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Sample records for rate turn point

  1. Identification and agreement of first turn point by mathematical analysis applied to heart rate, carbon dioxide output and electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Zamunér, Antonio R.; Catai, Aparecida M.; Martins, Luiz E. B.; Sakabe, Daniel I.; Silva, Ester Da

    2013-01-01

    Background The second heart rate (HR) turn point has been extensively studied, however there are few studies determining the first HR turn point. Also, the use of mathematical and statistical models for determining changes in dynamic characteristics of physiological variables during an incremental cardiopulmonary test has been suggested. Objectives To determine the first turn point by analysis of HR, surface electromyography (sEMG), and carbon dioxide output () using two mathematical models and to compare the results to those of the visual method. Method Ten sedentary middle-aged men (53.9±3.2 years old) were submitted to cardiopulmonary exercise testing on an electromagnetic cycle ergometer until exhaustion. Ventilatory variables, HR, and sEMG of the vastus lateralis were obtained in real time. Three methods were used to determine the first turn point: 1) visual analysis based on loss of parallelism between and oxygen uptake (); 2) the linear-linear model, based on fitting the curves to the set of data (Lin-Lin ); 3) a bi-segmental linear regression of Hinkley' s algorithm applied to HR (HMM-HR), (HMM- ), and sEMG data (HMM-RMS). Results There were no differences between workload, HR, and ventilatory variable values at the first ventilatory turn point as determined by the five studied parameters (p>0.05). The Bland-Altman plot showed an even distribution of the visual analysis method with Lin-Lin , HMM-HR, HMM-CO2, and HMM-RMS. Conclusion The proposed mathematical models were effective in determining the first turn point since they detected the linear pattern change and the deflection point of , HR responses, and sEMG. PMID:24346296

  2. Turning Points: Opportunity or Trouble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Anthony W.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews recommendations of the Carnegie report "Turning Points: Preparing American Youth for the 21st Century" with respect to the internal restructuring of middle schools and ways of integrating community and parental support. Discusses suggestions concerning small learning communities, core academic programs, ensuring student success, expert…

  3. Turning points in reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems.

  4. Market turning points forecasting using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Limiao; Yan, Sen; Zheng, Xiaolian; Chen, Ben M.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the system adaptation framework we previously proposed, a frequency domain based model is developed in this paper to forecast the major turning points of stock markets. This system adaptation framework has its internal model and adaptive filter to capture the slow and fast dynamics of the market, respectively. The residue of the internal model is found to contain rich information about the market cycles. In order to extract and restore its informative frequency components, we use wavelet multi-resolution analysis with time-varying parameters to decompose this internal residue. An empirical index is then proposed based on the recovered signals to forecast the market turning points. This index is successfully applied to US, UK and China markets, where all major turning points are well forecasted.

  5. A Turning Point for Inner-City Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Jeremy; Daughtry, Jody; Wise, Donald

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe McLane High School's Turning Points Academy (TPA), a revolutionary program which was created to counter the low graduation rates and even lower college attendance rates at McLane (Fresno, California). TPA, which began in 1994, is a small learning community that each spring brings 145 McLane sophomores to the…

  6. Single Point Diamond Turning of Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blough, Christian Gary

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of single point diamond turning optical quality glass surfaces has been experimentally studied. The main objective of the research is to study the ductile removal process of glass and identify the important parameters. By investigating several optical glasses and varying different machining variables, a matrix of the important parameters has been generated. A precision lathe capable of ductile machining glass has been assembled by adding a nano-positioning toolholder to an existing machine. The toolholder enables the structural loop between the tool and workpiece to be effectively closed. Using a proximity sensor and analog electronics, a feedback loop has been constructed that increases the rigidity, thermal stability, and tool positioning accuracy of the existing machine. With the closed loop system, the tool positioning resolution is 15 nm and the effective structural loop stiffness is 1.75 times 10^3 N/mum. The closed loop system has been verified by machining a circular grating in germanium to within 3 nm of its theoretical form. The ductile machining of glass was limited by one key variable, tool edge wear. For every glass investigated, except FCD1, there was nearly instantaneous catastrophic loss of the cutting edge due to oxidation and/or graphitization of the diamond.

  7. Turning Points: Priorities for Teacher Education in a Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Rosalie M.

    2009-01-01

    Every generation has its moment, some turning point that will mark its place in the historical record. Such points provide the direction of our history and our future. Turning points are, characteristically, times of turmoil based on a fundamental change in models or events--what Thomas Kuhn called a "paradigm shift." In terms of a democratic…

  8. Understanding Learning: Assessment in the Turning Points School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Collaborative Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Turning Points helps middle schools create challenging, caring, and equitable learning communities that meet the needs of young adolescents as they reach the "turning point" between childhood and adulthood. Based on more than a decade of research and experience, this comprehensive school reform model focuses on improving student learning through…

  9. Turning Points in the Development of Classical Musicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabor, Elena

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the vocational socialization turning points in families of classical musicians. I sampled and interviewed 20 parent-child dyads, for a total of 46 interviews. Data analysis revealed that classical musicians' experiences were marked by 11 turning points that affected their identification with the occupation:…

  10. 18. SOUTHERNMOST ARCH TOP AND BUTTRESS, AT TURNING POINT WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. SOUTHERNMOST ARCH TOP AND BUTTRESS, AT TURNING POINT WHERE THE EARTHEN EMBANKMENT MEETS THE CONCRETE ARCH DAM. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rock Creek Dam, East end of Rock Creek Road, Auburn, Placer County, CA

  11. Turning points in long distance grandparent-grandchild relationships.

    PubMed

    Bangerter, Lauren R; Waldron, Vincent R

    2014-04-01

    This study examines changes in long-distance relationships between grandparents and their adolescent grandchildren by identifying relational turning points and trajectories. Qualitative analysis of data collected from interviews with grandparents yielded 100 unique turning points. Constant comparative analysis revealed eight distinct categories of relational turning points; Spending Time Together, Family Relational Dynamics, Geographic Distance, Lack of Relational Investment, Use of Technology, Relational Investment, Lack of Free Time, and Grandchild Gaining Independence. These varied in the degree to which they positively or negatively impacted relational closeness. Application of the Retrospective Interview Technique (RIT) yielded five distinctive relational trajectories: Decrease in Closeness, Increase in Closeness, Multidimensional Changes in Closeness, Minimal Changes in Closeness, and Consistent Relational Closeness. The results expose the communicative challenges faced by long-distance-grandparents, the diversity of these relationships, and the ways in which grandparenting bonds change over time. Implications for an enriched understanding of grandparenting relationships and practical applications for families are explored. PMID:24655676

  12. Singular perturbations and vanishing passage through a turning point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Maesschalck, P.; Dumortier, F.

    The paper deals with planar slow-fast cycles containing a unique generic turning point. We address the question on how to study canard cycles when the slow dynamics can be singular at the turning point. We more precisely accept a generic saddle-node bifurcation to pass through the turning point. It reveals that in this case the slow divergence integral is no longer the good tool to use, but its derivative with respect to the layer variable still is. We provide general results as well as a number of applications. We show how to treat the open problems presented in Artés et al. (2009) [1] and Dumortier and Rousseau (2009) [13], dealing respectively with the graphics DI2a and DF1a from Dumortier et al. (1994) [14].

  13. The turning point in the number of traffic fatalities: two hypotheses about changes in underlying trends.

    PubMed

    Brüde, Ulf; Elvik, Rune

    2015-01-01

    The number of traffic fatalities reached a peak in many highly motorised countries around 1970. Some previous studies have suggested that the turning point in the number of traffic fatalities was inevitable and did not reflect a change in the underlying trends influencing the number of traffic fatalities. Other studies suggest that trends in traffic growth and fatality rate changed from before to after the turning point. This paper proposes two hypotheses about the turning point in the number of traffic fatalities. One hypothesis is that the long-term trends in traffic growth and fatality rate were the same before and after the turning point. The other hypothesis is that the long-term trends in traffic growth and fatality rate were different before and after the turning point was reached, in particular that the annual percentage decline in fatality rate became greater after the turning point than before. Such a change would suggest that road safety policy became more effective. Analysis of data for six countries (Denmark, Great Britain, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, United States) lends stronger support to the latter hypothesis than to the former. The lesson for policy makers, in particular in countries where the number of traffic fatalities is still growing, is that they should not expect a turning point to be reached without policy interventions. PMID:25463945

  14. Turning Points: Ideas in Books Affecting American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    Ideas in ten books which marked turning points in American educational directions are analyzed. William H. McGuffey's "Readers" (1836-44) set the moral and inspirational tone that still exists in American education, though now lessened and mainly in small-town America. "Medical Education in the United States and Canada" (Flexner, 1910) reflected…

  15. Turning Points of the Spherical Pendulum and the Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essen, Hanno; Apazidis, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We study the turning point problem of a spherical pendulum. The special cases of the simple pendulum and the conical pendulum are noted. For simple initial conditions the solution to this problem involves the golden ratio, also called the golden section, or the golden number. This number often appears in mathematics where you least expect it. To…

  16. Turning points in twentieth-century American psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Sabshin, M

    1990-10-01

    The author examines four major turning points in twentieth-century American psychiatry, emphasizing the movement during the post-World War II period toward a psychotherapeutic/psychoanalytic approach and the emergence of biological psychiatry, neuroscience, and logical positivism during the 1970s and 1980s. He discusses the impact of Adolf Meyer during the mid-twentieth century and his ongoing influence. The final turning point involves a prediction of a late twentieth-century change, including new directions in nosology, emphasis on combined pharmacotherapeutic/psychotherapeutic treatments, efforts to create alternatives to full inpatient care, better outcome data for psychiatric treatments, and beginning resolution of major boundary problems of current practice. PMID:2205113

  17. MC Energy Matters (formally Turning Point): January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-28

    The January 1999 issue of Energy Matters (formerly Turning Point) focuses on utility deregulation and restructuring and the implications for industry. An article describes how the Northeast Premium Efficiency Motor Initiative plans to increase the availability of premium efficiency motors. A case study reveals how General Motors achieved energy and cost savings by installing an energy-efficient water booster pumping system as part of a facility renovation.

  18. Changes in the upper turning point due to magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Rekha; Hindman, Bradley W.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1995-01-01

    It was observed that the p-mode power is substantially suppressed in magnetic regions. One possible explanation is that the upper turning point, the acoustic cut-off point of the solar p-modes is lowered in the presence of a magnetic field. A related possibility is that the attenuation length scale in the evanescent region is reduced in the presence of a magnetic field. It is likely that the observations sample a different position in the evanescent tails of the eigenfunctions in magnetic regions because of different temperature structures in these regions. A model is used to quantify the first of these effects.

  19. Turning points for perpetrators of intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Kathleen A; Thakor, Sumaiya; Stewart, Donna E

    2012-01-01

    Understanding why and how perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV) change their behavior is an important goal for both policy development and clinical practice. In this study, the authors investigated the concept of "turning points" for perpetrators of IPV by conducting a systematic review of qualitative studies that investigated the factors, situations, and attitudes that facilitated perpetrators' decisions to change their abusive behavior. Two literature databases were searched and six studies were found that met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. Most included participants from batterer intervention programs (BIPs). The data indicate that community, group, and individual processes all contribute to perpetrators' turning points and behavioral change. These include identifying key incidents that precede change, taking responsibility for past behavior, learning new skills, and developing relationships within and outside of the BIP. By using a qualitative systematic review, the authors were able to generate a more complete understanding of the catalysts for and process of change in these individuals. Further research, combining quantitative and qualitative approaches, will be helpful in the modification of existing BIPs and the development of new interventions to reduce IPV. PMID:22096016

  20. Nonlinear rheology of entangled polymers at turning point.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Qing

    2015-02-28

    Thanks to extensive observations of strain localization upon startup or after stepwise shear, a conceptual framework for nonlinear rheology of entangled polymers appears to have emerged that has led to discovery of many new phenomena, which were not previously predicted by the standard tube model. On the other hand, the published theoretical and experimental attempts to test the limits of the tube model have largely demonstrated that the most experimental data appear consistent with the tube-model based theoretical calculations. Therefore, the field of nonlinear rheology of entangled polymers is at a turning point and is thus a rather crucial area in which further examinations are needed. In particular, more molecular dynamics simulations are needed to delineate the detailed molecular mechanisms for the various nonlinear rheological phenomena. PMID:25606850

  1. Searching for intellectual turning points: Progressive knowledge domain visualization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chaomei

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces a previously undescribed method progressively visualizing the evolution of a knowledge domain's cocitation network. The method first derives a sequence of cocitation networks from a series of equal-length time interval slices. These time-registered networks are merged and visualized in a panoramic view in such a way that intellectually significant articles can be identified based on their visually salient features. The method is applied to a cocitation study of the superstring field in theoretical physics. The study focuses on the search of articles that triggered two superstring revolutions. Visually salient nodes in the panoramic view are identified, and the nature of their intellectual contributions is validated by leading scientists in the field. The analysis has demonstrated that a search for intellectual turning points can be narrowed down to visually salient nodes in the visualized network. The method provides a promising way to simplify otherwise cognitively demanding tasks to a search for landmarks, pivots, and hubs. PMID:14724295

  2. Using Modification Indexes to Detect Turning Points in Longitudinal Data: A Monte Carlo Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Oi-Man; Luo, Wen; West, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Some nonlinear developmental phenomena can be represented by using a simple piecewise procedure in which 2 linear growth models are joined at a single knot. The major problem of using this piecewise approach is that researchers have to optimally locate the knot (or turning point) where the change in the growth rate occurs. A relatively simple way…

  3. "Everything Changed": Relational Turning Point Events in College Teacher-Student Relationships from Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docan-Morgan, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate college teachers' experiences of relational turning points with their students, as well as how these turning point events may affect teacher outcomes. Teachers who were able to identify a relational turning point event with a student (n=306, 78.5% of the overall sample) completed open- and closed-ended…

  4. 77 FR 4989 - Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Availability of an Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Rural Utilities Service Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Availability of an Environmental Assessment... proposal by Turning Point Solar LCC (TPS). The proposal consists of constructing a 49.9 megawatt (MW) ground- mounted solar photovoltaic generating facility in Noble County, Ohio. Turning Point Solar LLC...

  5. 77 FR 25131 - Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Finding of No Significant Impact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... Rural Utilities Service Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY... Assessment (EA) associated with a solar generation project. The EA was prepared in accordance with the... associated with a potential loan or loan guarantee to Turning Point Solar LLC (Turning Point Solar) for...

  6. Influence of acute normobaric hypoxia on physiological variables and lactate turn point determination in trained men.

    PubMed

    Ofner, Michael; Wonisch, Manfred; Frei, Mario; Tschakert, Gerhard; Domej, Wolfgang; Kröpfl, Julia M; Hofmann, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the response of physiological variables to acute normobaric hypoxia compared to normoxia and its influence on the lactate turn point determination according to the three-phase model of energy supply (Phase I: metabolically balanced at muscular level; Phase II: metabolically balanced at systemic level; Phase III: not metabolically balanced) during maximal incremental exercise. Ten physically active (VO2max 3.9 [0.49] l·min(-1)), healthy men (mean age [SD]: 25.3 [4.6] yrs.), participated in the study. All participants performed two maximal cycle ergometric exercise tests under normoxic as well as hypoxic conditions (FiO2 = 14%). Blood lactate concentration, heart rate, gas exchange data, and power output at maximum and the first and the second lactate turn point (LTP1, LTP2), the heart rate turn point (HRTP) and the first and the second ventilatory turn point (VETP1, VETP2) were determined. Since in normobaric hypoxia absolute power output (P) was reduced at all reference points (max: 314 / 274 W; LTP2: 218 / 184 W; LTP1: 110 / 96 W), as well as VO2max (max: 3.90 / 3.23 l·min(-1); LTP2: 2.90 / 2.43 l·min(-1); LTP1: 1.66 / 1.52 l·min(-1)), percentages of Pmax at LTP1, LTP2, HRTP and VETP1, VETP2 were almost identical for hypoxic as well as normoxic conditions. Heart rate was significantly reduced at Pmax in hypoxia (max: 190 / 185 bpm), but no significant differences were found at submaximal control points. Blood lactate concentration was not different at maximum, and all reference points in both conditions. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER) (max: 1.28 / 1.08; LTP2: 1.13 / 0.98) and ventilatory equivalents for O2 (max: 43.4 / 34.0; LTP2: 32.1 / 25.4) and CO2 (max: 34.1 / 31.6; LTP2: 29.1 / 26.1) were significantly higher at some reference points in hypoxia. Significant correlations were found between LTP1 and VETP1 (r = 0.778; p < 0.01), LTP2 and HRTP (r = 0.828; p < 0.01) and VETP2 (r = 0.948; p < 0.01) for power output for

  7. Experimental design for single point diamond turning of silicon optics

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D.A.

    1996-06-16

    The goal of these experiments is to determine optimum cutting factors for the machining of silicon optics. This report describes experimental design, a systematic method of selecting optimal settings for a limited set of experiments, and its use in the silcon-optics turning experiments. 1 fig., 11 tabs.

  8. Turning Rate Dynamics of Zebrafish Exposed to Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice in alcohol-related pharmacological studies. In these studies, zebrafish are often exposed to acute ethanol treatments and their activity scored during behavioral assays. Computational modeling of zebrafish behavior is expected to positively impact these efforts by offering a predictive toolbox to plan hypothesis-driven studies, reduce the number of subjects, perform pilot trials, and refine behavioral screening. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the recently proposed jump persistent turning walker to model the turning rate dynamics of zebrafish exposed to acute ethanol administration. This modeling framework is based on a stochastic mean reverting jump process to capture the sudden and large changes in orientation of swimming zebrafish. The model is calibrated on an available experimental dataset of 40 subjects, tested at different ethanol concentrations. We demonstrate that model parameters are modulated by ethanol administration, whereby both the relaxation rate and jump frequency of the turning rate dynamics are influenced by ethanol concentration. This effort offers a first evidence for the possibility of complementing zebrafish pharmacological research with computational modeling of animal behavior.

  9. Relational Turning Point Events and Their Outcomes in College Teacher-Student Relationships from Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docan-Morgan, Tony; Manusov, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate teacher-student interaction using a relational frame (i.e., describing the student-teacher dynamic as inherently relational). Specifically, we focus on turning points and their potential outcomes in student-teacher relationships. Students who were able to identify a relational turning point event with a…

  10. Turning Points during the Life of Student Project Teams: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study a more flexible alternative of conceptualising changes over time in teams is tested within student project teams. The conceptualisation uses turning points during the lifespan of a team to outline team development, based on work by Erbert, Mearns, & Dena (2005). Turning points are moments that made a significant…

  11. Quantification of microscopic surface features of single point diamond turned optics with subsequent chemical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Kyrish, Matthew; Taylor, Daniel; Fraelich, Margaret; Lechuga, Oscar; Claytor, Richard; Claytor, Nelson

    2015-03-01

    Electro-Chemical Polishing is routinely used in the anodizing industry to achieve specular surface finishes of various metals products prior to anodizing. Electro-Chemical polishing functions by leveling the microscopic peaks and valleys of the substrate, thereby increasing specularity and reducing light scattering. The rate of attack is dependent of the physical characteristics (height, depth, and width) of the microscopic structures that constitute the surface finish. To prepare the sample, mechanical polishing such as buffing or grinding is typically required before etching. This type of mechanical polishing produces random microscopic structures at varying depths and widths, thus the electropolishing parameters are determined in an ad hoc basis. Alternatively, single point diamond turning offers excellent repeatability and highly specific control of substrate polishing parameters. While polishing, the diamond tool leaves behind an associated tool mark, which is related to the diamond tool geometry and machining parameters. Machine parameters such as tool cutting depth, speed and step over can be changed in situ, thus providing control of the spatial frequency of the microscopic structures characteristic of the surface topography of the substrate. By combining single point diamond turning with subsequent electro-chemical etching, ultra smooth polishing of both rotationally symmetric and free form mirrors and molds is possible. Additionally, machining parameters can be set to optimize post polishing for increased surface quality and reduced processing times. In this work, we present a study of substrate surface finish based on diamond turning tool mark spatial frequency with subsequent electro-chemical polishing.

  12. Turning Point.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document summarizes roundtable discussions held in November 1996 to address the current condition of higher education, the process of change, and possible joint projects under the new Knight Collaborative group. The group defined the four fundamental steps believed necessary to create a framework for institutional change: (1) establishing a…

  13. Self-Designed Points: Turning Responsibility for Learning over to Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    In her recent "Teaching English in the Two-Year College" ("TETYC") article, Denise Marchionda argues for a grading system in her first-year writing course that turns over responsibility to students for earning grades. The approach, which she calls "the point-by-point grading system," is a variation on a contract grading approach in which each…

  14. Guidance analysis of the aeroglide plane change maneuver as a turning point problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, Christopher

    1989-01-01

    The development of guidance approximations for the atmospheric (aeroglide) portion of the minimum fuel, orbital plane change, trajectory optimization problem is described. Asymptotic methods are used to reduce the two point, boundary value, optimization problem to a turning point problem from the bank angle control. The turning point problem solution, which yields an approximate optimal control policy, is given in terms of parabolic cylinder functions, which are tabulated, and integral expressions, which must be numerically computed. Comparisons of the former, over their region of validity, with optimal control solutions show good qualitative agreement. Additional work and analysis is needed to compute the guidance approximation work.

  15. Understanding Turning Points in Intimate Partner Violence: Factors and Circumstances Leading Women Victims Toward Change

    PubMed Central

    Dado, Diane; Hawker, Lynn; Cluss, Patricia A.; Buranosky, Raquel; Slagel, Leslie; McNeil, Melissa; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective When counseling women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV), healthcare providers can benefit from understanding the factors contributing to a women's motivation to change her situation. We wished to examine the various factors and situations associated with turning points and change seeking in the IPV situation. Methods We performed qualitative analysis on data from 7 focus groups and 20 individual interviews with women (61 participants) with past and/or current histories of IPV. Results The turning points women identified fell into 5 major themes: (1) protecting others from the abuse/abuser; (2) increased severity/humiliation with abuse; (3) increased awareness of options/access to support and resources; (4) fatigue/recognition that the abuser was not going to change; and (5) partner betrayal/infidelity. Conclusions Women experiencing IPV can identify specific factors and events constituting turning points or catalyst to change in their IPV situation. These turning points are dramatic shifts in beliefs and perceptions of themselves, their partners, and/or their situation that alter the women's willingness to tolerate the situation and motivate them to consider change. When counseling women experiencing IPV, health providers can incorporate understanding of turning points to motivate women to move forward in their process of changing their IPV situation. PMID:20113147

  16. Turning points and protective processes in the lives of people with chronic disabilities.

    PubMed

    King, Gillian; Cathers, Tamzin; Brown, Elizabeth; Specht, Jacqueline A; Willoughby, Colleen; Polgar, Janice Miller; MacKinnon, Elizabeth; Smith, Linda K; Havens, Lisa

    2003-02-01

    In this qualitative study, the authors examined the nature of resilience in people with chronic disabilities. Fifteen people with disabilities identified the factors that helped or hindered them at major turning points, and the triggers and resolutions to these turning points. Turning points were emotionally compelling experiences and realizations that involved meaning acquired through the routes of belonging, doing, or understanding the self or the world. The major protective factors were social support, traits such as perseverance and determination, and spiritual beliefs. Three new protective processes were identified: replacing a loss with a gain (transcending), recognizing new things about oneself (self-understanding), and making decisions about relinquishing something in life (accommodating). These protective factors, processes, and ways in which people with disabilities draw sense and meaning in life have important implications for service delivery. PMID:12643028

  17. 76 FR 37313 - Turning Point Solar LLC; Notice of Intent To Hold a Public Scoping Meeting and Prepare an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... Rural Utilities Service Turning Point Solar LLC; Notice of Intent To Hold a Public Scoping Meeting and... Turning Point Solar LLC. The proposal consists of constructing a 49.9 megawatt (MW) ground-mounted solar photovoltaic generating facility in Noble County, Ohio. Turning Point Solar LLC is requesting that RUS...

  18. Tolerancing of single point diamond turned diffractive optical elements and optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, R. F.

    2007-10-01

    Single point diamond turning has an increasing importance with the production of the surfaces for different optical systems such as infrared systems, prototype production of mobile phone cameras or head mounted displays with plastic lenses or master manufacturing for the injection moulding of plastic lenses for mass products. Tolerances which occur during single point diamond turning of aspheric surfaces and diffractive elements or during polar coordinate laser plotting of Computer-generated holograms will be treated. In both cases we expect similar tolerances, because the work piece is rotated in both diamond turning and laser plotting. The purpose is to understand the typical tolerances and to simulate their influence to the aberrations in the optical system.

  19. A Systematic Approach to Process Evaluation in the Central Oklahoma Turning Point (COTP) Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolma, Eleni L.; Cheney, Marshall K.; Chrislip, David D.; Blankenship, Derek; Troup, Pam; Hann, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Formation is an important stage of partnership development. Purpose: To describe the systematic approach to process evaluation of a Turning Point initiative in central Oklahoma during the formation stage. The nine-month collaborative effort aimed to develop an action plan to promote health. Methods: A sound planning framework was used in the…

  20. Turning Points in History: People, Ideas, Events. National History Day Curriculum Book 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Beatriz, Comp.

    The materials in this curriculum book provide examples of strategies and resources that can be used to initiate or enhance existing lessons and units in history and social studies. All the material can be adapted or modified by the teacher. The lessons are designed to encourage students to think critically about turning points in history, conduct…

  1. Gender, turning points, and boomerangs: returning home in young adulthood in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Stone, Juliet; Berrington, Ann; Falkingham, Jane

    2014-02-01

    The idea of a generation of young adults "boomeranging" back to the parental home has gained widespread currency in the British popular press. However, there is little empirical research identifying either increasing rates of returning home or the factors associated with this trend. This article addresses this gap in the literature using data from a long-running household panel survey to examine the occurrence and determinants of returning to the parental home. We take advantage of the longitudinal design of the British Household Panel Survey (1991-2008) and situate returning home in the context of other life-course transitions. We demonstrate how turning points in an individual's life course-such as leaving full-time education, unemployment, or partnership dissolution-are key determinants of returning home. An increasingly unpredictable labor market means that employment cannot be taken for granted following university graduation, and returning home upon completion of higher education is becoming normative. We also find that gender moderates the relationship among partnership dissolution, parenthood, and returning to the parental home, reflecting the differential welfare support in Great Britain for single parents compared with nonresident fathers and childless young adults. PMID:24186334

  2. Hysteresis compensation for piezoelectric actuators in single-point diamond turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng; Hu, Dejin; Wan, Daping; Liu, Hongbin

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, interests have been growing for fast tool servo (FTS) systems to increase the capability of existing single-point diamond turning machines. Although piezoelectric actuator is the most universal base of FTS system due to its high stiffness, accuracy and bandwidth, nonlinearity in piezoceramics limits both the static and dynamic performance of piezoelectric-actuated control systems evidently. To compensate the nonlinear hysteresis behavior of piezoelectric actuators, a hybrid model coupled with Preisach model and feedforward neural network (FNN) has been described. Since the training of FNN does not require a special calibration sequence, it is possible for on-line identification and real-time implementation with general operating data of a specific piezoelectric actuator. To describe the rate dependent behavior of piezoelectric actuators, a hybrid dynamic model was developed to predict the response of piezoelectric actuators in a wider range of input frequency. Experimental results show that a maximal error of less than 3% was accomplished by this dynamic model.

  3. Evaluation of a scanning Hartmann device for single point turning applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.C. Jr.; Stuhlinger, T.W.

    1993-08-01

    This paper concerns a new, machine mounted aspheric metrology device designed to measure a broad range of figures without the use of auxiliary optics. A prototype device, based on the classical Hartmann test, called a Hartmann Optical Surface Tester (HOST) was evaluated on a single point diamond turning machines. Design, initial testing, and validation data from reference spheres, and two types of aspheres will be discussed. Results of a simulation model for estimating acceptable alignment errors for the HOST on the diamond turning machine will also be presented. Peak-to-valley measurement uncertainty on the test optics was found to be better than 0.08 {mu}m.

  4. An emancipatory impulse: a feminist postmodern integrated turning point in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Glass, N; Davis, K

    1998-09-01

    This article critiques the current debates regarding feminism, postmodernism, and feminist/postmodernism within nursing research. The critique classified the debates into three identifiable constructs: dissatisfaction, fragmentation, and integration. The authors propose a solution from the integration debate as an emancipatory "workable" turning point for nursing research. The solution is situated within feminism and draws on the epistemological constructs of both modernism and postmodernism. Nursing research is framed within the proposed ontological links that characterize the integrated solution. PMID:9730406

  5. Revealing turning points in ecosystem functioning over the Northern Eurasian agricultural frontier.

    PubMed

    Horion, Stéphanie; Prishchepov, Alexander V; Verbesselt, Jan; de Beurs, Kirsten; Tagesson, Torbern; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2016-08-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 has been a turning point in the World history that left a unique footprint on the Northern Eurasian ecosystems. Conducting large scale mapping of environmental change and separating between naturogenic and anthropogenic drivers is a difficult endeavor in such highly complex systems. In this research a piece-wise linear regression method was used for breakpoint detection in Rain-Use Efficiency (RUE) time series and a classification of ecosystem response types was produced. Supported by earth observation data, field data, and expert knowledge, this study provides empirical evidence regarding the occurrence of drastic changes in RUE (assessment of the timing, the direction and the significance of these changes) in Northern Eurasian ecosystems between 1982 and 2011. About 36% of the study area (3.4 million km(2) ) showed significant (P < 0.05) trends and/or turning points in RUE during the observation period. A large proportion of detected turning points in RUE occurred around the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 and in the following years which were attributed to widespread agricultural land abandonment. Our study also showed that recurrent droughts deeply affected vegetation productivity throughout the observation period, with a general worsening of the drought conditions in recent years. Moreover, recent human-induced turning points in ecosystem functioning were detected and attributed to ongoing recultivation and change in irrigation practices in the Volgograd region, and to increased salinization and increased grazing intensity around Lake Balkhash. The ecosystem-state assessment method introduced here proved to be a valuable support that highlighted hotspots of potentially altered ecosystems and allowed for disentangling human from climatic disturbances. PMID:26929395

  6. Reaching a turning point--how patients in forensic care describe trajectories of recovery.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Helen; Strand, Susanne; Kristiansen, Lisbeth

    2014-09-01

    In Sweden, the duration of treatment is increasing for patients admitted to forensic psychiatric care. To reduce the length of stay, it is important for the forensic rehabilitation and recovery process to be effective and safe. Not much is known about how the process of recovery and transition begins and how it is described by the forensic patients. The purpose of this study was to explore how forensic patients with a history of high risk for violence experienced the turn towards recovery. A qualitative content analysis was used to analyse interviews with 10 patients who had decreased their assessed risk for violence on the risk assessment instrument HCR-20 and who were successfully managed a lower level of security. Three themes were identified: (i) the high-risk phase: facing intense negative emotions and feelings (ii) the turning point phase: reflecting on and approaching oneself and life in a new way (iii) the recovery phase: recognising, accepting and maturing. In the high-risk phase, chaotic and overwhelming feelings were experienced. The turning point phase was experienced as a sensitive stage, and it was marked by being forced to find a new, constructive way of being. The recovery phase was characterised by recognising personal circumstances in life, including accepting the need for structure, a feeling of maturity and a sense of responsibility for their own life. In order to ensure a successful recovery, the forensic nursing staff needs to recognise and support processes related to treatment motivation and turning points. Recommendations for best nursing practice are given accordingly. PMID:23952801

  7. Modeling of surface topography in single-point diamond turning machine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Yu; Liang, Rongguang

    2015-08-10

    Surface roughness is an important factor in characterizing the performance of high-precision optical surfaces. In this paper, we propose a model to estimate the surface roughness generated by a single-point diamond turning machine. In this model, we take into consideration the basic tool-cutting parameters as well as the relative vibration between the tool and the workpiece in both the infeed and feeding directions. Current models focus on the relative tool-workpiece vibration in the infeed direction. However, based on our experimental measurements, the contribution of relative tool-workpiece vibration in the feeding direction is significant and cannot be ignored in the model. The proposed model is able to describe the surface topography for flat as well as cylindrical surfaces of the workpiece. It has the potential to describe more complex spherical surfaces or freeform surfaces. Our experimental study with metal materials shows good correlation between the model and the diamond-turned surfaces. PMID:26368364

  8. "I Met This Wife of Mine and Things Got onto a Better Track" Turning Points in Risk Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronka, Anna; Oravala, Sanna; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2002-01-01

    Study examines the mechanisms involved in turning-point experiences among individuals who had been exposed to several risk factors in childhood and adolescence. Results indicate that childhood experiences influence the content of turning points in adult life by shaping the direction of actual life paths. The quality of current life, however, has…

  9. Rydberg-Klein-Rees 1-Sigma-positive potential curve turning points for the isotopes of carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Goorvitch, D.

    1982-01-01

    First order RKR turning points were computed for (C-12)O16, (C-12)O17, (C-13)O16, (C-12)O18, and (C-13)O18 for vibrational levels up to v = 40. These turning points should be useful in the numerical computation of matrix elements of powers of the internuclear separation.

  10. Sensitivity optimization with cladding-etched long period fiber gratings at the dispersion turning point.

    PubMed

    Del Villar, Ignacio; Cruz, Jose L; Socorro, Abian B; Corres, Jesus M; Matias, Ignacio R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a refractive index sensor based on a long period fiber grating (LPFG) made in a reduced cladding fiber whose low order cladding modes have the turning point at large wavelengths. The combination of these parameters results in an improved sensitivity of 8734 nm/refractive index unit (RIU) for the LP0,3 mode in the 1400-1650 wavelength range. This value is similar to that obtained with thin-film coated LPFGs, which permits to avoid the coating deposition step. The numerical simulations are in agreement with the experimental results. PMID:27505736

  11. Diffraction of acoustic-gravity waves in the presence of a turning point.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in an inhomogeneous atmosphere often have caustics, where the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified. Unlike acoustic waves and gravity waves in incompressible fluids, AGW fields in the vicinity of a caustic have never been systematically studied. Here, asymptotic expansions of acoustic gravity waves are derived in the presence of a turning point in a horizontally stratified, moving fluid such as the atmosphere. Sound speed and the background flow (wind) velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. It is found that uniform asymptotic expansions of the wave field in the presence of a turning point can be expressed in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for AGWs, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In the dominant term of the uniform asymptotic solution, the terms with the Airy function and its derivative are weighted by the cosine and sine of the Berry phase, respectively. The physical meaning and corollaries of the asymptotic solutions are discussed. PMID:27475153

  12. Laying medicine open: understanding major turning points in the history of medical ethics.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Laurence B

    1999-03-01

    At different times during its history medicine has been laid open to accountability for its scientific and moral quality. This phenonmenon of laying medicine open has sometimes resulted in major turning points in the history of medical ethics. In this paper, I examine two examples of when the laying open of medicine has generated such turning points: eighteenth-century British medicine and late twentieth-century American medicine. In the eighteenth century, the Scottish physician-philosopher, John Gregory (1724-1773), concerned with the unscientific, entrepreneurial, self-interested nature of then current medical practice, laid medicine open to accountability using the tools of ethics and philosophy of medicine. In the process, Gregory wrote the first professional ethics of medicine in the English-language literature, based on the physician's fiduciary responsibility to the patient. In the late twentieth century, the managed practice of medicine has laid medicine open to accountability for its scientific quality and economic cost. This current laying open of medicine creates the challenge of developing medical ethics and bioethics for population-based medical science and practice. PMID:11657315

  13. Optimal rate filters for biomedical point processes.

    PubMed

    McNames, James

    2005-01-01

    Rate filters are used to estimate the mean event rate of many biomedical signals that can be modeled as point processes. Historically these filters have been designed using principles from two distinct fields. Signal processing principles are used to optimize the filter's frequency response. Kernel estimation principles are typically used to optimize the asymptotic statistical properties. This paper describes a design methodology that combines these principles from both fields to optimize the frequency response subject to constraints on the filter's order, symmetry, time-domain ripple, DC gain, and minimum impulse response. Initial results suggest that time-domain ripple and a negative impulse response are necessary to design a filter with a reasonable frequency response. This suggests that some of the common assumptions about the properties of rate filters should be reconsidered. PMID:17282132

  14. Performance evaluation and optimization of a fast tool servo for single point diamond turning machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Arthur C., Jr.; Cuttino, James F.

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes a new, fast tool servo system designed for fabrication of non-rotationally symmetric components using single point diamond turning machines. A prototype device, designed for flexible interfacing to typical machine tool controllers, will be described along with performance testing data of tilted flat and off-axis conic sections. Evaluation data show that servo produced surfaces have an RMS roughness less than 175 angstroms. Techniques for linearizing the hysteretic effects in the piezoelectric actuator are also discussed. The nonlinear effects due to hysteresis are reduced using a dynamic compensator module in conjunction with a linear controller. The compensator samples the reduced using a dynamic compensator module in conjunction with a linear controller. The compensator samples the hysteretic voltage/displacement relationship in real time and modifies the effective gain accordingly. Simulation results indicate that errors in the performance of the system caused by hysteresis in the system can be compensated and reduced by 90 percent. Experimental implementation results in an 80 percent reduction in the motion error caused by hysteresis, but peak-to-valley errors are limited by side effects from the compensation. The uncompensated servo system demonstrated a peak-to-valley error of less than 0.80 micrometer for an off-axis conic section turned on-axis.

  15. Performance evaluation and optimization of a fast tool servo for single point diamond turning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.C. Jr.; Cuttino, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes a new, fast tool servo system for fabricating non-rotationally symmetric components using single point diamond turning machines. A prototype, designed for flexible interfacing to typical machine tool controllers, will be described along with performance testing data of tilted flat and off-axis conic sections. Evaluation data show that servo produced surfaces have an rms roughness less than 175 angstroms (2-200 {mu}m spatial filter). Techniques for linearizing the hysteretic effects in the piezoelectric actuator are also discussed. The nonlinear effects due to hysteresis are reduced using a dynamic compensator module in conjunction with a linear controller. The compensator samples the hysteretic voltage/displacement relation in real time and modifies the effective gain accordingly. Simulation results indicate that errors in the performance of the system caused by hysteresis can be compensated and reduced by 90%. Experimental implementation results in 80% reduction in motion error caused by hysteresis, but peak-to- valley errors are limited by side effects from the compensation. The uncompensated servo system demonstrated a peak-to-valley error of less than 0.80 micrometer for an off-axis conic section turned on-axis.

  16. The Cambrian explosion triggered by critical turning point in genome size evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Dirson Jian; Zhang, Shengli

    2010-02-01

    The Cambrian explosion is a grand challenge to science today and involves multidisciplinary study. This event is generally believed as a result of genetic innovations, environmental factors and ecological interactions, even though there are many conflicts on nature and timing of metazoan origins. The crux of the matter is that an entire roadmap of the evolution is missing to discern the biological complexity transition and to evaluate the critical role of the Cambrian explosion in the overall evolutionary context. Here, we calculate the time of the Cambrian explosion by a "C-value clock"; our result quite fits the fossil records. We clarify that the intrinsic reason of genome evolution determined the Cambrian explosion. A general formula for evaluating genome size of different species has been found, by which the genome size evolution can be illustrated. The Cambrian explosion, as a major transition of biological complexity, essentially corresponds to a critical turning point in genome size evolution. PMID:20074549

  17. Evaluation of repeated single-point diamond turning on the deformation behavior of monocrystalline silicon via molecular dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Hongwei; Yang, Yihan; Huang, Hu; Ma, Zhichao; Shao, Mingkun

    2014-07-01

    A three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation study is conducted to investigate repeated single-point turnings of a monocrystalline silicon specimen with diamond tools at nanometric scale. Morse potential energy function and Tersoff potential energy function are applied to model the silicon/diamond and silicon/silicon interactions, respectively. As repeated nano-cutting process on surfaces often involve the interactions between the consequent machining processes, repeated single-point diamond turnings are employed to investigate the phase transformation in the successive nano-cutting processes. The simulation results show that a layer of the damaged residual amorphous silicon remained beneath the surface after the first-time nano-cutting process. The amorphous phase silicon deforms and removes differently in the second nano-cutting process. By considering the coordination number (CN) of silicon atoms in the specimen, it is observed that there is an increase of atoms with six nearest neighbors during the second nano-cutting process. It suggests that the recovery of the crystalline phase from the amorphous phase occurred. Moreover, the instantaneous temperature distributions in the specimen are analyzed. Although the tangential force ( F X ) and the thrust force ( F Y ) become much smaller in the second cutting process, the material resistance rate is larger than the first cutting process. The larger resistance also induces the increase of local temperature between the cutting tool and the amorphous layer in the second cutting process.

  18. "From that moment on my life changed": turning points in the healing process for men recovering from child sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Easton, Scott D; Leone-Sheehan, Danielle M; Sophis, Ellen J; Willis, Danny G

    2015-01-01

    Recent research indicates that child sexual abuse often undermines the health of boys and men across the lifespan. However, some male survivors experience a turning point marking a positive change in their health trajectories and healing process. Although frequently discussed in reference to physical health problems or addictions, very little is known about turning points with respect to child sexual abuse for men. The purpose of this secondary qualitative analysis was to describe the different types of turning points experienced by male survivors who completed the 2010 Health and Well-Being Survey (N = 250). Using conventional content analysis, researchers identified seven types of turning points that were classified into three broad categories: influential relationships (professional and group support, personal relationships), insights and new meanings (cognitive realizations, necessity to change, spiritual transformation), and action-oriented communication (disclosure of CSA, pursuit of justice). Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:25747418

  19. The fork in the road: HIV as a potential positive turning point and the role of spirituality.

    PubMed

    Kremer, H; Ironson, G; Kaplan, L

    2009-03-01

    We interviewed 147 HIV-positive people regarding their key life-changing experiences - involving profound changes in attitudes, behaviors, beliefs (including spiritual beliefs), or self-views - to determine the prominence of HIV as the key positive/negative turning point. HIV was the key turning point, for 37% (26% positive, 11% negative), whereas for 63% of our sample it was not. Characteristics associated with perceiving HIV as the most positive turning point included having a near-death experience from HIV, increasing spirituality after HIV diagnosis, and feeling chosen by a Higher Powerto have HIV. Notably, perceived antecedents of viewing HIV as the key positive turning point were hitting rock bottom and calling on a Higher Power. Conversely, viewing HIV as the most negative turning point was associated with declining spirituality after diagnosis. Spirituality can both negatively and positively affect coping with HIV. Promoting positive spiritual coping may offer new counseling approaches. Further, for the majority of the participants, HIV is not the key turning point, which may be an indicator of the normalization of HIV with the advent of effective treatment. PMID:19280412

  20. Is educational achievement a turning point for incarcerated delinquents across race and sex?

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Thomas G; Bales, William D; Piquero, Alex R

    2012-02-01

    Research has linked the role of education to delinquency, but much of the focus has been on general population samples and with little attention to demographic differences. Employing a cumulative disadvantage framework that integrates elements of informal social control and labeling theories, this article examines whether academic achievement serves as a positive turning point and re-directs juvenile delinquents away from subsequent offending. Attention is also given to race/sex contingencies. Using a sample of 4,147 delinquents released from Florida correctional institutions (86% male, 57% non-White, average age at release = 16.8 years), propensity score analysis yielded two findings: youth with above average academic achievement while incarcerated were significantly more likely to return to school post-release, and youth with above average attendance in public school were significantly less likely to be re-arrested in the 1-year post-release period. While the academic gains were pronounced among African-American males, the preventive effects of school attendance are similar across race and sex, suggesting that education can be a part of a larger prevention effort that assists juvenile delinquents in successful community re-entry. PMID:21643669

  1. Single-Point Diamond-Turned Mirror Performance Before And After Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollid, Jon E.

    1980-11-01

    The surface finish of a single-point diamond-turned (SPOT) mirror produced in 1977 on the large (2-meter swing) Excello lathe at the Union Carbide Corporation's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was such that it was not possible to do visible alignment using it. Therefore, it was necessary to polish the mirror by hand. This was done at the University of Arizona. The intent was to remove the high ridges in the SPDT mirror but not to degrade the figure. Both interferometric and encircled energy measurements were made on the mirror before and after polishing. The mirror was an f/2 off-axis parabola 39.37 cm in diameter. The equation describing the generator of the mother parabola is y2 = 309x(cm2) and the center of each off-axis sister mirror is at x = 7.64 cm, and y = 48.59 cm. After polishing it was possible to align it using techniques which employed visible light. Furthermore, the polished mirror was about 20% better as far as the rms surface figure was concerned, although cosmetically the surface finish appeared visibly degraded after polish.

  2. Sol-gel replicated optics made from single point diamond turned masters exhibit fractal surface roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Moreshead, W.V.; Nogues, J.L.R.

    1996-05-01

    Deterministic optics manufacturing, notably single point diamond turning (SPDT) has matured such that the current generation of machines is capable of producing refractive and reflective optics for the visible wavelength region that are quite acceptable for many applications. However, spiral tool marks are still produced that result in unwanted diffractive scattering from grating-like features having a spatial frequency determined by the machine feed, tool radius, and other influences such as vibration and material removal effects. Such regular artifacts are the characteristic of deterministic manufacturing methods such as SPDT. The authors present some initial findings suggesting that fractal, or non-deterministic surfaces can be produced by SPDT through sol-gel replication. The key is the large isotropic shrinkage that occurs through monolithic sol-gel replication (a factor of 2.5) that results in all features, including tooling marks, being reduced by that amount. The large shrinkage itself would be a laudable-enough feature of the replication process. However, by an as-yet-not understood manner, the replication process itself seems to alter the roughness character of the replicated surface such that it appears to be fractal when analyzed using contact profilometry and the power spectrum approach.

  3. Turning points in nonlinear business cycle theories, financial crisis and the 2007-2008 downturn.

    PubMed

    Dore, Mohammed H I; Singh, Ragiv G

    2009-10-01

    This paper reviews three nonlinear dynamical business cycle theories of which only one (The Goodwin model) reflects the stylized facts of observed business cycles and has a plausible turning point mechanism. The paper then examines the US (and now global) financial crisis of 2008 and the accompanying downturn in the US. The paper argues that a skewed income distribution could not sustain effective demand and that over the 2001-2006 expansion demand was maintained through massive amounts of credit, with more than 50 percent of sales in the US being maintained through credit. A vector autoregression model confirms the crucial role played by credit. However legislative changes that dismantled the restrictions placed on the financial sector after the crash of 1929 and the consequent structural changes in the financial sector after 1980 enabled the growth of new debt instruments and credit. But overexpansion of credit when profits and house prices were declining in 2005/06 led to a nonlinear shift due to a new realization of the poor quality of some of this debt, namely mortgage backed securities. Bankruptcies, followed by retrenchment at the banks, then led to the bursting of the credit bubble, with the possibility of a severe recession. PMID:19781138

  4. The Turning Point Social Marketing National Excellence Collaborative: integrating social marketing into routine public health practice.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Sylvia; Reizes, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Social marketing can be an effective tool for achieving public health goals. Social marketing uses concepts from commercial marketing to plan and implement programs designed to bring about behavior change that will benefit individuals and society. Although social marketing principles have been used to address public health problems, efforts have been dominated by message-based, promotion-only strategies, and effective implementation has been hampered by both lack of understanding of and use of all of the components of a social marketing approach and lack of training. The Turning Point initiative's Social Marketing National Excellence Collaborative (SMNEC) was established to promote social marketing principles and practices to improve public health across the nation. After 4 years, the Collaborative's work has resulted in improved understanding of social marketing among participating members and the development of new tools to strengthen the social marketing skills among public health practitioners. The Collaborative has also made advances in incorporating and institutionalizing the practice of social marketing within public health in participating states. PMID:15711443

  5. Turning Points in Containment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B C; Rambo, J T; Pawloski, G A; Burkhard, N R

    2006-11-21

    Sometime in 1987 Billy Hudson, a long-time LLNL Containment Scientist and the Task Leader for Containment Diagnostics, put together a presentation entitled ''Turning Points in Containment''. This presentation identifies challenges, lessons learned, and changes made in containment practice over a 20-year period, from 1967-1987. Besides providing a significant historical summary, the presentation is valuable as we maintain a position of readiness 14 years after the last underground nuclear detonation. It is particularly valuable to personnel who are new to the program and have no first-hand experience in implementing underground nuclear test containment for actual tests. We now view this material as a unique containment summary with timeless importance. We envision this report to be particularly useful to new Containment Program members and anyone interested in the history of underground nuclear test containment practices. We believe that the Barnwell test, detonated in 1989, would have been added to this summary if Billy Hudson had the opportunity to update the presentation. We have chosen to add a few slides to the end of the original presentation to describe the issues and lessons learned from Barnwell.

  6. Turning point temperature and competition between relativistic and ponderomotive effects in self-focusing of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.; Jafari Milani, M. R.

    2013-10-15

    The propagation characters of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive and relativistic nonlinearities. The second-order differential equation of dimensionless beam width parameter is solved numerically, taking into account the effect of electron temperature. The results show that the ponderomotive force does not facilitate the relativistic self-focusing in all intensity ranges. In fact, there exists a certain intensity value that, if below this value, the ponderomotive nonlinearity can contribute to the relativistic self-focusing, or obstruct it, if above. It is also indicated that there is a temperature interval in which self-focusing can occur, while the beam diverges outside of this region. In addition, the results represent the existence of a “turning point temperature” in the mentioned interval that the self-focusing has the strongest power. The value of the turning point is dependent on laser intensity in which higher intensities result in higher turning point.

  7. Points of Interest: What Determines Interest Rates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Tim

    Interest rates can significantly influence people's behavior. When rates decline, homeowners rush to buy new homes and refinance old mortgages; automobile buyers scramble to buy new cars; the stock market soars, and people tend to feel more optimistic about the future. But even though individuals respond to changes in rates, they may not fully…

  8. Experiment study on the cutting property of hot press Zinc Sulfide by single point diamond turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weihao; Tong, Yi; Lian, Weiyan; Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Hao

    2014-08-01

    Microscopic morphology and XRD spectra of Hot Press(HP) ZnS powders and fractrues were tested. Preliminary analysis of the turning characters of HP ZnS was got by associating with the characters of HP ZnS and the processing mechanism of hard and brittle materials. Orthogonal experiment of 3 factors and 3 levers was taken by setting roughness Ra value index of the turning surface, and more analyses of the ultra-precision turning characters of HP ZnS were got by associating with the 3D microscopic morphology of CVD ZnSe ultra-precision turning surface and HP ZnS polishing surface. How to get the lower Ra value was discussed at last. The research shows: the primary removal mechanism of HP ZnS is powder removal; HP ZnS can get good ultra-precision turning surface which Ra value is lower than 10nm; to get the Ra value of the turning surface lower than 4nm, speed of main spindle, blunt edge radius, and the corner radius must be optimized because of the polycrystalline structure of the HP ZnS.

  9. Evaluating the Turning Points Curriculum: A Three-Year Study to Assess Parenting Knowledge in a Sample of Incarcerated Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Lynn S.; Burton, Barb

    2015-01-01

    The current study is an evaluation of the Turning Points parenting curriculum specially designed for use with incarcerated populations. The project combines intensive parent education with supervised offender mother/child visits in special family visiting rooms as well as ongoing offender support groups to help offender mothers become more…

  10. Overgrazing- How far are we from passing the tipping point of turning our rangelands into desert?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecological science, particularly with regard to Mongolian rangelands, is not able to estimate when a tipping point will be passed. Nonetheless, it does provide a framework for responding to the threat of desertification tipping points. ...

  11. Expectation of fairness: a turning point in the professional satisfaction of Iranian nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Forough; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Forooshani, Zahra Sadat Dibaji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The professional satisfaction of staff is one of the most challenging organizational concepts that can enhance the efficiency level of organizations. In a similar vein, the professional satisfaction of nurses is of considerable importance, in that, professional dissatisfaction among nurses could result in emotional detachment, depression, anger, evasion from work, and inefficacy and would negatively impact the organization’s work rate. The aim of this study was to understand Iranian nurses’ experiences of the concept of professional satisfaction. Methods This was a qualitative study conducted with a targeted sampling of 10 nurses (4 men and 6 women) in 2015. The data were collected through conducting in-depth interviews, and textual data were analyzed subsequently using the Qualitative Content Analysis (QCA) method. Results The findings of this study pointed to “fair conduct,” which was comprised of three sub-categories, i.e., expectation of fairness in social-professional settings, expectation of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and expectation of fairness in the area of professional interactions. Conclusions There are various ups and downs in nursing due to the challenging nature of the profession, from the initial education at the university until retirement. According to the findings of this study, a lack of fairness in social-professional settings, a lack of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and a lack of fairness in the area of professional interactions were among the factors that have great impacts on the degree of professional dissatisfaction among nurses. PMID:27504167

  12. Fabrication of fiber optic long period gratings operating at the phase matching turning point using an amplitude mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hromadka, J.; Correia, R.; Korposh, S.

    2016-05-01

    A fast method for the fabrication of the long period gratings (LPG) optical fibres operating at or near the phase matching turning point (PMTP) with the period of 109.0, 109.5 and 110.0 μm based on an amplitude mask writing system is described. The proposed system allows fabricating 3 cm long LPG sensors operating at PMPT within 20 min that is approximately 8 times faster than point-by-point approach. The reproducibility of the fabrication process was thoroughly studied. The response of the fabricated LPGs to the external change of the refractive index was investigated using water and methanol.

  13. Fabrication of large radii toroidal surfaces by single point diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.P.; Marlar, T.A.; Miller, A.C.; Paterson, R. L.

    1995-12-31

    An unconventional machining technique has been developed for producing relatively large radii quasi-toroidal surfaces which could not normally be produced by conventional diamond turning technology. The maximum radial swing capacity of a diamond turning lathe is the limiting factor for the rotational radius of any toroid. A typical diamond turned toroidal surface is produced when a part is rotated about the spindle axis while the diamond tool contours the surface with any curved path. Toric surfaces sliced horizontally, have been used in laser resonator cavities. This paper will address the fabrication of a special case of toroids where a rotating tool path is a circle whose center is offset from the rotational axis of the toroid by a distance greater than the minor radius of the tool path. The quasi-toroidal surfaces produced by this technique approximate all asymmetrical combinations of concave/convex section of a torus. Other machine configurations have been reported which offer alternative approaches to the fabrication of concave asymmetric aspheric surfaces. Prototypes of unique lenses each having two quasi-toroidal surfaces were fabricated in the Ultraprecision Manufacturing Technology Center at form key components of a scanned laser focusing system. As an example of the problem faced, the specifications for one of the surfaces was equivalent to a section of a torus with a two meter diameter hole. The lenses were fabricated on a Nanoform 600 diamond turning lathe. This is a numerically controlled two axis T-base lathe with an air bearing spindle and oil hydrostatic slides. The maximum radial swing for this machine is approximately 0.3 meters.

  14. Fabrication of large radii toroidal surfaces by single point diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.P.; Marlar, T.A.; Miller, A.C.

    1995-12-31

    An unconventional machining technique has been developed for producing relatively large radii quasi-toroidal surfaces which could not normally be produced by conventional diamond turning technology. The maximum radial swing capacity of a diamond turning lathe is the limiting factor for the rotational radius of any toroid. A typical diamond turned toroidal surface is produced when a part is rotated about the spindle axis while the diamond tool contours the surface with any curved path. Toric surfaces sliced horizontally, have been used in laser resonator cavities. This paper will address the fabrication of a special case of toroids where a rotating tool path is a circle whose center is offset from the rotational axis of the toroid by a distance greater than the minor radius of the tool path. The quasi-toroidal surfaces produced by this technique approximate all asymmetrical combinations of concave/convex sections of a torus. Other machine configurations have been reported which offer alternative approaches to the fabrication of concave asymmetric aspheric surfaces.

  15. Refractive index sensitivity characteristics near the dispersion turning point of the multimode microfiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haipeng; Sun, Qizhen; Li, Xiaolei; Yan, Zhijun; Li, Yanpeng; Liu, Deming; Zhang, Lin

    2015-11-01

    The turning point of the refractive index (RI) sensitivity based on the multimode microfiber (MMMF) in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is observed. By tracking the resonant wavelength shift of the MZI generated between the HE(11) and HE(12) modes in the MMMF, the surrounding RI (SRI) could be detected. Theoretical analysis demonstrates that the RI sensitivity will reach ±∞ on either side of the turning point due to the group effective RI difference (G) approaching zero. Significantly, the positive sensitivity exists in a very wide fiber diameter range, while the negative sensitivity can be achieved in a narrow diameter range of only 0.3 μm. Meanwhile, the experimental sensitivities and variation trend at different diameters exhibit high consistency with the theoretical results. High RI sensitivity of 10777.8 nm/RIU (RI unit) at the fiber diameter of 4.6 μm and the RI around 1.3334 is realized. The discovery of the sensitivity turning points has great significance on trace detection due to the possibility of ultrahigh RI sensitivity. PMID:26512514

  16. Educational Technology on a Turning Point: Curriculum Implementation in Flanders and Challenges for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderlinde, Ruben; van Braak, Johan; Hermans, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, we state that establishing technology curricula by national governments causes a shift in the policy actions of educational technology support: from a technical rationale with a main focus on funding and resources to a pedagogical rationale with a main focus on student competencies. We illustrate our point of view by describing the…

  17. Trajectories of Affective States in Adolescent Hockey Players: Turning Point and Motivational Antecedents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Amiot, Catherine E.; Vallerand, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal trajectories of positive and negative affective states with a sample of 265 adolescent elite hockey players followed across 3 measurement points during the 1st 11 weeks of a season. Latent class growth modeling, incorporating a time-varying covariate and a series of predictors assessed at the onset of the season,…

  18. Factors Associated with Success in Treating Chronic Drunk Drivers: The Turning Point Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Brandon K.; Latessa, Edward J.; Langworthy, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    Examines a program with typical failure rates for chronic drunk driver treatment, and identifies factors associated with client success. Results indicate that socioeconomic status, criminality, and time-at-risk predict client success following treatment. Staff prognosis, maturity, child abuse, and other conditions do not predict success. (RJM)

  19. Effects of F/G-actin ratio and actin turn-over rate on NADPH oxidase activity in microglia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most in vivo studies that have addressed the role of actin dynamics in NADPH oxidase function in phagocytes have used toxins to modulate the polymerization state of actin and mostly effects on actin has been evaluated by end point measurements of filamentous actin, which says little about actin dynamics, and without consideration for the subcellular distribution of the perturbed actin cytoskeleton. Results Here, we in addition to toxins use conditional expression of the major actin regulatory protein LIM kinase-1 (LIMK1), and shRNA knock-down of cofilin to modulate the cellular F/G-actin ratio in the Ra2 microglia cell line, and we use Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) in β-actin-YFP-transduced cells to obtain a dynamic measure of actin recovery rates (actin turn-over rates) in different F/G-actin states of the actin cytoskeleton. Our data demonstrate that stimulated NADPH oxidase function was severely impaired only at extreme actin recovery rates and F/G-actin ratios, and surprisingly, that any moderate changes of these parameters of the actin cytoskeleton invariably resulted in an increased NADPH oxidase activity. Conclusion moderate actin polymerization and depolymerization both increase the FMLP and PMA-stimulated NADPH oxidase activity of microglia, which is directly correlated with neither actin recovery rate nor F/G- actin ratio. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase functions in an enhanced state of activity in stimulated phagocytes despite widely different states of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:20825680

  20. Life's little (and big) lessons: identity statuses and meaning-making in the turning point narratives of emerging adults.

    PubMed

    McLean, Kate C; Pratt, Michael W

    2006-07-01

    A longitudinal study examined relations between 2 approaches to identity development: the identity status model and the narrative life story model. Turning point narratives were collected from emerging adults at age 23 years. Identity statuses were collected at several points across adolescence and emerging adulthood, as were measures of generativity and optimism. Narratives were coded for the sophistication of meaning-making reported, the event type in the narrative, and the emotional tone of the narrative. Meaning-making was defined as connecting the turning point to some aspect of or understanding of oneself. Results showed that less sophisticated meaning was associated particularly with the less advanced diffusion and foreclosure statuses, and that more sophisticated meaning was associated with an overall identity maturity index. Meaning was also positively associated with generativity and optimism at age 23, with stories focused on mortality experiences, and with a redemptive story sequence. Meaning was negatively associated with achievement stories. Results are discussed in terms of the similarities and differences in the 2 approaches to identity development and the elaboration of meaning-making as an important component of narrative identity. PMID:16802903

  1. Mitochondrial criticality: A new concept at the turning point of life or death

    PubMed Central

    Aon, Miguel Antonio; Cortassa, Sonia; Akar, Fadi Gabriel; O'Rourke, Brian

    2009-01-01

    A variety of stressors can cause the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), but the events leading up to this catastrophic cellular event are not well understood at the mechanistic level. Based on our recent studies of oscillations in mitochondrial energetics, we have coined the term “mitochondrial criticality” to describe the state in which the mitochondrial network of cardiomyocytes becomes very sensitive to small perturbations in reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in the scaling of local mitochondrial uncoupling and Δψm loss to the whole cell, and the myocardial syncytium. At the point of criticality, the dynamics of the mitochondrial network bifurcate to oscillatory behavior. These energetic changes are translated into effects on the electrical excitability of the cell, inducing dramatic changes in the morphology and the threshold for activating an action potential. Emerging evidence suggests that this mechanism, by creating spatial and temporal heterogeneity of excitability in the heart during ischemia and reperfusion, underlies the genesis of potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:16242921

  2. Turning point for US diets? Recessionary effects or behavioral shifts in foods purchased and consumed123

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shu Wen; Slining, Meghan M; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the past decade, the United States has seen declining energy intakes and plateauing obesity levels. Objective: We examined whether these observed trends suggest a longer-term shift in dietary and health behavior that is independent of adverse economic conditions. Design: We used nationally representative cross-sectional surveys on intake and longitudinal household food purchase data along with random-effects models to address this question. Data included individuals in NHANES 2003–2004 to 2009–2010 (children: n = 13,422; adults: n = 10,791) and households from the 2000–2011 Nielsen Homescan Panel (households with children: n = 57,298; households with adults only: n = 108,932). Results: In both data sets, we showed that children decreased their calories the most. Even after we controlled for important socioeconomic factors, caloric purchases fell significantly from 2003 to 2011 (P < 0.001), particularly for households with children. The Great Recession was associated with small increases in caloric purchases, in which a 1–percentage point increase in unemployment in the local market was associated with a 1.6–4.1-kcal · capita−1 · d−1 (P < 0.001) increase in total calories purchased. Results also indicated shifts in caloric purchases were driven more by declines in caloric purchases from beverages than food. Conclusions: US consumers have exhibited changes in intake and purchasing behavior since 2003 that were independent from changing economic conditions linked with the Great Recession or food prices. Public health efforts in the past decade may have contributed to this trend. PMID:24429538

  3. Defining natural species of bacteria: clear-cut genomic boundaries revealed by a turning point in nucleotide sequence divergence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacteria are currently classified into arbitrary species, but whether they actually exist as discrete natural species was unclear. To reveal genomic features that may unambiguously group bacteria into discrete genetic clusters, we carried out systematic genomic comparisons among representative bacteria. Results We found that bacteria of Salmonella formed tight phylogenetic clusters separated by various genetic distances: whereas over 90% of the approximately four thousand shared genes had completely identical sequences among strains of the same lineage, the percentages dropped sharply to below 50% across the lineages, demonstrating the existence of clear-cut genetic boundaries by a steep turning point in nucleotide sequence divergence. Recombination assays supported the genetic boundary hypothesis, suggesting that genetic barriers had been formed between bacteria of even very closely related lineages. We found similar situations in bacteria of Yersinia and Staphylococcus. Conclusions Bacteria are genetically isolated into discrete clusters equivalent to natural species. PMID:23865772

  4. Control of optical and electrical properties of nanosheets by the chemical structure of the turning point in a foldable polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Taichi; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Seki, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Oligomers of tetra(ethylene glycol)-disubstituted phenyl-capped bithiophene (Ph2TPh) linked by catechol and resorcinol were prepared. Catechol and resorcinol link the monomers via the ortho- and meta-positions of the benzene ring, respectively, and function as turning points in the folding process of the polymer. It was confirmed that the ortho-linked 8mer (o-8mer) and meta-linked 8mer (m-8mer) could form nanosheets through the self-assembly of folded polymers in o-dichlorobenzene. We confirmed that the arrangement of thiophene units inside the nanosheets was controllable by changing the chemical structure of the turning point. The different arrangements of the Ph2TPh units led to changes in other physical properties such as UV-Vis absorption, nanosheet thickness and charge carrier transport. The absorption spectrum of the o-8mer nanosheets suggested that the Ph2TPh units are arranged vertical to the lateral direction of the nanosheets. On the other hand, the Ph2TPh units in the m-8mer nanosheets were considered to have a tilted orientation. The change in the Ph2TPh tilt angle inside the nanosheets was supported by the different thicknesses of the o-8mer and m-8mer nanosheets. The relationship between the absorption spectrum and Ph2TPh unit arrangement was discussed based on the DFT calculation. Intrinsic charge carrier transport properties were evaluated by a noncontact microwave-based method. The o-8mer nanosheets showed higher conductivity than the m-8mer and triazole-linked-8mer nanosheets. The lifetime of charge carriers in the nanosheet was longer than that in the lamellar structure of the drop-cast film.Oligomers of tetra(ethylene glycol)-disubstituted phenyl-capped bithiophene (Ph2TPh) linked by catechol and resorcinol were prepared. Catechol and resorcinol link the monomers via the ortho- and meta-positions of the benzene ring, respectively, and function as turning points in the folding process of the polymer. It was confirmed that the ortho-linked 8mer (o

  5. Control of optical and electrical properties of nanosheets by the chemical structure of the turning point in a foldable polymer.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Taichi; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Seki, Shu

    2016-08-14

    Oligomers of tetra(ethylene glycol)-disubstituted phenyl-capped bithiophene (Ph2TPh) linked by catechol and resorcinol were prepared. Catechol and resorcinol link the monomers via the ortho- and meta-positions of the benzene ring, respectively, and function as turning points in the folding process of the polymer. It was confirmed that the ortho-linked 8mer (o-8mer) and meta-linked 8mer (m-8mer) could form nanosheets through the self-assembly of folded polymers in o-dichlorobenzene. We confirmed that the arrangement of thiophene units inside the nanosheets was controllable by changing the chemical structure of the turning point. The different arrangements of the Ph2TPh units led to changes in other physical properties such as UV-Vis absorption, nanosheet thickness and charge carrier transport. The absorption spectrum of the o-8mer nanosheets suggested that the Ph2TPh units are arranged vertical to the lateral direction of the nanosheets. On the other hand, the Ph2TPh units in the m-8mer nanosheets were considered to have a tilted orientation. The change in the Ph2TPh tilt angle inside the nanosheets was supported by the different thicknesses of the o-8mer and m-8mer nanosheets. The relationship between the absorption spectrum and Ph2TPh unit arrangement was discussed based on the DFT calculation. Intrinsic charge carrier transport properties were evaluated by a noncontact microwave-based method. The o-8mer nanosheets showed higher conductivity than the m-8mer and triazole-linked-8mer nanosheets. The lifetime of charge carriers in the nanosheet was longer than that in the lamellar structure of the drop-cast film. PMID:27438904

  6. 30 years of change in understory plant communities along the Tanana River, Alaska: Revisiting the concept of turning points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, T. N.; Lloyd, A. H.; Ruess, R. W.; Viereck, L. A.; Charlton, B. A.

    2008-12-01

    In interior Alaska, the most productive forests occur along the floodplain of the glacially fed Tanana River. The Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest (BCEF) is located approximately 20 km southwest of Fairbanks, Alaska and was established in 1963 to include representative floodplain forests along the Tanana River. Both the sequence and the mechanisms of succession have been relatively well studied along the Tanana River, where biological and physical "turning points" are hypothesized to be the main proponents of plant community succession. However, prior research has concentrated almost exclusively on four dominant woody taxa: willows, thin-leaf alder, balsam poplar, and white spruce. Comparatively little is known about successional changes in the understory taxa, including shrubs, herbaceous vascular plants, and nonvascular mosses and lichens. Long-term monitoring in BCEF not only provides a unique opportunity to investigate the relationships between vegetation and climate over a 30-year period, but also increases our knowledge and understanding about floodplain successional dynamics. Here, we analyze vegetation and climate data collected since 1977 located in the BCEF at the Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research (BNZ- LTER) site in order to address the following questions: 1) Are there identifiable understory turning points that mirror the overstory changes in succession? 2) Have changes in climate been manifested in unexpected understory vegetation changes? When examining understory vegetation, we found that the sites established in the 1970s rarely follow the traditional succesional paradigm. In addition, we found changes in functional abundance and diversity in late succesional stands that could indicate vegetation patterns related to associated changes in climate.

  7. Fixed-Rate Compressed Floating-Point Arrays.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Current compression schemes for floating-point data commonly take fixed-precision values and compress them to a variable-length bit stream, complicating memory management and random access. We present a fixed-rate, near-lossless compression scheme that maps small blocks of 4(d) values in d dimensions to a fixed, user-specified number of bits per block, thereby allowing read and write random access to compressed floating-point data at block granularity. Our approach is inspired by fixed-rate texture compression methods widely adopted in graphics hardware, but has been tailored to the high dynamic range and precision demands of scientific applications. Our compressor is based on a new, lifted, orthogonal block transform and embedded coding, allowing each per-block bit stream to be truncated at any point if desired, thus facilitating bit rate selection using a single compression scheme. To avoid compression or decompression upon every data access, we employ a software write-back cache of uncompressed blocks. Our compressor has been designed with computational simplicity and speed in mind to allow for the possibility of a hardware implementation, and uses only a small number of fixed-point arithmetic operations per compressed value. We demonstrate the viability and benefits of lossy compression in several applications, including visualization, quantitative data analysis, and numerical simulation. PMID:26356981

  8. IgG/anti-IgG immunoassay based on a turn-around point long period grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavaioli, F.; Biswas, P.; Trono, C.; Giannetti, A.; Tombelli, S.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Basumallick, N.; Dasgupta, K.; Baldini, F.

    2014-02-01

    Long period fiber gratings (LPFGs) have been proposed as label-free optical biosensor for a few years. Refractive index changes, which modify the fiber transmission spectrum, are still used for evaluating a biochemical interaction that occurs along the grating region. A turn-around point (TAP) LPFG was manufactured for enhancing the refractive index sensitivity of these devices. Considering the simplicity and the fast process with respect to the silanization procedure, the functionalization of the fiber was carried out by Eudragit L100 copolymer. An IgG/anti-IgG immunoassay was implemented for studying the antigen/antibody interaction. A limit of detection lower than 100 μg L-1 was achieved. Based on the same model assay, we compared the resonance wavelength shifts during the injection of 10 mg L-1 anti-IgG antigen between the TAP LPFG and a standard non-TAP one, in which the coupling occurs with a lower order cladding mode, as performance improvement of the LPFG-based biosensors.

  9. On the oxygen abundances of M 67 stars from the turn-off point through the red giant branch†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi; Honda, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    With an aim to examine whether the surface oxygen composition suffers any appreciable change due to evolution-induced mixing of nuclear-processed material in the envelope of red giants, abundance determinations for O/Fe/Ni based on the synthetic spectrum-fitting method were performed by using the moderate-dispersion spectra in the 7770-7792 Å region (comprising O I 7771-5, Fe I 7780, and Ni I 7788 lines) for 16 stars of the old open cluster M 67 in various evolutionary stages from the turn-off point through the red giant branch. We could not find any meaningful difference in the oxygen abundances between the non-giant group (Teff > 5000 K) and the red-giant group (Teff < 5000 K), which are almost consistent with each other on average (despite that both have rather large dispersions of a few tenths dex caused by insufficient data quality), though only one giant star (S 1054) appears to show an exceptionally low O abundance and thus needs a more detailed study. This result may suggest that oxygen content in the stellar envelope is hardly affected (or any changes are insignificant) by the mixing of H-burning products in the red giant phase, as far as M 67 stars of low mass (˜ 1.3 M⊙) are concerned, which is consistent with the prediction from the conventional stellar evolution theory of first dredge-up.

  10. High Resolution 1H NMR Spectroscopy in Rat Liver Using Magic Angle Turning at a 1 Hz Spinning Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi ); Rommereim, Donald N. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2001-12-01

    It is demonstrated that a high resolution 1H NMR spectrum of excised rat liver can be obtained using the technique of magic angle turning at a sample spinning rate of 1 Hz. A variant of the phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence that includes a water suppression segment was developed for the investigation. The spectral resolution achieved with PHORMAT is approaching that obtained from a standard magic angle spinning experiment at a spinning rate of several kHz. With such ultra-slow spinning, tissue and cell damage associated with the standard MAS experiment is minimized or eliminated. The technique is potentially useful for obtaining high-resolution 1H spectra in live animals.

  11. The Y-chromosome point mutation rate in humans.

    PubMed

    Helgason, Agnar; Einarsson, Axel W; Guðmundsdóttir, Valdís B; Sigurðsson, Ásgeir; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen D; Jagadeesan, Anuradha; Ebenesersdóttir, S Sunna; Kong, Augustine; Stefánsson, Kári

    2015-05-01

    Mutations are the fundamental source of biological variation, and their rate is a crucial parameter for evolutionary and medical studies. Here we used whole-genome sequence data from 753 Icelandic males, grouped into 274 patrilines, to estimate the point mutation rate for 21.3 Mb of male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) sequence, on the basis of 1,365 meioses (47,123 years). The combined mutation rate for 15.2 Mb of X-degenerate (XDG), X-transposed (XTR) and ampliconic excluding palindromes (rAMP) sequence was 8.71 × 10(-10) mutations per position per year (PPPY). We observed a lower rate (P = 0.04) of 7.37 × 10(-10) PPPY for 6.1 Mb of sequence from palindromes (PAL), which was not statistically different from the rate of 7.2 × 10(-10) PPPY for paternally transmitted autosomes. We postulate that the difference between PAL and the other MSY regions may provide an indication of the rate at which nascent autosomal and PAL de novo mutations are repaired as a result of gene conversion. PMID:25807285

  12. Onset Mechanism of Strain Rate Induced Flow Stress Up-turn

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yue; Osetskiy, Yury N; Yip, Sidney; Yildiz-Botterud, Bilge

    2012-01-01

    The strain-rate response of flow stress in a plastically deforming crystal is formulated through a stresssensitive dislocation mobility model that can be evaluated by atomistic simulation. For the flow stress of a model crystal of bcc Fe containing a 1/2 <111> screw dislocation, this approach describes naturally a non-Arrhenius upturn at high strain rate, an experimentally established transitional behavior for which the underlying mechanism has not been clarified. Implications of our findings regarding the previous explanations of strain-rate effects on flow stress are discussed.

  13. Fixed-rate compressed floating-point arrays

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-03-30

    ZFP is a library for lossy compression of single- and double-precision floating-point data. One of the unique features of ZFP is its support for fixed-rate compression, which enables random read and write access at the granularity of small blocks of values. Using a C++ interface, this allows declaring compressed arrays (1D, 2D, and 3D arrays are supported) that through operator overloading can be treated just like conventional, uncompressed arrays, but which allow the user tomore » specify the exact number of bits to allocate to the array. ZFP also has variable-rate fixed-precision and fixed-accuracy modes, which allow the user to specify a tolerance on the relative or absolute error.« less

  14. Detection rates of geckos in visual surveys: Turning confounding variables into useful knowledge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lardner, Bjorn; Rodda, Gordon H.; Yackel Adams, Amy A.; Savidge, Julie A.; Reed, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Transect surveys without some means of estimating detection probabilities generate population size indices prone to bias because survey conditions differ in time and space. Knowing what causes such bias can help guide the collection of relevant survey covariates, correct the survey data, anticipate situations where bias might be unacceptably large, and elucidate the ecology of target species. We used negative binomial regression to evaluate confounding variables for gecko (primarily Hemidactylus frenatus and Lepidodactylus lugubris) counts on 220-m-long transects surveyed at night, primarily for snakes, on 9,475 occasions. Searchers differed in gecko detection rates by up to a factor of six. The worst and best headlamps differed by a factor of at least two. Strong winds had a negative effect potentially as large as those of searchers or headlamps. More geckos were seen during wet weather conditions, but the effect size was small. Compared with a detection nadir during waxing gibbous (nearly full) moons above the horizon, we saw 28% more geckos during waning crescent moons below the horizon. A sine function suggested that we saw 24% more geckos at the end of the wet season than at the end of the dry season. Fluctuations on a longer timescale also were verified. Disturbingly, corrected data exhibited strong short-term fluctuations that covariates apparently failed to capture. Although some biases can be addressed with measured covariates, others will be difficult to eliminate as a significant source of error in longterm monitoring programs.

  15. Canard solution and its asymptotic approximation in a second-order nonlinear singularly perturbed boundary value problem with a turning point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jianhe; Han, Maoan

    2014-08-01

    This paper considers the existence and uniformly valid asymptotic approximation of canard solutions in a second-order nonlinear singularly perturbed boundary value problem with a turning point. We get the main results by constructing the asymptotic solution first and then defining a couple of upper and lower solutions suitably on the basis of the asymptotic solution. Two examples are carried out to illustrate and verify the theoretical results.

  16. Exploring outcomes through narrative: the long-term impacts of Better Beginnings, Better Futures on the turning point stories of youth at ages 18-19.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Geoffrey; Van Andel, Ashley K; Curwood, Susan Eckerle; Hasford, Julian; Love, Norah; Pancer, S Mark; Loomis, Colleen

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the long-term effects of the Better Beginnings, Better Futures project, a community-based early childhood development program, on 18-19 year-old youths' narratives about turning points in their lives. The sample consisted of youth who participated in Better Beginnings from ages 4-8 (n = 62) and youth from a comparison community who did not participate in Better Beginnings (n = 34). Controlling for covariates, significant differences favoring youth from the Better Beginnings sites were found on several dimensions of the turning point stories: ending resolution, personal growth, meaning-making, coherence, and affect transformation. Effect sizes ranged from .45 to .76 for these outcome dimensions, indicating moderate to large effects. Also, turning point story dimensions were found to be significantly correlated with two standardized measures of well-being: youths' self-esteem and community involvement. Youths' self-esteem was directly related to story ending resolution, personal growth, and meaning making, and youths' community involvement was directly related to story specificity, meaning making, and coherence. Family functioning was also examined in relation to these narrative dimensions but was not found to be significantly related to them. The findings suggest the utility of a narrative approach for the evaluation of the long-term outcomes of early childhood development programs. PMID:21792737

  17. The Management of Intercollegiate Athletics at UC Berkeley: Turning Points and Consequences. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.12.13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, John; Hextrum, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This white paper was prepared at the request of the Advisory Committee to the Athletic Study Center as a result of their concern over poor graduation rates in football as released by the NCAA in 2012. The paper received extensive review by the members of that committee as well as several other knowledgeable faculty and senior administrators before…

  18. Collateral Damage and Critical Turning Points: Public Health Implications of HPV Vaccine News Coverage for Boys and Men in 2011.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Melinda; Rogers, Brian

    2016-09-01

    In 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officially expanded approval of the Gardasil vaccine to include human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for boys and men, and in 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a formal recommendation for routine vaccination for this population. Despite these efforts, HPV vaccination rates for boys and men continue to fall short of public health targets. While news was breaking about the benefits of the HPV vaccine for boys and men, public attention shifted as a result of political debates concerning the vaccine. This study examines a pivotal time period for public health in which the vaccine became officially recommended for boys and men and at the same time became the center of political controversies in the lead-up to the 2012 presidential campaign. The current study extends previous research and presents a content analysis of newspaper articles (N = 154) about the HPV vaccine for the year 2011. Results indicate that the lack of comprehensive coverage of HPV and the HPV vaccine found in previous studies continued in this year. Results shed light on key political events that may have functioned to overshadow the recommendation of the HPV vaccine for boys and men. The implications of this pattern of news coverage can inform public health efforts to address low rates of HPV vaccination uptake among boys and men in present day. PMID:26799666

  19. Long-period gratings in photonic crystal fibers operating near the phase-matching turning point for evanescent chemical and biochemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanka, Jiri

    2012-06-01

    Fiber-optic long-period grating (LPG) operating near the dispersion turning point in its phase matching curve (PMC), referred to as a Turn Around Point (TAP) LPG, is known to be extremely sensitive to external parameters. Moreover, in a TAP LPG the phase matching condition can be almost satisfied over large spectral range, yielding a broadband LPG operation. TAP LPGs have been investigated, namely for use as broadband mode convertors and biosensors. So far TAP LPGs have been realized in specially designed or post-processed conventional fibers, not yet in PCFs, which allow a great degree of freedom in engineering the fiber's dispersion properties through the control of the PCF structural parameters. We have developed the design optimization technique for TAP PCF LPGs employing the finite element method for PCF modal analysis in a combination with the Nelder-Mead simplex method for minimizing the objective function based on target-specific PCF properties. Using this tool we have designed TAP PCF LPGs for specified wavelength ranges and refractive indices of medium in the air holes. Possible TAP PCF-LPG operational regimes - dual-resonance, broadband mode conversion and transmitted intensity-based operation - will be demonstrated numerically. Potential and limitations of TAP PCF-LPGs for evanescent chemical and biochemical sensing will be assessed.

  20. Learning turning points--in life with long-term illness--visualized with the help of the life-world philosophy.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Mia M U

    2014-01-01

    A long-term illness is an occurrence that changes one's life and generates a need to learn how to live with it. This article is based on an empirical study of interviews on people living with different long-term illnesses. The results have shown that the learning process is a complex phenomenon interwoven with life as a whole. The essential meaning of learning to live with long-term illness concerns a movement toward a change of understanding of access to the world. In this movement, in which everyday lives as well as relationships with oneself and others are affected, a continual renegotiation is needed. Texts from existential/lifeworld philosopher, Heidegger and Gadamer, have been used to get a greater understanding of the empirical results. These texts have been analysed with particular focus on learning turning points and the importance of reflection. The results are highlighted under the following themes: Pursuit of balance-the aim of learning, The tense grip-the resistance to learning, To live more really-the possibilities of the learning, Distancing-the how of the learning, and The tense of the learning-the whole of the learning. In those learning turning points are present. Knowledge from this study has been used to make a didactic model designed to give caregivers a tool to support patients' learning. The didactic model is called: The challenge to take charge of life with a long-term illness. PMID:24559547

  1. High-sensitivity high-resolution refractometry with twin turn-around-point long-period gratings in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanka, Jiri

    2013-05-01

    We present the numerical design of a turn-around-point long-period grating in a photonic crystal fiber (TAP PCFLPG) for high-sensitivity, high-resolution refractometry of gases. High refractive-index sensitivity is achieved by operating LPGs in the vicinity of the dispersion turning point of the optimized PCF. Despite the resonant wavelength of the optimized PCF-LPG is highly sensitive to the refractive index of analytes, its large shifts could be monitored with a reduced resolution because the resonance dip in the TAP LPG transmission spectrum is broad. To provide also high refractive-index resolution, twin TAP-LPGs have been proposed to be used as 3 dB broadband mode converters in the interferometric scheme. The first LPG couples a portion of the light in the core mode to a forward propagating cladding mode and the second LPG couples the light back to the core mode. The resulting interference fringes within the envelope of LPG attenuation dip provide a means for higher resolution sensing. Instead of monitoring the wavelength shift as a result of a refractive index change, the transmission spectrum can also be analyzed in terms of the shift in phase suffered by the fringe pattern. This is a more accurate way of interpreting the interferometric sensor measurements, since the phase shift is a direct result of an analyte-induced change in optical path length.

  2. Optimum Conditions for the Efficacy and Safety of Cryofiltration Apheresis: An Analysis of Circuit Temperatures Depending on Plasma Flow Rate and Cooling Coil Lengths/Turns.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Shuzo; Sato, Yukihiro; Takano, Tomoo; Hosino, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    A system providing both appropriate cooling and warming are needed for the efficacy and safety of cryofiltration (CF) plasmapheresis. We measured some points of CF circuit temperatures with varying plasma flow rates (QP  = 10-40 mL/min) and the numbers of connecting cooling coils (one or two) under the conditions of blood flow rate (QB ) 100 mL/min with 7700-mm coil length, 19 turns, and 50-mL priming volume. We measured the respective temperatures of each point of starting/returning for an extracorporeal circuit (TA /TV ), intracooling coil (TC ), and post-plasma fractionator (PF) (TPF ). The subtraction of TV from TA (ΔT) was used as an indicator of safe return. There were no significant differences in TC , TPF , or ΔT in accordance with each QP between that of one and two coils. All of the Tc values under the condition QP  ≤ 20 mL/min achieved <4°C. The TPF under the condition QP  ≥ 20 mL/min was not significantly different compared to that of QP 30 mL/min (the lowest condition). Although the ΔT increased depending on the QP increase, the ΔT under the condition QP  ≤ 15 mL/min was not significantly different from that of the control (one-way double-filtration plasmapheresis [DFPP]) group. We conclude that (i) one coil is enough for effective cooling in CF, and (ii) an ideal QP that fulfills the required conditions for both effective cooling and sufficient warming of returning fluid does not exist, but QP from 15 to 20 mL/min may be a relevant range. PMID:26386219

  3. Mortality rates of pathogen indicator microorganisms discharged from point and non-point sources in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geonha; Hur, Jin

    2010-01-01

    This research measured the mortality rates of pathogen indicator microorganisms discharged from various point and non-point sources in an urban area. Water samples were collected from a domestic sewer, a combined sewer overflow, the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant, and an urban river. Mortality rates of indicator microorganisms in sediment of an urban river were also measured. Mortality rates of indicator microorganisms in domestic sewage, estimated by assuming first order kinetics at 20 degrees C were 0.197 day(-1), 0.234 day(-1), 0.258 day(-1) and 0.276 day(-1) for total coliform, fecal coliform, Escherichia coli, and fecal streptococci, respectively. Effects of temperature, sunlight irradiation and settlement on the mortality rate were measured. Results of this research can be used as input data for water quality modeling or can be used as design factors for treatment facilities. PMID:20923108

  4. Study on characteristic parameters influencing laser-induced damage threshold of KH2PO4 crystal surface machined by single point diamond turning

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingjun; Li, Mingquan; Cheng, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2011-01-01

    It has fundamental meaning to find the elements influencing the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of KH2PO4 (KDP) crystal and to provide suitable characterization parameters for these factors in order to improve the LIDT of KDP. Using single-point diamond turning (SPDT) to process the KDP crystal, the machined surface quality has important effects on its LIDT. However, there are still not suitable characteristic parameters of surface quality of KDP to correspond with the LIDT nowadays. In this paper, guided by the Fourier model theory, we study deeply the relationship between the relevant characteristic parameters of surface topography of KDP crystal and the experimental LIDT. Research results indicate that the waviness rather than the roughness is the leading topography element on the KDP surface machined by the SPDT method when the LIDT is considered and the amplitude of micro-waviness has greater influence on the light intensity inside the KDP crystal within the scope of dangerous frequencies between (180 μm)−1 and (90 μm)−1; with suitable testing equipment, the characteristic parameters of waviness amplitude, such as the arithmetical mean deviation of three-dimensional profile Sa or root mean square deviation of three-dimensional contour Sq, are able to be considered as suitable parameters to reflect the optical quality of the machined surface in order to judge approximately the LIDT of the KDP surface and guide the machining course. PMID:22247567

  5. An evaluation of the three-point method to measure corrosion rates

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, M.J.

    1982-11-01

    The three-point method (TPM) as introduced by Barnartt, is shown to have some advantages over the linear polarization method in measuring corrosion rates. Experimental results on iron, theoretical limitations, and various potential sequences are discussed.

  6. Evaluation of the three-point method to measure corrosion rates

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, M.J.

    1982-11-01

    The three-point method (TPM) as introduced by Barnartt, is shown to have some advantages over the linear polarization method in measuring corrosion rates. Experimental results on iron, theoretical limitations, and various potential sequences are discussed.

  7. An Interactive Point Kernel Program For Photon Dose Rate Prediction of Cylindrical Source/Shield Arrangements.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1990-10-26

    Version 00 The program ZYLIND is an interactive point kernel program for photon dose rate prediction of a homogeneous cylindrical source shielded by cylindrical (radial) or plane (axial) layered shields.

  8. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL... intermediate points. (a) Applicability. (1) A carrier may provide in its tariff that existing rates between... destination points not named in the tariff. (2) A carrier must file a tariff publication applicable to...

  9. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL... intermediate points. (a) Applicability. (1) A carrier may provide in its tariff that existing rates between... destination points not named in the tariff. (2) A carrier must file a tariff publication applicable to...

  10. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL... intermediate points. (a) Applicability. (1) A carrier may provide in its tariff that existing rates between... destination points not named in the tariff. (2) A carrier must file a tariff publication applicable to...

  11. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL... intermediate points. (a) Applicability. (1) A carrier may provide in its tariff that existing rates between... destination points not named in the tariff. (2) A carrier must file a tariff publication applicable to...

  12. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL... intermediate points. (a) Applicability. (1) A carrier may provide in its tariff that existing rates between... destination points not named in the tariff. (2) A carrier must file a tariff publication applicable to...

  13. Approximate Method of Calculating Heating Rates at General Three-Dimensional Stagnation Points During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. H., II

    1982-01-01

    An approximate method for calculating heating rates at general three dimensional stagnation points is presented. The application of the method for making stagnation point heating calculations during atmospheric entry is described. Comparisons with results from boundary layer calculations indicate that the method should provide an accurate method for engineering type design and analysis applications.

  14. Community Schools--Results that Turn around Failing Schools: Test Scores, Attendance, Graduation and College-Going Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Community Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Great strides have been made by community school initiatives across the nation in their efforts to impact student achievement, attendance, student engagement, graduation rates, parent involvement and more. Data on community schools is growing and the authors encourage readers to review research reports and syntheses on results. The results…

  15. Taking Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Two people take turns selecting from an even number of items. Their relative preferences over the items can be described as a permutation, then tools from algebraic combinatorics can be used to answer various questions. We describe each person's optimal selection strategies including how each could make use of knowing the other's preferences. We…

  16. Determining oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus using an improved respirometer chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Longwu; Jiang, Haifeng; Tong, Guangxiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of oxygen consumption rates and asphyxiation points in fish is important to determine appropriate stocking and water quality management in aquaculture. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus were detected under laboratory conditions using an improved respirometer chamber. The results revealed that more accurate estimates can be obtained by adjusting the volume of the respirometer chamber, which may avoid system errors caused by either repeatedly adjusting fish density or selecting different equipment specifications. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point of C. mongolicus increased with increasing water temperature and decreasing fish size. Changes in the C. mongolicus oxygen consumption rate were divided into three stages at water temperatures of 11-33°C: (1) a low temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 11-19°C, (2) the optimum temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 19-23°C, and (3) a high temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was > 27°C. The temperature quotients (Q10) obtained suggested that C. mongolicus preferred a temperature range of 19-23°C. At 19°C, C. mongolicus exhibited higher oxygen consumption rates during the day when the maximum values were observed at 10:00 and 14:00 than at night when the minimum occurred at 02:00.

  17. Direct determination of the point mutation rate of a murine retrovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Monk, R J; Malik, F G; Stokesberry, D; Evans, L H

    1992-01-01

    The point mutation rate of a murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genome (AKV) was determined under conditions in which the number of replicative cycles was carefully controlled and the point mutation rate was determined by direct examination of the RNA genomes of progeny viruses. A clonal cell line infected at a low multiplicity of infection (2 x 10(-3)) was derived to provide a source of virus with high genetic homogeneity. Virus stocks from this cell line were used to infect cells at a low multiplicity of infection, and the cells were seeded soon after infection to obtain secondary clonal cell lines. RNase T1-oligonucleotide fingerprinting analyses of virion RNAs from 93 secondary lines revealed only 3 base changes in nearly 130,000 bases analyzed. To obtain an independent assessment of the mutation rate, we directly sequenced virion RNAs by using a series of DNA oligonucleotide primers distributed across the genome. RNA sequencing detected no mutations in over 21,000 bases analyzed. The combined fingerprinting and sequencing analyses yielded a mutation rate for infectious progeny viruses of one base change per 50,000 (2 x 10(-5)) bases per replication cycle. Our results suggest that over 80% of infectious progeny MuLVs may be replicated with complete fidelity and that only a low percentage undergo more than one point mutation during a replication cycle. Previous estimates of retroviral mutation rates suggest that the majority of infectious progeny viruses have undergone one or more point mutations. Recent studies of the mutation rates of marker genes in spleen necrosis virus-based vectors estimate a base substitution rate lower than estimates for infectious avian retroviruses and nearly identical to our determinations with AKV. The differences between mutation rates observed in studies of retroviruses may reflect the imposition of different selective conditions. Images PMID:1316475

  18. Constraining the Pluripotent Fate of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Cell Therapy – The Turning Point of Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Xuejun H.

    2014-01-01

    nuclear translocation of the neuronal specific transcription factor Nurr-1. Similarly, nicotinamide was rendered sufficient to induce the specification of cardiomesoderm direct from the pluripotent state of hESCs by promoting the expression of the earliest cardiac-specific transcription factor Csx/Nkx2.5 and triggering progression to cardiac precursors and beating cardiomyocytes with high efficiency. This technology breakthrough enables direct conversion of pluripotent hESCs into a large supply of high purity neuronal cells or heart muscle cells with adequate capacity to regenerate CNS neurons and contractile heart muscles for developing safe and effective stem cell therapies. Transforming pluripotent hESCs into fate-restricted therapy derivatives dramatically increases the clinical efficacy of graft-dependent repair and safety of hESC-derived cellular products. Such milestone advances and medical innovations in hESC research allow generation of a large supply of clinical-grade hESC therapy derivatives targeting for major health problems, bringing cell-based regenerative medicine to a turning point. PMID:24926434

  19. Use of the point load index in estimation of the strength rating for the RMR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Kadir; Kaya, Ayberk; Kesimal, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    The Rock Mass Rating (RMR) system is a worldwide reference for design applications involving estimation of rock mass properties and tunnel support. In the RMR system, Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS) is an important input parameter to determine the strength rating of intact rock. In practice, there are some difficulties in determining the UCS of rocks from problematic ground conditions due to rapid data requirements. In this study, a combined strength rating chart was developed to overcome this problem based on the experience gained in the last decades from the point load test. For this purpose, a total of 490 UCS and Point Load Index (PLI) data pairs collected from the accessible world literature and obtained from the Eastern Black Sea Region (EBSR) in Turkey were evaluated together. The UCS and PLI data pairs were classified for the cases of PLI < 1 and PLI > 1 MPa, and two different strength rating charts were suggested by using the regression analyses. The Variance Account For (VAF), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) indices were calculated to compare the performance of the prediction capacity of the suggested strength rating charts. Further, the one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to test whether the means of the calculated and predicted ratings are similar to each other. Findings of the analyses have demonstrated that the combined strength rating chart for the cases of PLI < 1 and PLI > 1 MPa can be reliably used in estimation of the strength ratings for the RMR system.

  20. Vigor rating and brix for first clonal selection stage of the Canal Point Cultivar Development Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A better understanding of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) genetic variability in agronomic performance will help optimize breeding and selection strategies. Vigor ratings and Brix data were collected from the 2009 and 2010 clones in the first clonal selection stage (Stage I) of the Canal Point (CP) sugar...

  1. [A turning point in the therapeutic history of open leg fractures: osteosynthesis coupled to the immediate dressing in the presence of major damage to the soft tissues].

    PubMed

    Vichard, P; Tropet, Y; Garbuio, P

    1999-01-01

    A brief history of the treatment of open leg fractures (OLF) points out the problems posed by the present therapy with regard to the soft tissues in the most serious cases (type III from cauchoix, Duparc, type III A and B from Gustilo). Which strategy should be foremost, knowing that the debridement, stabilization and cover are the three essential procedures? Rigorous debridement certainly carries unanimous approval but some are opposed to this procedure during the first few days. Also widely recognized is the beneficial aspect of early cover when regarding aseptic evolution, consolidation, low rate of complications, rehabilitation and the patient's helplessness. However, despite the well demonstrated results of BYRD [14] and GODINA [15] and because of the debridement concept and logistical insufficiencies, thorough treatment in a true emergency has not achieved full acceptance. In general, the majority of surgeons first clear, stabilize with the use of an external fixator in true emergency situations and cover several days later. For the past ten years, in real emergencies, in the Department of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Plastic Surgery at the Besançon University Hospital Center we have subscribed to a radical treatment which simultaneously combines debridement, osteosynthesis (locked centro-medullary nailing) and cover with the use of free flaps in the same operating period. A study based on 27 wounded patients seeks to validate the advantages of looked centro-medullary nailing over the use of an external fixator and the use of free flaps rather than local flaps in the most serious cases. PMID:10437287

  2. Reducing sojourn points from recurrence plots to improve transition detection: Application to fetal heart rate transitions.

    PubMed

    Zaylaa, Amira; Charara, Jamal; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of biomedical signals demonstrating complexity through recurrence plots is challenging. Quantification of recurrences is often biased by sojourn points that hide dynamic transitions. To overcome this problem, time series have previously been embedded at high dimensions. However, no one has quantified the elimination of sojourn points and rate of detection, nor the enhancement of transition detection has been investigated. This paper reports our on-going efforts to improve the detection of dynamic transitions from logistic maps and fetal hearts by reducing sojourn points. Three signal-based recurrence plots were developed, i.e. embedded with specific settings, derivative-based and m-time pattern. Determinism, cross-determinism and percentage of reduced sojourn points were computed to detect transitions. For logistic maps, an increase of 50% and 34.3% in sensitivity of detection over alternatives was achieved by m-time pattern and embedded recurrence plots with specific settings, respectively, and with a 100% specificity. For fetal heart rates, embedded recurrence plots with specific settings provided the best performance, followed by derivative-based recurrence plot, then unembedded recurrence plot using the determinism parameter. The relative errors between healthy and distressed fetuses were 153%, 95% and 91%. More than 50% of sojourn points were eliminated, allowing better detection of heart transitions triggered by gaseous exchange factors. This could be significant in improving the diagnosis of fetal state. PMID:25308517

  3. Using the Inflection Points and Rates of Growth and Decay to Predict Levels of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    The ascending and descending inflection points and rates of growth and decay at specific times during the sunspot cycle are examined as predictors for future activity. On average, the ascending inflection point occurs about 1-2 yr after sunspot minimum amplitude (Rm) and the descending inflection point occurs about 6-7 yr after Rm. The ascending inflection point and the inferred slope (including the 12-mo moving average (12-mma) of (Delta)R (the month-to-month change in the smoothed monthly mean sunspot number (R)) at the ascending inflection point provide strong indications as to the expected size of the ongoing cycle s sunspot maximum amplitude (RM), while the descending inflection point appears to provide an indication as to the expected length of the ongoing cycle. The value of the 12-mma of (Delta)R at elapsed time T = 27 mo past the epoch of RM (E(RM)) seems to provide a strong indication as to the expected size of Rm for the following cycle. The expected Rm for cycle 24 is 7.6 +/- 4.4 (the 90-percent prediction interval), occurring before September 2008. Evidence is also presented for secular rises in selected cycle-related parameters and for preferential grouping of sunspot cycles by amplitude and/or period.

  4. Turn-over rate of academic faculty at the College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University: a 20-year analysis (1991 to 2011)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Faculty turn-over affects both workers and organizations. Turnover of faculty and researchers is increasing alarmingly and costing the universities and the country at large. Fast turnover of health professionals from the health system and from academic institutions has recently received substantial attention from both academia and health sector managers. This paper calculates the faculty turnover rate at the College of Health Sciences of Addis Ababa University during the period of September 1991 to August 2011. Methods The study was conducted at the College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University. Retrospective analysis of employee records was done. All records of the faculty that were working in the College during the 20-year period, starting from September 1991 to August 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected from the employee records accessed from the College’s human resources database and supplemented by payroll sheets and different reports. A structured checklist was used to extract the required data from the database. The crude turnover rate for academic faculty was calculated. Results Within the 20-year period of September 1991 to August 2011, a total of 120 faculty members left. The overall turn-over rate was 92.8 %. The rate in the most recent five years (172 %) is 8.5 times higher than the rate for the first five years (20 %). The average retention period before the termination of an employment contract was 4.9 years. The top five departments where employment contracts were relatively higher include: Nursing 15 (15.6 %), Internal Medicine 12 (12.5%), Public Health 10 (10.4%), Pediatrics 9 (9.4%) and Surgery 9 (9.4%). About two thirds (66.6%) of the faculty who were leaving were at the ranks of assistant professorship and above. Conclusion This study revealed that outflow of faculty has been continuously increasing in the period reviewed. This implies that the College had been losing highly skilled professionals with

  5. To turn or not to turn?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beta, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria typically swim in straight runs, interruped by sudden turning events. In particular, some species are limited to a reversal in the swimming direction as the only turning maneuver at their disposal. In a recent article, Großmann et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043009) introduce a theoretical framework to analyze the diffusive properties of active particles following this type of run-and-reverse pattern. Based on a stochastic clock model to mimic the regulatory pathway that triggers reversal events, they show that a run-and-reverse swimmer can optimize its diffusive spreading by tuning the reversal rate according to the level of rotational noise. With their approach, they open up promising new perspectives of how to incorporate the dynamics of intracellular signaling into coarse-grained active particle descriptions.

  6. Structural origin underlying the effect of cooling rate on solidification point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen-Hui; Han, Xiu-Jun; Luan, Ying-Wei; Li, Jian-Guo

    2015-11-01

    Solidification behaviors of liquid aluminum at different cooling rates were examined via classical molecular dynamics simulation with an embedded atom method potential. The results demonstrate that solidification point decreases with increasing cooling rate. To explain this phenomenon, solid-like cluster in liquid was analyzed by the structural analysis method of bond order parameters. The results reveal that the size of the largest solid-like cluster in deeply undercooled liquid decreases with the increase of cooling rate, which can provide a structural interpretation to the above phenomenon. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB012900), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51171115), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai City, China (Grant No. 10ZR1415700), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20100073120008), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in Universities of China. This work is partially supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  7. Prediction of change in protein unfolding rates upon point mutations in two state proteins.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Priyashree; Naganathan, Athi N; Gromiha, M Michael

    2016-09-01

    Studies on protein unfolding rates are limited and challenging due to the complexity of unfolding mechanism and the larger dynamic range of the experimental data. Though attempts have been made to predict unfolding rates using protein sequence-structure information there is no available method for predicting the unfolding rates of proteins upon specific point mutations. In this work, we have systematically analyzed a set of 790 single mutants and developed a robust method for predicting protein unfolding rates upon mutations (Δlnku) in two-state proteins by combining amino acid properties and knowledge-based classification of mutants with multiple linear regression technique. We obtain a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.79/s and a Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.71 between predicted unfolding rates and experimental observations using jack-knife test. We have developed a web server for predicting protein unfolding rates upon mutation and it is freely available at https://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/proteinunfolding/unfoldingrace.html. Prominent features that determine unfolding kinetics as well as plausible reasons for the observed outliers are also discussed. PMID:27264959

  8. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  9. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Dendrite Coherency Point During Solidification of Al2024 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoncheh, M. H.; Shabestari, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Most research related to dendrite coherency point (DCP) has been done on cast aluminum alloys and at a low cooling rate condition. In this research, the DCP of a wrought aluminum alloy is calculated in the range of high cooling rates used in the direct-chill casting process. The two-thermocouple thermal analysis technique was used to determine the DCP of Al2024 alloy. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of different cooling rates on the dendrite coherency characteristics of Al2024. The cooling rates used in the present study range from 0.4 to 17.5 °C s-1. Also, the effect of 1.2 wt pct Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner on the DCP was studied. To calculate the solid fraction at dendrite coherency, solid fraction versus time is plotted based on Newtonian technique. The results show that by increasing the cooling rate, both time and temperature of dendrite coherency are decreased. Also, by adding the Al-5Ti-1B master alloy, dendrite coherency temperature is reduced and dendrite impingement is postponed. To reduce casting defects occurring during equiaxed solidification, e.g., macrosegregation, porosities, and hot tearing, these two operations which lead to postpone the transition from mass to inter-dendritic feeding, or dendrite coherency, can be useful. By increasing the cooling rate, solid fraction at dendrite coherency increases initially and then decreases at higher cooling rates. Presence of grain refiner leads to increasing of solid fraction at DCP. Thus, by delaying the dendrite coherency and increasing the solid fraction at DCP, semi-solid forming can be performed on parts with higher solid fraction and less shrinkage. Microstructural evaluation was carried out to present the correlation between the cooling rate and solid fraction in 2024 aluminum alloy.

  10. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p < 0.001) between physiological (HR and oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)]) and performance (Time, Stage, and Frequency of balls [Ballf]) variables corresponding to HRDP and VT2 were observed. Frequency of balls at the HRDP (BallfHRDP) was detected at 19.8 ± 1.7 shots per minute. Paired t-test showed no significant differences in HR (178.9 ± 8.5 vs. 177.9 ± 8.7 b·min for HRDP vs. HRVT2, respectively) at intensities corresponding to HRDP and VT2. Maximal test performance and (Equation is included in full-text article.)were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; p < 0.001). Heart rate deflection point obtained from this specific tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2. PMID:25162649

  11. Stagnation-point heat-transfer rate predictions at aeroassist flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Jones, Jim J.; Rochelle, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented for the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates used in the design process of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle over its entire aeropass trajectory. The prediction methods used in this investigation demonstrate the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to a wide range of flight conditions and their usefulness in a design process. The heating rates were computed by a viscous-shock-layer (VSL) code at the lower altitudes and by a Navier-Stokes (N-S) code for the higher altitude cases. For both methods, finite-rate chemically reacting gas was considered, and a temperature-dependent wall-catalysis model was used. The wall temperature for each case was assumed to be radiative equilibrium temperature, based on total heating. The radiative heating was estimated by using a correlation equation. Wall slip was included in the N-S calculation method, and this method implicitly accounts for shock slip. The N-S/VSL combination of projection methods was established by comparison with the published benchmark flow-field code LAURA results at lower altitudes, and the direct simulation Monte Carlo results at higher altitude cases. To obtain the design heating rate over the entire forward face of the vehicle, a boundary-layer method (BLIMP code) that employs reacting chemistry and surface catalysis was used. The ratio of the VSL or N-S method prediction to that obtained from the boundary-layer method code at the stagnation point is used to define an adjustment factor, which accounts for the errors involved in using the boundary-layer method.

  12. Migration as a turning point in food habits: the early phase of dietary acculturation among women from South Asian, African, and Middle Eastern Countries living in Norway.

    PubMed

    Terragni, Laura; Garnweidner, Lisa M; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Mosdøl, Annhild

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the early phase of dietary acculturation after migration. South Asian, African and Middle Eastern women (N = 21) living in Norway were interviewed about their early experiences with food in a new context. The findings pointed to abrupt changes in food habits in the first period after migration. To various degrees, women reported unfamiliarity with foods in shops, uncertainty about meal formats and food preparation and fear of eating food prohibited by their religion. Their food consumption tended to be restricted to food items perceived as familiar or safe. Our findings indicate that the first period after migration represents a specific phase in the process of dietary acculturation. Early initiatives aimed at enhancing confidence in food and familiarity with the new food culture are recommended. PMID:24735209

  13. Return rates from intertidal foraging from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point: Understanding early human economies.

    PubMed

    De Vynck, Jan C; Anderson, Robert; Atwater, Chloe; Cowling, Richard M; Fisher, Erich C; Marean, Curtis W; Walker, Robert S; Hill, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The south coast of South Africa provides the earliest evidence for Middle Stone Age (MSA) coastal resource exploitation by early Homo sapiens. In coastal archaeology worldwide, there has been a debate over the general productivity of intertidal foraging, leading to studies that directly measure productivity in some regions, but there have been no such studies in South Africa. Here we present energetic return rate estimates for intertidal foraging along the southern coast of South Africa from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point. Foraging experiments were conducted with Khoi-San descendants of the region, and hourly caloric return rates for experienced foragers were measured on 41 days near low tide and through three seasons over two study years. On-site return rates varied as a function of sex, tidal level, marine habitat type and weather conditions. The overall energetic return rate from the entire sample (1492 kcal h(-1)) equals or exceeds intertidal returns reported from other hunter-gatherer studies, as well as measured return rates for activities as diverse as hunting mammals and plant collecting. Returns are projected to be exceptionally high (∼3400 kcal h(-1) for men, ∼1900 kcal h(-1) for women) under the best combination of conditions. However, because of the monthly tidal cycle, high return foraging is only possible for about 10 days per month and for only 2-3 h on those days. These experiments suggest that while intertidal resources are attractive, women and children could not have subsisted independently, nor met all their protein-lipid needs from marine resources alone, and would have required substantial additional energy and nutrients from plant gathering and/or from males contributing game. PMID:26989020

  14. Use of dew-point detection for quantitative measurement of sweating rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brengelmann, G. L.; Mckeag, M.; Rowell, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    A method of measuring sweat rate (SR) based on detection of dew point (DP) is proposed which has advantages that may be attractive to other laboratories concerned with recording SR from selected areas of skin. It is similar to other methods in that dry gas is passed through a capsule which isolates several square centimeters of skin surface. The difference is in the means of determining how much gaseous water is carried off in the effluent moist gas. The DP detector used is free of the drawbacks of previous devices. DP is obtained through the fundamental technique of determining the temperature at which condensate forms on a mirror. Variations in DP are tracked rapidly, and accurately (+ or - 0.8 C nominal, sensitivity + or - 0.05 C) over a wide range ( -40 C to +50 C) without measurable hysteresis. The detector asembly is rugged and readily opened for cleaning and inspection.

  15. Development of reprogrammable high frame-rate detector devices for laser communication pointing, acquisition and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Terita; Conner, Kenneth; Covington, Richard; Ngo, Hung; Rink, Christine

    2008-02-01

    A Two Terminal Laser Communication Test Bed has been developed at The Aerospace Corporation. This paper presents the design and preliminary results of a reprogrammable detector within the Test Bed for use in pointing, acquisition, and tracking between a Satellite-to-Satellite Laser Communication link. The detector may be commanded by an emulated spacecraft Command & Data Handling subsystem to switch between full-array scanning and "small sized" N x M pixel Field of View (FOV) for high-rate laser tracking. The approach follows a parallel path to implement the signal processing algorithm on two different hardware resources: a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The focus of this effort is to present a methodology for testing and evaluating various techniques for advanced focal plane array (FPA) hardware, as well as sensor FPA control, image processing and laser beam X & Y position algorithms.

  16. Instantaneous monitoring of sleep fragmentation by point process heart rate variability and respiratory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Citi, Luca; Bianchi, Matt T; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel, automatic point-process approach that is able to provide continuous, instantaneous estimates of heart rate variability (HRV) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in long duration data recordings such as those during an entire night of sleep. We analyze subjects with and without sleep apnea who underwent diagnostic polysomnography. The proposed algorithm is able to quantify multi-scale high time resolution autonomic signatures of sleep fragmentation, such as arousals and stage transitions, throughout an entire night. Results demonstrate the ability of our methods to track fast dynamic transitions from sleep to wake and between REM sleep and other sleep stages, providing resolution details not available in sleep scoring summaries. An automatic threshold-based procedure is further able to detect brief arousals, with the instantaneous indices characterizing specific arousal dynamic signatures. PMID:22256131

  17. Detection of change points in underlying earthquake rates, with application to global mega-earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touati, Sarah; Naylor, Mark; Main, Ian

    2016-02-01

    The recent spate of mega-earthquakes since 2004 has led to speculation of an underlying change in the global `background' rate of large events. At a regional scale, detecting changes in background rate is also an important practical problem for operational forecasting and risk calculation, for example due to volcanic processes, seismicity induced by fluid injection or withdrawal, or due to redistribution of Coulomb stress after natural large events. Here we examine the general problem of detecting changes in background rate in earthquake catalogues with and without correlated events, for the first time using the Bayes factor as a discriminant for models of varying complexity. First we use synthetic Poisson (purely random) and Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) models (which also allow for earthquake triggering) to test the effectiveness of many standard methods of addressing this question. These fall into two classes: those that evaluate the relative likelihood of different models, for example using Information Criteria or the Bayes Factor; and those that evaluate the probability of the observations (including extreme events or clusters of events) under a single null hypothesis, for example by applying the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and `runs' tests, and a variety of Z-score tests. The results demonstrate that the effectiveness among these tests varies widely. Information Criteria worked at least as well as the more computationally expensive Bayes factor method, and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and runs tests proved to be the relatively ineffective in reliably detecting a change point. We then apply the methods tested to events at different thresholds above magnitude M ≥ 7 in the global earthquake catalogue since 1918, after first declustering the catalogue. This is most effectively done by removing likely correlated events using a much lower magnitude threshold (M ≥ 5), where triggering is much more obvious. We find no strong evidence that the background rate of large

  18. Meloxicam transdermal delivery: effect of eutectic point on the rate and extent of skin permeation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Yousefi, Gholamhossein; Mohammadi, Farhad; Ahmadi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Drug delivery through the skin can transfer therapeutic levels of drugs for pharmacological effects. Analgesics such as NSAIDs have gastrointestinal side effects and topical dosage forms of these drugs are mainly preferred, especially for local pains. Meloxicam is one of NSAIDs with no topical form in the market. In this research, we attempted to quantify the skin permeation of a meloxicam topical preparation and to show how permeation would be increased by using thymol as an enhancer. The effect of eutectic point of drug and thymol mixture on rate and extent of skin permeation was also studied. Materials and Methods: Different mixtures of thymol and meloxicam (2:8, 4:6, 5:5, 6:4, 8:2) were prepared and their melting point were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Then drug permeation was measured using diffusion cells and the Guinea pig skin. Results: Mixtures in ratios 5:5 and 4:6 of meloxicam / thymol showed a new endotherm at 149 and 140°C in DSC thermograms. The permeability of meloxicam from the creams containing 6:4, 5:5 and 4:6 ratios of meloxicam to thymol were 4.71, 15.2, 22.06 µg/cm2 respectively. This was significantly different from the cream of pure meloxicam (3.76 µg/cm2). Conclusion: This study set out to determine that thymol plays as a skin permeation enhancer and increases the meloxicam skin absorption and this enhancement is significant at the eutectic point of drug-enhancer mixture. PMID:24711894

  19. Benthic remineralisation rates in southern North Sea - from point measurements to areal estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2015-04-01

    The southern North Sea is enclosed by densely populated hinterland with intensive use by agriculture and industry and thus substantially affected by anthropogenic influences. As a coastal subsystem, this applies especially to the German Wadden Sea, a system of back-barrier tidal flats along the whole German Bight. Ongoing efforts to implement environmental protection policies during the last decades changed the significance of various pollutants such as reactive nitrogen or phosphate, which raises the desire for constant monitoring of the coastal ecosystem to assess the efficiency of the employed environmental protection measures. Environmental monitoring is limited to point measurements which thus have to be interpolated with appropriate models. However, existing models to estimate various sediment characteristics for the interpolation of point measurements appear insufficient when compared with actual field measurements in the southern North Sea. We therefore seek to improve these models by identifying and quantifying key variables of benthic solute fluxes by comprehensive measurements which cover the complete spatial and seasonal variability. We employ in-situ measurements with the eddy-correlation technique and flux chambers in combination with ex-situ incubations of sediment cores to establish benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients. Additional ex-situ measurements determine basic sediment characteristics such as permeability, volumetric reaction rates, and substrate concentration. With our first results we mapped the distribution of measured sediment permeability, which suggest that areas with water depth greater than 30 m are impervious whereas sediment in shallower water at the Dogger Bank and along the coast is substantially permeable with permeability between 10-12 m2 and 10-10 m2. This implies that benthic fluxes can be estimated with simple diffusion-type models for water depths >30 m, whereas estimates especially for coastal sediments require

  20. Noninvasive Determination of Anaerobic Threshold Based on the Heart Rate Deflection Point in Water Cycling.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Stephanie S; Brasil, Roxana M; Alberton, Cristine L; Ferreira, Hector K; Bagatini, Natália C; Calatayud, Joaquin; Colado, Juan C

    2016-02-01

    This study compared heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), percentage of maximal HR (%HRmax), percentage of maximal VO2, and cadence (Cad) related to the anaerobic threshold (AT) during a water cycling maximal test between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and ventilatory (VT) methods. In addition, the correlations between both methods were assessed for all variables. The test was performed by 27 men in a cycle ergometer in an aquatic environment. The protocol started at a Cad of 100 b · min(-1) for 3 minutes with subsequent increments of 15 b · min(-1) every 2 minutes until exhaustion. A paired two-tailed Student's t-test was used to compare the variables between the HRDP and VT methods. The Pearson product-moment correlation test was used to correlate the same variables determined by the 2 methods. There was no difference in HR (166 ± 13 vs. 166 ± 13 b · min(-1)), VO2 (38.56 ± 6.26 vs. 39.18 ± 6.13 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)), %HRmax (89.24 ± 3.84 vs. 89.52 ± 4.29%), VO2max (70.44 ± 7.99 vs. 71.64 ± 8.32%), and Cad (174 ± 14 b · min(-1) vs. 171 ± 8 b · min(-1)) related to AT between the HRDP and VT methods. Moreover, significant relationships were found between the methods to determine the AT for all variables analyzed (r = 0.57-0.97). The estimation of the HRDP may be a noninvasive and easy method to determine the AT, which could be used to adapt individualized training intensities to practitioners during water cycling classes. PMID:26200195

  1. Clinical Facts, Turning Points and Complexity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lush, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I explore how we might link ideas about clinical facts to current issues in child psychotherapy research. I consider what our understanding of clinical facts might contribute to our research methods and how our research methods might better represent the clinical facts. The paper introduces a selection of psychoanalytic writers'…

  2. Turning Points In My Medical Career

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Sunil

    2006-01-01

    I have reviewed briefly persons who have influenced me during my years as a student of medicine and to date. I have been blessed in my teachers and owe everything I am to them. The chief lessons they taught me were integrity, sincerity, the need to keep learning and practice ethically keeping the welfare of the patient in mind all the time. Above all, they taught me to observe the Golden Rule**. PMID:22013339

  3. Foundation for the Future: Turning Points.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

    This booklet, the third publication in the Foundation for the Future series, illustrates how involvement in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources' (EHR's) projects has been a watershed for many people. The personal profiles contained within describe how EHR programs are: changing people's lives, opening people's minds to new…

  4. The Turning Point: Telecommunications and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Marc S.

    1983-01-01

    Reports on the expanded role of telecommunications in education, especially the computer networks that are developing on college campuses such as University of Minnesota and Carnegie-Mellon University. Discusses how the growing importance of telecommunications will affect policy in the management of higher education. (PD)

  5. [French immigration policy at a turning point?].

    PubMed

    Wihtol De Wenden, C

    1995-01-01

    The author examines the changes to French immigration law adopted in 1993 in the light of current trends and pressures affecting migration to France. The focus is on the changes in the rules concerning the acquisition of French nationality, and the assimilation of existing immigrants from developing countries. The difficulties of resolving such problems at the national level while migration regulations are being developed at the European Community level are noted. Problems involving the control of the nation's borders, illegal immigration, and the growing demand for political asylum are also discussed. The author raises the possibility that immigration could be better managed in light of current labor market conditions in France. PMID:12321430

  6. Canard solutions near a degenerate turning point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, T.

    2006-12-01

    We are interested in the study of canard solutions in a singularly perturbed real first order ODE of the form epsilonu' = Ψ(x, u, a, epsilon), where epsilon > 0 is a small parameter, and a in Script R is a control parameter. An existence result for such solutions is given, and the method used in the demonstration allow us to conjecture the existence of a generalized epsilon1/(p+1)-asymptotic expansion for those solutions.

  7. At a long-awaited turning point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2014-07-01

    Research in nanotechnology in India is on an upswing given the substantial investments in the past two decades. Making an impact globally will now require investing in education, entrepreneurship, translational science, infrastructure for manufacturing, and changing the administrative mindset.

  8. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of a biological "antifreeze", AFGP 1-5: an explanation in terms of adsorption rate for the concentration dependence of the freezing point.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; DeVries, A L

    2009-07-21

    It is widely accepted, and we agree, that the lowering of the temperature at which ice can grow in a water solution of one of the biological antifreezes is a result of adsorption of the antifreeze molecules at the ice surface. However, how this can produce a well-defined "freezing point" that varies with the solution concentration has remained problematical. The results of a series of measurements of ice growing in supercooled solutions of an effective antifreeze are reported and interpreted in terms of this fundamental problem. It seemed that the solution of the problem would have to rely upon adsorption rate, because that appeared to be the only way for the concentration in solution to be so important. The crystal growth results are most unusual, and appear to confirm this. The growth rates over a wide range of antifreeze concentration in solution (about 0.05 to 9 mg ml(-1)) are zero from the thermodynamic freezing point down to the "non-equilibrium" freezing point, where there is a very sudden increase to a plateau value that then remains about constant as the supercooling is increased by about 2 degrees C. The plateau values of growth rate are faster than those from pure water at the lower-supercooling ends of the plateaus, but slower at higher supercooling, until the growth rate starts rising toward that from pure water. These plateau values of growth rate increase markedly with increasing concentration of the antifreeze in solution. Along with these changes there are complex changes in the growth orientations, from c-axis spicules in the plateaus to those more characteristic of growth from pure water at greater supercooling. We conclude that the non-equilibrium freezing point is determined by the adsorption rate. It is the warmest temperature at which the ice growth rate on the basal plane (where the antifreeze does not adsorb) is fast enough to prevent the area of basal face on a growing ice crystal from becoming too small to grow, which is determined in

  9. Nematode Chemotaxis: Gradual Turns, Sharp Turns, and Modulated Turn Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Amar; Padmanabhan, Venkat; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2013-03-01

    We examine strategies used by the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans for chemotaxis in complex environments. The proposed description is based on our recently developed piecewise-harmonic-curvature model of nematode locomotion [PLoS ONE, 7(7) e40121 (2012)], where random harmonic-curvature modes represent elementary locomotory movements. We show that the previously described gradual-turn and sharp-turn chemotaxis strategies can be unified in our model. The gradual-turn mechanism relies on crawling amplitude changes commensurate with the undulation frequency. The sharp-turn mechanism consists in modulation of the frequency of jumps to large-amplitude modes. We hypothesize that there exists a third strategy, where the nematode adjusts the variance of the amplitude distribution. Such adjustments result in a modulation of the magnitude of random turns, with smaller turns performed when the nematode moves toward the increasing chemoatractant concentration. Experiments are proposed to determine if the third strategy is present in the nematode behavior. This work was supported by NSF grant No. CBET 1059745.

  10. Turning towards History: Turning towards Utopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2004-01-01

    Turning towards history--to be contrasted with turning away from history--captures the Marxian sense of education. Marx worked out the elements of a theory of political education in relation to history by equating education with the coincidence of the changing of circumstances and people. This theory received its most comprehensive yet succinct…

  11. Agricultural Turns, Geographical Turns: Retrospect and Prospect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carol; Evans, Nick

    2004-01-01

    It is accepted that British rural geography has actively engaged with the "cultural turn", leading to a resurgence of research within the sub-discipline. However, a reading of recent reviews suggests that the cultural turn has largely, if not completely, bypassed those geographers interested in the agricultural sector. Farming centred engagements…

  12. ESTIMATING THE RATE OF PLASMID TRANSFER: AN END-POINT METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method is described for determining rate parameter of conjugative plasmid transfer that is based on single estimates of donor, recipient and transconjugant densities, and the growth rate in exponential phase of the mating culture. he formula for estimating the plasmid transfer ...

  13. The Effects of Part-Time Employment on High School Students' Grade Point Averages and Rate of School Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffez, Jack

    To determine what effects employment will have on high school students' grade point averages and rate of school attendance, the author involved fifty-six students in an experiment. Twenty-eight students were employed part-time under the Youth Incentive Entitlement Project (YIEP). The twenty-eight students in the control group were eligible for…

  14. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: a conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a technique for determining the trace gas emission rate from a point source. The technique was tested using data from controlled methane release experiments and from measurement downwind of a natural gas production facility in Wyoming. Concentration measuremen...

  15. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: A conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Wittig, Tierney A.; Thoma, Eben D.; Albertson, John D.

    2015-08-01

    Emerging mobile fugitive emissions detection and measurement approaches require robust inverse source algorithms to be effective. Two Gaussian plume inverse approaches are described for estimating emission rates from ground-level point sources observed from remote vantage points. The techniques were tested using data from 41 controlled methane release experiments (14 studies) and further investigated using 7 field studies executed downwind of oil and gas well pads in Wyoming. Analyzed measurements were acquired from stationary observation locations 18-106 m downwind of the emission sources. From the fluctuating wind direction, the lateral plume geometry is reconstructed using a derived relationship between the wind direction and crosswind plume position. The crosswind plume spread is determined with both modeled and reconstructed Gaussian plume approaches and estimates of source emission rates are found through inversion. The source emission rates were compared to a simple point source Gaussian emission estimation approach that is part of Draft EPA Method OTM 33A. Compared to the known release rates, the modeled, reconstructed, and point source Gaussian controlled release results yield average percent errors of -5%, -2%, and 6% with standard deviations of 29%, 25%, and 37%, respectively. Compared to each other, the three methods agree within 30% for 78% of all 48 observations (41 CR and 7 Wyoming).

  16. Does Scale Length Matter? A Comparison of Nine- versus Five-Point Rating Scales for the Mini-CEX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Educators must often decide how many points to use in a rating scale. No studies have compared interrater reliability for different-length scales, and few have evaluated accuracy. This study sought to evaluate the interrater reliability and accuracy of mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) scores, comparing the traditional mini-CEX…

  17. Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a SingleDownwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a Single Downwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor With the tremendous advances in onshore oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) capability comes the realization that new tools are needed to support env...

  18. [Turning points in world history: urological comments on pathography of famous people: did Napoleon Bonaparte have a cystitis during the battle of Waterloo and was the battle lost because of that?].

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, M; Stastny, M; Haferkamp, A

    2011-03-01

    Apparently unimportant diseases of some prominent figures can have a considerable effect on the course of time at turning points in world history. It is quite conceivable that the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815 had been lost by France because Napoleon was not in full possession of his powers, because he was suffering from acute cystitis. Adverse weather conditions with continuous rain and coldness in advance of the battle, extremely primitive hygienic conditions and more than simple quarters for the night led to the development of cystitis. Based on the records of his biographers, his personal physician and the letters to his brother, we know that Napoleon was not able to give the command to attack in the early morning as intended, but in the early noon, only because of his bad general condition. This delay of several hours led, as we all know, to the intervention of Prussia and the devastating defeat of France. Thus it appears that a relatively unimportant urological disease influenced the course of world history crucially. PMID:21340596

  19. The Turning and Evolution of the Recent Acceleration Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi; Tan, A.

    2007-05-01

    The turning point and evolution characteristics of the universe are investigated through solving the Friedmann equation with a non-zero cosmological constant. Choosing the present-time Hubble constant, the radius of the present universe , and the density parameter in matter as three key parameters, we obtain the density parameter in dark energy, the cosmological constant, the mass of the universe, the turning point redshif, the age of the present universe, and the time-dependent expansion rate, velocity, radius, and acceleration parameter of the universe. It is shown that the turing point redshift is soly dependent of the density parameters in matter and dark energy. For the flat universe, it turned from past deceleration to recent acceleration when its size was 1/2 to 2/3 of the present size if the density parameter in matter is between 0.2 and 0.4. The expansion rate is very large at initial and decreases with time to approach the Hubble constant. The expansion velocity can be over the light speed in the early period, which decreases to the minimum at the turning point and then increases with time to approach the ratio of the present radius to the Hubble radius times the square root of the density parameter in dark energy. The solution of the time-dependent radius increases with time. The present time depends on the three key parameters. The universe with a larger present radius, smaller Hubble constant, or smaller density parameter in dark energy is elder. The universe with greater density parameter in dark energy accelerates faster recently. The open and closed universes can also be accelerated recently. The turning points and evolution characteristics among different types of the universe and different sets of key parameters are compared. This presentation will show the details, supported by NASA grant (NNG04GD59G).

  20. Temporal variation in natural methane seep rate due to tides, Coal Oil Point area, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boles, J. R.; Clark, J. F.; Leifer, I.; Washburn, L.

    2001-11-01

    Two large steel tents (each 30 m by 30 m), open at the bottom to the seafloor, capture ˜16,800 m3 d-1 (594 MCF) of primarily methane from a large natural hydrocarbon seep, occurring a kilometer offshore in 67 m of water. The gas is piped to shore where it is metered and processed. The seep flow rate was monitored hourly for 9 months. Our results show that the tidal forcing causes the flow rate to vary by 4-7% around the mean. These results are the first quantitative documentation of the effect of tides on natural gas seepage in relatively deep water. Time series analyses of the 9 month record clearly show four principal tidal components with periods of 12.0, 12.4, 23.9, and 25.8 hours. High tide correlates with reduced flow, and low tide correlates with increased flow. The correlation indicates that each meter increase of sea height results in a decrease of 10-15 m3 hr-1 or 1.5-2.2% of the hourly flow rate. The observed changes are best accounted for by a pore activation model, whereby gas is released from small pores at low pressures but is inhibited at higher pressure. Pressure-dependent gas solubility changes are a less likely cause of flow variation. Our study implies that sea level differences, on a tidal timescale, can significantly change the gas seepage rate from sediments. Lower sea level in the last hundred thousand years would presumably allow higher gas loss from the sediment, assuming sufficient gas present, because of reduced hydrostatic pressure at the sediment-sea interface. The magnitude of this long-term change cannot be extrapolated from our tidal data.

  1. Temporal Variation in Natural Methane Seep Rate Due to Tides, Coal Oil Point Area, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boles, J. R.; Clark, J. F.; Leifer, I.; Washburn, L.

    2001-12-01

    Two large steel tents (each 30m by 30m) open at the bottom to the sea floor, capture about 16,800 m{3{ day -1 (594 MCF) of primarily methane from a large natural hydrocarbon seep, occurring a kilometer offshore in 67m of water. Hourly monitoring for 9 months shows the tidal forcing causes the flow rate to vary by 4-7% around the mean. These results are the first quantitative documentation of the effect of tides on natural gas seepage in relatively deep water. High tide correlates with reduced flow, low tide correlates with increased flow. The correlation indicates that each meter increase of sea height results in a decrease of 10 to 15 m3 hr-1 or 1.5 to 2.2% of the hourly flow rate. The observed cahnges are best accounted for by a pore activation mechanism, whereby gas is released from small pores at low pressure but is inhibited at higher pressure. Pressure dependent gas solubility changes are a less likely cause of flow variation. Our study implies that sea level differences, on a tidal time scale, can significantly change the gas seepage rate from sediments. Lower sea level in the last hundred thousand years would presumably allow higher gas loss from the sediment, assuming sufficient gas present, due to reduced hudrostatic pressure at the sediment-sea interface. The magnitude of this long term change cannot be extrapolated from our tidal data.

  2. Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dinkel, J.A.; Biggs, J.E.

    1994-03-01

    The Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector has been developed to facilitate the location of shorted turns in magnet coils. Finding these shorted turns is necessary to determine failure modes that are a necessary step in developing future production techniques. Up to this point, coils with shorted turns had the insulation burned off without the fault having been located. This disassembly process destroyed any chance of being able to find the fault. In order to maintain a flux balance in a coupled system such as a magnet coil, the current in a shorted turn must be opposed to the incident current. If the direction of the current in each conductor can be measured relative to the incident current, then the exact location of the short can be determined. In this device, an AC voltage is applied to the magnet under test. A small hand held B-dot pickup coil monitors the magnetic field produced by current in the individual magnet conductors. The relative phase of this pickup coil voltage is compared to a reference signal derived from the input current to detect a current reversal as the B-dot pickup coil is swept over the conductors of the coil under test. This technique however, is limited to only those conductors that are accessible to the hand held probe.

  3. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  4. Spatial statistical point prediction guidance for heating-rate-limited aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pradipto; Conway, Bruce A.

    2015-06-01

    Feedback control of constrained non-linear dynamical systems satisfying a certain optimality criterion and meeting a specified transfer objective in the state space is recognized as one of the most challenging problems in control theory. One approach to computing optimal feedback policies is the dynamic programming route of numerically solving the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) partial differential equation directly. In this paper an alternate and more tractable dynamic programming approach, the optimal feedback synthesis method, is utilized. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated through an explicit guidance scheme for the heating-rate-constrained maneuver of an Aeroassisted Transfer Vehicle (AOTV). In optimal feedback synthesis, a feedback chart is constructed from a family of open-loop extremals, thus ensuring optimality with respect to any initial condition in the family. This paper presents a solution to the AOTV optimal feedback synthesis problem using the Gaussian process spatial prediction method of universal kriging. A closed-form expression for a near-optimal guidance law is derived. Its performance is found to be very promising; initial atmospheric entry errors due to simulated thruster misfiring are seen to be accurately corrected while the algebraic state-inequality constraint is closely respected.

  5. Quantifying Knick Point Migration Rates Related to the Messinian Crisis. The Case of the Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt; Pucher, Christoph; Robl, Jörg; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Messinian crisis is a temporally well-constrained period between 5.3 my and 5.9 my, when the strait of Gibraltar was tectonically closed and the Mediterranean Sea had consequently desiccated. This dramatic base level drop by about 1500 vertical meters had a profound influence on the geomorphic evolution of the major drainages surrounding the Mediterranean basin. In particular, it caused substantial knickpoints in the major rivers including the Rhone, the Ebro, the Po and the Nile. While the knickpoints of the Rhone and Ebro have been studied previously and the knickpoints created by the Po may lie today underneath the Po plains, the knickpoint and its migration along the Nile has not been studied and would have migrated along its current river channel. In this contribution we focus on numerical modelling of the knickpoint migration in the Nile and use our modelling results in comparison with the present day morphological analyses of the river to constrain absolute migration rates. We suspect that the first Nile cataract near Assuan, some 1000 km upstream of today's river mouth may be the relict of the Messinian salinity crisis making it to one of the fastest migrating knickpoints in the world.

  6. High rates of energy expenditure and water flux in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crocker, D.E.; Kofahl, N.; Fellers, G.D.; Gates, N.B.; Houser, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    We measured water flux and energy expenditure in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea by using the doubly labeled water method. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested weak urinary concentrating ability, high rates of water flux, and low basal metabolic rates in this species. However, free-ranging measurements from hygric mammals are rare, and it is not known how these features interact in the environment. Rates of water flux (210 ?? 32 mL d-1) and field metabolic rates (1,488 ?? 486 kJ d-1) were 159% and 265%, respectively, of values predicted by allometric equations for similar-sized herbivores. Mountain beavers can likely meet their water needs through metabolic water production and preformed water in food and thus remain in water balance without access to free water. Arginine-vasopressin levels were strongly correlated with rates of water flux and plasma urea : creatinine ratios, suggesting an important role for this hormone in regulating urinary water loss in mountain beavers. High field metabolic rates may result from cool burrow temperatures that are well below lower critical temperatures measured in previous laboratory studies and suggest that thermoregulation costs may strongly influence field energetics and water flux in semifossorial mammals. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation of Point B and Lymph Node Dose in 3D-Planned High-Dose-Rate Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Russell, Anthony; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To compare high dose rate (HDR) point B to pelvic lymph node dose using three-dimensional-planned brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO Stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer received 70 tandem HDR applications using CT-based treatment planning. The obturator, external, and internal iliac lymph nodes (LN) were contoured. Per fraction (PF) and combined fraction (CF) right (R), left (L), and bilateral (Bil) nodal doses were analyzed. Point B dose was compared with LN dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: Mean PF and CF doses to point B were R 1.40 Gy +- 0.14 (CF: 7 Gy), L 1.43 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.15 Gy), and Bil 1.41 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.05 Gy). The correlation coefficients between point B and the D100, D90, D50, D2cc, D1cc, and D0.1cc LN were all less than 0.7. Only the D2cc to the obturator and the D0.1cc to the external iliac nodes were not significantly different from the point B dose. Significant differences between R and L nodal DVHs were seen, likely related to tandem deviation from irregular tumor anatomy. Conclusions: With HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer, per fraction nodal dose approximates a dose equivalent to teletherapy. Point B is a poor surrogate for dose to specific nodal groups. Three-dimensional defined nodal contours during brachytherapy provide a more accurate reflection of delivered dose and should be part of comprehensive planning of the total dose to the pelvic nodes, particularly when there is evidence of pathologic involvement.

  8. 14 CFR 23.203 - Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... tests as follows: (a) Establish and maintain a coordinated turn in a 30 degree bank. Reduce speed by... in § 23.201(b). The rate of speed reduction must be constant, and— (1) For a turning flight stall... case of accelerated turning stalls; and (6) Exceeding the maximum permissible speed or allowable...

  9. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  10. Interpreting human behavior from depositional rates and combustion features through the study of sedimentary microfacies at site Pinnacle Point 5-6, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Karkanas, Panagiotis; Brown, Kyle S; Fisher, Erich C; Jacobs, Zenobia; Marean, Curtis W

    2015-08-01

    Using fine and coarse resolution geoarchaeological studies at the Middle Stone Age site of PP5-6 at Pinnacle Point, Mossel Bay, South Africa, we discovered different patterns of anthropogenic input and changes in behavior through time. Through the microfacies approach, we documented the various geogenic and anthropogenic processes that formed the deposits of the site. By deciphering large scale rate differences in the production of these microfacies we estimated anthropogenic input rates and therefore gained understanding of occupational duration and intensity. The PP5-6 sediments document occupations characterized by small groups and short visits during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5. This part of the sequence is characterized by numerous single (and mostly intact) hearth structures in a roofspall-rich matrix. During this time the sea was very close to the site and the people were focused on exploiting the rocky shores. With the advent of the glacial conditions of MIS4, the occupation of the site became much more intense. The occurrence of thick palimpsests of burnt remains, sometimes disturbed by small-scale sedimentary gravity processes, supports this conclusion. As sea level dropped and the coastline retreated, the geogenic input shifted to predominately aeolian sediments, implying an exposed shelf probably associated with a rich but more distant coastal environment. The occupants of PP5-6 turned their preference to silcrete as a raw material and they began to make microlithic stone tools. Since sites dating to MIS4 are abundant in the Cape, we suggest that populations during MIS4 responded to glacial conditions with either demographic stability or growth as well as technological change. PMID:26024567

  11. High rate of A2142G point mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance among Iranian Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Khashei, Reza; Dara, Mahintaj; Bazargani, Abdollah; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Taghavi, Alireza; Moeini, Maryam; Dehghani, Behzad; Sohrabi, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clarithromycin resistance and its associated molecular mechanisms among Helicobacter pylori isolates from dyspeptic patients in Shiraz, Iran. From January to May 2014, 100 H. pylori strains were isolated from patients with gastroduodenal disorders. The resistance to clarithromycin was quantitatively evaluated, using Epsilometer (E-test) method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed on all the isolates to detect A2143G and A2142G mutations in 23S rRNA gene. The H. pylori isolation rate was found to be 31.4%. E-test showed that 20% of isolates were resistant to clarithromycin (MIC ≥ 1 mg/L). MIC of clarithromycin ranged between 0.016 and 24 mg/L. Findings of PCR-RFLP showed that the A2142G was the most (90%) frequently point mutation, followed by the A2143G (10%). No statistically significant difference was found between H. pylori clarithromycin resistance point mutations and patients' gender or age. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high frequency of A2142G point mutation in Iran and probably in other regions of the world. Considering the increasing trend of H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin due to these mutations, it is crucial to investigate the new therapeutic approaches against H. pylori infection. PMID:27357065

  12. Radar-derived asteroid shapes point to a 'zone of stability' for topography slopes and surface erosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J.; Graves, K.; Bowling, T.

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies of the combined effects of asteroid shape, spin, and self-gravity have focused primarily upon the failure limits for bodies with a variety of standard shapes, friction, and cohesion values [1,2,3]. In this study, we look in the opposite direction and utilize 22 asteroid shape-models derived from radar inversion [4] and 7 small body shape-models derived from spacecraft observations [5] to investigate the region in shape/spin space [1,2] wherein self-gravity and rotation combine to produce a stable minimum state with respect to surface potential differences, dynamic topography, slope magnitudes, and erosion rates. This erosional minimum state is self-correcting, such that changes in the body's rotation rate, either up or down, will increase slope magnitudes across the body, thereby driving up erosion rates non-linearly until the body has once again reached a stable, minimized surface state [5]. We investigated this phenomenon in a systematic fashion using a series of synthesized, increasingly prolate spheroid shape models. Adjusting the rotation rate of each synthetic shape to minimize surface potential differences, dynamic topography, and slope magnitudes results in the magenta curve of the figure (right side), defining the zone of maximum surface stability (MSS). This MSS zone is invariant both with respect to body size (gravitational potential and rotational potential scale together with radius), and density when the scaled-spin of [2] is used. Within our sample of observationally derived small-body shape models, slow rotators (Group A: blue points), that are not in the maximum surface stability (MSS) zone and where gravity dominates the slopes, will generally experience moderate erosion rates (left plot) and will tend to move up and to the right in shape/spin space as the body evolves (right plot). Fast rotators (Group C: red points), that are not in the MSS zone and where spin dominates the slopes, will generally experience high erosion rates

  13. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks. PMID:26722945

  14. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  15. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well polarized flocks. The continuum equations are derived by coarse graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. When the inertia is large, we find a novel instability that signals the transition to complex spatio-temporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks. This work was supported by the NSF Awards DMR-1305184 and DGE-1068780 at Syracuse University and NSF Award PHY11-25915 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Grant No. 2919 at the KITP at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

  16. Bacteria turn tiny gears

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Swarms of bacteria turn two 380-micron long gears, opening the possibility of building hybrid biological machines at the microscopic scale. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/bacterial-micro-machine/#more-15684 or Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=brownian-motion-bacteria

  17. Flip Turns with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queeney, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Kate Queeney, a professor of chemistry at Smith College, turned to a former student to receive one-on-one instruction in swimming. The student, who had been unsure and scared in chemistry class, seemed like an entirely different person when teaching the teacher. This article describes how the author learned that there is something undeniably…

  18. Warrants for left-turn lanes

    SciTech Connect

    Agent, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Most states use accident, traffic-volume, or delay data as guidelines for installing left-turn lanes. Computer simulation of these data compares statistics of intersections with left-turn lanes to those without. The study found that special lanes always lead to improvement in traffic flow, but noted that all intersections cannot accommodate a special lane. The recommendations specify the accident rate, critical-volume determination, and the rate of traffice conflicts which warrant a separate left-turn lane. 10 references, 6 figures, 4 tables. (DCK)

  19. Enhancement of the Liquefaction Rate in Small-Scale Helium Liquefiers Working Near and Above the Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rillo, C.; Gabal, M.; Lozano, M. P.; Sesé, J.; Spagna, S.; Diederichs, J.; Sager, R.; Chialvo, C.; Terry, J.; Rayner, G.; Warburton, R.; Reineman, R.

    2015-05-01

    Low-temperature research laboratories with typical liquid-helium consumption of the order of tens of liters per day have greatly benefited from the recent development of small-scale liquefiers. In general, these liquefiers are based on Gifford-McMahon or pulse-tube closed-cycle refrigerators with a nominal cooling power ranging from 1 to 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The liquefaction rate for these cryocooler-based liquefiers depends on the pressure at which the helium is liquefied, although the final user conditions of the produced liquid helium are always atmospheric pressure and boiling temperature (e.g., 4.2 K at 100 kPa). Here, we show a systematic study on this effect, in which an enhancement in excess of 70% in liquefaction rate is found experimentally for pressures near and above the critical point of helium (220 kPa). We propose that the underlying mechanism for the liquefaction enhancement is based on the increase in cryocooler cooling power with temperature and the decrease of the helium enthalpy with pressure.

  20. Crack initiation at high loading rates applying the four-point bending split Hopkinson pressure bar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, Sebastian; Krüger, Lutz

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic crack initiation with crack-tip loading rates of K˙ ≈ 2.106MPa√ms-1 in a high strength G42CrMoS4 steel was investigated. To this end, a previously developed split Hopkinson pressure bar with four-point bending was utilised. V-notched and pre-cracked Charpy specimens were tested. The detection of dynamic crack initiation was performed by analysing the dynamic force equilibrium between the incident and the transmission bar. Additionally, the signal of a near-field strain gauge and high-speed photography were used to determine the instant of crack initiation. To account for vibrations of the sample, a dynamic analysis of the stress intensity factor was performed. The dynamic and static analyses of the tests produced nearly the same results when a force equilibrium was achieved. Fracture-surface analysis revealed that elongated MnS inclusions strongly affected both the dynamic crack initiation and growth. Blunting of the precrack did not take place when a group of MnS inclusions was located directly at the precrack tip. Due to the direction of the elongated MnS inclusions perpendicular to the direction of crack growth, the crack could be deflected. The comparison with a 42CrMo4 steel without elongated MnS inclusions revealed the detrimental effect in terms of resistance to crack initiation. Taking the loading-rate dependency into consideration, it was shown that there was no pronounced embrittlement due to the high loading rates.

  1. Two-point, high-repetition-rate Rayleigh thermometry in flames: techniques to correct for apparent dissipation induced by noise.

    PubMed

    Wang, G H; Clemens, N T; Varghese, P L

    2005-11-01

    High-repetition-rate, two-point Rayleigh thermometry is used to measure the thermal dissipation in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames. Scalar-dissipation measurements are very important in turbulent combustion but are often strongly influenced by noise effects. Dissipation is proportional to the squared gradient of the scalar, and noise produces an "apparent dissipation" that can dominate the measured dissipation, particularly at high resolution. Two independent techniques are presented that enable correction for the apparent thermal dissipation, provided that the smallest spatial scales are resolved. A model for shot-noise-limited data is developed that predicts the magnitude of the apparent dissipation at any measurement location and gives the minimum value of the apparent dissipation for measurements that are not shot-noise limited. These techniques are applied to the Rayleigh thermometry data, and they are shown to be largely self-consistent and consistent with theoretical expectations. The apparent dissipation is significantly larger than the true dissipation, demonstrating the importance of data correction in this noise-limited, fully spatially resolved regime. PMID:16270563

  2. A portable fiberoptic ratiometric fluorescence analyzer provides rapid point-of-care determination of glomerular filtration rate in large animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Exing; Meier, Daniel J; Sandoval, Ruben M; Von Hendy-Willson, Vanessa E; Pressler, Barrak M; Bunch, Robert M; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Sturek, Michael S; Schwartz, George J; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is the gold standard for precise assessment of kidney function. A rapid, point-of-care determination of the GFR may provide advantages in the clinical setting over currently available assays. Here we demonstrate a proof of principle for such an approach in a pig and dogs, two species that approximate the vascular access and GFR results expected in humans. In both animal models, a sub-millimeter optical fiber that delivered excitation light and collected fluorescent emissions was inserted into a peripheral vein (dog) or central venous access (pig) by means of commercial intravenous catheters. A mixture of fluorescent chimeras of a small freely filterable reporter and large non-filterable plasma volume marker were infused as a bolus, excited by light-emitting diodes, and the in vivo signals detected and quantified by photomultiplier tubes in both species in less than 60 min. Concurrent standardized 6-h iohexol plasma kidney clearances validated the accuracy of our results for both physiologic and a chronic kidney disease setting. Thus, our ratiometric technique allows for both measurement of plasma vascular volume and highly accurate real-time GFR determinations, enabling clinical decision making in real time. PMID:21881552

  3. Maximal fat oxidation rate and cross-over point with respect to lactate thresholds do not have good agreement.

    PubMed

    González-Haro, C

    2011-05-01

    The present cross-sectional study was designed to assess the agreement between maximal fat oxidation rate (maxFAT (OXR)) VS. Lactate Threshold (LT), and CROSS-OVER point (CO (P)) VS. Individual Anaerobic Threshold (IAT) in well-trained athletes. 2 groups of male, well-trained endurance athletes (short-distance triathletes (ST) (n=11), and road cyclists (RC) (n=11)) performed a graded cycle ergometer test to exhaustion, with 4-min stages and 30-W increments. LT, IAT, maxFAT (OXR) and CO (P) were determined for each group. FAT (OXR) and CHO (OXR) were estimated by means of indirect calorimetry and stoichiometric equations. The agreement between maxFAT (OXR) VS. LT, and CO (P) VS. IAT were determined using the Bland-Altman methodology. In spite of the low systematic error (bias) (high accuracy) for CO (P) VS. IAT, the variable error (limits of agreement) was moderate (moderate precision). For maxFAT (OXR) VS. LT the systematic error was moderate (moderate accuracy), and the variable error was moderate to high (moderate to low precision). In conclusion, the data obtained from this study shows that maxFAT (OXR) and CO (P) do not exhibit good agreement with LT and IAT, in male endurance well-trained athletes. Consequently, it is not possible to assume that maxFAT (OXR) VS. LT and CO (P) VS. IAT occurs at the same exercise intensity. PMID:21380968

  4. Underwater turning movement during foraging in Hydromedusa maximiliani (Testudines, Chelidae) from southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Barbosa, O; Hohl, L S L; Novelli, I A; Sousa, B M; Gomides, S C; Loguercio, M F C

    2014-11-01

    A type of locomotor behavior observed in animals with rigid bodies, that can be found in many animals with exoskeletons, shells, or other forms of body armor, to change direction, is the turning behavior. Aquatic floated-turning behavior among rigid bodies animals have been studied in whirligig beetles, boxfish, and more recently in freshwater turtle, Chrysemys picta. In the laboratory we observed a different kind of turning movement that consists in an underwater turning movement during foraging, wherein the animal pivoted its body, using one of the hindlimbs as the fixed-point support in the substratum. We describe, analyze and quantify this movement during foraging in Hydromedusa maximiliani, using observations made in the laboratory. We studied 3 adult specimens (2 males, 1 female) and 2 non-sexed juveniles of H. maximiliani. They were kept individually in an aquarium filled with water and small fish. They were filmed, in dorsal view, at 30 frames per second. Sequences were analyzed frame by frame and points were marked on limbs and shell to enable analysis of variation in limb flexion and extension, as well as rotation movements. While foraging, turtles frequently turned their bodies, using one hind leg as the pivot point. This underwater turning movement, in addition to slow movements with the neck stretched, or staying nearly immobile and scanning the surroundings with lateral movements of the neck (in arcs up to 180°), and fast attacks of neck, may increase prey capture rates. PMID:25627611

  5. Development of beryllium mirror turning technology

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.B.

    1991-04-01

    Because of the unique properties of beryllium (Be) and the advantages of single point turning, a development program has been instituted to single point turn beryllium as a means to produce optics. Initial effort to diamond turn beryllium resulted in less than desirable results and development efforts were directed at finding a more suitable tool material. Both single and polycrystalline tool materials were evaluated and cubic boron nitride (CBN) was found to produce the better results. Tool wear has been the primary limitation in precision machining beryllium and advances have allowed a two order-of-magnitude reduction in this problem. After considerable efforts, results with CBN appear to be approaching a limit, and diamond, as tool material, was re-evaluated with promising results. A development program is now under way to determine if diamond may be used to machine larger and more complex beryllium parts.

  6. 75 FR 1363 - Dynegy Services Plum Point LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Dynegy Services Plum Point LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Dynegy Services Plum Point LLC's application...

  7. 76 FR 56194 - CenterPoint Energy-Illinois Gas Transmission Company; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission CenterPoint Energy--Illinois Gas Transmission Company; Notice of Petition...'s regulations, 18 CFR 284.224, CenterPoint Energy- Illinois Gas Transmission Company (``IGTC''),...

  8. Lattice Calibration with Turn-By-Turn BPM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Sebek, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Turn-by-turn beam position monitor (BPM) data from multiple BPMs are fitted with a tracking code to calibrate magnet strengths in a manner similar to the well known LOCO code. Simulation shows that this turn-by-turn method can be a quick and efficient way for optics calibration. The method is applicable to both linacs and ring accelerators. Experimental results for a section of the SPEAR3 ring is also shown.

  9. IASI is turning ten!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerbaux, Cathy; George, Maya; Bauduin, Sophie; Boynard, Anne; Coheur, Pierre-François; Clarisse, Lieven; Crevoisier, Cyril; Doniki, Stamatia; Hadji-Lazaro, Juliette; Hurtmans, Daniel; Lacour, Jean-Lionel; Ronsmans, Gaétane; Safieddine, Sarah; Van Damme, Martin; Wespes, Catherine; Whitburn, Simon

    2016-04-01

    The IASI mission is a versatile mission that fulfills the needs of three different communities: numerical weather prediction, climate research and atmospheric composition monitoring. In order to converge on the design of such an instrument all three communities had to make "reasonable accommodations" 20 years ago, and it turns out that this mission is now recognized as essential for weather forecasting, and for tracking pollutants/greenhouse gases from space. With the launch of MetOp-B and -C and the continuity and new challenges offered by IASI-NG, an exceptional data record will be available in the next few years. The presentation (movie) illustrates some of the major findings related to atmospheric composition changes as monitored by IASI during the last 10 years. It relies on accurate data available in near real time along with an excellent horizontal coverage. We will show the global scale mapping of gases, along with the detection of dust and ash particles, as well as the potential of the mission to catch special events such as volcanic eruptions, large fires and pollution peaks.

  10. Page turning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J. (Inventor); Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device for holding reading materials for use by readers without arm mobility is presented. The device is adapted to hold the reading materials in position for reading with the pages displayed to enable turning by use of a rubber tipped stick that is held in the mouth and has a pair of rectangular frames. The frames are for holding and positioning the reading materials opened in reading posture with the pages displayed at a substantially unobstructed sighting position for reading. The pair of rectangular frames are connected to one another by a hinge so the angle between the frames may be varied thereby varying the inclination of the reading material. A pair of bent spring mounted wires for holding opposing pages of the reading material open for reading without substantial visual interference of the pages is mounted to the base. The wires are also adjustable to the thickness of the reading material and have a variable friction adjustment. This enables the force of the wires against the pages to be varied and permits the reader to manipulate the pages with the stick.

  11. Bodily-visual practices and turn continuation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Cecilia E; Thompson, Sandra A; Drake, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers points in turn construction where conversation researchers have shown that talk routinely continues beyond possible turn completion, but where we find bodily-visual behavior doing such turn extension work. The bodily-visual behaviors we examine share many features with verbal turn extensions, but we argue that embodied movements have distinct properties that make them well-suited for specific kinds of social action, including stance display and by-play in sequences framed as subsidiary to a simultaneous and related verbal exchange. Our study is in line with a research agenda taking seriously the point made by Goodwin (2000a, b, 2003), Hayashi (2003, 2005), Iwasaki (2009), and others that scholars seeking to account for practices in language and social interaction do themselves a disservice if they privilege the verbal dimension; rather, as suggested in Stivers/Sidnell (2005), each semiotic system/modality, while coordinated with others, has its own organization. With the current exploration of bodily-visual turn extensions, we hope to contribute to a growing understanding of how these different modes of organization are managed concurrently and in concert by interactants in carrying out their everyday social actions. PMID:23526861

  12. Bodily-visual practices and turn continuation

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Cecilia E.; Thompson, Sandra A.; Drake, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers points in turn construction where conversation researchers have shown that talk routinely continues beyond possible turn completion, but where we find bodily-visual behavior doing such turn extension work. The bodily-visual behaviors we examine share many features with verbal turn extensions, but we argue that embodied movements have distinct properties that make them well-suited for specific kinds of social action, including stance display and by-play in sequences framed as subsidiary to a simultaneous and related verbal exchange. Our study is in line with a research agenda taking seriously the point made by Goodwin (2000a, b, 2003), Hayashi (2003, 2005), Iwasaki (2009), and others that scholars seeking to account for practices in language and social interaction do themselves a disservice if they privilege the verbal dimension; rather, as suggested in Stivers/Sidnell (2005), each semiotic system/modality, while coordinated with others, has its own organization. With the current exploration of bodily-visual turn extensions, we hope to contribute to a growing understanding of how these different modes of organization are managed concurrently and in concert by interactants in carrying out their everyday social actions. PMID:23526861

  13. When Inward Pain Turns Outward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Scott J.

    1999-01-01

    When depressed youth turn from the pathway of retreat to the pathway of vengeance, the results can be tragic. Article offers strategies that adults and other youth can use to reach these youth before their inward pain turns outward. (Author)

  14. Dynamic instability of dislocation motion at high-strain-rate deformation of crystals with high concentration of point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    The motion of an ensemble of edge dislocations has been studied under conditions of high-strainrate deformation of a crystal with a high concentration of point defects. The conditions of existence of the region of dynamic instability of dislocation motion have been found. It has been shown that the existence of the region and its boundaries is determined by the proportion of the point defect concentration and the dislocation density.

  15. Assessment of the point-source method for estimating dose rates to members of the public from exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim; Bellamy, Michael B.; Hertel, Nolan E.; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Sherbini, Sami; Saba, Mohammad S.; Eckerman, Keith F.

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate radiation dose rates to members of the public that may result from exposure to patients recently administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy. The main purpose was to compare dose rate estimates based on a point source and target with values derived from more realistic simulations that considered the time-dependent distribution of 131I in the patient and attenuation of emitted photons by the patient’s tissues. The external dose rate estimates were derived using Monte Carlo methods and two representations of the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs, previously developed by ORNL and the USNRC, to model the patient and a nearby member of the public. Dose rates to tissues and effective dose rates were calculated for distances ranging from 10 to 300 cm between the phantoms and compared to estimates based on the point-source method, as well as to results of previous studies that estimated exposure from 131I patients. The point-source method overestimates dose rates to members of the public in very close proximity to an 131I patient but is a broadly accurate method of dose rate estimation at separation distances of 300 cm or more at times closer to administration.

  16. Assessment of the point-source method for estimating dose rates to members of the public from exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim; Bellamy, Michael B.; Hertel, Nolan E.; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Sherbini, Sami; Saba, Mohammad S.; Eckerman, Keith F.

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate radiation dose rates to members of the public that may result from exposure to patients recently administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy. The main purpose was to compare dose rate estimates based on a point source and target with values derived from more realistic simulations that considered the time-dependent distribution of 131I in the patient and attenuation of emitted photons by the patient’s tissues. The external dose rate estimates were derived using Monte Carlo methods and two representations of the Phantommore » with Movable Arms and Legs, previously developed by ORNL and the USNRC, to model the patient and a nearby member of the public. Dose rates to tissues and effective dose rates were calculated for distances ranging from 10 to 300 cm between the phantoms and compared to estimates based on the point-source method, as well as to results of previous studies that estimated exposure from 131I patients. The point-source method overestimates dose rates to members of the public in very close proximity to an 131I patient but is a broadly accurate method of dose rate estimation at separation distances of 300 cm or more at times closer to administration.« less

  17. Switch points for highly eccentric orbits: Modelling the occurrences of sign changes in the rate of change of the eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassa, Matthew; Burlton, Bruce; Afagh, Fred; Langlois, Rob

    2015-06-01

    The lunar and solar gravitational perturbations coupled with the J2 effect acting on Earth-orbiting satellites in critically inclined highly eccentric orbits cause several modes of oscillation in the eccentricity of the orbit. The sign changes in the slope of the eccentricity variations are labelled "switch points" and their development is explored in this paper. Using spherical trigonometry, the switch points can be determined in terms of the position and orbital elements of the perturbing third body (i.e., Moon or Sun) and the orbital elements of the satellite. Furthermore, the concept of switch point angles, used to identify when the switch points occur, is defined and discussed. As a result, the fundamental nature of the interaction between the gravitational perturbations of the third body and the orbit of the satellite is expanded upon. The switch points are also used to analyze the different modes of oscillation that occur in the eccentricity variations, whose periods can vary from two weeks to several years, and as a result cause significant variations in the perigee and apogee altitudes of the highly eccentric orbits. This study provides insight into the behaviour of the satellite's orbit under the lunar and solar perturbations in relation to the position of the Moon and Sun.

  18. Tevatron stripline turn by turn data and the head-tail instability

    SciTech Connect

    James L Crisp

    2002-12-09

    Vic Scarpine recently collected turn by turn data from the vertical wideband stripline in the Tevatron during proton injection for store 1841. The data file name is ''PHT004.txt''. The single bunch intensity was roughly 200e9. The chromaticity was set to ''+6'' horizontal and ''-2'' vertical to induce instability. The data shown represents an extreme condition that shortly preceded losses leading to an abort. A Yokogawa DL 7200 oscilloscope was used to measure A-B and A+B simultaneously from the 1 meter long stripline. The scope has an analogue bandwidth of 500MHz with a 2 GHz sample rate. On each of the 2048 turns taken, 200 samples were saved. Vic Scarpine assembled some movie files from the same data that revealed intriguing variations in the A-B signals. The Excel data file contains 2048 turns of A+B followed by 2048 turns of A-B. The 200 samples taken on each turn is placed on one line in the file. Beam was injected at line 14 for A+B and line 2062 for A-B. Eight consecutive turns of data are examined starting at 1490 turns after injection (lines 1504-11 for A+B and 3552-9 for A-B).

  19. [inverted exclamation point]Si se Puede en Colaboracion! Increasing College Placement Rates of Low-Income Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Militello, Matthew; Schweid, Jason; Carey, John

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Today we have moved from the debate of student opportunity to postsecondary educational setting to 100% access. That is, today's high school settings have been charged with preparing "college ready" graduates. Educational policy has leveraged mandates and sanctions as a mechanism to improve college placement rates, especially…

  20. Analytical Evaluation of Bit Error Rate Performance of a Free-Space Optical Communication System with Receive Diversity Impaired by Pointing Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazrul Islam, A. K. M.; Majumder, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    Analysis is carried out to evaluate the conditional bit error rate conditioned on a given value of pointing error for a Free Space Optical (FSO) link with multiple receivers using Equal Gain Combining (EGC). The probability density function (pdf) of output signal to noise ratio (SNR) is also derived in presence of pointing error with EGC. The average BER of a SISO and SIMO FSO links are analytically evaluated by averaging the conditional BER over the pdf of the output SNR. The BER performance results are evaluated for several values of pointing jitter parameters and number of IM/DD receivers. The results show that, the FSO system suffers significant power penalty due to pointing error and can be reduced by increasing in the number of receivers at a given value of pointing error. The improvement of receiver sensitivity over SISO is about 4 dB and 9 dB when the number of photodetector is 2 and 4 at a BER of 10-10. It is also noticed that, system with receive diversity can tolerate higher value of pointing error at a given BER and transmit power.

  1. Turn-Continuation by Self and by Other

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidnell, Jack

    2012-01-01

    At the possible completion of a turn constructional unit (TCU) that has not selected a next speaker, a speaker has two available options: either begin a new TCU or continue the one that has just come to a point of possible completion. This article describes some of the complex turns that result from exercising the second option. These can be seen…

  2. Mycogen magically turns around agrigenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, G.

    1995-05-01

    This short article describes how Mycogen, which acquired Agrigenetics/Lubrizol`s seed industry in the 1993, finally turned a profit after drastic sales and brand consolidation updates. Lubrizol is a supplier of lubricant additives to the energy industry. Until Mycogen turned it around, Agrigenetics stood as a stark example of the unfulfilled dreams plaguing agbiotech.

  3. Socialization Turning Points: An Examination of Change in Organizational Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullis, Connie; Bach, Betsy Wackernagel

    To examine perspectives of change in individual-organizational socialization, a study used the retrospective interview technique (RIT) to reconstruct the history and process of individuals' socialization experiences over an 8-month period. Using the RIT, researchers asked subjects, 28 entering graduate students enrolled in three communication…

  4. Lau Vs. Nichols--A Turning Point in Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Estelle Pau-on

    In the wake of the 1974 decision handed down by the Supreme Court in Lau v Nichols, there has been a burgeoning of training programs, workshops, conferences, and graduate programs in bilingual bicultural education. This paper examines some of the sources of these developments and attempts to put theory and practice into historical, cultural, and…

  5. The PTV Satellite System: Turning Point or High Anxiety?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingras, Richard

    1978-01-01

    The Westar I satellite communications system for public television is discussed, and rationale for the original construction of the system, programming capabilities utilizing multichannel distribution, and additional communications services are reviewed. (RAO)

  6. Guide to Curriculum Development. Turning Points: Transforming Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lummis, Ben

    2001-01-01

    The educational needs of middle school students are truly unique. In no other period of PreK-12 education can one find such a wide range of physical, social, and cognitive development among students. For students, the middle school years can be a time of both great vulnerability and great responsiveness to change. These years are highly formative…

  7. Chemistry Courses as the Turning Point for Premedical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Donald A.; Matsui, John; Wanat, Stanley F.; Gonzalez, Maria Elena

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has documented that negative experiences in chemistry courses are a major factor that discourages many students from continuing in premedical studies. This adverse impact affects women and students from under-represented minority (URM) groups disproportionately. To determine if chemistry courses have a similar effect at a large…

  8. Single-point diamond turning of lead indium phosphate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Cunningham, J.P.; Rajic, S.; Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1996-08-01

    The development of the ability to routinely machine glass materials to optical tolerances is highly desirable and, in particular, could provide new degrees of control over the precise shape of complex and unusual optical surfaces. Of particular interest in this regard is the formation of non-spherical shapes where there is a need to fabricate both inexpensive, low-precision optics as well as specialized high-precision aspheric components. This work describes the initial feasibility tests of the machining of a new type of glass, lead indium phosphate (LIP), a material which transmits from the visible to 2.8 micrometers (for thin samples). Glossy surfaces were produced with a root-mean-square surface roughness of less than 100 nm (with 200 micrometer filter). The results indicate that this approach offers the potential for producing high-quality aspheric optical shapes based on the use of LIP glass.

  9. Wind Power: A Turning Point. Worldwatch Paper 45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Christopher

    Recent studies have shown wind power to be an eminently practical and potentially substantial source of electricity and direct mechanical power. Wind machines range from simple water-pumping devices made of wood and cloth to large electricity producing turbines with fiberglass blades nearly 300 feet long. Wind is in effect a form of solar…

  10. "Recovered-memory" therapy: profession at a turning point.

    PubMed

    Feigon, E A; de Rivera, J

    1998-01-01

    Six hundred Massachusetts-registered psychiatrists were surveyed for their opinions on items plausibly related to the production of false memories of childhood sexual abuse. One hundred fifty-four psychiatrists completed the written questionnaire. A majority of respondents (69%) endorsed the following statement: "The numbers of false accusations of childhood sexual abuse, appearing to emerge from the psychotherapy of adults, constitute a real problem needing public acknowledgment as such by the mental health professions." Nevertheless, a substantial minority endorsed the following practices: 37% endorsed searching for childhood roots of presenting complaints; 36% endorsed validation (expressed belief) of the patient's memories as an essential part of therapy; 36% believed in appropriateness of affect as an indicator of truth in memories; 36% believed in the therapeutic value of abreaction; 26% would refer presumed survivors of abuse to specialists in incest recovery; 18% believed in ritual abuse as an important cause of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dissociative disorders; 18% trusted symptom checklists as indicators of sexual abuse histories; and 15% believed that memory is a complete record of the individual's history. Small minorities (6% to 8%) endorsed these practices: using hypnosis to gain access to repressed memories of childhood abuse; patient confrontation of alleged abusers; and recommending the severing of contacts with skeptical family members. A factor analysis was performed, and it was found that self-designated specialists were more likely than nonspecialists to score toward the riskier pole of the four factors extracted. PMID:9829140

  11. The Voyages of Columbus: A Turning Point in World History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Alfred W.; Nader, Helen

    The far-reaching and transforming interactions of the Old World and the New are known today as "the Columbian Exchange." Part 1 of this booklet is an introduction by John J. Patrick dealing with teaching about the voyages of Christopher Columbus. Part 2, "Columbus and Ecological Imperialism," by Alfred W. Crosby, provides an ecological perspective…

  12. The Legacy of Earth Day: Reflections at a Turning Point.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Riordan, Timothy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Evaluates the environmental accomplishments of the last several decades, the predicted state of the environment in 2020, and the future of the environmental movement. Provides a "health report" for the Earth, and discusses the evolution of environmental science and interactions between policy, economics, and environment. (LZ)

  13. Turning Points: Improving Honors Student Preparation for Thesis Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patino, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an action research study that had as its primary goal to increase retention of honors college students at Arizona State University by implementing an additional advising session during the fifth semester of their academic career. Introducing additional, strategically-timed support for the honors thesis and demystifying the…

  14. Food Irradiation-A Technology at a Turning Point.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1986-01-01

    Food irradiation has been studied for years, but now with new Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of low-dose radiation, it may become a popular method to retard food spoilage. Radiolytic products, feeding studies, and nuclear issues are among the areas addressed. (JN)

  15. Building Effective Middle Level Teams. Turning Points: Recommendations into Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsh, Stephanie; Valentine, Jerry W.

    This booklet is the first in a series of monographs developed as a resource for middle-level leaders. It provides practical strategies, procedures, and ideas to enable school leaders to plan and implement programs that will provide opportunities for students to be prepared for high school and beyond. The text focuses on the application of team…

  16. Minorities in Public Higher Education: At a Turning Point.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.; And Others

    The fundamental issues confronting public higher education in its efforts to reach America's minorities are addressed. Higher education's historical progress in providing a path to equality is surveyed, and certain recent trends showing a clear reversal of that progress are examined. Three chapters offer strategies for stopping the trend and…

  17. Tune Evaluation From Phased BPM Turn-By-Turn Data

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Marsh, W.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-18

    In fast ramping synchrotrons like the Fermilab Booster the conventional methods of betatron tune evaluation from the turn-by-turn data may not work due to rapid changes of the tunes (sometimes in a course of a few dozens of turns) and a high level of noise. We propose a technique based on phasing of signals from a large number of BPMs which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio. Implementation of the method in the Fermilab Booster control system is described and some measurement results are presented.

  18. Modification of a Hydrophobic Layer by a Point Mutation in Syntaxin 1A Regulates the Rate of Synaptic Vesicle Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lagow, Robert D; Bao, Hong; Cohen, Evan N; Daniels, Richard W; Zuzek, Aleksej; Williams, Wade H; Macleod, Gregory T; Sutton, R. Bryan; Zhang, Bing

    2007-01-01

    Both constitutive secretion and Ca2+-regulated exocytosis require the assembly of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes. At present, little is known about how the SNARE complexes mediating these two distinct pathways differ in structure. Using the Drosophila neuromuscular synapse as a model, we show that a mutation modifying a hydrophobic layer in syntaxin 1A regulates the rate of vesicle fusion. Syntaxin 1A molecules share a highly conserved threonine in the C-terminal +7 layer near the transmembrane domain. Mutation of this threonine to isoleucine results in a structural change that more closely resembles those found in syntaxins ascribed to the constitutive secretory pathway. Flies carrying the I254 mutant protein have increased levels of SNARE complexes and dramatically enhanced rate of both constitutive and evoked vesicle fusion. In contrast, overexpression of the T254 wild-type protein in neurons reduces vesicle fusion only in the I254 mutant background. These results are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations of the SNARE core complex, suggesting that T254 serves as an internal brake to dampen SNARE zippering and impede vesicle fusion, whereas I254 favors fusion by enhancing intermolecular interaction within the SNARE core complex. PMID:17341138

  19. Analysis of dynamic stall using unsteady boundary-layer theory. [effect of pitch rate on the delay in forward movement of the rear flow reversal point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scruggs, R. M.; Nash, J. F.; Singleton, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The unsteady turbulent boundary layer and potential flow about a pitching airfoil are analyzed using numerical methods to determine the effect of pitch rate on the delay in forward movement of the rear flow reversal point. An explicit finite difference scheme is used to integrate the unsteady boundary layer equations, which are coupled at each instant of time to a fully unsteady and nonlinear potential flow analysis. A substantial delay in forward movement of the reversal point is demonstrated with increasing pitch rate, and it is shown that the delay results partly from the alleviation of the gradients in the potential flow, and partly from the effects of unsteadiness in the boundary layer itself. The predicted delay in flow-reversal onset, and its variation with pitch rate, are shown to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data relating to the delay in dynamic stall. From the comparisons it can be concluded (a) that the effects of time-dependence are sufficient to explain the failure of the boundary layer to separate during the dynamic overshoot, and (b) that there may be some link between forward movement of the reversal point and dynamic stall.

  20. Influence of the pointing direction and detector sensitivity variations on the detection rate of a double station meteor camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, T.; Koschny, D.; Drolshagen, G.; Soja, R.; Srama, R.; Poppe, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Canary Islands Long-Baseline Observatory (CILBO) is a double station meteor observation site on Tenerife and La Palma (Koschny et al., 2013; Koschny et al., 2014). Meteors are detected within the 40 ms long video frames of the identically built cameras using MetRec (Molau, 1999). MOTS (version 3, Koschny & Diaz, 2002) is used to determine the meteor trajectories of double-station observations. First scientific results regarding the velocity distribution and meteoroid flux have been published by Drolshagen et al., 2014 and Ott et al., 2014. Both authors found effects related to the Apex direction, such as an increasing number of detections in the morning hours. Sporadic meteors from the Apex cause additional observational bias, including in the velocity-magnitude domain and the meteor trail length determination. We show how the detection threshold conditions vary depending on the pointing direction of the cameras for both CILBO cameras. The angular velocity distribution of the meteors depends on the camera orientation. Meteors with a smaller angular velocity illuminate less CCD pixels in the same time interval than faster meteors causing a higher Signal-to-Noise ratio and consequently better detection threshold conditions. Additionally, we analyzed the detection distribution within the field of view of the CILBO cameras. We quantified this effect, which can be attributed mainly to vignetting in the wide-angle system.

  1. Volumetric (3D) bladder dose parameters are more reproducible than point (2D) dose parameters in vaginal vault high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Lucas Gomes; Flosi, Adriana; Aiza, Antonio; de Assis Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio; Chojniak, Rubens; Baiocchi, Glauco

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the use of computed tomography in vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB) planning. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine the reproducibility of point bladder dose parameters (DICRU and maximum dose), compared with volumetric-based parameters. Twenty-two patients who were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) VCB underwent simulation by computed tomography (CT-scan) with a Foley catheter at standard tension (position A) and extra tension (position B). CT-scan determined the bladder ICRU dose point in both positions and compared the displacement and recorded dose. Volumetric parameters (D0.1cc, D1.0cc, D2.0cc, D4.0cc and D50%) and point dose parameters were compared. The average spatial shift in ICRU dose point in the vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions was 2.91 mm (range: 0.10–9.00), 12.04 mm (range: 4.50–24.50) and 2.65 mm (range: 0.60–8.80), respectively. The DICRU ratio for positions A and B was 1.64 (p < 0.001). Moreover, a decrease in Dmax was observed (p = 0.016). Tension level of the urinary catheter did not affect the volumetric parameters. Our data suggest that point parameters (DICRU and Dmax) are not reproducible and are not the ideal choice for dose reporting. PMID:27296459

  2. Turning collectors for solar radiation

    DOEpatents

    Barak, Amitzur Z.

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for turning a solar collector about the polar axis so that the collector is directed toward the sun as the sun tracks the sky each day. It includes two heat-expansive elements and a shadow plate. In the morning a first expansive element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the second expansive element is shaded by the plate. In the afternoon the second element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the first is shaded by the plate.

  3. Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

  4. Effect of farmyard manure rate on water erosion of a Mediterranean soil: determination of the critical point of inefficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annabi, Mohamed; Bahri, Haithem; Cheick M'Hamed, Hatem; Hermessi, Taoufik

    2016-04-01

    Intensive cultivation of soils, using multiple soil tillage, led to the decrease of their organic matter content and structural stability in several cultivated area of the Mediterranean countries. In these degraded soils, the addition of organic products, traditionally the animal manure, should improve soil health among them the resistance of soil to water erosion. The aim of this study was to evaluate after 1 year of the addition to a cambisoil different doses of farmyard manure on soil organic matter content, on microbial activity and on aggregate stability (proxy to soil resistance to water erosion). The statistical process (bilinear model) was used to found a point at which the addition of the organic product no longer influences the soil resistance to erosion. The farmyard manure issued from a cow breeding was composted passively during 4 months and used to amend a small plots of a cultivated cambisol (silty-clay texture, 0.9% TOC) located in the northeast of Tunisia (Morneg region). The manure was intimately incorporate to the soil. The manure organic matter content was 31%, and its isohumic coefficient was 49%. Twelve dose of manure were tested: from 0 to 220 t C.ha-1. The experiment was started on September 2011. In November 2012, soil sampling was done and soil organic carbon content (Walkley-Black method) and soil aggregate stability (wet method of Le Bissonnais) were assessed. A laboratory incubations of soil+manure mixtures, with the same proportions as tested in the field conditions, was carried at 28°C and at 75% of the mixture field capacity water retention. Carbon mineralization was monitored during three months incubation. Results show that the addition of farmyard manure stimulated the microbial activity proportionally to the added dose. This activation is due to the presence of easily biodegradable carbon in the manure, which increases with increasing manure dose. On the other hand, the addition of manure increased the aggregate stability with

  5. Turning around Newton's Second Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric

    2004-01-01

    Conceptual and quantitative difficulties surrounding Newton's second law often arise among introductory physics students. Simply turning around how one expresses Newton's second law may assist students in their understanding of a deceptively simple-looking equation.

  6. Turning patients over in bed

    MedlinePlus

    ... This helps the skin stay healthy and prevents bedsores. Turning a patient is a good time to ... M, et al. Risk assessment and prevention of pressure ulcers: a clinical practice guideline from the American College ...

  7. Diamond turning of optical crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.T.; Syn, C.K.; Fuchs, B.A.; Velsko, S.P.

    1990-03-01

    Diamond turning (DT) has proven to be a cost effective optical fabrication technique for both aspherical and spherical/flat figures when precise geometrical tolerances are important. We are interested in the DT of crystals for several reasons. DT has been very effective to insure requisite accurate geometrical orientation of optical surfaces to crystalline axes for frequency conversion applications. Also, DT can achieve figure up to the edge of the crystal. Another key DT benefit is enhanced laser damage threshold, which we feel in part is due to the freedom of the surface from polishing impurities. Several important issues for diamond turning optical crystals are the tool wear, associated surface finish, and laser damage properties. We have found that careful selection and control of diamond turning parameters can yield production techniques for crystals previously considered incompatible with diamond turning. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Ontological turns, turnoffs and roundabouts.

    PubMed

    Sismondo, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    There has been much talk of an 'ontological turn' in Science and Technology Studies. This commentary explores some recent work on multiple and historical ontologies, especially articles published in this journal, against a background of constructivism. It can be tempting to read an ontological turn as based and promoting a version of perspectivism, but that is inadequate to the scholarly work and opens multiple ontologies to serious criticisms. Instead, we should read our ontological turn or turns as being about multiplicities of practices and the ways in which these practices shape the material world. Ontologies arise out of practices through which people engage with things; the practices are fundamental and the ontologies derivative. The purchase in this move comes from the elucidating power of the verbs that scholars use to analyze relations of practices and objects--which turn out to be specific cases of constructivist verbs. The difference between this ontological turn and constructivist work in Science and Technology Studies appears to be a matter of emphases found useful for different purposes. PMID:26477200

  9. Spatial Accumulation-Rate Pattern Inferred from Radar Internal Layers and Point Measurements of Velocity and Accumulation near Taylor Mouth, Victoria Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, E. D.; Neumann, T. A.; Morse, D. L.; Marshall, H.

    2002-12-01

    Internal layers in ice sheets, as measured by ice-penetrating radar, are most likely isochrones. The depth to a shallow internal layer is proportional to the local accumulation rate. However, low-frequency radars often do not record very shallow layers. High-frequency radars (GPR) record shallow layers, but cannot detect the deeper layers that reflect longer-term patterns of climate. Older, deeper layers are also influenced to an increasing degree by accumulated strain due to ice flow, and by the upstream accumulation rate. For this Geophysical Inverse Problem, our Forward Model is a steady-state ice-flow model with measured ice-sheet surface topography, ice thickness, and flowband width, which tracks particles to create modelled internal layers. Ice motion is driven by the input flux into the upper end of the flowband, and by the accumulation pattern along the flowband. To solve the Inverse Problem, our observations comprise depth of an internal layer, and point measurements of accumulation rate and surface velocity. Associated uncertainties are also required. We use Least-Squares or Singular-Value Decomposition to solve for model parameters (input ice flux, piece-wise linear accumulation-rate profile, and layer age) that minimize the mismatch between the data and the model estimates of the data. If the layer age and its uncertainty are known independently, they can also be used. Variable weights can be assigned to each type of data. The data-resolution matrix shows that, for shallow layers, we can resolve high-wavenumber variations in accumulation rate. For deeper layers, we resolve spatial averages of accumulation rates. We apply the model to a flowband at Taylor Mouth between Taylor Dome and Taylor Glacier. The model finds more variation in the inferred accumulation-rate profile than in the depth-profile of an internal layer. The new accumulation-rate profile produces an improved chronology for an ice core collected along the flowline.

  10. Bladder (ICRU) dose point does not predict urinary acute toxicity in adjuvant isolated vaginal vault high-dose-rate brachytherapy for intermediate-risk endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aiza, Antonio; Gomes, Maria José Leite; Chen, Michael Jenwei; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio de Assis; Mansur, David B.; Baiocchi, Glauco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) alone is an adjuvant treatment option for stage I intermediaterisk endometrial cancer after complete surgical resection. The aim of this study was to determine the value of the dose reported to ICRU bladder point in predicting acute urinary toxicity. Oncologic results are also presented. Material and methods One hundred twenty-six patients were treated with postoperative HDR-BT 24 Gy (4 × 6 Gy) per ICRU guidelines for dose reporting. Cox analysis was used to identify variables that affected local control. The mean bladder point dose was examined for its ability to predict acute urinary toxicity. Results Two patients (1.6%) developed grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity and 12 patients (9.5%) developed grades 1-2 urinary toxicity. No grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. The mean bladder point dose was 46.9% (11.256 Gy) and 49.8% (11.952 Gy) for the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups, respectively (p = 0.69). After a median follow-up of 36.8 months, the 3-year local failure and 5-year cancer-specific and overall survival rates were 2.1%, 100%, and 94.6%, respectively. No pelvic failure was seen in this cohort. Age over 60 years (p = 0.48), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.77), FIGO histological grade (p = 0.76), isthmus invasion (p = 0.68), and applicator type (cylinder × ovoid) (p = 0.82) did not significantly affect local control. Conclusions In this retrospective study, ICRU bladder point did not correlate with urinary toxicity. Four fractions of 6 Gy HDR-BT effected satisfactory local control, with acceptable urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:26622241

  11. 14 CFR 23.203 - Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... a 30 degree bank. Reduce speed by steadily and progressively tightening the turn with the elevator until the airplane is stalled, as defined in § 23.201(b). The rate of speed reduction must be constant... permissible speed or allowable limit load factor. (c) Compliance with the requirements of this section must...

  12. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  13. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers. PMID:26465546

  14. Data that describe at-a-point temporal variations in the transport rate and particle-size distribution of bedload; East Fork River, Wyoming, and Fall River, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, Basil; Emmett, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    Data from the East Fork River, Wyoming, and the Fall River, Colorado, that document at-a-point temporal variations in the transport rate and particle-size distribution of bedload, associated with the downstream migration of dunes, are presented. Bedload sampling was undertaken, using a 76.2 x 76.2 mm Helley-Smith sampler, on three separate occasions at each site in June 1988. In each instance, the sampling time was 30 seconds and the sampling intervals 5 minutes. The sampling period ranged from 4.92 to 8.25 hours. Water stage did not vary appreciably during any of the sampling periods. (USGS)

  15. Design of choking cascade turns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, J.

    1982-12-01

    Five different shock-positioning cascades, for short-radius turns in ramjet inlet diffusers, were designed and tested on the AFIT water table. These flow controllers were to perform the same function as the conventional arrangement of an aerodynamic grid and a long-radius turn. The tests were to determine the suitability of the water table for such experimentation, in addition to determining the flow-control capabilities and pressure recovery of the cascades. All five designs accomplished the flow-control function as designed, and two designs exhibited the same or better pressure recovery than the aerodynamic grid. The water table proved to be an excellent means of testing these cascades, primarily due to the ease of flow visualization in the tests done. The shock-positioning cascade, short-radius turn concept shows promise and should be tested further in gas-dynamic apparatus.

  16. Study on pulsed-discharge devices with high current rising rate for point spot short-wavelength source in dense plasma observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachinami, Fumitaka; Anzai, Nobuyuki; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Harada, Nob.

    2014-01-01

    A pulsed-power generator with high current rise based on a pulse-forming-network was studied toward generating intense point-spot X-ray source. To obtain the high rate of current rise, we have designed the compact discharge device with low circuit inductance. The results indicate that the inductance of the compact discharge device was dominated by a gap switch inductance. To reduce the gap switch inductance and operation voltage, the feasible gap switch inductance in the vacuum chamber has been estimated by the circuit simulation. The gap switch inductance can be reduced by the lower pressure operation. It means that the designed discharge device achieves the rate of current rise of 1012 A/s.

  17. Quixote's Visor: A Rhetorical Turn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses "Quixote's visor," a rhetorical turn that conceals a logical gap, an appeal to frustration or necessity. Suggests that the form of Quixote's visor, the testing of a series of possibilities, is a way of deriving logical and rhetorical inferences in response to acts of questioning. Discusses two "cousins"--Sherlock's visor and Darwin's…

  18. Turning Sunlight into Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    An aqueous solution contains silica particles that have been embedded with photooxidizing cobalt oxide nanocrystals plus a sensitizer to allow the water-splitting reaction to be driven by visible light. When laser light hits the solution it turns blue as the sensitizer absorbs light. Bubbles soon begin to form as oxygen gas is released from the spilt water molecules.

  19. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  20. Chatter detection in turning using persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Firas A.; Munch, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.

  1. Diamond turning of lithium niobate for optical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, B.A.; Syn, C.; Velsko, S.P. )

    1992-09-20

    We have investigated the surfae finishing of lithium niobate by using the single-point diamond turning technique. Surface finishes of better than 5 nm rms on {ital z}-oriented samples have been achieved. However, tool wear and spalling are much more significant with lithium niobate than with materials such as the crystals KDP and LAP. We present preliminary results comparing the optical damage thresholds of polished and diamond-turned samples.

  2. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  3. Bacteria turn a tiny gear

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Thousands of tiny Bacillus subtillis bacteria turn a single gear, just 380 microns across. (A human hair is about 100 microns across.) The method could be used to create micro-machines. Argonne National Laboratory scientist Igor Aronson pioneered this technique. Read more at the New York Times: http://ow.ly/ODfI or at Argonne: http://ow.ly/ODfa Video courtesy Igor Aronson.

  4. Solid-state turn coordinator display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Crouch, R. K.; Kelly, W. L., IV

    1975-01-01

    A solid state turn coordinator display which employs light emitting diodes (LED's) as the display medium was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for aircraft applications. The input to the display is supplied by a fluidic inertial rate sensor used in an aircraft wing leveler system. The display is composed of the LED radial display face and the electronics necessary to address and drive the individual lines of LED's. Three levels of brightness are provided to compensate for the different amounts of ambient light present in the cockpit.

  5. A non-rigid point matching method with local topology preservation for accurate bladder dose summation in high dose rate cervical brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haibin; Zhong, Zichun; Liao, Yuliang; Pompoš, Arnold; Hrycushko, Brian; Albuquerque, Kevin; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-02-01

    GEC-ESTRO guidelines for high dose rate cervical brachytherapy advocate the reporting of the D2cc (the minimum dose received by the maximally exposed 2cc volume) to organs at risk. Due to large interfractional organ motion, reporting of accurate cumulative D2cc over a multifractional course is a non-trivial task requiring deformable image registration and deformable dose summation. To efficiently and accurately describe the point-to-point correspondence of the bladder wall over all treatment fractions while preserving local topologies, we propose a novel graphic processing unit (GPU)-based non-rigid point matching algorithm. This is achieved by introducing local anatomic information into the iterative update of correspondence matrix computation in the ‘thin plate splines-robust point matching’ (TPS-RPM) scheme. The performance of the GPU-based TPS-RPM with local topology preservation algorithm (TPS-RPM-LTP) was evaluated using four numerically simulated synthetic bladders having known deformations, a custom-made porcine bladder phantom embedded with twenty one fiducial markers, and 29 fractional computed tomography (CT) images from seven cervical cancer patients. Results show that TPS-RPM-LTP achieved excellent geometric accuracy with landmark residual distance error (RDE) of 0.7  ±  0.3 mm for the numerical synthetic data with different scales of bladder deformation and structure complexity, and 3.7  ±  1.8 mm and 1.6  ±  0.8 mm for the porcine bladder phantom with large and small deformation, respectively. The RDE accuracy of the urethral orifice landmarks in patient bladders was 3.7  ±  2.1 mm. When compared to the original TPS-RPM, the TPS-RPM-LTP improved landmark matching by reducing landmark RDE by 50  ±  19%, 37  ±  11% and 28  ±  11% for the synthetic, porcine phantom and the patient bladders, respectively. This was achieved with a computational time of less than 15 s in all cases

  6. A non-rigid point matching method with local topology preservation for accurate bladder dose summation in high dose rate cervical brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haibin; Zhong, Zichun; Liao, Yuliang; Pompoš, Arnold; Hrycushko, Brian; Albuquerque, Kevin; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-02-01

    GEC-ESTRO guidelines for high dose rate cervical brachytherapy advocate the reporting of the D2cc (the minimum dose received by the maximally exposed 2cc volume) to organs at risk. Due to large interfractional organ motion, reporting of accurate cumulative D2cc over a multifractional course is a non-trivial task requiring deformable image registration and deformable dose summation. To efficiently and accurately describe the point-to-point correspondence of the bladder wall over all treatment fractions while preserving local topologies, we propose a novel graphic processing unit (GPU)-based non-rigid point matching algorithm. This is achieved by introducing local anatomic information into the iterative update of correspondence matrix computation in the 'thin plate splines-robust point matching' (TPS-RPM) scheme. The performance of the GPU-based TPS-RPM with local topology preservation algorithm (TPS-RPM-LTP) was evaluated using four numerically simulated synthetic bladders having known deformations, a custom-made porcine bladder phantom embedded with twenty one fiducial markers, and 29 fractional computed tomography (CT) images from seven cervical cancer patients. Results show that TPS-RPM-LTP achieved excellent geometric accuracy with landmark residual distance error (RDE) of 0.7  ±  0.3 mm for the numerical synthetic data with different scales of bladder deformation and structure complexity, and 3.7  ±  1.8 mm and 1.6  ±  0.8 mm for the porcine bladder phantom with large and small deformation, respectively. The RDE accuracy of the urethral orifice landmarks in patient bladders was 3.7  ±  2.1 mm. When compared to the original TPS-RPM, the TPS-RPM-LTP improved landmark matching by reducing landmark RDE by 50  ±  19%, 37  ±  11% and 28  ±  11% for the synthetic, porcine phantom and the patient bladders, respectively. This was achieved with a computational time of less than 15 s in all cases

  7. Estimated times to exhaustion and power outputs at the gas exchange threshold, physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold, and respiratory compensation point.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Haley C; Housh, Terry J; Zuniga, Jorge M; Camic, Clayton L; Traylor, Daniel A; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the power outputs and estimated times to exhaustion (T(lim)) at the gas exchange threshold (GET), physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold (PWC(RPE)), and respiratory compensation point (RCP). Three male and 5 female subjects (mean ± SD: age, 22.4 ± 2.8 years) performed an incremental test to exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer to determine peak oxygen consumption rate, GET, and RCP. The PWC(RPE) was determined from ratings of perceived exertion data recorded during 3 continuous workbouts to exhaustion. The estimated T(lim) values for each subject at GET, PWC(RPE), and RCP were determined from power curve analyses (T(lim) = ax(b)). The results indicated that the PWC(RPE) (176 ± 55 W) was not significantly different from RCP (181 ± 54 W); however, GET (155 ± 42 W) was significantly less than PWC(RPE) and RCP. The estimated T(lim) for the GET (26.1 ± 9.8 min) was significantly greater than PWC(RPE) (14.6 ± 5.6 min) and RCP (11.2 ± 3.1 min). The PWC(RPE) occurred at a mean power output that was 13.5% greater than the GET and, therefore, it is likely that the perception of effort is not driven by the same mechanism that underlies the GET (i.e., lactate buffering). Furthermore, the PWC(RPE) and RCP were not significantly different and, therefore, these thresholds may be associated with the same mechanisms of fatigue, such as increased levels of interstitial and (or) arterial [K⁺]. PMID:22716291

  8. The search for optimal cutoff points for apoptosis and proliferation rate in prognostification of early stage breast cancer patients treated with anthracyclines in adjuvant settings.

    PubMed

    Biesaga, Beata; Niemiec, Joanna; Wysocka, Joanna; Słonina, Dorota; Ziobro, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Cancer growth is determined by the proportion of proliferating to dying cells; thus, the aim of the study was to analyze how proliferation rate and apoptosis level affect disease-free survival (DFS) of breast cancer (BC) patients treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. For 172 BC, proliferation rate was investigated by Ki-67 labeling index (Ki-67 LI)-assessed immunohistochemically. Apoptosis level was analyzed by apoptotic index (AI) estimated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. To stratify patients into subgroups with higher and lower DFS and to achieve optimal categorization, optimal cutoff points were searching by minimal P value method. The best separation of DFS curves (P = 0.001) was observed for three categories of AI: (i) AI >1.8 % (DFS = 100 %), (ii) AI ≤0.3 % (DFS = 84.6 %), and (iii) 1.8 % <= AI >0.3 % (DFS = 64.0 %). The highest DFS (86.1 %) was shown for the subgroup with low-proliferating BC (Ki-67 LI ≤18.0 %), intermediate (73.9 %) for patients characterized by Ki-67 LI in the range 18.0-37.0 % and the lowest (60.0 %) for women with fast-proliferating tumors (Ki-67 LI >37.0 %) (P = 0.022). Summarized, minimal P value method allows for optimal separation of survival curves. Apoptosis level and proliferation rate have some prognostic potential for early stage breast cancer patients treated with anthracyclines in adjuvant setting, however, as suggested by multivariate analysis, not as independent prognostic factors. PMID:26687650

  9. When Is It My Turn To Speak?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orestrom, Bengt

    A study analyzed four dyadic conversations for evidence of the signals operating in the turn-taking process and facilitating the smooth exchange of turns. It found over 20 syntactic, prosodic, and semantic features occurring frequently with turn-taking. The five most significant factors correlating with turn-taking were a prosodically completed…

  10. Diamond Turning Of Infra-Red Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, B.; Lettington, A. H.; Stillwell, P. F. T. C.

    1986-05-01

    Single point diamond machining of infra-red optical components such as aluminium mirrors, germanium lenses and zinc sulphide domes is potentially the most cost effective method for their manufacture since components may be machined from the blanks to a high surface finish, requiring no subsequent polishing, in a few minutes. Machines for the production of flat surfaces are well established. Diamond turning lathes for curved surfaces however require a high capital investment which can be justified only for research purposes or high volume production. The present paper describes the development of a low cost production machine based on a Bryant Symons diamond turning lathe which is able to machine spherical components to the required form and finish. It employs two horizontal spindles one for the workpiece the other for the tool. The machined radius of curvature is set by the alignment of the axes and the radius of the tool motion, as in conventional generation. The diamond tool is always normal to the workpiece and does not need to be accurately profiled. There are two variants of this basic machine. For machining hemispherical domes the axes are at right angles while for lenses with positive or negative curvature these axes are adjustable. An aspherical machine is under development, based on the all mechanical spherical machine, but in which a ± 2 mm aspherecity may be imposed on the best fit sphere by moving the work spindle under numerical control.

  11. Electrodeposited coatings for diamond turning applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.; Bramlett, R.D.; Day, R.D. ); Evans, C.J.; Polvani, R.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Electrodeposited coatings are attractive for precision machining operations because thick coatings can be economically applied, with good adhesion, to a variety of substrates. Approximately 20 pure metals and a large number of alloys can be deposited from aqueous solutions. Fused salt and organic solvent electrolytes can be used to lengthen the list of metals that can be electrodeposited. However, both the choice of the metallic coating and the control of the plating process are critical for success in precision finishing of electrodeposited coatings. Some preliminary results at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory suggest that electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloys are excellent coatings for single point diamond turning from the standpoint of material properties and low tool wear. Electrodeposited aluminum and aluminum alloy coatings also merit consideration for precision finishing where weight is an important factor. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Mapped interpolation scheme for single-point energy corrections in reaction rate calculations and a critical evaluation of dual-level reaction path dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Y.Y.; Truhlar, D.G.; Corchado, J.C.

    1999-02-25

    Three procedures for incorporating higher level electronic structure data into reaction path dynamics calculations are tested. In one procedure, variational transition state theory with interpolated single-point energies, which is denoted VTST-ISPE, a few extra energies calculated with a higher level theory along the lower level reaction path are used to correct the classical energetic profile of the reaction. In the second procedure, denoted variational transition state theory with interpolated optimized corrections (VTST-IOC), which the authors introduced earlier, higher level corrections to energies, frequencies, and moments of inertia are based on stationary-point geometries reoptimized at a higher level than the reaction path was calculated. The third procedure, called interpolated optimized energies (IOE), is like IOC except it omits the frequency correction. Three hydrogen-transfer reactions, CH{sub 3} + H{prime}H {r_arrow} CH{sub 3}H{prime} + H (R1), OH + H{prime}H {r_arrow} HOH{prime} + H (R2), and OH + H{prime}CH{sub 3} {r_arrow} HOH{prime} + CH{sub 3} (R3), are used to test and validate the procedures by comparing their predictions to the reaction rate evaluated with a full variational transition state theory calculation including multidimensional tunneling (VTST/MT) at the higher level. The authors present a very efficient scheme for carrying out VTST-ISPE calculations, which are popular due to their lower computational cost. They also show, on the basis of calculations of the reactions R1--R3 with eight pairs of higher and lower levels, that VTST-IOC with higher level data only at stationary points is a more reliable dual-level procedure than VTST-ISPE with higher level energies all along the reaction path. Although the frequencies along the reaction path are not corrected in the IOE scheme, the results are still better than those from VTST-ISPE; this indicates the importance of optimizing the geometry at the highest possible level.

  13. Heart rate variability and hemodynamic change in the superior mesenteric artery by acupuncture stimulation of lower limb points: a randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Soichiro; Watanabe, Masashi; Takayama, Shin; Numata, Takehiro; Seki, Takashi; Tanaka, Junichi; Kanemura, Seiki; Kagaya, Yutaka; Ishii, Tadashi; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We investigated the relationship between superior mesenteric artery blood flow volume (SMA BFV) and autonomic nerve activity in acupuncture stimulation of lower limb points through heart rate variability (HRV) evaluations. Methods. Twenty-six healthy volunteers underwent crossover applications of bilateral manual acupuncture stimulation at ST36 or LR3 or no stimulation. Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, SMA BFV, and HRV at rest and 30 min after the intervention were analyzed. Results. SMA BFV showed a significant increase after ST36 stimulation (0% to 14.1% ± 23.4%, P = 0.007); very low frequency (VLF), high frequency (HF), low frequency (LF), and LF/HF were significantly greater than those at rest (0% to 479.4% ± 1185.6%, P = 0.045; 0% to 78.9% ± 197.6%, P = 0.048; 0% to 123.9% ± 217.1%, P = 0.006; 0% to 71.5% ± 171.1%, P = 0.039). Changes in HF and LF also differed significantly from those resulting from LR3 stimulation (HF: 78.9% ± 197.6% versus -18.2% ± 35.8%, P = 0.015; LF: 123.9% ± 217.1% versus 10.6% ± 70.6%, P = 0.013). Conclusion. Increased vagus nerve activity after ST36 stimulation resulted in increased SMA BFV. This partly explains the mechanism of acupuncture-induced BFV changes. PMID:24381632

  14. MAMAP - a new spectrometer system for column-averaged methane and carbon dioxide observations from aircraft: retrieval algorithm and first inversions for point source emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krings, T.; Gerilowski, K.; Buchwitz, M.; Reuter, M.; Tretner, A.; Erzinger, J.; Heinze, D.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2011-04-01

    MAMAP is an airborne passive remote sensing instrument designed for measuring columns of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The MAMAP instrument consists of two optical grating spectrometers: One in the short wave infrared band (SWIR) at 1590-1690 nm to measure CO2 and CH4 absorptions and another one in the near infrared (NIR) at 757-768 nm to measure O2 absorptions for reference purposes. MAMAP can be operated in both nadir and zenith geometry during the flight. Mounted on an airplane MAMAP can effectively survey areas on regional to local scales with a ground pixel resolution of about 29 m × 33 m for a typical aircraft altitude of 1250 m and a velocity of 200 km h-1. The retrieval precision of the measured column relative to background is typically ≲ 1% (1σ). MAMAP can be used to close the gap between satellite data exhibiting global coverage but with a rather coarse resolution on the one hand and highly accurate in situ measurements with sparse coverage on the other hand. In July 2007 test flights were performed over two coal-fired powerplants operated by Vattenfall Europe Generation AG: Jänschwalde (27.4 Mt CO2 yr-1) and Schwarze Pumpe (11.9 Mt CO2 yr-1), about 100 km southeast of Berlin, Germany. By using two different inversion approaches, one based on an optimal estimation scheme to fit Gaussian plume models from multiple sources to the data, and another using a simple Gaussian integral method, the emission rates can be determined and compared with emissions as stated by Vattenfall Europe. An extensive error analysis for the retrieval's dry column results (XCO2 and XCH4) and for the two inversion methods has been performed. Both methods - the Gaussian plume model fit and the Gaussian integral method - are capable of delivering reliable estimates for strong point source emission rates, given appropriate flight patterns and detailed knowledge of wind conditions.

  15. Wear inspection of a single-crystal diamond tool used in electroless nickel turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Kwon Su; Takahashi, Hideaki; Namba, Yoshiharu

    2014-03-01

    Single-point diamond turning is a useful optical fabrication method for simultaneously obtaining a smooth surface and generating an accurate shape. Generally, a single-crystal diamond tool has been used in the single-point diamond turning method and a degree of the wear on the diamond tool is unavoidable. Tool wear causes the degradation of the surface quality, surface roughness, and shape accuracy of the workpiece. Inspection of tool wear is important in improving the surface quality. A single-crystal diamond tool used in electroless nickel turning was inspected by a laser scanning microscope and a scanning probe microscope. Regular grooves were observed on the flank face of the diamond tool, and the pitch interval was the same as the feed rate. The worn distance was obtained by measuring the clearance angle and the groove length on the flank face of the worn diamond tool. The worn distance of the diamond tool was 1.7 μm after machining electroless nickel for a 3.18 km cutting distance. The worn distance could also be obtained using the worn width on the flank face and the nose radius and was 2.05 μm, which was very close to 1.7 μm. Two methods based on the wear measurement of the flank face will be new methods to measure the worn distance of the single-crystal diamond tool.

  16. Curve fits of predicted inviscid stagnation-point radiative heating rates, cooling factors, and shock standoff distances for hyperbolic earth entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suttles, J. T.; Sullivan, E. M.; Margolis, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    Curve-fit formulas are presented for the stagnation-point radiative heating rate, cooling factor, and shock standoff distance for inviscid flow over blunt bodies at conditions corresponding to high-speed earth entry. The data which were curve fitted were calculated by using a technique which utilizes a one-strip integral method and a detailed nongray radiation model to generate a radiatively coupled flow-field solution for air in chemical and local thermodynamic equilibrium. The range of free-stream parameters considered were altitudes from about 55 to 70 km and velocities from about 11 to 16 km.sec. Spherical bodies with nose radii from 30 to 450 cm and elliptical bodies with major-to-minor axis ratios of 2, 4, and 6 were treated. Powerlaw formulas are proposed and a least-squares logarithmic fit is used to evaluate the constants. It is shown that the data can be described in this manner with an average deviation of about 3 percent (or less) and a maximum deviation of about 10 percent (or less). The curve-fit formulas provide an effective and economic means for making preliminary design studies for situations involving high-speed earth entry.

  17. The immediate effects of traditional Thai massage on heart rate variability and stress-related parameters in patients with back pain associated with myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Buttagat, Vitsarut; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Chatchawan, Uraiwon; Kharmwan, Samerduen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of traditional Thai massage (TTM) on stress-related parameters including heart rate variability (HRV), anxiety, muscle tension, pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, and body flexibility in patients with back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. Thirty-six patients were randomly allocated to receive a 30-min session of either TTM or control (rest on bed) for one session. Results indicated that TTM was associated with significant increases in HRV (increased total power frequency (TPF) and high frequency (HF)), pressure pain threshold (PPT) and body flexibility (p<0.05) and significant decreases in self-reported pain intensity, anxiety and muscle tension (p<0.001). For all outcomes, similar changes were not observed in the control group. The adjusted post-test mean values for TPF, HF, PPT and body flexibility were significantly higher in the TTM group when compared with the control group (p<0.01) and the values for pain intensity, anxiety and muscle tension were significantly lower. We conclude that TTM can increase HRV and improve stress-related parameters in this patient population. PMID:21147414

  18. LX-17 Corner-Turning and Reactive Flow Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Andreski, H; Cook III, C F; Garza, R; Pastrone, R; Phillips, D; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Molitoris, J

    2004-03-11

    We have performed a series of highly-instrumented experiments examining corner-turning of detonation. A TATB booster is inset 15 mm into LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% kel-F) so that the detonation must turn a right angle around an air well. An optical pin located at the edge of the TATB gives the start time of the corner-turn. The breakout time on the side and back edges is measured with streak cameras. Three high-resolution X-ray images were taken on each experiment to examine the details of the detonation. We have concluded that the detonation cannot turn the corner and subsequently fails, but the shock wave continues to propagate in the unreacted explosive, leaving behind a dead zone. The detonation front farther out from the corner slowly turns and eventually reaches the air well edge 180{sup o} from its original direction. The dead zone is stable and persists 7.7 {micro}s after the corner-turn, although it has drifted into the original air well area. Our regular reactive flow computer models sometimes show temporary failure but they recover quickly and are unable to model the dead zones. We present a failure model that cuts off the reaction rate below certain detonation velocities and reproduces the qualitative features of the corner-turning failure.

  19. Support vector machines for prediction and analysis of beta and gamma-turns in proteins.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tho Hoan; Satou, Kenji; Ho, Tu Bao

    2005-04-01

    Tight turns have long been recognized as one of the three important features of proteins, together with alpha-helix and beta-sheet. Tight turns play an important role in globular proteins from both the structural and functional points of view. More than 90% tight turns are beta-turns and most of the rest are gamma-turns. Analysis and prediction of beta-turns and gamma-turns is very useful for design of new molecules such as drugs, pesticides, and antigens. In this paper we investigated two aspects of applying support vector machine (SVM), a promising machine learning method for bioinformatics, to prediction and analysis of beta-turns and gamma-turns. First, we developed two SVM-based methods, called BTSVM and GTSVM, which predict beta-turns and gamma-turns in a protein from its sequence. When compared with other methods, BTSVM has a superior performance and GTSVM is competitive. Second, we used SVMs with a linear kernel to estimate the support of amino acids for the formation of beta-turns and gamma-turns depending on their position in a protein. Our analysis results are more comprehensive and easier to use than the previous results in designing turns in proteins. PMID:15852509

  20. Turning Disciplinary Knowledge into Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gehlert, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Turning disciplinary knowledge about preadolescents’ and adolescents’ exposure to risk factors for cancer as adults into solutions for preventing such an outcome requires that investigators from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines come together to share knowledge. Optimally, these collaborations would occur across two dimensions: (1) transdisciplinary, from the molecular or cellular level (e.g., animal studies of endocrine disruption) to the societal level (e.g., economic studies related to state tobacco policies), and (2) translational, using basic research findings in clinical and other sciences to implement prevention programs and public policy. Only when collaboration is commonplace can the disparate groups of investigators working on cancer prevention during pre-adolescence and adolescence gain a holistic picture of the risk factors, inform one another’s work, and learn what we need to know to devise successful interventions for preventing cancer. Working transdisciplinarily also helps to ensure that messages to health professionals, policymakers, the news media, and the public are consistent and coordinated. At present, those investigating preadolescent and adolescent risk for adult cancer disseminate their knowledge individually, thus missing the opportunity to synthesize knowledge, coordinate dissemination, and implement prevention programs. In this paper, we distinguish multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary approaches, argue for the benefits of a transdisciplinary approach to devising successful solutions and how to achieve transdisciplinary functioning. PMID:23601619

  1. Turning erythrocytes into functional micromotors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiguang; Li, Tianlong; Li, Jinxing; Gao, Wei; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Weiwei; Galarnyk, Michael; He, Qiang; Zhang, Liangfang; Wang, Joseph

    2014-12-23

    Attempts to apply artificial nano/micromotors for diverse biomedical applications have inspired a variety of strategies for designing motors with diverse propulsion mechanisms and functions. However, existing artificial motors are made exclusively of synthetic materials, which are subject to serious immune attack and clearance upon entering the bloodstream. Herein we report an elegant approach that turns natural red blood cells (RBCs) into functional micromotors with the aid of ultrasound propulsion and magnetic guidance. Iron oxide nanoparticles are loaded into the RBCs, where their asymmetric distribution within the cells results in a net magnetization, thus enabling magnetic alignment and guidance under acoustic propulsion. The RBC motors display efficient guided and prolonged propulsion in various biological fluids, including undiluted whole blood. The stability and functionality of the RBC motors, as well as the tolerability of regular RBCs to the ultrasound operation, are carefully examined. Since the RBC motors preserve the biological and structural features of regular RBCs, these motors possess a wide range of antigenic, transport, and mechanical properties that common synthetic motors cannot achieve and thus hold considerable promise for a number of practical biomedical uses. PMID:25415461

  2. Turning Erythrocytes to Functional Micromotors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiguang; Li, Tianlong; Li, Jinxing; Gao, Wei; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Weiwei; Galarnyk, Michael; He, Qiang; Zhang, Liangfang; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Attempts to apply artificial nano/micromotors for diverse biomedical applications have inspired a variety of strategies for designing new motors with unique propulsion mechanisms and functions. However, existing artificial motors are made exclusively of synthetic materials, which are subject to serious immune attack and clearance upon entering the bloodstream. Herein we report an elegant approach that turns natural red blood cells (RBCs) into functional micromotors with the aid of ultrasound propulsion and magnetic guidance. Iron oxide nanoparticles are loaded into the RBCs, where their asymmetric distribution within the cells results in a net magnetization, thus enabling magnetic alignment and guidance under acoustic propulsion. The RBC motors display efficient guided and prolonged propulsion in various biological fluids, including undiluted whole blood. The stability and functionality of the RBC motors, as well as the tolerability of regular RBCs to the ultrasound operation, are carefully examined. Since the RBC motors preserve the biological and structural features of regular RBCs, these motors possess a wide range of antigenic, transport, and mechanical properties that common synthetic motors cannot achieve and thus hold considerable promise for a number of practical biomedical uses. PMID:25415461

  3. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.135 Turns. (a) Each person making a right turn in a motor vehicle shall make the approach and turn as close...

  4. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.135 Turns. (a) Each person making a right turn in a motor vehicle shall make the approach and turn as close...

  5. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Turning basins. 401.48 Section 401.48 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.48 Turning basins. No vessel shall be turned about in any canal,...

  6. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Turning basins. 401.48 Section... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.48 Turning basins. No vessel... the locations set out in the table to this section. Table 1. South Shore Canal: (a) Turning Basin...

  7. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Turning basins. 401.48 Section... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.48 Turning basins. No vessel... the locations set out in the table to this section. Table 1. South Shore Canal: (a) Turning Basin...

  8. As the Third World turns.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, E

    1991-01-01

    Throughout the 3rd World, family planners have turned to television in order to spread their message. Combining education and entertainment in the form of advertisements and soap operas, television offers a way to provide clear and memorable information about an otherwise sensitive issue. In 1977, Mexico's Miguel Sabido developed the idea of using television as a means of social instruction. His initial soap opera dealt with adult literacy, and the success of that program led him to develop a show focusing on family planning called "Come Along with Me." Following the airing of this soap opera, attendance to family planning clinics increased by 32%. Since then, Mexico has produced a series of soap operas dealing with sex education, women's status, and the treatment of children. Soon, Mexican viewers will see a soap opera addressing the issue of AIDS. Family planners in other countries have also begun employing television. Conventional communication methods require trained counselors travelling villages, and most often, those most in need of family planning are the most difficult to reach. But over the last 10 years, the number of televisions in the Third World has doubled, and there is now approximately 1 television for every 12 people in the developing nations. In Turkey, advertisements have been used to promote modern methods of contraception. In Brazil, vasectomy has been one of the topics of ad campaigns. Mexico, the Philippines, and Nigeria have also experimented with the use of music videos. Nigeria has already had great success in integrating family planning themes to an already existing variety show. Family planning visits have increased by 47%. International agencies have recognized the value of television and have provided financial support. PMID:12343296

  9. Gasdynamic evaluation of choking cascade turns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, D. R.

    1984-12-01

    Uses for ram air in airborne vehicles are increasing along with the need for sophisticated ducting of the compressed air. Inlets operating supercritically, a normal shock in the subsonic diffuser, and use an aerodynamic grid to control the normal shock position to a region of low total pressure losses are discussed. Turning of the flow requires long radius curves to maintain the total pressure. This study combines the internal shock positioning and flow turning into a flow choking cascade turn with a short radius. Several sets of 90 degree turning sections, for turning compressed air, were selected, designed, and tested gas dynamically. Two of the turn sections were totally subsonic and only turned the air flow. Two other sections turned and choked the flow during supercritical inlet operation. These flow controllers perform the same function as an aerodynamic grid and flow turning vanes used in current internal compressible airflow designs. These tests correlated the suitability of using a water table versus a gas dynamic apparatus for determining the flow control capabilities and pressure recovery of the cascades. The subsonic only turning section gave the best pressure recovery and total pressure distribution along the turning axis, but allowed the supercritical internal shock to move towards large shock/boundary layer interaction. The two shock positioning cascades provided good internal shock control with only slightly lower pressure recovery. Further investigation is needed for the effects of back pressure fluctuations on the flow dynamics.

  10. Turning the Tide for Birth

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2010-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education discusses the escalating cesarean surgery rate and the need for evidence-based practice changes that support vaginal birth after cesarean. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote natural, safe, and healthy birth practices. PMID:20498750

  11. Missing the (question) mark? What is a turn to ontology?

    PubMed

    Woolgar, Steve; Lezaun, Javier

    2015-06-01

    Our introductory essay in this journal's 2013 Special Issue on the 'turn to ontology' examined the shift from epistemology to ontology in science and technology studies and explored the implications of the notion of enactment. Three responses to that Special Issue argue that (I) there is no fundamental qualitative difference between the ontological turn and social constructivism, (2) we need to be wary of overly generic use of the term 'ontology' and (3) the language of 'turns' imposes constraints on the richness and diversity of science and technology studies. In this brief reply, we show how each of those critiques varies in its commitment to circumspection about making objective determinations of reality and to resisting reification. We illustrate our point by considering overlapping discussions in anthropology. This brings out the crucial difference between the science and technology studies slogan 'it could be otherwise' and the multinaturalist motto 'it actually is otherwise'. PMID:26477203

  12. Turning Bacteria Suspensions into Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Héctor Matías; Gachelin, Jérémie; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidence for a low-shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semidilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension displays a "superfluidlike" transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that, macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  13. Nine Frames as Jupiter Turns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This sequence of nine true-color, narrow-angle images shows the varying appearance of Jupiter as it rotated through more than a complete 360-degree turn. The smallest features seen in this sequence are no bigger than about 380 kilometers (about 236 miles). Rotating more than twice as fast as Earth, Jupiter completes one rotation in about 10 hours. These images were taken on Oct. 22 and 23, 2000. From image to image (proceeding left to right across each row and then down to the next row), cloud features on Jupiter move from left to right before disappearing over the edge onto the nightside of the planet. The most obvious Jovian feature is the Great Red Spot, which can be seen moving onto the dayside in the third frame (below and to the left of the center of the planet). In the fourth frame, taken about 1 hour and 40 minutes later, the Great Red Spot has been carried by the planet's rotation to the east and does not appear again until the final frame, which was taken one complete rotation after the third frame.

    Unlike weather systems on Earth, which change markedly from day to day, large cloud systems in Jupiter's colder, thicker atmosphere are long-lived, so the two frames taken one rotation apart have a very similar appearance. However, when this sequence of images is eventually animated, strong winds blowing eastward at some latitudes and westward at other latitudes will be readily apparent. The results of such differential motions can be seen even in the still frames shown here. For example, the clouds of the Great Red Spot rotate counterclockwise. The strong westward winds northeast of the Great Red Spot are deflected around the spot and form a wake of turbulent clouds downstream (visible in the fourth image), just as a rock in a rapidly flowing river deflects the fluid around it.

    The equatorial zone on Jupiter is currently bright white, indicating the presence of clouds much like cirrus clouds on Earth, but made of ammonia instead of water ice. This

  14. Head Turning-Induced Hypotension in Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    Schoon, Yvonne; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rongen, Sara; Lagro, Joep; Schalk, Bianca; Claassen, Jurgen A. H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Carotid sinus hypersensitivity has a high prevalence in the elderly and is a possible cause of falls. In carotid sinus hypersensitivity, external triggers cause sudden reductions in blood pressure, leading to dizziness or syncope, resulting in falls. Turning of the head is considered an important example of such an external trigger in everyday life, wherein rotation of the neck is thought to manipulate the hypersensitive carotid sinus. However, direct evidence for this is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of head turning in elderly with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. We performed a prospective, observational study in 105 elderly patients who visited a geriatric falls clinic in a university teaching hospital and in 25 community dwelling healthy elderly subjects. Continuous measurements of blood pressure and heart rate (Finapres) were performed before, during, and after head turning. Head turning-induced hypotension was defined as a drop in systolic blood pressure of at least 20 mmHg during head turning. Carotid sinus hypersensitivity was examined with carotid sinus massage. We also tested for two other common geriatric hypotensive syndromes, orthostatic hypotension and post prandial hypotension, using active standing and a meal test. All three hypotensive syndromes were defined using consensus definitions. Head turning resulted in hypotension in 39% of patients (mean systolic blood pressure drop 36 mm Hg) and in 44% of the healthy elderly, irrespective of the direction of the head movement. Carotid sinus hypersensitivity was associated with head-turning induced hypotension (OR= 3.5, 95% CI= 1.48 to 8.35). We conclude that head turning is indeed an important cause of sudden drops in blood pressure in elderly with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. PMID:23977361

  15. Turning the Corner on Quality Education through Monitoring Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutts, J. Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Administrators' classroom observations should be supplemented by more thorough evaluation techniques. This article describes a simple device for measuring teachers' progress toward completing instructional goals based on electronically submitted lesson plans. Repeated low "turn" rates may signify the need for extra classroom resources or problems…

  16. Marking the Interaction Order: The Social Constitution of Turn Exchange and Speaking Turns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Rita

    1985-01-01

    Presents a conceptual framework for analyzing and interpreting turn exchange and speaking turns from two perspectives: that of the surface forms of turn taking such as smooth and simultaneous exchanges and that of an empirical analysis of the formal or underlying structure of a turn-taking system. (SED)

  17. Realistic page-turning of electronic books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chaoran; Li, Haisheng; Bai, Yannan

    2014-01-01

    The booming electronic books (e-books), as an extension to the paper book, are popular with readers. Recently, many efforts are put into the realistic page-turning simulation o f e-book to improve its reading experience. This paper presents a new 3D page-turning simulation approach, which employs piecewise time-dependent cylindrical surfaces to describe the turning page and constructs smooth transition method between time-dependent cylinders. The page-turning animation is produced by sequentially mapping the turning page into the cylinders with different radii and positions. Compared to the previous approaches, our method is able to imitate various effects efficiently and obtains more natural animation of turning page.

  18. Surface finish in ultra-precision diamond turning of single-crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayomoh, M.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.

    2015-10-01

    Silicon is an optical material widely used in the production of infrared optics. However, silicon as a brittle material exhibits some difficulties when ultra-precision machined by mono-crystalline single point diamond. Finish turning of silicon with mono- crystalline diamond inserts results in accelerated tool wear rates if the right combination of the machining parameters is not properly selected. In this study, we conducted a series of machining tests on an ultra-high precision machine tool using finish turning conditions when using mono-crystalline diamond inserts with negative rake angle and relatively big nose radius. The study yields some recommendations on the best combination of machining parameters that will result in maximum material removal rates with smallest possible surface finish. In this work, standard non-controlled waviness diamond inserts having nose radius of about 1.5 mm, rake angle of negative 25°, and clearance angle of 5° were used to produce flat surfaces on silicon disk. From the results, it has been established that feed rate has the most influential effect followed by the depth of cut and cutting speed.

  19. When Bad Masks Turn Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Roberto G.

    In keeping with the spirit of a meeting on ‘masks,' this talk presents two short stories on the theme of dust. In the first, dust plays the familiar role of the evil obscurer, the enemy to bedefeated by the cunning observer in order to allow a key future technology (adaptive optics) to be exploited fully by heroic astronomers. In the second story, dust itself emerges as the improbable hero, in the form of a circumstellar debris disks. I will present evidence of a puzzling near-infrared excess in the continuum of high-redshift galaxies and will argue that the seemingly improbable origin of this IR excess is a population of young circumstellar disks formed around high-mass stars in distant galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses,as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems in distant galaxies at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.

  20. Hybrid refractive-diffractive lens for manufacture by diamond turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Andrew P.

    1992-04-01

    The potential advantages of hybrid refractive-diffractive elements in infrared systems are reviewed. It is shown that these advantages can be realized in practice by single point diamond turning. Indeed, their manufacture by this process is no more complex in principle than making conventional aspherics which is a well-established technology. The design and manufacture of a zinc sulphide hybrid lens for the 3 - 5 micron waveband is described.

  1. Multiple Stochastic Point Processes in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Rajamanickam

    2008-04-01

    We generalize the idea of multiple-stochasticity in chemical reaction systems to gene expression. Using Chemical Langevin Equation approach we investigate how this multiple-stochasticity can influence the overall molecular number fluctuations. We show that the main sources of this multiple-stochasticity in gene expression could be the randomness in transcription and translation initiation times which in turn originates from the underlying bio-macromolecular recognition processes such as the site-specific DNA-protein interactions and therefore can be internally regulated by the supra-molecular structural factors such as the condensation/super-coiling of DNA. Our theory predicts that (1) in case of gene expression system, the variances ( φ) introduced by the randomness in transcription and translation initiation-times approximately scales with the degree of condensation ( s) of DNA or mRNA as φ ∝ s -6. From the theoretical analysis of the Fano factor as well as coefficient of variation associated with the protein number fluctuations we predict that (2) unlike the singly-stochastic case where the Fano factor has been shown to be a monotonous function of translation rate, in case of multiple-stochastic gene expression the Fano factor is a turn over function with a definite minimum. This in turn suggests that the multiple-stochastic processes can also be well tuned to behave like a singly-stochastic point processes by adjusting the rate parameters.

  2. A jump persistent turning walker to model zebrafish locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Mwaffo, Violet; Anderson, Ross P.; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish are gaining momentum as a laboratory animal species for the investigation of several functional and dysfunctional biological processes. Mathematical models of zebrafish behaviour are expected to considerably aid in the design of hypothesis-driven studies by enabling preliminary in silico tests that can be used to infer possible experimental outcomes without the use of zebrafish. This study is motivated by observations of sudden, drastic changes in zebrafish locomotion in the form of large deviations in turn rate. We demonstrate that such deviations can be captured through a stochastic mean reverting jump diffusion model, a process that is commonly used in financial engineering to describe large changes in the price of an asset. The jump process-based model is validated on trajectory data of adult subjects swimming in a shallow circular tank obtained from an overhead camera. Through statistical comparison of the empirical distribution of the turn rate against theoretical predictions, we demonstrate the feasibility of describing zebrafish as a jump persistent turning walker. The critical role of the jump term is assessed through comparison with a simplified mean reversion diffusion model, which does not allow for describing the heavy-tailed distributions observed in the fish turn rate. PMID:25392396

  3. Turning Processes: The Change of Representations in Consultee-Centered Case Consultation. Linkoping Studies in Education and Psychology No. 74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylander, Ingrid

    This study investigates sudden changes in the consultee-centered case consultation method. Three types of sudden changes in consultation were identified: (1) turnings, (2) turning points, and (3) shifts. The first part of this study explores the turning of the consultee's representation of his/her interaction to the client. The second part…

  4. Adaptive control of surface finish in automated turning processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Plaza, E.; Núñez, P. J.; Martín, A. R.; Sanz, A.

    2012-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to design and develop an on-line control system of finished surfaces in automated machining process by CNC turning. The control system consisted of two basic phases: during the first phase, surface roughness was monitored through cutting force signals; the second phase involved a closed-loop adaptive control system based on data obtained during the monitoring of the cutting process. The system ensures that surfaces roughness is maintained at optimum values by adjusting the feed rate through communication with the PLC of the CNC machine. A monitoring and adaptive control system has been developed that enables the real-time monitoring of surface roughness during CNC turning operations. The system detects and prevents faults in automated turning processes, and applies corrective measures during the cutting process that raise quality and reliability reducing the need for quality control.

  5. 14 CFR 25.495 - Turning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turning. 25.495 Section 25.495 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.495 Turning. In the static position,...

  6. 14 CFR 25.495 - Turning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turning. 25.495 Section 25.495 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.495 Turning. In the static position,...

  7. 14 CFR 25.495 - Turning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turning. 25.495 Section 25.495 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.495 Turning. In the static position,...

  8. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Turning basins. 401.48 Section 401.48 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF... vessels up to 180 m in overall length. (c) Turning Basin No. 3—Immediately south of Port Robinson (Mile...

  9. Plagiarism and the Internet: Turning the Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Thomas; Nelson, Gene

    2001-01-01

    Notes the problem of Net-based plagiarism in student papers. Describes a solution that turns the tables by using the Internet: TurnItIn.com, an Internet scanner that annotates/marks unattributed material in student papers and compiles a report for the teacher overnight. (SR)

  10. 32 CFR 636.23 - Turning movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL... movements. (a) U-turns are prohibited on all streets in the cantonment area. (b) Right-turns will be made from a position as close to the right edge or right curb of the roadway as possible. (c)...

  11. 14 CFR 25.495 - Turning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turning. 25.495 Section 25.495 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.495 Turning. In the static position,...

  12. 14 CFR 25.495 - Turning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turning. 25.495 Section 25.495 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.495 Turning. In the static position,...

  13. An introduction to Turning the Pages.

    PubMed

    Kinally, Bridget; Stocking, Michael

    2007-06-01

    Turning the Pages, the award-winning interactive program developed by the British Library, provides access to unique medical resources held by the Wellcome Library, allowing visitors to 'turn' the pages virtually, zoom in on the high-quality digitized images and read (or listen to) notes explaining the beauty and significance of each text. PMID:17671916

  14. Contact mechanics of and Reynolds flow through saddle points: On the coalescence of contact patches and the leakage rate through near-critical constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2015-02-01

    We study numerically local models for the mechanical contact between two solids with rough surfaces. When the solids softly touch either through adhesion or by a small normal load L, contact only forms at isolated patches and fluids can pass through the interface. When the load surpasses a threshold value, L\\text{c} , adjacent patches coalesce at a critical constriction, i.e., near points where the interfacial separation between the undeformed surfaces forms a saddle point. This process is continuous without adhesion and the interfacial separation near percolation is fully defined by scaling factors and the sign of L\\text{c}-L . The scaling leads to a Reynolds flow resistance which diverges as (L\\text{c}-L)-β with β = 3.45 . Contact merging and destruction near saddle points become discontinuous when either short-range adhesion or specific short-range repulsion are added to the hard-wall repulsion. These results imply that coalescence and break-up of contact patches can contribute to Coulomb friction and contact aging.

  15. The Third Turn toward the Social: Nancy Welch's "Living Room," Tony Scott's "Dangerous Writing," and Rhetoric and Composition's Turn toward Grassroots Political Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Kelly; Girshin, Thomas; Bowlin, Barrett

    2013-01-01

    This review essay examines recent texts by Nancy Welch and Tony Scott, both of which use embodied activism as a starting point for their inquiries. Taken together, these works point to a distinct shift in composition studies' turn toward the social, one that calls on workers both within and outside the academy to actively engage in grassroots…

  16. Functional criteria for assessing pointe-readiness.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Megan; Liederbach, Marijeanne; Sandow, Emily

    2010-01-01

    The most popular criterion cited in the dance literature for advancement to pointe work is attainment of the chronological age of 12 years. However, dancers at this age vary greatly in terms of musculoskeletal maturity and motor skill development. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether objective, functional tests could be used in conjunction with dance teacher expertise to determine pointe-readiness. It was hypothesized that dynamic tests of motor control can better indicate pointe-readiness than chronological age alone or in combination with static musculoskeletal measurements. Thirty-seven pre-pointe students from two professional ballet schools were tested for muscular strength, ankle joint range of motion, single leg standing balance, dynamic alignment, and turning skill. In addition, the participating students' ballet teachers independently graded each student on her readiness to begin dancing en pointe. Performance on three functional tests (the Airplane test, Sauté test, and Topple test) was closely associated with teacher subjective rating for pointe-readiness. It is concluded that these tests may be more useful for gauging acquisition of the skills required for safe and successful performance than the traditionally accepted indicators of chronological age, years of dance training, and ankle joint range of motion. PMID:21067685

  17. The effect of stopping before turning on the direct observational measure of whole body turning bias.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J D; Strike, S C

    2016-06-01

    Turning bias, the preferential tendency to turn toward a given direction has been reported in both rodents and human participants. The observational gait method of determining turning bias in humans requires a stop prior to turning. This study removed the stop and hypothesised that turning bias would remain the same between stop and non-stop conditions if bias was solely under the control of neurochemical asymmetries. The results showed that statistically turning bias remained the same (to the left) regardless of method used but there was no agreement between the methods thus rejecting the hypothesis. It is likely that when not stopping biomechanical factors related to gait when turning influence the direction of turn rather than solely neurochemical asymmetries. PMID:26974038

  18. Freeform turning lathe with direct drives and aerostatic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Chao-liang; Dai, Yi-fan; Yin, Zi-qiang; Yang, Fan

    2009-05-01

    More and more precision freeform parts are required by defense technology and national economy today and in the future. The applications of freeform parts have traditionally conformed to the limitations imposed by practical limits on high effective fabricating technology. Single point diamond turning is one of the important methods of machining freeform surface parts. Generally speaking, optical freeform surfaces have complex geometrical surface shapes and require ultra smooth surface (roughness down to 10nm) and high form accuracy (form accuracy down to several ten nanometers). So, the ultra precision turning lathe must improve the motion accuracy, dynamic stiffness and bandwidth of every axis. Direct drive technology combined with aerostatic bearing do not affect by frication and eliminate the micro-backlash and creeping; reduce the number of transmission element, shorten the transmitted chains and be propitious to improve dynamic stiffness and bandwidth. This paper presents a ultra precision diamond turning lathe with linear motor and aerostatic guide drive system. Combined with the lathe a FTS (Fast Tool Servo) system driven by voice coil actor is use to machining free form surface. The turning experiments show that this lathe can satisfy the requirement of machine freeform surface.

  19. Universals and cultural variation in turn-taking in conversation

    PubMed Central

    Stivers, Tanya; Enfield, N. J.; Brown, Penelope; Englert, Christina; Hayashi, Makoto; Heinemann, Trine; Hoymann, Gertie; Rossano, Federico; de Ruiter, Jan Peter; Yoon, Kyung-Eun; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Informal verbal interaction is the core matrix for human social life. A mechanism for coordinating this basic mode of interaction is a system of turn-taking that regulates who is to speak and when. Yet relatively little is known about how this system varies across cultures. The anthropological literature reports significant cultural differences in the timing of turn-taking in ordinary conversation. We test these claims and show that in fact there are striking universals in the underlying pattern of response latency in conversation. Using a worldwide sample of 10 languages drawn from traditional indigenous communities to major world languages, we show that all of the languages tested provide clear evidence for a general avoidance of overlapping talk and a minimization of silence between conversational turns. In addition, all of the languages show the same factors explaining within-language variation in speed of response. We do, however, find differences across the languages in the average gap between turns, within a range of 250 ms from the cross-language mean. We believe that a natural sensitivity to these tempo differences leads to a subjective perception of dramatic or even fundamental differences as offered in ethnographic reports of conversational style. Our empirical evidence suggests robust human universals in this domain, where local variations are quantitative only, pointing to a single shared infrastructure for language use with likely ethological foundations. PMID:19553212

  20. 14 CFR 23.203 - Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls. 23.203 Section 23.203 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... a 30 degree bank. Reduce speed by steadily and progressively tightening the turn with the...

  1. 14 CFR 23.203 - Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls. 23.203 Section 23.203 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... a 30 degree bank. Reduce speed by steadily and progressively tightening the turn with the...

  2. 14 CFR 23.203 - Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls. 23.203 Section 23.203 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... a 30 degree bank. Reduce speed by steadily and progressively tightening the turn with the...

  3. Nucleation rate in monotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, F.

    Cooling a melt of a monotectic system into the miscibility gap results in nucleation of fluid droplets in a fluid matrix prior to solidification. For homogeneous nucleation the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate is calculated. As material parameters the chemical potential of the species involved, the diffusion constant of the fluid, and the surface tension between adjacent phases are important. Since their temperature dependence is not well known from experiments, different theoretical models are used and their influence is discussed. The surface tension turns out to be the most crucial parameter in determining the nucleation rate. For AlIn numerical results are presented. In this system the undercooling with respect to homogeneous nucleation increases from zero at the critical point to 100 K at a composition near the monotectic point.

  4. Polarization (ellipsometric) measurements of liquid condensate deposition and evaporation rates and dew points in flowing salt/ash-containing combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    An application of an optical polarization technique in a combustion environment is demonstrated by following, in real-time, growth rates of boric oxide condensate on heated platinum ribbons exposed to seeded propane-air combustion gases. The results obtained agree with the results of earlier interference measurements and also with theoretical chemical vapor deposition predictions. In comparison with the interference method, the polarization technique places less stringent requirements on surface quality, which may justify the added optical components needed for such measurements.

  5. MedlinePlus.gov Turns 10!

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Photo courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group celebrates 10 years of success. Photo courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH NIH's MedlinePlus.gov , the popular, consumer- ...

  6. Clarification of 'Turn Performance of Aircraft'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, William F.

    1996-01-01

    A recent note analyzed the minimum turning radius of an airplane in terms of its airspeed and angle of bank. Unfortunately, some misconceptions concerning the underlying physics were introduced. This note is intended to clarify those areas.

  7. Numerical study of flow turning phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, J. D.; Levine, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    A research project is currently being conducted that is to provide an understanding of the physical mechanisms by which energy is exchanged between the mean and acoustic flowfields in resonant combustion chambers, giving particular attention to solid rocket motors. The present paper is concerned with progress which has been made toward the understanding of the 'flow turning' phenomenon. This term is used to describe the loss of acoustic energy by the acoustic field in the combustor resulting from the inflow of combustion products through the lateral boundary of a combustion chamber containing longitudinal acoustic waves. Attention is given to the modeling of flow turning, acoustic refraction, the numerical solution, numerical results, acoustic wave propagation with no mean flow, and a flow turning study. The discussed research verifies the existence of the flow turning loss phenomenon.

  8. Method of Rotational Turning With Multifaceted Cutters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indakov, N.; Gordeev, Y.; Binchurov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The proposed method combines the elements of skew turning (in which a cut layer moves along the cutting edge) and rotary turning (in which the sections of the cutting edge are constantly renewed). This leads to better cooling and, hence, a longer tool life. The required cutting speed is ensured by selection of the required number of revolutions of the cutter; the rotation of the machined shaft corresponds to the rotary feed.

  9. Influence of random point defects introduced by proton irradiation on the flux creep rates and magnetic field dependence of the critical current density J c of co-evaporated GdBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberkorn, N.; Kim, Jeehoon; Suárez, S.; Lee, Jae-Hun; Moon, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    We report the influence of random point defects introduced by 3 MeV proton irradiation (doses of 0.5 × 1016, 1 × 1016, 2 × 1016 and 6 × 1016 cm-2) on the vortex dynamics of co-evaporated 1.3 μm thick, GdBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors. Our results indicate that the inclusion of additional random point defects reduces the low field and enhances the in-field critical current densities J c. The main in-field J c enhancement takes place below 40 K, which is in agreement with the expectations for pinning by random point defects. In addition, our data show a slight though clear increase in flux creep rates as a function of irradiation fluence. Maley analysis indicates that this increment can be associated with a reduction in the exponent μ characterizing the glassy behavior.

  10. Reconceptualizing Autonomy: A Relational Turn in Bioethics.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    History's judgment on the success of bioethics will not depend solely on the conceptual creativity and innovation in the field at the level of ethical and political theory, but this intellectual work is not insignificant. One important new development is what I shall refer to as the relational turn in bioethics. This development represents a renewed emphasis on the ideographic approach, which interprets the meaning of right and wrong in human actions as they are inscribed in social and cultural practices and in structures of lived meaning and interdependence; in an ideographic approach, the task of bioethics is to bring practice into theory, not the other way around. The relational turn in bioethics may profoundly affect the critical questions that the field asks and the ethical guidance it offers society, politics, and policy. The relational turn provides a way of correcting the excessive atomism of many individualistic perspectives that have been, and continue to be, influential in bioethics. Nonetheless, I would argue that most of the work reflecting the relational turn remains distinctively liberal in its respect for the ethical significance of the human individual. It moves away from individualism, but not from the value of individuality.In this review essay, I shall focus on how the relational turn has manifested itself in work on core concepts in bioethics, especially liberty and autonomy. Following a general review, I conclude with a brief consideration of two important recent books in this area: Jennifer Nedelsky's Law's Relations and Rachel Haliburton's Autonomy and the Situated Self. PMID:26847836

  11. Dynamic characterization of the cutting conditions in dry turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, R.; Chibane, H.; Leroy, R.

    2009-08-01

    Machining instability in the form of violent vibrations or chatter is a physical process characterized by extreme cutting force at the cutting point. The process has very negative impact on machine integrity, tool life, surface quality and dimensional accuracy. Thus it could significantly compromise productivity and manufacturing quality. In the present paper, the importance of characterization and identification of dynamic instability in dry turning operation are shown. The stability behaviour of machine vibration or chatter has been examined and the various relevant parameters are studied and discuted. For chatter detection and identification of the transition between stable and unstable states, different methods are used. Results obtained proof the accuracy of these methods.

  12. The Opportunities and Threats of Turning Airports into Hubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, Andreas; Koch, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the opportunities and threats which arise when turning origin/destination airports into hubs. The analysis focuses on market development trends, competitive structures, especially in the light of airline network strategies and the growing rivalry between airports, and finally the potential financial impacts for the airport, including both investment efforts and the financial results from hub operations. We argue that in most cases a decision against converting a traditional origin/destination airport into a major transfer point is preferable to the transformation into a hub.

  13. Turning a Poor Ion Channel into a Good Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astumian, Dean

    2003-05-01

    We consider a membrane protein that can exist in two configurations, either one of which acts as a poor ion channel, allowing ions to slowly leak across the membrane from high to low elctrochemical potential. We show that random external fluctuations can provide the energy to turn this poor channel into a good pump that drives ion transport from low to high electrochemical potential. We discuss this result in terms of a gambling analogy, and point to possible implications for fields as far ranging as population biology, economics, and actuarial science.

  14. Tipping point leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2003-04-01

    When William Bratton was appointed police commissioner of New York City in 1994, turf wars over jurisdiction and funding were rife and crime was out of control. Yet in less than two years, and without an increase in his budget, Bratton turned New York into the safest large city in the nation. And the NYPD was only the latest of five law-enforcement agencies Bratton had turned around. In each case, he succeeded in record time despite limited resources, a demotivated staff, opposition from powerful vested interests, and an organization wedded to the status quo. Bratton's turnarounds demonstrate what the authors call tipping point leadership. The theory of tipping points hinges on the insight that in any organization, fundamental changes can occur quickly when the beliefs and energies of a critical mass of people create an epidemic movement toward an idea. Bratton begins by overcoming the cognitive hurdles that block organizations from recognizing the need for change. He does this by putting managers face-to-face with operational problems. Next, he manages around limitations on funds, staff, or equipment by concentrating resources on the areas that are most in need of change and that have the biggest payoffs. He meanwhile solves the motivation problem by singling out key influencers--people with disproportionate power due to their connections or persuasive abilities. Finally, he closes off resistance from powerful opponents. Not every CEO has the personality to be a Bill Bratton, but his successes are due to much more than his personality. He relies on a remarkably consistent method that any manager looking to turn around an organization can use to overcome the forces of inertia and reach the tipping point. PMID:12687920

  15. Meta-analyses of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 transcriptomic profiles identify a respiration rate-related gene expression transition point and interoperon recruitment of a key oxidoreductase subunit.

    PubMed

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Rowe, Annette R; Heavner, Gretchen L W; Zinder, Stephen H; Richardson, Ruth E

    2014-10-01

    A cDNA-microarray was designed and used to monitor the transcriptomic profile of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 (in a mixed community) respiring various chlorinated organics, including chloroethenes and 2,3-dichlorophenol. The cultures were continuously fed in order to establish steady-state respiration rates and substrate levels. The organization of array data into a clustered heat map revealed two major experimental partitions. This partitioning in the data set was further explored through principal component analysis. The first two principal components separated the experiments into those with slow (1.6±0.6 μM Cl-/h)- and fast (22.9±9.6 μM Cl-/h)-respiring cultures. Additionally, the transcripts with the highest loadings in these principal components were identified, suggesting that those transcripts were responsible for the partitioning of the experiments. By analyzing the transcriptomes (n=53) across experiments, relationships among transcripts were identified, and hypotheses about the relationships between electron transport chain members were proposed. One hypothesis, that the hydrogenases Hup and Hym and the formate dehydrogenase-like oxidoreductase (DET0186-DET0187) form a complex (as displayed by their tight clustering in the heat map analysis), was explored using a nondenaturing protein separation technique combined with proteomic sequencing. Although these proteins did not migrate as a single complex, DET0112 (an FdhB-like protein encoded in the Hup operon) was found to comigrate with DET0187 rather than with the catalytic Hup subunit DET0110. On closer inspection of the genome annotations of all Dehalococcoides strains, the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon was found to lack a key subunit, an FdhB-like protein. Therefore, on the basis of the transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic evidence, the place of the missing subunit in the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon is likely filled by recruiting a subunit expressed from the Hup operon (DET0112). PMID:25063656

  16. Meta-Analyses of Dehalococcoides mccartyi Strain 195 Transcriptomic Profiles Identify a Respiration Rate-Related Gene Expression Transition Point and Interoperon Recruitment of a Key Oxidoreductase Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Rowe, Annette R.; Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    A cDNA-microarray was designed and used to monitor the transcriptomic profile of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 (in a mixed community) respiring various chlorinated organics, including chloroethenes and 2,3-dichlorophenol. The cultures were continuously fed in order to establish steady-state respiration rates and substrate levels. The organization of array data into a clustered heat map revealed two major experimental partitions. This partitioning in the data set was further explored through principal component analysis. The first two principal components separated the experiments into those with slow (1.6 ± 0.6 μM Cl−/h)- and fast (22.9 ± 9.6 μM Cl−/h)-respiring cultures. Additionally, the transcripts with the highest loadings in these principal components were identified, suggesting that those transcripts were responsible for the partitioning of the experiments. By analyzing the transcriptomes (n = 53) across experiments, relationships among transcripts were identified, and hypotheses about the relationships between electron transport chain members were proposed. One hypothesis, that the hydrogenases Hup and Hym and the formate dehydrogenase-like oxidoreductase (DET0186-DET0187) form a complex (as displayed by their tight clustering in the heat map analysis), was explored using a nondenaturing protein separation technique combined with proteomic sequencing. Although these proteins did not migrate as a single complex, DET0112 (an FdhB-like protein encoded in the Hup operon) was found to comigrate with DET0187 rather than with the catalytic Hup subunit DET0110. On closer inspection of the genome annotations of all Dehalococcoides strains, the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon was found to lack a key subunit, an FdhB-like protein. Therefore, on the basis of the transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic evidence, the place of the missing subunit in the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon is likely filled by recruiting a subunit expressed from the Hup operon (DET0112). PMID

  17. Magnetic substorms and northward IMF turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    To determine the relation of the northward IMF turnings to substorm sudden onsets, we separated all events with sharp northward IMF turnings observed in years of solar maximum (1999-2002) and solar minimum (2007-2008). The events (N=261) have been classified in 5 groups in accordance with average magnetic activity in auroral zone (low, moderate or high levels of AL index) at unchanged or slightly changed PC index and with dynamics of PC (steady distinct growth or distinct decline) at arbitrary values of AL index. Statistical analysis of relationships between the IMF turning and changes of PC and AL indices has been fulfilled separately for each of 5 classes. Results of the analysis showed that, irrespective of geophysical conditions and solar activity epoch, the magnetic activity in the polar caps and in the auroral zone demonstrate no response to the sudden northward IMF turning, if the moment of northward turning is taken as a key date. Sharp increases of magnetic disturbance in the auroral zone are observed only under conditions of the growing PC index and statistically they are related to moment of the PC index exceeding the threshold level (~1.5 mV/m), not to northward turnings timed, as a rule, after the moment of sudden onset. Magnetic disturbances observed in these cases in the auroral zone (magnetic substorms) are guided by behavior of the PC index, like to ordinary magnetic substorms or substorms developed under conditions of the prolonged northward IMF impact on the magnetosphere. The evident inconsistency between the sharp IMF changes measured outside of the magnetosphere and behavior of the ground-based PC index, the latter determining the substorm development, provides an additional argument in favor of the PC index as a ground-based proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into magnetosphere.

  18. Turn-timing in signed conversations: coordinating stroke-to-stroke turn boundaries.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Connie; Torreira, Francisco; Levinson, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    In spoken interactions, interlocutors carefully plan, and time their utterances, minimizing gaps and overlaps between consecutive turns. Cross-linguistic comparison has indicated that spoken languages vary only minimally in terms of turn-timing, and language acquisition research has shown pre-linguistic vocal turn-taking in the first half year of life. These observations suggest that the turn-taking system may provide a fundamental basis for our linguistic capacities. The question remains, however, to what extent our capacity for rapid turn-taking is determined by modality constraints. The avoidance of overlapping turns could be motivated by the difficulty of hearing and speaking at the same time. If so, turn-taking in sign might show greater toleration for overlap. Alternatively, signed conversations may show a similar distribution of turn-timing as spoken languages, thus avoiding both gaps and overlaps. To address this question we look at turn-timing in question-answer sequences in spontaneous conversations of Sign Language of the Netherlands. The findings indicate that although there is considerable overlap in two or more signers' articulators in conversation, when proper allowance is made for onset preparation, post-utterance retraction and the intentional holding of signs for response, turn-taking latencies in sign look remarkably like those reported for spoken language. This is consistent with the possibility that, at least with regard to responses to questions, speakers and signers follow similar time courses in planning and producing their utterances in on-going conversation. This suggests that turn-taking systems may well be a shared cognitive infrastructure underlying all modern human languages, both spoken and signed. PMID:25852593

  19. Turn-timing in signed conversations: coordinating stroke-to-stroke turn boundaries

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Connie; Torreira, Francisco; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    In spoken interactions, interlocutors carefully plan, and time their utterances, minimizing gaps and overlaps between consecutive turns. Cross-linguistic comparison has indicated that spoken languages vary only minimally in terms of turn-timing, and language acquisition research has shown pre-linguistic vocal turn-taking in the first half year of life. These observations suggest that the turn-taking system may provide a fundamental basis for our linguistic capacities. The question remains, however, to what extent our capacity for rapid turn-taking is determined by modality constraints. The avoidance of overlapping turns could be motivated by the difficulty of hearing and speaking at the same time. If so, turn-taking in sign might show greater toleration for overlap. Alternatively, signed conversations may show a similar distribution of turn-timing as spoken languages, thus avoiding both gaps and overlaps. To address this question we look at turn-timing in question–answer sequences in spontaneous conversations of Sign Language of the Netherlands. The findings indicate that although there is considerable overlap in two or more signers’ articulators in conversation, when proper allowance is made for onset preparation, post-utterance retraction and the intentional holding of signs for response, turn-taking latencies in sign look remarkably like those reported for spoken language. This is consistent with the possibility that, at least with regard to responses to questions, speakers and signers follow similar time courses in planning and producing their utterances in on-going conversation. This suggests that turn-taking systems may well be a shared cognitive infrastructure underlying all modern human languages, both spoken and signed. PMID:25852593

  20. Early-time turn-on characteristics of a high current thyristor

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, L.D.; Rohwein, G.J.

    1996-07-01

    Studies and experiments aimed at increasing the turn-on speed of high current thyristors have been carried out in recent years to meet an expanding need in the pulsed power handling capacity and high pulse repetition rate capability. The present tests were conducted to measure the early-time turn-on characteristics of ABB 2003-45A02 thyristors and to determine whether special triggering techniques could raise the safe turn-on rate to the 100,000 A/{micro}s range which would qualify it for applications such as direct drive accelerator circuits. Results were encouraging. With these devices and special triggering techniques a maximum turn-on rate of 65,373 A/{micro}s and a peak current of 19,040 A were recorded at a pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  1. Turning the Page with Preconference Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowledge Quest, 2011

    2011-01-01

    For those who are experiencing a lack of creative inspiration within their school library program but are ready to "turn a page" in their career or school library program, they may head to Minneapolis to attend one of the many great preconference workshops. This article presents and describes preconference workshops design to rid librarians of the…

  2. Business Intelligence: Turning Knowledge into Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endsley, Krista

    2009-01-01

    Today, many school districts are turning to business intelligence tools to retrieve, organize, and share knowledge for faster analysis and more effective, guided decision making. Business intelligence (BI) tools are the technologies and applications that gather and report information to help an organization's leaders make better decisions. BI…

  3. 32 CFR 636.23 - Turning movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Turning movements. 636.23 Section 636.23 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart,...

  4. Primordial spectra from sudden turning trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Noumi, Toshifumi; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp

    2013-12-01

    Effects of heavy fields on primordial spectra of curvature perturbations are discussed in inflationary models with a sudden turning trajectory. When heavy fields are excited after the sudden turn and oscillate around the bottom of the potential, the following two effects are generically induced: deformation of the inflationary background spacetime and conversion interactions between adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations, both of which can affect the primordial density perturbations. In this paper, we calculate primordial spectra in inflationary models with sudden turning potentials taking into account both of the two effects appropriately. We find that there are some non-trivial correlations between the two effects in the power spectrum and, as a consequence, the primordial scalar power spectrum has a peak around the scale exiting the horizon at the turn. Though both effects can induce parametric resonance amplifications, they are shown to be canceled out for the case with the canonical kinetic terms. The peak feature and the scale dependence of bispectra are also discussed.

  5. Turning Practitioners into Professors: Exploring Effective Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Steven R.; Gustafson, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents results of focus interviews with 25 "practitioners turned professors" regarding their transition from industry to academia. Finds a general consensus that all advertising and public relations programs should implement a formal mentoring process to include teacher training and inservice, greater explanation of and assistance with promotion…

  6. A Practice Turn for Teacher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Within the Research Institute for Professional Practice, Learning and Education (RIPPLE) at Charles Sturt University, teacher education researchers have been quick to respond to the opportunities created by what is known as "the practice turn" that characterises contemporary theory around the globe and across disciplines. We are working, together…

  7. MedlinePlus.gov Turns 10!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10 years of bringing trusted health information to people across the country and around the world. What a difference a decade makes. Since its debut in 1998, MedlinePlus.gov has grown to include: Information on hundreds ... Nearly 500 million people in more than 200 countries have turned to ...

  8. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND... motion from a stopped position, or change from or merge into a lane of traffic, until he can safely...

  9. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND... motion from a stopped position, or change from or merge into a lane of traffic, until he can safely...

  10. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND... motion from a stopped position, or change from or merge into a lane of traffic, until he can safely...

  11. Turning Parents from Critics to Allies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagarese, Margaret M.; Giannetti, Charlene C.

    1998-01-01

    Authors of "The Roller Coaster Years" (1997) advise how middle-level educators can turn wary, disinterested parents into allies. Teachers should welcome parents, advertise their own expertise, implement an early-warning system, portray children positively, convey shared values, reassure parents about children's safety, demonstrate insider…

  12. The Linguistic Turn within Curriculum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englund, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    If, as the linguistic turn has taught us, there is no representational knowledge, but more agreements and/or struggles over how to talk and learn about what we call reality, we need to address and analyse the consequences of different vocabularies of educational phenomena and schooling, in order to better understand and make use of both the…

  13. Turn Allocation Patterns and Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on data from three English classrooms at two Chinese universities, this paper documents the turn-taking patterns that the teachers and students developed over time and explores how these patterns affected students' opportunities to participate in classroom discourse. The data were collected through observations, audio- and video-taping,…

  14. Circuit Controls Turn-On Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    Single choke used in primary circuit with diode arrangement, maintaining dc current flow through choke and setting up a unidirectional magnetic field, limits turn-on current of transformer-rectifier power supply. Technique reduces number and weight of components and minimizes effect of initial inrush surge current on source.

  15. Leadership Helps Turn around a Troubled School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Von

    2013-01-01

    The author tells how he employed leadership skills to help turn around a failing school loaded with at-risk students. Dayton's Bluff Elementary School was one of the worst in St. Paul when Von Sheppard took over as principal in 2001. Changing the staff and attitudes at the largely low-income, minority majority school in a tough neighborhood…

  16. Turning movement estimation in real time

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.T.

    1997-08-01

    Fast processors offer exciting opportunities for real-time traffic monitoring. Conventional transportation planning models that assume stable and predictable travel patterns do not lend themselves to on-line traffic forecasting. This paper describes how a new traffic flow inference model has the potential to determine comprehensive flow information in real time. Its philosophical basis is borrowed from the field of operational research, where it has been used for optimizing water and electricity flows. This paper shows how road traffic turning movement flows can be estimated from link detected flows at small recurrent intervals, in real time. The paper details the formulation of the problem, outlines the structure of the data set that provides the detector data for the model input and observed turning flows for the model evaluation. The theoretical principles that define the model are described briefly. Turning movement flow estimates, at 5-min intervals, from two independent surveys are presented and analyzed. The results show an overall mean coefficient of determination (r{sup 2}) of 79--82% between observed and modeled turning movement flows.

  17. Can Language Classrooms Take the Multilingual Turn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquet-Gauthier, Myriam; Beaulieu, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    For the past three decades, momentum has gathered in favour of a multilingual turn in second language acquisition research and teaching. "Multicompetence" has been proposed to replace "nativeness" and "monolingualism" to measure L2 learners' success. This proposed shift has not made its way into L2 teaching settings.…

  18. Tipping Point

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of a building. ...

  19. Effects of cutting parameters during turning 100C6 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, R.; Chibane, H.

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the paper is to evaluate the effects of cutting parameters in terms of cutting speed, depth of cut and feed rate on the influence of the surface roughness, consumed power, cutting time and tool vibrations during turning process. The material chosen in this case was 100C6 steel in dry conditions. The effects of the selected process parameters have been investigated using full factorial design of experiments (33) and the multiple linear regression (MLR). Thus, first-order empirical models were established. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to check the validity of the developed models within the limits of the factors that were being investigated and to test the significance of the above parameters. Results indicate that the feed rate is the only significant factor affecting the surface roughness. The cutting speed and feed rate are the most influential factors on cutting time. Estimated tool vibrations are functions of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut in decreasing order. Finally, the models obtained can be used for determination of optimal settings of cuttings parameters and this methodology should help us to obtain the best process parameters for dry turning of 100C6 steel.

  20. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Gangyao; Li, Jun; Huang, Alex Q.; Melcher, Jerry; Atcitty, Stan

    2008-01-01

    A novel MOS-conmore » trolled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO) is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA) and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5  A / cm 2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100  W / cm 2 conduction and the 100  W / cm 2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV) and higher frequency (10 kHz) are needed.« less

  1. Bank-to-turn control technology survey for homing missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    The potential advantages of bank-to-turn control are summarized. Recent and current programs actively investigating bank-to-turn steering are reviewed and critical technology areas concerned with bank-to-turn control are assessed.

  2. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  3. Experimental evaluation of corner turning vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Royce D.; Boldman, Donald R.; Shyne, Rickey J.; Gelder, Thomas F.

    1987-01-01

    Two types of turning vane airfoils (a controlled-diffusion shape and a circular arc shape) have been evaluated in the high-speed and fan-drive corners of a 0.1-scale model of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel. The high-speed corner was evaluated with and without a simulated engine exhaust removal scoop. The fan-drive corner was evaluated with and without the high-speed corner. Flow surveys of pressure and flow angle were taken for both the corners and the vanes to determine their respective losses. The two-dimensional vane losses were low; however, the overall corner losses were higher because three-dimensional flow was generated by the complex geometry resulting from the turning vanes intersecting the end wall. The three-dimensional effects were especially pronounced in the outer region of the circular corner.

  4. Turning of slender workpieces: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R.; Lee, C. W.; Ulsoy, A. G.; Scott, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    This paper introduces a dynamic cutting force model for turning of slender workpieces, as well as experimental results related to the frequency response of the workpiece in turning. The model is based on a flexible workpiece and rigid machine tool, and a workpiece displacement dependent cutting force. The model is described and studied theoretically as well as experimentally. The experimental studies utilise both cutting force and workpiece vibration measurements in two orthogonal directions. This data is obtained for both cutting and non-cutting conditions, and analysed in the frequency domain. The model was found to be in partial agreement with the experimental results. The experimental procedure described here represents a new method for determining the cutting process damping ratio, based on differences in the measured workpiece natural frequencies with and without cutting.

  5. Spirit Takes a Turn for Adirondack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This rear hazard-identification camera image looks back at the circular tracks made in the martian soil when the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove about 3 meters (10 feet) toward the mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack, Spirit's first rock target. Spirit made a series of arcing turns totaling approximately 1 meter (3 feet). It then turned in place and made a series of short, straightforward movements totaling approximately 2 meters (6.5 feet). The drive took about 30 minutes to complete, including time stopped to take images. The two rocks in the upper left corner of the image are called 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi.' In the upper right corner is a portion of the lander, now known as the Columbia Memorial Station.

  6. An investigation into magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, M. A. M.; Ismaeial, A. L.; Aly, F. F.

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning (MEAT) process as a non-traditional machining is used to obtain surface finishing like mirror. MEAT provides one of the best alternatives for producing complex shapes with good finish in advanced materials used in aircraft and aerospace industries. The improvement of machining accuracy of MEAT continues to be a major challenge for modern industry. MEAT is a hybrid machining which combines two or more processes to remove material. The present research focuses on the development of precision electrochemical turning (ECT) under the effects of magnetic field and abrasives. The effect of magnetic flux density, electrochemical conditions and abrasive parameters on finishing efficiency and surface roughness are investigated. An empirical relationship is deduced.

  7. When attempts at robbing prey turn fatal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejean, Alain; Corbara, Bruno; Azémar, Frédéric; Carpenter, James M.

    2012-07-01

    Because group-hunting arboreal ants spread-eagle insect prey for a long time before retrieving them, these prey can be coveted by predatory flying insects. Yet, attempting to rob these prey is risky if the ant species is also an effective predator. Here, we show that trying to rob prey from Azteca andreae workers is a fatal error as 268 out of 276 potential cleptobionts (97.1 %) were captured in turn. The ant workers hunt in a group and use the "Velcro®" principle to cling firmly to the leaves of their host tree, permitting them to capture very large prey. Exceptions were one social wasp, plus some Trigona spp. workers and flies that landed directly on the prey and were able to take off immediately when attacked. We conclude that in this situation, previously captured prey attract potential cleptobionts that are captured in turn in most of the cases.

  8. Testing of nonlinear diamond-turned reflaxicons.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J; Underwood, K L; Loomis, J S; Parks, R E; Wyant, J C

    1981-01-15

    The extreme alignment sensitivity of nonlinear diamond-turned reflaxicons makes them difficult to test and analyze. To evaluate the wave front it is necessary to know what portion results from alignment errors. This paper describes the setup, alignment, and testing of a nonlinear diamond-turned independent-element reflaxicon manufactured at the Union Carbide, Oak Ridge Y-12 plant. Interferograms taken with the center cone misaligned a known amount are analyzed using the axicon preprocessing option in FRINGE [J. S. Loomis (ASTM Report STP 666 and Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng. 171, 64 (1979)]. The results show that FRINGE correctly removes the cone and decenter errors introduced by the misalignments. It is also shown how the resulting interferograms are unfolded to give the OPD errors as seen on the outer cone. PMID:20309096

  9. Downhill turn techniques and associated physical characteristics in cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Sandbakk, S Bucher; Supej, M; Sandbakk, Ø; Holmberg, H-C

    2014-08-01

    Three dominant techniques are used for downhill turning in cross-country skiing. In this study, kinematic, kinetic, and temporal characteristics of these techniques are described and related to skier strength and power. Twelve elite female cross-country skiers performed six consecutive turns of standardized geometry while being monitored by a Global Navigation Satellite System. Overall time was used as an indicator of performance. Skiing and turning parameters were determined from skier trajectories; the proportional use of each technique was determined from video analysis. Leg strength and power were determined by isometric squats and countermovement jumps on a force plate. Snow plowing, parallel skidding, and step turning were utilized for all turns. Faster skiers employed less snow plowing and more step turning, more rapid deceleration and earlier initiation of step turning at higher speed (r = 0.80-0.93; all P < 0.01). Better performance was significantly correlated to higher mean speed and shorter trajectory (r = 0.99/0.65; both P < 0.05) and to countermovement jump characteristics of peak force, time to peak force, and rate of force development (r = -0.71/0.78/-0.83; all P < 0.05). In conclusion, faster skiers used step turning to a greater extent and exhibited higher maximal leg power, which enabled them to combine high speeds with shorter trajectories during turns. PMID:23517089

  10. Individual muscle contributions to circular turning mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Jessica D; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2015-04-13

    Turning is an activity of daily living that involves both the acceleration of the body center-of-mass (COM) towards the center of curvature and rotation of the pelvis towards the new heading. The purpose of this study was to understand which muscles contribute to turning using experimentation, musculoskeletal modeling and simulation. Ten healthy adults consented to walk around a 1-m radius circular path at their self-selected walking speed and then along a straight line at the same speed. Forward dynamics simulations of the individual subjects during the turning and straight-line walking tasks were generated to identify the contributions of individual muscle groups to the body mediolateral and anterior-posterior COM acceleration impulse and to the pelvis angular acceleration impulse. The stance leg gluteus medius and ankle plantarflexor muscles and the swing leg adductor muscles were the primary contributors to redirect the body's COM relative to straight-line walking. In some cases, contributions to mediolateral COM acceleration were modulated through changes in leg orientation rather than through changes in muscle force. While modulation of the muscle contributions generally occurred in both the inner and outer legs, greater changes were observed during inner single-leg support than during outer single-leg support. Total pelvis angular acceleration was minimal during the single-support phase, but the swing leg muscles contributed significantly to balancing the internal and external rotation of the pelvis. The understanding of which muscles contribute to turning the body during walking may help guide the development of more effective locomotor therapies for those with movement impairments. PMID:25700608

  11. Crack Turning in Integrally Stiffened Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard Glen

    2000-01-01

    Current emphasis in the aircraft industry toward reducing manufacturing cost has created a renewed interest in integrally stiffened structures. Crack turning has been identified as an approach to improve the damage tolerance and fail-safety of this class of structures. A desired behavior is for skin cracks to turn before reaching a stiffener, instead of growing straight through. A crack in a pressurized fuselage encounters high T-stress as it nears the stiffener--a condition favorable to crack turning. Also, the tear resistance of aluminum alloys typically varies with crack orientation, a form of anisotropy that can influence the crack path. The present work addresses these issues with a study of crack turning in two-dimensions, including the effects of both T-stress and fracture anisotropy. Both effects are shown to have relation to the process zone size, an interaction that is central to this study. Following an introduction to the problem, the T-stress effect is studied for a slightly curved semi-infinite crack with a cohesive process zone, yielding a closed form expression for the future crack path in an infinite medium. For a given initial crack tip curvature and tensile T-stress, the crack path instability is found to increase with process zone size. Fracture orthotropy is treated using a simple function to interpolate between the two principal fracture resistance values in two-dimensions. An extension to three-dimensions interpolates between the six principal values of fracture resistance. Also discussed is the transition between mode I and mode II fracture in metals. For isotropic materials, there is evidence that the crack seeks out a direction of either local symmetry (pure mode I) or local asymmetry (pure mode II) growth. For orthotropic materials the favored states are not pure modal, and have mode mixity that is a function of crack orientation.

  12. Capacity Estimation Model for Signalized Intersections under the Impact of Access Point.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xizhao

    2016-01-01

    Highway Capacity Manual 2010 provides various factors to adjust the base saturation flow rate for the capacity analysis of signalized intersections. No factors, however, is considered for the potential change of signalized intersections capacity caused by the access point closeing to the signalized intersection. This paper presented a theoretical model to estimate the lane group capacity at signalized intersections with the consideration of the effects of access points. Two scenarios of access point locations, upstream or downstream of the signalized intersection, and impacts of six types of access traffic flow are taken into account. The proposed capacity model was validated based on VISSIM simulation. Results of extensive numerical analysis reveal the substantial impact of access point on the capacity, which has an inverse correlation with both the number of major street lanes and the distance between the intersection and access point. Moreover, among the six types of access traffic flows, the access traffic flow 1 (right-turning traffic from major street), flow 4 (left-turning traffic from access point), and flow 5 (left-turning traffic from major street) cause a more significant effect on lane group capacity than others. Some guidance on the mitigation of the negative effect is provided for practitioners. PMID:26726998

  13. Capacity Estimation Model for Signalized Intersections under the Impact of Access Point

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xizhao

    2016-01-01

    Highway Capacity Manual 2010 provides various factors to adjust the base saturation flow rate for the capacity analysis of signalized intersections. No factors, however, is considered for the potential change of signalized intersections capacity caused by the access point closeing to the signalized intersection. This paper presented a theoretical model to estimate the lane group capacity at signalized intersections with the consideration of the effects of access points. Two scenarios of access point locations, upstream or downstream of the signalized intersection, and impacts of six types of access traffic flow are taken into account. The proposed capacity model was validated based on VISSIM simulation. Results of extensive numerical analysis reveal the substantial impact of access point on the capacity, which has an inverse correlation with both the number of major street lanes and the distance between the intersection and access point. Moreover, among the six types of access traffic flows, the access traffic flow 1 (right-turning traffic from major street), flow 4 (left-turning traffic from access point), and flow 5 (left-turning traffic from major street) cause a more significant effect on lane group capacity than others. Some guidance on the mitigation of the negative effect is provided for practitioners. PMID:26726998

  14. Nanostructural Evolution of Hard Turning Layers in Carburized Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedekar, Vikram

    The mechanisms of failure for components subjected to contact fatigue are sensitive to the structure and properties of the material surface. Although, the bulk material properties are determined by the steel making, forming and the heat treatment; the near surface material properties are altered during final material removal processes such as hard turning or grinding. Therefore, the ability to optimize, modulate and predict the near surface properties during final metal removal operations would be extremely useful in the enhancement of service life of a component. Hard machining is known to induce severely deformed layers causing dramatic microstructural transformations. These transformations occur via grain refinement or thermal phenomena depending upon cutting conditions. The aim of this work is to engineer the near surface nanoscale structure and properties during hard turning by altering strain, strain rate, temperature and incoming microstructure. The near surface material transformations due to hard turning were studied on carburized SAE 8620 bearing steel. Variations in parent material microstructures were introduced by altering the retained austenite content. The strain, strain rate and temperature achieved during final metal cutting were altered by varying insert geometry, insert wear and cutting speed. The subsurface evolution was quantified by a series of advanced characterization techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), X-ray stress evaluation and nanoindentation which were coupled with numerical modeling. Results showed that the grain size of the nanocrystalline near surface microstructure can be effectively controlled by altering the insert geometry, insert wear, cutting speed and the incoming microstructure. It was also evident that the near surface retained austenite decreased at lower cutting speed indicating transformation due to plastic deformation, while it increased at higher cutting

  15. Point nodes persisting far beyond Tc in Bi2212

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takeshi; Malaeb, W.; Ishida, Y.; Sasagawa, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Tohyama, T.; Shin, S.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to a complex feature of antinodal state, suffering from competing orders, the pairing gap of cuprates is obtained in the nodal region, which therefore holds the key to the superconducting mechanism. One of the biggest question is whether the point nodal state as a hallmark of d-wave pairing collapses at Tc like the BCS-type superconductors, or it instead survives above Tc turning into the preformed pair state. A difficulty in this issue comes from the small magnitude of the nodal gap, which has been preventing experimentalists from solving it. Here we use a laser ARPES capable of ultrahigh-energy resolution, and detect the point nodes surviving far beyond Tc in Bi2212. By tracking the temperature evolution of spectra, we reveal that the superconductivity occurs when the pair-breaking rate is suppressed smaller than the single-particle scattering rate on cooling, which governs the value of Tc in cuprates. PMID:26158431

  16. Lattice Modeling and Calibration with Turn-by-Turn Orbit Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Sebek, J.; Martin, D.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    A new method that explores turn-by-turn BPM data to calibrate lattice models of accelerators is proposed. The turn-by-turn phase space coordinates at one location of the ring are first established using data from two BPMs separated by a simple section with a known transfer matrix, such as a drift space. The phase space coordinates are then tracked with the model to predict positions at other BPMs, which can be compared to measurements. The model is adjusted to minimize the difference between the measured and predicted orbit data. BPM gains and rolls are included as fitting variables. This technique can be applied to either the entire or a section of the ring. We have tested the method experimentally on a part of the SPEAR3 ring.

  17. Turn-Taking Organization for Korean Conversation: With a Conversation Analytic Proposal for the Research and Teaching of Korean Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jae-Eun

    2009-01-01

    From a conversation analytic perspective, this dissertation investigates how talk-in-turns in conversation are constructed and organized in a way that minimizes gaps and overlaps between speakers. Based on an informed assumption that turns are built out of turn units that allow the projection of their possible end points, I first characterize…

  18. Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics.

    PubMed

    Read, Tyson J G; Segre, Paolo S; Middleton, Kevin M; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2016-03-01

    Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left-right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a quasi-steady model. During arcing turns, hummingbirds symmetrically banked the stroke plane of both wings, and the body, into turns, supporting a body-dependent mechanism. However, several wingbeat asymmetries were present during turning, including a higher and flatter outer wingtip path and a lower more deviated inner wingtip path. A quasi-steady analysis of arcing turns performed with different trajectories revealed that changes in radius were associated with asymmetrical kinematics and forces, and changes in velocity were associated with symmetrical kinematics and forces. Collectively, our results indicate that both body-dependent and -independent force orientation mechanisms are available to hummingbirds, and that these kinematic strategies are used to meet the separate aerodynamic challenges posed by changes in velocity and turning radius. PMID:27030042

  19. Influence of turn-to-turn resistivity and coil geometrical size on charging characteristics of no-electrical-insulation REBCO pancake coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Song, H.

    2016-07-01

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) no-electrical-insulation (NEI) coils demonstrate great advantages in thermal stability and self-protection features. However, an intrinsic delay is observed in the charging process and as a result there maybe a possible settle-out problem. It becomes more critical for large HTS coils with more turns, such as the magnets for the accelerator system and DC induction heater applications. This paper presents detailed studies on the charging characteristics of NEI coils. Firstly, two different no-electrical-insulation coils are wound: the first is directly wound using only REBCO tapes with brass lamination, which is called a no-insulation (NI) coil. The other one is co-wound with stainless steel (SS) strips and REBCO tapes whose copper stabilizer is electroplated, which is called a metallic insulation (MI) coil. Fast discharging tests are performed on the two coils and their equivalent turn-to-turn resistivity is calculated. A similar discharging delay is observed on both coils, but the turn-to-turn resistivity of the SS co-wound coil is much higher than that of the first coil. Then the resistivity data is directly applied to an equivalent circuit network model which is developed to predict the charging behaviours. The model calculates coil voltage, currents along the azimuthal and radial directions, as well as the induced magnetic field. A practical charging time is defined to characterize the field ramping process considering the charging delay between field ramping and current charging. The charging behaviours are extensively analyzed and compared in terms of three primary factors: equivalent turn-to-turn resistivity, coil size and ramping rate. The results show that the charging time increases dramatically with the coil size and may be too long to be practical for large-scale applications using HTS coils with low turn-to-turn resistivity. Increasing the turn-to-turn resistivity enables one to accelerate the charging process

  20. Virtual Rover Takes its First Turn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows a screenshot from the software used by engineers to drive the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The software simulates the rover's movements across the martian terrain, helping to plot a safe course for the rover. The virtual 3-D world around the rover is built from images taken by Spirit's stereo navigation cameras. Regions for which the rover has not yet acquired 3-D data are represented in beige. This image depicts the state of the rover before it backed up and turned 45 degrees on Sol 11 (01-13-04).

  1. Genesis of a flexible turning center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanclemente, Paul; French, Robert D.

    GE - Aircraft Engines has designed, built, and is operating a flexible turning center for jet engine hardware. Although the plant is in the forefront of manufacturing technology development, it was intended from the start to be a production facility. So while there was much to learn from being involved in all phases of the project, meeting production schedules was, and is, key to its success. This paper reviews the early history of the project and ends with a view of its recent production status.

  2. Corning and Kroger turn whey to yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-16

    It is reported that Corning and Kroger intend to build a 35,000 sq. ft. plant in Winchester, Ky., that will turn whey into bakers' yeast. The plant will convert whey from Kroger's dairies into bakers' yeast, supplying about 60% of the yeast needed for nine Kroger bakeries. It will also produce syrups and whey protein concentrate for use in other food processing activities. In addition to making useful products, the project will convert the whey to glucose and galactose. The protein component of the whey will be concentrated and used in various foods and feeds.

  3. "Turning off" the dipolar coupling in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yanqun; Murray, John; Li, Dale; Dementyev, Anatoly; Ramos, Rona; Barrett, Sean

    2004-03-01

    Static NMR studies of Silicon revealed several surprising features [A.E. Dementyev, D. Li, K. MacLean, S.E. Barrett, Phys. Rev. B, 68, 153302(2003)], such as very long CPMG echo trains, and even-odd asymmetry. We suggested the surprising effects were due to the Si-29 homonuclear dipolar coupling. To see what would happen if the nuclear dipolar coupling is "turned off", we carried out magic angle spinning (MAS) experiments, with varying spinning speed, on several Si-29 samples. I will present some results of the MAS experiments, and discuss the implications for the static NMR puzzles.

  4. Alchemical inflation: inflaton turns into Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2012-11-01

    We propose a new inflation model in which a gauge singlet inflaton turns into the Higgs condensate after inflation. The inflationary path is characterized by a moduli space of supersymmetric vacua spanned by the inflaton and Higgs field. The inflation energy scale is related to the soft supersymmetry breaking, and the Hubble parameter during inflation is smaller than the gravitino mass. The initial condition for the successful inflation is naturally realized by the pre-inflation in which the Higgs plays a role of the waterfall field.

  5. Surface roughness when diamond turning RSA 905 optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otieno, T.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Hsu, W. Y.; Cheng, Y. C.; Mkoko, Z.

    2015-08-01

    Ultra-high precision machining is used intensively in the photonics industry for the production of various optical components. Aluminium alloys have proven to be advantageous and are most commonly used over other materials to make various optical components. Recently, the increasing demand from optical systems for optical aluminium with consistent material properties has led to the development of newly modified grades of aluminium alloys produced by rapid solidification in the foundry process. These new aluminium grades are characterised by their finer microstructures and refined mechanical and physical properties. However the machining database of these new optical aluminium grades is limited and more research is still required to investigate their machinability performance when they are diamond turned in ultrahigh precision manufacturing environment. This work investigates the machinability of rapidly solidified aluminium RSA 905 by varying a number of diamond-turning cutting parameters and measuring the surface roughness over a cutting distance of 4 km. The machining parameters varied in this study were the cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. The results showed a common trend of decrease in surface roughness with increasing cutting distance. The lowest surface roughness Ra result obtained after 4 km in this study was 3.2 nm. This roughness values was achieved using a cutting speed of 1750 rpm, feed rate of 5 mm/min and depth of cut equal to 25 μm.

  6. The management of turn transition in signed interaction through the lens of overlaps

    PubMed Central

    Girard-Groeber, Simone

    2015-01-01

    There have been relatively few studies on sign language interaction carried out within the framework of conversation analysis (CA). Therefore, questions remain open about how the basic building blocks of social interaction such as turn, turn construction unit (TCU) and turn transition relevance place (TRP) can be understood and analyzed in sign language interaction. Recent studies have shown that signers regularly fine-tune their turn-beginnings to potential completion points of turns (Groeber, 2014; Groeber and Pochon-Berger, 2014; De Vos et al., 2015). Moreover, signers deploy practices for overlap resolution as in spoken interaction (McCleary and Leite, 2013). While these studies have highlighted the signers' orientation to the “one-at-a-time” principle described by Sacks et al. (1974), the present article adds to this line of research by investigating in more detail those sequential environments where overlaps occur. The contribution provides an overview of different types of overlap with a focus of the overlap's onset with regard to a current signer's turn. On the basis of a 33-min video-recording of a multi-party interaction between 4 female signers in Swiss German Sign Language (DSGS), the paper provides evidence for the orderliness of overlapping signing. Furthermore, the contribution demonstrates how participants collaborate in the situated construction of turns as a dynamic and emergent gestalt and how they interactionally achieve turn transition. Thereby the study adds to recent research in spoken and in signed interaction that proposes to rethink turn boundaries and turn transition as flexible and interactionally achieved. PMID:26150792

  7. The management of turn transition in signed interaction through the lens of overlaps.

    PubMed

    Girard-Groeber, Simone

    2015-01-01

    There have been relatively few studies on sign language interaction carried out within the framework of conversation analysis (CA). Therefore, questions remain open about how the basic building blocks of social interaction such as turn, turn construction unit (TCU) and turn transition relevance place (TRP) can be understood and analyzed in sign language interaction. Recent studies have shown that signers regularly fine-tune their turn-beginnings to potential completion points of turns (Groeber, 2014; Groeber and Pochon-Berger, 2014; De Vos et al., 2015). Moreover, signers deploy practices for overlap resolution as in spoken interaction (McCleary and Leite, 2013). While these studies have highlighted the signers' orientation to the "one-at-a-time" principle described by Sacks et al. (1974), the present article adds to this line of research by investigating in more detail those sequential environments where overlaps occur. The contribution provides an overview of different types of overlap with a focus of the overlap's onset with regard to a current signer's turn. On the basis of a 33-min video-recording of a multi-party interaction between 4 female signers in Swiss German Sign Language (DSGS), the paper provides evidence for the orderliness of overlapping signing. Furthermore, the contribution demonstrates how participants collaborate in the situated construction of turns as a dynamic and emergent gestalt and how they interactionally achieve turn transition. Thereby the study adds to recent research in spoken and in signed interaction that proposes to rethink turn boundaries and turn transition as flexible and interactionally achieved. PMID:26150792

  8. Turn-taking: From perception to speech preparation.

    PubMed

    Wesselmeier, Hendrik; Müller, Horst M

    2015-11-16

    We investigated the preparation of a spoken answer response to interrogative sentences by measuring response time (RT) and the response-related readiness potential (RP). By comparing the RT and RP results we aimed to identify whether the RP-onset is more related to the actual speech preparation process or the pure intention to speak after turn-anticipation. Additionally, we investigated if the RP-onset can be influenced by the syntactic structure (one or two completion points). Therefore, the EEG data were sorted based on two variables: the cognitive load required for the response and the syntactic structure of the stimulus questions. The results of the response utterance preparation associated event-related potential (ERP) and the RT suggest that the RP-onset is more related to the actual speech preparation process rather than the pure intention to speak after turn-anticipation. However, the RP-onset can be influenced by the syntactic structure of the question leading to an early response preparation. PMID:26483323

  9. Ductile-regime turning of germanium and silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter N.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    1989-01-01

    Single-point diamond turning of silicon and germanium was investigated in order to clarify the role of cutting depth in coaxing a ductile chip formation in normally brittle substances. Experiments based on the rapid withdrawal of the tool from the workpiece have shown that microfracture damage is a function of the effective depth of cut (as opposed to the nominal cutting depth). In essence, damage created by the leading edge of the tool is removed several revolutions later by lower sections of the tool edge, where the effective cutting depth is less. It appears that a truly ductile cutting response can be achieved only when the effective cutting depth, or critical chip thickness, is less than about 20 nm. Factors such as tool rake angle are significant in that they will affect the actual value of the critical chip thickness for transition from brittle to ductile response. It is concluded that the critical chip thickness is an excellent parameter for measuring the effects of machining conditions on the ductility of the cut and for designing tool-workpiece geometry in both turning and grinding.

  10. Early development of turn-taking with parents shapes vocal acoustics in infant marmoset monkeys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daniel Y; Fenley, Alicia R; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2016-05-01

    In humans, vocal turn-taking is a ubiquitous form of social interaction. It is a communication system that exhibits the properties of a dynamical system: two individuals become coupled to each other via acoustic exchanges and mutually affect each other. Human turn-taking develops during the first year of life. We investigated the development of vocal turn-taking in infant marmoset monkeys, a New World species whose adult vocal behaviour exhibits the same universal features of human turn-taking. We find that marmoset infants undergo the same trajectory of change for vocal turn-taking as humans, and do so during the same life-history stage. Our data show that turn-taking by marmoset infants depends on the development of self-monitoring, and that contingent parental calls elicit more mature-sounding calls from infants. As in humans, there was no evidence that parental feedback affects the rate of turn-taking maturation. We conclude that vocal turn-taking by marmoset monkeys and humans is an instance of convergent evolution, possibly as a result of pressures on both species to adopt a cooperative breeding strategy and increase volubility. PMID:27069047

  11. Early development of turn-taking with parents shapes vocal acoustics in infant marmoset monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daniel Y.; Fenley, Alicia R.; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, vocal turn-taking is a ubiquitous form of social interaction. It is a communication system that exhibits the properties of a dynamical system: two individuals become coupled to each other via acoustic exchanges and mutually affect each other. Human turn-taking develops during the first year of life. We investigated the development of vocal turn-taking in infant marmoset monkeys, a New World species whose adult vocal behaviour exhibits the same universal features of human turn-taking. We find that marmoset infants undergo the same trajectory of change for vocal turn-taking as humans, and do so during the same life-history stage. Our data show that turn-taking by marmoset infants depends on the development of self-monitoring, and that contingent parental calls elicit more mature-sounding calls from infants. As in humans, there was no evidence that parental feedback affects the rate of turn-taking maturation. We conclude that vocal turn-taking by marmoset monkeys and humans is an instance of convergent evolution, possibly as a result of pressures on both species to adopt a cooperative breeding strategy and increase volubility. PMID:27069047

  12. Design and performance of a small precision CNC turning machine

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, R.R.; Thompson, D.C.

    1986-02-26

    This paper describes the design of a CNC turning machine that is capable of machining workpieces up to 100 mm in diameter with a high contour accuracy and a very low surface roughness. Two nearly identical machines have been built and put into operation using this design, one for serial parts manufacture and the other for research into improving the accuracy of single-point machining; information based on this operational experience is also presented. The first machine has demonstrated an accuracy of 0.1 ..mu..m peak-to-valley on contoured workpieces, while the second machine has produced surface roughnesses of 1 nm rms in flat facing of electroless nickel with a diamond tool.

  13. Turning toward dissonance: lessons from art, music, and literature.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Suzana K E; Epstein, Ronald M

    2012-02-01

    Conflict and chaos are prevalent in health care, and perhaps especially in palliative care. Typically, our point of entry into our patients' lives is often at the moment of conflict, discord, or intense suffering. Despite this, little in our formal training as clinicians teaches us how to be present for this suffering. Much has been written about the process of communication with regard to giving bad news, handling family meeting conflicts, and negotiating shifting goals of care, but little has been addressed about how to train the clinician to be present with the dissonance and suffering. In this paper, we explore how music, art, and literature teach us how to stay in moments of tension. In turn, lessons on how to learn to lean into the dissonance of many palliative care encounters are extrapolated. PMID:22248788

  14. Pressure loss through sharp 180 deg turns in smooth rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, D. E.; Plevich, C. W.; Fan, C. S.

    1984-07-01

    Measured pressure distributions, pressure loss coefficients, and surface streamline visualizations are presented for 180-deg turns in smooth, rectangular cross-section channels. The flow geometry models situations that exist in multipass internal cooling of gas turbine engine airfoils. The turn geometry is characterized by parameters that include the ratio of upstream and downstream channel widths, the nondimensional channel depth, the nondimensional clearance height at the tip of the turn, and the nondimensional corner fillet radius. The present results cover a range of combinations of geometry parameters and Reynolds numbers to aid in prediction of coolant flow rates in present and future cooled airfoil designs.

  15. ACCELERATORS: Preliminary application of turn-by-turn data analysis to the SSRF storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Zhen-Tang

    2009-07-01

    There is growing interest in utilizing the beam position monitor turn-by-turn (TBT) data to debug accelerators. TBT data can be used to determine the linear optics, coupled optics and nonlinear behaviors of the storage ring lattice. This is not only a useful complement to other methods of determining the linear optics such as LOCO, but also provides a possibility to uncover more hidden phenomena. In this paper, a preliminary application of a β function measurement to the SSRF storage ring is presented.

  16. Beam diagnostics via model independent analysis of the turn-by-turn BPM data

    SciTech Connect

    Xi Yang

    2004-08-11

    Model independent analysis (MIA) can be used to obtain all the eigen modes included in the turn-by-turn BPM data. Not only the synchrotron tune and betatron tune can be obtained from the fast Fourier transforms (FFT) of the temporal eigen vector of the corresponding mode, but also the error mode, which could be caused by the different gain of a BPM, can be observed in both the temporal and spatial eigen vectors of the error mode. It can be applied as a diagnostic tool for Booster.

  17. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  18. Twists and turns: a scientific journey.

    PubMed

    Tilghman, Shirley M

    2014-01-01

    In this perspective I look back on the twists and turns that influenced the direction of my scientific career over the past 40 years. From my early ambition to be a chemist to my training in Philadelphia and Bethesda as a molecular biologist, I benefited enormously from generous and valuable mentoring. In my independent career in Philadelphia and Princeton, I was motivated by a keen interest in the changes in gene expression that direct the development of the mammalian embryo and inspired by the creativity and energy of my students, fellows, and research staff. After twelve years as President of Princeton University, I have happily returned to the faculty of the Department of Molecular Biology. PMID:25288111

  19. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2014-06-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  20. Turning on gravity with the Higgs mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Stephon; Barrow, John D.; Magueijo, João

    2016-07-01

    We investigate how a Higgs mechanism could be responsible for the emergence of gravity in extensions of Einstein theory, with a suitable low energy limit. In this scenario, at high energies, symmetry restoration could ‘turn off’ gravity, with dramatic implications for cosmology and quantum gravity. The sense in which gravity is muted depends on the details of the implementation. In the most extreme case gravity’s dynamical degrees of freedom would only be unleashed after the Higgs field acquires a non-trivial vacuum expectation value, with gravity reduced to a topological field theory in the symmetric phase. We might also identify the Higgs and the Brans–Dicke fields in such a way that in the unbroken phase Newton’s constant vanishes, decoupling matter and gravity. We discuss the broad implications of these scenarios.

  1. Hard turning micro-machine tool

    DOEpatents

    DeVor, Richard E; Adair, Kurt; Kapoor, Shiv G

    2013-10-22

    A micro-scale apparatus for supporting a tool for hard turning comprises a base, a pivot coupled to the base, an actuator coupled to the base, and at least one member coupled to the actuator at one end and rotatably coupled to the pivot at another end. A tool mount is disposed on the at least one member. The at least one member defines a first lever arm between the pivot and the tool mount, and a second lever arm between the pivot and the actuator. The first lever arm has a length that is less than a length of the second lever arm. The actuator moves the tool mount along an arc.

  2. Turning assistive machines into assistive robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argall, Brenna D.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, the potential for automation in particular, in the form of smart wheelchairs to aid those with motor, or cognitive, impairments has been recognized. It is a paradox that often the more severe a person's motor impairment, the more challenging it is for them to operate the very assistive machines which might enhance their quality of life. A primary aim of my lab is to address this confound by incorporating robotics autonomy and intelligence into assistive machines turning the machine into a kind of robot, and offloading some of the control burden from the user. Robots already synthetically sense, act in and reason about the world, and these technologies can be leveraged to help bridge the gap left by sensory, motor or cognitive impairments in the users of assistive machines. This paper overviews some of the ongoing projects in my lab, which strives to advance human ability through robotics autonomy.

  3. Abortion: at the still point of the turning conscientious objection debate.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Elliott Louis

    2012-06-01

    Abortion is the central issue in the conscientious objection debate. In this article I demonstrate why this is so for two philosophical viewpoints prominent in American culture. One, represented by Patrick Lee and Robert P. George, holds that the fundamental moral value of being human can be found in bare life and the other, represented by Tom Beauchamp and James Childress, holds that this fundamental value is found in the life that can choose and determine itself. First, I articulate Lee and George's philosophical theory and demonstrate how the fundamental moral value of their theory, personhood, is represented in the issue of abortion. Second, I examine Beauchamp and Childress' theoretical vision and demonstrate how their fundamental moral value, the right to autonomous self-determination, is represented in abortion. Third, I sketch the theoretical and practical dynamics of the conscientious objection debate as well as each author's understanding of conscience. Fourth, I demonstrate how abortion, which represents their respective fundamental value, shapes each perspectives' approach to the conscientious objection debate. I conclude that because each theory finds its fundamental value represented in the issue of abortion, each perspective is bound to engage the conscientious objection debate in a way that centers on the issue of abortion. PMID:21769599

  4. Canine viral vaccines at a turning point--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, L E

    1999-01-01

    The most important canine viral infections are distemper and CPV-2. Problems of variable CD vaccine safety and efficacy persist, but CD vaccines have greatly reduced the prevalence of disease and cases in vaccinated dogs are now rare. Canine hepatitis (ICH, CAV-1 infection) also has been controlled well by vaccines for more than 35 years and it is now rare; the sporadic cases seen in the 1990s have usually occurred in unvaccinated dogs. CAV-2 vaccines should, therefore, continue to be given since they have proved to be safe and effective, and prevent hepatitis as well as adenoviral tracheobronchitis. Failure to vaccinate would likely result in increase in cases of ICH, a serious disease, but never as significant as distemper and CPV infection. "Are we vaccinating too often?" The question is complex, but the dominant opinion is "yes" (Smith, 1995). The question cannot be responded to unequivocally, however, since manufacturers employ different strains that vary in their immunizing capacity and, probably, duration of immunity. This question was frequent with distemper in the 1960s. At that time, many veterinarians tested batches of the vaccine they used by providing pre- and postvaccinal sera to competent diagnostic laboratories. That practice appeared to benefit veterinarians and dogs, as well as the quality of vaccines. Unfortunately, many owners and some veterinarians seem to hold the view that infectious diseases such as parvovirus infection can be controlled by frequent vaccination alone. The common practice of dog breeders of vaccinating their animals several times each year is senseless. Revaccination for distemper and parvovirus infection is suggested at 1 year of age, but recommendations regarding the frequency of most vaccinations given after that time are unclear. Since most distemper and CPV-2 vaccines probably provide immunity that endures several years, vaccination at 3- to 5-year intervals, after the first year, seems a reasonable practice until more data on duration of immunity become available. "Are too many kinds of vaccines being promoted for dogs?" Distemper and parvovirus vaccines are essential; canine adenovirus vaccines are recommended since the few cases brought to our attention in recent years have been in unvaccinated dogs. Vaccination against respiratory infections is recommended for most dogs, especially those in kennels, or if they are to be boarded. Need has not been clearly established for coronavirus vaccines; Lyme disease vaccines (see below) are useful in preventing illness in areas where the disease exists, but are unnecessary elsewhere since dogs respond rapidly to appropriate antibiotics; current Leptospira bacterins are without benefit since they contain serovars that fail to protect in most areas (noted below). Lyme disease (LD) was not considered here, but newer recombinant (OspA) vaccines are now available that appear to be safe and effective for at least 1 year and they have not caused vaccine-induced postvaccinal lameness, which has been documented with certain whole-cell Lyme disease bacterins. Lyme disease vaccines should be restricted to dogs in, or entering, endemic areas where infested ticks reside. More than 85% of LD cases occur in the mid-Atlantic and Northeastern States, about 10% in six Midwestern states (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin), and a smaller percentage in restricted areas of northern California and the Pacific Northwest. Leptospirosis also was not discussed here, but vaccines are commonly reported as a cause of anaphylaxis and current vaccines do not contain the serovars prevalent in most regions. The vast majority of cases diagnosed at the New York State Diagnostic Lab at Cornell are grippotyphosa and pomona serovars and there have been no recent cases caused by canicola or icterohemorrhagiae serovars. Because leptospirosis is an important disease of dogs, there is an urgent need for more research and the development of safer vaccines that contain the prevalent PMID:9890023

  5. Is Educational Achievement a Turning Point for Incarcerated Delinquents across Race and Sex?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomberg, Thomas G.; Bales, William D.; Piquero, Alex R.

    2012-01-01

    Research has linked the role of education to delinquency, but much of the focus has been on general population samples and with little attention to demographic differences. Employing a cumulative disadvantage framework that integrates elements of informal social control and labeling theories, this article examines whether academic achievement…

  6. Alterations of Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons: Turning Points in the Genesis of Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Alberto; De Giorgio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons (PNs) represent the majority of neocortical cells and their involvement in cognitive functions is decisive. Therefore, they are the most obvious target of developmental disorders characterized by mental retardation. Genetic and non-genetic forms of intellectual disability share a few basic pathogenetic signatures that result in the anomalous function of PNs. Here, we review the key mechanisms impairing these neurons and their participation in the cortical network, with special focus on experimental models of fetal exposure to alcohol. Due to the heterogeneity of PNs, some alterations affect selectively a given cell population, which may also differ depending on the considered pathology. These specific features open new possibilities for the interpretation of cognitive defects observed in mental retardation syndromes, as well as for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:25157343

  7. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  8. The 2015 Paris Climate Conference: A turning point in the world's energy history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, V. V.; Mikushina, O. V.; Tereshin, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    It has been established that the consistent implementation of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference implies the quick retire of coal from the global energy balance and its replacement with the energy from unconventional and renewable sources. It is shown that even the full-scale implementation of the agreement will not keep global warming within 2°C.

  9. Transitions and Turning Points: Examining the Links between Child Maltreatment and Juvenile Offending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Anna; Livingston, Michael; Dennison, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The links between child maltreatment and juvenile offending are well established. However, the majority of maltreated children do not offend. The research presented in this paper examines the impact that timing and chronicity of child maltreatment have on juvenile offending. Methods: Administrative data were obtained on all children who…

  10. A Turning Point: Embodied Meanings of Early Childbearing among American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Janelle; Chesla, Catherine; Kennedy, Holly; Strickland, June

    2012-01-01

    Introduction American Indian women have poor perinatal outcomes and are at risk for early childbearing. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the experience and meaning of early childbearing among American Indian women. Methods Employing interpretive phenomenology and a semi-structured interview guide, 30 adult American Indian women residing in a Northwestern American Indian Reservation were interviewed about their experience and meaning of early childbearing. Results Three overarching themes were tied to their eventual positive evaluation of the experience: 1) mourning a lost childhood, 2) seeking fulfillment, and 3) embodying responsibility. Discussion Women indicated that despite their tumultuous childhoods, early childbearing presented an opportunity to effect positive change in their lives. Midwives and nurses are positioned to help women change their lives; thereby, improving health outcomes. PMID:22909397

  11. Interactive Micro-Processes in Classroom Discourse: Turning Points and Emergent Meanings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mameli, Consuelo; Molinari, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Based on a qualitative analysis of classroom discourse in Italian primary schools, this paper analyses the micro-processes that are emergent moment-by-moment in the unfolding interactions between teacher and pupils. More in particular, our purpose is to identify the conditions under which the interactive orientation of a sequence changes. We argue…

  12. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  13. Turning Points: A Resource Guide on Teenagers, Pregnancy, Alcohol, and Other Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankston, Karen; Strong, Sherrill

    This resource guide was written for teachers; school counselors and nurses; principals and school administrators; other professionals in health care, family planning, alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) prevention and treatment; and community agencies who work with pregnant teenagers and their partners. It is designed to help these practitioners…

  14. The optic chiasm: a turning point in the evolution of eye/hand coordination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The primate visual system has a uniquely high proportion of ipsilateral retinal projections, retinal ganglial cells that do not cross the midline in the optic chiasm. The general assumption is that this developed due to the selective advantage of accurate depth perception through stereopsis. Here, the hypothesis that the need for accurate eye-forelimb coordination substantially influenced the evolution of the primate visual system is presented. Evolutionary processes may change the direction of retinal ganglial cells. Crossing, or non-crossing, in the optic chiasm determines which hemisphere receives visual feedback in reaching tasks. Each hemisphere receives little tactile and proprioceptive information about the ipsilateral hand. The eye-forelimb hypothesis proposes that abundant ipsilateral retinal projections developed in the primate brain to synthesize, in a single hemisphere, visual, tactile, proprioceptive, and motor information about a given hand, and that this improved eye-hand coordination and optimized the size of the brain. If accurate eye-hand coordination was a major factor in the evolution of stereopsis, stereopsis is likely to be highly developed for activity in the area where the hands most often operate. The primate visual system is ideally suited for tasks within arm’s length and in the inferior visual field, where most manual activity takes place. Altering of ocular dominance in reaching tasks, reduced cross-modal cuing effects when arms are crossed, response of neurons in the primary motor cortex to viewed actions of a hand, multimodal neuron response to tactile as well as visual events, and extensive use of multimodal sensory information in reaching maneuvers support the premise that benefits of accurate limb control influenced the evolution of the primate visual system. The eye-forelimb hypothesis implies that evolutionary change toward hemidecussation in the optic chiasm provided parsimonious neural pathways in animals developing frontal vision and visually guided forelimbs, and also suggests a new perspective on vision convergence in prey and predatory animals. PMID:23866932

  15. Turning point in the study of human factors: From centurion to modern man

    SciTech Connect

    Bienvenu, C.; Larchier-Boulanger, J.

    1988-01-01

    For many years, it has been traditional to declare the superiority of man over the machine. The notion of man's fragility in confrontation with his machine only emerged slowly, and indeed as a result of a succession of catastrophes. The first of these date back to the railway age (signal errors), while more recent instances are to be found in the fields of aviation (pilot errors) and nuclear power. Increasing attention and in-depth studies have been devoted to the relationship between man and the machine. The following topics are discussed: the ergonomic era, emergence of the group situation, the institutional aspect, and the weight of society.

  16. Turning Point for Korean Computer Educators: Introducing LogoWriter as a Thinking Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Mi Ok

    LogoWriter was introduced in this study as a tool to teach problem solving and thinking skills to students in Korean schools; teacher-mediated learning was also structured to help students monitor their thinking processes. In the teacher-mediated learning model, the following problem solving strategies were used: decomposing, planning, detecting…

  17. Turning Points in Qualitative Research: Tying Knots in a Handkerchief. Crossroads in Qualitative Inquiry Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.; Denzin, Norman K., Ed.

    The chapters of this volume traces the changes in the discipline of qualitative inquiry over the last five decades. The collection serves as a textbook for training scholars in the history and trajectory of qualitative research. The chapters of part 1, The Revolution of Representation: Feminist and Race/Ethnic Studies Discourses, are: (1) Situated…

  18. Turning Points in the Lives of Two Pioneer Arab Women Principals in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arar, Khalid Husny; Abu-Rabia-Queder, Sarab

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the managerial career development of two Arab women, pioneer principals within the Arab education system in Israel. Using in-depth interviews relating to the characteristics of the different stages leading up to and within their careers as school principals (childhood and academic studies; the struggle to achieve the…

  19. Teenage Turning Point. Does Adolescence Herald the Twilight of Girls' Self-Esteem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is research related to the self-esteem of adolescents in the United States. Studies conducted by the American Association of University Women (AAUW), Carol Gilligan, and others are highlighted. (CW)

  20. Stressors and Turning Points in High School and Dropout: A Stress Process, Life Course Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupéré, Véronique; Leventhal, Tama; Dion, Eric; Crosnoe, Robert; Archambault, Isabelle; Janosz, Michel

    2015-01-01

    High school dropout is commonly seen as the result of a long-term process of failure and disengagement. As useful as it is, this view has obscured the heterogeneity of pathways leading to dropout. Research suggests, for instance, that some students leave school not as a result of protracted difficulties but in response to situations that emerge…

  1. A study of the turning points of a nems shuttle using td-scc-dftb

    SciTech Connect

    Huldt, C.; Kinaret, J.; Koskinen, P.

    2009-01-21

    Nanoelectromechanical systems, of which the shuttle is one of the most fundamental, have theoretically been described mainly with phenomenological models with simplified interactions between the mobile part and the electrodes. Many microscopic methods, which in principle can give a more realistic picture of the shuttling process, are poorly suited for the dynamic non-equilibrium problem at hand. This is primarily due to the presence of several timescales associated with the mechanical motion, electronic relaxation within subsystems, and charge transfer between the mobile shuttle and the electrodes. The last timescale varies by many orders of magnitude during a shuttling cycle, which complicates many of the standard approaches. To overcome these difficulties, we use a TD-SCC-DFTB code developed in the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials (IWM) in Freiburg. The method, which is a well-tested approximation to TDDFT, couples the reliability of DFT with the efficiency of the TB approach.

  2. Is the GAIN Act a turning point in new antibiotic discovery?

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D

    2013-03-01

    The United States GAIN (Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now) Act is a call to action for new antibiotic discovery and development that arises from a ground swell of concern over declining activity in this therapeutic area in the pharmaceutical sector. The GAIN Act aims to provide economic incentives for antibiotic drug discovery in the form of market exclusivity and accelerated drug approval processes. The legislation comes on the heels of nearly two decades of failure using the tools of modern drug discovery to find new antibiotic drugs. The lessons of failure are examined herein as are the prospects for a renewed effort in antibiotic drug discovery and development stimulated by new investments in both the public and private sector. PMID:23540332

  3. Autobiographical Memory and Depression in the Later Age: The Bump Is a Turning Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidron, Yori; Alon, Shirly

    2007-01-01

    This preliminary study integrated previous findings of the distribution of autobiographical memories in the later age according to their age of occurrence, with the overgeneral memory bias predictive of depression. Twenty-five non-demented, Israeli participants between 65-89 years of age provided autobiographical memories to 4 groups of word cues…

  4. Turned versus anodised dental implants: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL)and post-operative infection for patients being rehabilitated by turned versus anodised-surface implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in November 2015. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not. Thirty-eight publications were included. The results suggest a risk ratio of 2·82 (95% CI 1·95-4·06, P < 0·00001) for failure of turned implants, when compared to anodised-surface implants. Sensitivity analyses showed similar results when only the studies inserting implants in maxillae or mandibles were pooled. There were no statistically significant effects of turned implants on the MBL (mean difference-MD 0·02, 95%CI -0·16-0·20; P = 0·82) in comparison to anodised implants. The results of a meta-regression considering the follow-up period as a covariate suggested an increase of the MD with the increase in the follow-up time (MD increase 0·012 mm year(-1) ), however, without a statistical significance (P = 0·813). Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome 'post-operative infection' was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies. PMID:27295394

  5. Directional avoidance turns encoded by single interneurons and sustained by multifunctional serotonergic cells.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jian; Gillette, Rhanor

    2003-04-01

    Avoidance turns in the sea slug Pleurobranchaea are responses to noxious stimuli and replace orienting turns to food stimuli after avoidance conditioning or satiation. Avoidance turns proved to be centrally patterned behaviors, the fictive expression of which could be elicited in reduced preparations and the isolated CNS. Activity in one of a bilateral interneuron pair, the A4 cells, was necessary and sufficient to drive the avoidance turn toward the contralateral side. Single A4 cells appeared to encode both turn direction and angle, in contrast to directional behaviors of other animals in which displacement angle is usually encoded by multiple units. The As1-4 cells, bilateral serotonergic cell clusters, excited the prolonged A4 burst during the turn through electrical and chemical coupling. However, during the escape swim, As1-4 became integral elements of the swim motor network, and A4 activity was entrained to the swim rhythm by alternating excitatory-inhibitory inputs, with only weak spiking. This provides a likely mechanism for the previously observed suppression of the avoidance turn by escape swimming. These observations add significant new aspects to the multiplying known functions of As1-4 and their homologs in other molluscs and point to a pivotal role of these neurons in the organization of gastropod behavior. Simple functional models predict (1) the essential actions of inhibitor neurons in the directionality of the turning network motor output and (2) an integrating role for As1-4 in the behavioral switch between turning avoidance and swimming escape, on the basis of their response to increasing stimulus intensity. PMID:12684491

  6. Aquatic turning performance of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and functional consequences of a rigid body design.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel; Rivera, Angela R V; Dougherty, Erin E; Blob, Richard W

    2006-11-01

    The ability to capture prey and avoid predation in aquatic habitats depends strongly on the ability to perform unsteady maneuvers (e.g. turns), which itself depends strongly on body flexibility. Two previous studies of turning performance in rigid-bodied taxa have found either high maneuverability or high agility, but not both. However, examinations of aquatic turning performance in rigid-bodied animals have had limited taxonomic scope and, as such, the effects of many body shapes and designs on aquatic maneuverability and agility have yet to be examined. Turtles represent the oldest extant lineage of rigid-bodied vertebrates and the only aquatic rigid-bodied tetrapods. We evaluated the aquatic turning performance of painted turtles, Chrysemys picta (Schneider, 1783) using the minimum length-specific radius of the turning path (R/L) and the average turning rate (omega(avg)) as measures of maneuverability and agility, respectively. We filmed turtles conducting forward and backward turns in an aquatic arena. Each type of turn was executed using a different pattern of limb movements. During forward turns, turtles consistently protracted the inboard forelimb and held it stationary into the flow, while continuing to move the outboard forelimb and both hindlimbs as in rectilinear swimming. The limb movements of backward turns were more complex than those of forward turns, but involved near simultaneous retraction and protraction of contralateral fore- and hindlimbs, respectively. Forward turns had a minimum R/L of 0.0018 (the second single lowest value reported from any animal) and a maximum omega(avg) of 247.1 degrees. Values of R/L for backward turns (0.0091-0.0950 L) were much less variable than that of forward turns (0.0018-1.0442 L). The maneuverability of turtles is similar to that recorded previously for rigid-bodied boxfish. However, several morphological features of turtles (e.g. shell morphology and limb position) appear to increase agility relative to the body

  7. Why Critical Literacy Should Turn to "The Affective Turn": Making a Case for Critical Affective Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.

    2016-01-01

    The central argument of this essay is that critical literacy with a rationalistic bent may not enable us to cope with ethical dilemmas in our responsiveness to human sufferings. I argue that critical literacy education would benefit from turning to the recent scholarship on affect/emotion studies. I draw upon the works of Sara Ahmed--one of the…

  8. Turn-by-Turn Imaging of the Transverse Beam Profile in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan A.; Petree, Mark; /SLAC

    2006-12-18

    During injection or instability, the transverse profile of an individual bunch in a storage ring can change significantly in a few turns. However, most synchrotron-light imaging techniques are not designed for this time scale. We have developed a novel diagnostic that enhances the utility of a fast gated camera by adding, inexpensively, some features of a dual-axis streak camera, in order to watch the turn-by-turn evolution of the transverse profile, in both x and y. The beam's elliptical profile is reshaped using cylindrical lenses to form a tall and narrow ellipse--essentially the projection of the full ellipse onto one transverse axis. We do this projection twice, by splitting the beam into two paths at different heights, and rotating the ellipse by 90{sup o} on one path. A rapidly rotating mirror scans these vertical ''pencils'' of light horizontally across the photocathode of the camera, which is gated for 3 ns on every Nth ring turn. A single readout of the camera captures 100 images, looking like a stroboscopic photograph of a moving object. We have observed the capture of injected charge into a bunch and the rapid change of beam size at the onset of a fast instability.

  9. Squeezed light from a diamond-turned monolithic cavity.

    PubMed

    Brieussel, A; Shen, Y; Campbell, G; Guccione, G; Janousek, J; Hage, B; Buchler, B C; Treps, N; Fabre, C; Fang, F Z; Li, X Y; Symul, T; Lam, P K

    2016-02-22

    For some crystalline materials, a regime can be found where continuous ductile cutting is feasible. Using precision diamond turning, such materials can be cut into complex optical components with high surface quality and form accuracy. In this work we use diamond-turning to machine a monolithic, square-shaped, doubly-resonant LiNbO3 cavity with two flat and two convex facets. When additional mild polishing is implemented, the Q-factor of the resonator is found to be limited only by the material absorption loss. We show how our monolithic square resonator may be operated as an optical parametric oscillator that is evanescently coupled to free-space beams via birefringent prisms. The prism arrangement allows for independent and large tuning of the fundamental and second harmonic coupling rates. We measure 2.6 ± 0.5 dB of vacuum squeezing at 1064 nm using our system. Potential improvements to obtain higher degrees of squeezing are discussed. PMID:26907056

  10. Unmanned Turning Force Control Based on the Spindle Drive Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Kunsoo; Pak, Changho

    While the rough turning process is machining a workpiece at various cutting depth, the feedrate is usually selected based on the maximum depth of cut. Even if this selection can avoid power saturation or tool breakage, it is very conservative compared to the capacity of machine tools and can reduce the productivity significantly. Many adaptive control techniques have been reported that can adjust the feedrate to maintain the constant cutting force. However, these controllers are not very widely used in manufacturing industry because of the limitations in measuring the cutting force signals and selecting the appropriate cutting force level. In this paper, an unmanned turning process control system is proposed based on the spindle drive characteristics. A synthesized cutting force monitor is introduced to estimate the cutting force as accurately as a dynamometer does. The reference cutting force level as well as the feed-rate is selected considering the spindle motor characteristics. Because the cutting process is highly nonlinear, a fuzzy logic controller is applied to maintain the desired cutting force level. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system can be easily realized in CNC lathe with requiring little additional hardware.

  11. Ultra-precision turning of complex spiral optical delay line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Po; Fang, Fengzhou; Wang, Qichang

    2011-11-01

    Optical delay line (ODL) implements the vertical or depth scanning of optical coherence tomography, which is the most important factor affecting the scanning resolution and speed. The spinning spiral mirror is found as an excellent optical delay device because of the high-speed and high-repetition-rate. However, it is one difficult task to machine the mirror due to the special shape and precision requirement. In this paper, the spiral mirror with titled parabolic generatrix is proposed, and the ultra-precision turning method is studied for its machining using the spiral mathematic model. Another type of ODL with the segmental shape is also introduced and machined to make rotation balance for the mass equalization when scanning. The efficiency improvement is considered in details, including the rough cutting with the 5- axis milling machine, the machining coordinates unification, and the selection of layer direction in turning. The onmachine measuring method based on stylus gauge is designed to analyze the shape deviation. The air bearing is used as the measuring staff and the laser interferometer sensor as the position sensor, whose repeatability accuracy is proved up to 10nm and the stable feature keeps well. With this method developed, the complex mirror with nanometric finish of 10.7nm in Ra and the form error within 1um are achieved.

  12. A Logical OR Redundancy Within the Asx-Pro-Asx-Gly Type I beta-Turn Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,J.; Dubey, V.; Longo, L.; Blaber, M.

    2008-01-01

    Turn secondary structure is essential to the formation of globular protein architecture. Turn structures are, however, much more complex than either ?-helix or ?-sheet, and the thermodynamics and folding kinetics are poorly understood. Type I ?-turns are the most common type of reverse turn, and they exhibit a statistical consensus sequence of Asx-Pro-Asx-Gly (where Asx is Asp or Asn). A comprehensive series of individual and combined Asx mutations has been constructed within three separate type I 3:5 G1 bulge ?-turns in human fibroblast growth factor-1, and their effects on structure, stability, and folding have been determined. The results show a fundamental logical OR relationship between the Asx residues in the motif, involving H-bond interactions with main-chain amides within the turn. These interactions can be modulated by additional interactions with residues adjacent to the turn at positions i + 4 and i + 6. The results show that the Asx residues in the turn motif make a substantial contribution to the overall stability of the protein, and the Asx logical OR relationship defines a redundant system that can compensate for deleterious point mutations. The results also show that the stability of the turn is unlikely to be the prime determinant of formation of turn structure in the folding transition state.

  13. A Logical OR Redundancy within the Asx-Pro-Asx-Gly Type 1 {Beta}-Turn Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jihun; Dubey, Vikash Kumar; Longo, Lian M.; Blaber, Michael

    2008-04-19

    Turn secondary structure is essential to the formation of globular protein architecture. Turn structures are, however, much more complex than either {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet, and the thermodynamics and folding kinetics are poorly understood. Type I {beta}-turns are the most common type of reverse turn, and they exhibit a statistical consensus sequence of Asx-Pro-Asx-Gly (where Asx is Asp or Asn). A comprehensive series of individual and combined Asx mutations has been constructed within three separate type I 3:5 G1 bulge {beta}-turns in human fibroblast growth factor-1, and their effects on structure, stability, and folding have been determined. The results show a fundamental logical OR relationship between the Asx residues in the motif, involving H-bond interactions with main-chain amides within the turn. These interactions can be modulated by additional interactions with residues adjacent to the turn at positions i + 4 and i + 6. The results show that the Asx residues in the turn motif make a substantial contribution to the overall stability of the protein, and the Asx logical OR relationship defines a redundant system that can compensate for deleterious point mutations. The results also show that the stability of the turn is unlikely to be the prime determinant of formation of turn structure in the folding transition state.

  14. As the Egg Turns: Monitoring Egg Attendance Behavior in Wild Birds Using Novel Data Logging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Scott A.; Clatterbuck, Corey A.; Kelsey, Emma C.; Naiman, Alex D.; Young, Lindsay C.; VanderWerf, Eric A.; Warzybok, Pete; Bradley, Russell; Jahncke, Jaime; Bower, Geoff C.

    2014-01-01

    Egg turning is unique to birds and critical for embryonic development in most avian species. Technology that can measure changes in egg orientation and temperature at fine temporal scales (1 Hz) was neither readily available nor small enough to fit into artificial eggs until recently. Here we show the utility of novel miniature data loggers equipped with 3-axis (i.e., triaxial) accelerometers, magnetometers, and a temperature thermistor to study egg turning behavior in free-ranging birds. Artificial eggs containing egg loggers were deployed in the nests of three seabird species for 1–7 days of continuous monitoring. These species (1) turned their eggs more frequently (up to 6.5 turns h−1) than previously reported for other species, but angular changes were often small (1–10° most common), (2) displayed similar mean turning rates (ca. 2 turns h−1) despite major differences in reproductive ecology, and (3) demonstrated distinct diurnal cycling in egg temperatures that varied between 1.4 and 2.4°C. These novel egg loggers revealed high-resolution, three-dimensional egg turning behavior heretofore never measured in wild birds. This new form of biotechnology has broad applicability for addressing fundamental questions in avian breeding ecology, life history, and development, and can be used as a tool to monitor birds that are sensitive to disturbance while breeding. PMID:24887441

  15. Turning Oscillations Into Opportunities: Lessons from a Bacterial Decision Gate

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Daniel; Lu, Mingyang; Stavropoulos, Trevor; Onuchic, Jose'; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2013-01-01

    Sporulation vs. competence provides a prototypic example of collective cell fate determination. The decision is performed by the action of three modules: 1) A stochastic competence switch whose transition probability is regulated by population density, population stress and cell stress. 2) A sporulation timer whose clock rate is regulated by cell stress and population stress. 3) A decision gate that is coupled to the timer via a special repressilator-like loop. We show that the distinct circuit architecture of this gate leads to special dynamics and noise management characteristics: The gate opens a time-window of opportunity for competence transitions during which it generates oscillations that are turned into a chain of transition opportunities – each oscillation opens a short interval with high transition probability. The special architecture of the gate also leads to filtering of external noise and robustness against internal noise and variations in the circuit parameters. PMID:23591544

  16. Turning Oscillations Into Opportunities: Lessons from a Bacterial Decision Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Daniel; Lu, Mingyang; Stavropoulos, Trevor; Onuchic, Jose'; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2013-04-01

    Sporulation vs. competence provides a prototypic example of collective cell fate determination. The decision is performed by the action of three modules: 1) A stochastic competence switch whose transition probability is regulated by population density, population stress and cell stress. 2) A sporulation timer whose clock rate is regulated by cell stress and population stress. 3) A decision gate that is coupled to the timer via a special repressilator-like loop. We show that the distinct circuit architecture of this gate leads to special dynamics and noise management characteristics: The gate opens a time-window of opportunity for competence transitions during which it generates oscillations that are turned into a chain of transition opportunities - each oscillation opens a short interval with high transition probability. The special architecture of the gate also leads to filtering of external noise and robustness against internal noise and variations in the circuit parameters.

  17. THE NEOLIBERAL TURN IN AMERICAN HEALTH CARE.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Leaving millions both uninsured and underinsured, the Affordable Care Act does not create a system of universal health care in the United States. To understand its shortcomings, we have to understand it as part of a historic shift in the political economy of American health care. This "neoliberal turn" began as a reaction against the welfare state as it expanded during the New Deal and post-World War II period. What began as a movement associated with philosophers like Friedrich Hayek ultimately had a powerful impact via the attraction of powerful corporate sponsors and political supporters, and it was to historically transform American health care thought and organization. In health policy circles, for example, it can be seen in a rising emphasis on "moral hazard," overuse, and cost sharing above a concern with universalism and equity. It was likewise manifested by the corporatization of the health maintenance organization and the rise of the "consumer-driven" health care movement. By the time of the health care reform debate, the influence of corporate "stakeholders" was to prove predominant. These developments, however, must be construed as connected parts of a much larger political transformation, reflected in rising inequality and privatization, occurring both domestically and internationally. PMID:26460446

  18. Turning and maneuverability during sidewinding locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Henry; Goldman, Daniel; Hu, David

    2014-03-01

    Sidewinding is an unusual form of snake locomotion used to move rapidly on yielding substrates such as desert sands. Posteriorly propagating waves alternate between static contact with the substrate and elevated motion, resulting in a ``stepping'' motion of body segments. Unlike lateral undulation, the direction of travel is not collinear with the axis of the body wave, and posterior body segments do not follow the path of anterior segments. Field observations indicate that sidewinding snakes are highly maneuverable, but the mechanisms by which these snakes change direction during this complex movement are unknown. Motion capture data from three Colorado Desert sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes laterorepens) shows a variety of turn magnitudes and behaviors. Additionally, sidewinders are capable of ``reversals'' in which the snakes halts forward progress and begins locomotion in the opposite direction without rotation of the body. Because the head is re-oriented with respect to the body during these reversals, the snake is able to reverse direction without rotation yet continue moving in the new direction without impediment to perception or mechanics, a rare level of maneuverability in animals.

  19. [TURNING THE PYRAMID IN PRENATAL CARE].

    PubMed

    Ohel-Shani, Iris; Daniel-Spiegel, Etty

    2015-10-01

    Most complications of pregnancy manifest towards the latter part of pregnancy. Nevertheless, present day diagnostic techniques, such as sonography, Doppler, biochemical screening tests, and the newly developed ability to study free fetal DNA in maternal blood, enables early identification of high risk groups for maternal and fetal morbidity, as well as fetal genetic and anatomical pathology. Dr. Nicolaides has coined this changing trend with the term "Turning the Pyramid". Early screening enables earlier and more directed follow-up with the application of relevant diagnostic tests. Obvious advantages include the potential to reduce maternal-fetal morbidity before it becomes apparent clinically. Additionally, the earlier diagnosis of fetal pathology, allows more time for parents and medical staff to assess the situation, and reach a decision regarding the continuation of the pregnancy. A possible drawback of such an approach, of early identification of high risk groups, is the uncertainty it arouses, sometimes for a long duration, with the accompanying apprehension and stress parents have to endure. A multidisciplinary team, consisting of specialists in fetal-maternal medicine, genetics, ultrasound, and perinatology, will be needed in order to best deal with the often complex information, which is becoming increasingly available at a very early stage of pregnancy. PMID:26742229

  20. Recovery of Neonatal Head Turning to Decreased Sound Pressure Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarquinio, Nancy; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated newborns' responses to decreased sound pressure level (SPL) by means of a localized head turning habituation procedure. Findings, which demonstrated recovery of neonatal head turning to decreased SPL, were inconsistent with the selective receptor adaptation model. (RH)

  1. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... launch vehicle velocity turn magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to the... magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to the velocity vector turn angle envelope....

  2. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... launch vehicle velocity turn magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to the... magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to the velocity vector turn angle envelope....

  3. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... launch vehicle velocity turn magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to the... magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to the velocity vector turn angle envelope....

  4. Now, It's Your Turn: How You Can Take Medicine Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely Now, It's Your Turn: How You Can Take Medicine Safely ... medicine. The pharmacist has filled the prescription. Now it's up to you to take the medicine safely. ...

  5. Turning the tide of corneal blindness.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Matthew S; Schottman, Tim; Gulati, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Corneal diseases represent the second leading cause of blindness in most developing world countries. Worldwide, major investments in public health infrastructure and primary eye care services have built a strong foundation for preventing future corneal blindness. However, there are an estimated 4.9 million bilaterally corneal blind persons worldwide who could potentially have their sight restored through corneal transplantation. Traditionally, barriers to increased corneal transplantation have been daunting, with limited tissue availability and lack of trained corneal surgeons making widespread keratoplasty services cost prohibitive and logistically unfeasible. The ascendancy of cataract surgical rates and more robust eye care infrastructure of several Asian and African countries now provide a solid base from which to dramatically expand corneal transplantation rates. India emerges as a clear global priority as it has the world's largest corneal blind population and strong infrastructural readiness to rapidly scale its keratoplasty numbers. Technological modernization of the eye bank infrastructure must follow suit. Two key factors are the development of professional eye bank managers and the establishment of Hospital Cornea Recovery Programs. Recent adaptation of these modern eye banking models in India have led to corresponding high growth rates in the procurement of transplantable tissues, improved utilization rates, operating efficiency realization, and increased financial sustainability. The widespread adaptation of lamellar keratoplasty techniques also holds promise to improve corneal transplant success rates. The global ophthalmic community is now poised to scale up widespread access to corneal transplantation to meet the needs of the millions who are currently blind. PMID:22944753

  6. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Malfunction turn analysis. 417.209 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.209 Malfunction turn analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a malfunction turn analysis that...

  7. Pitch, Loudness, and Turn Regulation in Akan Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obeng, Samuel Gyasi

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between turn-regulation, the phonetic features of pitch, and loudness is examined in a study of two recorded natural conversations in Akan. Analysis of patterns in turn-delimitation suggests that (1) diminuendo loudness, a low pitch height, and falling pitch movement are treated by turn-occupants and their co-participants as…

  8. History of Education in Canada: Historiographic "Turns" and Widening Horizons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno-Jofré, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores major historiographic "turns" in history of education with a focus, although not exclusively, on English-speaking Canada. It addresses the transformative intellectual impact of the turn toward social history on the history of education, the impact of cultural history and the linguistic turn, the reception of Michel…

  9. A time-motion analysis of turns performed by highly ranked viennese waltz dancers.

    PubMed

    Prosen, Jerneja; James, Nic; Dimitriou, Lygeri; Perš, Janez; Vučković, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-four dance couples performing at the 2011 IDSF (International DanceSport Federation) International Slovenia Open were divided into two groups: the first twelve placed couples (top ranked) and the last twelve placed couples (lower ranked). Video recordings were processed automatically using computer vision tracking algorithms under operator supervision to calculate movement parameters. Time and speed of movement were analysed during single natural (right) and reverse (left) turns performed during the Viennese waltz. Both top and lower ranked dancers tended to perform similar proportionate frequencies of reverse (≈ 35%) and natural (≈ 65%) turns. Analysis of reverse turns showed that the top ranked dancers performed less turns on a curved trajectory (16%) than the lower ranked dancers (33%). The top ranked couples performed all turns at similar speeds (F = 1.31, df = 3, p = 0.27; mean = 2.09m/s) all of which were significantly quicker than the lower ranked couples (mean = 1.94m/s), the greatest differences found for reverse turns (12.43% faster for curved trajectories, 8.42% for straight trajectories). This suggests that the ability to maintain a high speed in the more difficult turns, particularly the reverse turns on a curved trajectory, results in the overall dance appearing more fluent as the speed of movement does not fluctuate as much. This aspect of performance needs to be improved by lower ranked dancers if they wish to improve rating of their performance. Future research should determine which factors relate to the speed of turns. PMID:24146705

  10. Application of the lie-transform perturbation theory for the turn-by-turn data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Harmonic analysis of turn-by-turn BPM data is a rich source of information on linear and nonlinear optics in circular machines. In the present report the normal form approach first introduced by R. Bartolini and F. Schmidt is extended on the basis of the Lie-transform perturbation theory to provide direct relation between the sources of perturbation and observable spectra of betatron oscillations. The goal is to localize strong perturbing elements, find the resonance driving terms--both absolute value and phase--that are necessary for calculation of the required adjustments in correction magnet circuits: e.g. skew-quadrupoles for linear coupling correction. The theory is nonlinear and permits to analyze higher order effects, such as coupling contribution to beta-beating and nonlinear sum resonances.

  11. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, A.V.; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  12. Stibiconite (Sb3O6OH), senarmontite (Sb2O3) and valentinite (Sb2O3): Dissolution rates at pH 2-11 and isoelectric points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biver, M.; Shotyk, W.

    2013-05-01

    . The isoelectric point (i.e.p.) of the minerals was determined electrokinetically, as a proxy for the zero point of charge (pHzpc), which was experimentally inaccessible; the measured i.e.p. do not correspond to the dissolution rate minima. I.e.p. of antimony oxides have not yet been documented in the literature. The geochemical implications for the weathering of antimony oxide minerals and stibnite, with particular reference to the mobilization of antimony in the context of an abandoned antimony mine (Goesdorf, Luxembourg), are discussed.

  13. Vivid Motor Imagery as an Adaptation Method for Head Turns on a Short-Arm Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, N. J.; Mast, F. W.; Natapoff, A.; Paloski, W. H.

    2006-01-01

    Artificial gravity (AG) has been proposed as a potential countermeasure to the debilitating physiological effects of long duration space flight. The most economical means of implementing AG may be through the use of a short-radius (2m or less) centrifuge. For such a device to produce gravitational forces comparable to those on earth requires rotation rates in excess of 20 revolutions per minute (rpm). Head turns made out of the plane of rotation at these rates, as may be necessary if exercise is combined with AG, result in cross-coupled stimuli (CCS) that cause adverse side effects including motion sickness, illusory sensations of motion, and inappropriate eye movements. Recent studies indicate that people can adapt to CCS and reduce these side effects by making multiple head turns during centrifuge sessions conducted over consecutive days. However, about 25% of the volunteers for these studies have difficulty tolerating the CCS adaptation paradigm and often drop out due to motion sickness symptoms. The goal of this investigation was to determine whether vivid motor imagery could be used as a pseudostimulus for adapting subjects to this unique environment. Twenty four healthy human subjects (14 males, 10 females), ranging in age from 21 to 48 years (mean 33, sd 7 years) took part in this study. The experimental stimuli were produced using the NASA JSC short-arm centrifuge (SAC). Subjects were oriented supinely on this device with the nose pointed toward the ceiling and head centered on the axis of rotation. Thus, centrifuge rotation was in the body roll plane. After ramp-up the SAC rotated clockwise at a constant rate of 23 rpm, producing a centrifugal force of approximately 1 g at the feet. Semicircular canal CCS were produced by having subjects make yaw head turns from the nose up (NU) position to the right ear down (RED) position and from RED to NU. Each head turn was completed in about one second, and a 30 second recovery period separated consecutive head

  14. Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground control is required to georeferenced airborne and spaceborne images. The production of ortho-photogrammetric data requires ground control that is traditionally provided as Ground Control Points (GCPs) by GNSS measurements in the field. However, it can be difficult to acquire accurate ground control points due to required turn-around time, high costs or impossible access. CompassData, Inc. a specialist in ground control, has expanded its service to deliver Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points (RSGCPs®). TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X are two satellites with such high accuracy of their orbital positions and SAR data that RSGCPs® can be produced to a sub-meter quality depending on certain parameters and circumstances. The technology and required parameters are discussed in this paper as well as the resulting accuracies.

  15. Effect of Furniture Weight on Carrying, Lifting, and Turning of Chairs and Desks among Elementary School Children

    PubMed Central

    Funatsu, Kyotaro; Xiong, Jinghong; Rosyidi, Cucuk Nur

    2015-01-01

    Rearranging furniture in elementary school classrooms encourages classroom activities. In elementary schools in Indonesia and some other developing countries, usually only one style of furniture is used for all children, and the furniture is heavy and oversized for younger children. This affects their ability to carry it. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of elementary school furniture weight and children’s age on performance of three carrying tasks (carrying a chair, lifting and turning a chair on a desk, and carrying both a chair and a desk together), from the ergonomics point of view. A total of 42 schoolchildren (ages 6–9; 17 Indonesian, 25 Japanese) participated in this study. Two types of Japanese chairs (Chair A and B, weight: 3.2 kg and 3.9 kg), one type of Indonesian chair (Chair C, weight: 5.0 kg), and two types of desks (height: 58 cm and 68 cm) were used. Indonesian chairs took significantly longer time to carry than the two Japanese chairs, and there was a significant negative relationship between age and task time for Chairs B and C, but not Chair A. Success rates for lifting and turning the chair declined as age decreased and chair weight increased, but were not significantly influenced by desk height. Success rates for carrying a chair and desk together significantly decreased with heavier furniture. Children aged six showed an extremely low success rate in almost all conditions. In conclusion, children’s ability to carry furniture is affected by their age and furniture characteristics, especially weight. In order to encourage classroom activities in elementary school, school furniture should be of appropriate weight. Supervision for younger children is required during classroom furniture arrangement. PMID:26053154

  16. Specular points and critical gimbal angles of ogival radomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam R.

    1988-07-01

    Results on critical gimbal angles of ogival radomes have been presented as a function of fineness ratios and source point locations. It is shown that, for a given source point and reflected ray direction, no more than two specular points generally exist on the radome inner surface. The critical gimbal angle, beyond which reflected rays contribute to geometrical optics fields, is obtained in terms of a turning-point effect. Critical gimbal angles computed are significantly different from previously published results which overlooked the turning-point effect. Special techniques to determine the contribution of specular points near the turning point are briefly discussed. The techniques proposed can be applied to rotationally symmetric geometries other than ogives.

  17. Creep turns linear in narrow ferromagnetic nanostrips

    PubMed Central

    Leliaert, Jonathan; Van de Wiele, Ben; Vansteenkiste, Arne; Laurson, Lasse; Durin, Gianfranco; Dupré, Luc; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel

    2016-01-01

    The motion of domain walls in magnetic materials is a typical example of a creep process, usually characterised by a stretched exponential velocity-force relation. By performing large-scale micromagnetic simulations, and analyzing an extended 1D model which takes the effects of finite temperatures and material defects into account, we show that this creep scaling law breaks down in sufficiently narrow ferromagnetic strips. Our analysis of current-driven transverse domain wall motion in disordered Permalloy nanostrips reveals instead a creep regime with a linear dependence of the domain wall velocity on the applied field or current density. This originates from the essentially point-like nature of domain walls moving in narrow, line- like disordered nanostrips. An analogous linear relation is found also by analyzing existing experimental data on field-driven domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetised media. PMID:26843125

  18. Creep turns linear in narrow ferromagnetic nanostrips.

    PubMed

    Leliaert, Jonathan; Van de Wiele, Ben; Vansteenkiste, Arne; Laurson, Lasse; Durin, Gianfranco; Dupré, Luc; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel

    2016-01-01

    The motion of domain walls in magnetic materials is a typical example of a creep process, usually characterised by a stretched exponential velocity-force relation. By performing large-scale micromagnetic simulations, and analyzing an extended 1D model which takes the effects of finite temperatures and material defects into account, we show that this creep scaling law breaks down in sufficiently narrow ferromagnetic strips. Our analysis of current-driven transverse domain wall motion in disordered Permalloy nanostrips reveals instead a creep regime with a linear dependence of the domain wall velocity on the applied field or current density. This originates from the essentially point-like nature of domain walls moving in narrow, line- like disordered nanostrips. An analogous linear relation is found also by analyzing existing experimental data on field-driven domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetised media. PMID:26843125

  19. Creep turns linear in narrow ferromagnetic nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leliaert, Jonathan; van de Wiele, Ben; Vansteenkiste, Arne; Laurson, Lasse; Durin, Gianfranco; Dupré, Luc; van Waeyenberge, Bartel

    2016-02-01

    The motion of domain walls in magnetic materials is a typical example of a creep process, usually characterised by a stretched exponential velocity-force relation. By performing large-scale micromagnetic simulations, and analyzing an extended 1D model which takes the effects of finite temperatures and material defects into account, we show that this creep scaling law breaks down in sufficiently narrow ferromagnetic strips. Our analysis of current-driven transverse domain wall motion in disordered Permalloy nanostrips reveals instead a creep regime with a linear dependence of the domain wall velocity on the applied field or current density. This originates from the essentially point-like nature of domain walls moving in narrow, line- like disordered nanostrips. An analogous linear relation is found also by analyzing existing experimental data on field-driven domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetised media.

  20. Crack Turning Mechanics of Composite Wing Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The safety of future composite wing skin integral stiffener panels requires a full understanding of failure mechanisms of these damage tolerance critical structures under both in-plane and bending loads. Of primary interest is to derive mathematical models using fracture mechanics in anisotropic cracked plate structures, to assess the crack turning mechanisms, and thereby to enhance the residual strength in the integral stiffener composite structures. The use of fracture mechanics to assess the failure behavior in a cracked structure requires the identification of critical fracture parameters which govern the severity of stress and deformation field ahead of the flaw, and which can be evaluated using information obtained from the flaw tip. In the three-year grant, the crack-tip fields under plane deformation, crack-tip fields for anisotropic plates and anisotropic shells have been obtained. In addition, methods for determining the stress intensity factors, energy release rate, and the T-stresses have been proposed and verified. The research accomplishments can be summarized as follows: (1) Under plane deformation in anisotropic solids, the asymptotic crack-tip fields have been obtained using Stroh formalism; (2) The T-stress and the coefficient of the second term for sigma(sub y), g(sub 32), have been obtained using path-independent integral, the J-integral and Betti's reciprocal theorem together with auxiliary fields; (3) With experimental data performed by NASA, analyses indicated that the mode-I critical stress intensity factor K(sub Q) provides a satisfactory characterization of fracture initiation for a given laminate thickness, provided the failure is fiber-dominated and crack extends in a self-similar manner; (4) The high constraint specimens, especially for CT specimens, due to large T-stress and large magnitude of negative g(sub 32) term may be expected to inhibit the crack extension in the same plane and promote crack turning; (5) Crack turning out of

  1. In Vivo Dosimetry of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in the Pelvic Region: Use of a Radiophotoluminescence Glass Dosimeter for Measurement of 1004 Points in 66 Patients With Pelvic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Nose, Takayuki Koizumi, Masahiko; Yoshida, Ken; Nishiyama, Kinji; Sasaki, Junichi; Ohnishi, Takeshi; Kozuka, Takuyo; Gomi, Kotaro; Oguchi, Masahiko; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ito, Akira; Yamashita, Takashi

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To perform the largest in vivo dosimetry study for interstitial brachytherapy yet to be undertaken using a new radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLGD) in patients with pelvic malignancy and to study the limits of contemporary planning software based on the results. Patients and Methods: Sixty-six patients with pelvic malignancy were treated with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy, including prostate (n = 26), gynecological (n = 35), and miscellaneous (n = 5). Doses for a total of 1004 points were measured by RPLGDs and calculated with planning software in the following locations: rectum (n = 549), urethra (n = 415), vagina (n = 25), and perineum (n = 15). Compatibility (measured dose/calculated dose) was analyzed according to dosimeter location. Results: The compatibility for all dosimeters was 0.98 {+-} 0.23, stratified by location: rectum, 0.99 {+-} 0.20; urethra, 0.96 {+-} 0.26; vagina, 0.91 {+-} 0.08; and perineum, 1.25 {+-} 0.32. Conclusions: Deviations between measured and calculated doses for the rectum and urethra were greater than 20%, which is attributable to the independent movements of these organs and the applicators. Missing corrections for inhomogeneity are responsible for the 9% negative shift near the vaginal cylinder (specific gravity = 1.24), whereas neglect of transit dose contributes to the 25% positive shift in the perineal dose. Dose deviation of >20% for nontarget organs should be taken into account in the planning process. Further development of planning software and a real-time dosimetry system are necessary to use the current findings and to achieve adaptive dose delivery.

  2. A process for treating uranium chips and turnings

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinska, K.; Lussiez, G.; Munger, D.

    1995-02-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) chips and turnings are generated during machining of uranium metal. Because high surface area uranium is pyrophoric, the turnings are subject to spontaneous ignition in air. The oxidation of uranium to U0{sub 2} and U{sub 3}0{sub 8} is highly exothermic and therefore the reaction may be self-sustaining. A uranium fire or even rapid oxidation and thermal convection currents will cause emission of radioactive uranium oxides. In the presence of water as liquid or vapor, uranium may also oxidize into U0{sub 2} and U{sub 3}0{sub 8}-with generation of hydrogen, a flammable and explosive gas. The heat generated the water reaction may ignite the uranium or hydrogen producing a fire, explosion, or convection current resulting in some uranium oxide becoming airborne. Because the high surface area uranium has the hazardous characteristic of reactivity, it is stored immersed in diesel oil preventing contact with water or air. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed and constructed a process to remove the reactivity characteristic by oxidizing uranium metal to an inert product. This inert form can then be landfilled as a low-level waste. The treatment process consists of draining the packing oils, treating with sodium hypochlorite to wet-oxidize the DU to uranyl hydroxide (UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}), using sodium thiosulfate to reduce the (UO{sub 2}(OH)2) to U0{sub 2}, neutralizing with sodium hydroxide, and stabilizing the settled slurry in a cement matrix. The neutralized waste water is consumed at a radioactive waste water treatment facility. Studies done at LANL describe a manageable oxidation rate well within safe bounds.

  3. Plasticity of the RNA Kink Turn Structural Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Antonioli, A.; Cochrane, J; Lipchock, S; Strobel, S

    2010-01-01

    The kink turn (K-turn) is an RNA structural motif found in many biologically significant RNAs. While most examples of the K-turn have a similar fold, the crystal structure of the Azoarcus group I intron revealed a novel RNA conformation, a reverse kink turn bent in the direction opposite that of a consensus K-turn. The reverse K-turn is bent toward the major grooves rather than the minor grooves of the flanking helices, yet the sequence differs from the K-turn consensus by only a single nucleotide. Here we demonstrate that the reverse bend direction is not solely defined by internal sequence elements, but is instead affected by structural elements external to the K-turn. It bends toward the major groove under the direction of a tetraloop-tetraloop receptor. The ability of one sequence to form two distinct structures demonstrates the inherent plasticity of the K-turn sequence. Such plasticity suggests that the K-turn is not a primary element in RNA folding, but instead is shaped by other structural elements within the RNA or ribonucleoprotein assembly.

  4. Complement in disease: a defence system turning offensive.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2016-07-01

    Although the complement system is primarily perceived as a host defence system, a more versatile, yet potentially more harmful side of this innate immune pathway as an inflammatory mediator also exists. The activities that define the ability of the complement system to control microbial threats and eliminate cellular debris - such as sensing molecular danger patterns, generating immediate effectors, and extensively coordinating with other defence pathways - can quickly turn complement from a defence system to an aggressor that drives immune and inflammatory diseases. These host-offensive actions become more pronounced with age and are exacerbated by a variety of genetic factors and autoimmune responses. Complement can also be activated inappropriately, for example in response to biomaterials or transplants. A wealth of research over the past two decades has led to an increasingly finely tuned understanding of complement activation, identified tipping points between physiological and pathological behaviour, and revealed avenues for therapeutic intervention. This Review summarizes our current view of the key activating, regulatory, and effector mechanisms of the complement system, highlighting important crosstalk connections, and, with an emphasis on kidney disease and transplantation, discusses the involvement of complement in clinical conditions and promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:27211870

  5. Liking Health Reform But Turned Off By Toxic Politics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lawrence R; Mettler, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    Six years after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) became law, the number of nonelderly Americans with health insurance has expanded by twenty million, and the uninsurance rate has declined nearly 9 percentage points. Nevertheless, public opinion about the law remains deeply divided. We investigated how individuals may be experiencing and responding to health reform implementation by analyzing three waves of a panel study we conducted in 2010, 2012, and 2014. While public opinion about the ACA remains split (45.6 percent unfavorable and 36.2 percent favorable), there have been several detectable shifts. The share of respondents believing that reform had little or no impact on access to health insurance or medical care diminished by 18 percentage points from 2010 to 2014, while those considering reform to have some or a great impact increased by 19 percentage points. Among individuals who held unfavorable views toward the law in 2010, the percentage who supported repeal-while still high, at 72 percent-shrank by 9 percentage points from 2010 to 2014. We found that party affiliation and distrust in government were influential factors in explaining the continuing divide over the law. The ACA has delivered discernible benefits, and some Americans are increasingly recognizing that it is improving access to health insurance and medical care. PMID:27076227

  6. LINEAR COUPLING CORRECTION WITH N-TURN MAPS.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-12

    The linear one-turn map of a storage ring contains coupling information on which a correction algorithm can be based. In principal, the one-turn matrix can be fitted from turn-by-turn data of beam position monitors after a kick was applied. However, the so obtained coupling information often sinks into the noise floor. The signal-to-noise ratio of the coupling information can be greatly enhanced by fitting maps for larger turn numbers N, equal to half the beat period. With the so obtained N-turn map an automated global coupling correction is possible without the need for a tune change. This is demonstrated for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider where the algorithm is implemented for operational use at injection.

  7. Automation: Turning mixed cullet into cash

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, R.

    1994-01-01

    Ask any glass processor or recycler about the principal reason prices for their cullet can falter and the second most popular response probably will be material quality.'' No matter how well-educated the customers, no matter how well-trained the line pickers, there are always some unnoticed contaminants that fool the eye and get into the recycling bins, slip past on the conveyor belts, and ruin a load. In addition, glass has the tendency to break -- especially in the growing number of high-compaction co-collection vehicles -- leaving unusable, mixed cullet behind that is difficult and dangerous to sort by had. Most work on automated separation of whole glass containers in this country remains in the research and development stage. So far, this work has had few enthusiastic supporters, and has ground nearly to a halt. Right now, it just doesn't make economic sense.'' With most processors sticking to manual sorting of whole bottles, MSS and several other companies are focusing, instead, of beneficiating nearly marketless mixed broken cullet. From that stream new contaminant-detection technology can pick out bits of unwanted window glass, bottle caps, plastics, labels, ceramics, and porcelain, which have different melting points and can cause impurities and structural weaknesses in recycled glass. Other units can detect colored cullet from clear and automatically eject it. To date, applications of these machines have been limited, but news from field tests in the US and commercial operations in Europe -- considered by many to be the birthplace of automated sorting technology -- is encouraging.

  8. Anticipation in turn-taking: mechanisms and information sources

    PubMed Central

    Riest, Carina; Jorschick, Annett B.; de Ruiter, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    During conversations participants alternate smoothly between speaker and hearer roles with only brief pauses and overlaps. There are two competing types of accounts about how conversationalists accomplish this: (a) the signaling approach and (b) the anticipatory (‘projection’) approach. We wanted to investigate, first, the relative merits of these two accounts, and second, the relative contribution of semantic and syntactic information to the timing of next turn initiation. We performed three button-press experiments using turn fragments taken from natural conversations to address the following questions: (a) Is turn-taking predominantly based on anticipation or on reaction, and (b) what is the relative contribution of semantic and syntactic information to accurate turn-taking. In our first experiment we gradually manipulated the information available for anticipation of the turn end (providing information about the turn end in advance to completely removing linguistic information). The results of our first experiment show that the distribution of the participants’ estimation of turn-endings for natural turns is very similar to the distribution for pure anticipation. We conclude that listeners are indeed able to anticipate a turn-end and that this strategy is predominantly used in turn-taking. In Experiment 2 we collected purely reacted responses. We used the distributions from Experiments 1 and 2 together to estimate a new dependent variable called Reaction Anticipation Proportion. We used this variable in our third experiment where we manipulated the presence vs. absence of semantic and syntactic information by low-pass filtering open-class and closed class words in the turn. The results suggest that for turn-end anticipation, both semantic and syntactic information are needed, but that the semantic information is a more important anticipation cue than syntactic information. PMID:25699004

  9. Continuous monitoring of turning in patients with movement disability.

    PubMed

    El-Gohary, Mahmoud; Pearson, Sean; McNames, James; Mancini, Martina; Horak, Fay; Mellone, Sabato; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Difficulty with turning is a major contributor to mobility disability and falls in people with movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Turning often results in freezing and/or falling in patients with PD. However, asking a patient to execute a turn in the clinic often does not reveal their impairments. Continuous monitoring of turning with wearable sensors during spontaneous daily activities may help clinicians and patients determine who is at risk of falls and could benefit from preventative interventions. In this study, we show that continuous monitoring of natural turning with wearable sensors during daily activities inside and outside the home is feasible for people with PD and elderly people. We developed an algorithm to detect and characterize turns during gait, using wearable inertial sensors. First, we validate the turning algorithm in the laboratory against a Motion Analysis system and against a video analysis of 21 PD patients and 19 control (CT) subjects wearing an inertial sensor on the pelvis. Compared to Motion Analysis and video, the algorithm maintained a sensitivity of 0.90 and 0.76 and a specificity of 0.75 and 0.65, respectively. Second, we apply the turning algorithm to data collected in the home from 12 PD and 18 CT subjects. The algorithm successfully detects turn characteristics, and the results show that, compared to controls, PD subjects tend to take shorter turns with smaller turn angles and more steps. Furthermore, PD subjects show more variability in all turn metrics throughout the day and the week. PMID:24379043

  10. Anticipation in turn-taking: mechanisms and information sources.

    PubMed

    Riest, Carina; Jorschick, Annett B; de Ruiter, Jan P

    2015-01-01

    During conversations participants alternate smoothly between speaker and hearer roles with only brief pauses and overlaps. There are two competing types of accounts about how conversationalists accomplish this: (a) the signaling approach and (b) the anticipatory ('projection') approach. We wanted to investigate, first, the relative merits of these two accounts, and second, the relative contribution of semantic and syntactic information to the timing of next turn initiation. We performed three button-press experiments using turn fragments taken from natural conversations to address the following questions: (a) Is turn-taking predominantly based on anticipation or on reaction, and (b) what is the relative contribution of semantic and syntactic information to accurate turn-taking. In our first experiment we gradually manipulated the information available for anticipation of the turn end (providing information about the turn end in advance to completely removing linguistic information). The results of our first experiment show that the distribution of the participants' estimation of turn-endings for natural turns is very similar to the distribution for pure anticipation. We conclude that listeners are indeed able to anticipate a turn-end and that this strategy is predominantly used in turn-taking. In Experiment 2 we collected purely reacted responses. We used the distributions from Experiments 1 and 2 together to estimate a new dependent variable called Reaction Anticipation Proportion. We used this variable in our third experiment where we manipulated the presence vs. absence of semantic and syntactic information by low-pass filtering open-class and closed class words in the turn. The results suggest that for turn-end anticipation, both semantic and syntactic information are needed, but that the semantic information is a more important anticipation cue than syntactic information. PMID:25699004

  11. Crack Turning and Arrest Mechanisms for Integral Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    In the course of several years of research efforts to predict crack turning and flapping in aircraft fuselage structures and other problems related to crack turning, the 2nd order maximum tangential stress theory has been identified as the theory most capable of predicting the observed test results. This theory requires knowledge of a material specific characteristic length, and also a computation of the stress intensity factors and the T-stress, or second order term in the asymptotic stress field in the vicinity of the crack tip. A characteristic length, r(sub c), is proposed for ductile materials pertaining to the onset of plastic instability, as opposed to the void spacing theories espoused by previous investigators. For the plane stress case, an approximate estimate of r(sub c), is obtained from the asymptotic field for strain hardening materials given by Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren (HRR). A previous study using of high order finite element methods to calculate T-stresses by contour integrals resulted in extremely high accuracy values obtained for selected test specimen geometries, and a theoretical error estimation parameter was defined. In the present study, it is shown that a large portion of the error in finite element computations of both K and T are systematic, and can be corrected after the initial solution if the finite element implementation utilizes a similar crack tip discretization scheme for all problems. This scheme is applied for two-dimensional problems to a both a p-version finite element code, showing that sufficiently accurate values of both K(sub I) and T can be obtained with fairly low order elements if correction is used. T-stress correction coefficients are also developed for the singular crack tip rosette utilized in the adaptive mesh finite element code FRANC2D, and shown to reduce the error in the computed T-stress significantly. Stress intensity factor correction was not attempted for FRANC2D because it employs a highly accurate

  12. Turning the tables: language and spatial reasoning.

    PubMed

    Li, Peggy; Gleitman, Lila

    2002-04-01

    This paper investigates possible influences of the lexical resources of individual languages on the spatial organization and reasoning styles of their users. That there are such powerful and pervasive influences of language on thought is the thesis of the Whorf-Sapir linguistic relativity hypothesis which, after a lengthy period in intellectual limbo, has recently returned to prominence in the anthropological, linguistic, and psycholinguistic literatures. Our point of departure is an influential group of cross-linguistic studies that appear to show that spatial reasoning is strongly affected by the spatial lexicon in everyday use in a community (e.g. Brown, P., & Levinson, S. C. (1993). Linguistic and nonlinguistic coding of spatial arrays: explorations in Mayan cognition (Working Paper No. 24). Nijmegen: Cognitive Anthropology Research Group, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics; Cognitive Linguistics 6 (1995) 33). Specifically, certain groups customarily use an externally referenced spatial-coordinate system to refer to nearby directions and positions ("to the north") whereas English speakers usually employ a viewer-perspective system ("to the left"). Prior findings and interpretations have been to the effect that users of these two types of spatial system solve rotation problems in different ways, reasoning strategies imposed by habitual use of the language-particular lexicons themselves. The present studies reproduce these different problem-solving strategies in speakers of a single language (English) by manipulating landmark cues, suggesting that language itself may not be the key causal factor in choice of spatial perspective. Prior evidence on rotation problem solution from infants (e.g. Acredolo, L.P. (1979). Laboratory versus home: the effect of environment on the 9-month-old infant's choice of spatial reference system. Developmental Psychology, 15 (6), 666-667) and from laboratory animals (e.g. Restle, F. (1975). Discrimination of cues in mazes: a

  13. Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac Arrest (SHoC): Rates of Abnormal Findings in Undifferentiated Hypotension and During Cardiac Arrest as a Basis for Consensus on a Hierarchical Point of Care Ultrasound Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Milne, James; Lewis, David; Fraser, Jacqueline; Diegelmann, Laura; Olszynski, Paul; Stander, Melanie; Lamprecht, Hein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) has become an established tool in the initial management of patients with undifferentiated hypotension. Current established protocols (RUSH and ACES) were developed by expert user opinion, rather than objective, prospective data. PoCUS also provides invaluable information during resuscitation efforts in cardiac arrest by determining presence/absence of cardiac activity and identifying reversible causes such as pericardial tamponade. There is no agreed guideline on how to safely and effectively incorporate PoCUS into the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) algorithm. We wished to report disease incidence as a basis to develop a hierarchical approach to PoCUS in hypotension and during cardiac arrest. Methods We summarized the recorded incidence of PoCUS findings from the initial cohort during the interim analysis of two prospective studies. We propose that this will form the basis for developing a modified Delphi approach incorporating this data to obtain the input of a panel of international experts associated with five professional organizations led by the International Federation of Emergency Medicine (IFEM). The modified Delphi tool will be developed to reach an international consensus on how to integrate PoCUS for hypotensive emergency department patients as well as into cardiac arrest algorithms. Results Rates of abnormal PoCUS findings from 151 patients with undifferentiated hypotension included left ventricular dynamic changes (43%), IVC abnormalities (27%), pericardial effusion (16%), and pleural fluid (8%). Abdominal pathology was rare (fluid 5%, AAA 2%). During cardiac arrest there were no pericardial effusions, however abnormalities of ventricular contraction (45%) and valvular motion (39%) were common among the 43 patients included. Conclusions A prospectively collected disease incidence-based hierarchy of scanning can be developed based on the reported findings. This will inform an international consensus

  14. Test and study on mirror quality of ultra-precision diamond turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yanyan; Sun, Tao; Li, Zengqiang; Wu, Baosen

    2014-09-01

    Using the diamond turning lathe and mono crystalline diamond tool, the aluminum alloy of 2A12 was cut under different cutting parameters including cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut and the mirror surfaces were made. The surface roughness, micro hardness and residual stress of the mirror surface were tested by the surface profiler, the universal hardness tester and X-stress Robot. The influences of the cutting parameters on the mirror quality were studied. The research results have theoretical and practical significance to the selection of the optimal cutting parameters in ultraprecision diamond turning.

  15. Atomic migration of carbon in hard turned layers of carburized bearing steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bedekar, Vikram; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Shivpuri, Rajiv; Scott Hyde, R.

    2016-01-01

    In grain finement and non-equilibrium there is carbon segregation within grain boundaries alters the mechanical performance of hard turning layers in carburized bearing steel. Moreover, an atom probe tomography (APT) study on the nanostructured hard turning layers reveals carbon migration to grain boundaries as a result of carbide decomposition during severe plastic deformation. In addition, samples exposed to different cutting speeds show that the carbon migration rate increases with the cutting speed. For these two effects lead to an ultrafine carbon network structure resulting in increased hardness and thermal stability in the severely deformed surface layer.

  16. Turning soot into diamonds with microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Luo, J.; Pan, X.; Liu, S.

    1994-06-01

    Growth of diamond films using fullerene precursors in an argon microwave plasma without the addition of hydrogen or oxygen has recently been accomplished. Microwave discharges (2.45 GHz) were generated in C{sub 60}-containing Ar. The gas mixtures were produced by flowing Ar over fullerene-containing soot at a variety of temperatures. Optical spectroscopy shows that the spectrum is dominated by the d{sup 3}{Pi}{minus}a{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}. Swan bands of C{sub 2} and particularly the {Delta}{nu} = {minus}2, {minus}1.0, +1, and +2 sequences, that C{sub 2} is one of the products of C{sub 60} fragmentation brought about, at least in part, by collisionally-induced dissociation. The nanocrystalline films were characterized with scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Assuming a linear dependence on carbon concentration, a growth rate at least six times higher than commonly observed using methane as a precursor would be predicted at a carbon content of 1% based on C{sub 60}. Energetic and mechanistic arguments are advanced to rationalize this result based on C{sub 2} as the growth species.

  17. Grey Relational Analyses for Multi-Objective Optimization of Turning S45C Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. H. A.; Azmi, A. I.; Khalil, A. N. M.

    2016-02-01

    The optimization of performance characteristics in turning process can be achieved through selection of proper machining parameters. It is well known that many researchers have successfully reported the optimization of single performance characteristic. Nevertheless, the multi-objective optimization can be difficult and challenging to be studied due to its complexity in analysis. This is because an improvement of one performance characteristic may lead to degradation of other performance characteristic. As a result, the study of multi-objective optimization in CNC turning of S45C carbon steel has been attempted in this paper through Taguchi and Grey Relational Analysis (GRA) method. Through this methodology, the multiple performance characteristics, namely; surface roughness, material removal rate (MRR), tool wear, and power consumption; can be optimized simultaneously. It appears from the experimental results that the multiple performance characteristics in CNC turning was achieved and improved through the methodology employed.

  18. Investigation of diamond turning: of rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Olufayo, Oluwole; Otieno, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Aluminum 6061 is often considered the preferred material for manufacturing optical components for ground-based astronomical applications. One reason for using this material is its high specific stiffness and excellent thermal properties. Moreover, a large amount of data exists for this material and commercially available aluminum 6061 can be diamond turned to achieve surface roughness values of approximately 4 to 8 nm, which is adequate for applications that involve the infrared spectral range, but not for the near-ultraviolet wavelength (NUV) spectral range. In this study, we used a novel aluminum material, fabricated using a rapid solidification process that is equivalent to the conventional aluminum 6061 alloy grade. Using rapidly solidified aluminum (RSA) can achieve improved surface finish and enhanced optical performance. The rapid solidification process was realized using a melt spinning operation, which achieves a high cooling rate to yield a fine microstructure. The properties of RSA 6061 are similar to those of conventional aluminum 6061, but its grain size is extremely small. In this paper, the background of RSA is introduced, and the diamond turnability characteristics and coating processes for both traditional aluminum 6061 and RSA are discussed. The surface roughness and grain structure of RSA were evaluated using white light interferometers and the surface roughness during coating of the reflectance multilayers of samples were analyzed using near-ultraviolet wavelengths. Finally, indicators such as optimal cutting parameters and optical performance are discussed.

  19. 3D FEM Simulation of Flank Wear in Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attanasio, Aldo; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Giardini, Claudio

    2011-05-01

    This work deals with tool wear simulation. Studying the influence of tool wear on tool life, tool substitution policy and influence on final part quality, surface integrity, cutting forces and power consumption it is important to reduce the global process costs. Adhesion, abrasion, erosion, diffusion, corrosion and fracture are some of the phenomena responsible of the tool wear depending on the selected cutting parameters: cutting velocity, feed rate, depth of cut, …. In some cases these wear mechanisms are described by analytical models as a function of process variables (temperature, pressure and sliding velocity along the cutting surface). These analytical models are suitable to be implemented in FEM codes and they can be utilized to simulate the tool wear. In the present paper a commercial 3D FEM software has been customized to simulate the tool wear during turning operations when cutting AISI 1045 carbon steel with uncoated tungsten carbide tip. The FEM software was improved by means of a suitable subroutine able to modify the tool geometry on the basis of the estimated tool wear as the simulation goes on. Since for the considered couple of tool-workpiece material the main phenomena generating wear are the abrasive and the diffusive ones, the tool wear model implemented into the subroutine was obtained as combination between the Usui's and the Takeyama and Murata's models. A comparison between experimental and simulated flank tool wear curves is reported demonstrating that it is possible to simulate the tool wear development.

  20. Human Rights Education and the Post Secular Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowie, Bob

    2012-01-01

    This article questions whether human rights education (HRE) scholarship is responding adequately to the post secular turn in thinking about the place and nature of religion in society. Here the post secular turn is used to describe the discrediting of secularisation theory, the recognition of religion as an enduring and pervasive global cultural…

  1. Kinematic Analysis of Rotary Deep-Depth Turning Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurtyakov, A. M.; Babaev, A. S.; Chudinova, A. I.

    2016-04-01

    This article offers a parameterization procedure for deep-depth turning without simplifying assumptions. In this paper the authors will show comparative results of researching parameters for rotary turning according to the developed methodology and according to the methodology of finish-machining conditions. A theoretically found kinematic coefficient of rotary cutting is presented in the paper

  2. High explosive corner turning performance and the LANL Mushroom test

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Seitz, W.L.; Forest, C.A.; Harry, H.H.

    1997-09-01

    The Mushroom test is designed to characterize the corner turning performance of a new generation of less insensitive booster explosives. The test is described in detail, and three corner turning figures-of-merit are examined using pure TATB (both Livermore`s Ultrafine and a Los Alamos research blend) and PBX9504 as examples.

  3. High explosive corner turning performance and the LANL mushroom test

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Seitz, W.L.; Forest, C.A.; Harry, H.H.

    1998-07-01

    The Mushroom test is designed to characterize the corner turning performance of a new generation of less sensitive booster explosives. The test is described in detail, and three corner turning figures-of-merit are examined using pure TATB (both Livermore{close_quote}s Ultrafine and a Los Alamos research blend) and PBX9504 as examples. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Case Study Using Ultrasound to Treat /[turned r]/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modha, Geetanjalee; Bernhardt, B. May; Church, Robyn; Bacsfalvi, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound has shown promise as visual feedback in remediation of /[turned r]/.Aims: To compare treatment for [turned r] with and without ultrasound.Methods & Procedures: A Canadian English-speaking adolescent participated in a case study with a no treatment baseline, alternating treatment blocks with and without ultrasound and a final…

  5. Inhibition of Cerebellar Granule Cell Turning by Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, Tatsuro; Komuro, Yutaro; Li, Ying; Hu, Taofang; Wang, Zhe; Littner, Yoav; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic neurons are often found in the brains of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) patients, suggesting that alcohol exposure impairs neuronal cell migration. Although it has been reported that alcohol decreases the speed of neuronal cell migration, little is known about whether alcohol also affects the turning of neurons. Here we show that ethanol exposure inhibits the turning of cerebellar granule cells in vivo and in vitro. First, in vivo studies using P10 mice demonstrated that a single i.p. injection of ethanol not only reduces the number of turning granule cells but also alters the mode of turning at the EGL-ML border of the cerebellum. Second, in vitro analysis using microexplant cultures of P0-P3 mouse cerebella revealed that ethanol directly reduces the frequency of spontaneous granule cell turning in a dose-dependent manner. Third, the action of ethanol on the frequency of granule cell turning was significantly ameliorated by stimulating Ca2+ and cGMP signaling or by inhibiting cAMP signaling. Taken together, these results indicate that ethanol affects the frequency and mode of cerebellar granule cell turning through alteration of the Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways, suggesting that the abnormal allocation of neurons found in the brains of FASD and FSA patients results, at least in part, from impaired turning of immature neurons by alcohol. PMID:20691765

  6. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Malfunction turn analysis. 417.209 Section 417.209 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.209 Malfunction turn analysis. (a) General. A flight safety...

  7. An azobenzene photoswitch sheds light on turn nucleation in amyloid-β self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Doran, Todd M; Anderson, Elizabeth A; Latchney, Sarah E; Opanashuk, Lisa A; Nilsson, Bradley L

    2012-03-21

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) self-assembly into cross-β amyloid fibrils is implicated in a causative role in Alzheimer's disease pathology. Uncertainties persist regarding the mechanisms of amyloid self-assembly and the role of metastable prefibrillar aggregates. Aβ fibrils feature a sheet-turn-sheet motif in the constituent β-strands; as such, turn nucleation has been proposed as a rate-limiting step in the self-assembly pathway. Herein, we report the use of an azobenzene β-hairpin mimetic to study the role turn nucleation plays on Aβ self-assembly. [3-(3-Aminomethyl)phenylazo]phenylacetic acid (AMPP) was incorporated into the putative turn region of Aβ42 to elicit temporal control over Aβ42 turn nucleation; it was hypothesized that self-assembly would be favored in the cis-AMPP conformation if β-hairpin formation occurs during Aβ self-assembly and that the trans-AMPP conformer would display attenuated fibrillization propensity. It was unexpectedly observed that the trans-AMPP Aβ42 conformer forms fibrillar constructs that are similar in almost all characteristics, including cytotoxicity, to wild-type Aβ42. Conversely, the cis-AMPP Aβ42 congeners formed nonfibrillar, amorphous aggregates that exhibited no cytotoxicity. Additionally, cis-trans photoisomerization resulted in rapid formation of native-like amyloid fibrils and trans-cis conversion in the fibril state reduced the population of native-like fibrils. Thus, temporal photocontrol over Aβ turn conformation provides significant insight into Aβ self-assembly. Specifically, Aβ mutants that adopt stable β-turns form aggregate structures that are unable to enter folding pathways leading to cross-β fibrils and cytotoxic prefibrillar intermediates. PMID:22860190

  8. Interaction of the body, head, and eyes during walking and turning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imai, T.; Moore, S. T.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Body, head, and eye movements were measured in five subjects during straight walking and while turning corners. The purpose was to determine how well the head and eyes followed the linear trajectory of the body in space and whether head orientation followed changes in the gravito-inertial acceleration vector (GIA). Head and body movements were measured with a video-based motion analysis system and horizontal, vertical, and torsional eye movements with video-oculography. During straight walking, there was lateral body motion at the stride frequency, which was at half the frequency of stepping. The GIA oscillated about the direction of heading, according to the acceleration and deceleration associated with heel strike and toe flexion, and the body yawed in concert with stepping. Despite the linear and rotatory motions of the head and body, the head pointed along the forward motion of the body during straight walking. The head pitch/roll component appeared to compensate for vertical and horizontal acceleration of the head rather than orienting to the tilt of the GIA or anticipating it. When turning corners, subjects walked on a 50-cm radius over two steps or on a 200-cm radius in five to seven steps. Maximum centripetal accelerations in sharp turns were ca.0.4 g, which tilted the GIA ca.21 degrees with regard to the heading. This was anticipated by a roll tilt of the head of up to 8 degrees. The eyes rolled 1-1.5 degrees and moved down into the direction of linear acceleration during the tilts of the GIA. Yaw head deviations moved smoothly through the turn, anticipating the shift in lateral body trajectory by as much as 25 degrees. The trunk did not anticipate the change in trajectory. Thus, in contrast to straight walking, the tilt axes of the head and the GIA tended to align during turns. Gaze was stable in space during the slow phases and jumped forward in saccades along the trajectory, leading it by larger angles when the angular velocity of turning was greater

  9. Influences of various cutting parameters on the surface roughness during turnings stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhimin, Zhou; Yuanliang, Zhang; Xiaoyan, Li; Huiyuan, Zhou; Baoyuan, Sun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the process factors affecting the surface roughness in ultra-precision diamond turning with ultrasonic vibration. Stainless steel was turned by diamond tools with ultrasonic vibration applied in the feed direction with an auto-resonant control system. Surface roughness was measured and compared along with the change of the cutting parameters. The relation curves between the cutting parameters and surface roughness were achieved by comparing the experimental results with different cutting speeds, feed rates, cutting depths. Experimental results indicate that cutting parameters have an obvious effect on the surface roughness. The conclusions are draw in given conditions, the smaller amplitude of the vibration, the worse the surface quality and the higher vibrating frequency, the better surface quality, and the deeper the cutting depth and the more the feed rate, the worse the surface quality. Among these parameters, the feed rate was the most important factor on surface quality.

  10. Dose–volume histogram parameters of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for Stage I–II cervical cancer (≤4cm) arising from a small-sized uterus treated with a point A dose-reduced plan

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akiko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Kuwako, Keiko; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the rectal dose-sparing effect and tumor control of a point A dose-reduced plan in patients with Stage I–II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) arising from a small-sized uterus. Between October 2008 and August 2011, 19 patients with Stage I–II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the pelvis and CT-guided brachytherapy. Seven patients were treated with brachytherapy with standard loading of source-dwell positions and a fraction dose of 6 Gy at point A (conventional brachy-plan). The other 12 patients with a small uterus close to the rectum or small intestine were treated with brachytherapy with a point A dose-reduction to match D2cc of the rectum and <6 Gy as the dose constraint (‘point A dose-reduced plan’) instead of the 6-Gy plan at point A (‘tentative 6-Gy plan’). The total doses from EBRT and brachytherapy were added up and normalized to a biological equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The median doses to the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 in the conventional brachy-plan, tentative 6-Gy plan and point A dose-reduced plan were 62 GyEQD2, 80 GyEQD2 and 64 GyEQD2, respectively. The median doses of rectal D2cc in the corresponding three plans were 42 GyEQD2, 62 GyEQD2 and 51 GyEQD2, respectively. With a median follow-up period of 35 months, three patients developed Grade-1 late rectal complications and no patients developed local recurrence. Our preliminary results suggested that CT-guided brachytherapy using an individualized point A dose-reduced plan might be useful for reducing late rectal complications while maintaining primary tumor control. PMID:24566721

  11. Upper-surface-blowing flow-turning performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeman, W. C., Jr.; Phelps, A. E., III

    1976-01-01

    Jet exhaust flow-turning characteristics were determined for systematic variations in upper-surface blowing exhaust nozzles and trailing-edge flap configuration variables from experimental wind-off (static) flow studies. For conditions with parallel flow exhausting from the nozzle, jet height (as indicated by nozzle exit height) and flap radius were found to be the most important parameters relating to flow turning. Nonparallel flow from the nozzle, as obtained from an internal roof angle and/or side spread angle, had a large favorable effect on flow turning. Comparisons made between static turning results and wind tunnel aerodynamic studies of identical configurations indicated that static flow-turning results can be indicative of wind-on powered lift performance for both good and poor nozzle-flap combinations but, for marginal designs, can lead to overly optimistic assessment of powered lift potential.

  12. Turn costs change the value of animal search paths.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R P; Griffiths, I W; Legg, P A; Friswell, M I; Bidder, O R; Halsey, L G; Lambertucci, S A; Shepard, E L C

    2013-09-01

    The tortuosity of the track taken by an animal searching for food profoundly affects search efficiency, which should be optimised to maximise net energy gain. Models examining this generally describe movement as a series of straight steps interspaced by turns, and implicitly assume no turn costs. We used both empirical- and modelling-based approaches to show that the energetic costs for turns in both terrestrial and aerial locomotion are substantial, which calls into question the value of conventional movement models such as correlated random walk or Lévy walk for assessing optimum path types. We show how, because straight-line travel is energetically most efficient, search strategies should favour constrained turn angles, with uninformed foragers continuing in straight lines unless the potential benefits of turning offset the cost. PMID:23848530

  13. Experience sharing, emotional reciprocity, and turn-taking

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Melisa; Peräkylä, Anssi

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective article, we consider the relationship between experience sharing and turn-taking. There is much evidence suggesting that human social interaction is permeated by two temporal organizations: (1) the sequential framework of turn-taking and (2) the concurrent framework of emotional reciprocity. From this perspective, we introduce two alternative hypotheses about how the relationship between experience sharing and turn-taking could be viewed. According to the first hypothesis, the home environment of experience sharing is in the concurrent framework of emotional reciprocity, while the motivation to share experiences is in tension with the sequential framework of turn-taking. According to the second hypothesis, people’s inclination to coordinate their actions in terms of turn-taking is motivated precisely by their propensity to share experiences. We consider theoretical and empirical ideas in favor of both of these hypotheses and discuss their implications for future research. PMID:25926811

  14. β-Turn Sequences Promote Stability of Peptide Substrates for Kinases within the Cytosolic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shan; Proctor, Angela; Cline, Lauren L.; Houston, Kaiulani M.; Waters, Marcey L.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    A strategy was developed to extend the lifetime of an peptide-based substrate for Abl kinase in the cytosolic environment. Small β-turn structures were added to the peptide’s N-terminus to block entry into peptidase catalytic sites. The influence of the size of the β-turn and two covalent cross-linking strategies on the rate of hydrolysis was assessed. The most peptidase-resistant substrate was degraded at a rate of 0.6 pmol mg−1 s−1 and possessed a half-life of 20.3 ± 1.7 min in a Baf/BCR-ABL cytosolic lysate, representing 16- and 40-fold improvements, respectively, over that of a control peptide lacking the β-turn structure. Furthermore, the kcat/KM value of this peptide was 432 μM−1 min−1, a 1.25X increase over the unmodified control, verifying that the added β-turn did not hinder the substrate properties of the peptide. This improved peptide was microinjected into single Baf/BCR-ABL cells and substrate phosphorylation measured. Zero to forty percent of the peptide was phosphorylated in the single cells. In contrast, when the control peptide without a β-turn was loaded into cells, the peptide was too rapidly degraded to detect phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that small β-turn structures can render peptides more resistant to hydrolysis while retaining substrate efficacy and shows that these stabilized peptides have the potential to be of high utility in single-cell enzyme assays. PMID:23785707

  15. Turn-by-Turn and Bunch-by-Bunch Transverse Profiles of a Single Bunch in a Full Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, R.; Fisher, A.S.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    The apparatus described in this paper can image the evolution of the transverse profile of a single bunch, isolated from a full PEP-II ring of 1500 bunches. Using this apparatus there are two methods of single bunch imaging; bunch-by-bunch beam profiling can image every bunch in the ring a single bunch at a time with the images of sequential bunches being in order, allowing one to see variations in beam size along a train. Turn-by-turn beam profiling images a single bunch on each successive turn it makes around the ring. This method will be useful in determining the effect that an injected bunch has on a stable bunch as the oscillations of the injected bunch damp out. Turn-by-turn imaging of the synchrotron light uses a system of lenses and mirrors to image many turns of both the major and minor axis of a single bunch across the photocathode of a gateable camera. The bunch-by-bunch method is simpler: because of a focusing mirror used in porting the light from the ring, the synchrotron light from the orbiting electrons becomes an image at a certain distance from the mirror; and since the camera does not use a lens, the photocathode is set exactly at this image distance. Bunch-by-bunch profiling has shown that in the Low Energy Ring (LER) horizontal bunch size decreases along a train. Turn-by-turn profiling has been able to image 100 turns of a single bunch on one exposure of the camera. The turn-by-turn setup has also been able to image 50 turns of the minor axis showing part of the damping process of an oscillating injected charge during a LER fill. The goal is to image the damping of oscillations of injected charge for 100 turns of both the major and minor axis throughout the damping process during trickle injection. With some changes to the apparatus this goal is within reach and will make turn-by-turn imaging a very useful tool in beam diagnostics.

  16. Influence of bus stop with left-turn lines between two adjacent signalized intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Ming-Bao; Ye, Lan-Hang; Pei, Ya-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Based on the symmetric two-lane Nagel–Schreckenberg (STNS) model, a three-lane cellular automaton model between two intersections containing a bus stop with left-turning buses is established in which model the occurrences of vehicle accidents are taken into account. The characteristics of traffic flows with different ratios of left-turn lines are discussed via the simulation experiments. The results indicate that the left-turn lines have more negative effects on capacity, accident rate as well as delay if the stop is located close to the intersections, where the negative effect in a near-side stop is more severe than that in a far-side one. The range of appropriate position for a bus stop without the bottleneck effect becomes more and more narrow with the increase of the ratio of left-turn bus lines. When the inflow is small, a short signal cycle and a reasonable offset are beneficial. When the inflow reaches or exceeds the capacity, a longer signal cycle is helpful. But if the stop position is inappropriate, the increase of cycle fails in reducing the negative effect of left-turning buses and the effectiveness of offset is weakened. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50478088) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2015202266).

  17. Misalignment of the Desired and Measured Center of Pressure Describes Falls Caused by Slip during Turning

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Hironari; Onodera, Hiroshi; Hokkirigawa, Kazuo; Masani, Kei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, desired center of pressure (dCOP) was introduced to evaluate dynamic postural stability. The dCOP is defined as a virtual point on the ground, where the moment around the body center of mass (COM) becomes zero when dCOP and the measured COP (mCOP) coincide. We hypothesized that, when the misalignment of the dCOP and mCOP (dCOP-mCOP) increases up to a certain value due to a large perturbation during walking, it becomes difficult to make a compensatory step and to recover balance of COM and to continue gait. Here we tested this hypothesis in slipping during turning. The study involved twelve healthy young adult males with an average age of 21.5±1.9 yrs. The subjects were asked to (1) walk straight and turn 60 degrees to the right with the right foot (spin turn) on a dry floor surface, and (2) walk straight and 60 degrees spin turn to the right on a slippery lubricated surface. The dCOP-mCOP during turning in the slip trial with fall were significantly larger, particularly in x-direction (i.e., the medial-lateral direction during straight walk), than that in no-slip trial and slip trial without fall. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that the dCOP-mCOP in x-direction is good indicator of falling (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.93) and the threshold in the dCOP-mCOP in x-direction to distinguish for fall or no-fall was 0.55 m. These results support our hypothesis in slipping during turning. PMID:27166954

  18. Misalignment of the Desired and Measured Center of Pressure Describes Falls Caused by Slip during Turning.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Higuchi, Hironari; Onodera, Hiroshi; Hokkirigawa, Kazuo; Masani, Kei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, desired center of pressure (dCOP) was introduced to evaluate dynamic postural stability. The dCOP is defined as a virtual point on the ground, where the moment around the body center of mass (COM) becomes zero when dCOP and the measured COP (mCOP) coincide. We hypothesized that, when the misalignment of the dCOP and mCOP (dCOP-mCOP) increases up to a certain value due to a large perturbation during walking, it becomes difficult to make a compensatory step and to recover balance of COM and to continue gait. Here we tested this hypothesis in slipping during turning. The study involved twelve healthy young adult males with an average age of 21.5±1.9 yrs. The subjects were asked to (1) walk straight and turn 60 degrees to the right with the right foot (spin turn) on a dry floor surface, and (2) walk straight and 60 degrees spin turn to the right on a slippery lubricated surface. The dCOP-mCOP during turning in the slip trial with fall were significantly larger, particularly in x-direction (i.e., the medial-lateral direction during straight walk), than that in no-slip trial and slip trial without fall. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that the dCOP-mCOP in x-direction is good indicator of falling (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.93) and the threshold in the dCOP-mCOP in x-direction to distinguish for fall or no-fall was 0.55 m. These results support our hypothesis in slipping during turning. PMID:27166954

  19. Measurement and Comparison of Taekwondo and Yongmudo Turning Kick Impact Force for Two Target Heights

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, David; Chung, Chulsoo; Lee, Kikwang; Kim, Euihwan; Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Taewhan; Shin, Insik

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to compare the impact characteristics of Taekwondo (TKD) and Yongmudo (YMD) player’s turning kick according to the target height. 5 highly skilled YMD and 5 TKD players participated in this study. To measure the impact force, two accelerometers were fixed to a PVC pipe in a sandbag. Each participant performed 10 turning kicks trunk and face height in random order. Only the trial with the most accurate (most central impact) measurement was used in the statistical analysis (p < 0.05).There was a significant difference for impact force according to the target height approximately 6400 ± 898 N, 6393 ± 1382 N for the mid section and 5419 ± 659 N, 5475 ± 1293 N for the high section of TKD and YMD groups, but not between groups. The swing phase for the TKD group was significantly shorter than the YMD group’s. The TKD groups’ recovery phase of the trunk height turning kick was significantly shorter. There was a difference in the players’ center of mass (COM) movement as the TKD players’ moved significantly more forward, suggesting that the TKD players tended to slide towards the target during the execution of the kick. In conclusion, as the turning kick was performed quicker by the TKD players with a similar impact force and more forward motion, it is evaluated to be a better technique of turning kicking. Key Points This impact force measuring device had a significantly smaller standard deviation then that of impact force measuring devices. There was a significant difference between the impact forces according to the height approximately 6400 ± 898N, 6393 ± 1382N for the mid section and 5419 ± 659N, 5475 ± 1293N for the high section of TKD and YMD groups. The turning kick was performed quicker by the TKD players with a similar impact force and more forward motion. PMID:24474880

  20. BolA Is a Transcriptional Switch That Turns Off Motility and Turns On Biofilm Development

    PubMed Central

    Dressaire, Clémentine; Moreira, Ricardo Neves; Barahona, Susana; Alves de Matos, António Pedro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria are extremely versatile organisms that rapidly adapt to changing environments. When bacterial cells switch from planktonic growth to biofilm, flagellum formation is turned off and the production of fimbriae and extracellular polysaccharides is switched on. BolA is present in most Gram-negative bacteria, and homologues can be found from proteobacteria to eukaryotes. Here, we show that BolA is a new bacterial transcription factor that modulates the switch from a planktonic to a sessile lifestyle. It negatively modulates flagellar biosynthesis and swimming capacity in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, BolA overexpression favors biofilm formation, involving the production of fimbria-like adhesins and curli. Our results also demonstrate that BolA is a protein with high affinity to DNA and is able to regulate many genes on a genome-wide scale. Moreover, we show that the most significant targets of this protein involve a complex network of genes encoding proteins related to biofilm development. Herein, we propose that BolA is a motile/adhesive transcriptional switch, specifically involved in the transition between the planktonic and the attachment stage of biofilm formation. PMID:25691594

  1. Experimental study of the diamond turning characteristics of tungsten carbide (Co 0.5%) when using a chamfered diamond bite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Jae; Lee, June Key; Hwang, Yeon; Cha, Du Hwan; Kim, Hye Jeong; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2012-11-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) is a widely used as a mold material for fabrication of glass lens because of its superior properties. Due to its extremely high hardness (R c > 90), an abrasive machining process, although unproductive and expensive, is used to fabricate the mold. In this research, the authors investigated the machining possibility of tungsten carbide by single-point diamond turning (SPDT) for fabricating high-quality optical surfaces directly. A finite element analysis (FEA) was carried out in order to investigate the effects of the chamfered length on the cutting forces and the strain rate of single-crystal diamond tools. The obtained FEA results showed that a smaller chamfered length decreased the bite strain rate. The performance characteristics in terms of surface roughness (R a ) and tool wear (VB max ) of a conventional bite and a chamfered bite under same machining conditions were studied, the results were compared. Experimental results suggest that the chamfered bite wased a better performance than the conventional bite in terms of tool wear resistance. The WC surface machined by using the chamfered bite showed a 2.26 nm roughness (R a ), which is suitable for the fabrication of glass lenses.

  2. A Fixed-Point Iteration Method with Quadratic Convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Kevin P.; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The fixed-point iteration algorithm is turned into a quadratically convergent scheme for a system of nonlinear equations. Most of the usual methods for obtaining the roots of a system of nonlinear equations rely on expanding the equation system about the roots in a Taylor series, and neglecting the higher order terms. Rearrangement of the resulting truncated system then results in the usual Newton-Raphson and Halley type approximations. In this paper the introduction of unit root functions avoids the direct expansion of the nonlinear system about the root, and relies, instead, on approximations which enable the unit root functions to considerably widen the radius of convergence of the iteration method. Methods for obtaining higher order rates of convergence and larger radii of convergence are discussed.

  3. U-turn alternative to the large aperture switch

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.

    1994-03-09

    The primary alternative laser architecture is the U-turn design. The U-turn has significantly different cost and performance risks than the full-aperture switch, which makes it a highly desirable alternative. The U-turn was conceived at LLNL in 1992. A similar concept, the L-turn had already been discovered by the French at CEL-V. Both concepts are based on the multipass glass amplifier design, but the full-aperture Pockels cell and polarizer are replaced with smaller and less expensive optics. Eliminating the large switch and polarizer not only reduces component costs, it also provides options for shortening the laser which, in turn, could reduce the size and cost of the laser building. Efficient use of the amplifier aperture (small vignetting allowance) requires that the U-turn have a long transport spatial filter; however, this is not a disadvantage if a long spatial filter is already required for image relaying to the frequency converter. Given a long spatial filter, the U-turn is potentially more efficient because losses in the switch and polarizer are avoided.

  4. Exceptional running and turning performance in a mite.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Samuel; Young, Maria Ho-Yan; Wright, Jonathan C; Whitaker, Dwight L; Ahn, Anna N

    2016-03-01

    The Southern California endemic mite Paratarsotomus macropalpis was filmed in the field on a concrete substrate and in the lab to analyze stride frequency, gait and running speed under different temperature conditions and during turning. At ground temperatures ranging from 45 to 60 °C, mites ran at a mean relative speed of 192.4 ± 2.1 body lengths (BL) s(-1), exceeding the highest previously documented value for a land animal by 12.5%. Stride frequencies were also exceptionally high (up to 135 Hz), and increased with substrate temperature. Juveniles exhibited higher relative speeds than adults and possess proportionally longer legs, which allow for greater relative stride lengths. Although mites accelerated and decelerated rapidly during straight running (7.2 ± 1.2 and -10.1 ± 2.1 m s(-2), respectively), the forces involved were comparable to those found in other animals. Paratarsotomus macropalpis employs an alternating tetrapod gait during steady running. Shallow turns were accomplished by a simple asymmetry in stride length. During tight turns, mites pivoted around the tarsus of the inside third leg (L3), which thus behaved like a grappling hook. Pivot turns were characterized by a 42% decrease in turning radius and a 40% increase in angular velocity compared with non-pivot turns. The joint angle amplitudes of the inner L2 and L3 were negligible during a pivot turn. While exceptional, running speeds in P. macropalpis approximate values predicted from inter-specific scaling relationships. PMID:26787481

  5. Example of quality assurance and optimization system for super hard materials turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, R.; Zebala, W.

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces an example of automated intelligent system for super hard materials turning process that works according to a designed algorithm. Main task of the proposed system is to supervise the super hard materials turning process (acronym: ISSSHMT - Intelligent Supervision System of Super Hard Materials Turning) with the maximal metal removal rate Qvmax, the amplitude of natural tool wear and the measurement of values that define the state of the turning process (e.g. magnitude of cutting force, surface quality, temperature in workspace). Based on the measured values it is possible to select the optimal machining parameters (vc, ap, f), for which desired surface quality and dimensional precision can be achieved for the maximal metal removal rate Qvmax. Presented system (ISSSHMT) can be used for any CNC machine - accommodation for workspace and construction of the machine. An example of NC-code program that allows using the data acquired from the ISSSHMT system by a CNC machine control unit is presented. Optimization of the process and cost cutting can be achieved with the usage of proper target functions, for products machined with required precision class.

  6. INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY BY IMPROVING BETA-TURNS

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald R.; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of how protein stability can be increased by improving β-turns. We studied 22 β-turns in nine proteins with 66 to 370 residues by replacing other residues with proline and glycine and measuring the stability. These two residues are statistically preferred in some β-turn positions. We studied: Cold shock protein B (CspB), Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), Ubiquitin, Ribonucleases Sa2, Sa3, T1, and HI, Tryptophan synthetase α-subunit (TSα), and Maltose binding protein (MBP). Of the fifteen single proline mutations, 11increased stability (Average = 0.8 ± 0.3; Range = 0.3 – 1.5 kcal/mol), and the stabilizing effect of double proline mutants was additive. Based on this and our previous work, we conclude that proteins can generally be stabilized by replacing non-proline residues with proline residues at the i + 1 position of Type I and II β-turns and at the i position in Type II β-turns. Other turn positions can sometimes be used if the φ angle is near −60° for the residue replaced. It is important that the side chain of the residue replaced is less than 50% buried. Identical substitutions in β-turns in related proteins give similar results. Proline substitutions increase stability mainly by decreasing the entropy of the denatured state. In contrast, the large, diverse group of proteins considered here had almost no residues in β-turns that could be replaced by Gly to increase protein stability. Improving β-turns by substituting Pro residues is a generally useful way of increasing protein stability. PMID:19626709

  7. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  8. Non-Poissonian run-and-turn motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detcheverry, F.

    2015-09-01

    Swimming bacteria exhibit a variety of motion patterns, in which persistent runs are punctuated by turning events. A simple yet fundamental question is to establish the properties of these random walks. While a complete answer is available when turning events follow a Poisson process, much less is known outside this particular case. We present a generic framework for such non-Poissonian run-and-turn motions. Extending the formalism of continuous time random walks, we obtain the generating function of moments in terms of noncommuting operators. We characterize analytically a bimodal model of persistent motion, which describes all types of swimming pattern, and is also relevant for cell motility.

  9. MULTI - MILLION - TURN BEAM POSITION MONITORS FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.CAMERON,P.CERNIGLIA,P.CUPOLO,J.DAWSON,CDEGEN,CMEAD,JVETTER,K

    2003-05-12

    During the RHIC 2003 run, two beam position monitors (BPMs) in each transverse plane in the RHIC blue ring were upgraded with high-capacity mezzanine cards. This upgrade provided these planes with the capability to digitize up to 128 million consecutive turns of RHIC beam, or almost 30 minutes of continuous beam centroid phase space evolution for a single RHIC bunch. This paper describes necessary hardware and software changes and initial system performance. We discuss early uses and results for diagnosis of coherent beam oscillations, turn-by-turn (TBT) acquisition through a RHIC acceleration ramp, and ac-dipole nonlinear dynamics studies.

  10. Improving surface figure and microroughness of IR materials and diamond turned surfaces with magnetorheological finishing (MRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supranowitz, Christopher; Hall, Christopher; Dumas, Paul; Hallock, Bob

    2007-04-01

    Optics manufactured for infrared (IR) applications are commonly produced using single point diamond turning (SPDT). SPDT can efficiently produce spherical and aspheric surfaces with microroughness and figure error that is often acceptable for use in this region of the spectrum. The tool marks left by the diamond turning process cause high surface microroughness that can degrade performance when used in the visible region of the spectrum. For multispectral and high precision IR applications, surface figure may also need to be improved beyond the capabilities of the SPDT process. Magnetorheological finishing (MRF®) is a deterministic, subaperture polishing technology that has proven to be very successful at simultaneously improving both surface microroughness and surface figure on spherical, aspheric, and most recently, freeform surfaces. MRF has been used on many diamond turned IR materials to significantly reduce surface microroughness from tens of nanometers to below 1 nm. MRF has also been used to successfully correct figure error on several IR materials that are not diamond turnable. This paper will show that the combination of SPDT and MRF technologies enable the manufacture of high precision surfaces on a variety of materials including calcium fluoride, silicon, and nickel-plated aluminum. Results will be presented for microroughness reduction and surface figure improvement, as well as for smoothing of diamond turning marks on an off-axis part. Figure correction results using MRF will also be presented for several other IR materials including sapphire, germanium, AMTIR, zinc sulfide, and polycrystalline alumina (PCA).

  11. Verification of the heart rate threshold.

    PubMed

    Bunc, V; Hofmann, P; Leitner, H; Gaisl, G

    1995-01-01

    Among the methods for determining anaerobic threshold (AT), the heart rate (HR) method seems to be the simplest. On the other hand, many conflicting results from comparing this method with others have been presented over the last 10 years. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the heart rate threshold (HRT) with the lactate turn point (LTP)-"second" break point of dependence of lactate (LA) to power output, ventilatory threshold (VT) and threshold determined by electromyography (EMGAT), all determined by the same exercise test and evaluated by the same computer algorithm. A group of 24 female students [mean age 20.5 (SD 1.6) years, maximal oxygen consumption 48.8 (SD 4.7) ml.kg-1.min-1] performed an incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer (modified Conconi test) starting with an initial power output (PO) of 40 W with intensity increments of 10 W.min-1 until the subjects were exhausted. The HRT, LTP and EMGAT determination was done by computer-aided break-point regression analysis from dependence of functional measures on PO. The same computer algorithm was used for VT determination from the relationship between ventilation (V) and oxygen uptake (VO2) or carbon dioxide output (VCO2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7607203

  12. Influences of semantic and syntactic incongruence on readiness potential in turn-end anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Wesselmeier, Hendrik; Jansen, Stefanie; Müller, Horst M.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing when it is convenient to take a turn in a conversation is an important task for dialog partners. As it appears that this decision is made before the transition point has been reached, it seems to involve anticipation. There are a variety of studies in the literature that provide possible explanations for turn-end anticipation. This study particularly focuses on how turn-end anticipation relies on syntactic and/or semantic information during utterance processing, as tested with syntactically and semantically violated sentences. With a combination reaction time and EEG experiment, we used the onset latencies of the readiness potential (RP) to uncover possible differences in response preparation. Although the mean anticipation timing accuracy (ATA) values of the behavioral test were all within a similar time range (control sentences: 108 ms, syntactically violated sentences: 93 ms and semantically violated sentences: 116 ms), we found evidence that response preparation is indeed different for syntactically and semantically violated sentences in comparison with control sentences. Our preconscious EEG data, in the form of RP results, indicated a response preparation onset to sentence end interval of 1452 ms in normal sentences, 937 ms in sentences with syntactic violations and 944 ms in sentences with semantic violations. Compared with control sentences, these intervals resulted in a significant RP interruption for both sentence types and indicate an interruption of preconscious response preparation. However, the behavioral response to sentence types occurred at comparable time points. PMID:24904349

  13. Focus on Marshall: The Marshall Center Turns 50! (Part 2)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This month, the Focus on Marshall team invites you to a very special ceremony -- the NASA verison of a "birthday party" as the Marshall Space Flight Center turns 50 years old. Join them for the unv...

  14. In Mice, Scientists Turn Stem Cells into Sperm

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_157465.html In Mice, Scientists Turn Stem Cells Into Sperm Researchers from China say lab tests ... News) -- Scientists in China say they used mouse stem cells to create functional mouse sperm in the laboratory. ...

  15. When the Stakes Turn Toxic: Learn about Problem Gambling

    MedlinePlus

    ... When the Stakes Turn Toxic Learn About Problem Gambling Anyone who’s bought a lottery ticket or played ... Recognizing Schizophrenia Wise Choices Links Signs of Problem Gambling Are you troubled by gambling? Seek help if: ...

  16. Tropical Storm Gordon Makes a U-Turn

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from August 14-17, 2012, shows the birth and strengthening of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Storm Gordon making a U-turn and heading back to the east. This vi...

  17. Tribological aspects of hard turning with ceramic tools

    SciTech Connect

    Toenshoff, H.K.; Wobker, H.G.; Brandt, D.

    1995-02-01

    Process parameters in hard turning are completely different from those in conventional turning. The tribological effects which occur in finishing hardened steels, using coolants and in dry cutting, were compared by means by turning tests with ceramic tools. Tool wear, surface integrity and chip formation, as influenced by different coolants in hard turning, are described. Cooling effect reduces the thermal load of the cutting edge, and thus increases tool life as compared to dry cutting. In addition, surface roughness of the workpiece can be improved either by chemical interaction between workpiece surface and extreme-pressure additives of the coolant or by pure mineral oil application. On the workpiece surface, rehardened layers were found both in dry and wet cutting, a result of rapid self-cooling. However, rehardened zones at the bottom side of the chips appeared only when coolant was supplied because this operation exceeded the critical quench speed in their chip. 16 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. View of turbine showing gears which turned the motion of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of turbine showing gears which turned the motion of the vertical turbine shafts to the horizontal for distribution to the mill and increased the speed. - Harmony Manufacturing Company, Mill Number 3, 100 North Mohawk Street, Cohoes, Albany County, NY

  19. 1. DETAIL BELOW ROASTER, SOUTHEAST VIEW (SHAFT, TURNING GEAR MECHANISM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DETAIL BELOW ROASTER, SOUTHEAST VIEW (SHAFT, TURNING GEAR MECHANISM AND FURNACE). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Steel Skimmer Salt Roaster, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  20. Printed Multi-Turn Loop Antennas for RF Biotelemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Hall, David G.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    Printed multi-turn loop antennas have been designed for contactless powering of, and reception of radio signals transmitted by, surgically implantable biotelemetric sensor units operating at frequencies in the vicinity of 300 MHz.