasing cantilever deflection and/or angle of loading. Tensile tests were performed on templated carbon nanotubes (TCNTs) with a custom-made nanomanipulator inside a scanning electron microscope. Atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers were used to load the TCNTs and sense the force. During the tests the AFM cantilevers were loaded to relatively large deflections with nonvertical loads applied at the AFM tip. Based on the slope and the loading angle measurements, the breaking forces of the TCNTs were obtained through numerical integration of the analytical equations. A comparison was made between the load results obtained from linear and nonlinear analyses. The linear analysis was found to underestimate the applied load by up to 15%.

  5. Tensile, creep, and ABI tests on sn5%sb solder for mechanical property evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, K. Linga; Haggag, Fahmy M.; Mahidhara, Rao K.

    1997-07-01

    Sn5%Sb is one of the materials considered for replacing lead containing alloys for soldering in electronic packaging. We evaluated the tensile properties of the bulk material at varied strain-rates and temperatures (to 473K) to determine the underlying deformation mechanisms. Stress exponents of about three and seven were observed at low and high stresses, respectively, and very low activation energies for creep (about 16.7 and 37.7 kJ/mole) were noted. A maximum ductility of about 350% was noted at ambient temperature. Creep tests performed in the same temperature regime also showed two distinct regions, albeit with slightly different exponents (three and five) and activation energy (about 54.4 kJ/mole). Ball indentation tests were performed on the shoulder portions of the creep samples (prior to creep tests) using a Stress-Strain Microprobe@ (Advanced Technology Corporation) at varied indentation rates (strain-rates). The automated ball indentation (ABI) data were at relatively high strain-rates; however, they were in excellent agreement with creep data, while both these results deviated from the tensile test data. Work is planned to perform creep at high stresses at ambient and extend ABI tests to elevated temperatures.

  6. Rate effect on mechanical properties of hydraulic concrete flexural-tensile specimens under low loading rates using acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Su, Huaizhi; Hu, Jiang; Tong, Jianjie; Wen, Zhiping

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) waveform is generated by dislocation, microcracking and other irreversible changes in a concrete material. Based on the AE technique (AET), this paper focuses on strain rate effect on physical mechanisms of hydraulic concrete specimens during the entire fracture process of three point bending (TPB) flexural tests at quasi-static levels. More emphasis is placed on the influence of strain rate on AE hit rate and AE source location around peak stress. Under low strain rates, namely 0.77×10(-7)s(-1), 1×10(-7)s(-1) to 1×10(-6)s(-1) respectively, the results show that the tensile strength increases as the strain rate increases while the peak AE hit rate decreases. Meanwhile, the specimen under a relatively higher strain rate shows a relatively wider intrinsic process zone in a more diffuser manner, lots of distributed microcracks relatively decrease stress intensity, thus delay both microcracking localization and macrocrack propagation. These phenomena can be attributed to Stéfan effect. In addition, further tests, namely the combination of AE monitoring and strain measuring systems was designed to understand the correlation between AE event activity and microfracture (i.e., microcracking and microcracking localization). The relative variation trend of cumulative AE events accords well with that of the load-deformation curve. PMID:22534061

  7. Hoop tensile strength testing of small diameter ceramic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wereszczak, A. A.; Jadaan, O. M.; Lin, H.-T.; Champoux, G. J.; Ryan, D. P.

    2007-03-01

    A method to measure hoop tensile strength of 1-mm-diameter brittle ceramic spheres was demonstrated through the use of a 'C-sphere' flexure strength specimen. This innovative specimen geometry was chosen because a simple, monotonically increasing uniaxial compressive force produces a hoop tensile stress at the C-sphere's outer surface that ultimately initiates fracture. This enables strength quantification and strength-limiting-flaw identification of the sphere itself. Such strength information is relevant to design optimization and durability assessments of ceramic fuel particles and breeder/multiplier pebbles for fusion when particle surfaces are subjected to tensile stresses during their manufacturing or service.

  8. Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Botner, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    A small 10-ft x 12-ft temperature and relative humidity controlled room for tensile testing of parachute materials is presented. Tensile tests of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials indicate there is a negligible change in break strength of test samples soaked in the controlled environment vs samples soaked in ambient conditions.

  9. Micro/nano-mechanical test system employing tensile test holder with push-to-pull transformer

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Yunje; Cyrankowski, Edward; Shan, Zhiwei; Asif, Syed Amanula Syed

    2013-05-07

    A micromachined or microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based push-to-pull mechanical transformer for tensile testing of micro-to-nanometer scale material samples including a first structure and a second structure. The second structure is coupled to the first structure by at least one flexible element that enables the second structure to be moveable relative to the first structure, wherein the second structure is disposed relative to the first structure so as to form a pulling gap between the first and second structures such that when an external pushing force is applied to and pushes the second structure in a tensile extension direction a width of the pulling gap increases so as to apply a tensile force to a test sample mounted across the pulling gap between a first sample mounting area on the first structure and a second sample mounting area on the second structure.

  10. Micro/nano-mechanical test system employing tensile test holder with push-to-pull transformer

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Yunje; Cyrankowski, Edward; Shan, Zhiwei; Syed Asif, Syed Amanula

    2014-07-29

    A micromachined or microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based push-to-pull mechanical transformer for tensile testing of micro-to-nanometer scale material samples including a first structure and a second structure. The second structure is coupled to the first structure by at least one flexible element that enables the second structure to be moveable relative to the first structure, wherein the second structure is disposed relative to the first structure so as to form a pulling gap between the first and second structures such that when an external pushing force is applied to and pushes the second structure in a tensile extension direction a width of the pulling gap increases so as to apply a tensile force to a test sample mounted across the pulling gap between a first sample mounting area on the first structure and a second sample mounting area on the second structure.

  11. Investigation on thermoformability of PLA by rheological and hot tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, Emilia; Iannaccone, Giovanni; Scarfato, Paola; Di Maio, Luciano; Incarnato, Loredana

    2012-07-01

    In this work the correlation between the thermoformability of different grades of polylactide acid (PLA 4032D, PLA 4042D and PLA 2003D) and their mechanical, thermal, and rheological properties was explored. In particular, hot tensile tests, at different stretching temperatures and crosshead speeds, were performed in order to identify an optimum windows of temperature and strain rate for improved thermoforming performance. The properties measured from the creep experiments were correlated with the propensity of PLA sheet to sag, while the unrecovered strains by the creep recovery tests were associated to mold replication attitude of the materials investigated.

  12. Impurity effects on high-temperature tensile ductility of iridium alloys at high strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; George, E.P.; Lee, E.H.; Ohriner, E.K.; Heatherly, L.; Cohron, J.W.

    1999-12-17

    The current study was undertaken to determine what effects, if any, larger amounts of certain impurities (Al,Cr,Fe,Ni, and Si) might have on the physical metallurgy and mechanical properties of the DOP-26 iridium alloy. This report summarizes the effects of these impurities on grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility. Comparisons are made to the grain growth behavior and high-strain-rate tensile properties of the DOP-26 alloy without intentional impurity additions.

  13. Effects of surface cracks and strain rate on the tensile behavior of Balmoral Red granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardoukhi, Ahmad; Hokka, Mikko; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental procedure for studying the effects of surface cracks on the mechanical behavior of Balmoral Red granite under dynamic and quasi-static loading. Three different thermal shocks were applied on the surface of the Brazilian Disc test samples by keeping a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample surface for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Microscopy clearly shows that the number of the surface cracks increases with the duration of the thermal shock. After the thermal shock, the Brazilian Disc tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing machine and a compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) device. The results show that the tensile strength of the rock decreases and the rate sensitivity of the rock increases as more cracks are introduced to the structure. The DIC analysis of the Brazilian disc tests shows that the fracture of the sample initiates at the center of the samples or slightly closer to the incident bar contact point. This is followed by crushing of the samples at both contact points with the stress bars.

  14. Tensile and fatigue qualification testing of ITER-CS conduit alloy JK2LB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; McRae, D. M.; Han, K.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) coils utilize cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) and the conduit alloy is JK2LB. The production grade conduit alloy (and it's welds) must meet strict requirements for strength, toughness, fatigue crack resistance, and fabricability. The conduit alloy must retain good mechanical properties after additional fabrication steps such as welding, coil winding strain and exposure to the Nb3Sn superconductor's reaction heat treatment. Here we present data from cryogenic tensile, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth rate, and axial fatigue tests of JK2LB alloy and conduit butt welds, before and after the exposure to the reaction heat treatment. The tests of specimens removed directly from the conduit provide confirmation of the materials properties and the effect of the cold work and aging. The 4 K fatigue performance is extremely important to the reliability of the CS and is covered both by axial cyclic fatigue tests and the fatigue crack growth rate measurements.

  15. Dynamic tensile test of single PET textile cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guégan, P.; Othman, R.; Pasco, F.; Bruant, R.

    2012-08-01

    The tyres conception involves for certain applications, the use of textile cables as reinforcement. During its use, the tyre undergoes temperatures variations and dynamic loading rates. The consideration of these conditions during the numeric simulations requires the knowledge of the sensitivity of the mechanical behaviour to loading rate and temperature. In this paper, we developed an experimental methodology for testing textile cable up to high strain rate. The main difficulty of testing cables is the optimization of cable fixing on the machine. For that purpose, we adapted the solution of fixing by progressive binding already used in quasi-static, while taking into account constraints inherent to high strain tests. Firstly, the mass of grips was decreased in order to get force signal less sensitive to grips inertia. The method was developed on a high speed hydraulic machine equipped with a thermal enclosure. The investigated temperatures and strain rates range from room temperature to 373 ∘K (100 ∘C) and from 0,01 to 100/s, respectively. In addition, the hydraulic machine was equipped with a high speed video camera. The obtained images were analysed by a tracking technique to measure the average strain in the cable (from 50 to 20000 f/s).

  16. A cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by miniature pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. B.; Liu, S. X.; Gu, K. X.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by a miniature pulse tube cryocooler. At present, tensile tests are widely applied to measure the mechanical properties of materials; most of the cryogenic tensile testing apparatus are designed for samples with standard sizes, while for non-standard size samples, especially for microsamples, the tensile testing cannot be conducted. The general approach to cool down the specimens for tensile testing is by using of liquid nitrogen or liquid helium, which is not convenient: it is difficult to keep the temperature of the specimens at an arbitrary set point precisely, besides, in some occasions, liquid nitrogen, especially liquid helium, is not easily available. To overcome these limitations, a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus cooled by a high frequency pulse tube cryocooler has been designed, built and tested. The operating temperatures of the developed tensile testing apparatus cover from 20 K to room temperature with a controlling precision of ±10 mK. The apparatus configurations, the methods of operation and some cooling performance will be described in this paper.

  17. Establishing Correlations for Predicting Tensile Properties Based on the Shear Punch Test and Vickers Microhardness data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Timothy S.

    A series of mechanical tests was performed on a matrix of pressure vessel alloys to establish correlations between shear punch tests (SPT), microhardness (Hv), and tensile data. The purpose is to estimate tensile properties from SPT and Hv data. Small specimen testing is central to characterization of irradiation-induced changes in alloys used for nuclear applications. SPT have the potential for estimating tensile yield and ultimate strengths, strain hardening and ductility data, by using TEM disks, for example. Additional insight into SPT was gained by performing finite element analysis (FEA) simulations.

  18. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  19. Test system accurately determines tensile properties of irradiated metals at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, P. J.; Skalka, R. J.; Vandergrift, E. F.

    1967-01-01

    Modified testing system determines tensile properties of irradiated brittle-type metals at cryogenic temperatures. The system includes a lightweight cryostat, split-screw grips, a universal joint, and a special temperature control system.

  20. High strain rate and quasi-static tensile behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V after cyclic damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán López, J.; Verleysen, P.; Degrieck, J.

    2012-08-01

    It is common that energy absorbing structural elements are subjected to a number of loading cycles before a crash event. Several studies have shown that previous fatigue can significantly influence the tensile properties of some materials, and hence the behaviour of structural elements made of them. However, when the capacity of absorbing energy of engineering materials is determined, fresh material without any fatigue damage is most often used. This study investigates the effect of fatigue damage on the dynamic tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V in thin-sheet form. Results are completed with tests at quasi-static strain rates and observations of the fracture surfaces, and compared with results obtained from other alloys and steel grades. The experiments show that the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V are not affected by a number of fatigue loading cycles high enough to significantly reduce the energy absorbing capabilities of EDM machined samples.

  1. In situ TEM tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a MEMS device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changhong; Howe, Jane Y.; Perovic, Doug; Filleter, Tobin; Sun, Yu

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a monolithic TEM compatible microelectromechanical system device. The set-up allows direct on-chip nanosheet thickness mapping, high resolution electron beam linking of a pre-fractured nanosheet, and mechanical tensile testing of the nanosheet. This technique enables simultaneous mechanical and high energy electron beam characterization of 2D nanomaterials.

  2. In situ TEM tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a MEMS device.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changhong; Howe, Jane Y; Perovic, Doug; Filleter, Tobin; Sun, Yu

    2016-07-15

    This paper reports in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a monolithic TEM compatible microelectromechanical system device. The set-up allows direct on-chip nanosheet thickness mapping, high resolution electron beam linking of a pre-fractured nanosheet, and mechanical tensile testing of the nanosheet. This technique enables simultaneous mechanical and high energy electron beam characterization of 2D nanomaterials. PMID:27256541

  3. An Evaluation of Some Current Practices for Short-Time Elevated-Temperature Tensile Tests of Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Charles R., Jr.; Heimerl, George J.

    1960-01-01

    The effect of different testing practices on the short-time elevated-temperature tensile properties was determined for 2024-T3 aluminum-alloy, HM21A-T8 and HK31A-H24 magnesium-alloy, and 12 MoV stainless-steel sheet. Tests were made under single strain-rate and single head-speed conditions. A dual strain-rate test was also included. An evaluation of the effects of these practices is given for the tensile and yield strengths, the elongation in 2 inches, and the uniform elongation. The need for a uniform testing practice is demonstrated. Recommended practices suggested by different organizations are included.

  4. Constitutive Modeling of the Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion Test of PTFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnyansky, Anatoly; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl; Gray, George

    2015-06-01

    Use of polymers in the defence, aerospace and industrial application at extreme conditions makes prediction of behaviour of these materials very important. Crucial to this is knowledge of the physical damage response in association with the phase transformations during the loading and the ability to predict this via multi-phase simulation taking the thermodynamical non-equilibrium and strain rate sensitivity into account. The current work analyses Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (DTE) experiments on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). In particular, the phase transition during the loading with subsequent tension are analysed using a two-phase rate sensitive material model implemented in the CTH hydrocode and the calculations are compared with experimental high-speed photography. The damage patterns and their link with the change of loading modes are analysed numerically and are correlated to the test observations.

  5. Design and use of nonstandard tensile specimens for irradiated materials testing

    SciTech Connect

    Panayotou, N.F.; Atkin, S.D.; Puigh, R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Two types of miniature specimens been developed to utilize the limited irradiation volume of high energy neutron sources such as the Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS)-II and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. Wire-type specimens have been used to obtain tensile data for several metals irradiated at RTNS-II. Difficulties in the control of wire specimen dimensions led to the design of a miniature tensile specimen which could be fabricated from 0.25 mm thick sheet stock. Sheet-type tensile specimens are currently our standard tensile specimen for high energy neutron source experiments. These specimens are fabricated, like transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disks, by a punching technique. Precise test frame alignment is essential if reproducible test data are to be obtained. The dedicated test frame developed for miniature tensile specimen testing is briefly described. Miniature tensile specimens of a range of metals have been fabricated and tested. The data are reproducible and are in good agreement with data obtained from larger specimens.

  6. A comparative TEM study of in-reactor and post-irradiation tensile tested copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Tähtinen, S.; Singh, B. N.

    2013-11-01

    The deformation microstructures of oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following in-reactor and post-irradiation slow strain rate tensile tests. The TEM results suggest that the main modes of deformation differ between all examined cases. Plastic deformation appeared predominantly localized in the defect-free cleared channels following post-irradiation testing and hardly any dislocations were seen outside the channels. The microstructures following in-reactor tests were characterized by a small amount of cleared channels and a distinct dislocation density within the matrix. However, the dislocations observed following in-reactor testing did not seem to interact with each other, whereas that was the main mode of deformation in the non-irradiated reference sample. The possible mechanisms of plastic deformation are discussed based on the experimental results. Dislocation-dislocation interactions played the major role if irradiation or irradiation damage is not present. As a result of the interactions, the microstructure of non-irradiated reference copper was characterized by a well-defined cellularized dislocation microstructure. Dynamic dislocation-displacement cascade interactions dominated the deformation process at the in-reactor tensile tests. As a result, the formation of defect-free cleared channels was delayed, dislocations were found from the matrix between the channels, and a clear strain hardening was observed after the yield point. No clear difference between accumulated irradiation damage at in-reactor and post-irradiation samples was found, which may be due to localized nature of SFT evolution in displacement cascades at copper. In the post-irradiation experiments, dislocations were confined to slip planes and annihilate irradiation defects, while moving on the planes and creating defect-free cleared channels. The plastic deformation is localized into these channels, causing a decrease in

  7. Tensile, Fracture, and Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Behavior of High Manganese Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyilas, A.; Weiss, K.; Grikurov, G.; Zoidze, N.

    2006-03-01

    Mechanical low temperature investigations were carried out to determine the cryogenic mechanical properties of newly developed Fe-Cr-Mn alloys with contents of chromium between 5 % and 10 % and manganese between 30 % and 40 % under the Project G-811, Russia. The final products were forged, rolled, and solution heat treated to obtain appropriate plate sizes necessary for the mechanical measurements. The tensile properties of these alloys determined between 4 K and 7 K show for certain alloy combination high elongation values at fracture of greater than 50 % with considerable high yield strengths around 900 MPa. The measured fracture toughness values with small scale compact tension specimens using elastic plastic J-tests show KIC data between 100 MPa√m and 220 MPa√m according to the alloy combination. Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) measurements of these alloys result also in some alloy combination case, high resistance against crack propagation with measured Paris coefficients of m ˜ 5 and C ˜ 8.5 E-13 mm/cycle. Thermal expansion of these alloys has been also determined resulting in values between 1600 μm/m and 1700 μm/m expansion from 5 K to 290 K.

  8. Tensile Properties, Ferrite Contents, and Specimen Heating of Stainless Steels in Cryogenic Gas Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.; Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.

    2006-03-01

    We performed tensile tests at cryogenic temperatures below 77 K and in helium gas environment for SUS 304L and SUS 316L in order to obtain basic data of mechanical properties of the materials for liquid hydrogen tank service. We evaluate tensile curves, tensile properties, ferrite contents, mode of deformation and/or fracture, and specimen heating during the testing at 4 to 77 K. For both SUS 304L and 316L, tensile strength shows a small peak around 10 K, and specimen heating decreases above 30 K. The volume fraction of α-phase increases continuously up to 70 % with plastic strain, at approximately 15 % plastic strain for 304L and up to 35 % for 316L. There was almost no clear influence of testing temperature on strain-induced martensitic transformation at the cryogenic temperatures.

  9. Validating Material Modelling of OFHC Copper Using Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) Test at Different Impact Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Nicola; Testa, Gabriel; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using phenomenological and physically based models (Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong and Rusinek-Klepaczko), are presented. Preliminary simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using crystal plasticity package CPFEM, providing, as input, the strain history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the extruded fragments. Results were compared with EBSD investigation.

  10. Intrinsic tensile properties of cocoon silk fibres can be estimated by removing flaws through repeated tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Kaur, Jasjeet; Wang, Xungai; Batchelor, Warren

    2015-06-01

    Silk fibres from silkworm cocoons have lower strength than spider silk and have received less attention as a source of high-performance fibres. In this work, we have used an innovative procedure to eliminate the flaws gradually of a single fibre specimen by retesting the unbroken portion of the fibre, after each fracture test. This was done multiple times so that the final test may provide the intrinsic fibre strength. During each retest, the fibre specimen began to yield once the failure load of the preceding test was exceeded. For each fibre specimen, a composite curve was constructed from multiple tests. The composite curves and analysis show that strengths of mass-produced Muga and Eri cocoon silk fibres increased from 446 to 618 MPa and from 337 to 452 MPa, respectively. Similarly, their toughness increased from 84 to 136 MJ m(-3) and from 61 to 104 MJ m(-3), respectively. Composite plots produced significantly less inter-specimen variations compared to values from single tests. The fibres with reduced flaws as a result of retests in the tested section have a tensile strength and toughness comparable to naturally spun dragline spider silk with a reported strength of 574 MPa and toughness of 91-158 MJ m(-3), which is used as a benchmark for developing high-performance fibres. This retesting approach is likely to provide useful insights into discrete flaw distributions and intrinsic mechanical properties of other fatigue-resistant materials. PMID:25948613

  11. Intrinsic tensile properties of cocoon silk fibres can be estimated by removing flaws through repeated tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Kaur, Jasjeet; Wang, Xungai; Batchelor, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibres from silkworm cocoons have lower strength than spider silk and have received less attention as a source of high-performance fibres. In this work, we have used an innovative procedure to eliminate the flaws gradually of a single fibre specimen by retesting the unbroken portion of the fibre, after each fracture test. This was done multiple times so that the final test may provide the intrinsic fibre strength. During each retest, the fibre specimen began to yield once the failure load of the preceding test was exceeded. For each fibre specimen, a composite curve was constructed from multiple tests. The composite curves and analysis show that strengths of mass-produced Muga and Eri cocoon silk fibres increased from 446 to 618 MPa and from 337 to 452 MPa, respectively. Similarly, their toughness increased from 84 to 136 MJ m−3 and from 61 to 104 MJ m−3, respectively. Composite plots produced significantly less inter-specimen variations compared to values from single tests. The fibres with reduced flaws as a result of retests in the tested section have a tensile strength and toughness comparable to naturally spun dragline spider silk with a reported strength of 574 MPa and toughness of 91–158 MJ m−3, which is used as a benchmark for developing high-performance fibres. This retesting approach is likely to provide useful insights into discrete flaw distributions and intrinsic mechanical properties of other fatigue-resistant materials. PMID:25948613

  12. Tensile and burst tests in support of the cadmium safety rod failure evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.

    1992-02-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. This report discusses confirmatory separate effects tests conducted to support the evaluation of failures observed in the safety rod thermal tests. As part of the failure evaluation, the potential for liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of the safety rod cladding by cadmium (Cd) -- aluminum (Al) solutions was examined. Based on the test conditions, literature data, and U-Bend tests, its was concluded that the SS304 safety rod cladding would not be subject to LME by liquid Cd-Al solutions under conditions relevant to the safety rod thermal tests or gamma heating accident. To confirm this conclusion, tensile tests on SS304 specimens were performed in both air and liquid Cd-Al solutions with the range of strain rates, temperatures, and loading conditions spanning the range relevant to the safety rod thermal tests and gamma heating accident.

  13. Studies on tensile properties and fracture behavior of Al-6Si-0.5Mg (-Cu or/and Ni) alloys at various strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effects of various strain rates on the tensile properties of Al-6Si-0.5Mg cast alloys with Cu or/and Ni additions and to establish data on the stress-strain behavior of the alloys with applications in automotive engineering. Experimental alloys of the following composition were prepared by melt processing technique. Both microstructure and the mechanical properties were investigated. The uniaxial tension test was carried out at strain rates ranging from 10-4s-1 to 10-2s-1. Tensile strengths were found to increase with ageing temperature and the maximum being attained at peak age condition (1hr at 225°C). The additions of Cu or/and Ni resulted in an increase in tensile strength and 2wt% Cu content alloy (Al-6Si-0.5Mg-2Cu) showed maximum strength. Evaluation of tensile properties at three strain rates (10-4, 10-3 and 10-2s-1) showed that strain rates affected the tensile properties significantly. At higher strain rates the strength was better but ductility was poor.

  14. Acoustic emission monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad aluminum 2024-T3 and characterization of effects of corrosion on AE source events and material tensile properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Natarajan, Shridhar

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion damage affects structural integrity and deteriorates material properties of aluminum alloys in aircraft structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) is an effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique for monitoring such damages and predicting failure in large structures of an aircraft. For successful interpretation of data from AE monitoring, sources of AE and factors affecting it need to be identified. This paper presents results of AE monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad Aluminum 2024-T3 test specimens, and characterization of the effects of strain-rate and corrosion damage on material tensile properties and AE source events. Effect of corrosion was studied by inducing corrosion in the test specimens by accelerated corrosion testing in a Q-Fog accelerated corrosion chamber for 12 weeks. Eight (8) masked dog-bone shaped specimens were placed in the accelerated corrosion chamber at the beginning of the test. Two (2) dog-bone shaped specimens were removed from the corrosion chamber after exposure time of 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks respectively, and subjected to tension testing till specimen failure along with AE monitoring, as well as two (2) reference samples not exposed to corrosion. Material tensile properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, toughness, and elongation) obtained from tension test and AE parameters obtained from AE monitoring were analyzed and characterized. AE parameters increase with increase in exposure period of the specimens in the corrosive environment. Aluminum 2024-T3 is an acoustically silent material during tensile deformation without any damage. Acoustic emission events increase with increase of corrosion damage and with increase in strain rate above a certain value. Thus AE is suitable for structural health monitoring of corrosion damage. Ultimate tensile strength, toughness and elongation values decrease with increase of exposure period in corrosion chamber.

  15. Annealing and Test Temperature Dependence of Tensile Properties of UNS N04400 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Naveed; Ahmad, R.; Akhtar, Tanveer; Ayub, R.; Ghauri, I. M.

    2013-07-01

    Effects of annealing and test temperatures on the tensile behavior of UNS N04400 alloy have been examined. The specimens were annealed at 800, 1000, and 1200 °C for 4 h under vacuum in a muffle furnace. Stress-strain curves of the specimens were obtained in the temperature range 25-300 °C using a universal testing machine fitted with a thermostatic chamber. The results indicate that the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and percentage elongation of the specimens decrease with increase of annealing temperature. By increasing the test temperature, the YS and UTS decrease, whereas the percentage elongation initially decreases with increase of test temperature from 25 to 100 °C and then increases with further increasing the temperature up to 300 °C. The changes in the tensile properties of the alloy are associated with the post-annealing microstructure and modes of fracture.

  16. Instrumented impact and residual tensile strength testing of eight-ply carbon eopoxy specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Instrumented drop weight impact testing was utilized to examine a puncture-type impact on thin carbon-epoxy coupons. Four different material systems with various eight-ply lay-up configurations were tested. Specimens were placed over a 10.3-mm diameter hole and impacted with a smaller tup (4.2-mm diameter) than those used in previous studies. Force-time plots as well as data on absorbed energy and residual tensile strength were gathered and examined. It was found that a critical impact energy level existed for each material tested, at which point tensile strength began to rapidly decrease with increasing impact energy.

  17. Computational Simulation of the High Strain Rate Tensile Response of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    A research program is underway to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Under these types of loading conditions, the material response can be highly strain rate dependent and nonlinear. State variable constitutive equations based on a viscoplasticity approach have been developed to model the deformation of the polymer matrix. The constitutive equations are then combined with a mechanics of materials based micromechanics model which utilizes fiber substructuring to predict the effective mechanical and thermal response of the composite. To verify the analytical model, tensile stress-strain curves are predicted for a representative composite over strain rates ranging from around 1 x 10(exp -5)/sec to approximately 400/sec. The analytical predictions compare favorably to experimentally obtained values both qualitatively and quantitatively. Effective elastic and thermal constants are predicted for another composite, and compared to finite element results.

  18. Evaluation of damage models by finite element prediction of fracture in cylindrical tensile test.

    PubMed

    Eom, Jaegun; Kim, Mincheol; Lee, Seongwon; Ryu, Hoyeun; Joun, Mansoo

    2014-10-01

    In this research, tensile tests of cylindrical specimens of a mild steel are predicted via the finite element method, with emphasis on the fracture predictions of various damage models. An analytical model is introduced for this purpose. An iterative material identification procedure is used to obtain the flow stress, making it possible to exactly predict a tensile test up to the fracture point, in the engineering sense. A node-splitting technique is used to generate the cracks on the damaged elements. The damage models of McClintock, Rice-Tracey, Cockcroft-Latham, Freudenthal, Brozzo et al. and Oyane et al. are evaluated by comparing their predictions from the tensile test perspective. PMID:25942914

  19. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of conditioned foamed asphalt mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS) Test for samples prepared with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Samples were conditioned in water at 25°C for 24 hours prior to testing. Results show that recycled aggregate from reclaimed asphalt pavement performs as well as virgin aggregate.

  20. A combined analytical-experimental tensile test technique for brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    A semiconventional tensile test technique is developed for impact ices and other brittle materials. Accurate results have been obtained on ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity in a refrigerated ice test. It is noted that the technique can be used to determine the physical properties of impact ices accreted inside icing wind tunnels or other brittle materials.

  1. Tensile adhesion test measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings are briefly studied, including a critical analysis of the experimental scatter for duplicate tests. The application of a simple method which presents adhesion strength data in a fracture mechanics perspective is demonstrated. Available data are analyzed in a way which suggests an approach to finding the overall defect contribution to reducing the apparent strength of coatings.

  2. Microstructural evolutions and stability of gradient nano-grained copper under tensile tests and subsequent storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; You, Z. S.; Tao, N. R.; Lu, L.

    2015-08-01

    A gradient nano-grained (GNG) surface layer is produced on a bulk coarse-grained Cu by means of a surface mechanical grinding treatment. Homogeneous grain coarsening induced by mechanical deformation is observed in the GNG Cu layer under tensile tests at both 300 K and 123 K. The concurrent grain coarsening during tensile deformation is proven to be also thermally activated, because the extent of grain coarsening of the GNG Cu layer is less significant at 123 K than at 300 K, although a higher flow stress is achieved at 123 K. During the subsequent storage at 258 K after tensile tests, no obvious change can be found for the grain size in the GNG Cu layer deformed at 300 K. In contrast, widespread abnormal grain coarsening is frequently observed in the GNG Cu layer deformed at 123 K and stored for 100 days, which may be caused by the higher stored energy in the non-equilibrium grain boundary structures.

  3. In situ tensile testing of individual Co nanowires inside a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Breguet, Jean-Marc; Clavel, Reymond; Phillippe, Laetitia; Utke, Ivo; Michler, Johann

    2009-09-01

    Uniaxial quasi-static tensile testing on individual nanocrystalline Co nanowires (NWs), synthesized by electrochemical deposition process (EDP) in porous templates, was performed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) using a microfabricated tensile stage consisting of a comb drive actuator and a clamped-clamped beam force sensor. A 'three-beam structure' was fabricated by focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID) on the stage, from which the specimen elongation and the tensile force could be measured simultaneously from SEM images at high magnification. A novel strategy of modifying device topography, e.g. in the form of trenches and pillars, was proposed to facilitate in situ SEM pick-and-place nanomanipulation, which could achieve a high yield of about 80% and reduce the difficulties in specimen preparation for tensile testing at the nanoscale. The measured apparent Young's modulus (75.3 +/- 14.6) GPa and tensile strength (1.6 +/- 0.4) GPa are significantly lower than the bulk modulus and the theoretical strength of monocrystalline samples, respectively. This result is important for designing Co NW-based devices. The origins of these distinctions are discussed in terms of the stiffnesses of the soldering portions, specimen misalignment, microstructure of the NWs and the experimental measurement uncertainty. PMID:19687546

  4. Strain rate dependence of the tensile properties of V-(4--5%)Cr-(4--5%)Ti irradiated in EBR-II and HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1998-03-01

    Elevated temperature tensile tests performed on V-(405)Cr-(4-5)Ti indicate that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate for irradiation and test temperatures near 200 C, and decreases with increasing strain rate for irradiation and test temperatures near 400 C. This observation is in qualitative agreement with the temperature-dependent strain rate effects observed on unirradiated specimens, and implies that some interstitial solute remains free to migrate in irradiated specimens. Additional strain rate data at different temperatures are needed.

  5. Tensile test of SS 316LN jacket with different conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jinggang; Dai, Chao; Liao, Guojun; Wu, Yu; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng; wang, Kun; Shen, Xiaogang; Tu, Zhengpin; Ji, Hui

    2014-11-01

    316LN stainless steel is selected as a material for Toroidal-field (TF) conductor jacket of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). When energized, the ITER TF coils experience large pulsed electromagnetic forces that the conductor jacket itself must withstand. The conductor will be compacted, spooled and aged at approximately 650 °C during manufacture. Therefore, the sample jackets were prepared under compaction, stretching and annealing to simulate the manufacturing process and operation of TF coils. The present Chinese TF jacket has good performance under standard conditions. In order to investigate more mechanical properties of 316LN jacket, the different cold working and annealing were applied to the raw materials. The samples were measured at 4.2 K, 77 K and 300 K. Youngs modulus, yield strength (0.2% offset), elongation at failure and SEM images are reported. There is no big deviation among different conditions. The test results show that Chinese TF jacket has good performance.

  6. Tensile tests of niobium material for SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Dhanaraj, N.; Cooley, L.; Hicks, D.; Hahn, E.; Burk, D.; Muranyi, W.; Foley, N.; Edwards, H.; Harms, E.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab /Michigan State U.

    2009-06-01

    Mechanical tests of cavity-grade niobium samples were conducted to provide engineering information for the certification of 3rd-harmonic superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryomodules. Large changes of mechanical properties occur throughout the cavity fabrication process due to the cold work introduced by forming, the heating introduced by electron beam welding, and the recovery of cold work during the anneal used to degas hydrogen after chemical processing. Data is provided here to show the different properties at various stages of fabrication, including both weld regions and samples from the bulk niobium far away from the weld. Measurements of RRR were used to assure that any contamination during annealing was negligible.

  7. Tensile Tests of Niobium Material for Srf Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G.; Dhanaraj, N.; Cooley, L.; Hicks, D.; Hahn, E.; Burk, D.; Muranyi, W.; Foley, M.; Edwards, H.; Harms, E.; Champion, M.; Baars, D.; Compton, C.

    2010-04-01

    Mechanical tests of cavity-grade niobium samples were conducted to provide engineering information for the certification of 3rd-harmonic superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryomodules. Large changes of mechanical properties occur throughout the cavity fabrication process due to the cold work introduced by forming, the heating introduced by electron beam welding, and the recovery of cold work during the anneal used to degas hydrogen after chemical processing. Data is provided here to show the different properties at various stages of fabrication, including both weld regions and samples from the bulk niobium far away from the weld. Measurements of RRR were used to assure that any contamination during annealing was negligible.

  8. Grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of iridium alloy DOP-26

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Gubbi, A.N.; Lin, Y.; Cohron, J.W.; Lee, E.H.; George, E.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the new-process iridium-based DOP-26 alloy used for the Cassini space mission. This alloy was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1980`s and is currently used by NASA for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. Included within this report are data generated on grain growth in vacuum or low-pressure oxygen environments; a comparison of grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material with sheet material; effect of grain size, test temperature, and oxygen exposure on high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility; and grain growth in vacuum and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of welded DOP-26. The data for the new-process material is compared to available old-process data.

  9. Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2009-03-10

    TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

  10. On-wafer time-dependent high reproducibility nano-force tensile testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergers, L. I. J. C.; Hoefnagels, J. P. M.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Time-dependent mechanical investigations of on-wafer specimens are of interest for improving the reliability of thin metal film microdevices. This paper presents a novel methodology, addressing key challenges in creep and anelasticity investigations through on-wafer tensile tests, achieving highly reproducible force and specimen deformation measurements and loading states. The methodology consists of a novel approach for precise loading using a pin-in-hole gripper and a high-precision specimen alignment system based on three-dimensional image tracking and optical profilometry resulting in angular alignment of <0.1 mrad and near-perfect co-linearity. A compact test system enables in situ tensile tests of on-wafer specimens under light and electron microscopy. Precision force measurement over a range of 0.07 µN to 250 mN is realized based on a simple drift-compensated elastically-hinged load cell with high-precision deflection measurement. The specimen deformation measurement, compensated for drift through image tracking, yields displacement reproducibility of <6 nm. Proof of principle tensile experiments are performed on 5 µm-thick aluminum-alloy thin film specimens, demonstrating reproducible Young’s modulus measurement of 72.6 ± 3.7 GPa. Room temperature creep experiments show excellent stability of the force measurement and underline the methodology’s high reproducibility and suitability for time-dependent nano-force tensile testing of on-wafer specimens.

  11. Biaxial Tensile Test of Cold Rolled IF Steel Sheet for Large Plastic Strain Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enatsu, Ryotaro; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2011-08-01

    Deformation behavior of cold rolled IF steel sheet (SPCE) under biaxial tension has been investigated for large plastic strain range over 15%. The test material was bent and TIG welded to form a tubular specimen with an outer diameter of 46.2 mm and wall thickness of 0.8 mm. The tubular specimens have been subjected to linear stress paths in the first quadrant of stress space with the use of a servo-controlled tension-internal pressure testing machine developed by one of the authors [T. Kuwabara, K. Yoshida, K. Narihara, S. Takahashi, Anisotropic plastic deformation of extruded aluminum alloy tube under axial forces and internal pressure, Int. J. Plasticity 21, 101-117 (2005)]. Moreover, biaxial tensile tests using a cruciform specimen have also been carried out to more precisely measure the deformation behavior for a small strain range following initial yielding. True stress-true plastic strain curves, contours of plastic work in stress space and the directions of plastic strain rates have been measured and compared with those calculated using selected yield functions: the von Mises, Hill's quadratic and Yld2000-2d [Barlat, F., Brem, J.C., Yoon, J.W., Chung, K., Dick, R.E., Lege, D.J., Pourboghrat, F., Choi, S.H., Chu, E., Plane stress yield function for aluminum alloy sheets—Part 1: Theory. Int. J. Plasticity 19, 1297-1319 (2003)]. The plastic deformation behavior up to a work equivalent plastic strain of ɛ0p = 0.19 has been successfully measured. It is found that the test material exhibits differential hardening and that the Yld2000-2d yield function with an exponent of six most closely predicts the contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates.

  12. A modified Weibull model for tensile strength distribution of carbon nanotube fibers with strain rate and size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gengzhi; Pang, John H. L.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Zhang, Yani; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Zheng, Lianxi

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental studies on the effects of strain rate and size on the distribution of tensile strength of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers are reported in this paper. Experimental data show that the mechanical strength of CNT fibers increases from 0.2 to 0.8 GPa as the strain rate increases from 0.00001 to 0.1 (1/s). In addition, the influence of fiber diameter at low and high strain rate conditions was investigated further with statistical analysis. A modified Weibull distribution model for characterizing the tensile strength distribution of CNT fibers taking into account the effect of strain rate and fiber diameter is proposed.

  13. Experimental Study on Tensile Behavior of Carbon Fiber and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Aluminum at Different Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuanxin; Wang, Ying; Jeelani, Shaik; Xia, Yuanming

    2007-01-01

    In this study, dynamic and quasi-static tensile behaviors of carbon fiber and unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced aluminum composite have been investigated. The complete stress strain curves of fiber bundles and the composite at different strain rates were obtained. The experimental results show that carbon fiber is a strain rate insensitive material, but the tensile strength and critical strain of the Cf/Al composite increased with increasing of strain rate because of the strain rate strengthening effect of aluminum matrix. Based on experimental results, a fiber bundles model has been combined with Weibull strength distribution function to establish a one-dimensional damage constitutive equation for the Cf/Al composite.

  14. Analysis of Factors Influencing Measurement Accuracy of Al Alloy Tensile Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgornik, Bojan; Žužek, Borut; Sedlaček, Marko; Kevorkijan, Varužan; Hostej, Boris

    2016-02-01

    In order to properly use materials in design, a complete understanding of and information on their mechanical properties, such as yield and ultimate tensile strength must be obtained. Furthermore, as the design of automotive parts is constantly pushed toward higher limits, excessive measuring uncertainty can lead to unexpected premature failure of the component, thus requiring reliable determination of material properties with low uncertainty. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of different metrology factors, including the number of tested samples, specimens machining and surface quality, specimens input diameter, type of testing and human error on the tensile test results and measurement uncertainty when performed on 2xxx series Al alloy. Results show that the most significant contribution to measurement uncertainty comes from the number of samples tested, which can even exceed 1 %. Furthermore, moving from experimental laboratory conditions to very intense industrial environment further amplifies measurement uncertainty, where even if using automated systems human error cannot be neglected.

  15. Nano-Scale Tensile Testing and Sample Preparation Techniques for Silicon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Sudoh, Koichi; Sakakihara, Shouichi; Naito, Muneyuki; Inoue, Shozo; Namazu, Takahiro

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we describe an experimental technique to achieve a highly reliable characterization of the mechanical properties of silicon (Si) nanowires (NWs). A reusable on-chip Si device consisting of comb-drive electrostatic actuator for generating tensile force and capacitive sensors for measuring tensile force and displacement was designed and developed for quasi-static tensile test of Si NWs. The combination of focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication, FIB-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and probe manipulation enabled us to directly fabricate the NWs on the device. This sampling technique led to high yielding percentage of nano-scale tensile testing. The NWs were made from 200-nm-thick Si membranes that were produced by using silicon-on-nothing membrane fabrication technique. Several Si NWs were annealed at 700 °C in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) for 5 min in order to examine the influence of annealing on the mechanical characteristics. The mean Young's modulus for nonannealed NWs was 129.1+/-10.1 GPa. After UHV annealing, the mean value was improved to be 168.1+/-1.3 GPa, comparable to the ideal value for Si(001)[110]. The annealing process gave rise to improving the Young's modulus, whereas it degraded the strength. Transmission electron microscopy suggested that recrystallization and gallium nanoclusters formation by annealing would have changed the mechanical characteristics.

  16. Development of a miniature tensile Kolsky bar for dynamic testing of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jastin V.

    Mechanical properties such as yield stress and ultimate strength are most commonly obtained under quasi-static (strain rate of 10--4 s--1) loading conditions Materials such as metals, ceramics, and polymers may exhibit significant changes in mechanical response when subjected to high strain rate (102 --105 per second) conditions. The loading rate or strain rate can affect the material properties such as elastic modulus, yield strength, work hardening, and ductility. To ensure product quality and reliability under impact conditions, the mechanical responses of materials under dynamic loading conditions must be characterized. A Kolsky bar is a tool that can be used to study the uniaxial compressive constitutive behavior of materials under high strain rates. The goal of this thesis is to develop a miniature Tensile Kolsky bar that can be used to test materials with thickness on the order of 200 micrometers (thin foils). The system consists of a cylindrical launch tube with an internal striker, a rectangular incident bar and a transmitted bar. The specimen is held in pockets that were milled directly into the incident and transmitted bar. The rectangular incident and transmitted bars facilitate specimen and strain gage mounting. The rectangular section also provides a reduced cross sectional bar area compared to a bar of circular cross section with diameter equivalent to the width of the rectangular bar, which increases the system sensitivity. This thesis presents the detailed description of the miniature Kolsky bar device, specimen geometry, diagnostic techniques and different calibration and validation techniques used for developing the system. The Kolsky bar setup was used to test 99.9 percent pure magnesium at two different strain rates (5000 and 10000 per second). Specimens were cut from billets processed via the 4Bc equal channel angular extrusion route and were tested in three different directions: extrusion, longitudinal and transverse. The results from the

  17. Strain rate change tests with the Split Hopkinson Bar method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakov, M.; Kokkonen, J.; Östman, K.; Kuokkala, V.-T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, methods to produce rapid strain rate changes for strain rate sensitivity measurements in Split Hopkinson Bar arrangements are presented and discussed. Two different cases are considered: a strain rate change test within the high strain rate region in compression, and a tension test incorporating a large strain rate jump directly from the low strain rate region to high strain rates. The former method is based on the loading wave amplitude manipulation, while the latter method is based on the incorporation of a low strain rate loading device into a Tensile Split Hopkinson Bar apparatus.

  18. Ten deg off-axis tensile test for intralaminar shear characterization of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted to assess the suitability of the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen for the intralaminar shear characterization of unidirectional composites. Composite mechanics, a combined-stress failure criterion, and a finite element analysis were used to determine theoretically the stress-strain variation across the specimen width and the relative stress and strain magnitudes at the 10 deg plane. Strain gages were used to measure the strain variation across the specimen width at specimen midlength and near the end tabs. Specimens from Mod-I/epoxy, T-300/epoxy, and S-glass/epoxy were used in the experimental program. It was found that the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen is suitable for intralaminar shear characterization and it is recommended that it should be considered as a possible standard test specimen for such a characterization.

  19. Dual phase versus TRIP strip steels: Microstructural changes as a consequence of quasi-static and dynamic tensile testing

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, S.; Jones, T.B.; Fourlaris, G. . E-mail: g.fourlaris@swan.ac.uk

    2007-04-15

    The development of present day and future vehicles is being driven by the need to simultaneously reduce mass and increase passenger and pedestrian safety. For this reason, the steel industry has developed strip steel grades with suitable properties, as required for meeting the demands placed on the automotive manufacturers. Two of these strip steel grades are the Dual Phase (DP) and the Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, which are thought to offer solutions for critical crash component criteria. Limited published information is available on the changes in microstructure of these novel strip steel grades at different rates of deformation. This paper examines the change in microstructure of a range of both commercial and experimental DP and TRIP strip steel grades, which were tensile tested at low (0.001 s{sup -1}) and very high strain rates (200 s{sup -1}). The DP and TRIP microstructures were characterised in terms of ferrite grain size, ferrite grain elongation and volume fraction of constituent phases. The specimens were examined following deformation and compared to the as-received condition to assess microstructural changes. This paper concentrates only on microstructural changes through dynamic tensile testing of DP and TRIP grades at low and high strain rates. The full crash performance data from the dynamic tensile tests and crushing of box sections is presented in a separate publication. [S. Oliver, G. Fourlaris and T.B. Jones, 'Dual Phase versus TRIP strip steels: a comparison of dynamic properties for automotive crash performance', Materials Science and Technology, 2006 (submitted for publication)].

  20. Microstructure and fracture behavior of F82H steel under different irradiation and tensile test conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of martensitic steel F82H were irradiated to doses ranging from 10.7 dpa/850 appm He to 19.6 dpa/1740 appm He at temperatures between 165 and 305 °C in the second experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-II). Tensile tests were conducted at different temperatures and various fracture modes were observed. Microstructural changes including irradiation-induced defect clusters, dislocation loops and helium bubbles under different irradiation conditions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deformation microstructures of tensile tested specimens were carefully examined to understand the underlying deformation mechanisms. Deformation twinning was for the first time observed in irradiated martensitic steels. A change of deformation mechanism from dislocation channeling to deformation twinning was observed when the fracture mode changed from rather ductile (quasi-cleavage) to brittle (intergranular or cleavage and intergranular mixed).

  1. A novel strategy for utilizing voice coil servoactuators in tensile tests of low volume protein hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Saqlain, Farees; Popa, Ionel; Fernández, Julio M.; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel tensile testing system optimized for the mechanical loading of microliter volume protein hydrogels. Our apparatus incorporates a voice coil servoactuator capable of carrying out fixed velocity extension-relaxation cycles as well as extension step protocols. The setup is equipped with an acrylic cuvette permitting day-long incubations in solution. To demonstrate the functionality of the device, we photochemically crosslinked polyproteins of the I91 immunoglobulin domain from the muscle protein titin to create solid hydrogels that recapitulate elastic properties of muscle. We present data from tensile tests of these low volume biomaterials that support protein unfolding as a main determinant of the elasticity of protein hydrogels. Our results demonstrate the potential use of protein hydrogels as biomaterials whose elastic properties dynamically respond to their environment. PMID:25960689

  2. Tensile test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsusue, K.; Fujisawa, Y.; Takahara, K.

    1985-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile strength tests of pressureless sintered silicon nitride were carried out in air at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to 1600 C. Silicon nitrides containing Y2O3, Al2O3, Al2O3-MgO, or MgO-CeO2 additives were tested. The results show that the composition of the additive used influences the strength characteristics of the silicon nitride. The tensile strength rapidly decreased at temperatures above 1000 C for the materials containing MgO as the additive and above 1000 C for the material with Y2O3. When the temperature increased to as high as 1300 C, the strength decreased to about 10 percent of the room temperature strength in each case. Observations of the fracture origin and of the crack propagation on the fracture surfaces are discussed.

  3. Adhesion Assessment of Bnt Films on Titanium Substrates Using a Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fangchao; Kusukawa, Kazuhiro

    Lead-free piezoelectric (Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3 (abbreviated as BNT) films were deposited on 1 mm thick pure titanium(Ti) substrates by a hydrothermal method. Tensile tests were performed to quantitatively assess the adhesion strength between BNT films and Ti substrates. Ti substrates were pretreated by chemical polish and mechanical polish respectively prior to BNT film deposition. In the tensile test, the behavior of BNT film exfoliation was investigated by the replica method. The critical Ti substrate strain inducing BNT film exfoliation was determined by the aid of finite element analysis (FEM). In this study, the results revealed that BNT film exfoliations were caused by the strain of Ti substrate, and the mechanical polish pretreatment improved the adhesion of BNT film to Ti substrate.

  4. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of foamed asphalt mix tested in dry condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    Indirect tensile strength (ITS) test was conducted to analyse strength of the foamed asphalt mixes incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement. Samples were tested for ITS after cured in the oven at 40°C for 72 hours. This testing condition known as dry condition or unconditioned. Laboratory results show that reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) contents insignificantly affect the ITS results. ITS results significantly affected by foamed bitumen contents.

  5. Microtensile and tensile bond strength of single-bottle adhesives: a new test method.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, A I

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the tensile and microtensile bond strength of five single-bottle adhesives to dentine, extracted human molar teeth were used. For each tooth dentine was exposed on the occlusal surface by cutting with an isomet saw and the remaining part was mounted in a plastic ring using dental stone. The tested adhesive materials were: Scotchbond 1, Syntac SC, One-Step, Prime & Bond 2.1 and Clearfil SE Bond. The adhesive was applied to either 1 mm(2) of dentine or a circular area with a diameter of 3.9 mm. Composite resin Clearfil AP-X was placed to the adhesives using a Teflon split mould 3.9 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in height. Tensile and microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Under tensile mode, the bond strengths were 16.7 +/- 3.5, 15.2 +/- 2.5, 11.5 +/- 3.2, 13.7 +/- 2.6, 20.9 +/- 4.2 MPa for each material. Under microtensile mode, the bond strengths were 52.5 +/- 9.5, 55.3 +/- 8.3, 40.5 +/- 5.2, 37.5 +/- 8.7, 60 +/- 6.21 MPa. Fracture pattern of bonded specimens showed 66% cohesive dentine failure in samples tested for tensile bond strength. For the microtensile test, failures were mainly adhesive at the interface between adhesive and dentine (94%). PMID:15089946

  6. Tensile-shear correlations obtained from shear punch test technique using a modified experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, V.; Visweswaran, P.; Vijayraghavan, A.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Raj, Baldev

    2009-09-01

    Shear punch testing has been a very useful technique for evaluating mechanical properties of irradiated alloys using a very small volume of material. The load-displacement data is influenced by the compliance of the fixture components. This paper describes a modified experimental approach where the compliances of the punch and die components are eliminated. The analysis of the load-displacement data using the modified setup for various alloys like low carbon steel, SS316, modified 9Cr-1Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo indicate that the shear yield strength evaluated at 0.2% offset of normalized displacement relates to the tensile YS as per the Von Mises yield relation ( σys = 1.73 τys). A universal correlation of type UTS = mτmax where m is a function of strain hardening exponent, is seen to be obeyed for all the materials in this study. The use of analytical models developed for blanking process are explored for evaluating strain hardening exponent from the load-displacement data. This study is directed towards rationalizing the tensile-shear empirical correlations for a more reliable prediction of tensile properties from shear punch tests.

  7. The Tensile Mechanical Properties of Thermomechanically Consolidated Titanium at Different Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cun; Ma, Mingxing; Jia, Mingtu; Raynova, Stiliana; Yan, Jianqiang; Zhang, Deliang

    2015-11-01

    The microstructures, tensile mechanical properties, and fracture behavior of a commercially pure (CP) titanium disk (called PF/Ti disk) and a CP titanium bar (called PE/Ti bar) made by powder compact forging (PCF) and powder compact extrusion (PCE) respectively have been studied. With increasing the strain rate from 10-4 to 10-1 s-1, the yield strength of the PF/Ti disk and PE/Ti bar increased from 708 to 811 MPa and from 672 to 764 MPa, respectively; their UTS increased from 824 to 1009 MPa and from 809 to 926 MPa, respectively, and their elongation to fracture decreased from 21 to 8 pct and from 25 to 17.8 pct, respectively. With a low strain rate of 10-4 s-1, the PF/Ti disk did not show any cavities at unbonded or weakly bonded interparticle boundaries, but the PE/Ti bar showed a small number of cavities with sizes of around 1 μm. With a high strain rate of 10-2 s-1, the PF/Ti disk showed a small number of cavities with sizes in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm, while for the PE/Ti bar, the cavities grew into microcracks of up to 20 μm long. The findings suggest that close to 100 pct of consolidation is rapidly achieved by PCF at 1573 K (1300 °C) and PCE at 1523 K (1250 °C), respectively, possibly due to the dissolution of the particle oxide surface films during heating and rapid diffusion bonding between the fresh particle surfaces during PCF and PCE.

  8. Effect of strain rate on the tensile properties of unirradiated and irradiated V-4Cr-4Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowcliffe, A. F.; Zinkle, S. J.; Hoelzer, D. T.

    2000-12-01

    Tensile tests were carried out on an annealed, unirradiated V-4Cr-4Ti alloy from RT to 850°C at strain rates ranging from 10-1 to 10-5 s-1. Below 300°C, where interstitial solutes are relatively immobile, deformation is homogeneous, and the strain rate sensitivity (SRS) of the yield and flow stress is positive. Between 300°C and 700°C, the formation of solute atmospheres at locked dislocations results in dynamic strain-aging (DSA), deformation becomes heterogeneous, and the SRS of the flow stress is negative; in this regime the lower yield stress is independent of strain rate. Above 700°C, substitutional solutes are also mobile, DSA declines, and the material enters a power law creep regime in which the SRS becomes positive again. Following neutron irradiation to 0.5 dpa at temperatures ⩽400°C, severe flow localization occurs due to the high number density of <1 1 0> and <1 1 1> loops. However, above 400°C, strain hardening capacity returns but without the Lüders extension. At 500°C, after several percent plastic deformation, DSA occurs as interstitial solutes are released from the defect structure.

  9. Tensile properties of nicalon fiber-reinforced carbon following aerospace turbine engine testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. L.; Zawada, L. P.; Srinivasan, R.

    2003-06-01

    The durability of coated Nicalon silicon carbide fiber-reinforced carbon (SiC/C) as the flap and seal exhaust nozzle components in a military aerospace turbine engine was studied. Test specimens machined from both a flap and a seal component were tested for residual strength following extended ground engine testing on a General Electric F414 afterburning turbofan engine. Although small amounts of damage to the protective exterior coating were identified on each component following engine testing, the tensile strengths were equal to the as-fabricated tensile strength of the material. Differences in strength between the two components and variability within the data sets could be traced back to the fabrication process using witness coupon test data from the manufacturer. It was also observed that test specimens machined transversely across the flap and seal components were stronger than those machined along the length. The excellent retained strength of the coated SiC/C material after extended exposure to the severe environment in the afterburner exhaust section of an aerospace turbofan engine has resulted in this material being selected as the baseline material for the F414 exhaust nozzle system.

  10. Orthodontic brackets removal under shear and tensile bond strength resistance tests - a comparative test between light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P. C. G.; Porto-Neto, S. T.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    We have investigated if a new LEDs system has enough efficient energy to promote efficient shear and tensile bonding strength resistance under standardized tests. LEDs 470 ± 10 nm can be used to photocure composite during bracket fixation. Advantages considering resistance to tensile and shear bonding strength when these systems were used are necessary to justify their clinical use. Forty eight human extracted premolars teeth and two light sources were selected, one halogen lamp and a LEDs system. Brackets for premolar were bonded through composite resin. Samples were submitted to standardized tests. A comparison between used sources under shear bonding strength test, obtained similar results; however, tensile bonding test showed distinct results: a statistical difference at a level of 1% between exposure times (40 and 60 seconds) and even to an interaction between light source and exposure time. The best result was obtained with halogen lamp use by 60 seconds, even during re-bonding; however LEDs system can be used for bonding and re-bonding brackets if power density could be increased.

  11. Infarcted rat myocardium: Data from biaxial tensile and uniaxial compressive testing and analysis of collagen fibre orientation.

    PubMed

    Sirry, Mazin S; Butler, J Ryan; Patnaik, Sourav S; Brazile, Bryn; Bertucci, Robbin; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ron; Davies, Neil H; Liao, Jun; Franz, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Myocardial infarction was experimentally induced in rat hearts and harvested immediately, 7, 14 and 28 days after the infarction induction. Anterior wall infarct samples underwent biaxial tensile and uniaxial compressive testing. Orientation of collagen fibres was analysed following mechanical testing. In this paper, we present the tensile and compressive stress-strain raw data, the calculated tensile and compressive moduli and the measured angles of collagen orientation. The presented data is associated with the research article titled "Characterisation of the mechanical properties of infarcted myocardium in the rat under biaxial tension and uniaxial compression" (Sirry et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27579338

  12. Self-Healing Nanofiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites. 1. Tensile Testing and Recovery of Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; An, Seongpil; Jo, Hong Seok; Yoon, Sam S; Yarin, Alexander L

    2015-09-01

    The present work aims at development of self-healing materials capable of partially restoring their mechanical properties under the conditions of prolonged periodic loading and unloading, which is characteristic, for example, of aerospace applications. Composite materials used in these and many other applications frequently reveal multiple defects stemming from their original inhomogeneity, which facilitates microcracking and delamination at ply interfaces. Self-healing nanofiber mats may effectively prevent such damage without compromising material integrity. Two types of core-shell nanofibers were simultaneously electrospun onto the same substrate in order to form a mutually entangled mat. The first type of core-shell fibers consisted of resin monomer (dimethylsiloxane) within the core and polyacrylonitrile within the shell. The second type of core-shell nanofibers consisted of cure (dimethyl-methyl hydrogen-siloxane) within the core and polyacrylonitrile within the shell. These mutually entangled nanofiber mats were used for tensile testing, and they were also encased in polydimethylsiloxane to form composites that were also subsequently subjected to tensile testing. During tensile tests, the nanofibers can be damaged in stretching up to the plastic regime of deformation. Then, the resin monomer and cure was released from the cores and the polydimethylsiloxane resin was polymerized, which might be expected to result in the self-healing properties of these materials. To reveal and evaluate the self-healing properties of the polyacrylonitrile-resin-cure nanofiber mats and their composites, the results were compared to the tensile test results of the monolithic polyacrylonitrile nanofiber mats or composites formed by encasing polyacrylonitrile nanofibers in a polydimethylsiloxane matrix. The latter do not possess self-healing properties, and indeed, do not recover their mechanical characteristics, in contrast to the polyacrylonitrile-resin-cure nanofiber mats and

  13. Lamb wave ultrasonic evaluation of welded AA2024 specimens at tensile static and fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, M. V.; Byakov, A. V.; Shah, R. T.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Panin, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of Lamb waves ultrasonic testing technique applied for evaluation of different stress-strain and damaged state of aluminum specimens at static and fatigue loading in order to develop a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) approach. The experimental results of tensile testing of AA2024T3 specimens with welded joints are presented. Piezoelectric transducers used as actuators and sensors were adhesively bonded to the specimen's surface using two component epoxy. The set of static and cyclic tensile tests with two frequencies of acoustic testing (50 kHz and 335 kHz) were performed. The recorded signals were processed to calculate the maximum envelope in order to evaluate the changes of the stress-strain state of the specimen and its microstructure during static tension. The registered data are analyzed and discussed in terms of signal attenuation due to the formation of fatigue defects during cyclic loading. Understanding the relations between acoustic signal features and fatigue damages will provide us the ability to determine the damage state of the structure and its residual lifetime in order to design a robust SHM system.

  14. Localized strain measurements of the intervertebral disc annulus during biaxial tensile testing.

    PubMed

    Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-01-01

    Both inter-lamellar and intra-lamellar failures of the annulus have been described as potential modes of disc herniation. Attempts to characterize initial lamellar failure of the annulus have involved tensile testing of small tissue samples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a method of measuring local surface strains through image analysis of a tensile test conducted on an isolated sample of annular tissue in order to enhance future studies of intervertebral disc failure. An annulus tissue sample was biaxial strained to 10%. High-resolution images captured the tissue surface throughout testing. Three test conditions were evaluated: submerged, non-submerged and marker. Surface strains were calculated for the two non-marker conditions based on motion of virtual tracking points. Tracking algorithm parameters (grid resolution and template size) were varied to determine the effect on estimated strains. Accuracy of point tracking was assessed through a comparison of the non-marker conditions to a condition involving markers placed on tissue surface. Grid resolution had a larger effect on local strain than template size. Average local strain error ranged from 3% to 9.25% and 0.1% to 2.0%, for the non-submerged and submerged conditions, respectively. Local strain estimation has a relatively high potential for error. Submerging the tissue provided superior strain estimates. PMID:25145810

  15. Characterization of the deformation texture after tensile test and cold rolling of a Ti-6Al-4V sheet alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, B.; Azzeddine, H.; Badji, R.; Ji, V.; Alili, B.; Bradai, D.

    2015-04-01

    The deformation texture after cold rolling and tensile test of an industrial Ti-6Al-4V sheet alloy was studied using X-ray diffraction. The alloy was subjected to a cold rolling to different thickness reductions (from 20% to 60%) and then tensile tests have been carried out along three directions relatively to the rolling direction (0°, 45° and 90°). The experimental results were compared to the existing literature and discussed in terms of active plastic deformation mechanisms.

  16. Measurement of field-dependence elastic modulus of iron-gallium alloy using tensile test

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Flatau, Alison B.

    2005-05-15

    An experimental approach is used to identify Galfenol material properties under dc magnetic bias fields. Dog-bone-shaped specimens of single crystal Fe{sub 100-x}Ga{sub x}, where 18.6{<=}x{<=}33.2, underwent tensile testing along two crystallographic axis orientations, [110] and [100]. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio sensitivity to magnetic fields and stoichiometry are investigated. Data are presented that demonstrate the dependence of these properties on applied magnetic-field levels and provide a substantial assessment of the trends in material properties for performance of alloys of different stoichiometries under varied operating conditions.

  17. Stiffness reductions during tensile fatigue testing of graphite/epoxy angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odom, E. M.; Adams, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Tensile fatigue data was generated under carefully controlled test conditions. A computerized data acquisition system was used to permit the measurement of dynamic modulus without interrupting the fatigue cycling. Two different 8-ply laminate configurations, viz, + or - 45 (2s) and + or - 67.5 (2s), of a T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite were tested. The + or - 45 (2s) laminate did exhibit some modulus decay, although there was no well-defined correlation with applied stress level or number of cycles. The + or - 67.5 (2s) laminate did not exhibit any measurable modulus decay. Secondary effects observed included a small but distinct difference between modulus as measured statically and dynamically, a slight recovery of the modulus decay after a test interruption, and a significant viscoelastic (creep) response of the + or - 45 (2s) laminate during fatigue testing.

  18. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, Wojciech; Kruszka, Leopold; Brodecki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard) and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  19. Tensile strain-rate sensitivity of tungsten/niobium composites at 1300 to 1600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The tensile behavior of continuous tungsten fiber reinforced niobium composites (W/Nb), fabricated by an arc-spray process, was studied in the 1300 to 1600 K temperature range. The tensile properties of the fiber and matrix components as well as of the composites were measured and were compared to rule of mixtures (ROM) predictions. The deviation from the ROM was found to depend upon the chemistry of the tungsten alloy fibers, with positive deviations for ST300/Nb (i.e., stronger composite strength than the ROM) and negative or zero deviations for 218/Nb.

  20. Design and construction of a tensile tester for the testing of simple composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borst, Mark A.; Spiegel, F. Xavier

    1994-01-01

    The following is a design for a tensile tester which will be used to test the tensile strength and anisotropic properties of simple composites. These simple composites are suspected to be anisotropic primarily in a single plane. When the composites undergo a tensile force, they will undergo deformation, causing movement either to the left or right. The composites are suspect due to their method of construction. Each sample has a single layer of unidirectional continuous fibers embedded in a rubbery resin. It has been well established that a serious limitation of unidirectional fiber composites is the very large in-plane anisotropy. The design presented here incorporates a single degree of freedom such that distortion (to the left or right) due to anisotropic tendencies may be measured. The device will spend the vast majority of its time in an undergraduate materials lab. As a result, ease of use and durability are valued more highly than research grade accuracy. Additional concerns focus on the fact that this machine will be built as a student project. Issues which are dealt with during this design include: specimen configuration or shape; a method of applying consistent, linear tension force; a method of gripping specimen without affecting its overall properties; a method of collecting data; repeatability of data; ease of use; ease of construction; and cost. After the device has been constructed, it will be used to test the simple composites which were fabricated in house. A comparison will be made between composites manufactured using aluminum screening as the strengthening fibers and those manufactured using fiberglass screening.

  1. Effect of Load Rate on Ultimate Tensile Strength of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    The strengths of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-II, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, were determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 to 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for composite materials, at least for short range of lifetimes and when ultimate strength is used as the failure criterion.

  2. Microstructure- and Strain Rate-Dependent Tensile Behavior of Fiber Laser-Welded DP980 Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qiang; Guo, Wei; Peng, Peng; Li, Minggao; Zhu, Ying; Zou, Guisheng

    2016-02-01

    DP980 steels were butt-welded by fiber laser welding. The microstructures, microhardness distribution, and tensile behavior of the joint were investigated. The results showed that the fusion zone (FZ) consisted of fully martensite with higher hardness compared to the base metal (BM). A softened zone (20 HV0.2 drop) was produced in heat-affected zone due to martensite tempering during the laser welding. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield strength (YS) of the laser-welded joint were not degraded compared to BM with the existence of softened zone. The UTS and YS of the welded joint increased with the increase of tensile strain rate. The work hardening exponents of the BM and welded joint showed weak positive strain rate dependence. The deformation of softened zone was restrained by the hardened FZ during loading, resulting in a higher work hardening rate of softened zone than that of BM. The failure of welded joint occurred in the BM instead of softened zone. The fracture surfaces of the joint exhibited typical ductile fracture over strain rate from 0.0001 to 0.1 s-1.

  3. An investigation of tensile damage behavior of X5230/T800 polymer matrix composites through in-situ tensile testing in SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.J.; Zhang, H.Q.; Delale, F.; Liaw, B.M.; Bode, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    Dog bone tensile specimens made of 8-ply X5230/T800 polymer matrix composites with [0{degree}/+45{degree}/0{degree}/{minus}45{degree}]{sub s}, arrangement and 57% fiber volume fraction have been subjected to tensile loading either along or perpendicular to the 0{degree} fiber direction at various temperatures. The tests were conducted inside an enlarged specimen chamber of a Hitachi S-2400 scanning electron microscope (SEM). During the test, the upper surface of the specimen in the gage section area was closely monitored through the screen of the SEM and the images revealing the intermediate tensile damage events on the surface and the edge of the specimen were captured in-situ either by using a Polaroid camera or a thermal print processor. When loading was applied parallel to the 0{degree} fiber direction at room temperature, damage started in the 0{degree} ply in the form of fiber breaking, followed by multiple fiber braiding in the 0{degree} ply, delamination between O{degree} and {+-}45{degree} plies, matrix cracking along the fiber direction in the {+-}45{degree} plies and the eventual failure of the specimen. No matrix cracks in the 0{degree} ply were observed for tests in room temperature. However, when tested at 1OO C, interface cracks were found in the 0{degree} ply and the failure load decreases substantially. When the loading was applied perpendicular to the 0{degree} fiber direction, no damage was observed in the 0{degree} ply until failure. A finite element model which incorporates the observed damage progression and based on the microstructure of the composite was also developed.

  4. Baseline tensile tests of composite materials for LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility) exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Tensile specimens of five graphite fiber reinforced composite materials were tested at room temperature to provide baseline data for similar specimens exposed to the space environment in low-Earth orbit on the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility. All specimens were 4-ply (+ or - 45 deg)s layups; at least five replicate specimens were tested for each parameter evaluated. Three epoxy-matrix materials and two polysulfone-matrix materials, several fiber volume fractions, and two sizes of specimen were evaluated. Stress-strain and Poisson's ratio-stress curves, ultimate stress, strain at failure, secant modulus at 0.004 strain, inplane shear stress-strain curves, and unidirectional shear modulus at .004 shear strain are presented.

  5. Analysis of Sandwich Shells with Metallic Foam Cores based on the Uniaxial Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, H.; Santos, A.; Fernandes, A. A.; Valente, R. A. F.; Parente, M. P. L.; Jorge, R. Natal

    2011-05-01

    On this work, the authors present the development and evaluation of an innovative system able to perform reliable panels of sandwich sheets with metallic foam cores for industrial applications, especially in automotive and aeronautical industries. This work is divided into two parts; in the first part the mathematical model used to describe the behavior of sandwich shells with metal cores form is presented and some numerical examples are presented. In the second part of this work, the numerical results are validated using the experimental results obtained from the mechanical experiments. Using the isotropic hardening crushable foam constitutive model, available on ABAQUS, a set of different mechanical tests were simulated. The isotropic hardening model available uses a yield surface that is an ellipse centered at the origin in the p-q stress plane. Using this constitutive model, the uniaxial tensile test for this material was simulated, and a comparison with the experimental results was made.

  6. Multiscale stochastic simulations for tensile testing of nanotube-based macroscopic cables.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola M; Bosia, Federico; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2008-08-01

    Thousands of multiscale stochastic simulations are carried out in order to perform the first in-silico tensile tests of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based macroscopic cables with varying length. The longest treated cable is the space-elevator megacable but more realistic shorter cables are also considered in this bottom-up investigation. Different sizes, shapes, and concentrations of defects are simulated, resulting in cable macrostrengths not larger than approximately 10 GPa, which is much smaller than the theoretical nanotube strength (approximately 100 GPa). No best-fit parameters are present in the multiscale simulations: the input at level 1 is directly estimated from nanotensile tests of CNTs, whereas its output is considered as the input for the level 2, and so on up to level 5, corresponding to the megacable. Thus, five hierarchical levels are used to span lengths from that of a single nanotube (approximately 100 nm) to that of the space-elevator megacable (approximately 100 Mm). PMID:18666164

  7. Elevated temperature tensile properties of irradiated 20/25/Nb stainless steel fuel pin cladding at low and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravenor, J. G.; Douglas, J.

    1988-09-01

    Tensile specimens were prepared from 20/25/Nb stainless steel fuel pin cladding irradiated in a Commercial Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (CAGR) at temperatures in the range 622-866 K and integrated fast neutron doses up to 16 × 10 24n/ m2. The tests were performed in air at temperatures in the range 298-873 K at strain rates from 2 × 10 -5s-1 to 7.2 s -1. The tensile properties varied with irradiation temperature, test temperature and strain rate. At lower irradiation temperature, strengthening produced by fast neutron damage was accompanied by reduced elongation. Strengthening was also observed at higher irradiation temperatures, possibly due to precipitation phenomena. The maximum irradiation embrittlement was observed in tests at 873 K at low strain rates between 2 × 10 -4s-1 and 2 × 10 -5s-1. The failure mode of embrittled specimens irradiated at higher temperatures was characterized by prematurely ruptured ductile fibres, rather than by intergranular cracking.

  8. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J.O.

    1994-09-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to a least 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work was to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite`s potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests were conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests were performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating tests specimens up to 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Tensile stress-strain data were obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  9. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to at least 1093 C (2000F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work is to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite's potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests are conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests are performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating test specimens up to 1093 C (2000 F). Tensile stress-strain data are obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  10. Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires studied by tensile tests

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Wei, X. L. E-mail: qingchen@pku.edu.cn; Xu, T. T.; Ning, Z. Y.; Shu, J. P.; Chen, Q. E-mail: qingchen@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. Y.; Pan, D.; Zhao, J. H.; Yang, T.

    2014-03-10

    Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires (NWs) synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods are studied by in-situ tensile tests in a scanning electron microscope and their fracture strength and Young's modulus are obtained. The two types of NWs both exhibit brittle fracture with a maximum elastic strain up to ∼10%. Their fracture strength distributes in a similar range of ∼2–5 GPa with a general trend of increasing with NW volume decrease, which is well described by Weibull statistic with a smaller Weibull modulus and a higher characteristic strength for MOCVD NWs. Young's modulus is determined to be 16–78 GPa with an average value of 45 GPa and no dependence on NW diameter for MOCVD NWs and 34–79 GPa with an average value of 58 GPa for MBE NWs.

  11. Effects of segregated Cu on an Fe grain boundary by first-principles tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Motohiro; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2010-12-22

    Cu is known as one of the harmful tramp elements in recycled Fe. In the present work, the effects of Cu on Fe grain boundary (GB) embrittlement have been investigated by first-principles tensile tests. Because the Fe-Cu bonds are rather isotropic and the effects due to their difference in atomic size are negligibly small, the GB atomic structure prior to straining is little changed by Cu segregation. However, the Fe-Fe bond around the Cu atom is weakened due to charge transfer from the Fe atom to the Cu atom, and premature bond breaking occurs at the weakened Fe-Fe bond, resulting in an enhancement of GB embrittlement by Cu segregation. The s and p electrons play a vital role in the charge transfer. PMID:21406808

  12. Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

  13. An in situ tensile test apparatus for polymers in high pressure hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvine, K. J.; Kafentzis, T. A.; Pitman, S. G.; Johnson, K. I.; Skorski, D.; Tucker, J. C.; Roosendaal, T. J.; Dahl, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  14. An In-situ Tensile Test Apparatus for Polymers in High Pressure Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Pitman, Stan G.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Tucker, Joseph C.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2014-10-10

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex-situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in-situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials like Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in-situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 5,000 psi. Modulus data from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  15. Directionally solidified lamellar eutectic superalloys by edge-defined, film-fed growth. [including tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was performed to scale up the edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) method for the gamma/gamma prime-beta eutectic alloy of the nominal composition Ni-19.7 Cb - 6 Cr-2.5 Al. Procedures and problem areas are described. Flat bars approximately 12 x 1.7 x 200 mm were grown, mostly at speeds of 38 mm/hr, and tensile tests on these bars at 25 and 1000 C showed lower strength than expected. The feasibility of growing hollow airfoils was also demonstrated by growing bars over 200 mm long with a teardrop shaped cross-section, having a major dimension of 12 mm and a maximum width of 5 mm.

  16. An in situ tensile test apparatus for polymers in high pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, K. J. Kafentzis, T. A.; Pitman, S. G.; Johnson, K. I.; Skorski, D.; Tucker, J. C.; Roosendaal, T. J.; Dahl, M. E.

    2014-10-15

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  17. Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires studied by tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Wei, X. L.; Xu, T. T.; Ning, Z. Y.; Shu, J. P.; Wang, X. Y.; Pan, D.; Zhao, J. H.; Yang, T.; Chen, Q.

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires (NWs) synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods are studied by in-situ tensile tests in a scanning electron microscope and their fracture strength and Young's modulus are obtained. The two types of NWs both exhibit brittle fracture with a maximum elastic strain up to ˜10%. Their fracture strength distributes in a similar range of ˜2-5 GPa with a general trend of increasing with NW volume decrease, which is well described by Weibull statistic with a smaller Weibull modulus and a higher characteristic strength for MOCVD NWs. Young's modulus is determined to be 16-78 GPa with an average value of 45 GPa and no dependence on NW diameter for MOCVD NWs and 34-79 GPa with an average value of 58 GPa for MBE NWs.

  18. Effects of segregated Cu on an Fe grain boundary by first-principles tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, Motohiro; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2010-12-01

    Cu is known as one of the harmful tramp elements in recycled Fe. In the present work, the effects of Cu on Fe grain boundary (GB) embrittlement have been investigated by first-principles tensile tests. Because the Fe-Cu bonds are rather isotropic and the effects due to their difference in atomic size are negligibly small, the GB atomic structure prior to straining is little changed by Cu segregation. However, the Fe-Fe bond around the Cu atom is weakened due to charge transfer from the Fe atom to the Cu atom, and premature bond breaking occurs at the weakened Fe-Fe bond, resulting in an enhancement of GB embrittlement by Cu segregation. The s and p electrons play a vital role in the charge transfer.

  19. Tensile Fracture Strength of Brisbane Tuff by Static and Cyclic Loading Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erarslan, N.; Alehossein, H.; Williams, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    This research presents the results of laboratory experiments during the investigation of tensile strength-strain characteristics of Brisbane tuff disc specimens under static and diametral cyclic loading. Three different cyclic loading methods were used; namely, sinusoidal cyclic loading, type I and II increasing cyclic loading with various amplitude values. The first method applied the stress amplitude-cycle number (s-n) curve approach to the measurement of the indirect tensile strength (ITS) and fracture toughness ( K IC) values of rocks for the first time in the literature. The type I and II methods investigated the effect of increasing cyclic loading on the ITS and K IC of rocks. For Brisbane tuff, the reduction in ITS was found to be 30 % under sinusoidal loading, whereas type I and II increasing cyclic loading caused a maximum reduction in ITS of 36 %. The maximum reduction of the static K IC of 46 % was obtained for the highest amplitude type I cyclic loading tested. For sinusoidal cyclic loading, a maximum reduction of the static K IC of 30 % was obtained. A continuous irreversible accumulation of damage was observed in dynamic cyclic tests conducted at different amplitudes and mean stress levels. Scanning electron microscope images showed that fatigue damage in Brisbane tuff is strongly influenced by the failure of the matrix because of both inter-granular fracturing and trans-granular fracturing. The main characteristic was grain breakage under cyclic loading, which probably starts at points of contact between grains and is accompanied by the production of very small fragments, probably due to frictional sliding within the weak matrix.

  20. Discussion on FRP design properties based on flexural tests (ASTM D-790) and tensile tests (ASTM D-638)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    Tensile and flexural test results on the same laminate can have significant difference with the reported flexural strength being up to 100% greater than the tensile strength using the standard ASTM reporting methods. Taken at face value, these results can lead to nonconservative designs. The flexural test method is much simpler and less expensive, but must be used with a clear understanding of how they were computed and with sound engineering judgment since the flexural strength is calculated with linear bending theory at failure loads that are usually in the nonlinear range. This is significant since the general accepted design practice is to use linear theory in the design of FRP equipment. Manufacturers reporting this value should thus have a clear understanding of the difference between the reported results for flexural strength and the required design strength. This paper shows how to determine the proper design value from a flexural test which results in safe designs of FRP equipment and shows that the reported flexural strength from the ASTM D-790 method should not be used in design of FRP equipment.

  1. Tensile Tests of Round-head, Flat-head, and Brazier-head Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuette, Evan H; Bartone, Leonard M; Mandel, Merven W

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the tensile strength of round-head (AN43C), flat-head(AN442), and brazier-head (AN4556) aluminum-alloy rivets because of the scarcity of information on the tensile strength of rivets. The results of the investigation are presented as curves that show the variation of the ratio of the tensile strength of the rivet to the tensile strength of the rivet crank with the ratio of the sheet thickness to the rivet diameter for the different types of rivet.

  2. Tensile Properties of 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 Aluminum-alloy Sheet Heated at Uniform Temperature Rates Under Constant Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Inge, John E

    1955-01-01

    Results are presented of tests to determine the effect of heating at uniform temperature rates from 0.2 degrees to 100 degrees F. per second on the tensile properties of 7075-T6 d(75s-T6) and 2024-T3 (24s-T3) aluminum-alloy sheet under constant-load conditions. Yield and rupture stresses, obtained under rapid-heating conditions, are compared with results of elevated-temperature stress-strain tests for 1/2-hour exposure. Master yield-and-rupture-stress curves based on linear temperature-rate parameter are presented. Yield and rupture stresses and temperatures may be predicted by means of master curves and the parameter.

  3. Fracture Testing with Surface Crack Specimens. [especially the residual tensile strength test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recommendations are given for the design, preparation, and static fracture testing of surface crack specimens. The recommendations are preceded by background information including discussions of stress intensity factors, crack opening displacements, and fracture toughness values associated with surface crack specimens. Cyclic load and sustained load tests are discussed briefly.

  4. Tensile and compression testing of single-crystal gamma Ti-55.5Al

    SciTech Connect

    Zupan, M.; LaVan, D.; Hemker, K.J.

    1997-12-31

    Gamma based titanium aluminides are considered to be promising high temperature application alloys because of their exceptional high temperature mechanical properties and good oxidation resistance. Moreover, with a density less than half of current nickel based super alloys, the increased power to weight ratio that can be realized by using titanium aluminides is very attractive to the automotive and aircraft industries. Here the orientation and temperature dependence of the flow strength of {gamma}-TiAl is being measured to promote a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms that are active in this alloy. High quality single crystals of {gamma}-Ti-55.5 Al have been grown using an optical float zone furnace, which allows for crystal seeding and provides a containerless growth environment. These crystals have been oriented using back reflection Laue and TEM and cut into microsample tensile specimens by electric discharge machining. The microsample testing technique developed at Johns Hopkins is being utilized to measure the orientation, temperature and tension/compression dependence of the flow strength of TiAl. An outline of the microsample testing techniques that have been developed for this study and preliminary results follow in this paper.

  5. Tensile Tests of NACA and Conventional Machine-countersunk Flush Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartone, Leonard M.; Mandel, Merven W.

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine and compare the tensile strength of NACA and conventional machine-countersunk flush rivets of several rivet-head angles and varying countersunk depth. The results of the investigation are presented in the form of curves that show the variation of the tensile strength of the rivet with the ratio of the sheet thickness to the rivet diameter. For the same rivet-head angle and for a given angle of c/d, the NACA rivets developed higher tensile strength than the conventional rivets.

  6. Mechanical properties of Bi2223 filaments extracted from multifilamentary tape evaluated by the single-fibre tensile test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Michinaka; Osamura, Kozo; Hojo, Masaki

    2003-05-01

    The Young's modulus and the tensile fracture strength of Bi2223 filaments extracted from multifilamentary tape have been evaluated using the single-fibre tensile test; they are estimated to be 106 GPa and 45 MPa, respectively. The distribution of the fracture strength can be analysed using the Weibull distribution function. It was found that the observed scatter of strength is very large compared with other superconducting filaments such as NbTi and Nb3Al. The Young's modulus was nearly identical with the estimated values based on the rule of mixture from the unload/reload modulus.

  7. Cubical Mass-Spring Model design based on a tensile deformation test and nonlinear material model.

    PubMed

    San-Vicente, Gaizka; Aguinaga, Iker; Tomás Celigüeta, Juan

    2012-02-01

    Mass-Spring Models (MSMs) are used to simulate the mechanical behavior of deformable bodies such as soft tissues in medical applications. Although they are fast to compute, they lack accuracy and their design remains still a great challenge. The major difficulties in building realistic MSMs lie on the spring stiffness estimation and the topology identification. In this work, the mechanical behavior of MSMs under tensile loads is analyzed before studying the spring stiffness estimation. In particular, the performed qualitative and quantitative analysis of the behavior of cubical MSMs shows that they have a nonlinear response similar to hyperelastic material models. According to this behavior, a new method for spring stiffness estimation valid for linear and nonlinear material models is proposed. This method adjusts the stress-strain and compressibility curves to a given reference behavior. The accuracy of the MSMs designed with this method is tested taking as reference some soft-tissue simulations based on nonlinear Finite Element Method (FEM). The obtained results show that MSMs can be designed to realistically model the behavior of hyperelastic materials such as soft tissues and can become an interesting alternative to other approaches such as nonlinear FEM. PMID:22156291

  8. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Polycrystalline Titanium Nitride Films Measured by XRD Tensile Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazu, Takahiro; Inoue, Shozo; Takemoto, Hideki; Koterazawa, Keiji

    This paper describes measurement of mechanical properties of micron-thin polycrystalline titanium nitride (TiN) films. We developed a novel tensile test technique that can directly measure lateral elastic strain of a microscale single/poly-crystalline specimen by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), which enables evaluation of not only Young's modulus but also Poisson's ratio of TiN films. TiN films having thicknesses of 0.5 μm to 1.6 μm are deposited onto the top and bottom surfaces of a microscale single crystal silicon (Si) specimen. The deposition is carried out by r.f. reactive magnetron sputtering under Ar partial pressure ranging from 0.7 Pa to 1.0 Pa. Average values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for the Si monolayer specimen are found to be 169 GPa and 0.35, respectively, which are in close agreement with analytical values. TiN films deposited under an Ar partial pressure of 0.7 Pa have average Young's modulus of 290 GPa and Poisson's ratio of 0.36. These values gradually decrease with increasing Ar partial pressure, but are independent of TiN film thickness. Fracture strength of a TiN/Si/TiN composite specimen shows dependence on film thickness, regardless of Ar partial pressure.

  10. Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin

    PubMed Central

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Fricke, Heiko; Knoche, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The skin of developing soft and fleshy fruit is subjected to considerable growth stress, and failure of the skin is associated with impaired barrier properties in water transport and pathogen defence. The objectives were to establish a standardized, biaxial tensile test of the skin of soft and fleshy fruit and to use it to characterize and quantify mechanical properties of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit skin as a model. A segment of the exocarp (ES) comprising cuticle, epidermis, hypodermis and adhering flesh was mounted in the elastometer such that the in vivo strain was maintained. The ES was pressurized from the inner surface and the pressure and extent of associated bulging were recorded. Pressure : strain responses were almost linear up to the point of fracture, indicating that the modulus of elasticity was nearly constant. Abrading the cuticle decreased the fracture strain but had no effect on the fracture pressure. When pressure was held constant, bulging of the ES continued to increase. Strain relaxation upon releasing the pressure was complete and depended on time. Strains in longitudinal and latitudinal directions on the bulging ES did not differ significantly. Exocarp segments that released their in vivo strain before the test had higher fracture strains and lower moduli of elasticity. The results demonstrate that the cherry skin is isotropic in the tangential plane and exhibits elastic and viscoelastic behaviour. The epidermis and hypodermis, but not the cuticle, represent the structural ‘backbone’ in a cherry skin. This test is useful in quantifying the mechanical properties of soft and fleshy fruit of a range of species under standardized conditions. PMID:24876301

  11. Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin.

    PubMed

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Fricke, Heiko; Knoche, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The skin of developing soft and fleshy fruit is subjected to considerable growth stress, and failure of the skin is associated with impaired barrier properties in water transport and pathogen defence. The objectives were to establish a standardized, biaxial tensile test of the skin of soft and fleshy fruit and to use it to characterize and quantify mechanical properties of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit skin as a model. A segment of the exocarp (ES) comprising cuticle, epidermis, hypodermis and adhering flesh was mounted in the elastometer such that the in vivo strain was maintained. The ES was pressurized from the inner surface and the pressure and extent of associated bulging were recorded. Pressure : strain responses were almost linear up to the point of fracture, indicating that the modulus of elasticity was nearly constant. Abrading the cuticle decreased the fracture strain but had no effect on the fracture pressure. When pressure was held constant, bulging of the ES continued to increase. Strain relaxation upon releasing the pressure was complete and depended on time. Strains in longitudinal and latitudinal directions on the bulging ES did not differ significantly. Exocarp segments that released their in vivo strain before the test had higher fracture strains and lower moduli of elasticity. The results demonstrate that the cherry skin is isotropic in the tangential plane and exhibits elastic and viscoelastic behaviour. The epidermis and hypodermis, but not the cuticle, represent the structural 'backbone' in a cherry skin. This test is useful in quantifying the mechanical properties of soft and fleshy fruit of a range of species under standardized conditions. PMID:24876301

  12. Effect of Test Specimen Shape and Size on Interlaminar Tensile Properties of Advanced Carbon-Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.

    2015-01-01

    The interlaminar tensile strength of 1000-tow T-300 fiber ACC-6 carbon-carbon composites was measured using the method of bonding the coupons to adherends at room temperature. The size, 0.70 to 1.963 inches maximum width or radius, and shape, round or square, of the test coupons were varied to determine if the test method was sensitive to these variables. Sixteen total variations were investigated and the results modeled.

  13. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  14. Dynamic Brazilian Test of Rock Under Intermediate Strain Rate: Pendulum Hammer-Driven SHPB Test and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. C.; Niu, L. L.; Li, S. H.; Xu, Z. H.

    2015-09-01

    The tensile strength of rock subjected to dynamic loading constitutes many engineering applications such as rock drilling and blasting. The dynamic Brazilian test of rock specimens was conducted with the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) driven by pendulum hammer, in order to determine the indirect tensile strength of rock under an intermediate strain rate ranging from 5.2 to 12.9 s-1, which is achieved when the incident bar is impacted by pendulum hammer with different velocities. The incident wave excited by pendulum hammer is triangular in shape, featuring a long rising time, and it is considered to be helpful for achieving a constant strain rate in the rock specimen. The dynamic indirect tensile strength of rock increases with strain rate. Then, the numerical simulator RFPA-Dynamics, a well-recognized software for simulating the rock failure under dynamic loading, is validated by reproducing the Brazilian test of rock when the incident stress wave retrieved at the incident bar is input as the boundary condition, and then it is employed to study the Brazilian test of rock under the higher strain rate. Based on the numerical simulation, the strain-rate dependency of tensile strength and failure pattern of the Brazilian disc specimen under the intermediate strain rate are numerically simulated, and the associated failure mechanism is clarified. It is deemed that the material heterogeneity should be a reason for the strain-rate dependency of rock.

  15. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  16. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1987-08-18

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensile specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen regardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis. 4 figs.

  17. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensil specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen irregardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis.

  18. Analysis of the Deformation and Damage Mechanisms of Pearlitic Steel by EBSD and "in-situ" SEM Tensile Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, Habib; Yahyaoui, H.; Braham, C.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-07-01

    The processes governing the deformation and damage of C70 pearlitic steel were investigated in nanometer and micrometer scales using electron backscatter diffraction technique and "in-situ" scanning electron microscope tensile testing. The ferrite behavior was identified by "in-situ" x-ray tensile tests. Investigations were carried out on annealed microstructure with two interlamellar spacings of Sp = 170 and Sp = 230 nm. It is shown that pearlite yielding is controlled by the deformation mechanisms occurring in ferrite. Deformation and damage mechanisms were proposed. At low strain, pearlite deforms homogeneously with low misorientation (<5°) inside the pearlite colonies and elongates the cementite plates. At high strain, pearlite deforms heterogeneously in intense localized shear bands inside the more favorably oriented pearlite colonies. Misorientation reaches values up to 15°. Cementite deforms by an offset of lamella along the shear bands. The nucleation of these shear bands occurs at strain level of E 11 = 7% for coarse pearlite and at a higher value for fine pearlite. Damage occurs by brittle fracture of the elongated cementite lamellae parallel to the tensile axis and which are developed by shear micro-cracks along the slip bands. The plastic-induced damage is thus delayed by the fine pearlite structure.

  19. High-speed imaging on static tensile test for unidirectional CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, Hideaki; Aoki, Yuichiro; Hirano, Yoshiyasu; Kondo, Yasushi; Nagao, Yosuke

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) under static tensile loading. The advantages of CFRP are higher specific stiffness and strength than the metal material. The use of CFRP is increasing in not only the aerospace and rapid transit railway industries but also the sports, leisure and automotive industries. The tensile fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP has not been experimentally made clear because the fracture speed of unidirectional CFRP is quite high. We selected the intermediate modulus and high strength unidirectional CFRP laminate which is a typical material used in the aerospace field. The fracture process under static tensile loading was captured by a conventional high-speed camera and a new type High-Speed Video Camera HPV-1. It was found that the duration of fracture is 200 microseconds or less, then images taken by a conventional camera doesn't have enough temporal-resolution. On the other hand, results obtained by HPV-1 have higher quality where the fracture process can be clearly observed.

  20. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

  1. ESR (Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be used along with other clinical findings, the individual's health history, and results from other laboratory tests. If the ESR and clinical findings match, the health practitioner may be able to confirm ...

  2. In-situ SAXS study on PET/ PMMT composites during tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei-Dong, Cheng; Xiao-Hua, Gu; Xue, Song; Peng, Zeng; Zhao-Jun, Wu; Xue-Qing, Xing; Guang, Mo; Zhong-Hua, Wu

    2016-01-01

    The nanostructures during the tensile drawing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)/hexadecyl triphenyl phosphonium bromide montmorillonite (PMMT) nanocomposites were studied by in-situ small angle x-ray scattering. For strain higher than the yield point, the scattering intensity increases dramatically due to the nucleation and growth of nanovoids and crystals. The nanovoids and crystals are significantly dependent on the heating temperature. The effective filling of PMMT in the PET matrix provokes a strong restriction to the long period. The peaks of the long period disappear gradually with the deformation strain increasing from 0% to 34%. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. U1232203, U1432104, U1332107, 11305198, and 11405199), the Program for Young Teachers Scientific Research in Qiqihar University, China (Grant No. 2012k-Z02), and the Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. E201259).

  3. Tensile testing of Fe and FeCr nanowires using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Byggmästar, J. Granberg, F.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.; Henriksson, K. O. E.

    2015-01-07

    Using molecular dynamics, we have studied the behaviour of cylindrical [001]-oriented Fe and FeCr nanowires under uniaxial tensile strain with both an embedded atom method (EAM) and a Tersoff-like bond order potential. The mechanical properties were analysed and the deformation mechanism was studied and compared between the potentials. The effects of chromium content and size of the wire were studied. Both potentials show elongation by deformation twinning in the 〈111〉/(211) system resulting in a significantly stiffer and stronger [110]-axial nanowire. The pure iron nanowires are elastically softer than bulk iron and an addition of chromium has both a softening and weakening effect. The bond order potential shows a strong dependence on chromium concentration, while the dependence is considerably weaker for the EAM potential.

  4. Nonlinear acoustic approach to material characterisation of polymers and composites in tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Solodov, I; Pfleiderer, K; Gerhard, H; Busse, G

    2004-04-01

    The paper reports on experimental study of elastic nonlinearity of polymers and glass fibre-reinforced (GFR-) composites in a wide range of tensile stress applied (up to a fracture limit). Focused slanted transmission mode (FSTM) of air-coupled ultrasound is adapted for remote generation and detection of flexural waves in the samples of plastics. Local noncontact measurements of flexural wave velocity as a function of static strain are used to calculate the second-order nonlinearity parameters beta2 and study their behaviour through a loading cycle. Molecular untangling and crazing phenomena are identified, respectively, with maxima of positive and negative beta2 in thermoplastics. In composites, mechanics of fibre-matrix interaction is considered for brittle and plastic fractures. Hysteresis in velocity variation during loading-unloading cycle is used as an indicator of residual defect accumulation. PMID:15047422

  5. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R; Crone, Wendy C; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  6. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R.; Crone, Wendy C.; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  7. Advantages of a 3-parameter reduced constitutive model for the measurement of polymers elastic modulus using tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, A.; André, S.; Delobelle, P.; Meshaka, Y.; Cunat, C.

    2016-04-01

    Exact measurements of the rheological parameters of time-dependent materials are crucial to improve our understanding of their intimate relation to the internal bulk microstructure. Concerning solid polymers and the apparently simple determination of Young's modulus in tensile tests, international standards rely on basic protocols that are known to lead to erroneous values. This paper describes an approach allowing a correct measurement of the instantaneous elastic modulus of polymers by a tensile test. It is based on the use of an appropriate reduced model to describe the behavior of the material up to great strains, together with well-established principles of parameter estimation in engineering science. These principles are objective tools that are used to determine which parameters of a model can be correctly identified according to the informational content of a given data set. The assessment of the methodology and of the measurements is accomplished by comparing the results with those obtained from two other physical experiments, probing the material response at small temporal and length scales, namely, ultrasound measurements with excitation at 5 MHz and modulated nanoindentation tests over a few nanometers of amplitude.

  8. Hydrogen-induced crack nucleation in tensile testing of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malitckii, Evgenii; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Hänninen, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of continuous hydrogen charging on tensile properties of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels was studied at room and elevated temperatures of 100 °C and 300 °C. The hydrogen effect decreases with increase of the temperature for ODS-EUROFER steel, while susceptibility to hydrogen of EUROFER 97 steel remains approximately the same at all testing temperatures. Continuous hydrogen charging results in a reduction of the grain boundary cohesion of the EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels tested at RT. With increase of the testing temperature up to 300 °C EUROFER 97 steel exhibits relatively high amount of micro-cracks which agglomerate in sub-micrometer size cracks, while the hydrogen-induced intergranular crack nucleation in ODS-EUROFER steel is effectively suppressed. Possible mechanism of the hydrogen-induced crack nucleation and propagation under applied external stress is discussed.

  9. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Coal under Dry and Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yixin; Liu, Shimin; Jiang, Yaodong; Wang, Kai; Huang, Yaqiong

    2016-05-01

    The tensile failure characterization of dry and saturated coals under different impact loading conditions was experimentally investigated using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar. Indirect dynamic Brazilian disc tension tests for coals were carried out. The indirect tensile strengths for different bedding angles under different impact velocities, strain rates and loading rates are analyzed and discussed. A high-speed high-resolution digital camera was employed to capture and record the dynamic failure process of coal specimens. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the saturated specimens have stronger loading rate dependence than the dry specimens. The bedding angle has a smaller effect on the dynamic indirect tensile strength compared to the impact velocity. Both shear and tensile failures were observed in the tested coal specimens. Saturated coal specimens have higher indirect tensile strength than dry ones.

  10. Microcracking damage and the fracture process in relation to strain rate in human cortical bone tensile failure.

    PubMed

    Zioupos, Peter; Hansen, Ulrich; Currey, John D

    2008-10-20

    It is difficult to define the 'physiological' mechanical properties of bone. Traumatic failures in-vivo are more likely to be orders of magnitude faster than the quasistatic tests usually employed in-vitro. We have reported recently [Hansen, U., Zioupos, P., Simpson, R., Currey, J.D., Hynd, D., 2008. The effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering/Transactions of the ASME 130, 011011-1-8] results from tests on specimens of human femoral cortical bone loaded in tension at strain rates (epsilon ) ranging from low (0.08s(-1)) to high (18s(-1)). Across this strain rate range the modulus of elasticity generally increased, stress at yield and failure and strain at failure decreased for rates higher than 1s(-1), while strain at yield was invariant for most strain rates and only decreased at rates higher than 10s(-1). The results showed that strain rate has a stronger effect on post-yield deformation than on initiation of macroscopic yielding. In general, specimens loaded at high strain rates were brittle, while those loaded at low strain rates were much tougher. Here, a post-test examination of the microcracking damage reveals that microcracking was inversely related to the strain rate. Specimens loaded at low strain rates showed considerable post-yield strain and also much more microcracking. Partial correlation and regression analysis suggested that the development of post-yield strain was a function of the amount of microcracking incurred (the cause), rather than being a direct result of the strain rate (the excitation). Presumably low strain rates allow time for microcracking to develop, which increases the compliance of the specimen, making them tougher. This behaviour confirms a more general rule that the degree to which bone is brittle or tough depends on the amount of microcracking damage it is able to sustain. More importantly, the key to bone toughness is its ability to avoid a ductile

  11. Effect of lateral contraction and magnetism on the energy release upon fracture in metals: First-principles computational tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z. X.; Yan, J. X.; Xiao, W.; Geng, W. T.

    2009-04-01

    On many occasions, there is an energy release upon fracture of materials. Taking the Σ5 (210) grain boundary in nickel as an example, we have studied the effect of lateral contraction (the Poisson effect) upon stretching and the effect of magnetism on the energy release at the break point, using density-functional theory computational tensile tests. For both clean and sulfur segregated grain boundaries, our calculations show that the Poisson effect can reduce the total energy of the grain-boundary system remarkably. For Σ3 (111) grain boundary, however, lateral optimization of the computation cell has only a minor effect because of the close packing of the Ni (111) plane. Surprisingly, magnetism is found to reduce much of the energy release upon fracture for grain boundaries for such a weak magnetic metal. As a result, the calculated ultimate tensile strength of the material will be significantly diminished. Segregated sulfur atoms reduce the energy barrier between metastable and ground-state configurations in straining procedure. Near the break point, spin polarization of the interfacial atoms is significantly enhanced which introduces an extra energy lowering of the system.

  12. Comparison of Superelasticity of Nickel Titanium Orthodontic Arch wires using Mechanical Tensile Testing and Correlating with Electrical Resistivity

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraj, Aravind

    2013-01-01

    Background: Application of light and continuous forces for optimum physiological response and least damage to the tooth supporting structures should be the primary aim of the orthodontist. Nickel titanium alloys with the properties of excellent spring back, super elasticity and wide range of action is one of the natural choices for the clinicians to achieve this goal. In recent periods, various wire manufacturers have come with a variety of wires exhibiting different properties. It is the duty of the clinician to select appropriate wires during various stages of treatment for excellent results. For achieving this evaluation of the properties of these wires is essential. Materials & Methods: This study is focussed on evaluating the super elastic property of eight groups of austenite active nickel titanium wires. Eight groups of archwires bought from eight different manufacturers were studied. These wires were tested through mechanical tensile testing and electrical resistivity methods. Results: Unloading curves were carefully assessed for superelastic behaviour on deactivation. Rankings of the wires tested were based primarily upon the unloading curve’s slope Conclusion: Ortho organisers wires ranked first and superior, followed by American Orthodontics and Ormco A wires. Morelli and GAClowland NiTi wires were ranked last. It can be concluded that the performance of these wires based on rankings should be further evaluated by clinical studies. How to cite this article: Sivaraj A. Comparison of Superelasticity of Nickel Titanium Orthodontic Arch wires using Mechanical Tensile Testing and Correlating with Electrical Resistivity. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):1-12. PMID:24155596

  13. Reliability design and assessment of a micro-probe using the results of a tensile test of a beryllium-copper alloy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Hyub; Shin, Myung-Soo

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes the results of tensile tests for a beryllium-copper (BeCu) alloy thin film and the application of the results to the design of a probe. The copper alloy films were fabricated by electroplating. To obtain the tensile characteristics of the film, the dog-bone type specimen was fabricated by the etching method. The tensile tests were performed with the specimen using a test machine developed by the authors. The BeCu alloy has an elastic modulus of 119 GPa and the 0.2% offset yield and ultimate tensile strengths of 1078 MPa and 1108 MPa, respectively. The design and manufacture of a smaller probe require higher pad density and smaller pad-pitch chips. It should be effective in high-frequency testing. For the design of a new micro-probe, we investigated several design parameters that may cause problems, such as the contact force and life, using the tensile properties and the design of experiment method in conjunction with finite element analysis. The optimal dimensions of the probe were found using the response surface method. The probe with optimal dimensions was manufactured by a precision press process. It was verified that the manufactured probe satisfied the life, the contact force and the over drive through the compression tests and the life tests of the probes.

  14. Determination of carbon fiber adhesion to thermoplastic polymers using the single fiber/matrix tensile test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Cordner, L. W.; Hinkley, J. L.; Johnston, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    The single fiber adhesion shear test has been adapted to testing the adhesion between carbon fiber and thermoplastic polymers. Tests of three thermoplastics, polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide and polyetherimide indicate the shear adhesion strength is significantly less than of an epoxy polymer to the same carbon fiber.

  15. Determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of the smooth adhesive organs of Carausius morosus using tensile testing

    PubMed Central

    Bennemann, Michael; Backhaus, Stefan; Scholz, Ingo; Park, Daesung; Mayer, Joachim; Baumgartner, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive organs like arolia of insects allow these animals to climb on different substrates by creating high adhesion forces. According to the Dahlquist criterion, adhesive organs must be very soft, exhibiting an effective Young's modulus of below 100 kPa to adhere well to substrates. Such a low effective Young's modulus allows the adhesive organs to make almost direct contact with the substrate and results in van der Waals forces along with capillary forces. In previous studies, the effective Young's moduli of adhesive organs were determined using indentation tests, revealing their structure to be very soft. However, adhesive organs show a layered structure, thus the measured values comprise the effective Young's moduli of several layers of the adhesive organs. In this study, a new approach is illustrated to measure the Young's modulus of the outermost layer of the arolium, i.e. of the epicuticle, of the stick insect Carausius morosus. As a result of the epicuticle being supported by upright fibres, tensile tests allow the determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle with hardly influence from subjacent layers. In our tensile tests, arolia of stick insects adhering on a latex membrane were stretched by stretching the membrane while the elongation of the contact area between an arolium and the membrane was recorded. For analysis, mathematical models of the mechanical system were developed. When fed with the observed elongations, these models yield estimates for the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of approximately 100 MPa. Thus, in arolia, a very thin layer (~225 nm) of a rather stiff material, which is less susceptible to abrasion, makes contact with the substrates, whereas the inner fibrous structure of arolia is responsible for their softness. PMID:25214493

  16. A Discrete Element Model for Predicting Shear Strength and Degradation of Rock Joint by Using Compressive and Tensile Test Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazerani, T.; Yang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.

    2012-09-01

    A discrete element model is proposed to examine rock strength and failure. The model is implemented by UDEC, which is developed for this purpose. The material is represented as a collection of irregular-sized deformable particles interacting at their cohesive boundaries. The interface between two adjacent particles is viewed as a flexible contact whose constitutive law controls the material fracture and fragmentation properties. To reproduce rock anisotropy, an orthotropic cohesive law is developed for the contacts, which allows their shear and tensile behaviors to be different from each other. Using a combination of original closed-form expressions and statistical calibrations, a unique set of the contact microparameters are found based on the uniaxial/triaxial compression and Brazilian tension test data of a plaster. Applying the obtained microparameters, joint specimens, made of the same plaster, are simulated, where the comparison of the obtained results to laboratory data shows a reasonable agreement.

  17. Effect of sample test volume and geometry on the tensile mechanical behavior of SiC/SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Neogi, J.

    1998-09-01

    The development of a silicon carbide-type fiber from an organometallic precursor has led to a major resurgence of interest in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites. By combining this high strength fiber with a variety of ceramic matrices it has been possible to achieve tough composites offering significant potential advantages over monolithic ceramics and carbon-carbon for high temperature applications. A continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composite (CFCC) typical of materials proposed for such industrial applications as power generation, heat recovery and chemical production as well as biomedical and environmental applications was tested in uniaxial tension using a universal test machine. Test parameters investigated included: test mode (load versus displacement), test rate (0.003 mm/s, 0.03 mm/s, 50 N/s and 500 N/s), specimen geometry (straight-sided versus reduced-gauge section) and type of specimen volume (long/thin versus short/fat). Typical properties include an average elastic modulus 130 {+-} 10 Gpa, an average proportional limit stress of 45 {+-} 20 Mpa, an average ultimate tensile strength of 180 {+-} 20 MPa and an average modulus of toughness of 8.4 {+-} 2 (x10{sup 5})J/m{sup 3}.

  18. Comparisons of planar and tubular biaxial tensile testing protocols of the same porcine coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Joseph T; Lockwood, Danielle R; Utzinger, Urs; Montilla, Leonardo G; Witte, Russell S; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    To identify the orthotropic biomechanical behavior of arteries, researchers typically perform stretch-pressure-inflation tests on tube-form arteries or planar biaxial testing of splayed sections. We examined variations in finite element simulations (FESs) driven from planar or tubular testing of the same coronary arteries to determine what differences exist when picking one testing technique versus another. Arteries were tested in tube-form first, then tested in planar-form, and fit to a Fung-type strain energy density function. Afterwards, arteries were modeled via finite element analysis looking at stress and displacement behavior in different scenarios (e.g., tube FESs with tube- or planar-driven constitutive models). When performing FESs of tube inflation from a planar-driven constitutive model, pressure-diameter results had an error of 12.3% compared to pressure-inflation data. Circumferential stresses were different between tube- and planar-driven pressure-inflation models by 50.4% with the planar-driven model having higher stresses. This reduced to 3.9% when rolling the sample to a tube first with planar-driven properties, then inflating with tubular-driven properties. Microstructure showed primarily axial orientation in the tubular and opening-angle configurations. There was a shift towards the circumferential direction upon flattening of 8.0 . There was also noticeable collagen uncrimping in the flattened tissue. PMID:23132151

  19. Comparisons of planar and tubular biaxial tensile testing protocols of the same porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Joseph T; Lockwood, Danielle R; Utzinger, Urs; Montilla, Leonardo G; Witte, Russell S; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2013-07-01

    To identify the orthotropic biomechanical behavior of arteries, researchers typically perform stretch-pressure-inflation tests on tube-form arteries or planar biaxial testing of splayed sections. We examined variations in finite element simulations (FESs) driven from planar or tubular testing of the same coronary arteries to determine what differences exist when picking one testing technique vs. another. Arteries were tested in tube-form first, then tested in planar-form, and fit to a Fung-type strain energy density function. Afterwards, arteries were modeled via finite element analysis looking at stress and displacement behavior in different scenarios (e.g., tube FESs with tube- or planar-driven constitutive models). When performing FESs of tube inflation from a planar-driven constitutive model, pressure-diameter results had an error of 12.3% compared to pressure-inflation data. Circumferential stresses were different between tube- and planar-driven pressure-inflation models by 50.4% with the planar-driven model having higher stresses. This reduced to 3.9% when rolling the sample to a tube first with planar-driven properties, then inflating with tubular-driven properties. Microstructure showed primarily axial orientation in the tubular and opening-angle configurations. There was a shift towards the circumferential direction upon flattening of 8.0°. There was also noticeable collagen uncrimping in the flattened tissue. PMID:23132151

  20. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Deformation Mechanism in AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets Under Pulsed Electric-Assisted Tensile and Compressive Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Song, Jung Han; Choi, Seogou; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-06-01

    The uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain responses of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under pulsed electric current are reported. Tension and compression tests with pulsed electric current showed that flow stresses dropped instantaneously when the electric pulses were applied. Thermo-mechanical-electrical finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effects of Joule heating and electro-plasticity on the flow responses of AZ31B sheets under electric-pulsed tension and compression tests. The proposed finite element simulations could reproduce the measured uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain curves under pulsed electric currents, when the temperature-dependent flow stress hardening model and thermal properties of AZ31B sheet were properly described in the simulations. In particular, the simulation results that fit best with experimental results showed that almost 100 pct of the electric current was subject to transform into Joule heating during electrically assisted tensile and compressive tests.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Deformation Mechanism in AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets Under Pulsed Electric-Assisted Tensile and Compressive Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Song, Jung Han; Choi, Seogou; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-04-01

    The uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain responses of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under pulsed electric current are reported. Tension and compression tests with pulsed electric current showed that flow stresses dropped instantaneously when the electric pulses were applied. Thermo-mechanical-electrical finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effects of Joule heating and electro-plasticity on the flow responses of AZ31B sheets under electric-pulsed tension and compression tests. The proposed finite element simulations could reproduce the measured uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain curves under pulsed electric currents, when the temperature-dependent flow stress hardening model and thermal properties of AZ31B sheet were properly described in the simulations. In particular, the simulation results that fit best with experimental results showed that almost 100 pct of the electric current was subject to transform into Joule heating during electrically assisted tensile and compressive tests.

  2. Promoted Combustion Test Propagation Rate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borstorff, J.; Jones, P.; Lowery, F.

    2002-01-01

    Combustion propagation rate data were examined for potential use in benchmarking a thermal model of the Promoted Combustion Test (PCT), and also for potential use in measuring the repeatability of PCT results.

  3. Relating tensile, bending, and shear test data of asphalt binders to pavement performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.S.; Tsai, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    Eight different asphalt binders representing a wide range of applications for pavement construction were tested in uniaxial tension, bending, and shear stresses. Theoretical analyses were performed in this study to covert the data from the three engineering tests to stiffness moduli for predicting pavement performance. At low temperatures, high asphalt stiffness may induce pavement thermal cracking; thus, the allowable maximum stiffness was set at 1,000 MPa. At high temperatures, low asphalt stiffness may lead to pavement rutting (ruts in the road); master curves were constructed to rank the potential for rutting in the asphalts. All three viscoelastic functions were shown to be interchangeable within the linear viscoelastic region. When subjected to large deformation in the direct tension test, asphalt binders behaved nonlinear viscoelastic in which the data under bending, shear and tension modes were not comparable. The asphalts were, however, found toe exhibit linear viscoelasticity up to the failure point in the steady-state strain region.

  4. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1990-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semi-circular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semi-circular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is under way to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  5. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1991-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semicircular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semicircular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is underway to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  6. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    SciTech Connect

    Hiel, C.C.; Sumich, M.; Chappell, D.P. )

    1991-07-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semicircular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semicircular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is underway to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout). 10 refs.

  7. Servohydraulic methods for mechanical testing in the Sub-Hopkinson rate regime up to strain rates of 500 1/s.

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2005-10-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain experiments on metals at strain rates in the range of 1-1000 1/s are relevant to many applications such as gravity-dropped munitions and airplane accidents. While conventional test methods cover strain rates up to {approx}10 s{sup -1} and split-Hopkinson and other techniques cover strain rates in excess of {approx}1000 s{sup -1}, there are no well defined techniques for the intermediate or ''Sub-Hopkinson'' strain-rate regime. The current work outlines many of the challenges in testing in the Sub-Hopkinson regime, and establishes methods for addressing these challenges. The resulting technique for obtaining intermediate rate stress-strain data is demonstrated in tension on a high-strength, high-toughness steel alloy (Hytuf) that could be a candidate alloy for earth penetrating munitions and in compression on a Au-Cu braze alloy.

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment and Layer Orientation on the Tensile Strength of a Crystalline Rock Under Brazilian Test Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha Roy, Debanjan; Singh, T. N.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of heat treatment and the layer orientation on the tensile properties of granitic gneiss were studied under the unconfined stress condition. The tensile strength of the samples was studied using a Brazilian configuration, and the geochemical and microstructural properties were studied using the X-ray diffraction technique as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The fracture pattern and the geometrical analyses were performed using the digital photographs. The results show that both the heat treatment and layer orientation have strong control on the tensile strength, force-parallel and layer-parallel strains, and on the tensile fracture geometry. A general decrease in the tensile strength of the rock was documented with the increasing heat treatment. Although, in the heat-treated samples, X-ray diffraction study do not reveal any major change in the mineral composition, but the SEM shows the development of several micro-cracks in the grains. In the samples with different layer orientation, along with the changes in the tensile strength and layer-parallel to force-parallel strain ratio, the layer activation under shear stress is also noticed. Here, the ratio between the tensile to shear stress, acting along the layers is thought to be the major controlling factor of the tensile properties of rocks, which has many applications in mining, civil constructions, and waste disposal work.

  9. Statistical properties of microcracking in polyurethane foams under tensile and creep tests: influence of temperature and density.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschanel, Stephanie; Vigier, Gerard; Godin, Nathalie; Vanel, Loic; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2007-03-01

    For some heterogeneous materials fracture can be described as a clustering of microcracks: global rupture being not controlled by a single event. We focus on polyurethane foams whose heterogeneities (pores) constitute the termination points where microcracks can stop. We record both the spatial and time distributions of acoustic emission emitted by a sample during mechanical tests: each microcrack nucleation corresponds to a burst of energy that can be localized on the widest face of the specimen. The probability distributions of the energy released is power-law distributed, independently of the material density, the loading mode or the mechanical behavior. On the other hand, the agreement of a power law for the time intervals between two damaging events seems to require a quasi constant stress during damaging. Moreover, we notice a behavior difference of the cumulative number of events and the cumulative energy of the localized events with temperature in the case of tensile tests and not any more for creep tests. The occurrence of a unique behavior and a power law in a restricted time interval for the cumulative number of events and the cumulative energy in creep allow us to apprehend interesting later studies of materials' lifetime prediction.

  10. An open-end burst test method to obtain uniaxial hoop tensile properties of fuel cladding in a hot cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Aita, Makoto; Sakamoto, Kan; Higuchi, Toru

    2013-03-01

    The hoop stress-hoop strain relationship of fuel cladding is one of the essential input parameters for safety analysis of fuel rods. The three objectives of this paper were: to propose a burst test method for open-end tube specimens with the uniaxial hoop stress condition; to develop the necessary in-cell high temperature open-end burst (OEB) techniques to implement the method; and to determine the optimum specimen length for the proposed OEB test method. Silicone oil was selected as the pressurization medium, and it was sealed inside the specimens not by welding but by O-rings so that no axial tensile stress was induced in the specimens. The specimens with combined end plugs and O-rings were successfully assembled by manipulators in a hot cell, and a high temperature (⩽350 °C), high pressure (⩽100 MPa) seal was achieved. The optimum specimen length was determined by using ductile and embrittled tubes with various lengths of 30-60 mm and was found to be around 45 mm for typical BWR fuel rods. During the OEB test, internal pressure and diametral expansion were monitored to obtain the basic mechanical performance properties of the fuel cladding such as yield stress, ultimate strength, as well as the true hoop stress-hoop strain curve.

  11. Effects of shock-induced tensile failure on mb-Ms discrimination: Contrasts between historic nuclear explosions and the North Korean test of 9 October 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Howard J.; Taylor, Steven R.

    2008-07-01

    Rayleigh wave excitation is studied for an explosion source model consisting of a superposition of isotropic (monopole), tensile failure, and tectonic release point sources. The body-force representation for shock-induced, deep-seated tensile failure is a compensated linear vector dipole CLVD, where the relative strength of the CLVD is given by an index K. Rayleigh wave amplitudes are reduced owing to destructive interference between an explosive monopole and a CLVD source with vertical axis of symmetry in extension (K > 1). The effect of tensile failure on M s is to enhance the explosion-like characteristics on a plot of m b -M s . This model suggests that the success of the m b -M s discriminant results from the fact that nuclear tests were conducted under containment practices for which tensile failure is ubiquitous, while the North Korean nuclear test of 9 October 2006 is a harbinger of poor m b -M s performance when tensile failure is completely suppressed.

  12. Device for testing closure disks at high rates of change of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Merten, Jr., Charles W.

    1993-11-09

    A device for testing the burst pressure of closure disks which provides high pressure to both sides of a disk and rapidly releases pressure from one side thereof causing a high rate of change of pressure. A hollow notched plug allows the rapid release of pressure upon rupturing. A means is also disclosed for transmitting a tensile load from a piston to a hollow notched plug and for sealing the means for transmitting load within a hole in a piston.

  13. Determination of the elastic properties of rabbit vocal fold tissue using uniaxial tensile testing and a tailored finite element model.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Neda; Miri, Amir K; Mongeau, Luc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the effects of the specimen shape on the accuracy of mechanical properties determined from a shape-specific model generation strategy. Digital images of five rabbit vocal folds (VFs) in their initial undeformed conditions were used to build corresponding specific solid models. The displacement field of the VFs under uniaxial tensile test was then measured over the visible portion of the surface using digital image correlation. A three-dimensional finite element model was built, using ABAQUS, for each solid model, while imposing measured boundary conditions. An inverse-problem method was used, assuming a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic constitutive model. Unknown elastic properties were identified iteratively through an error minimization technique between simulated and measured force-time data. The longitudinal elastic moduli of the five rabbit VFs were calculated and compared to values from a simple analytical method and those obtained by approximating the cross-section as elliptical. The use of shape-specific models significantly reduced the standard deviation of the Young׳s moduli of the tested specimens. However, a non-parametric statistical analysis test, i.e., the Friedman test, yielded no statistically significant differences between the shape-specific method and the elliptic cylindrical finite element model. Considering the required procedures to reconstruct the shape-specific finite element model for each tissue specimen, it might be expedient to use the simpler method when large numbers of tissue specimens are to be compared regarding their Young׳s moduli. PMID:25173237

  14. HIV Testing Rates and Testing Locations, by Race and Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Michele A.; Chen Lynn; Brown Adama; Pomeroy, Elizabeth C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the HIV testing rates among white Americans, African Americans, and Hispanic Americans and to identify the frequency of use of HIV testing locations according to a variety of sociodemographic variables. Data for this study came from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Participants in…

  15. The effect of spherical inclusions in metallic glass nanowires under tensile test and its relation to atomic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda, Matias; Gutierrez, Gonzalo; Amigo, Nicolas

    The plastic behavior of crystalline metals is well understood. It is know that this regime is mainly mediated by nucleation and propagation of dislocations as well as by grain boundary sliding. In metallic glasses (MGs) the plastic behavior is quite different from their crystalline counterparts and a relationship between atomic-micro structure and properties remains one of the barriers that has hampered the progress to wide applications of MGs. In particular it would be desirable to have studies which directly relate the evolution of the shear bands (SBs) and glass matrix structure to each step of the applied strain, which would allow us to easily connect the evolution of the atomic structure to the stress-strain curve. Here we present a computational tensile test which shows the evolution of the atomic structure according to the strain is applied for a Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowire at 300 K with a Cu-Zr b2 inclusion in the center of the system with three different radius from 20 to 60 Å. The system consists of a million atoms and the local structure is analyzed by means of the Voronoi polyhedral technique and the nucleation and propagation of SBs by monitoring the local atomic shear strain. CONICyT PhD Fellowship No. 21140904.

  16. Vacuum test fixture improves leakage rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, H.; Marx, H.

    1966-01-01

    Cylindrical chamber, consisting of two matching halves, forms a vacuum test fixture for measuring leakage rates of individual connections, brazed joints, and entrance ports used in closed fluid flow line systems. Once the chamber has been sufficiently evacuated, atmospheric pressure holds the two halves together.

  17. Ex-situ tensile fatigue-creep testing: A powerful tool to simulate in-situ mechanical degradation in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, A.; Venkatesan, S. V.; Khorasany, R. M. H.; Kim, W. H. J.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-04-01

    An ex-situ tensile fatigue and creep based accelerated stress test (TFC-AST) is proposed to evaluate the mechanical stability of catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) used in fuel cells. The fatigue-creep action of the TFC test is analyzed by tensile and hygrothermal expansion measurements on partially degraded specimens supplemented by microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy, revealing significant decay in mechanical properties as well as morphological rearrangement due to the combined fatigue and creep loading. Through comparison with in-situ hygrothermally degraded CCMs, the TFC-AST protocol is demonstrated to be an economical alternative to the costly in-situ mechanical accelerated stress tests that can reduce the test duration by more than 99%.

  18. DWPF Macrobatch 2 Melt Rate Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-01-03

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister production rate must be increased to meet canister production goals. Although a number of factors exist that could potentially increase melt rate, this study focused on two: (1) changes in frit composition and (2) changes to the feed preparation process to alter the redox of the melter feed. These two factors were investigated for Macrobatch 2 (sludge batch 1B) utilizing crucible studies and a specially designed ''melt rate'' furnace. Other potential factors that could increase melt rate include: mechanical mixing via stirring or the use of bubblers, changing the power skewing to redistribute the power input to the melter, and elimination of heat loss (e.g. air in leakage). The melt rate testing in FY00 demonstrated that melt rate can be improved by adding a different frit or producing a much more reducing glass by the addition of sugar as a reductant. The frit that melted the fastest in the melt rate testing was Frit 165. A paper stud y was performed using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to determine the impact on predicted glass viscosity, liquidus, durability, and operating window if the frit was changed from Frit 200 to Frit 165. PCCS indicated that the window was very similar for both frits. In addition, the predicted viscosity of the frit 165 glass was 46 poise versus 84 poise for the Frit 200 glass. As a result, a change from Frit 200 to Frit 165 is expected to increase the melt rate in DWPF without decreasing waste loading.

  19. Humidity Testing for Human Rated Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    Determination that equipment can operate in and survive exposure to the humidity environments unique to human rated spacecraft presents widely varying challenges. Equipment may need to operate in habitable volumes where the atmosphere contains perspiration, exhalation, and residual moisture. Equipment located outside the pressurized volumes may be exposed to repetitive diurnal cycles that may result in moisture absorption and/or condensation. Equipment may be thermally affected by conduction to coldplate or structure, by forced or ambient air convection (hot/cold or wet/dry), or by radiation to space through windows or hatches. The equipment s on/off state also contributes to the equipment s susceptibility to humidity. Like-equipment is sometimes used in more than one location and under varying operational modes. Due to these challenges, developing a test scenario that bounds all physical, environmental and operational modes for both pressurized and unpressurized volumes requires an integrated assessment to determine the "worst-case combined conditions." Such an assessment was performed for the Constellation program, considering all of the aforementioned variables; and a test profile was developed based on approximately 300 variable combinations. The test profile has been vetted by several subject matter experts and partially validated by testing. Final testing to determine the efficacy of the test profile on actual space hardware is in the planning stages. When validation is completed, the test profile will be formally incorporated into NASA document CxP 30036, "Constellation Environmental Qualification and Acceptance Testing Requirements (CEQATR)."

  20. Effect of natural fiber types and sodium silicate coated on natural fiber mat/PLA composites: Tensile properties and rate of fire propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongpin, C.; Srimuk, J.; hipkam, N.; Wachirapong, P.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, 3 types of natural fibres, i.e. jute, sisal and abaca, were plain weaved to fibre mat. Before weaving, the fibres were treated with 5% NaOH to remove hemi cellulose and lignin. The weaving was performed by hand using square wooden block fit with nails for weaving using one and two types of natural fibres as weft and warp fibre to produce natural fibre mat. The fibre mat was also impregnated in sodium silicate solution extracted from rich husk ash. The pH of the solution was adjusted to pH 7 using H2SO4 before impregnation. After predetermined time, sodium silicate was gelled and deposited on the mat. The fabric mat and sodium silicate coated mat were then impregnated with PLA solution to produce prepreg. Dried pepreg was laminated with PLA sheet using compressing moulding machine to obtain natural fibre mat/PLA composite. The composite containing abaca aligned in longitudinal direction with respect to tension force enhanced Young's modulus more than 300%. Fibre mat composites with abaca aligned in longitudinal direction also showed tensile strength enhancement nearly 400% higher than neat PLA. After coating with sodium silicate, the tensile modulus of the composites was found slightly increased. The silicate coating was disadvantage on tensile strength of the composite due to the effect of sodium hydroxide solution that was used as solvent for silicate extraction from rice husk ash. However, sodium silicate could retard rate of fire propagation about 50%compare to neat PLA and about 10% reduction compared to fibre mat composites without sodium silicate coated fibre mat.

  1. Influence of the tensile strain rate on the mechanical properties and phase composition of VNS 9-Sh TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terent'ev, V. F.; Slizov, A. K.; Prosvirnin, D. V.; Sirotinkin, V. P.; Ashmarin, A. A.; Gol'dberg, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of the strain rate on the mechanical properties and the phase composition of a sheet VNS 9-Sh (23Kh15N5AM3-Sh) TRIP steel is studied during static tension. The strain rate is changed in the range from 8.3 × 10-5 to 25 × 10-3 s-1. The dependence of the mechanical properties on the strain rate is found to be nonlinear. The TRIP effect is most pronounced at a strain rate of (8.3-17) × 10-5 s-1. In this strain rate, the deformation martensite content increases significantly, from 50 to 87%, as is detected by X-ray diffraction.

  2. Correlation of infrared thermographic patterns and acoustic emission signals with tensile deformation and fracture processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, B.; Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2001-04-01

    During tensile deformation, part of the mechanical work done on the specimen is transformed into heat and acoustic activity. The amount of acoustic activity and the thermal emissions depend on the test conditions and the deformation behavior of the specimen during loading. Authors have used thermography and acoustic emission (AE) simultaneously for monitoring tensile deformation in AISI type 316 SS. Tensile testing was carried out at 298 K at three different strain rates. It has been shown that the simultaneous use of these techniques can provide complementary information for characterizing the tensile deformation and fracture processes.

  3. An evaluation of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, S.; Morton, J.; Jackson, K. E.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of advanced composite laminates is studied. The assumptions used for the development of the shear strength formulas were examined, and factors such as the specimen geometry and stacking sequence were assessed experimentally. It was found that the strength of symmetric and balanced +/-45 deg laminates depends primarily upon the specimen thickness rather than the specimen width. These findings have important implications for the +/-45 deg tensile test which is recommended by several organizations for the determination of the in-plane shear stress/strain response and the shear strength of continuous fiber reinforced composites. Modifications to the recommended practices for specimen selection and shear strength determination are suggested.

  4. Unveil the Size-Dependent Mechanical Behaviors of Individual CNT/SiC Composite Nanofibers by In Situ Tensile Tests in SEM.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingchao; Chen, Weibing; Hacopian, Emily; Dong, Pei; Sun, Anqi; Ci, Lijie; Lou, Jun

    2016-09-01

    In situ quantitative tensile tests of individual carbon nanotube (CNT)/SiC core-shell nanofibers are carried out in both a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The incorporation of CNTs into a SiC matrix led to improved elastic modulus and fracture strength of the CNT/SiC nanofibers as compared to SiC alone. PMID:27400777

  5. 26 CFR 1.1274-4 - Test rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Test rate. 1.1274-4 Section 1.1274-4 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1274-4 Test rate. (a) Determination of test rate of interest—(1) In general—(i) Test rate is the 3-month rate. Except as provided...

  6. High-temperature tensile tester for ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus measures tensile strength of rigid, low-density ceramic materials at temperatures up to 1375 K. Tensile grips mate with tensile specimen and form top and bottom of lightweight furnace. Apparatus can only be used with rigid materials and grips must be stronger than material under test.

  7. Stress-induced martensitic transformation during tensile test of full-size TF conductor jacket tube at 4.2 K

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H. H.; Li, S. P.; Wu, Z. X.; Huang, C. J.; Huang, R. J.; Li, L. F.

    2014-01-27

    The toroidal-field (TF) conductor jacket of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is made of modified 316LN stainless steel, which is influenced by heat treatment at approximately 650 °C for 200 h to produce Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting materials at the final stage. Due to the high electromagnetic forces arising during magnet operation, higher mechanical properties of the jacket materials at cryogenic temperatures are required. In our work, mechanical properties of the full-size TF conductor jacket tube were investigated, which satisfied the ITER requirements. Stress-induced martensitic transformation mechanism during tensile test of the conductor jacket material at 4.2 K was characterized by means of in-situ temperature dependent XRD, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile behavior related to the amount of stress-induced phase transformation at cryogenic temperature was also discussed.

  8. Gas cylinder release rate testing and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despres, Joseph; Sweeney, Joseph; Yedave, Sharad; Chambers, Barry

    2012-11-01

    There are varying cylinder technologies employed for the storage of gases, each resulting in a potentially different hazard level to the surroundings in the event of a gas release. Subatmospheric Gas delivery Systems Type I (SAGS I) store and deliver gases subatmospherically, while Subatmospheric Gas delivery Systems Type II (SAGS II) deliver gases subatmospherically, but store them at high pressure. Standard high pressure gas cylinders store and deliver their contents at high pressure. Due to the differences in these cylinder technologies, release rates in the event of a leak or internal component failure, can vary significantly. This paper details the experimental and theoretical results of different Arsine (AsH3) gas cylinder release scenarios. For the SAGS II experimental analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to determine the spatial concentration profiles when a surrogate gas, CF4, was released via a simulated leak within an ion implanter. Various SAGS I and SAGS II cylinder types and failure modes were tested. Additionally, theoretical analysis was performed to support an understanding of the different potential AsH3 leak rates. The results of this work show that the effects of a leak from the various cylinder types can be quite different, with the concentrations resulting from cylinders containing high pressure gas often being in excess of IDLH levels.

  9. The dynamic tensile strength of ice and ice-silicate mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of icy media is measured at strain rates on the order of 10,000/sec to aid in the understanding of impact and cratering phenomena. Compressed samples consisting of ice and ice-silicate mixtures with 5 and 30 wt % sand were impacted at temperatures between 230 and 250 K by projectile plexiglas plates imparting the required strain rates in less than 0.75 microsec. Taking the tensile stress corresponding to the transition from intact to spalled or fragmented samples as the dynamic tensile strength, strengths of 17, 20 and 22 MPa were obtained for the pure ice, 5 wt % sand, and 30 wt % sand specimens, respectively. The values lie considerably above those observed in static testing. A continuum fracturing model is used to obtain relations between tensile strength and stress rate as well as to derive stress and damage histories during tensile loading and the size distribution of icy fragments as a function of strain rate.

  10. Device for testing closure disks at high rates of change of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Merten, C.W. Jr.

    1993-11-09

    A device is described for testing the burst pressure of closure disks which provides high pressure to both sides of a disk and rapidly releases pressure from one side thereof causing a high rate of change of pressure. A hollow notched plug allows the rapid release of pressure upon rupturing. A means is also disclosed for transmitting a tensile load from a piston to a hollow notched plug and for sealing the means for transmitting load within a hole in a piston. 5 figures.

  11. Tensile and pack compressive tests of some sheets of aluminum alloy, 1025 carbon steel, and chromium-nickel steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atchison, C S; Miller, James A

    1942-01-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain curves, stress-deviation curves, and secant modulus-stress curves are given for longitudinal and transverse specimens of 17S-T, 24S-T, and 24S-RT aluminum-alloy sheet in thicknesses from 0.032 to 0.081 inch, 1025 carbon steel sheet in thicknesses of 0.054 and 0.120 inch, and chromium-nickel steel sheet in thicknesses form 0.020 to 0.0275 inch. Significant differences were found between the tensile and the compressive stress-strain curves, and also the corresponding corollary curves; similarly, differences were found between the curves for the longitudinal and transverse directions. These differences are of particular importance in considering the compressive strength of aircraft structures made of thin sheet. They are explored further for the case of compression by giving tangent modulus-stress curves in longitudinal and transverse compression and dimensionless curves of the ratio of tangent modulus to Young's modulus and of the ratio of reduced modulus for a rectangular section to Young's modulus, both plotted against the ratio of stress to secant yield strength.

  12. Test Review: Autism Spectrum Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simek, Amber N.; Wahlberg, Andrea C.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews Autism Spectrum Rating Scales (ASRS) which are designed to measure behaviors in children between the ages of 2 and 18 that are associated with disorders on the autism spectrum as rated by parents/caregivers and/or teachers. The rating scales include items related to behaviors associated with Autism, Asperger's Disorder, and…

  13. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700 °C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; Nasiatka, James R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2014-08-15

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300 °C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750 °C.

  14. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700 °C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography.

    PubMed

    Haboub, Abdel; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Nasiatka, James R; Cox, Brian N; Marshall, David B; Ritchie, Robert O; MacDowell, Alastair A

    2014-08-01

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300 °C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750 °C. PMID:25173271

  15. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700 °C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haboub, Abdel; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Nasiatka, James R.; Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B.; Ritchie, Robert O.; MacDowell, Alastair A.

    2014-08-01

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300 °C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750 °C.

  16. Dependency of Shear Strength on Test Rate in SiC/BSAS Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Both interlaminar and in-plane shear strengths of a unidirectional Hi-Nicalon(TM) fiber-reinforced barium strontium aluminosilicate (SiC/BSAS) composite were determined at 1100 C in air as a function of test rate using double notch shear test specimens. The composite exhibited a significant effect of test rate on shear strength, regardless of orientation which was either in interlaminar or in in-plane direction, resulting in an appreciable shear-strength degradation of about 50 percent as test rate decreased from 3.3 10(exp -1) mm/s to 3.3 10(exp -5) mm/s. The rate dependency of composite's shear strength was very similar to that of ultimate tensile strength at 1100 C observed in a similar composite (2-D SiC/BSAS) in which tensile strength decreased by about 60 percent when test rate varied from the highest (5 MPa/s) to the lowest (0.005 MPa/s). A phenomenological, power-law slow crack growth formulation was proposed and formulated to account for the rate dependency of shear strength of the composite.

  17. 76 FR 79204 - Random Drug Testing Rate for Covered Crewmembers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Random Drug Testing Rate for Covered Crewmembers AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of minimum random drug testing rate. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard has set the calendar year 2012 minimum random drug testing rate at 50 percent of covered crewmembers. DATES: The minimum random...

  18. 76 FR 1448 - Random Drug Testing Rate for Covered Crewmembers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Random Drug Testing Rate for Covered Crewmembers AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of minimum random drug testing rate. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard has set the calendar year 2011 minimum random drug testing rate at 50 percent of covered crewmembers. DATES: The minimum random...

  19. 78 FR 4855 - Random Drug Testing Rate for Covered Crewmembers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Random Drug Testing Rate for Covered Crewmembers AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of minimum random drug testing rate. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard has set the calendar year 2013 minimum random drug testing rate at 25 percent of covered crewmembers. The Coast Guard will continue...

  20. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  1. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  2. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  3. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  4. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  5. Effects of chemical composition and test conditions on the dynamic tensile response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Laws, K. J.; Trujillo, C. P.; Brown, A. D.; Cerreta, E. K.; Hazell, P. J.; Quadir, M. Z.; Ferry, M.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of impact velocity and temperature on the dynamic mechanical behavior of two bulk metallic glasses (BMG) with slightly different elemental compositions (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38) have been investigated. Bullet-shaped samples were accelerated by a gas gun to speeds in the 400 ~ 600m/s range and tested at room temperature and 250 °C. The specimens impacted a steel extrusion die which subjected them to high strains at high strain-rates. The extruded samples were subsequently soft recovered by using low density foams. The deformed specimens were examined by optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and hardness measurements. The characterization results aided to assess the effect of chemical composition on the microstructural evolution, i.e. phase changes or crystallization, which might influence the ductility on the nominally brittle amorphous BMGs. The most significant results from this study will be presented. School of Engineering and Information Technology, UNSW Canberra.

  6. Lattice strain and damage evolution of 9-12/%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel during in situ tensile test by x-ray diffraction and small angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, X.; Wu, X.; Mo, K.; Chen, X,; Almer, J. D.; Ilavsky, J.; Haeffner, D. R.; Stubbins, J. F.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Illinois

    2010-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction and small angle scattering measurements during tensile tests were performed on 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. The lattice strains in both particle and matrix phases, along two principal directions, were directly measured. The load transfer between particle and matrix was calculated based on matrix/particle elastic mismatch, matrix plasticity and interface decohesion. In addition, the void or damage evolution during the test was measured using small angle X-ray scattering. By combining stress and void evolution during deformation, the critical interfacial strength for void nucleation was determined, and compared with pre-existing void nucleation criteria. These comparisons show that models overestimate the measured critical strength, and require a larger particle size than measured to match the X-ray observations.

  7. Temperature and strain rate effects in high strength high conductivity copper alloys tested in air

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile properties of the three candidate alloys GlidCop{trademark} Al25, CuCrZr, and CuNiBe are known to be sensitive to the testing conditions such as strain rate and test temperature. This study was conducted on GlidCop Al25 (2 conditions) and Hycon 3HP (3 conditions) to ascertain the effect of test temperature and strain rate when tested in open air. The results show that the yield strength and elongation of the GlidCop Al25 alloys exhibit a strain rate dependence that increases with temperature. Both the GlidCop and the Hycon 3 HP exhibited an increase in strength as the strain rate increased, but the GlidCop alloys proved to be the most strain rate sensitive. The GlidCop failed in a ductile manner irrespective of the test conditions, however, their strength and uniform elongation decreased with increasing test temperature and the uniform elongation also decreased dramatically at the lower strain rates. The Hycon 3 HP alloys proved to be extremely sensitive to test temperature, rapidly losing their strength and ductility when the temperature increased above 250 C. As the test temperature increased and the strain rate decreased the fracture mode shifted from a ductile transgranular failure to a ductile intergranular failure with very localized ductility. This latter observation is based on the presence of dimples on the grain facets, indicating that some ductile deformation occurred near the grain boundaries. The material failed without any reduction in area at 450 C and 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1}, and in several cases failed prematurely.

  8. Impact tensile properties and strength development mechanism of glass for reinforcement fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Oshima, K.; Kawada, H.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, impact tensile properties of E-glass were investigated by fiber bundle testing under a high strain rate. The impact tests were performed employing two types of experiments. One is the tension-type split Hopkinson pressure bar system, and the other is the universal high-speed tensile-testing machine. As the results, it was found that not only the tensile strength but also the fracture strain of E-glass fiber improved with the strain rate. The absorbed strain energy of this material significantly increased. It was also found that the degree of the strain rate dependency of E-glass fibers on the tensile strength was varied according to fiber diameter. As for the strain rate dependency of the glass fiber under tensile loading condition, change of the small crack-propagation behaviour was considered to clarify the development of the fiber strength. The tensile fiber strength was estimated by employing the numerical simulation based on the slow crack-growth model (SCG). Through the parametric study against the coefficient of the crack propagation rate, the numerical estimation value was obtained for the various testing conditions. It was concluded that the slow crack-growth behaviour in the glass fiber was an essential for the increase in the strength of this material.

  9. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

  11. Tensile and creep properties of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel for fusion energy application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M. D.; Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Varaprasad Reddy, G.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2011-10-01

    Tensile and creep properties of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel for Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be tested in ITER have been evaluated. The tensile strength was found to decrease with temperature; the rate of decrease being slower in the intermediate temperature range of 450-650 K. Tensile ductility of the steel decreased with increase in temperature up to 650 K, followed by a rapid increase beyond 650 K. Creep studies have been carried out at 773, 823 and 873 K over a stress range of 100-300 MPa. The variation of minimum creep rate with applied stress followed a power law, ɛ = Aσ n. The ' n' value decreased with increase in temperature. The creep rupture life was found to relate inversely with minimum creep rate through the Monkman-Grant relation, t r · ɛ = constant. The tensile and creep properties of the steel were comparable with those of Eurofer 97.

  12. Tensile properties of impact ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Kellackey, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A special test apparatus was developed to measure the tensile strength of impact ices perpendicular to the direction of growth. The apparatus consists of a split tube carefully machined to minimize the effect of the joint on impact ice strength. The tube is supported in the wind tunnel by two carefully aligned bearings. During accretion the tube is turned slowly in the icing cloud to form a uniform coating of ice on the split tube specimen. The two halves of the split tube are secured firmly by a longitudinal bolt to prevent relative motion between the two halves during ice accretion and handling. Tensile test strength results for a variety of icing conditions were obtained. Both glaze and rime ice conditions were investigated. In general, the tensile strength of impact ice was significantly less than refrigerator ice. Based on the limited data taken, the median strength of rime ice was less than glaze ice. However, the mean values were similar.

  13. Effects of test environment and grain size on the tensile properties of L1 sub 2 -ordered (Co,Fe) sub 3 V alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, C.; Liu, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of test environment, grain size, and heat treatment on the tensile properties and fracture behavior of L1{sub 2}-ordered (Co{sub 78}Fe{sub 22}){sub 3}V and (Co{sub 85}Fe{sub 15}){sub 3}V alloys was studied at room temperature. The tensile ductility depends strongly on test environments; the elongation decreases in the sequence of oxygen, vacuum, air, and distilled water. The loss in elongation is accompanied by a change in fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular. When tested in oxygen or vacuum, (Co{sub 78}Fe{sub 22}){sub 3}V specimens exhibited predominantly transgranular fracture, while (Co{sub 85}Fe{sub 15}){sub 3}V specimens exhibited essentially intergranular fracture. Grain refinement of (Co{sub 78}Fe{sub 22}){sub 3}V resulted in a ductility improvement in air, while such a beneficial effect of a grain refinement was not observed in (Co{sub 85}Fe{sub 15}){sub 3}V. These results suggest that: (1) (Co,Fe){sub 3}V alloys exhibit a moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement and (2) grain boundaries are more intrinsically brittle in (Co{sub 85}Fe{sub 15}){sub 3}V than in (Co{sub 78}Fe{sub 22}){sub 3}V. The presence of a brittle hexagonal phase is suggested to be the reason for the observed grain-boundary brittleness in (Co{sub 85}Fe{sub 15}){sub 3}V. 29 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Tensile and compressive behavior of a swirl mat composite

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B.

    1998-07-01

    The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the US Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on one representative reference material--an isocyanurate (polyurethane) reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass. The present report describes tensile and compressive testing and results for the reference composite. Behavior trends and proportional limit are established for both tension and compression. Damage development due to tensile loading and strain rate effects are discussed.

  15. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding.

    PubMed

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10-20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  16. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flow rating tests. 162.018-7 Section 162.018-7 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII...

  17. Examination of a Rock Failure Criterion Based on Circumferential Tensile Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, , Y.; Kiyama, , T.; Ishijima, Y.; Kodama, J.

    Uniaxial compression, triaxial compression and Brazialian tests were conducted on several kinds of rock, with particular attention directed to the principal tensile strain. In this paper we aim to clarify the effects of the experimental environment-such as confining pressure, loading rate, water content and anisotropy-on the critical tensile strain, i.e., the measured principal tensile strain at peak load.It was determined that the chain-type extensometer is a most suitable method for measuring the critical tensile strain in uniaxial compression tests. It is also shown that the paper-based strain gage, whose effective length is less than or equal to a tenth of the specimen's diameter and glued on with a rubber-type adhesive, can be effectively used in the Brazilian tests.The effect of confining pressure PC on the critical tensile strain ɛTC in the brittle failure region was between -0.02 × 10-10 Pa-1 and 0.77 × 10-10 Pa-1. This pressure sensitivity is small compared to the critical tensile strain values of around -0.5 × 10-2. The strain rate sensitivities ∂ɛTC/∂{log(d|ɛ|/dt)} were observed in the same way as the strength constants in other failure criteria. They were found to be from -0.10 × 10-3 to -0.52 × 10-3 per order of magnitude in strain rate in the triaxial tests. The average magnitude of the critical tensile strain ɛTC increased due to the presence of water by 4% to 20% for some rocks, and decreased by 22% for sandstone. It can at least be said that the critical tensile strain is less sensitive to water content than the uniaxial compressive strength under the experimental conditions reported here. An obvious anisotropy was observed in the P-wave velocity and in the uniaxial compressive strength of Pombetsu sandstone. It was not observed, however, in the critical tensile strain, although the data do show some variation.A "tensile strain criterion" was proposed, based on the above experimental results. This criterion signifies that stress begins

  18. Bond mobility mechanism in grain boundary embrittlement: First-principles tensile tests of Fe with a P-segregated {Sigma}3 grain boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Yuasa, Motohiro; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2010-09-01

    First-principles simulated tensile tests have been performed on Fe with a P-segregated grain boundary to investigate the nature of the bond mobility mechanism in grain boundary embrittlement. The first site for bond breaking was the Fe-P bond, despite its high charge density. This is because the Fe-P bond exhibited the covalentlike characteristics of a localized bonding and the mobility of electrons was reduced. The breaking of the Fe-P bond accelerated the breaking of the Fe-Fe bond around the Fe-P bond because the Fe-P bond breaking affected the electron density of states of the Fe-Fe bond. Thus, P segregation enhanced the grain boundary embrittlement in Fe.

  19. Preliminary report on tests of tensile specimens with a part-through surface notch for a filament wound graphite/epoxy material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of tensile coupons with surface notches of various semi-elliptical shapes were evaluated for specimens obtained from a filament wound graphite/epoxy cylinder. The quasi-static test results, in some instances, are inadequate for defining complete trend curves and the interpretive analysis is considered to be preliminary. Specimens with very shallow notches were observed to be notch insensitive and the unnotched strength from these specimens was determined to be 54.97 Ksi. The failure strain of the laminate was found to be 1.328%. Specimens with deeper notches were sensitive to notch depth, notch aspect ratio, and specimen width. Using the unnotched strength of 54.97 Ksi and Poe's general toughness parameter, the fracture toughness was estimated to be 27.2 Ksi square root of In. Isotropic linear elastic fracture mechanics together with the estimated fracture toughness correctly predicted the influence of notch depth, aspect ratio, and specimen finitewidth.

  20. Effect of Strain-Induced Martensite on Tensile Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement of 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Bak, Sang Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature tensile tests have been conducted at different strain rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-2/s on hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 stainless steel (SS). Using a ferritescope and neutron diffraction, the amount of strain-induced martensite (SIM) has been in situ measured at the center region of the gage section of the tensile specimens or ex situ measured on the fractured tensile specimens. The ductility, tensile stress, hardness, and the amount of SIM increase with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and decrease in hydrogen-charged one. Specifically, SIM that forms during tensile tests is beneficial in increasing the ductility, strain hardening, and tensile stress of 304 SS, irrespective of the presence of hydrogen. A correlation of the tensile properties of hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 SS and the amount of SIM shows that hydrogen suppresses the formation of SIM in hydrogen-charged 304 SS, leading to a ductility loss and localized brittle fracture. Consequently, we demonstrate that hydrogen embrittlement of 304 SS is related to hydrogen-suppressed formation of SIM, corresponding to the disordered phase, according to our proposition. Compelling evidence is provided by the observations of the increased lattice expansion of martensite with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and its lattice contraction in hydrogen-charged one.

  1. High temperature, short term tensile strength of C6000/PMR-15 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digiovanni, P. R.; Paterson, D.

    1985-01-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on 0 unidirectionally reinforced Celion 6000 graphite fibers in PMR-15 polyimide matrix. Tensile strengths for coupons subjected to short and long term uniform temperatures were obtained. Thick coupons, heated on one side to produce significant transient through thickness temperature gradients, were tested and compared to the strength of specimens with uniform temperature distributions. All coupons were radiantly heated and reached maximum test temperatures within 15 sec. Tensile loads were applied to the coupons after 15 sec of elevated temperature exposure. Loading rates were selected so that specimen failures occurred within a maximum of 45 sec after reaching the test temperature. Results indicate that significant tensile strength remains beyond the material post cure temperature.

  2. 26 CFR 1.1274-4 - Test rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Test rate. 1.1274-4 Section 1.1274-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1274-4 Test rate. (a) Determination of test rate of interest—(1) In general—(i)...

  3. Controlling type-1 error rates in whole effluent toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Johnson, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    A form of variability, called the dose x test interaction, has been found to affect the variability of the mean differences from control in the statistical tests used to evaluate Whole Effluent Toxicity Tests for compliance purposes. Since the dose x test interaction is not included in these statistical tests, the assumed type-1 and type-2 error rates can be incorrect. The accepted type-1 error rate for these tests is 5%. Analysis of over 100 Ceriodaphnia, fathead minnow and sea urchin fertilization tests showed that when the test x dose interaction term was not included in the calculations the type-1 error rate was inflated to as high as 20%. In a compliance setting, this problem may lead to incorrect regulatory decisions. Statistical tests are proposed that properly incorporate the dose x test interaction variance.

  4. Anti-buckling fatigue test assembly. [for subjecting metal specimen to tensile and compressive loads at constant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Imig, L. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An antibuckling fatigue test assembly is described for holding a metal specimen which is subjected to compression and to rapid cyclical heating and cooling while permitting visual observation. In an illustrative embodiment of this invention, the anti-buckling fatigue test apparatus includes first and second guide members between which the metal specimen is disposed and held, a heating assembly comprising a suitable heating source such as a quartz lamp and a reflecting assembly directing the heat onto the specimen, and a cooling assembly for directing a suitable cooling fluid such as air onto the specimen. The guide members each have a passage to permit the heat to be directed onto the specimen. An opening is provided in the reflecting assembly to permit visual inspection of that region of the specimen adjacent to the opening onto which the heat is directed.

  5. 75 FR 9018 - Pipeline Safety: Random Drug Testing Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... percent for calendar year 2010. ] On January 19, 2010, PHMSA published an Advisory Bulletin (75 FR 2926... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Random Drug Testing Rate AGENCY... Percentage Rate for Random Drug Testing. SUMMARY: PHMSA has determined that the minimum random drug...

  6. Dynamic tensile properties of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Manoogian, Sarah J; Bisplinghoff, Jill A; McNally, Craig; Kemper, Andrew R; Santago, Anthony C; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-12-01

    Automobile crashes are the largest cause of injury death for pregnant females and the leading cause of traumatic fetal injury mortality in the United States. Computational models, useful tools to evaluate the risk of fetal loss in motor vehicle crashes, are based on a limited number of quasi-static material tests of the placenta. This study presents a total of 20 dynamic uniaxial tensile tests on the maternal side of the placenta and 10 dynamic uniaxial tensile tests on the chorion layer of the placenta. These tests were completed from 6 human placentas to determine material properties at a strain rate of 7.0 strains/s. The results show that the average peak strain at failure for both the maternal portion and the chorion layer of the placenta are similar with a value of 0.56 and 0.61, respectively. However, the average failure stress for the chorion layer, 167.8 kPa, is much higher than the average failure stress for the placenta with the chorionic plate removed, 18.6 kPa. This is due to differences in the structure and function of these layers in the placenta. In summary, dynamic loading data for the placenta have been determined for use in computational modeling of pregnant occupant kinematics in motor vehicle crashes. Moreover the computational model should utilize the material properties for the placenta without the chorion layer. PMID:18996533

  7. An in-plane tensile test for rheological and formability identification: comparison between experimental and numerical FLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leotoing, L.; Guines, D.; Ragneau, E.

    2011-05-01

    Both accurate constitutive laws and formability limits of materials are essential for a numerical optimization of sheet forming processes. To identify these behaviors, experimental databases are needed. In this work, experiments are performed from a biaxial device able to give for a unique in-plane specimen a good prediction of rheological parameters and formability. The proposed device is a servo-hydraulic testing machine provided with four independent dynamic actuators. By localizing necking in the central zone of the specimen, the strain path in this zone is controlled by the speed ratio between the two axes and the whole forming limit diagram can be covered. The experimental forming limit curve for the aluminium alloy AA5086 is determined thanks to a rigorous procedure for detecting the onset of necking in the specimen. Material parameters (constants of both hardening law and anisotropic yield criterion) are identified from the global measurement of force versus displacement curves by means of an inverse analysis procedure. Comparison between experimental and numerical forming limit curves are presented. For the numerical FLCs, two sets of material parameters are compared, the former is identified through the classical uniaxial test and the latter thanks to the dedicated cruciform specimen.

  8. An in-plane tensile test for rheological and formability identification: comparison between experimental and numerical FLC

    SciTech Connect

    Leotoing, L.; Guines, D.; Ragneau, E.

    2011-05-04

    Both accurate constitutive laws and formability limits of materials are essential for a numerical optimization of sheet forming processes. To identify these behaviors, experimental databases are needed. In this work, experiments are performed from a biaxial device able to give for a unique in-plane specimen a good prediction of rheological parameters and formability. The proposed device is a servo-hydraulic testing machine provided with four independent dynamic actuators. By localizing necking in the central zone of the specimen, the strain path in this zone is controlled by the speed ratio between the two axes and the whole forming limit diagram can be covered. The experimental forming limit curve for the aluminium alloy AA5086 is determined thanks to a rigorous procedure for detecting the onset of necking in the specimen. Material parameters (constants of both hardening law and anisotropic yield criterion) are identified from the global measurement of force versus displacement curves by means of an inverse analysis procedure. Comparison between experimental and numerical forming limit curves are presented. For the numerical FLCs, two sets of material parameters are compared, the former is identified through the classical uniaxial test and the latter thanks to the dedicated cruciform specimen.

  9. Effect of micro-roughness produced by TiO2 blasting--tensile testing of bone attachment by using coin-shaped implants.

    PubMed

    Rønold, Hans Jacob; Ellingsen, Jan Eirik

    2002-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine bone response to micro-rough titanium implants. Forty coin-shaped implants were divided into eight groups according to their surface roughness. The first group had electropolished surfaces. The surfaces of implant groups 2-8 were blasted with TiO2 particles with incremental grain sizes ranging from 7.5-12.5 to 270-330 microns. Five implants from each group were placed into the cortical bone of the proximal tibia in New Zealand Black rabbits. To avoid bone overgrowth during the retention phase the implants were fitted into tight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) caps leaving only the flat test surface exposed to bone. The healing period was set to 10 weeks, and implants with attached bone were evaluated using a tensile testing machine. In groups 1-7 a significant correlation between the micro-roughness of the implant surfaces and retention strength was observed. Maximum bone bonding was observed with implants blasted with 180-220 microns grain size (group 7). Blasting with larger TiO2 particles appeared to decrease the effect. The findings suggest that the best grain size of TiO2 particles for optimising retention of titanium implants in cortical bone should be in the 180-220 microns range. PMID:12194524

  10. Effect of thermomechanical processing on the microstructure and retained austenite stability during in situ tensile testing using synchrotron x-ray diffraction of NbMoAI TRIP steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Pereloma, E.; Zhang, L.; Liss, K.-D.; Garbe, U.; Almer, J.; Schambron, T.; Beladi, H.; Timokhina, I.

    2011-06-01

    In this work we compare and contrast the stability of retained austenite during tensile testing of Nb-Mo-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel subjected to different thermomechanical processing schedules. The obtained microstructures were characterised using optical metallography, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The transformation of retained austenite to martensite under tensile loading was observed by in-situ high energy X-ray diffraction at 1ID / APS. It has been shown that the variations in the microstructure of the steel, such as volume fractions of present phases, their morphology and dimensions, play a critical role in the strain-induced transition of retained austenite to martensite.

  11. The effect of structure on tensile properties of directionally solidified Zn-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, A. E.; Schvezov, C. E.

    2011-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to measure thermal (cooling rates, temperature gradients and velocities of the liquidus and solidus isotherms), structural (grain size and primary and secondary dendritic arm spacings) and tensile parameters (maximum tensile strength (MTS), yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS)) in zinc-aluminum (ZA) hypoeutectic (Zn-3 wt%Al) and hypereutectic (Zn-10 wt%Al, Zn-15 wt%Al, Zn-20 wt%Al, Zn-30 wt%Al, Zn-37 wt%Al and Zn-50 wt%Al) alloys directionally solidified, which present columnar, equiaxed and columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) structures. The different types of structures were analyzed with optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Correlations between temperature gradient, cooling rate, local solidification time, grain size and dendritic spacings and tensile tests parameters are presented and discussed. The results show the influence of concentration, microstructural arrangement and thermal conditions on the mechanical properties during the solidification process.

  12. Controlling Test Overlap Rate in Automated Assembly of Multiple Equivalent Test Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chuan-Ju

    2010-01-01

    Assembling equivalent test forms with minimal test overlap across forms is important in ensuring test security. Chen and Lei (2009) suggested a exposure control technique to control test overlap-ordered item pooling on the fly based on the essence that test overlap rate--ordered item pooling for the first t examinees is a function of test overlap…

  13. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1982-05-28

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  14. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, Joe L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  15. User’s Guide for Getter Rate Test System

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, Monte R.

    2007-06-27

    This User’s Guide describes the operation and maintenance of the Getter Rate Test System, including the mechanical equipment, instrumentation, and datalogger/computer components. The Getter Rate Test System includes equipment and instrumentation to conduct two getter rate tests simultaneously. The mechanical equipment comprises roughing and high-vacuum pumps, heated test chambers, standard hydrogen leaks, and associated piping and valves. Instrumentation includes thermocouples, pressure (vacuum) transducers, panel displays, analog-to-digital signal converter, and associated wiring. The datalogger/computer is a stand-alone computer with installed software to allow the user to record data input from the pressure transducers to data files and to calculate the getter rate from the data in an Excel® spreadsheet.

  16. Fighter pilots' heart rate, heart rate variation and performance during an instrument flight rules proficiency test.

    PubMed

    Mansikka, Heikki; Virtanen, Kai; Harris, Don; Simola, Petteri

    2016-09-01

    Increased task demand will increase the pilot mental workload (PMWL). When PMWL is increased, mental overload may occur resulting in degraded performance. During pilots' instrument flight rules (IFR) proficiency test, PMWL is typically not measured. Therefore, little is known about workload during the proficiency test and pilots' potential to cope with higher task demands than those experienced during the test. In this study, fighter pilots' performance and PMWL was measured during a real IFR proficiency test in an F/A-18 simulator. PMWL was measured using heart rate (HR) and heart rate variation (HRV). Performance was rated using Finnish Air Force's official rating scales. Results indicated that HR and HRV differentiate varying task demands in situations where variations in performance are insignificant. It was concluded that during a proficiency test, PMWL should be measured together with the task performance measurement. PMID:27109324

  17. High strain rate compression testing of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, R. A.; Langdon, G. S.; Cloete, T. J.; Nurick, G. N.

    2012-08-01

    This paper details an investigation of the high strain rate compression testing of GFPP with the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) in the through-thickness and in-plane directions. GFPP posed challenges to SHPB testing as it fails at relatively high stresses, while having relatively low moduli and hence mechanical impedance. The modifications to specimen geometry and incident pulse shaping in order to gather valid test results, where specimen equilibrium was achieved for SHPB tests on GFPP are presented. In addition to conventional SHPB tests to failure, SHPB experiments were designed to achieve specimen equilibration at small strains, which permitted the capture of high strain rate elastic modulus data. The strain rate dependency of GFPP's failure strengths in the in-plane and through-thickness direction is modelled using a logarithmic law.

  18. 26 CFR 1.1274-4 - Test rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... test rate is the market yield on U.S. Treasury bills with the same maturity date as the debt instrument. If the same maturity date is not available, the market yield on U.S. Treasury bills that mature in... (see § 601.601(d)(2)(ii) of this chapter). The applicable Federal rates are based on the yield...

  19. Generalized procedures for testing hypotheses about survival or recovery rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, J.R.; Williams, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    Comparisons of survival or recovery rates from different time periods or geographic regions may be difficult to accomplish using the Z-tests suggested by Brownie et al. (1985). We propose a general Chi-square statistic that addresses an unambiguous null hypothesis of homogeneity among several survival or recovery rates. With this statistic, specific hypotheses of differences in rates can be simultaneously tested using contrasts. If necessary, a posteriori multiple comparisons can also be conducted that incorporate an adjustment for Type I error.

  20. Degree of learning, interpolated tests, and rate of forgetting.

    PubMed

    Rose, R J

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of the two experiments reported here was to observe the effects of degree of learning, interpolated tests, and retention interval, primarily on the rate of forgetting of a list of words, and secondarily on hypermnesia for those words. In the first experiment, all the subjects had one study trial on a list of 20 common words, followed by two tests of recall. Half of the subjects had further study and test trials until they had learned the words to a criterion of three correct consecutive recalls. Two days later, half of the subjects under each learning condition returned for four retention tests, and 16 days later, all the subjects returned for four tests. Experiment 2 was similar, except that all the subjects had at least three study trials followed by four recall tests on Day 1, intermediate tests were given 2 or 7 days later, and they all had final tests 14 days later. The results showed that rate of forgetting was attenuated by an additional intermediate set of tests but not by criterion learning. Hypermnesia was generally found over the tests that were given after a retention interval of 2 or more days. The best predictor of the amount of hypermnesia over a set of tests was the difference between overall cumulative recall and net recall on the first test of the set. PMID:1435265

  1. High-Strain-Rate Compression Testing of Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was employed to study the effect of strain rate on the dynamic material response of ice. Disk-shaped ice specimens with flat, parallel end faces were either provided by Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH) or grown at Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH). The SHPB was adapted to perform tests at high strain rates in the range 60 to 1400/s at test temperatures of -10 and -30 C. Experimental results showed that the strength of ice increases with increasing strain rates and this occurs over a change in strain rate of five orders of magnitude. Under these strain rate conditions the ice microstructure has a slight influence on the strength, but it is much less than the influence it has under quasi-static loading conditions. End constraint and frictional effects do not influence the compression tests like they do at slower strain rates, and therefore the diameter/thickness ratio of the samples is not as critical. The strength of ice at high strain rates was found to increase with decreasing test temperatures. Ice has been identified as a potential source of debris to impact the shuttle; data presented in this report can be used to validate and/or develop material models for ice impact analyses for shuttle Return to Flight efforts.

  2. MELT RATE FURNACE TESTING FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 FRIT OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D; Fox, K; Pickenheim, B; Stone, M

    2008-10-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to provide the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) with a frit composition for Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) to optimize processing. A series of experiments were designed for testing in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF). This dry fed tool can be used to quickly determine relative melt rates for a large number of candidate frit compositions and lead to a selection for further testing. Simulated Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product was made according to the most recent SB5 sludge projections and a series of tests were conducted with frits that covered a range of boron and alkali ratios. Several frits with relatively large projected operating windows indicated melt rates that would not severely impact production. As seen with previous MRF testing, increasing the boron concentration had positive impacts on melt rate on the SB5 system. However, there appears to be maximum values for both boron and sodium above which the there is a negative effect on melt rate. Based on these data and compositional trends, Frit 418 and a specially designed frit (Frit 550) have been selected for additional melt rate testing. Frit 418 and Frit 550 will be run in the Slurry Fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF), which is capable of distinguishing rheological properties not detected by the MRF. Frit 418 will be used initially for SB5 processing in DWPF (given its robustness to compositional uncertainty). The Frit 418-SB5 system will provide a baseline from which potential melt rate advantages of Frit 550 can be gauged. The data from SMRF testing will be used to determine whether Frit 550 should be recommended for implementation in DWPF.

  3. Spacecraft Parachute Recovery System Testing from a Failure Rate Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft parachute recovery systems, especially those with a parachute cluster, require testing to identify and reduce failures. This is especially important when the spacecraft in question is human-rated. Due to the recent effort to make spaceflight affordable, the importance of determining a minimum requirement for testing has increased. The number of tests required to achieve a mature design, with a relatively constant failure rate, can be estimated from a review of previous complex spacecraft recovery systems. Examination of the Apollo parachute testing and the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster recovery chute system operation will clarify at which point in those programs the system reached maturity. This examination will also clarify the risks inherent in not performing a sufficient number of tests prior to operation with humans on-board. When looking at complex parachute systems used in spaceflight landing systems, a pattern begins to emerge regarding the need for a minimum amount of testing required to wring out the failure modes and reduce the failure rate of the parachute system to an acceptable level for human spaceflight. Not only a sufficient number of system level testing, but also the ability to update the design as failure modes are found is required to drive the failure rate of the system down to an acceptable level. In addition, sufficient data and images are necessary to identify incipient failure modes or to identify failure causes when a system failure occurs. In order to demonstrate the need for sufficient system level testing prior to an acceptable failure rate, the Apollo Earth Landing System (ELS) test program and the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System failure history will be examined, as well as some experiences in the Orion Capsule Parachute Assembly System will be noted.

  4. Static and dynamic tensile behaviour of aluminium processed by high pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verleysen, Patricia; Oelbrandt, Wouter; Naghdy, Soroosh; Kestens, Leo

    2015-09-01

    High pressure torsion (HPT) is a severe plastic deformation technique in which a small, disk-like sample is subjected to a torsional deformation under a high hydrostatic pressure. In present study, the static and dynamic tensile behaviour of commercially pure aluminium (99.6 wt%) processed by HPT is studied. The high strain rate tensile behaviour is characterized using a purpose-developed miniature split Hopkinson tensile bar setup by which strain rates up to 5 × 103 s-1 can be reached. During the tests, the deformation of a speckle pattern applied to the samples is recorded, by which local information on the strain is obtained using a digital image correlation technique. Electron back scatter diffraction images are used to investigate the microstructural evolution, more specifically the grain refinement obtained by HPT. The fracture surfaces of the tensile samples are studied by scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the imposed severe plastic deformation significantly increases the tensile strength, however, at the expense of ductility. The strain rate only has a minor influence on the materials tensile behaviour.

  5. Maximizing SB3 Waste Throughput Melt Rate Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. E.; Miller, D. H.

    2005-09-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is presently vitrifying Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) and preparing to process Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in late 2006 or early 2007. Previous laboratory testing and DWPF operational experience has indicated that the maximum waste throughput peak for the Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) system occurs at a waste loading in the mid-30's. This trend has been shown as well for SB3 on a lab-scale basis. These SB3 tests used SRAT product that targeted a REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) of 0.2 and an acid stoichiometry of 135%. Acid stoichiometry, however, has been shown to impact melt rate of MRF tests at one waste loading (35%). Due to the impact of acid stoichiometry on melt rate, it is possible that the current target acid stoichiometry (155%) with SB3 may not exhibit the same maximum waste throughput peak, or there may not even be a discernable peak. In fact, current DWPF operational experience with SB3 and Frit 418 has not shown the same drop off in melt rate and hence waste throughput as was observed with SB2 and Frit 320. The objective of this testing is to determine if increasing the overall alkali content in the feed (via using the higher alkali Frit 320 versus Frit 418) will either result in a shift in the waste throughput to higher waste loadings or an increase in the overall waste throughput at waste loadings of interest (31 to 41%). For these tests, the target Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product REDOX was 0.2 and the target acid stoichiometry was 155%. The incentive for this series of tests stems from a previous Slurry-Fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF) test with SB3/Frit 320 feed which showed an increase in melt rate versus SB3/Frit 418 at 35% waste loading. This single data point suggests that overall waste throughput for the SB3/Frit 320 system is higher at 35% waste loading (i.e., the melt rate versus waste loading curve has potentially shifted upward). To address the potential shift in waste throughput, the strategy was to fully

  6. Tensile and Fatigue Testing and Material Hardening Model Development for 508 LAS Base Metal and 316 SS Similar Metal Weld under In-air and PWR Primary Loop Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2015 report we presented a baseline mechanistic finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) for systemlevel heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis and fatigue life estimation under reactor thermal-mechanical cycles. In the present report, we provide tensile and fatigue test data for 508 low-alloy steel (LAS) base metal, 508 LAS heat-affected zone metal in 508 LAS–316 stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal welds, and 316 SS-316 SS similar metal welds. The test was conducted under different conditions such as in air at room temperature, in air at 300 oC, and under PWR primary loop water conditions. Data are provided on materials properties related to time-independent tensile tests and time-dependent cyclic tests, such as elastic modulus, elastic and offset strain yield limit stress, and linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening model parameters. The overall objective of this report is to provide guidance to estimate tensile/fatigue hardening parameters from test data. Also, the material models and parameters reported here can directly be used in commercially available finite element codes for fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components under in-air and PWR water conditions.

  7. Steam generator tube integrity program leak rate tests. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.A.; Bickford, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    This interim report presents preliminary results on leak rate tests performed on through-wall defected Inconel 600 steam generator tubing. Tube defects included an EDM (electro-discharge machine) notch and IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracks) of various lengths. Tests were conducted at PWR operating temperatures with leakage of hot water/steam into air. A number of IGSCC cracks were unstable under the experiment conditions of these initial tests, continuing to grow until system capacity limitations resulted in decreased pressure differential. However, initial tesing also pointed to a need for reconfiguration of the test apparatus to sustain increased flow and, more importantly, alter the mode of control. The initial test configuration is based on flow control, with pressure differential across the specimen an independent variable. This often results in pressure increases too rapid to establish the initiation of crack instability. A reconfigured system based on pressure control with flow as an independent parameter is being recommended for future tests.

  8. Tensile Properties of Contractile and Synthetic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    Tensile properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of synthetic and contractile phenotypes were determined using a newly developed tensile test system. Synthetic and contractile VSMCs were isolated from the rabbit thoracic aorta with an explant and an enzymatic digestion method, respectively. Each cell floated in Hanks' balanced salt solution of 37°C was attached to the fine tips of a pair of micropipettes with a cell adhesive and, then, stretched at the rate of 6µm/sec by moving one of the micropipettes with a linear actuator. Load applied to the cell was measured with a cantilever-type load cell; its elongation was determined from the distance between the micropipette tips using a video dimension analyzer. The synthetic and contractile VSMCs were not broken even at the tensile force of 2.4µN and 3.4µN, respectively. Their stiffness was significantly higher in contractile phenotype (0.17N/m) than in synthetic one (0.09N/m). The different tensile properties between synthetic and contractile cells are attributable to the differences in cytoskeletal structures and contractile apparatus.

  9. Theoretical Accuracy for ESTL Bit Error Rate Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin

    1998-01-01

    "Bit error rate" [BER] for the purposes of this paper is the fraction of binary bits which are inverted by passage through a communication system. BER can be measured for a block of sample bits by comparing a received block with the transmitted block and counting the erroneous bits. Bit Error Rate [BER] tests are the most common type of test used by the ESTL for evaluating system-level performance. The resolution of the test is obvious: the measurement cannot be resolved more finely than 1/N, the number of bits tested. The tolerance is not. This paper examines the measurement accuracy of the bit error rate test. It is intended that this information will be useful in analyzing data taken in the ESTL. This paper is divided into four sections and follows a logically ordered presentation, with results developed before they are evaluated. However, first-time readers will derive the greatest benefit from this paper by skipping the lengthy section devoted to analysis, and treating it as reference material. The analysis performed in this paper is based on a Probability Density Function [PDF] which is developed with greater detail in a past paper, Theoretical Accuracy for ESTL Probability of Acquisition Tests, EV4-98-609.

  10. Measurement error of Young’s modulus considering the gravity and thermal expansion of thin specimens for in situ tensile testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Ren, Luquan

    2016-06-01

    Most miniature in situ tensile devices compatible with scanning/transmission electron microscopes or optical microscopes adopt a horizontal layout. In order to analyze and calculate the measurement error of the tensile Young’s modulus, the effects of gravity and temperature changes, which would respectively lead to and intensify the bending deformation of thin specimens, are considered as influencing factors. On the basis of a decomposition method of static indeterminacy, equations of simplified deflection curves are obtained and, accordingly, the actual gage length is confirmed. By comparing the effects of uniaxial tensile load on the change of the deflection curve with gravity, the relation between the actual and directly measured tensile Young’s modulus is obtained. Furthermore, the quantitative effects of ideal gage length l o, temperature change ΔT and the density ρ of the specimen on the modulus difference and modulus ratio are calculated. Specimens with larger l o and ρ present more obvious measurement errors for Young’s modulus, but the effect of ΔT is not significant. The calculation method of Young’s modulus is particularly suitable for thin specimens.

  11. 78 FR 78275 - Alcohol and Drug Testing: Determination of Minimum Random Testing Rates for 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...According to data from FRA's Management Information System, the rail industry's random drug testing positive rate has remained below 1.0 percent for the last two years. FRA's Administrator has therefore determined that the minimum annual random drug testing rate for the period January 1, 2014, through December 31, 2014, will remain at 25 percent of covered railroad employees. In addition,......

  12. 76 FR 80781 - Alcohol and Drug Testing: Determination of Minimum Random Testing Rates for 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Minimum Random Testing Rates for 2012 AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... random drug testing ] positive rate has remained below 1.0 percent for the last two years. The Federal Railroad Administrator (Administrator) has therefore determined that the minimum annual random drug...

  13. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... groundwater availability analysis to determine the availability of water during a 1-in-10-year recurrence... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER...

  14. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... groundwater availability analysis to determine the availability of water during a 1-in-10-year recurrence... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER...

  15. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... groundwater availability analysis to determine the availability of water during a 1-in-10-year recurrence... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER...

  16. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... groundwater availability analysis to determine the availability of water during a 1-in-10-year recurrence... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER...

  17. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... groundwater availability analysis to determine the availability of water during a 1-in-10-year recurrence... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER...

  18. Optimized system to improve pumping rate stability during aquifer tests.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael H; Rasmussen, Todd C; Lyons, F Comer; Pennell, Kurt D

    2002-01-01

    Aquifer hydraulic properties are commonly estimated using aquifer tests, which are based on an assumption of a uniform and constant pumping rate. Substantial uncertainties in the flow rate across the borehole-formation interface can be induced by dynamic head losses, caused by rapid changes in borehole water levels early in an aquifer test. A system is presented that substantially reduces these sources of uncertainty by explicitly accounting for dynamic head losses. The system which employs commonly available components (including a datalogger, pressure transducers, a variable-speed pump motor, a flow controller, and flowmeters), is inexpensive, highly mobile, and easily set up. It optimizes the flow rate at the borehole-formation interface, making it suitable for any type of aquifer test, including constant, step, or ramped withdrawal and injection, as well as sinusoidal. The system was demonstrated for both withdrawal and injection tests in three aquifers at the Savannah River Site. No modifications to the control system were required, although a small number of characteristics of the pumping and monitoring system were added to the operating program. The pumping system provided a statistically significant, constant flow rate with time. The range in pumping variability (95% confidence interval) was from +/- 2.58 x 10(-4) L/sec to +/- 9.07 x 10(-4) L/sec, across a wide range in field and aquifer conditions. PMID:12425350

  19. Effective Rating Scale Development for Speaking Tests: Performance Decision Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred; Kemp, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Rating scale design and development for testing speaking is generally conducted using one of two approaches: the measurement-driven approach or the performance data-driven approach. The measurement-driven approach prioritizes the ordering of descriptors onto a single scale. Meaning is derived from the scaling methodology and the agreement of…

  20. 21 CFR 864.6700 - Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test. 864.6700 Section 864.6700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6700...

  1. 21 CFR 864.6700 - Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test. 864.6700 Section 864.6700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6700...

  2. 21 CFR 864.6700 - Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test. 864.6700 Section 864.6700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6700...

  3. 21 CFR 864.6700 - Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test. 864.6700 Section 864.6700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6700...

  4. 21 CFR 864.6700 - Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test. 864.6700 Section 864.6700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6700...

  5. Improving Beta Test Evaluation Response Rates: A Meta-Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ-Eft, Darlene; Preskill, Hallie

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a meta-evaluation of a beta-test of a customer service training program. The initial evaluation showed a low response rate. Therefore, the meta-evaluation focused on issues related to the conduct of the initial evaluation and reasons for nonresponse. The meta-evaluation identified solutions to the nonresponse problem as related…

  6. 40 CFR 280.104 - Local government bond rating test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... issues. I hereby certify that the wording of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR... of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR part 280.104(e) as such regulations... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Local government bond rating test....

  7. 40 CFR 280.104 - Local government bond rating test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... issues. I hereby certify that the wording of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR... of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR part 280.104(e) as such regulations... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Local government bond rating test....

  8. 40 CFR 280.104 - Local government bond rating test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... issues. I hereby certify that the wording of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR... of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR part 280.104(e) as such regulations... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Local government bond rating test....

  9. Slow strain rate testing of aluminum alloy 7050 in different tempers using various synthetic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, R.

    1997-06-01

    The slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of aluminum alloy Al 7050 in different tempers in various electrolytes at the free-corrosion potential. Smooth tensile specimens were strained dynamically in the short transverse direction under permanent immersion conditions. Strain rates were from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}/s to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}/s. Using substitute ocean water, Al 7050 was found sensitive and immune to environmentally assisted cracking in the peak-aged temper T651 and in the over-aged temper T7351, respectively. In the less-over-aged heat treatment T7651, fracture energy data revealed a large scatter. An aqueous solution of 0.5 M sodium perchlorate was not conducive to environmentally assisted cracking. SSRT performed in an aqueous solution of 0.1 M sodium chloride + 0.05 M sodium sulfate + 0.05 M sodium nitrate + 0.01 M sodium bicarbonate at pH 3.5 indicated SCC susceptibility for Al 7050-T651. The latter electrolyte did not promote SCC with the alloy in the heat treatments T7651 and T7351. Scatter was observed in the fracture energy data of Al 7050-T7351 specimens dynamically strained in the mixed salt solution. Deterioration was attributed to pitting attack, as supported by fractography.

  10. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  11. Estimating hydraulic properties of volcanic aquifers using constant-rate and variable-rate aquifer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rotzoll, K.; El-Kadi, A. I.; Gingerich, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years the ground-water demand of the population of the island of Maui, Hawaii, has significantly increased. To ensure prudent management of the ground-water resources, an improved understanding of ground-water flow systems is needed. At present, large-scale estimations of aquifer properties are lacking for Maui. Seven analytical methods using constant-rate and variable-rate withdrawals for single wells provide an estimate of hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity for 103 wells in central Maui. Methods based on constant-rate tests, although not widely used on Maui, offer reasonable estimates. Step-drawdown tests, which are more abundantly used than other tests, provide similar estimates as constant-rate tests. A numerical model validates the suitability of analytical solutions for step-drawdown tests and additionally provides an estimate of storage parameters. The results show that hydraulic conductivity is log-normally distributed and that for dike-free volcanic rocks it ranges over several orders of magnitude from 1 to 2,500 m/d. The arithmetic mean, geometric mean, and median values of hydraulic conductivity are respectively 520, 280, and 370 m/d for basalt and 80, 50, and 30 m/d for sediment. A geostatistical approach using ordinary kriging yields a prediction of hydraulic conductivity on a larger scale. Overall, the results are in agreement with values published for other Hawaiian islands. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  12. Evaluation of hydrogen pressure vessels using slow strain rate testing and fracture mechanics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S.H.; Desai, V.H.

    1998-12-31

    A total of 108 seamless, forged pressure vessels, fabricated from ASTM A372 type IV (UNS K14508) and type V low alloy steel, are currently in 4,200 psi (29 MPa) gaseous hydrogen (GH{sub 2}) service at the Kennedy Space Center`s (KSC) Space Shuttle Launch Complex 39 (LC-39). The vessels were originally used in 6,000 psi (41 MPa) GH{sub 2} service during the Apollo program. NASA recently received a letter of warning from the manufacturer of the vessels stating that the subject vessels should be now be removed from GH{sub 2} service due to the fact that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of many of the vessels exceeds the maximum limit of 126 ksi (869 MPa) now imposed on A372 steel intended for GH{sub 2} service, and therefore are susceptible to hydrogen environment embrittlement. Due to the expense associated with vessel replacement, it was decided to determine by testing and analysis whether or not the vessels needed to be removed from GH{sub 2} service. Slow strain rate testing was performed under hydrogen charging conditions to determine the value of the threshold fracture toughness for sustained loading crack growth in GH{sub 2}, (K{sub H}) for the vessel material, this value was then used in a fracture mechanics safe-life analysis (a 20-year service life was modeled) that indicated the vessels are safe for continued use.

  13. Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

    2013-08-01

    Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

  14. Effect of yttrium additions on the elevated-temperature tensile properties and hardness of an advanced iron-nickel-chromium LMFBR cladding and duct alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, M.H.

    1981-10-01

    The effect of the addition of yttrium on the elevated temperature tensile properties and hardness of an Fe-34% Ni-12% Cr candidate LMFBR cladding and duct alloy was investigated. Tensile tests were performed from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C in 100/sup 0/C steps at strain rates of 2.2 x 10/sup -3/ and 2.2 x 10/sup -4/ sec/sup -1/. Hardness tests were performed from room temperature to 850/sup 0/C in 50/sup 0/C steps. The addition of 0.1% yttrium decreased the yield stress and ultimate tensile stress in the test temperature range employed. Hardness also decreased over this test temperature range. In tensile tests, dynamic strain aging behavior occurred both for the undoped and doped alloy in the temperature range from 200 to 600/sup 0/C and 300 to 600/sup 0/C for the lower and higher strain rate, respectively.

  15. 77 FR 75896 - Alcohol and Drug Testing: Determination of Minimum Random Testing Rates for 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 219 Alcohol and Drug Testing: Determination of Minimum Random.... According to data from FRA's Management Information System, the rail industry's random drug testing positive... (Administrator) has therefore determined that the minimum annual random drug testing rate for the period...

  16. Effect of oxygen and oxidation on tensile behavior of V-5Cr-5Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K.

    1996-04-01

    Oxidation studies were conducted on V-5Cr-5Ti alloy specimens in an air environment to evaluate the oxygen uptake of the alloy as a function of temperature and exposure time. The oxidation rates calculated from parabolic kinetic measurements of thermogravimetric testing and confirmed by microscopic analyses of cross sections of exposed specimens were 5, 17, and 27 {mu}m per year after exposure at 300, 400, and 500{degrees}C, respectively. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at room temperature and at 500{degrees}C on preoxidized specimens of the alloy to examine the effects of oxidation and oxygen migration on tensile strength and ductility. Microstructural characteristics of several of the tested specimens were determined by electron optics techniques. Correlations were developed between tensile strength and ductility of the oxidized alloy and microstructural characteristics such as oxide thickness, depth of hardened layer, depth on intergranular fracture zone, and transverse crack length.

  17. Tensile deformation mechanisms of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. H.; Gao, J.; Lin, S. X.; Zhang, P.; Huang, J.; Xu, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    The tensile deformation mechanisms of acrylonitrile - butadiene - styrene (ABS) / polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) blends toughened by ethylene methacrylate (EMA) copolymer was investigated by analysing the fracture morphology. ABS/PMMA was blended with EMA copolymer by melt mixing technique using co-rotating twin extruder. Tensile tests show that the elongation at break of ABS/PMMA blends can be efficiently improved with the increase in EMA content. Fracture morphology of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends reveals that the material yield induced by hollowing-out of EMA particles and its propagation into yield zone is the main toughening mechanism. Moreover, the appearance that EMA particles in the central area are given priority to hollowing-out may be related to the skin-core structure of the injection moulded parts caused by the different cooling rate between surface and inside in the process of injection moulding.

  18. Selected hydraulic test analysis techniques for constant-rate discharge tests

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The constant-rate discharge test is the principal field method used in hydrogeologic investigations for characterizing the hydraulic properties of aquifers. To implement this test, the aquifer is stressed by withdrawing ground water from a well, by using a downhole pump. Discharge during the withdrawal period is regulated and maintained at a constant rate. Water-level response within the well is monitored during the active pumping phase (i.e., drawdown) and during the subsequent recovery phase following termination of pumping. The analysis of drawdown and recovery response within the stress well (and any monitored, nearby observation wells) provides a means for estimating the hydraulic properties of the tested aquifer, as well as discerning formational and nonformational flow conditions (e.g., wellbore storage, wellbore damage, presence of boundaries, etc.). Standard analytical methods that are used for constant-rate pumping tests include both log-log type-curve matching and semi-log straight-line methods. This report presents a current state of the art'' review of selected transient analysis procedures for constant-rate discharge tests. Specific topics examined include: analytical methods for constant-rate discharge tests conducted within confined and unconfined aquifers; effects of various nonideal formation factors (e.g., anisotropy, hydrologic boundaries) and well construction conditions (e.g., partial penetration, wellbore storage) on constant-rate test response; and the use of pressure derivatives in diagnostic analysis for the identification of specific formation, well construction, and boundary conditions.

  19. Selected hydraulic test analysis techniques for constant-rate discharge tests

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The constant-rate discharge test is the principal field method used in hydrogeologic investigations for characterizing the hydraulic properties of aquifers. To implement this test, the aquifer is stressed by withdrawing ground water from a well, by using a downhole pump. Discharge during the withdrawal period is regulated and maintained at a constant rate. Water-level response within the well is monitored during the active pumping phase (i.e., drawdown) and during the subsequent recovery phase following termination of pumping. The analysis of drawdown and recovery response within the stress well (and any monitored, nearby observation wells) provides a means for estimating the hydraulic properties of the tested aquifer, as well as discerning formational and nonformational flow conditions (e.g., wellbore storage, wellbore damage, presence of boundaries, etc.). Standard analytical methods that are used for constant-rate pumping tests include both log-log type-curve matching and semi-log straight-line methods. This report presents a current ``state of the art`` review of selected transient analysis procedures for constant-rate discharge tests. Specific topics examined include: analytical methods for constant-rate discharge tests conducted within confined and unconfined aquifers; effects of various nonideal formation factors (e.g., anisotropy, hydrologic boundaries) and well construction conditions (e.g., partial penetration, wellbore storage) on constant-rate test response; and the use of pressure derivatives in diagnostic analysis for the identification of specific formation, well construction, and boundary conditions.

  20. NASA's Advanced Life Support Systems Human-Rated Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, D. L.; Tri, T. O.; Packham, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    Future NASA missions to explore the solar system will be long-duration missions, requiring human life support systems which must operate with very high reliability over long periods of time. Such systems must be highly regenerative, requiring minimum resupply, to enable the crews to be largely self-sufficient. These regenerative life support systems will use a combination of higher plants, microorganisms, and physicochemical processes to recycle air and water, produce food, and process wastes. A key step in the development of these systems is establishment of a human-rated test facility specifically tailored to evaluation of closed, regenerative life supports systems--one in which long-duration, large-scale testing involving human test crews can be performed. Construction of such a facility, the Advanced Life Support Program's (ALS) Human-Rated Test Facility (HRTF), has begun at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and definition of systems and development of initial outfitting concepts for the facility are underway. This paper will provide an overview of the HRTF project plan, an explanation of baseline configurations, and descriptive illustrations of facility outfitting concepts.

  1. Grain boundary sliding measurements during tensile creep of a single-phase alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, C.R.; Lin, H.T.; Becher, P.F.

    1998-06-01

    The grain boundary sliding (GBS) behavior of a single-phase (relatively coarse-grained) alumina material was studied after tensile creep experiments were performed at 1,500 C at stress levels of 20 and 35 MPa. Specimens tested at 35 MPa exhibited a number of modes of GBS, including Mode II (shear) displacements, Mode I (opening) displacements, out-of-plane sliding displacements, and in-plane grain rotation. Strains in the grain boundaries due to Mode II GBS displacements ranged from 940% to 4,400%. Average Mode II GBS displacements ranged from 0.08 to 0.28 {micro}m in samples tested for 120 and 480 min, respectively, at 35 MPa. The GBS displacements were shown to fit a Weibull distribution. Tensile creep under a 35 MPa stress yielded a GBS rate of 9.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} {micro}m/s, while the 20 MPa stress resulted in a GBS rate of 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} {micro}m/s. The average Mode II GBS displacements increased linearly with specimen strain, suggesting that GBS may play an important role in creep cavitation during tensile creep. The data also revealed that compatibility and constraint rules appear to govern GBS behavior during tensile creep. GBS behavior during compressive creep will be compared to the tensile creep GBS measurements presented.

  2. Influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the tensile properties of a modified 14Cr-15Ni stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M. D.

    2014-10-01

    The titanium modified 14Cr-15Ni austenitic stainless steel is used as clad and wrapper material for fast breeder nuclear reactor. Thermo-mechanical treatments consisting of solution annealing at two different temperatures of 1273 and 1373 K followed by cold-work and thermal ageing have been imparted to the steel to tailor its microstructure for enhancing strength. Tensile tests have been carried out on the thermo-mechanically treated steel at nominal strain rate of 1.6 × 10-4 s-1 over a temperature range of 298-1073 K. The yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength of the steel increased with increase in solution treatment temperature and this has been attributed to the fine and higher density of Ti(C,N) precipitate. Tensile flow behaviour of the steel has been analysed using Ludwigson and Voce constitutive equations. The steel heat treated at higher solution temperature exhibited earlier onset of cross slip during tensile deformation. The rate of recovery at higher test temperatures was also influenced by variations in solution heat treatment temperature. In addition, dynamic recrystallization during tensile deformation at higher temperatures was profound for steel solution heat-treated at lower temperature. The differences in flow behaviour and softening mechanisms during tensile testing of the steel after different heat treated conditions have been attributed to the nature of Ti(C,N) precipitation.

  3. Tensile strength of dome rocks and lavas at Santiaguito dome complex, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, Adrian; Lamb, Oliver; Lamur, Anthony; Lavallée, Yan

    2015-04-01

    Lava domes are inherently unstable structures, subject to intense gas flux and rapid variations in the state of stress. At shallow depths confining stresses are minimal and deformation is dilatant, occurring predominantly through tensile fractures. This fracture mode facilitates outgassing and contributes to the development of gas-and-ash activity as well as vulcanian eruptions. However, there is a paucity of tensile strength data for volcanic materials in the published literature, and we know of no paper which addresses this at high temperatures. We study the tensile strength of dome rocks collected at the Santiaguito dome complex, Guatemala, over a porosity range of 3-25%. Indirect tensile (Brazilian) tests were conducted on 40-mm diameter cores, by imposing a compressive displacement rate (radial to the core) of 4 micron/s at room temperature as well as an eruptive temperature of ca. 850 °C. An acoustic monitoring system is employed to track the nucleation, propagation and coalescence of fractures leading to complete sample failure. We find that the rocks' tensile strength exhibits a nonlinear decrease with porosity. Preliminary tests at high temperature indicate that some rocks exhibit a higher tensile strength (than at room temperature); in these experiments, samples containing a higher fraction of interstitial melt revealed an additional component of viscous flow. Further experiments conducted at higher strain rates will define the brittle response of the liquid during tensile failure. The data is compared against similar datasets for volcanic rocks. We will discuss implications for shallow volcanic processes ranging from dilation bands and tuffisite formation to gas-and-ash explosions and dome structural stability.

  4. Tensile properties of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; McDonald, R.E.; Booker, M.K.; Bodine, G.C.

    1982-02-01

    Tensile properties of commercial heats of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo alloy are presented for test temperatures in the range from room temperature to 760/sup 0/C. Data included the effects of melting practice, compositional differences, strain rate (8.0 to 0.00008/min), postweld heat treatment (1 through 112 h at 732/sup 0/C), tempering temperature (732 and 746/sup 0/C versus 760/sup 0/C), isothermal annealing (1038/sup 0/C for 1 h and 704/sup 0/C for 24 h followed by AC), and thermal aging (5000 and 11,600 h at 538, 593, and 649/sup 0/C). The average-to-minimum property range for the yield and ultimate tensile strengths was compared with the similar data range for standard 9 Cr-1 Mo alloy. Tensile data on commercial heats were used to set the room-temperature specified minimum values for the alloy. The conservativeness of the specified minimum values was checked against the data at several strain rates, data after postweld heat treatment at 732/sup 0/C up to 112 h, and data on thermally aged material.

  5. Tensile properties of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber in an epoxy matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The fiber performance and reinforcement potential for fiber composites of a special PAN-based graphite fiber were evaluated by testing the fiber's tensile properties in an epoxy matrix. Representative strand samples were taken from 30 spools of single-end, 1500-filament fiber to make over 5000 fiber/epoxy strand specimens using the filament-winding process. Characteristics studied were fiber uniformity, strength and modulus distributions at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures, stress-strain behavior, the effect of strain rate on fiber strength, and acoustic emission during tensile loading to failure. The fiber was found to have a 3570-MPa failure stress, a 1.7% failure strain, a 206-GPa modulus, and a density of 1.77 Mg/cu m at 23 C. Liquid-nitrogen temperature and various strain rates had no significant effect on fiber tensile properties.

  6. Tensile properties of V-5Cr-5Ti alloy after exposure in air environment

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K.

    1997-04-01

    Oxidation studies were conducted on V-5Cr-5Ti alloy specimens in an air environment to evaluate the oxygen uptake behavior of the alloy as a function of temperature and exposure time. The oxidation rates, calculated from parabolic kinetic measurements of thermogravimetric testing and confirmed by microscopic analysis of cross sections of exposed specimens, were 5, 17, and 27 {mu}m per year after exposure at 300, 400, and 500{degrees}C, respectively. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at room temperature and at 500{degrees}C on preoxidized specimens of the alloy to examine the effects of oxidation and oxygen migration on tensile strength and ductility. Correlations were developed between tensile strength and ductility of the oxidized alloy and microstructural characteristics such as oxide thickness, depth of hardened layer, depth of intergranular fracture zone, and transverse crack length.

  7. Effect of High Tensile Strain Rate on the Evolution of Microstructure in Fe-Mn-C-Al Twinning-Induced Plasticity (TWIP) Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tuhin; Saha, Rajib; Bera, Supriya; Dahmen, Kirsten; Ghosh, Mainak; Haldar, Arunansu; Bleck, Wolfgang; Chowdhury, Sandip Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Fe-17.8Mn-0.52C-0.5Al TWIP steel has been investigated under high-strain rate conditions. Twinning along with stacking faults and high dislocation densities in the austenite matrix has been evaluated by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The samples strained at 100 s-1 show a gradient in the evolution of the dislocation density along the gage length except the fracture end where the density shows a decrease. In case of the samples strained at 1 s-1, the evolution of density shows attainment of a near-saturation stage. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the decrease in the dislocation density as well as near-saturation stage is due to dynamic recovery as well as dynamic recrystallization at region near the fracture end. The dynamically recrystallized grains are related to the deformed matrix through twin relationship.

  8. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  9. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  10. Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

  11. An experimental evaluation of the tensile strength of impact ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xian, X.; Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1989-01-01

    The evaluation of the tensile strength of impact built-up ice on structural components has been prompted by such problems as electrical transmission line losses and catastrophic failures in Arctic regions, deicing problems with fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft, etc. It is demonstrated that the conventional tensile-testing technique furnishes adequate data on artificially refrigerated ice, and helps establish the influence of extrinsic factors on ice tensile strength.

  12. Tensile properties of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Lyon, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    The importance of textile composite materials in aerospace structural applications has been gaining momentum in recent years. With a view to better understand the suitability of these materials in aerospace applications, an experimental program was undertaken to assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Specifically, the braided textile preforms were infiltrated with suitable polymeric matrices leading to the fabrication of composite test coupons. Evaluation of the tensile properties and the analyses of the results in the form of strength moduli, Poisson's ratio, etc., for the braided composites are presented. Based on our past experience with the textile coupons, the fabrication techniques have been modified (by incorporating glass microballoons in the matrix and/or by stabilizing the braid angle along the length of the specimen with axial fibers) to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of the textile composites. This paper outlines the preliminary experimental results obtained from testing these composites.

  13. Predicted maximal heart rate for upper body exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Hill, M; Talbot, C; Price, M

    2016-03-01

    Age-predicted maximal heart rate (HRMAX ) equations are commonly used for the purpose of prescribing exercise regimens, as criteria for achieving maximal exertion and for diagnostic exercise testing. Despite the growing popularity of upper body exercise in both healthy and clinical settings, no recommendations are available for exercise modes using the smaller upper body muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to determine how well commonly used age-adjusted prediction equations for HRMAX estimate actual HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy young and older adults. A total of 30 young (age: 20 ± 2 years, height: 171·9 ± 32·8 cm, mass: 77·7 ± 12·6 kg) and 20 elderly adults (age: 66 ± 6 years, height: 162 ± 8·1 cm, mass: 65·3 ± 12·3 kg) undertook maximal incremental exercise tests on a conventional arm crank ergometer. Age-adjusted maximal heart rate was calculated using prediction equations based on leg exercise and compared with measured HRMAX data for the arms. Maximal HR for arm exercise was significantly overpredicted compared with age-adjusted prediction equations in both young and older adults. Subtracting 10-20 beats min(-1) from conventional prediction equations provides a reasonable estimate of HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy older and younger adults. PMID:25319169

  14. Low-energy electron effects on tensile modulus and infrared transmission properties of a polypyromellitimide film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, J. E.; Long, E. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy and tensile modulus testing were used to evaluate the importance of experimental procedure on changes in properties of pyromellitic dianhydride-p,p prime-oxydianiline film exposed to electron radiation. The radiation exposures were accelerated, approximate equivalents to the total dose expected for a 30 year mission in geosynchronous Earth orbit. The change in the tensile modulus depends more on the dose rate and the time interval between exposure and testing than on total dose. The IR data vary with both total dose and dose rate. A threshold dose rate exists below which reversible radiation effects on the IR spectra occur. Above the threshold dose rate, irreversible effects occur with the appearance of a new band. Post-irradiation and in situ IR absorption bands are significantly different. It is suggested that the electron radiation induced metastable, excites molecular states.

  15. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  16. Tensile bond strength of repaired amalgam.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Czech, D; Ambrose, E R

    1992-03-01

    This study evaluated the tensile strength of repaired high-copper amalgams and analyzed the different treatments of the amalgam interface prior to repair. One hundred specimens were divided into 10 groups: group 1 was left intact and was considered as the control group. In groups 2 through 8, the specimens were sectioned into halves after 10 days and were reconstructed with new amalgam. Groups 9 and 10 were condensed with time intervals of 15 minutes and all specimens were subjected to tensile loads in a Universal Testing Machine. The tensile strengths at the junction between old and new amalgam ranged between 50% to 79% of those of the control group and verified that the same type of amalgam and uncontaminated interfaces had higher strengths. The results also suggested that if an amalgam repair is anticipated, additional retention is critical to the longevity of the restoration. PMID:1507091

  17. Modes of heart rate compensations during exercise ECG test.

    PubMed

    Viik, Jari

    2005-12-01

    Heart rate (HR) compensation of electrocardiographic (ECG) parameters is not an unique concept. However, in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) ST-segment plotted as a function HR has been studied extensively during the last 20 years. In clinical practice quantitative methods are evolved for the exercise phase of the exercise test and post-exercise recovery phase has not been studied as extensively. Quantitative parameters, as ST/HR hysteresis, which represents the average difference in ST depressions between the exercise and recovery phases at an identical HR up to three minutes of recovery, has been shown to improve the detection of CAD. Furthermore, the ST/HR parameters have been demonstrated to be very competent in a prediction of mortality. PMID:16330399

  18. 75 FR 79308 - Alcohol and Drug Testing: Determination of Minimum Random Testing Rates for 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    .... SUMMARY: Using data from Management Information System annual reports, FRA has determined that the 2009... taken from FRA's Management Information System. Based on this data, the Administrator publishes a... Drug and Alcohol Testing Rates In a final rule published on December 2, 1994 (59 FR 62218),...

  19. Voltage stress effects on microcircuit accelerated life test failure rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of Arrhenius and Eyring reaction rate models for describing microcircuit aging characteristics as a function of junction temperature and applied voltage was evaluated. The results of a matrix of accelerated life tests with a single metal oxide semiconductor microcircuit operated at six different combinations of temperature and voltage were used to evaluate the models. A total of 450 devices from two different lots were tested at ambient temperatures between 200 C and 250 C and applied voltages between 5 Vdc and 15 Vdc. A statistical analysis of the surface related failure data resulted in bimodal failure distributions comprising two lognormal distributions; a 'freak' distribution observed early in time, and a 'main' distribution observed later in time. The Arrhenius model was shown to provide a good description of device aging as a function of temperature at a fixed voltage. The Eyring model also appeared to provide a reasonable description of main distribution device aging as a function of temperature and voltage. Circuit diagrams are shown.

  20. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-01

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  1. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-28

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  2. Effects of Plasma Nitriding on the Tensile Properties of Al-Mg-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghauri, I. M.; Ahmad, R.; Mubarik, F. E.; Afzal, Naveed; Ahmed, Sajjad; Ayub, R.

    2012-07-01

    Effects of plasma nitriding on the tensile behavior of Al-Mg-Si alloy were investigated in this study. The specimens were nitrided at 70 W input pulsed DC power at 1 mbar pressure of nitrogen for 4 h using glow discharge plasma. The formation of aluminum nitride layer on the specimen's surface was confirmed by the XRD analysis. Stress-strain curves of both un-nitrided and nitrided specimens were obtained using Universal Testing Machine. The comparison of these curves reveals that yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, percentage elongation, and stress relaxation rate decrease after plasma nitriding. The changes in the tensile properties after nitriding have been correlated with the changes in the microstructure of the specimens as observed using scanning electron microscope.

  3. The Tensile Properties of Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Superalloys During Quenching Heat Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete T.; Biles, Tiffany; Konkel, William

    2001-01-01

    There is a need to increase the temperature capabilities of superalloy turbine disks. This would allow full utilization of higher temperature combustor and airfoil concepts under development. One approach to meet this goal is to modify the processing and chemistry of advanced alloys, while preserving the ability to use rapid cooling supersolvus heat treatments to achieve coarse grain, fine gamma prime microstructures. An important step in this effort is to understand the key high temperature tensile properties of advanced alloys as they exist during supersolvus heat treatments. This could help in projecting cracking tendencies of disks during quenches from supersolvus heat treatments. The objective of this study was to examine the tensile properties of two advanced disk superalloys during simulated quenching heat treatments. Specimens were cooled from the solution heat treatment temperatures at controlled rates, interrupted, and immediately tensile tested at various temperatures. The responses and failure modes were compared and related to the quench cracking tendencies of disk forgings.

  4. Mechanical shear and tensile characteristics of selected biomass stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanical characteristics (stress and energy of tensile and shear modes) of selected biomass stems, such as big bluestem, bromegrass, and Barlow wheat were determined. A high capacity MTI-100K universal testing machine attached with standard tensile clamps and designed fabricated double-shear devic...

  5. Tensile strength and durability of bovine dentin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshiko; Miyazaki, Takashi; Nishimura, Fumio

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of thermal cycling on the tensile strength of dentin. Bovine dentin were divided into 10 groups, which were then subjected to various conditions: intact after preparation, thereby serving as a control; heating in boiling water for 45 minutes; 10,000 thermal cycles in water; 10,000 thermal cycles in PBS; storage in water at 5, 23, or 55 degrees C for two weeks; and storage in PBS at 5, 23, or 55 degrees C for two weeks. Subsequently, bovine dentin were trimmed into dumbbell-shaped specimens and the tensile test performed in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Mean tensile strengths were compared statistically by one-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLTD test (p<0.05). Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and reliability of the results was analyzed with Weibull distribution. Tensile strength did not significantly change after thermal cycling or storage in water and PBS at all temperatures tested (71.2-77.0 MPa) but decreased after treatment with boiling water (65.5 MPa). PMID:17694743

  6. Round robin comparison of tensile results on GlidCop Al25

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Zinkle, S.J.; Fabritsiev, S.A.; Pokrovsky, A.S.

    1998-09-01

    A round robin comparison of the tensile properties of GlidCop{trademark} Al25 oxide dispersion strengthened copper was initiated between collaborating laboratories to evaluate the test and analysis procedures used in the irradiation experiments in SRIAR in Dimitrovgrad. The tests were conducted using the same tensile specimen geometry as used in previous irradiation experiments, with tests at each laboratory being conducted in air or vacuum at 25, 150, and 300 C at a strain rate of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1}. The strength of the GlidCop Al25 decreased as the test temperature increased, with no observable effect of testing in air versus vacuum on the yield and ultimate strengths. The uniform elongation decreased by almost a factor of 3 when the test temperature was raised from room temperature to 300 C, but the total elongation remained roughly constant over the range of test temperatures. Any effect of testing in air on the ductility may have been masked by the scatter introduced into the results because each laboratory tested the specimens in a different grip setup. In light of this, the results of the round robin tests demonstrated that the test and analysis procedures produced essentially the same values for tensile yield and ultimate, but significant variability was present in both the uniform and total elongation measurements due to the gripping technique.

  7. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    PubMed Central

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  8. Change in tensile properties of neoprene and nitrile gloves after repeated exposures to acetone and thermal decontamination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pengfei; Tomasovic, Beth

    2005-11-01

    This study investigated the change in tensile properties of neoprene and nitrile gloves after repeated cycles of exposure to acetone, followed by thermal decontamination. The glove was exposed to acetone (outer surface in contact with chemical), subjected to thermal decontamination, and tested for the tensile strength and the ultimate elongation. Thermal decontamination was carried out inside an oven for 16 hours at 100 degrees C. The exposure/decontamination procedure was repeated for a maximum of 10 cycles. For neoprene versus acetone, the mean tensile strength consistently decreased after each exposure/decontamination cycle. Multiple comparisons indicated that the mean tensile strengths between the new swatches and each exposure/decontamination group were significantly different (p < 0.05). The loss of either tensile strength or ultimate elongation was less than 23% compared with new swatches after four exposure/decontamination cycles. Swatches with out acetone exposure were then cycled through the oven in the same manner. It was found that both the heat used for thermal decontamination and acetone exposure significantly affected the tensile strength and ultimate elongation. For nitrile gloves exposed to acetone, the mean tensile strength remained virtually unchanged (p > 0.05). The mean tensile strength for the new swatches was 37.1 MPa and the mean tensile strength after nine exposure/decontamination cycles was 36.0 MPa, with a loss less than 3%. The largest single cycle loss for ultimate elongation occurred during the first exposure/decontamination cycle for both glove materials. In our previous study, decisions regarding the effectiveness of the decontamination process were based on having no discernible change in the breakthrough time and steady-state permeation rate. The results of this study indicate that the effectiveness of the decontamination process cannot be based on permeation parameters alone but must also take into account the change in physical

  9. Tensile and compressive constitutive response of 316 stainless steel at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Muralidharan, U.; Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    It is demonstrated that creep rate of 316 SS is lower by factors of 2 to 10 in compression than in tension if the microstructure is the same and tests are conducted at identical temperatures and equal but opposite stresses. Such behavior was observed for both monotonic creep and conditions involving cyclic creep. In the latter case creep rate in both tension and compression progressively increases from cycle to cycle, rendering questionable the possibility of expressing a time-stabilized constitutive relationship. The difference in creep rates in tension and compression is considerably reduced if the tension specimen is first subjected to cycles of tensile creep (reversed by compressive plasticity), while the compression specimen is first subjected to cycles of compressive creep (reversed by tensile plasticity). In both cases, the test temperature is the same and the stresses are equal and opposite. Such reduction is a reflection of differences in microstructure of the specimens resulting from different prior mechanical history.

  10. Tensile and Compressive Constitutive Response of 316 Stainless Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Muralidharan, U.; Halford, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Creep rate in compression is lower by factors of 2 to 10 than in tension if the microstructure of the two specimens is the same and are tested at equal temperatures and equal but opposite stresses. Such behavior is characteristic for monotonic creep and conditions involving cyclic creep. In the latter case creep rate in both tension and compression progressively increases from cycle to cycle, rendering questionable the possibility of expressing a time stabilized constitutive relationship. The difference in creep rates in tension and compression is considerably reduced if the tension specimen is first subjected to cycles of tensile creep (reversed by compressive plasticity), while the compression specimen is first subjected to cycles of compressive creep (reversed by tensile plasticity). In both cases, the test temperature is the same and the stresses are equal and opposite. Such reduction is a reflection of differences in microstructure of the specimens resulting from different prior mechanical history.

  11. Tensile and Creep-Rupture Evaluation of a New Heat of Haynes Alloy 25

    SciTech Connect

    Shingledecker, J.P.; Glanton, D.B.; Martin, R.L.; Sparks, B.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2007-02-14

    From 1999 to 2006, a program was undertaken within the Materials Science and Technology Division, formerly the Metals and Ceramics Division, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory to characterize the tensile and creep-rupture properties of a newly produced heat of Haynes alloy 25 (L-605). Tensile properties from room temperature to 1100 C were evaluated for base material and welded joints aged up to 12,000 hours at 675 C. Creep and creep-rupture tests were conducted on base metal and cross-weldments from 650 to 950 C. Pressurized tubular creep tests were conducted to evaluate multiaxial creep-rupture response of the material. Over 800,000 hours of creep test data were generated during the test program with the longest rupture tests extending beyond 38,000 hours, and the longest creep-rate experiments exceeding 40,000 hours.

  12. Modelling and Simulation of Tensile Fracture in High Velocity Compacted Metal Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsen, P.; Haeggblad, H.-A.

    2007-05-17

    In cold uniaxial powder compaction, powder is formed into a desired shape with rigid tools and a die. After pressing, but before sintering, the compacted powder is called green body. A critical property in the metal powder pressing process is the mechanical properties of the green body. Beyond a green body free from defects, desired properties are high strength and uniform density. High velocity compaction (HVC) using a hydraulic operated hammer is a production method to form powder utilizing a shock wave. Pre-alloyed water atomised iron powder has been HVC-formed into circular discs with high densities. The diametral compression test also called the Brazilian disc test is an established method to measure tensile strength in low strength material like e.g. rock, concrete, polymers and ceramics. During the test a thin disc is compressed across the diameter to failure. The compression induces a tensile stress perpendicular to the compressed diameter. In this study the test have been used to study crack initiation and the tensile fracture process of HVC-formed metal powder discs with a relative density of 99%. A fictitious crack model controlled by a stress versus crack-width relationship is utilized to model green body cracking. Tensile strength is used as a failure condition and limits the stress in the fracture interface. The softening rate of the model is obtained from the corresponding rate of the dissipated energy. The deformation of the powder material is modelled with an elastic-plastic Cap model. The characteristics of the tensile fracture development of the central crack in a diametrically loaded specimen is numerically studied with a three dimensional finite element simulation. Results from the finite element simulation of the diametral compression test shows that it is possible to simulate fracturing of HVC-formed powder. Results from the simulation agree reasonably with experiments.

  13. Modelling and Simulation of Tensile Fracture in High Velocity Compacted Metal Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsén, P.; Häggblad, H.-A.˚.

    2007-05-01

    In cold uniaxial powder compaction, powder is formed into a desired shape with rigid tools and a die. After pressing, but before sintering, the compacted powder is called green body. A critical property in the metal powder pressing process is the mechanical properties of the green body. Beyond a green body free from defects, desired properties are high strength and uniform density. High velocity compaction (HVC) using a hydraulic operated hammer is a production method to form powder utilizing a shock wave. Pre-alloyed water atomised iron powder has been HVC-formed into circular discs with high densities. The diametral compression test also called the Brazilian disc test is an established method to measure tensile strength in low strength material like e.g. rock, concrete, polymers and ceramics. During the test a thin disc is compressed across the diameter to failure. The compression induces a tensile stress perpendicular to the compressed diameter. In this study the test have been used to study crack initiation and the tensile fracture process of HVC-formed metal powder discs with a relative density of 99%. A fictitious crack model controlled by a stress versus crack-width relationship is utilized to model green body cracking. Tensile strength is used as a failure condition and limits the stress in the fracture interface. The softening rate of the model is obtained from the corresponding rate of the dissipated energy. The deformation of the powder material is modelled with an elastic-plastic Cap model. The characteristics of the tensile fracture development of the central crack in a diametrically loaded specimen is numerically studied with a three dimensional finite element simulation. Results from the finite element simulation of the diametral compression test shows that it is possible to simulate fracturing of HVC-formed powder. Results from the simulation agree reasonably with experiments.

  14. Testing Theories of Transfer Using Error Rate Learning Curves.

    PubMed

    Koedinger, Kenneth R; Yudelson, Michael V; Pavlik, Philip I

    2016-07-01

    We analyze naturally occurring datasets from student use of educational technologies to explore a long-standing question of the scope of transfer of learning. We contrast a faculty theory of broad transfer with a component theory of more constrained transfer. To test these theories, we develop statistical models of them. These models use latent variables to represent mental functions that are changed while learning to cause a reduction in error rates for new tasks. Strong versions of these models provide a common explanation for the variance in task difficulty and transfer. Weak versions decouple difficulty and transfer explanations by describing task difficulty with parameters for each unique task. We evaluate these models in terms of both their prediction accuracy on held-out data and their power in explaining task difficulty and learning transfer. In comparisons across eight datasets, we find that the component models provide both better predictions and better explanations than the faculty models. Weak model variations tend to improve generalization across students, but hurt generalization across items and make a sacrifice to explanatory power. More generally, the approach could be used to identify malleable components of cognitive functions, such as spatial reasoning or executive functions. PMID:27230694

  15. Electrothermal fracturing of tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinn, H. O.; Hanks, J. G.; Perkins, H. P.

    1970-01-01

    Pulling device consisting of structural tube, connecting rod, spring-loaded nuts, loading rod, heating element, and three bulkheads fractures tensile specimens. Alternate heating and cooling increases tensile loading by increments until fracturing occurs. Load cell or strain gage, applied to pulling rod, determines forces applied.

  16. Tensile Properties of 17-7 PH and 12 MoV Stainless-Steel Sheet under Rapid-Heating and Constant-Temperature Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Charles R., Jr.; Price, Howard L.

    1961-01-01

    Results are presented of rapid-heating tests of 17-7 PH and 12 MoV stainless-steel sheet heated to failure at temperature rates from about 1 F to 170 F per second under constant-load conditions. Yield and rupture strengths obtained from rapid-heating tests are compared with yield and tensile strengths obtained from short-time elevated-temperature tensile tests (30-minute exposure). A rate-temperature parameter was used to construct master curves from which yield and rupture stresses or temperatures can be predicted. A method for measuring strain by optical means is described.

  17. Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion of Polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmanski, Jevan; Cady, Carl; Rae, Philip; Trujillo, Carl; Gray, G. T., III; Brown, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Polyurea was investigated under Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) loading where spherical projectiles were propelled at 440-509 m/s through an extrusion die with an area reduction of 87%. Momentum of the leading edge imposes a rapid tensile deformation on the extruding material. Polyurea is an elastomer with outstanding high-rate tensile performance of interest in the shock regime. Previous Dyn-Ten-Ext work on semi-crystalline polymers (PTFE, PCTFE) resulted in small-scale fragmentation of the polymer, and did not provide clear information on the evolution of tensile damage in those materials. The polyurea behaved very differently; the polymer first extruded a jet of apparently intact material, which then broke down via void formation and coalescence, followed by fibrillation and tearing of the material. Most of the material in the jet elastically retracted back into the die, and only a few fragments of torn material were liberated from the sample. The surface texture of all failed surfaces was rough indicating a considerable amount of energy was absorbed by sub-critical failure mechanisms. It is interesting to note that while damage nucleation appeared pervasive in the extruded jet, the samples were nevertheless recovered largely intact, with limited fragmentation.

  18. Tensile Strength of Carbon/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Hiroshi; Aoi, Tatsuji; Kawahara, Itaru; Kogo, Yasuo; Shiota, Ichiro

    In order to identify ruling mechanisms of tensile fracture of Carbon/Carbon composites (C/Cs), tensile tests were carried out for various C/Cs as functions of the density, heat treatment temperature, and interfacial strength between fiber and matrix. Three processing routes of preformed yarn, resin char, and HIP processes were adopted to densify C/Cs. These C/Cs were finally heat-treated at temperatures from 2273K to 3300K. The interfacial strength between fiber and matrix was varied by the selection of processing routes. As a result, two ruling failure mechanisms were identified. At density lower than 1.6g/cm3, the tensile fracture was controlled by stress transfer capability from the matrix to reinforcing fibers. However, at higher density than 1.6g/cm3, tensile strength was primarily governed by the interfacial strength between the matrix and fibers. Thus the latter mechanism is nearly same as ceramic matrix composites.

  19. Tensile Stress-Strain Results for 304L and 316L Stainless-Steel Plate at Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; S. D. Snow; T. E. Rahl

    2007-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting moderate strain rate (10 to 200 per second) research on stainless steel materials in support of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). For this research, strain rate effects are characterized by comparison to quasi-static tensile test results. Considerable tensile testing has been conducted resulting in the generation of a large amount of basic material data expressed as engineering and true stress-strain curves. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of quasi-static tensile testing of 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steels in order to add to the existing data pool for these materials and make the data more readily available to other researchers, engineers, and interested parties. Standard tensile testing of round specimens in accordance with ASTM procedure A 370-03a were conducted on 304L and 316L stainless-steel plate materials at temperatures ranging from -20 °F to 600 °F. Two plate thicknesses, eight material heats, and both base and weld metal were tested. Material yield strength, Young’s modulus, ultimate strength, ultimate strain, failure strength and failure strain were determined, engineering and true stress-strain curves to failure were developed, and comparisons to ASME Code minimums were made. The procedures used during testing and the typical results obtained are described in this paper.

  20. Tearing analysis of a new airship envelope material under uniaxial tensile load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. X.; Xu, W.; Chen, Y. L.; Fu, G. Y.

    2016-07-01

    This paper experimentally investigated the tearing properties of a new kind of coated woven fabrics, GQ-6, made of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene fiber. Such material can be used for the envelope materials of a stratospheric airship. First, the uniaxial tearing tests were carried out. Effects of the stretching rate, the initial crack length, and the initial crack orientation on the material's tearing tensile strength were investigated. Experimental results showed that the initial crack length and the initial crack orientation can be represented by the equivalent initial crack length while the stretching rate has a slight influence on tearing behavior of the uniaxial tensile specimens. Then analytical studies using three methods, i.e. Griffith energy theory, the stress intensity factor theory, and Thiele's empirical theory, among which, the stress intensity factor theory gives the best correlation with the test data. Finally, a 48mm threshold of the equivalent initial crack length was recommended to the envelope material in operation.

  1. High temperature tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Stevens, C.O.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests have been performed on V-4Cr-4Ti at 750 and 800 C in order to extend the data base beyond the current limit of 700 C. From comparison with previous measurements, the yield strength is nearly constant and tensile elongations decrease slightly with increasing temperature between 300 and 800 C. The ultimate strength exhibits an apparent maximum near 600 C (attributable to dynamic strain aging) but adequate strength is maintained up to 800 C. The reduction in area measured on tensile specimens remained high ({approximately}80%) for test temperatures up to 800 C, in contrast to previous reported results.

  2. Dynamic tensile response of a carbon-fiber-reinforced LCP composite and its temperature sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Victor P. W.; Yuan, J.; Lim, C. T.

    2001-06-01

    The tensile mechanical behavior of a short carbon fiber filled liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) composite, Vectra A230, was examined under static extension and dynamic loading at three temperatures. Dynamic tension was applied using a pendulum-type tensile spilt Hopkinson bar device. Specimens fabricated according to both the mould flow and transverse directions were tested. The stress-strain curves at various strain rates and temperatures were determined and found to be sensitive to strain rate as well as temperature for both types of specimens. With reference to the properties of pure LCP, mechanical anisotropy and fiber reinforcement effects were characterized and are discussed. Failed specimens were observed suing an optical microscope. Deformation and failure mechanisms in the microstructure of the LCP composite were studied to understand the effects of strain rate and temperature on material strength and failure strain.

  3. Tensile properties of AZ11A-0 magnesium-alloy sheet under rapid-heating and constant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurg, Ivo M

    1956-01-01

    Specimens of AZ31A-0 magnesium alloy sheet were heated to rupture at nominal rates of 0.2 F to 100 F per second under constant tensile load conditions. The data are presented and compared with the results of conventional tensile stress-strain tests at elevated temperatures after 1.2-hour exposure. A temperature-rate parameter was used to construct master curves from which stresses and temperatures for yield and rupture can be predicted under rapid-heating conditions. A comparison of the elevated-temperature tensile properties of AZ31A-0 and HK31XA-H24 magnesium-alloy sheet under both constant-temperature and rapid-heating conditions is included.

  4. Tensile strength of dried gelcast green bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, S.D.; Omatete, O.O.; Walls, C.A.; Barker, D.L.

    1994-04-01

    Ceramic green bodies were prepared by three different techniques, dry pressing, slip casting, and gelcasting. The tensile strength of the green bodies was measured using a diametral compression test. It was found that the gelcast samples were from 2 to 20 times stronger than the conventionally formed green bodies. SEM examination of the gelcast samples revealed a homogeneous, brittle fracture surface indicating a very uniform distribution of the binder and excellent dispersion of the ceramic powder.

  5. Dynamic tensile deformation and fracture of a highly particle-filled composite using SHPB and high-speed DIC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Chen, P.; Guo, B.; Huang, F.

    2012-08-01

    In this work, various tensile tests, including Brazilian disc test (BDT), flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) test and semi-circular bending (SCB) test, were carried out on a highly particle-filled composite by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). With the consideration of low strength and low wave impedance of the materials, a quartz crystal transducer was embedded in SHPB to measure the loading forces. A high-speed camera was used to capture the deformation and fracture process of materials. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to process these digital images to obtain the dynamic deformation information. Based on the measured strain fields, the crack growth path was determined and the failure mechanism of samples was analyzed. Combining SHPB and DIC method, the indirect tensile stress strain plots of disc samples were obtained, and the dynamic fracture toughness of materials was measured using both FBD and SCB tests. The results show that the tensile failure strength and fracture toughness increases with the increase of strain rates, exhibiting strain rate dependence. The high-speed DIC method combined with SHPB is effective to study the dynamic tensile behaviour of brittle materials with low strengths.

  6. Tensile buckling of advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Aiello, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies were conducted to determine analytically the tensile buckling of advanced propeller blades (turboprops) in centrifugal fields, as well as the effects of tensile buckling on other types of structural behavior, such as resonant frequencies and flutter. Theoretical studies were also conducted to establish the advantages of using high performance composite turboprops as compared to titanium. Results show that the vibration frequencies are not affected appreciably prior to 80 percent of the tensile speed. Some frequencies approach zero as the tensile buckling speed is approached. Composites provide a substantial advantage over titanium on a buckling speed to weight basis. Vibration modes change as the rotor speed is increased and substantial geometric coupling is present.

  7. Tensile behavior of tungsten and tungsten-alloy wires from 1300 to 1600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hee, Man Yun

    1988-01-01

    The tensile behavior of a 200-micrometer-diameter tungsten lamp (218CS-W), tungsten + 1.0 atomic percent (a/o) thoria (ST300-W), and tungsten + 0.4 a/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) wires was determined over the temperature range 1300 t0 1600 K at strain rates of 3.3 X 10 to the -2 to 3.3 X 10 to the -5/sec. Although most tests were conducted on as-drawn materials, one series of tests was undertaken on ST300-W wires in four different conditions: as-drawn and vacuum-annealed at 1535 K for 1 hr, with and without electroplating. Whereas heat treatment had no effect on tensile properties, electropolishing significantly increased both the proportional limit and ductility, but not the ultimate tensile strength. Comparison of the behavior of the three alloys indicates that the HfC-dispersed material possesses superior tensile properties. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength/ductility advantage of WHfC is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  8. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  9. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  10. 75 FR 76078 - Pipeline Safety: Random Drug Testing Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ..., and carbon dioxide pipelines and operators of liquefied natural gas facilities must select and test a... percent for calendar year 2011. On January 19, 2010, PHMSA published an Advisory Bulletin (75 FR...

  11. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  12. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Sugar Addition Test

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-06-20

    In order to meet certain production goals, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has focused on implementing a more temporally efficient method of waste vitrification. Changes in frit composition and alterations in the feed preparation process were investigated to determine if melt rate could be improved. The addition of sugar as an alternative reductant to formic acid was investigated for Macrobatch 3 (MB3).

  13. 40 CFR 280.104 - Local government bond rating test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... issues. I hereby certify that the wording of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR... of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR part 280.104(e) as such regulations... Standard & Poor's rating of AAA, AA, A, or BBB. Where a local government has multiple outstanding...

  14. 40 CFR 280.104 - Local government bond rating test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... issues. I hereby certify that the wording of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR... of this letter is identical to the wording specified in 40 CFR part 280.104(e) as such regulations... Standard & Poor's rating of AAA, AA, A, or BBB. Where a local government has multiple outstanding...

  15. High strain-rate testing of parachute materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, K.W.; Totten, J.J.; Waye, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    Research at Sandia National Laboratories has shown a strain rate dependence of many materials used in the production of parachutes. Differences in strength of 30% have been found between strain rates of 12 sec{sup {minus}1} and slow rates normally used to define material properties for lightweight nylon cloth. These structures are sometimes deployed in a rapid fashion and the loading is experienced in milliseconds; the production of material data in the same loading regime is required for full understanding of material response. Also, material behavior suitable for structural analysis of these structures is required for successful analysis. This is especially important when different materials are used in the same fabric structure. Determining the distribution of load to various portions of a nylon and Kevlar parachute requires the correct moduli and material behavior in the analytical model. The effect of strain rate on the material properties of nylon and Kevlar components commonly used in parachute construction are reported in this paper. These properties are suitable for use in analytical models of these fabric structures.

  16. Microstructural Evolution of an Al-Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel During Tensile Deformation Between 77 K and 473 K (-196 °C and 200 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Reza; Ullrich, Christiane; Rafaja, David; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Tensile deformation behavior of an Al-alloyed Fe-17Cr-6Mn-4Al-3Ni-0.45C (mass pct) duplex stainless steel containing approximately 20 vol pct ferrite was studied in the temperature range from 77 K to 473 K (-196 °C to 200 °C). While the elongation exhibited a maximum near room temperature, the yield strength continuously increased at lower tensile test temperatures. According to the microstructural examinations, the twinning-induced plasticity and the dislocation cell formation were the dominant deformation mechanisms in the austenite and ferrite, respectively. Reduction of the tensile ductility at T < 273 K (0 °C) was attributed to the ready material decohesion at the ferrite/austenite boundaries. Tensile testing at 473 K (200 °C) was associated with the serrated flow which was ascribed to the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. Due to a rise in the stacking fault energy of austenite, the occurrence of mechanical twinning was impeded at higher tensile test temperatures. Furthermore, the evolution of microstructural constituents at room temperature was studied by interrupted tensile tests. The deformation in the austenite phase started with the formation of Taylor lattices followed by mechanical twinning at higher strains/stresses. In the ferrite phase, on the other hand, the formation of dislocation cells, cell refinement, and microbands formation occurred in sequence during deformation. Microhardness evolution of ferrite and austenite in the interrupted tensile test specimens implied a higher strain-hardening rate for the austenite as it clearly became the harder phase at higher tensile strain levels.

  17. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Melt Rate Furnace Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-07-24

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) would like to increase its canister production rate. The goal of this study is to improve the melt rate in DWPF specifically for Macrobatch 3. However, the knowledge gained may result in improved melting efficiencies translating to future DWPF macrobatches and in higher throughput for other Department of Energy's (DOE) melters. Increased melting efficiencies decrease overall operational costs by reducing the immobilization campaign time for a particular waste stream. For melt rate limited systems, a small increase in melting efficiency translates into significant hard dollar savings by reducing life cycle operational costs.

  18. Automated preference testing apparatus for rating palatability of foods1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, R. D.; Grant, C. V.

    1971-01-01

    An electronic preference testing apparatus is described for measuring taste preference of rodents and other small animals with solid or liquid foods. The apparatus is designed on the principle of the two-choice, preference technique. It operates photoelectrically with a sequence of presentations so that whenever a subject eats from a compartmentalized food tray, a standard and a test food are each briefly sampled alone before both foods are presented together (in alternate positions) for preference determination. Preferences are automatically recorded on digital counters. The apparatus is built in two modules (a preference tester and the master control) connected by multiconductor cable. The modular design provides portability and isolation of the animals from the major noise-producing components. Diagrams of the apparatus are given, and test results from a trial that evaluated positional bias and a sucrose-concentration preference experiment are presented to demonstrate its application in research. PMID:5550602

  19. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  20. Tensile Deformation of Polyethylenes: Crystallinity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, Buckley; Metaxas, Costas

    2004-03-01

    The crystalline fraction of polyethylene can be reduced by increasing the cooling rate, the molecular weight or the fraction of comonomer. All three methods have been used in this study of tensile deformation which shows that true stress - true strain behavior depends systematically on morphology. The dependence of uniaxial yield stress on crystal thickness is well understood in terms of dislocation nucleation. Post yield flow is dominated by the strain hardening rate that is larger in polyethylenes of lower crystallinity. Noncrystalline polymer evidently reduces the plastic compliance while providing for elastic (reversible) strains. These observations are examined in terms of old and new theories for deformation of semicrystalline polymers.

  1. Tensile stiffness analysis on ocean dynamic power umbilical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming-gang; Yan, Jun; Wang, Ye; Yue, Qian-jin

    2014-04-01

    Tensile stiffness of ocean dynamic power umbilical is an important design parameter for functional implementation and structural safety. A column with radial stiffness which is wound by helical steel wires is constructed to predict the tensile stiffness value of umbilicals in the paper. The relationship between the tension and axial deformation is expressed analytically so the radial contraction of the column is achieved in the relationship by use of a simple finite element method. With an agreement between the theoretical prediction and the tension test results, the method is proved to be simple and efficient for the estimation of tensile stiffness of the ocean dynamic power umbilical.

  2. Tensile strength of bovine trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, S J; Hayes, W C; Stone, J L; Beaupré, G S

    1985-01-01

    Data on the tensile and compressive properties of trabecular bone are needed to define input parameters and failure criteria for modeling total joint replacements. To help resolve differences in reports comparing tensile and compressive properties of trabecular bone, we have developed new methods, based on porous foam technology, for tensile testing of fresh/frozen trabecular bone specimens. Using bovine trabecular bone from an isotropic region from the proximal humerus as a model material, we measured ultimate strengths in tension and compression for two groups of 24 specimens each. The average ultimate strength in tension was 7.6 +/- 2.2 (95% C.I.) MPa and in compression was 12.4 +/- 3.2 MPa. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.013) and was not related to density differences between the test groups (p = 0.28). Strength was related by a power-law function of the local apparent density, but, even accounting for density influences, isotropic bovine trabecular bone exhibits significantly lower strengths in tension than in compression. PMID:4077868

  3. Multiple Maximum Exposure Rates in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramon Barrada, Juan; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Olea, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing is subject to security problems, as the item bank content remains operative over long periods and administration time is flexible for examinees. Spreading the content of a part of the item bank could lead to an overestimation of the examinees' trait level. The most common way of reducing this risk is to impose a…

  4. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types. PMID:25940499

  5. Tensile properties of palladium-silver alloys with absorbed hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. J.; Otterson, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The alloys 90Pd-10Ag, 80Pd-20Ag, 70Pd-30Ag, 60Pd-40Ag, and 50Pd-50Ag containing absorbed hydrogen were tested in tension. The results show the tensile properties to be independent of the phase transition. Also, hydrogen in the lattice does not necessarily cause embrittlement or poor elongation. The changes in the tensile properties appear dependent on the electron to atom site ratio.

  6. Dynamic tensile strength of glass fiber reinforced pultruded composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Kumar, M.M.; Hui, D.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the stress-strain behavior, fracture strength, influence of low temperature, and energy absorption in the diametral tensile splitting fracturing of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite. Experiments were conducted at low-temperature in a thermal chamber installed on a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. The tensile strength was determined by diametral compression of disc samples at 24, {minus}5 and {minus}40 C.

  7. Discrete Analysis of Clay Layer Tensile Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lê, T. N. H.; Plé, O.; Villard, P.; Gotteland, P.; Gourc, J. P.

    2009-06-01

    The Discrete Element Method is used to investigate the tensile behaviour and cracks mechanisms of a clay material submitted to bending loading. It is the case of compacted clay liners in landfill cap cover application. Such as the soil tested in this study is plastic clay, the distinct elements model was calibrated with previous data results by taking into account cohesive properties. Various contact and cohesion laws are tested to show that the numerical model is able to reproduce the failure mechanism. Numerical results are extending to simulate a landfill cap cover.

  8. Hydraulically Driven Grips For Hot Tensile Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Johnson, George W.

    1994-01-01

    Pair of grips for tensile and compressive test specimens operate at temperatures up to 1,500 degrees F. Grips include wedges holding specimen inside furnace, where heated to uniform temperature. Hydraulic pistons drive wedges, causing them to exert clamping force. Hydraulic pistons and hydraulic fluid remain outside furnace, at room temperature. Cooling water flows through parts of grips to reduce heat transferred to external components. Advantages over older devices for gripping specimens in high-temperature tests; no need to drill holes in specimens, maintains constant gripping force on specimens, and heated to same temperature as that of specimen without risk of heating hydraulic fluid and acuator components.

  9. Validation of Empirically Derived Rating Scales for a Story Retelling Speaking Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirai, Akiyo; Koizumi, Rie

    2013-01-01

    In recognition of the rating scale as a crucial tool of performance assessment, this study aims to establish a rating scale suitable for a Story Retelling Speaking Test (SRST), which is a semidirect test of speaking ability in English as a foreign language for classroom use. To identify an appropriate scale, three rating scales, all of which have…

  10. Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl P.; Martinez, Daniel Tito; Gray, George T. III

    2012-06-07

    The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

  11. High temperature tensile deformation behavior of Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Shrestha, Triratna; Charit, Indrajit

    2014-10-01

    Candidate structural materials for advanced reactors need to have superior high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties among other characteristics. The ferritic-martensitic Grade 92 steel (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.5Mo, wt.%) is considered such a candidate structural material. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C in the strain rate range of 10-5-10-3 s-1. After analyzing the tensile results using the Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn (BMD) equation, a stress exponent of about 9.5 and an activation energy of about 646 kJ/mol were obtained. In the light of high values of the stress exponent and activation energy, the threshold stress concept was used to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. As a result of this modification, the true activation energy and stress exponent of the high temperature deformation in Grade 92 steel were found to be about 245 kJ/mol and 5, respectively. Thus, the dominant high temperature deformation mechanism was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed.

  12. Effect of initial orientation on the tensile properties of commercially pure titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Subhasis; Ghosh, Atasi; Gurao, N. P.

    2016-05-01

    Effect of crystallographic texture on uniaxial tensile deformation of commercially pure titanium was studied using in situ as well as post-mortem electron backscatter diffraction and elastoplastic self-consistent simulations. Correlation of mechanical properties and strain hardening response with deformation micromechanisms like different modes of slip and twinning was established. Tensile specimens were machined along rolling direction in the plane perpendicular to normal and transverse direction (sample A and C, respectively) as well as along transverse direction in the plane normal to rolling direction (sample B) to obtain different initial texture from cold rolled and annealed plate of commercially pure titanium. Sample B showed higher strength but lower strain hardening rate and ductility than the orientations A and C. It showed extension twinning with lateral thickening while the other samples showed coexistence of extension and contraction twinning. Schmid factor accounted for most of the observed twinning although some contraction twinning in sample A is attributed to the effect of internal stresses. A combination of in situ tensile test in a field emission gun scanning electron microscope with electron backscatter diffraction facility and elastoplastic self-consistent simulations aid in obtaining high-fidelity Voce hardening parameters for different slip and twinning systems in commercially pure titanium. The variation in tensile properties can be explained on the basis of propensity of twinning which tends to provide strain hardening at lower strain but contributes to failure at higher strain.

  13. High temperature tensile properties and fracture characteristics of bimodal 12Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Ankur; Litvinov, Dimitri; Aktaa, Jarir

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the tensile properties and fracture characteristics of a 12Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. The tensile tests were carried out at four different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 700 °C, at a nominal strain rate of 10-3 s-1. At room temperature the material exhibits a high tensile strength of 1294 MPa and high yield strength of 1200 MPa. At 700 °C, the material still exhibits relatively high tensile strength of 300 MPa. The total elongation-to-failure exceeds 18% over the whole temperature range and has a maximum value of 29% at 600 °C. This superior ductility is attributed to the material's bimodal grain size distribution. In comparison to other commercial, as well as experimental, ODS steels, the material shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. The fracture surface studies reveal a change in fracture behavior from a mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. At 700 °C, the fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture, which is associated with a reduced ductility.

  14. Dynamic tensile stress-strain characteristics of carbon/epoxy laminated composites in through-thickness direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    The effect of strain rate up to approximately ɛ˙ = 102/s on the tensile stress-strain properties of unidirectional and cross-ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites in the through-thickness direction is investigated. Waisted cylindrical specimens machined out of the laminated composites in the through-thickness direction are used in both static and dynamic tests. The dynamic tensile stress-strain curves up to fracture are determined using the split Hopkinson bar (SHB). The low and intermediate strain-rate tensile stress-strain relations up to fracture are measured on an Instron 5500R testing machine. It is demonstrated that the ultimate tensile strength and absorbed energy up to fracture increase significantly, while the fracture strain decreases slightly with increasing strain rate. Macro- and micro-scopic examinations reveal a marked difference in the fracture surfaces between the static and dynamic tension specimens.

  15. 12 CFR 563e.21 - Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in... TREASURY COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT Standards for Assessing Performance § 563e.21 Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general. (a) Performance tests and standards. The OTS assesses the CRA performance...

  16. Long-Term Stability of Teacher Certification Test Objective Job Analysis Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvestro, John R.; And Others

    Public school ratings of the importance of subject-matter test objectives associated with teacher certification tests were examined by means of a job-analysis survey conducted in 1986 and a similar survey conducted in 1993. It was predicted that there would be a high degree of change in the importance ratings assigned to these test objectives…

  17. Tensile properties of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Lavan, D.A.; Hohlfelder, R.J.; Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Mitchell, M.A.; Ashby, C.I.

    1999-12-02

    The strength and modulus of amorphous diamond, a new material for surface micromachined MEMS and sensors, was tested in uniaxial tension by pulling laterally with a flat tipped diamond in a nanoindenter. Several sample designs were attempted. Of those, only the single layer specimen with a 1 by 2 {micro}m gage cross section and a fixed end rigidly attached to the substrate was successful. Tensile load was calculated by resolving the measured lateral and normal forces into the applied tensile force and frictional losses. Displacement was corrected for machine compliance using the differential stiffness method. Post-mortem examination of the samples was performed to document the failure mode. The load-displacement data from those samples that failed in the gage section was converted to stress-strain curves using carefully measured gage cross section dimensions. Mean fracture strength was found to be 8.5 {+-} 1.4 GPa and the modulus was 831 {+-} 94 GPa. Tensile results are compared to hardness and modulus measurements made using a nanoindenter.

  18. Hydration dependent viscoelastic tensile behavior of cornea.

    PubMed

    Hatami-Marbini, Hamed

    2014-08-01

    The cornea is a protective transparent connective tissue covering the front of the eye. The standard uniaxial tensile experiments are among the most popular techniques for investigating biomechanical properties of the cornea. This experimental method characterizes the stress-strain response of corneal strips immersed in a bathing solution. In the present study, the important roles of corneal hydration on tensile viscoelastic properties were investigated. The thickness was used as a surrogate for hydration and uniaxial tensile experiments were performed on bovine corneal samples with four different average thickness (hydration), i.e., 1100 μm (4.87 mg water/mg dry tissue), 900 μm (4.13 mg water/mg dry tissue), 700 μm (3.20 mg water/mg dry tissue), and 500 μm (1.95 mg water/mg dry tissue). The samples were immersed in mineral oil in order to prevent their swelling during the experiments. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model was used to analyze the experimental measurements and determine viscoelastic material constants. It was observed that both maximum and equilibrium (relaxed) stresses were exponentially increased with decreasing tissue thickness (hydration). Furthermore, the QLV model successfully captured the corneal viscoelastic response with an average R (2) value greater than 0.99. Additional experiments were conducted in OBSS in order to confirm that these significant changes in viscoelastic properties were because of corneal hydration and not the bathing solution. The findings of this study suggest that extra care must be taken in interpreting the results of earlier uniaxial tensile testings and their correspondence to the corneal biomechanical properties. PMID:24668183

  19. Seat belt usage rates: a test of Peltzman's hypothesis.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, P S

    1986-10-01

    Despite the universally accepted belief that the use of seat belts would have a significant impact upon the number of vehicular fatalities, current evidence indicates that relatively few drivers employ their seat belts. Various hypotheses have been offered to explain this phenomenon, many of which conclude that a driver's decision to use a seat belt is independent of the risk experienced in his trip making. This paper develops an economic model which focuses upon the relationship between driver use of seat belts and the travel conditions under which trips are made. Using data obtained from a national survey of households, a binary logit model is developed to test the hypothesis that seat belt usage is influenced by the level of risk experienced in one's trip making. The estimation results were consistent with the underlying hypothesis that individuals travelling in more risky environments are more likely to use their seat belts. The econometric results are then employed to examine various policy issues, including the predicted use of seat belts for population sub-groups, driver response to the introduction of a small urban car, and the impact upon the probability of a fatality resulting from vehicle fleet downsizing. PMID:3768132

  20. The tensile behavior of demineralized bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Bowman, S M; Zeind, J; Gibson, L J; Hayes, W C; McMahon, T A

    1996-11-01

    Bone is frequently modeled as a two-phase composite of hydroxyapatite mineral crystals dispersed throughout an organic collagen matrix. However, because of the numerous limitations (e.g. small sample size, poor strain measuring techniques, rapid demineralization with acids) of previous mechanical tests of bone with its hydroxyapatite chemically removed, we have determined new, accurate data on the material properties of the demineralized bone matrix for use in these composite models. We performed tensile tests on waisted specimens of demineralized bovine cortical bone from six humeral diaphyses. Specimens were demineralized over 14 days with a 0.5 M disodium EDTA solution that was replaced daily. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to track the demineralization process and to determine the effectiveness of our demineralization protocol. Mechanical tests were performed at room temperature under displacement control at an approximate strain rate of 0.5% per s. We imposed nine preconditioning cycles before a final ramp to failure, and measured gauge length displacements using a non-invasive optical technique. The resulting stress-strain curves were similar to the tensile behavior observed in mechanical tests of other collagenous tissues, exhibiting an initial non-linear 'toe' region, followed by a linear region and subsequent failure without evidence of yielding. We found an average modulus, ultimate stress, and ultimate strain of 613 MPa (S.D. = 113 MPa), 61.5 MPa (S.D. = 13.1 MPa), and 12.3% (S.D. = 0.5%), respectively. Our average modulus is approximately half the value frequently used in current composite bone analyses. These data should also have clinical relevance because the early strength of healing fractured bone depends largely on the material properties of the collagen matrix. PMID:8894931

  1. Tensile properties of the human glenoid labrum

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C D; Masouros, S D; Hill, A M; Wallace, A L; Amis, A A; Bull, A M J

    2008-01-01

    Human fresh-frozen cadaveric glenoid labrae from 16 donors were harvested and ten of these had no gross degeneration. These ten were divided into eight equal circumferential sections. Each section was cut to produce test-samples from the core layer with a cross-section of 1 × 1 mm. Tensile testing was performed within a controlled environment unit at 37 ± 1 °C and 100% relative humidity. Each test-sample was precycled to a quasi-static state to alleviate the effects of deep-freezing, prior to final testing. The tangent modulus was calculated for each test-sample before and after a 5-min period of stress relaxation and at yield. The mean elastic modulus and yield stress of the glenoid labrum were 22.8 ± 11.4 and 2.5 ± 2.1 MPa, respectively. The anterosuperior portion had a lower elastic modulus and lower yield stress than the inferior portion (both P < 0.02). The pre-stress relaxation tangent modulus was significantly lower than the post-stress relaxation tangent modulus for all portions of the labrum. The glenoid labrum has similar tensile material properties to articular cartilage. Its elastic modulus varies around its circumference. This suggests that the labrum may encounter different forces at different positions. PMID:18031481

  2. Effect of temperature on tensile and creep characteristics of PRD49 fiber/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Tensile and creep data of PRD49-1 and 3 fiber/epoxy-resin composites are presented. Tensile data were obtained from 20 to 477 K (-423 to 400 F). Tensile strengths and moduli were determined at selected temperatures. Creep data are presented for fiber composites at 297, 422 and 450 K (75, 300, and 350 F) for as long as 1000 hours at stress levels of approximately 50 and 80 percent of the ultimate tensile strength at 297 K (75 F). Details of tensile specimens and test procedures used in the investigation are presented.

  3. Effects of conventional welding and laser welding on the tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength and surface characteristics of two cobalt-chromium alloys: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Madhan Kumar, Seenivasan; Sethumadhava, Jayesh Raghavendra; Anand Kumar, Vaidyanathan; Manita, Grover

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser welding and conventional welding on the tensile strength and ultimate tensile strength of the cobalt-chromium alloy. Samples were prepared with two commercially available cobalt-chromium alloys (Wironium plus and Diadur alloy). The samples were sectioned and the broken fragments were joined using Conventional and Laser welding techniques. The welded joints were subjected to tensile and ultimate tensile strength testing; and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the surface characteristics at the welded site. Both on laser welding as well as on conventional welding technique, Diadur alloy samples showed lesser values when tested for tensile and ultimate tensile strength when compared to Wironium alloy samples. Under the scanning electron microscope, the laser welded joints show uniform welding and continuous molt pool all over the surface with less porosity than the conventionally welded joints. Laser welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing cast metal prosthetic frameworks. PMID:23858281

  4. Effect of Strain Rate on Mechanical Properties of Wrought Sintered Tungsten at Temperatures above 2500 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Paul F.; Hall, Robert W.

    1961-01-01

    Specimens of wrought sintered commercially pure tungsten were made from 1/8-inch swaged rods. All the specimens were recrystallized at 4050 F for 1 hour prior to testing at temperatures from 2500 to 4000 F at various strain rates from 0.002 to 20 inches per inch per minute. Results showed that, at a constant temperature, increasing the strain rate increased the ultimate tensile strength significantly. The effects of both strain rate and temperature on the ultimate tensile strength of tungsten may be correlated by the linear parameter method of Manson and Haferd and may be used to predict the ultimate tensile strength at higher temperatures, 4500 and 5000 F. As previously reported, ductility, as measured by reduction of area in a tensile test, decreases with increasing temperature above about 3000 F. Increasing the strain rate at temperatures above 3000 F increases the ductility. Fractures are generally transgranular at the higher strain rates and intergranular at the lower strain rates.

  5. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  6. Biomechanical response of human spleen in tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; Santago, Anthony C; Stitzel, Joel D; Sparks, Jessica L; Duma, Stefan M

    2012-01-10

    Blunt splenic injuries are most frequently caused as a result of motor vehicle collisions and are associated with high mortality rates. In order to accurately assess the risk of automotive related spleen injuries using tools such as finite element models, tissue level tolerance values and suitable material models must be developed and validated based on appropriate biomechanical data. This study presents a total of 41 tension tests performed on spleen parenchyma coupons and 29 tension tests performed on spleen capsule/parenchyma coupons. Standard dog-bone coupons were obtained from fresh human spleen and tested within 48 h of death. Each coupon was tested once to failure at one of the four loading rates to investigate the effects of rate dependence. Load and acceleration data were obtained at each of the specimen grips. High-speed video and optical markers placed on the specimens were used to measure local displacement. Failure stress and strain were calculated at the location of failure in the gage length of the coupon. The results of the study showed that both the spleen parenchyma and the capsule are rate dependent, with higher loading rates yielding higher failure stresses and lower failure strains. The results also show that the failure stress of the splenic capsule is significantly greater than that of the underlying parenchyma. Overall, this study provides novel biomechanical data that demonstrate the rate dependent tissue level tolerance values of human spleen tissue in tensile loading, which can aid in the improvement of finite element models used to assess injury risk in blunt trauma. PMID:22078273

  7. The effects of damage accumulation on the tensile strength and toughness of compact bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tekalur, Srinivasan Arjun; Baumann, Melissa; McCabe, Laura R

    2013-03-15

    Damage accumulation in compact bovine femur subjected to uniaxial tensile loading was examined by strong light illumination effects of microcracking. Imaging was done using a high-speed camera capturing image at 200 to 1500FPS. The tensile tests were performed in a multipurpose tensile testing system with cross-head speeds ranging from 0.5 to 10mm/min which leads to strain rates of 0.0001 to 0.0012s(-1) (physiologically relevant to walking and running Hansen et al., 2008). The post-failure images were then examined in a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and effects of microstructure, strain rate, and orientation were evaluated. Correlation of the high-speed images with stress-strain curves indicated that optically visible microcracks were most likely initiated at yielding, and the specimens with dispersed microcracks exhibited a higher energy-absorption capacity compared to the specimens with coalesced local cracks. It was found that damage accumulation negatively correlates to strain rate and that transverse specimens exhibited a different failure pattern compared to the longitudinal specimens. Strain hardening and softening were found in the longitudinal and transverse specimens respectively. The microcracking in the transverse specimens instantly increased to peak after yielding compared to the gradual growth until failure in the longitudinal specimens. The average Young's modulus (21.5GPa) and ultimate stress (93.5MPa) of the specimens loaded in the longitudinal direction were more than twice that of the specimens (10.9GPa and 36.2MPa respectively) loaded in the transverse direction. The current technique has shown potential in relating damage accumulation real time in bone samples subjected to tensile loading condition. This information will be helpful in relating the role of micro damage accumulation in initiating failure and/or remodeling in bone. PMID:23337851

  8. Effect of boron on post irradiation tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic steel (F-82H) irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Suzuki, Masahide; Hishinuma, Akimichi; Pawel, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F-82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses between 11 and 34 dpa at 400 and 500 C. Post irradiation tensile tests were performed at the nominal irradiation temperature in vacuum. Some specimens included {sup 10}B or natural boron (nB) to estimate the helium effect on tensile properties. Tensile properties including the 0.2% offset yield stress, the ultimate tensile strength, the uniform elongation and the total elongation were measured. The tensile properties were not dependent on helium content in specimens irradiated to 34 dpa, however {sup 10}B-doped specimens with the highest levels of helium showed slightly higher yield strength and less ductility than boron-free specimens. Strength appears to go through a peak, and ductility through a trough at about 11 dpa. The irradiation to more than 21 dpa reduced the strength and increased the elongation to the unirradiated levels. Ferritic steels are one of the candidate alloys for nuclear fusion reactors because of their good thermophysical properties, their superior swelling resistance, and the low corrosion rate in contact with potential breeder and coolant materials.

  9. Hot Tensile Behavior and Self-consistent Constitutive Modeling of TA15 Titanium Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Baoyu; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Huijun; Zhou, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Hot tensile behavior of TA15 sheets with bimodal microstructure was studied through tensile tests from 750 to 850 °C with an interval of 25 °C and at strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 s-1. Results of the tensile tests reveal that the flow stress reaches peak values at specific strains, and then softening or steady-state flow occurs. Metallographic examination of deformed specimens shows that the primary α-phase becomes equiaxed, while the secondary α-phase and the lamellar β-phase are curved until crushed, indicating that the deformation occurred mainly in the secondary α-phase and the lamellar β-phase. A self-consistent model was developed to predict the plastic flow behavior of the TA15 sheets. Model parameters were determined according to the composition contents of individual phases and the stress-strain curves. The stress-strain curves at 775 °C and at the strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 s-1 were predicted by the proposed model, showing good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. New York State 2010 HIV testing law: an evaluation of testing rates using laboratory data.

    PubMed

    Lazariu, Victoria; Parker, Monica M; Leung, Shu-Yin J; McVoy, Matthew; Gieryic, Susan; Rowe, Kirsten A; Ortega-Peluso, Christina; Anderson, Bridget J; McNutt, Louise-Anne; Smith, Lou C

    2015-01-01

    As of September 2010, New York State (NYS) Public Health Law mandates the offer of HIV testing to all persons aged 13-64 years receiving hospital or primary care services. Changes in the number of HIV tests 13 months before and after law enactment were assessed using HIV test volume data from 166 laboratories holding NYS permits to conduct HIV testing on specimens originating in NYS. Compared with the pre-enactment baseline, overall HIV testing volume increased by 13% following enactment, with the volume of conventional and rapid HIV screening tests increasing by 12.0% and 13.7%, respectively. These data suggest that testing law is having an impact consistent with the legislative intent to increase HIV testing in NYS. Monitoring should be continued to assess testing trends across a variety of health care venues to identify and address additional barriers to HIV testing access. PMID:25545488

  11. Analysis on dynamic tensile extrusion behavior of UFG OFHC Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyung-Tae; Park, Leeju; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Seok Bong; Lee, Chong Soo

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests with the strain rate order of ~105 s-1 were conducted on coarse grained (CG) Cu and ultrafine grained (UFG) Cu. ECAP of 16 passes with route Bc was employed to fabricate UFG Cu. DTE tests were carried out by launching the sphere samples to the conical extrusion die at a speed of ~475 m/sec in a vacuumed gas gun system. UFG Cu was fragmented into 3 pieces and showed a DTE elongation of ~340%. CG Cu exhibited a larger DTE elongation of ~490% with fragmentation of 4 pieces. During DTE tests, dynamic recrystallization occurred in UFG Cu, but not in CG Cu. In order to examine the DTE behavior of CG Cu and UFG Cu under very high strain rates, a numerical analysis was undertaken by using a commercial finite element code (LS-DYNA 2D axis-symmetric model) with the Johnson - Cook model. The numerical analysis correctly predicted fragmentation and DTE elongation of CG Cu. But, the experimental DTE elongation of UFG Cu was much smaller than that predicted by the numerical analysis. This difference is discussed in terms of microstructural evolution of UFG Cu during DTE tests.

  12. Specimen for high-temperature tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Split nut with internal taper to hold specially formed specimen composed of filaments of refractory material provides means for holding at high temperature and under tension so that performance evaluations may be made.

  13. Hot tensile tests of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The physical metallurgy of near-solidus integranular cracking in Inconel 718 welds was investigated. The data, although inconclusive, suggest at least two mechanisms which might explain intergranular cracking (microfissuring) in the heat-affected zone of several high temperature alloys. One theory is based on the separation of intergranular liquid while the other involves mechanical failure of solid ligaments surrounded by intergranular liquid. Both mechanisms concentrate strain in the grain boundaries resulting in low strain (1%) intergranular brittleness. The mechanisms reported might also pertain to the physical metallurgy of casting, powder metallurgy sintering and hot isostatic pressing.

  14. Effect of Tensile Stress on Cavitation Erosion and Damage of Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, M.; Inaba, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kishimoto, K.; Hayabusa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation erosion tests for epoxy, unsaturated polyester, polycarbonate, and acrylic resin were conducted under various tensile stress conditions (Tensile-Cavitation test). A new testing device was designed to conduct the Tensile-Cavitation test and observe specimen surface during the experiment based on ASTM G32. When tensile stress of 1.31 MPa was loaded on epoxy resin, cracks occurred on the specimen after 0.5 hours during cavitation erosion. When no tensile stress was loaded on the epoxy resin, the damage was general cavitation erosion only. As well as the epoxy resin, unsaturated polyester resin applied tensile stress of 1.31 MPa and polycarbonate resin of 6.54 MPa indicated erosion damages and cracks. When tensile stress of 6.54 MPa was loaded on acrylic resin, the erosion damage was almost the same as the results without tensile stress. We confirmed that anti-cavitation property of epoxy resin was higher than those of acrylic and polycarbonate without tensile stress while the damage of epoxy resin was much serious than that of acrylic resins under tensile stress loadings.

  15. Actuator Exerts Tensile Or Compressive Axial Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozzi, John; Richards, Cuyler H.

    1994-01-01

    Compact, manually operated mechanical actuator applies controlled, limited tensile or compressive axial force. Designed to apply loads to bearings during wear tests in clean room. Intended to replace hydraulic actuator. Actuator rests on stand and imparts axial force to part attached to clevis inside or below stand. Technician turns control screw at one end of lever. Depending on direction of rotation of control screw, its end of lever driven downward (for compression) or upward (for tension). Lever pivots about clevis pin at end opposite of control screw; motion drives downward or upward link attached via shearpin at middle of lever. Link drives coupling and, through it, clevis attached to part loaded.

  16. Auditing HIV Testing Rates across Europe: Results from the HIDES 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Raben, D.; Mocroft, A.; Rayment, M.; Mitsura, V. M.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Sthoeger, Z. M.; Palfreeman, A.; Morris, S.; Kutsyna, G.; Vassilenko, A.; Minton, J.; Necsoi, C.; Estrada, V. P.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Johansson, V. Svedhem; Begovac, J.; Ong, E. L. C.; Cabié, A.; Ajana, F.; Celesia, B. M.; Maltez, F.; Kitchen, M.; Comi, L.; Dragsted, U. B.; Clumeck, N.; Gatell, J.; Gazzard, B.; d’Arminio Monforte, A.; Rockstroh, J.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Champenois, K.; Jakobsen, M. L.; Sullivan, A.; Lundgren, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    European guidelines recommend the routine offer of an HIV test in patients with a number of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS conditions believed to share an association with HIV; so called indicator conditions (IC). Adherence with this guidance across Europe is not known. We audited HIV testing behaviour in patients accessing care for a number of ICs. Participating centres reviewed the case notes of either 100 patients or of all consecutive patients in one year, presenting for each of the following ICs: tuberculosis, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, anal and cervical cancer, hepatitis B and C and oesophageal candidiasis. Observed HIV-positive rates were applied by region and IC to estimate the number of HIV diagnoses potentially missed. Outcomes examined were: HIV test rate (% of total patients with IC), HIV test accepted (% of tests performed/% of tests offered) and new HIV diagnosis rate (%). There were 49 audits from 23 centres, representing 7037 patients. The median test rate across audits was 72% (IQR 32–97), lowest in Northern Europe (median 44%, IQR 22–68%) and highest in Eastern Europe (median 99%, IQR 86–100). Uptake of testing was close to 100% in all regions. The median HIV+ rate was 0.9% (IQR 0.0–4.9), with 29 audits (60.4%) having an HIV+ rate >0.1%. After adjustment, there were no differences between regions of Europe in the proportion with >0.1% testing positive (global p = 0.14). A total of 113 patients tested HIV+. Applying the observed rates of testing HIV+ within individual ICs and regions to all persons presenting with an IC suggested that 105 diagnoses were potentially missed. Testing rates in well-established HIV ICs remained low across Europe, despite high prevalence rates, reflecting missed opportunities for earlier HIV diagnosis and care. Significant numbers may have had an opportunity for HIV diagnosis if all persons included in IC audits had been tested. PMID:26560105

  17. Auditing HIV Testing Rates across Europe: Results from the HIDES 2 Study.

    PubMed

    Raben, D; Mocroft, A; Rayment, M; Mitsura, V M; Hadziosmanovic, V; Sthoeger, Z M; Palfreeman, A; Morris, S; Kutsyna, G; Vassilenko, A; Minton, J; Necsoi, C; Estrada, V P; Grzeszczuk, A; Johansson, V Svedhem; Begovac, J; Ong, E L C; Cabié, A; Ajana, F; Celesia, B M; Maltez, F; Kitchen, M; Comi, L; Dragsted, U B; Clumeck, N; Gatell, J; Gazzard, B; d'Arminio Monforte, A; Rockstroh, J; Yazdanpanah, Y; Champenois, K; Jakobsen, M L; Sullivan, A; Lundgren, J D

    2015-01-01

    European guidelines recommend the routine offer of an HIV test in patients with a number of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS conditions believed to share an association with HIV; so called indicator conditions (IC). Adherence with this guidance across Europe is not known. We audited HIV testing behaviour in patients accessing care for a number of ICs. Participating centres reviewed the case notes of either 100 patients or of all consecutive patients in one year, presenting for each of the following ICs: tuberculosis, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, anal and cervical cancer, hepatitis B and C and oesophageal candidiasis. Observed HIV-positive rates were applied by region and IC to estimate the number of HIV diagnoses potentially missed. Outcomes examined were: HIV test rate (% of total patients with IC), HIV test accepted (% of tests performed/% of tests offered) and new HIV diagnosis rate (%). There were 49 audits from 23 centres, representing 7037 patients. The median test rate across audits was 72% (IQR 32-97), lowest in Northern Europe (median 44%, IQR 22-68%) and highest in Eastern Europe (median 99%, IQR 86-100). Uptake of testing was close to 100% in all regions. The median HIV+ rate was 0.9% (IQR 0.0-4.9), with 29 audits (60.4%) having an HIV+ rate >0.1%. After adjustment, there were no differences between regions of Europe in the proportion with >0.1% testing positive (global p = 0.14). A total of 113 patients tested HIV+. Applying the observed rates of testing HIV+ within individual ICs and regions to all persons presenting with an IC suggested that 105 diagnoses were potentially missed. Testing rates in well-established HIV ICs remained low across Europe, despite high prevalence rates, reflecting missed opportunities for earlier HIV diagnosis and care. Significant numbers may have had an opportunity for HIV diagnosis if all persons included in IC audits had been tested. PMID:26560105

  18. Tensile and burning properties of clay/phenolic/GF composite and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Armunanto, V. Bram; Kristiawan, S. Adi

    2016-03-01

    Composite material has been widely used in automotive due to its properties can be improved by combining with reinforcement, like fiber and particle to enhance mechanical properties and burning resistance. This study aims to investigate the tensile and burning properties of hybrid composite combining glass fiber and clay in phenolic resin. The clay was produced from roof tile rejected by tile industries in Sokka, Kebumen, Indonesia. The composite was made using a press mold method for different number of laminates and orientation of woven-roving-glass-fiber/ WRGF (0/90 and ±45), and the total volume fraction of fiber and clay is constant 40%. The specimens were tested using universal testing machine for tensile properties and burning tests apparatus for burning resistance (time to ignite/ TTI and burning rate/ BR). The enhancing of the Clay/Penolic/GF composite can be performed by the increasing of GF laminates, and the composite with 0/90 orientation of WRGF has higher tensile strength and modulus compared to that with ±45 orientation of WRGF. Both composite with 0/90 and ±45 orientation of WRGF have similar burning resistance (TTI and BR) and the composite containing 13 laminates of WR-GF shows the best burning resistance. According to these properties, this composite has good opportunity to be applied as car body panels or other structure in industries due to save weight and high burning resistance.

  19. Dynamic tensile characterization of pig skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatam, H.; Liu, Q.; Ravi-Chandar, K.

    2014-04-01

    The strain-rate dependent response of porcine skin oriented in the fiber direction is explored under tensile loading. Quasi-static response was obtained at strain rates in the range of 10-3 s-1 to 25 s-1. Characterization of the response at even greater strain rates is accomplished by measuring the spatio-temporal evolution of the particle velocity and strain in a thin strip subjected to high speed impact loading that generates uniaxial stress conditions. These experiments indicate the formation of shock waves; the shock Hugoniot that relates particle velocity to the shock velocity and the dynamic stress to dynamic strain is obtained directly through experimental measurements, without any assumptions regarding the constitutive properties of the material. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Voltage generation from individual BaTiO(3) nanowires under periodic tensile mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyu; Hu, Jie; Suryavanshi, Abhijit P; Yum, Kyungsuk; Yu, Min-Feng

    2007-10-01

    Direct tensile mechanical loading of an individual single-crystal BaTiO(3) nanowire was realized to reveal the direct piezoelectric effect in the nanowire. Periodic voltage generation from the nanowire was produced by a periodically varying tensile mechanical strain applied with a precision mechanical testing stage. The measured voltage generation from the nanowire was found to be directly proportional to the applied strain rate and was successfully modeled through the consideration of an equivalent circuit for a piezoelectric nanowire under low-frequency operation. The study, besides demonstrating a controlled experimental method for the study of direct piezoelectric effect in nanostructures, implies also the use of such perovskite piezoelectric nanowires for efficient energy-harvesting applications. PMID:17894515

  1. 12 CFR 195.21 - Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general. 195.21 Section 195.21 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT Standards for Assessing Performance § 195.21 Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general. (a) Performance...

  2. 12 CFR 563e.21 - Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general. 563e.21 Section 563e.21 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT Standards for Assessing Performance § 563e.21 Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general. (a)...

  3. Characterization of Damage in Triaxial Braid Composites Under Tensile Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites utilizing flattened, large tow yarns in woven or braided forms are being used in many aerospace applications. Their complex fiber architecture and large unit cell size present challenges in both understanding deformation processes and measuring reliable material properties. This report examines composites made using flattened 12k and 24k standard modulus carbon fiber yarns in a 0 /+60 /-60 triaxial braid architecture. Standard straight-sided tensile coupons are tested with the 0 axial braid fibers either parallel with or perpendicular to the applied tensile load (axial or transverse tensile test, respectively). Nonuniform surface strain resulting from the triaxial braid architecture is examined using photogrammetry. Local regions of high strain concentration are examined to identify where failure initiates and to determine the local strain at the time of initiation. Splitting within fiber bundles is the first failure mode observed at low to intermediate strains. For axial tensile tests splitting is primarily in the 60 bias fibers, which were oriented 60 to the applied load. At higher strains, out-of-plane deformation associated with localized delamination between fiber bundles or damage within fiber bundles is observed. For transverse tensile tests, the splitting is primarily in the 0 axial fibers, which were oriented transverse to the applied load. The initiation and accumulation of local damage causes the global transverse stress-strain curves to become nonlinear and causes failure to occur at a reduced ultimate strain. Extensive delamination at the specimen edges is also observed.

  4. USING AN ADAPTER TO PERFORM THE CHALFANT-STYLE CONTAINMENT VESSEL PERIODIC MAINTENANCE LEAK RATE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Trapp, D.

    2011-06-03

    Recently the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems (PT&PS) organization at the Savannah River National Laboratory was asked to develop an adapter for performing the leak-rate test of a Chalfant-style containment vessel. The PT&PS organization collaborated with designers at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant to develop the adapter currently in use for performing the leak-rate testing on the containment vessels. This paper will give the history of leak-rate testing of the Chalfant-style containment vessels, discuss the design concept for the adapter, give an overview of the design, and will present results of the testing done using the adapter.

  5. Acceptance test procedure for the 105-KW isolation barrier leak rate

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, K.J.

    1995-05-19

    This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared in accordance with CM-6-1 EP 4.2, Standard Engineering Practices.

  6. Analysis of Tensile Deformation and Failure in Austenitic Stainless Steels: Part I- Temperature Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Weon; Byun, Thak Sang

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the temperature dependence of deformation and failure behaviors in the austenitic stainless steels (annealed 304, 316, 316LN, and 20% cold-worked 316LN) in terms of equivalent true stress-true strain curves. The true stress-true strain curves up to the final fracture were calculated from the tensile test data obtained at -150 ~ 450oC using an iterative technique of finite element simulation. Analysis was largely focused on the necking deformation and fracture: Key parameters such as the strain hardening rate, equivalent fracture stress, fracture strain, and tensile fracture energy were evaluated, and their temperature dependencies were investigated. It was shown that a significantly high strain hardening rate was still retained during unstable deformation although overall strain hardening rate beyond the onset of necking was lower than that of the uniform deformation. The values of the parameters except for fracture strain decreased with temperature up to 200oC and were saturated as the temperature came close to the maximum test temperature 450oC. The fracture strain increased and had a maximum at -50oC to 20oC before decreasing with temperature. It was explained that these temperature dependencies of fracture properties were associated with a change in the dominant strain hardening mechanism with test temperature. Also, it was seen that the pre-straining of material has little effect on the strain hardening rate during necking deformation and on fracture properties.

  7. Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Wayne R.

    2010-07-01

    This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

  8. A Descriptive Analysis of Test Session Observation Checklist Ratings from the Woodcock Johnson III Standardization Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby, Craig L.; Osterlind, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    Modern scale construction techniques have been used to develop scales measuring examiner ratings of examinees' test session behavior (TSB) on Wechsler and Stanford-Binet intelligence tests. This study analyzes data from the Test Session Observation Checklist (TSOC), a measure developed by post hoc rational analysis, from a portion of the Woodcock…

  9. Preliminary test results for Li-SOCl2 high-rate D cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Johnson, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The performance and abuse characteristics of 55 D-size lithium-thionyl chloride (Li-SOCl2) cells are evaluated at relatively high rates. Results from the following tests are presented: shock test, vibration test, capacity performance, uninsulated short circuit, high temperature exposure, and overdischarge.

  10. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  11. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  12. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  13. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  14. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  15. Tensile and tribological properties of high-crystallinity radiation crosslinked UHMWPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bistolfi, Alessandro; Turell, Mary Beth; Lee, Ying-Lung; Bellare, Anuj

    2009-09-02

    Osteolysis due to particulate wear debris associated with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) components of total joint replacement prostheses has been a major factor determining their in vivo lifetime. In recent years, radiation crosslinking has been employed to decrease wear rates in PE components, especially in acetabular cups of total hip replacement prostheses. A drawback of radiation crosslinking is that it leads to a crosslinked PE (or XPE) with lower mechanical properties compared with uncrosslinked PE. In contrast, high-crystallinity PEs are known to have several mechanical properties higher than conventional PE. In this study, we hypothesized that increasing the crystallinity of radiation crosslinked and remelted XPE would result in an increase in tensile properties without compromising wear resistance. High-pressure crystallization was performed on PE and XPE and analyzed for the resulting morphological alterations using differential scanning calorimeter, low voltage scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering. Uniaxial tensile tests showed that high-pressure crystallization increased the tensile modulus and yield stress in both PE and XPE, decreased the ultimate strain and ultimate stress in PE but had no significant effect on ultimate strain or ultimate stress in XPE. Multidirectional wear tests demonstrated that high-pressure crystallization decreased the wear resistance of PE but had no effect on the wear resistance of XPE. In conclusion, this study shows that high-pressure crystallization can be effectively used to increase the crystallinity and modulus of XPE without compromising its superior wear resistance compared with PE.

  16. Limiting tensile strength of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidakov, Vladimir G.; Vinogradov, Vladimir E.; Pavlov, Pavel A.

    2016-05-01

    The method of pulsed liquid superheating in a tension wave that forms when a compression pulse is reflected from the liquid free surface has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous cavitation in liquid nitrogen. The limiting tensile stress pn of nitrogen corresponding to nucleation rates J = 1020 - 1022 s-1 m-3 and the slope of the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate GT = dlnJ/dT have been determined by experiment. The results of experiments are compared with classical nucleation theory (CNT) and a modified classical nucleation theory (MCNT), which takes into account the size dependence of the properties of a critical bubble. It has been noted that experimental data are in better agreement with the results of MCNT than with those of CNT.

  17. Effects of bathing solution on tensile properties of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Rahimi, Abdolrasol

    2014-03-01

    The cornea is a transparent tissue with the major functions of protecting the inner contents of the eye and refracting incoming light. The biomechanical properties of the cornea strongly depend on the microstructure and composition of the stromal layer, a hydrated bio-gel. The uniaxial strip testing is a convenient and well-accepted experimental technique for characterizing corneal material parameters. It is known that the water content of specimens in this method depends on the osmolality of the bathing solution. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of different bathing solutions on uniaxial tensile material properties of the cornea. The tensile behavior of bovine corneal samples was measured in six different bathing solutions, i.e., hypertonic solution (12% NaCl solution), common preserving isotonic solutions (e.g., phosphate buffer saline, ophthalmic balanced salt solution, and 0.9% NaCl solution), hypotonic solution (distilled water), and neutral solution (mineral oil). It was observed that the bathing solution had significant influence on the tensile behavior of the corneal samples. In particular, the specimens tested in bathing solutions causing less swelling had significantly stiffer tensile properties. Furthermore, a simple mathematical model based on Voigt composite material model was developed to represent the measured solution-dependent tensile properties. The present study suggests that extra attention should be paid to corneal thickness (hydration) in uniaxial tensile experiments. It also provides important data on tensile properties of the cornea; such information could significantly contribute to improving the accuracy of numerical predictions of corneal biomechanics. PMID:24333541

  18. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  19. SITE project. Phase 1: Continuous data bit-error-rate testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    1992-09-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) Project at NASA LeRC encompasses a number of research and technology areas of satellite communications systems. Phase 1 of this project established a complete satellite link simulator system. The evaluation of proof-of-concept microwave devices, radiofrequency (RF) and bit-error-rate (BER) testing of hardware, testing of remote airlinks, and other tests were performed as part of this first testing phase. This final report covers the test results produced in phase 1 of the SITE Project. The data presented include 20-GHz high-power-amplifier testing, 30-GHz low-noise-receiver testing, amplitude equalization, transponder baseline testing, switch matrix tests, and continuous-wave and modulated interference tests. The report also presents the methods used to measure the RF and BER performance of the complete system. Correlations of the RF and BER data are summarized to note the effects of the RF responses on the BER.

  20. SITE project. Phase 1: Continuous data bit-error-rate testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) Project at NASA LeRC encompasses a number of research and technology areas of satellite communications systems. Phase 1 of this project established a complete satellite link simulator system. The evaluation of proof-of-concept microwave devices, radiofrequency (RF) and bit-error-rate (BER) testing of hardware, testing of remote airlinks, and other tests were performed as part of this first testing phase. This final report covers the test results produced in phase 1 of the SITE Project. The data presented include 20-GHz high-power-amplifier testing, 30-GHz low-noise-receiver testing, amplitude equalization, transponder baseline testing, switch matrix tests, and continuous-wave and modulated interference tests. The report also presents the methods used to measure the RF and BER performance of the complete system. Correlations of the RF and BER data are summarized to note the effects of the RF responses on the BER.

  1. The tensile strength properties of CFRPs and GRRPs for Unnes electric car body material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaedi, Muhammad; Sumbodo, Wirawan; Widodo, Rahmat Doni

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes composite materials tensile testing of electric car body material. The UNNES electric car body must be developed using a high strength and lightweight material. A fiber-reinforced plastic composite is widely used for the concerned objective. Selection of the type of composites, variations in fiber orientation, and the number of fiber layers will affect the tensile strength of the material. Composite materials use Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs) and glass-fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRPs) variation to the fiber areal weight, variations in fiber orientation and the number of fiber layers. The CFRPs areal weight consists of 230 gsm and 400 gsm. The GFRPsareal weight consists of 400 gsm and 600 gsm. Fibre orientationsconsist of 0° and 45°. Number of fiber layers consists of one layer and two layers. Various variations were then tested to figure out their tensile to get ultimate tensile strength of materials. Standard test method for tensile test was conducted using ASTM D3039. Tensile specimen geometry used a type of balanced and symmetric fiber orientation, with 25mm in width, 250 mm in length, and 2.5 mm in thickness. The result shows that the more fiber areal weight and the layer number were used, the more its tensile strength would increase, beside it increased the ultimate tensile strength of the material for both glass and carbon fiber with 0o and 45o fiber arientation. Fiber plain wave with 45o has greater tensile strength compared to any other variation.

  2. Tensile behavior of irradiated SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.C.; Steiner, D.; Snead, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    Tensile results are presented for low oxygen Nicalon fibers neutron irradiated at damage levels of 0.013 displacements per atom (dpa), 0.13 dpa and 0.32 dpa. Single fibers were tensile tested and analyzed, using Weibull statistics, for mean strength and distribution. Tensile modulus was also determined. Using a diffractometer, the fiber grain size and percent crystallinity were determined. The mean strength and modulus decreased by 20% but then increased with the highest damage level tested. Both grain size and crystallinity decreased as dose increased. These initial results of low level neutron irradiation of low oxygen Nicalon fibers exhibit no substantial degradation of the properties investigated. Therefore, continued research at higher doses is recommended.

  3. Payload and Components Real-Time Automated Test System (PACRATS), Data Acquisition of Leak Rate and Pressure Data Test Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Maegan L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to provide the Mechanical Components Test Facility (MCTF) with the capability to obtain electronic leak test and proof pressure data, Payload and Components Real-time Automated Test System (PACRATS) data acquisition software will be utilized to display real-time data. It will record leak rates and pressure/vacuum level(s) simultaneously. This added functionality will provide electronic leak test and pressure data at specified sampling frequencies. Electronically stored data will provide ES61 with increased data security, analysis, and accuracy. The tasks performed in this procedure are to verify PACRATS only, and are not intended to provide verifications for MCTF equipment.

  4. An Efficient Implementation of Fixed Failure-Rate Ratio Test for GNSS Ambiguity Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanqing; Verhagen, Sandra; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguity Resolution (AR) plays a vital role in precise GNSS positioning. Correctly-fixed integer ambiguities can significantly improve the positioning solution, while incorrectly-fixed integer ambiguities can bring large positioning errors and, therefore, should be avoided. The ratio test is an extensively used test to validate the fixed integer ambiguities. To choose proper critical values of the ratio test, the Fixed Failure-rate Ratio Test (FFRT) has been proposed, which generates critical values according to user-defined tolerable failure rates. This contribution provides easy-to-implement fitting functions to calculate the critical values. With a massive Monte Carlo simulation, the functions for many different tolerable failure rates are provided, which enriches the choices of critical values for users. Moreover, the fitting functions for the fix rate are also provided, which for the first time allows users to evaluate the conditional success rate, i.e., the success rate once the integer candidates are accepted by FFRT. The superiority of FFRT over the traditional ratio test regarding controlling the failure rate and preventing unnecessary false alarms is shown by a simulation and a real data experiment. In the real data experiment with a baseline of 182.7 km, FFRT achieved much higher fix rates (up to 30% higher) and the same level of positioning accuracy from fixed solutions as compared to the traditional critical value. PMID:27347949

  5. Testing and simulation of a polypropylene-glass fibre reinforced woven composite on a wide range of strain-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A.; Othman, R.; Rozycki, P.

    2012-08-01

    Medium costs composites materials are good candidates to develop lightweight and economical shock absorber for the next generation of cars. In this context we are interested in characterising and modelling of Twintex a long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene. Testing will be carried with a standard tensile rig and an original layout using a crossbow/Hopkinson rig. A special attention is made to compression behaviour identification, often neglected but critical for crash absorber behaviour. The model will be checked on the testing specimen and its validity will be discussed.

  6. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  7. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330 steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-08-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  8. 75 FR 1547 - Alcohol and Drug Testing: Determination of Minimum Random Testing Rates for 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of Determination. SUMMARY: Using data from Management Information System... alcohol program data taken from FRA's Management Information System. Based on this data, the Administrator..., 1994 (59 FR 62218), FRA announced that it will set future minimum random drug and alcohol testing...

  9. Estimating Pesticide Effects on Fecundity Rates of Wild Birds Using Current Laboratory Reproduction Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manuscript reviews the issues concerning the use of results on pesticide effects from laboratory avian reproduction tests for estimating potential impacts of pesticides on fecundity rates in avian population models.

  10. Performance and Abuse Testing of 5 Year Old Low Rate and Medium Rate Lithium Thionyl Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frerker, Rick; Zhang, Wenlin; Jeevarajan, Judith; Bragg, Bobby J.

    2001-01-01

    Most cells survived the 3 amp (A) over-discharge at room temperature for 2 hours. The cell that failed was the LTC-114 after high rate discharge of 500 mA similar to the results of the 1 A over-discharge test. Most cells opened during 0.05 Ohm short circuit test without incident but three LTC-111 cells exploded apparently due to a lack of a thermal cutoff switch. The LTC-114 cells exposed to a hard short of 0.05 Ohms recovered but the LTC-114 cells exposed to a soft short of 1 Ohm did not. This is probably due to the activation of a resetable fuse during a hard short. Fresh cells tend to survive exposure to higher temperatures than cells previously discharged at high rate (1 Amp). LTC-111 cells tend to vent at lower temperatures than the all LTC-114 cells and the LTC-115 cells that were previously discharged at rates exceeding 1 Amp.

  11. Characterization of ovine utero-placental interface tensile failure.

    PubMed

    Klinich, K D; Miller, C S; Hu, J; Samorezov, J E; Pearlman, M D; Schneider, L W; Rupp, J D

    2012-10-01

    Data on the strength of the utero-placental interface (UPI) would help improve understanding of the mechanisms of placental abruption (premature separation of the placenta from the uterus) during motor-vehicle crashes involving pregnant occupants. An ovine model was selected for study because like the human, its placenta has a villous attachment structure. Uteri with intact placentas were obtained from three sheep as by-products of another research study. The samples were harvested between 102 and 119 days of the 145-day gestational period. Rectangular specimens with areas measuring 15 mm × 5 mm were cut through the thickness of the placenta and uterus. Each subject provided eight samples, of which four were tested at a nominal strain rate of 0.10 strains/sec and the remainder was tested at a nominal strain rate of 1.0 strains/sec. Sutures were used to secure the uterine side of the specimens to the test fixture, while mechanical clamps were used to attach the placenta side. A FARO arm scanner recorded the initial geometry of the tissue, and a random dot pattern applied to the placenta and uterus tissue allowed visualization of displacement. For the structure of the UPI, mean tensile failure strain and standard deviations are 0.37 (0.11) and 0.37 (0.18) for the 0.10 and 1.0 strain rates, respectively (p-value = 0.970) while the associated failure stresses are 6.5 (1.37) and 15.0 (5.08) kPa, (p-value = 0.064). The results from sheep UPI testing provide the first estimate of the human UPI structural failure tolerance. PMID:22809672

  12. A miniscale ballistic test motor for propellant burning rate characterization from one motor firing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rast, Robert H.; Boyles, Sharon M.; Obney, Phyllis

    1992-07-01

    A mini ballistic test motor for burn rate characterization from one motor firing has been developed. The small charge weight required for this motor allows ballistic characterization of small scale lot set evaluation and R&D propellant mixes in a rocket motor environment. This paper presents results comparing the mini-motor to the standard Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head (IHDIVNAVSURFWARCEN) ballistic test motor, (BTM). Burn rate data from the standard BTM and mini BTM show excellent agreement.

  13. Space Station Freedom delta pressure leakage rate comparison test data analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E. B.

    1992-01-01

    Results are provided of a series of tests performed to identify the relationship between gas leakage rates across a seal at various internal to external pressure ratios. The results complement and provide insight into the analysis technique used to obtain the results presented in MSFC SSF/DEV/EL91-008, 'Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) Seal Flaw Study with Delta Pressure Leak Rate Comparison Test Report.'

  14. Leak rate measurements for satellite subsystems and residual gas analysis during space environment tests. [thermal vacuum and solar simulation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The measuring and evaluation procedure for the determination of leak rates of satellite subsystems with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and the results of the residual gas analysis are described. The method selected for leak rate determination was placing the system into a vacuum chamber and furnishing the chamber with a mass spectrometer and calibrated leaks. The residual gas of a thermal vacuum test facility, in which the thermal balance test radiation input was simulated by a heated canister, was analyzed with the mass spectrometer in the atomic mass unit range up to 300 amu. In addition to the measurements during the space environment tests, mass spectrometric studies were performed with samples of spacecraft materials. The studies were carried out during tests for the projects HELIOS, AEROS B and SYMPHONIE.

  15. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil.

    PubMed

    Hinchee, R E; Ong, S K

    1992-10-01

    An in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O2) and production of carbon dioxide (CO2) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O2/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O2 utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO2 production. CO2 produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions. PMID:1418936

  16. A Bayesian hierarchical model with novel prior specifications for estimating HIV testing rates.

    PubMed

    An, Qian; Kang, Jian; Song, Ruiguang; Hall, H Irene

    2016-04-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a severe infectious disease actively spreading globally, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an advanced stage of HIV infection. The HIV testing rate, that is, the probability that an AIDS-free HIV infected person seeks a test for HIV during a particular time interval, given no previous positive test has been obtained prior to the start of the time, is an important parameter for public health. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian hierarchical model with two levels of hierarchy to estimate the HIV testing rate using annual AIDS and AIDS-free HIV diagnoses data. At level one, we model the latent number of HIV infections for each year using a Poisson distribution with the intensity parameter representing the HIV incidence rate. At level two, the annual numbers of AIDS and AIDS-free HIV diagnosed cases and all undiagnosed cases stratified by the HIV infections at different years are modeled using a multinomial distribution with parameters including the HIV testing rate. We propose a new class of priors for the HIV incidence rate and HIV testing rate taking into account the temporal dependence of these parameters to improve the estimation accuracy. We develop an efficient posterior computation algorithm based on the adaptive rejection metropolis sampling technique. We demonstrate our model using simulation studies and the analysis of the national HIV surveillance data in the USA. PMID:26567891

  17. A Bayesian hierarchical model with novel prior specifications for estimating HIV testing rates

    PubMed Central

    An, Qian; Kang, Jian; Song, Ruiguang; Hall, H. Irene

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a severe infectious disease actively spreading globally, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an advanced stage of HIV infection. The HIV testing rate, that is, the probability that an AIDS-free HIV infected person seeks a test for HIV during a particular time interval, given no previous positive test has been obtained prior to the start of the time, is an important parameter for public health. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian hierarchical model with two levels of hierarchy to estimate the HIV testing rate using annual AIDS and AIDS-free HIV diagnoses data. At level one, we model the latent number of HIV infections for each year using a Poisson distribution with the intensity parameter representing the HIV incidence rate. At level two, the annual numbers of AIDS and AIDS-free HIV diagnosed cases and all undiagnosed cases stratified by the HIV infections at different years are modeled using a multinomial distribution with parameters including the HIV testing rate. We propose a new class of priors for the HIV incidence rate and HIV testing rate taking into account the temporal dependence of these parameters to improve the estimation accuracy. We develop an efficient posterior computation algorithm based on the adaptive rejection metropolis sampling technique. We demonstrate our model using simulation studies and the analysis of the national HIV surveillance data in the USA. PMID:26567891

  18. Estimating base rates of impairment in neuropsychological test batteries: a comparison of quantitative models.

    PubMed

    Decker, Scott L; Schneider, W Joel; Hale, James B

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychologists frequently rely on a battery of neuropsychological tests which are normally distributed to determine impaired functioning. The statistical likelihood of Type I error in clinical decision-making is in part determined by the base rate of normative individuals obtaining atypical performance on neuropsychological tests. Base rates are most accurately obtained by co-normed measures, but this is rarely accomplished in neuropsychological testing. Several statistical methods have been proposed to estimate base rates for tests that are not co-normed. This study compared two statistical approaches (binomial and Monte Carlo models) used to estimate the base rates for flexible test batteries. The two approaches were compared against empirically derived base rates for a multitest co-normed battery of cognitive measures. Estimates were compared across a variety of conditions including age and different α levels (N =3,356). Monte Carlo R(2) estimates ranged from .980 to .997 across five different age groups, indicating a good fit. In contrast, the binomial model fit estimates ranged from 0.387 to 0.646. Results confirm that the binomial model is insufficient for estimating base rates because it does not take into account correlations among measures in a multitest battery. Although the Monte Carlo model produced more accurate results, minor biases occurred that are likely due to skewess and kurtosis of test variables. Implications for future research and applied practice are discussed. PMID:22172567

  19. Tensile strength of cementitious materials under triaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Shuji

    1998-11-01

    A general tension-compression-compression (sigmasb1, sigmasb2=sigmasb3) failure criterion for brittle materials is mathematically developed using FEM analysis and experimentally verified by use of the cementitious composite axial tensile test (CCATT). This tensile failure criterion is based on the stress concentration derived from the classical theory of elasticity. This analytical approach shows the upper bound of the tension-compression-compression failure surface for brittle materials. Since the CCATT applies confining hydraulic pressure, a tensile specimen is subjected to triaxial loading defined by the principal stress ratio sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|. When lateral pressure increases, tensile strength decreases; therefore, stress concentration is defined as a function of the principal stress ratio. The model has three distinct regions of behavior corresponding to the principal stress ratio, 0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<0.9 (high-lateral pressure), 0.9≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<3.0 (medium-lateral pressure), 3.0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2| (low-lateral pressure). The experimental failure line shows true tensile strength of cementitious materials under low-lateral pressure. The predicted nominal stress fsb{ta} with large size specimens for the CCATT is written as$fsb{ta}=gamma*{1/{Kt}}*alpha* pwhere gamma$ is the size effect obtained by experimental results; Kt is the stress concentration factor derived from triaxial loading. Tensile strength values from the CCATT are compared to experimental results from other tests such as the uniaxial tensile test and the split cylinder test. CCATT results are analyzed using Weibull theory to measure material reliability and to develop characteristic stresses for construction design. Failure analysis using fractography was conducted on fractured cementitious materials and composites. The failure analysis on test specimens correlated well with FEM stress distributions and with the principal stress ratio. The observed fracture behavior (fracture

  20. Calorimeter measures high nuclear heating rates and their gradients across a reactor test hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burwell, D.; Coombe, J. R.; Mc Bride, J.

    1970-01-01

    Pedestal-type calorimeter measures gamma-ray heating rates from 0.5 to 7.0 watts per gram of aluminum. Nuclear heating rate is a function of cylinder temperature change, measured by four chromel-alumel thermocouples attached to the calorimeter, and known thermoconductivity of the tested material.

  1. 12 CFR 228.21 - Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance tests, standards, and ratings, in general. 228.21 Section 228.21 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT (REGULATION BB) Standards for Assessing Performance § 228.21 Performance tests, standards,...

  2. An Analysis of Teachers' Rating Scales as Sources of Evidence for a Standardised Greek Reading Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triga, Anastassia

    2004-01-01

    Until recently there has been no nationally acceptable test for assessing reading for the higher grades (Five and Six) of the elementary schools in Greece. As part of an effort to validate such a test, evidence was gathered from teachers' rating scales. Seventy-two teachers from Fifth and Sixth Grades all over Greece evaluated their 1377 students'…

  3. TEST METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS AND DEPOSITION RATES IN A RESEARCH HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses test methods to characterize particulate matter (PM) emissions and deposition rates in a research house. In a room in the research house, specially configured for PM source testing, a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered air supply system, used for...

  4. Relative User Ratings of MMPI-2 Computer-Based Test Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John E.; Weed, Nathan C.

    2004-01-01

    There are eight commercially available computer-based test interpretations (CBTIs) for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), of which few have been empirically evaluated. Prospective users of these programs have little scientific data to guide choice of a program. This study compared ratings of these eight CBTIs. Test users…

  5. Multiengine Airplane Class and Type Ratings: Flight Test Guide (Part 61 Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    The flight test guide has been prepared to assist the applicant and his instructor in preparing for a Multiengine Airplane Class or Type Rating. It contains information and guidance concerning the pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight tests: preflight operations, airport operations, takeoffs and landings, flight at…

  6. 78 FR 41129 - Market Test of Experimental Product - International Merchandise Return Service-Non-Published Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Market Test of Experimental Product -- International Merchandise Return Service--Non-Published Rates AGENCY: U.S. Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Postal Service hereby gives notice of a market test...

  7. Phase 2 testing and evaluation of low data rate voice CODEC equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehel, Thomas; Grable, Marcus; Child, Joseph

    1989-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is currently evaluating low rate voice digitizing coder/decoder (CODEC's) for use with the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Service (AMSS). Phase 2 of this evaluation consisted of air traffic control (ATC) personnel participating in an objective intelligibility test of several CODEC's under operational conditions. The results of the testing show that the intelligibility of the low rate 4.8 kilobits per second (kbps) CODEC's is essentially equivalent to the intelligibility of the 9.6 kbps CODEC. The results also show that the 4.8 kbps CODEC's can operate with high intelligibility under conditions of high bit error rates and operational background noise.

  8. Tensile Properties of GRCop-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Loewenthal, William S.; Yun, Hee-Man

    2012-01-01

    This is a chapter in the final report on GRCop-84 for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Second Generation/Project Constellation Program. It contains information on the tensile properties of GRCop-84. GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) was produced by extrusion and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing). Some of the extrusions were rolled to plate and sheet while other extrusions were drawn into tubing. The material was further subjected to various heat treatments corresponding to annealing, anticipated typical brazing conditions, an end-of-life condition and various elevated temperature exposures to attempt to improve creep resistance. As anticipated, cold work increased strength while decreasing ductility. Annealing at 600 C (1112 F) and higher temperatures was effective. An exposure for 100 h at 500 C (932 F) resulted in an increase in strength rather than the anticipated decrease. High temperature simulated-braze cycles and thermal exposures lowered the strength of GRCop-84, but the deceases were small compared to precipitation strengthened copper alloys. It was observed that the excess Cr could form large precipitates that lower the reduction in area though it appears a minimum amount is required. Overall, GRCop-84 exhibits good stability of its tensile properties, which makes it an excellent candidate for rocket engine liners and many other high temperature applications.

  9. [*C]octanoic acid breath test to measure gastric emptying rate of solids.

    PubMed

    Maes, B D; Ghoos, Y F; Rutgeerts, P J; Hiele, M I; Geypens, B; Vantrappen, G

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a breath test to measure solid gastric emptying using a standardized scrambled egg test meal (250 kcal) labeled with [14C]octanoic acid or [13C]octanoic acid. In vitro incubation studies showed that octanoic acid is a reliable marker of the solid phase. The breath test was validated in 36 subjects by simultaneous radioscintigraphic and breath test measurements. Nine healthy volunteers were studied after intravenous administration of 200 mg erythromycin and peroral administration of 30 mg propantheline, respectively. Erythromycin significantly enhanced gastric emptying, while propantheline significantly reduced gastric emptying rates. We conclude that the [*C]octanoic breath test is a promising and reliable test for measuring the gastric emptying rate of solids. PMID:7995200

  10. Sediment bioaccumulation test with Lumbriculus variegatus (EPA test method 100.3) effects of feeding and organism loading rate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation test methodology of USEPA and ASTM in 2000 specifies that the Lumbriculus variegatus should not be fed during the 28-day exposure and recommends an organism loading rate of total organic carbon in sediment to organism dry weight of no less than 50:1. It ...

  11. Tensile Properties and Integrity of Clean Room and Low-Modulus Disposable Nitrile Gloves: A Comparison of Two Dissimilar Glove Types

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, Robert N.; Wong, Weng kee

    2012-01-01

    Background: The selection of disposable nitrile exam gloves is complicated by (i) the availability of several types or formulations, (ii) product variability, and (iii) an inability of common quality control tests to detect small holes in the fingers. Differences in polymer formulation (e.g. filler and plasticizer/oil content) and tensile properties are expected to account for much of the observed variability in performance. Objectives: This study evaluated the tensile properties and integrity (leak failure rates) of two glove choices assumed to contain different amounts of plasticizers/oils. The primary aims were to determine if the tensile properties and integrity differed and if associations existed among these factors. Additional physical and chemical properties were evaluated. Methods: Six clean room and five low-modulus products were evaluated using the American Society for Testing and Materials Method D412 and a modified water-leak test to detect holes capable of passing a virus or chemical agent. Results: Significant differences in the leak failure rates and tensile properties existed between the two glove types (P ≤ 0.05). The clean room gloves were about three times more likely to have leak failures (chi-square; P = 0.001). No correlation was observed between leak failures and tensile properties. Solvent extract, an indication of added plasticizer/oil, was not associated with leak failures. However, gloves with a maximum modulus <4 MPa or area density (AD) <11 g cm−2 were about four times less likely to leak. Conclusions: On average, the low-modulus gloves were a better choice for protection against aqueous chemical or biological penetration. The observed variability between glove products indicated that glove selection cannot rely solely on glove type or manufacturer labeling. Measures of modulus and AD may aid in the selection process, in contrast with common measures of tensile strength and elongation at break. PMID:22201179

  12. Skin testing and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in women undergoing breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lane, R; Ungerer, J; Bernene, J; Askenase, P

    The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of skin testing and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as measures of immune function in a population undergoing stress. Eight women were tested one week prior to breast biopsy and six were retested at least four weeks later. All biopsies were negative for malignancy. Control subjects were also tested four weeks apart. ESR values were elevated with stress but the magnitude of this effect was small. There were no differences between groups in skin test responses. Skin testing and ESR may have limited usefulness in the study of immune function in populations under stress. PMID:6885263

  13. Ideal tensile strength of B2 transition-metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianshu; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2004-08-01

    The ideal tensile strengths of the B2 -type (CsCl) transition-metal aluminides FeAl , CoAl , and NiAl have been investigated using an ab initio electronic structure total energy method. The three materials exhibit dissimilar mechanical behaviors under the simulated ideal tensile tests along [001], [110], and [111] directions. FeAl is weakest in tension along [001] whereas CoAl and NiAl are strongest in the same direction. The weakness of FeAl along [001] direction is attributed to the instability introduced by the filling of antibonding d states.

  14. Tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.; Schmidt, E. H.

    1969-01-01

    Tests to determine the tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures show that the alloy increases in strength at low temperatures, with very little change in toughness. The effect of surface finish and grain size on the fatigue properties was also determined.

  15. Tensile and creep data on type 316 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V. K.; Booker, B. L.P.; Booker, M. K.; McEnerney, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes tensile and creep data on 13 heats of type 316 stainless steel. It includes ten different product forms (three plates, four pipes, and three bars) of the reference heat tested at ORNL. Tensile data are presented in tabular form and analyzed as a function of temperature by the heat centering method. This method yielded a measure of variations within a single heat as well as among different heats. The upper and lower scatter bands developed by this method were wider at the lower temperatures than at the high temperatures (for strength properties), a trend reflected by the experimental data. The creep data on both unaged and aged specimens are presented in tabular form along with creep curves for each test. The rupture time data are compared with the ASME Code Case minimum curve at each test temperature in the range from 538 to 704{sup 0}C. The experimental rupture time data are also compared with the values predicted by using the rupture model based on elevated-temperature ultimate tensile strength. A creep ductility trend curve was developed on the basis of the reference heat data and those published in the literature on nitrogen effects. To characterize the data fully, information was also supplied on vendor, product form, fabrication method, material condition (mill-annealed vs laboratory annealed and aged), grain size, and chemical composition for various heats. Test procedures used for tensile and creep results are also discussed.

  16. Static and fatigue interlaminar tensile characterization of laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Koudela, K.L.; Strait, L.H.; Caiazzo, A.A.; Gipple, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    Spool and curved-beam specimens were evaluated to determine the viability of using either one or both of these configurations to characterize the static and fatigue interlaminar tensile behavior of carbon/epoxy laminates. Unidirectional curved-beam and quasi-isotropic spool specimens were fabricated, nondestructively inspected, and statically tested to failure. Tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted at 10 Hz and an R-ratio ({sigma}{sub min}/{sigma}{sub max}) equal to 0.1 for each specimen configuration. The interlaminar tensile strength of the spool specimen was 12% larger than the strength obtained using curved-beam specimens. In addition, data scatter associated with spool specimens was significantly less than the scatter associated with curved-beam specimens. The difference in data scatter was attributed to the influence of the fabrication process on the quality of the laminates tested. The fatigue limit at 0{sup 7} cycles for both specimen types was shown to be at least 40% of the average interlaminar tensile strength. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that either the spool or the curved-beam specimens can be used to characterize the interlaminar tensile static and fatigue behavior of carbon/epoxy laminates. However, to obtain the most representative results, the test specimen configuration should be selected so that the specimen fabrication process closely simulates the actual component fabrication process.

  17. Bit error rate testing of fiber optic data links for MMIC-based phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Kunath, R. R.; Daryoush, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The measured bit-error-rate (BER) performance of a fiber optic data link to be used in satellite communications systems is presented and discussed. In the testing, the link was measured for its ability to carry high burst rate, serial-minimum shift keyed (SMSK) digital data similar to those used in actual space communications systems. The fiber optic data link, as part of a dual-segment injection-locked RF fiber optic link system, offers a means to distribute these signals to the many radiating elements of a phased array antenna. Test procedures, experimental arrangements, and test results are presented.

  18. Cryogenic Temperature-Gradient Foam/Substrate Tensile Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailhe, Christophe

    2003-01-01

    The figure shows a fixture for measuring the tensile strength of the bond between an aluminum substrate and a thermally insulating polymeric foam. The specimen is meant to be representative of insulating foam on an aluminum tank that holds a cryogenic liquid. Prior to the development of this fixture, tensile tests of this type were performed on foam/substrate specimens immersed in cryogenic fluids. Because the specimens were cooled to cryogenic temperatures throughout their thicknesses, they tended to become brittle and to fracture at loads below true bond tensile strengths. The present fixture is equipped to provide a thermal gradient from cryogenic temperature at the foam/substrate interface to room temperature on the opposite foam surface. The fixture includes an upper aluminum block at room temperature and a lower aluminum block cooled to -423 F (approx. -253 C) by use of liquid helium. In preparation for a test, the metal outer surface (the lower surface) of a foam/substrate specimen is bonded to the lower block and the foam outer surface (the upper surface) of the specimen is bonded to the upper block. In comparison with the through-the-thickness cooling of immersion testing, the cryogenic-to-room-temperature thermal gradient that exists during testing on this fixture is a more realistic approximation of the operational thermal condition of sprayed insulating foam on a tank of cryogenic liquid. Hence, tensile tests performed on this fixture provide more accurate indications of operational bond tensile strengths. In addition, the introduction of the present fixture reduces the cost of testing by reducing the amount of cryogenic liquid consumed and the time needed to cool a specimen.

  19. Effect of banana on cold stress test & peak expiratory flow rate in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, C; Bairy, K L; Rao, N M; Udupa, E G

    1999-07-01

    The effect of banana on cold stress induced hypertension, peak expiratory flow rate and plasma ACE activity in healthy human volunteers was tested. Systolic blood pressure (P < 0.005), diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.025) and mean arterial blood pressure (P < 0.005) were significantly decreased during cold stress after banana treatment compared to controls subjected to cold stress. There was no significant changes in heart rate and peak expiratory flow rate but only significant decrease in plasma ACE activity after banana treatment. Banana decreased the rise of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure in healthy volunteers subjected to cold stress test without much effect on heart rate and peak expiratory flow rate. PMID:10709336

  20. Comparison of bridge load rating based on analytical and field testing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chun S.; Shahawy, Mohsen A.; El-Saad, Adnan

    1999-02-01

    Unit H4 of the ACOSTA bridge in Jacksonville, Florida is composed of steel with a composite concrete deck. The bridge, designed for AASHTO HS20 loading, was built in 1993 on a horizontal curve. However it was later discovered that the designer neglected to consider the effect of curvature in the original design. Considering the effect of curvature in the analytical load rating resulted in load rating of HS4. To resolve the concerns about the low load rating of this essentially new bridge and to establish the actual load capacity, field load testing was conducted in 1996. Critical sections along the span were instrumented with strain and deflection gauges. The bridge was incrementally loaded and all measurements were recorded at each load step. The results were used to study the behavior of the bridge. The field test results combined with analysis resulted in a higher load rating than the original analytical rating considering curvature effect.