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Sample records for ratio ion exchange

  1. HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

    2007-09-27

    A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit.

  2. Studies of the effect of variation of blend ratio on permselectivity and heterogeneity of ion-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Vyas, P V; Ray, P; Adhikary, S K; Shah, B G; Rangarajan, R

    2003-01-01

    Heterogeneous ion-exchange membranes (both cationic and anionic types) have been synthesized by solution casting techniques using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) as binder and ion-exchange resin (-300+400 mesh). The binder:resin ratio varied from 60:40 to 30:70. The transport behavior of the membranes has been evaluated chronopotentiometrically in sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions of different concentrations. The different parameters E(0) (potential drop across the membrane at the instant of application of current I), E(max) (maximum potential drop across the membrane after the application of current I), DeltaE (magnitude of the potential jump across the membrane at transition time tau), Itau(1/2), tau, etc., have been evaluated. The isoconductance points were determined and based on the microheterogeneous model proposed by Zabolotsky and Nikonenko (J. Membrane Sci. 79 (1993) 181) the distribution factors beta has been evaluated for both types of ion exchange membranes. The electroconductivity of the joint gel (kappa ) and pure gel phases (kappa ' ) has been determined. At any particular solution concentration the transport number as well as the permselectivity of membranes increases with increased resin content of the membrane. The microheterogeneity factor beta exhibits synchronization among the each set of four different membranes for both the cationic and anionic type. PMID:16256464

  3. Measurement of radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ion using charge exchange spectroscopy with two-wavelength spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Wieland, B.; Goto, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Murakami, I.; Moon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ions are measured using the charge exchange spectroscopy technique with the two-wavelength spectrometer system in the large helical device. The two-wavelength spectrometer system consists of a dichroic mirror box, a spectrometer with two grating and two camera lenses, and one CCD detector. The dichroic mirror box is used to divide the light of one fiber from the plasma to two fibers, one for HeII (? = 468.6 nm) and the other for H? (? = 656.3 nm), that are connected to the entrance slit of the spectrometer to eliminate the interference between the HeII and the H? spectra on the CCD. This system provides a simultaneous measurement of helium and hydrogen ion density ratio at 8 exact same locations (8 spatial channels) with a time resolution of >40 ms in the wide range of the density ratio of 0.05-5.

  4. Measurement of radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ion using charge exchange spectroscopy with two-wavelength spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ida, K; Yoshinuma, M; Wieland, B; Goto, M; Nakamura, Y; Kobayashi, M; Murakami, I; Moon, C

    2015-12-01

    Radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ions are measured using the charge exchange spectroscopy technique with the two-wavelength spectrometer system in the large helical device. The two-wavelength spectrometer system consists of a dichroic mirror box, a spectrometer with two grating and two camera lenses, and one CCD detector. The dichroic mirror box is used to divide the light of one fiber from the plasma to two fibers, one for HeII (λ = 468.6 nm) and the other for Hα (λ = 656.3 nm), that are connected to the entrance slit of the spectrometer to eliminate the interference between the HeII and the Hα spectra on the CCD. This system provides a simultaneous measurement of helium and hydrogen ion density ratio at 8 exact same locations (8 spatial channels) with a time resolution of >40 ms in the wide range of the density ratio of 0.05-5. PMID:26724034

  5. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  6. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, David P.

    2005-04-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchange resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchange process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange resins are provided. The utility of these agents to stabilize drugs are evaluated. Commonly occurring chemical and physical incompatibilities are reviewed. Ion-exchange resins have found applicability as inactive pharmaceutical constituents, particularly as disintegrants (inactive tablet ingredient whose function is to rapidly disrupt the tablet matrix on contact with gastric fluid). One of the more elegant approaches to improving palatability of ionizable drugs is the use of ion-exchange resins as taste-masking agents. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a review of scaleup of typical manufacturing processes for taste-masked products are provided. Ion-exchange resins have been extensively utilized in oral sustained-release products. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a summary of commonly occurring commercial sustained-release products are discussed. Ion-exchange resins have also been used in topical products for local application to the skin, including those where drug flux is controlled by a differential electrical current (ionotophoretic delivery). General applicability of ion-exchange resins, including ophthalmic delivery, nasal delivery, use as drugs in their own right (e.g., colestyramine, formerly referred to as cholestyramine), as well as measuring gastrointestinal transit times, are discussed. Finally, pharmaceutical monographs for ion-exchange resins are reviewed.

  7. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  8. The Precise Determination of Cd Isotope Ratio in Geological Samples by MC-ICP-MS with Ion Exchange Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, C.; Hu, S.; Wang, D.; Jin, L.; Guo, W.

    2014-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a trace element which occurs at μg g-1 level abundances in the crust. Cd isotopes have great prospects in the study of the cosmogony, the trace of anthropogenic sources, the micronutrient cycling and the ocean productivity. This study develops an optimized technique for the precise and accurate determination of Cd isotopic compositions. Cd was separated from the matrix by elution with AG-MP-1 anionic exchange chromatographic resin. The matrix elements (K, Na, Ca, Al, Fe, and Mg etc.), polyatomic interfered elements (Ge, Ga, Zr, Nb, Ru, and Mo), and isobaric interfered elements (In, Pd and most of Sn) were eluted using HCl with gradient descent concentrations (2, 0.3, 0.06, 0.012 and 0.0012 mol L-1). The same elution procedure was repeated to eliminate the residuel Sn (Sn/Cd < 0.018). The collected Cd was analyzed using MC-ICP-MS, in which the instrumental mass fractionation was controlled by a "sample-standard bracketing" technique. The recovery of Cd larger than 96.85%, and the δ114/110Cd are in the range of -1.43~+0.20‰ for ten geological reference materials (GSD-3a, GSD-5a, GSD-7a, GSD-6, GSD-9, GSD-10, GSD-11, GSD-12, GSD-23, and GSS-1). The δ114/110Cd obtained for GSS-1 soil sample relative to the NIST SRM 3108 Cd solution was 0.20, which was coherent with the literature values (0.08±0.23). This method had a precision of 0.001~0.002% (RSD), an error range of 0.06~0.14 (δ114/110Cd, 2σ), and a long-term reproducibility of 0.12 (δ114/110Cd, 2σ).

  9. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-12-31

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  10. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  11. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (inventors)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  12. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  13. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  14. Ion exchange - Simulation and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Cal C.; Finn, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for simulating multicomponent adsorption by ion-exchange resins was adapted for use as both an ASPEN-callable module and as a free-standing simulator of the ion-exchange bed. Four polystyrene-divinylbenzene sulfonic acid resins have been characterized for three principal ions. It is concluded that a chelating resin appears appropriate as a heavy-metal trap. The same ASPEN-callable module is used to model this resin when Wilson parameters can be obtained.

  15. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Workman, Rhonda Jackson (North Augusta, SC)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  16. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

    1995-08-15

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio. 2 figs.

  17. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, Jane P. (Aiken, SC); Wallace, Richard M. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio.

  18. Electrically Switched Cesium Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    JPH Sukamto; ML Lilga; RK Orth

    1998-10-23

    This report discusses the results of work to develop Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) for separations of ions from waste streams relevant to DOE site clean-up. ESIX combines ion exchange and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible method for radionuclide separation that lowers costs and minimizes secondary waste generation typically associated with conventional ion exchange. In the ESIX process, an electroactive ion exchange film is deposited onto. a high surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. As a result, the production of secondary waste is minimized, since the large volumes of solution associated with elution, wash, and regeneration cycles typical of standard ion exchange are not needed for the ESIX process. The document is presented in two parts: Part I, the Summary Report, discusses the objectives of the project, describes the ESIX concept and the approach taken, and summarizes the major results; Part II, the Technology Description, provides a technical description of the experimental procedures and in-depth discussions on modeling, case studies, and cost comparisons between ESIX and currently used technologies.

  19. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  20. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  1. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  2. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  3. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxbille, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  4. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  5. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  6. Ion Exchange and Liquid Column Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Harold F.

    1980-01-01

    Emphasizes recent advances in principles and methodology in ion exchange and chromatography. Two tables list representative examples for inorganic ions and organic compounds. Cites 544 references. (CS)

  7. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOEpatents

    Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

  8. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOEpatents

    Herchenroeder, Laurie A.; Burkholder, Harvey R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity.

  9. 225-B ion exchange piping design documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, M.C.

    1996-02-01

    This document describes the interface between the planned permanent ion exchange piping system and the planned portable ion exchange system. This is part of the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). In order to decouple this WESF from B-Plant and to improve recovery from a capsule leak, contaminated pool cell water will be recirculated through a portable ion exchange resin system.

  10. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, David

    2005-01-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchanged resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchanged process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange are provided that include drug stabilization, pharmaceutical excipients, taste-masking agents, oral sustained-release products, topical products for local application…

  11. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, David

    2005-01-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchanged resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchanged process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange are provided that include drug stabilization, pharmaceutical excipients, taste-masking agents, oral sustained-release products, topical products for local application

  12. PRTR ion exchange vault column sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1995-03-14

    This report documents ion exchange column sampling and Non Destructive Assay (NDA) results from activities in 1994, for the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. The objective was to obtain sufficient information to prepare disposal documentation for the ion exchange columns found in the PRTR Ion exchange vault. This activity also allowed for the monitoring of the liquid level in the lower vault. The sampling activity contained five separate activities: (1) Sampling an ion exchange column and analyzing the ion exchange media for purpose of waste disposal; (2) Gamma and neutron NDA testing on ion exchange columns located in the upper vault; (3) Lower vault liquid level measurement; (4) Radiological survey of the upper vault; and (5) Secure the vault pending waste disposal.

  13. XAFS Studies of Silver Environments in Ion-Exchanged Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. C.; Dubiel, M.

    2007-02-02

    The X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique was used to analyze the structural geometry of Ag atoms introduced into soda-lime silicate glass and soda aluminosilicate glass by ion-exchange methods. The results show that Ag+ ions in aluminosilicate glass are coordinated by about two oxygens and the nearest-neighbor Ag-O distance increases when the Ag+-for-Na+ ion-exchange ratio is larger than 0.47. When the exchange ratio is low, the introduced Ag+ ions are stabilized at the non-bridge oxygen (NBO) site with a Ag-O distance of 2.20 A, and the Na+ ions in the AlO4 site are exchanged by Ag+ ions after full replacement of the NBO sites with a Ag-O distance of 2.28 A. The disorder of Ag-O coordination increases with increasing ion-exchange ratio in aluminosilicate glass where Ag+ ions are coordinated by NBO and bridge oxygen (BO)

  14. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  15. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"

  16. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"…

  17. Ion Exchange Formation via Sulfonated Bicomponent Nonwovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Hannah L.

    For many years ion exchange resins were used to: remove heavy metals from water, recover materials from wastewater, and eliminate harmful gases from the air. While use of these resin beads dominates the ion exchange industry, the beads have limitations that should be considered when decisions are made to employ them. For instance, officials must balance the inherent zero sum surface area and porosity of the materials. This series of studies investigates the use of bicomponent nonwovens as a base substrate for producing high surface area ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metal ions. Functionalized materials were produced in a two-step process: (1) PET/PE spunbond bicomponent fibers were fractured completely, producing the high surface area nonwoven to be used as the base ion exchange material, and (2) the conditions for functionalizing the PET fibers of the nonwoven webs were investigated where an epoxy containing monomer was grafted to the surface followed by sulfonation of the monomer. The functionalization reactions of the PET fibers were monitored based on: weight gain, FTIR, TOF-SIMS, and SEM. Ion exchange properties were evaluated using titration and copper ion removal capacity from test solutions. The relationship between web structure and removal efficiency of the metal ions was defined through a comparison of the bicomponent and homocomponent nonwovens for copper ion removal efficiency. The investigation revealed that utilizing the high surface area, fractured bicomponent nonwoven ion exchange materials with capacities comparable to commercially available ion exchange resins could be produced.

  18. Evaluation of Alternate Ion Exchange Designs for CST Non-Elutable Ion Exchange Process

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, S.N.; Pike, J.A.; Jacobs, R.A.; Poirier, M.R.; Sahawneh, B.M.; Leugemors, R.K.

    2001-06-27

    A study of alternative column designs was initiated in late 2000 to explore ion exchange column design concepts outside of the baseline case. The study, which is discussed in detail in the report, has identified two promising commercially proven ion-exchange column designs as candidates to be developed further for application to CST ion-exchange technology.

  19. [Ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium in natural clinoptilolite].

    PubMed

    He, Yun-Hua; Li, Hang; Liu, Xin-Min; Xiong, Hai-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Zeolites have been widely applied in soil improvement and environment protection. The study on ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium is of important significance for better use of zeolites. The maximum adsorption capacities of alkali ions during ion exchange equilibrium in the clinoptilolite showed obvious specificity. For alkali metal ions with equivalent valence, the differences in adsorption capacity increased with the decrease of ionic concentration. These results cannot be well explained by the classical theories including coulomb force, ionic size, hydration, dispersion force, classic induction force and surface complexation. We found that the coupling of polarization effects resulted from the quantum fluctuation of diverse alkali metal ions and electric field near the zeolite surface should be the primary reason for specific ion effect during ion exchange in zeolite. The result of this coupling effect was that the difference in the ion dipole moment increased with the increase of surface potential, which further expanded the difference in the adsorption ability between zeolite surface and ions, resulting in different ion exchange adsorption ability at the solid/liquid interface. Due to the high surface charge density of zeolite, ionic size also played an important role in the distribution of ions in the double diffuse layer, which led to an interesting result that distinct differences in exchange adsorption ability of various alkali metal ions were only detected at high surface potential (the absolute value was greater than 0.2 V), which was different from the ion exchange equilibrium result on the surface with low charge density. PMID:25929073

  20. Titania bound sodium titanate ion exchanger

    DOEpatents

    DeFilippi, Irene C. G.; Yates, Stephen Frederic; Shen, Jian-Kun; Gaita, Romulus; Sedath, Robert Henry; Seminara, Gary Joseph; Straszewski, Michael Peter; Anderson, David Joseph

    1999-03-23

    This invention is method for preparing a titania bound ion exchange composition comprising admixing crystalline sodium titanate and a hydrolyzable titanium compound and, thereafter drying the titania bound crystalline sodium titanate and subjecting the dried titania bound ion exchange composition to optional compaction and calcination steps to improve the physical strength of the titania bound composition.

  1. Ion exchange in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Ion exchange is used in nearly every part of the nuclear fuel cycle -- from the purification of uranium from its ore to the final recovery of uranium and transmutation products. Ion exchange also plays a valuable role in the management of nuclear wastes generated in the fuel cycle.

  2. Ion exchange in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.P.

    1990-12-31

    Ion exchange is used in nearly every part of the nuclear fuel cycle -- from the purification of uranium from its ore to the final recovery of uranium and transmutation products. Ion exchange also plays a valuable role in the management of nuclear wastes generated in the fuel cycle.

  3. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  4. Developments in ion exchange: The mintek perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, B. R.; Kotze, M. H.; Wyethe, J. P.

    2002-10-01

    Mintek has been involved in the development of ion-exchange technologies for the gold industry for more than 25 years. These technologies include the development of gold-selective anionexchange resins, design and engineering aspects of resin-in-pulp and resin-in-solution for the recovery of gold, and the use of ion exchange for the recovery and recycling of cyanide. More recently, an automated ion-exchange process was developed to recover gold powder from carbon eluate in an attempt to limit gold theft during the final stages of processing.

  5. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  6. Ion-exchange materials: Seizing the caesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clearfield, Abraham

    2010-03-01

    Public acceptance of the expansion of nuclear power may hinge on the safe disposal of nuclear waste. Ion exchangers that remove radioactive metals - such as caesium ions - from the waste could provide part of the answer, so a flexible-framework material that selectively grab them from solution is a step in the right direction.

  7. ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING: EFFECTS ON METAL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corrosion control pipe loop study to evaluate the effect of ion exchange water softening on metal leaching from household plumbing materials was conducted on two different water qualities having different pH's and hardness levels. The results showed that removing hardness ions ...

  8. Improved monoclonal antibody tumor/background ratios with exchange transfusions.

    PubMed

    Henry, C A; Clavo, A C; Wahl, R L

    1991-01-01

    Blood exchange transfusions were performed in nude rats with subcutaneous HTB77 human ovarian carcinoma xenografts in an attempt to improve specific monoclonal antibody (MoAb) tumor/non-tumor uptake ratios. Animals were injected intravenously with both 131I-5G6.4 specific and 125I-UPC-10 non-specific MoAb. Twenty-four hours later 65-80% of the original blood was exchanged with normal heparinized rat blood and then these rodents were sacrificed. Exchange transfusion significantly (P less than 0.05) decreased normal tissue activities of 131I (except for muscle) by 63-85%, while tumor activity decreased only 5%. Tumor to background ratios increased from 0.1-0.8 to 2.3-6.3. Exchange transfusions substantially enhance tumor/normal tissue antibody uptake ratios and, along with plasmapheresis, may be useful in enhancing antibody localization in vivo, particularly for therapy. PMID:1917528

  9. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-06-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ?2). 14N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (Cn+ ? C-) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14C in enriched samples of CO2 gas with 14C/12C isotopic ratio down to the 10-9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few ?Bq of 14C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development.

  10. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  11. Organic ion exchange resin separation methods evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Witwer, K.S.

    1998-05-27

    This document describes testing to find effective methods to separate Organic Ion Exchange Resin (OIER) from a sludge simulant. This task supports a comprehensive strategy for treatment and processing of K-Basin sludge. The simulant to be used resembles sludge that has accumulated in the 105KE and 105KW Basins in the 1OOK area of the Hanford Site. The sludge is an accumulation of fuel element corrosion products, organic and inorganic ion exchange materials, canister gasket materials, iron and aluminum corrosion products, sand, dirt, and other minor amounts of organic matter.

  12. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A

    2002-06-28

    In the nuclear industry, ion exchange resins are used for purification of aqueous streams. The major contaminants of the resins are usually the radioactive materials that are removed from the aqueous streams. The use of the ion exchange resins creates a waste stream that can be very high in both organic and radioactive constituents. Therefore, disposal of the spent resin often becomes an economic problem because of the large volumes of resin produced and the relatively few technologies that are capable of economically stabilizing this waste. Vitrification of this waste stream presents a reasonable disposal alternative because of its inherent destruction capabilities, the volume reductions obtainable, and the durable product that it produces.

  13. Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1999-06-16

    This document reports results from an ion exchange column heat transfer analysis requested by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades.

  14. Rapid exchange effects on isotope ratios in groundwater systems: 2. Flow investigation using Sr isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas M.; Depaolo, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    Sr isotope ratios were measured in groundwater, whole rock digestions, and cation exchange extracts from a clay-rich groundwater system at Ernest O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and were used to constrain flow velocities and search for preferential flow paths. In the Orinda formation siltstone, 87Sr/86Sr increases strongly over tens of meters along presumed flow paths, indicating slow groundwater flow. Dissolved Sr is close to isotopic equilibrium with the exchangeable Sr in the clays, and the observed 87Sr/86Sr increase is interpreted as a cation exchange front moving slowly through the unit combined with dissolution of minerals with relatively high 87Sr/86Sr ratios. The data are inverted using a one-dimensional transport-dissolution-exchange model; the results indicate long-term average flow velocities of less than 0.2 m/yr which are consistent with 14C measurements. The data suggest a lack of strong preferential flow paths through this unit.

  15. Graphene/Ionic Liquid Composite Films and Ion Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yufei; Wan, Yunfang; Chau, Alicia; Huang, Fuchuan

    2014-01-01

    Wettability of graphene is adjusted by the formation of various ionic surfaces combining ionic liquid (IL) self-assembly with ion exchange. The functionalized ILs were designed and synthesized with the goal of obtaining adjustable wettability. The wettability of the graphene surface bearing various anions was measured systematically. The effect of solvent systems on ion exchange ratios on the graphene surface has also been investigated. Meanwhile, the mechanical properties of the graphene/IL composite films were investigated on a nanometer scale. The elasticity and adhesion behavior of the thin film was determined with respected to the indentation deformation by colloid probe nanoindentation method. The results indicate that anions played an important role in determining graphene/IL composite film properties. In addition, surface wetting and mechanics can be quantitatively determined according to the counter-anions on the surface. This study might suggest an alternate way for quantity detection of surface ions by surface force. PMID:24970602

  16. Ion-ion charge-exchange collisions and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trassl, R.; Bruning, H.; Diemar, K. V.; Melchert, F.; Salzborn, E.; Hofmann, I.

    2000-11-01

    Collisions between ions belong to the elementary processes in all kinds of plasmas in astrophysical objects as well as in laboratory discharges. In recent years, the impetus for accurate cross section data for such collisions has become greater due to research in thermonuclear fusion using either magnetic or inertial confinement. While the data base for charge-exchange collisions between singly-charged ions is still rather small, practically no data at all exist for collisions between multiply-charged ions. Using the Giessen ion-ion crossed-beams facility, we have systematically studied electron capture processes in keV-collisions between (i) Li-like ions and He2+ ions (in this paper we focus on the collision system C3++He2+) and (ii) homonuclear heavy ions X4++X4+, with X=Xe, Pb, Bi. While reactions (i) provide an ideal testing ground for different theoretical models, reactions (ii) are of applied interest in heavy ion inertial fusion scenarios and for the designing of storage rings where losses due to intra-beam ion-ion collisions can be estimated from the measured cross sections. .

  17. SPEEDUP{trademark} ion exchange column model

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.

    2000-03-06

    A transient model to describe the process of loading a solute onto the granular fixed bed in an ion exchange (IX) column has been developed using the SpeedUp{trademark} software package. SpeedUp offers the advantage of smooth integration into other existing SpeedUp flowsheet models. The mathematical algorithm of a porous particle diffusion model was adopted to account for convection, axial dispersion, film mass transfer, and pore diffusion. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was employed to solve the governing transport equations. The model allows the use of a non-linear Langmuir isotherm based on an effective binary ionic exchange process. The SpeedUp column model was tested by comparing to the analytical solutions of three transport problems from the ion exchange literature. In addition, a sample calculation of a train of three crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IX columns in series was made using both the SpeedUp model and Purdue University's VERSE-LC code. All test cases showed excellent agreement between the SpeedUp model results and the test data. The model can be readily used for SuperLig{trademark} ion exchange resins, once the experimental data are complete.

  18. Ion exchange in a zeolite-molten chloride system

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, R.H.; Pereira, C.

    1997-07-01

    Electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel results in a secondary waste stream of radioactive fission products dissolved in chloride salt. Disposal plans include a waste form that can incorporate chloride forms featuring one or more zeolites consolidated with sintered glass. A candidate method for incorporating fission products in the zeolites is passing the contaminated salt over a zeolite column for ion exchange. To date, the molten chloride ion-exchange properties of four zeolites have been investigated for this process: zeolite A, IE95{reg_sign}, clinoptilolite, and mordenite. Of these, zeolite A has been the most promising. Treating zeolite 4A, the sodium form of zeolite A , with the solvent salt for the waste stream-lithium-potassium chloride of eutectic melting composition, is expected to provide a material with favorable ion-exchange properties for the treatment of the waste salt. The authors constructed a pilot-plant system for the ion-exchange column. Initial results indicate that there is a direct relationship between the two operating variable of interest, temperature, and initial sodium concentration. Also, the mass ratio has been about 3--5 to bring the sodium concentration of the effluent below 1 mol%.

  19. Electrically switched cesium ion exchange. FY 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Sukamto, J.P.H.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) separation technology being developed as an alternative to ion exchange for removing radionuclides from high-level waste. Progress in FY 1997 for specific applications of ESIX is also outlined. The ESIX technology, which combines ion exchange and electrochemistry, is geared toward producing electroactive films that are highly selective, regenerable, and long lasting. During the process, ion uptake and elution can be controlled directly by modulating the potential of an ion exchange film that has been electrochemically deposited onto a high surface area electrode. This method adds little sodium to the waste stream and minimizes the secondary wastes associated with traditional ion exchange techniques. Development of the ESIX process is well underway for cesium removal using ferrocyanides as the electroactive films. Films having selectivity for perrhenate (a pertechnetate surrogate) over nitrate also have been deposited and tested. Based on the ferrocyanide film capacity, stability, rate of uptake, and selectivity shown during performance testing, it appears possible to retain a consistent rate of removal and elute cesium into the same elution solution over several load/unload cycles. In batch experiments, metal hexacyanoferrate films showed high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. Cesium uptake was unaffected by Na/Cs molar ratios of up to 2 x 10{sup 4} , and reached equilibrium within 18 hours. During engineering design tests using 60 pores per inch, high surface area nickel electrodes, nickel ferrocyanide films displayed continued durability. losing less than 20% of their capacity after 1500 load/unload cycles. Bench-scale flow system studies showed no change in capacity or performance of the ESIX films at a flow rate up to 13 BV/h, the maximum flow rate tested, and breakthrough curves further supported once-through waste processing. 9 refs., 24 figs.

  20. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOEpatents

    Barkey, Dale P. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid embrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selected for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  1. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOEpatents

    Barkey, Dale P. (Berkeley, CA)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid membrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selective for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  2. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    DOEpatents

    Arora, Michelle B. (Woodridge, IL); Hestekin, Jamie A. (Morton Grove, IL); Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); St. Martin, Edward J. (Libertyville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  3. Charge exchange lifetimes for ions in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1977-01-01

    Latest and best measurements of physical quantities involved in complete calculation of the charge exchange lifetime of mirroring magnetospheric ions are coalesced and summarized. It is critical that the charge exchange lifetimes for ions be known as accurately as possible in order to apply the charge exchange mechanism to ion phenomena within the earth's magnetosphere.

  4. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  5. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  6. Polymethylmethacrylate open tubular ion exchange columns: nondestructive measurement of very small ion exchange capacities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Yang, Bingcheng; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2013-08-20

    We describe an approach to prepare an open tubular ion exchange (OTIE) column by coating a monolayer of anion exchange nanoparticle to a 16-20 ?m bore polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) capillary. The latex nanoparticle was electrostatically attached to carboxylate groups on the inner wall of capillary, pretreated with strong base for hydrolyzing the ester. Several approaches to nondestructively measure ion exchange capacities (IEC) of the columns were examined: (a) adsorption-desorption of an intensely fluorescent ion, e.g. fluorescein, and off-line fluorometry, (b) loading a weakly retained ion (e.g., IO3(-)), frontal displacement by a strongly bound ion (e.g., Cl(-)), and online optical or conductometric boundary detection, and (c) similar to the above except displacement being accompanied by reaction (e.g., acid-base titration). To our knowledge, this is the first time on-column titration has been used to measure capacities. By using different pH displacer solutions, we demonstrate for the first time the possibility of pKa-differentiated ion exchange capacity measurements. The cation exchange capacity of bare PMMA capillaries was on the order of 1 pequiv/mm(2) with little dependence on time and temperature of hydrolysis conditions. After AS18 latex coating, the strong base anion exchange capacity was on the order of 10 pequiv/mm(2), very close to what would be estimated on the basis of monolayer coverage of the surface by individual latex particles. The latex used contained a significant, additional amount of weak base character, about the same as the strong base ion exchange capacity. PMID:23875750

  7. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-03-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 75C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45C. Above 60C the resin appears to not load at all.

  8. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  9. Sorption of tellurium ion from aqueous solutions by anion-exchangers and amphoteric ion-exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Dreipa, E.F.; Pakholkov, V.S.; Luk'yanov, S.A.

    1981-10-20

    Sorption of tellurium from solutions of telluric acid under dynamic and static conditions by anion-exchangers and amphoteric ion-exchangers containing various ionic groups was studied and the influence of the ion form, pH of the medium, presence of electrolytes, and the H/sub 6/TeO/sub 6/ concentration in the original solutions was determined. The mechanism of sorption of tellurium (VI) by anion-exchangers was deduced from sorption and IR-spectroscopic data. Differences in the behavior of tellurium and selenium were used for separating these elements in 0.05 N H/sub 2/SeO/sub 4/ + 0.05 N H/sub 6/TeO/sub 6/ solution of pH = 1.0 with the aid of EDE-10P anion-exchange resin.

  10. Anion exchangers with branched functional ion exchange layers of different hydrophilicity for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shchukina, O I; Zatirakha, A V; Smolenkov, A D; Nesterenko, P N; Shpigun, O A

    2015-08-21

    Novel polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) based anion exchangers differing from each other in the structure of the branched functional ion exchange layer are prepared to investigate the role of linker and functional site on ion exchange selectivity. The proposed method of synthesis includes the obtaining of aminated PS-DVB particles by means of their acylation with following reductive amination with methylamine. Further modification of the obtained secondary aminogroups is provided by the alkylation with either 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (1,4-BDDGE) or resorcinol diglycidyl ether (RDGE), which form the linkers of different hydrophobicity, and amination of terminal epoxide rings with trimethylamine (TMA), dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) or triethanolamine (TEA). The variation of the structure and hydrophobicity of the linker and terminal quaternary ammonium sites in the functional layer allows the alteration of selectivity and separation efficiency of the obtained adsorbents. The ion exchange selectivity and separation efficiency of the anion exchangers are evaluated using the model mixtures of anions (F(-), HCOO(-), Cl(-), NO2(-), Br(-), NO3(-), HPO4(2-) and SO4(2-)) in potassium hydroxide eluents. The adsorbents show the decrease of selectivity with increasing the hydrophilicity of the terminal functional site. The anion exchangers having more flexible and hydrophilic 1,4-BDDGE linker provide smaller separation factors for most of the analytes as compared with RDGE-containing adsorbents with the same terminal ion exchange sites, but are characterized with higher column efficiencies and better peak symmetry for polarizable anions. In case of 1,4-BDDGE-modified anion exchangers of the particle size of 3.3μm functionalized with DMEA and MDEA the calculated values of column efficiencies for polarizable NO3(-) and Br(-) are up to 49,000 and 53,000N/m, respectively, which is almost twice higher than the values obtained for the RDGE-containing analogues. PMID:26159253

  11. Ion exchange in hydroxyapatite with lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-16

    Naturally occurring hydroxyapatite, Ca5(PO4)3(OH) (HAP), is the main inorganic component of bone matrix, with synthetic analogues finding applications in bioceramics and catalysis. An interesting and valuable property of both natural and synthetic HAP is the ability to undergo cationic and anionic substitution. The lanthanides are well-suited for substitution for the Ca(2+) sites within HAP, because of their similarities in ionic radii, donor atom requirements, and coordination geometries. We have used isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the thermodynamics of ion exchange in HAP with a representative series of lanthanide ions, La(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Ho(3+), Yb(3+) and Lu(3+), reporting the association constant (Ka), ion-exchange thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG), and binding stoichiometry (n). We also probe the nature of the La(3+):HAP interaction by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), in support of the ITC results. PMID:25594577

  12. Ion exchange materials, method of forming ion exchange materials, and methods of treating liquids

    DOEpatents

    Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wey, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-12-25

    The invention includes an ion affinity material having an organic component which is sulfonated and which is chemically bonded to an inorganic substrate component. The invention includes a method of forming a metal binding material. A solid support material comprising surface oxide groups is provided and an organic component having at least one alkyl halide is covalently linked to at least some of the surface oxide groups to form a modified support material. The at least one alkyl halide is subsequently converted into an alkyl sulfonate. The invention further includes a method and system for extracting ions from a liquid. An ion exchange material having a sulfonated alkyl silane component covalently bonded to a metal oxide support material is provided and a liquid is exposed to the ion exchange material.

  13. Ion exchange polymers and method for making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H. (Inventor); Street, Kenneth W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange polymer comprised of an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a poly(carboxylic acid) in a poly(vinyl acetal) matrix is described. The polymer is made by treating a mixture made of poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(acrylic acid) with a suitable aldehyde and an acid catalyst to cause acetalization with some cross-linking. The material is then subjected to an alkaline aqueous solution of an alkali metal salt or an alkali earth metal salt. All of the film forming and cross-linking steps can be carried out simultaneously, if desired.

  14. Biodegradation of ion-exchange media

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, B.S.; Clinton, J.H.; Cowdery, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate further the potential for ion-exchange media (resin beads or powdered filter media) to support biological growth. A mixed microbial culture was grown from resin wastes obtained from the BNL HFBR by mixing the resin with a nutrient salt solution containing peptone and yeast extract. Bacterial and fungal growths appeared in the solution and on the resins after 7 to 10 days incubation at 337)degree)C. The mixed microbial cultures were used to inoculate several resin types, both irradiated and unirradiated. 12 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Anisotropic microporous supports impregnated with polymeric ion-exchange materials

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, D.; Babcock, W.C.; Tuttle, M.

    1985-05-07

    Novel ion-exchange media are disclosed, the media comprising polymeric anisotropic microporous supports containing polymeric ion-exchange or ion-complexing materials. The supports are anisotropic, having small exterior pores and larger interior pores, and are preferably in the form of beads, fibers and sheets. 5 figs.

  16. Ion Exchange Chromatography and Spectrophotometry: An Introductory Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, N.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which students use ion exchange chromatography to separate a mixture of chloro complexes of transition metal ions and then use spectrophotometry to define qualitatively the efficiency of the ion exchange columns. Background information, materials needed, and procedures used are included. (JN)

  17. Radionuclide Leaching from Organic Ion Exchange Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of leach treatments for decontaminating organic ion exchange resins (OIER), which have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East Basin sludge. Based on process records, the OIER found in the K Basins is a mixed-bet strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite{trademark} NRW-037. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the OIER can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). To help understand the effects of anticipated OIER elutriation and washing, tests were performed with well-rinsed OIER material from K East Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed OIER having approximately 5% added K East canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). The rinsed resin-bearing material also contained the inorganic ion exchanger Zeolon-900{trademark}, a zeolite primarily composed of the mineral mordenite. The zeolite was estimated to comprise 27 weight percent of the dry H-08 BEAD G material.

  18. Multicomponent liquid ion exchange with chabazite zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Byers, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In spite of the increasing commercial use of zeolites for binary and multicomponent sorption, the understanding of the basic mass-transfer processes associated with multicomponent zeolite ion-exchange systems is quite limited. This study was undertaken to evaluate Na-Ca-Mg-Cs-Sr ion exchange from an aqueous solution using a chabazite zeolite. Mass-transfer coefficients and equilibrium equations were determined from experimental batch-reactor data for single and multicomponent systems. The Langmuir isotherm was used to represent the equilibrium relationship for binary systems, and a modified Dubinin-Polyani model was used for the multicomponent systems. The experimental data indicate that diffusion through the microporous zeolite crystals is the primary diffusional resistance. Macropore diffusion also significantly contributes to the mass-transfer resistance. Various mass-transfer models were compared to the experimental data to determine mass-transfer coefficients. Effective diffusivities were obtained which accurately predicted experimental data using a variety of models. Only the model which accounts for micropore and macropore diffusion occurring in series accurately predicted multicomponent data using single-component diffusivities. Liquid and surface diffusion both contribute to macropore diffusion. Surface and micropore diffusivities were determined to be concentration dependent.

  19. Computer prediction of arsenic ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D.

    1995-04-01

    Anion exchange may be the method of choice for removing arsenic from drinking water provided that the sulfate and total dissolved solids (TDS) levels are not too high. In this process, arsenic-contaminated water, which has been preoxidized to convert arsenite [As(III)] to arsenate [As(V)], is passed through a bed of anion exchange resin in the chloride form. Two important engineering questions must be answered when an ion exchange process to remove arsenic is designed. Both are related to breakthrough, which is a sharp rise in effluent arsenic concentration. The questions are how many bed volumes (BV) of water can be put through the resin before arsenic breaks through into the effluent; will arsenic peak if the run is not stopped when arsenic breaks through? Equilibrium multicomponent chromatography theory with constant separation factors (EMCT-CSF) has been used to answer these questions. A computer program based on this theory has been described and was used to predict the effluent histories, i.e., breakthrough curves, for the common anions present in natural water in addition to arsenate.

  20. Mineral Separation in a CELSS by Ion-exchange Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wong, F. W.; Wydeven, T.; Johnson, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Operational parameters pertinent to ion exchange chromatography separation were identified. The experiments were performed with 9 mm diameter ion exchange columns and conventional column accessories. The cation separation beds were packed with AG 50W-X2 strong acid cation exchange resin in H(+) form and 200-400 dry mesh particle size. The stripper beds used in some experiments were packed with AG 1-XB strong base cation exchange resin in OH(-) form and 200-400 dry mesh particle size.

  1. Ion exchange of cesium by crystalline silico-titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhixin; Anthony, R.G.; Miller, J.E.; Trudell, D.

    1995-12-01

    The crystalline silico-titanates developed by the Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University, Sandia National Laboratories and UOP exhibits extremely high ion exchange selectivity for removing cesium from aqueous defense wastes. Based on experimental data and structure studies, a competitive ion exchange model was proposed to predict the ion exchange performance in different simulated waste solutions. The predicted distribution coefficients were within 10% of the experimentally determined values.

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

  3. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins - 12210

    SciTech Connect

    Braehler, Georg; Slametschka, Rainer

    2012-07-01

    Organic ion exchangers (IEX) play a major and increasing role in the reactor coolant and other water purification processes. During their operation time they receive significant amounts of radioactivity, making their disposal, together with their organic nature, as medium active waste challenging. Processes applied so far do not eliminate the organic matter, which is unwanted in disposal facilities, or, if high temperatures are applied, raise problems with volatile radionuclides. NUKEM Technologies offers their well introduces process for the destruction of spent solvent (TBP), the pebble bed pyrolysis, now for the treatment of spent IEX (and other problematic waste), with the following benefits: the pyrolysis product is free of organic matter, and the operation temperature with approx. 500 deg. C keeps Cs radionuclides completely in the solid residue. (authors)

  4. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  5. TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

    2010-12-28

    At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

  6. Rupture Loop Annex (RLA) ion exchange vault entry and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1996-01-04

    This engineering report documents the entry and characterization of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located near the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns were found in the vault. Some of which contained transuranics, Cs 137, and Co 60. The characterization information is necessary for future vault cleanout and column disposal.

  7. Closed system respirometry may underestimate tissue gas exchange and bias the respiratory exchange ratio (RER).

    PubMed

    Malte, Christian Lind; Nørgaard, Simon; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Closed respirometry is a commonly used method to measure gas exchange in animals due to its apparent simplicity. Typically, the rates of O2 uptake and CO2 excretion (V˙O2 and V˙CO2, respectively) are assumed to be in steady state, such that the measured rates of gas exchange equal those at tissue level. In other words, the respiratory gas exchange ratio (RER) is assumed to equal the respiratory quotient (RQ). However, because the gas concentrations change progressively during closure, the animal inspires air with a progressively increasing CO2 concentration and decreasing O2 concentration. These changes will eventually affect gas exchange causing the O2 and CO2 stores within the animal to change. Because of the higher solubility/capacitance of CO2 in the tissues of the body, V˙CO2 will be more affected than V˙O2, and we hypothesize therefore that RER will become progressively underestimated as closure time is prolonged. This hypothesis was addressed by a combination of experimental studies involving closed respirometry on ball pythons (Python regius) as well as mathematical models of gas exchange. We show that increased closed duration of the respirometer reduces RER by up to 13%, and these findings may explain previous reports of RER values being below 0.7. Our model reveals that the maximally possible reduction in RER is determined by the storage capacity of the body for CO2 (product of size and specific capacitance) relative to the respirometer storage capacity. Furthermore, modeling also shows that pronounced ventilatory and circulatory response to hypercapnia can alleviate the reduction in RER. PMID:26523499

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy of ion exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Dunesh

    Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study Nafion, a sulfonated tetrafluoroethylene ionomer used as the electrolyte material of choice for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). A methodology is described for assignment of infrared peaks in terms of mechanically coupled internal coordinates of near neighbor functional groups. This work demonstrates (chapter 2--4) the use of ionomer functional group internal coordinate coupling analysis to assign two key Nafion peaks formerly assigned as the sulfonate symmetric stretch (1056 cm -1) and a COC (A) vibrational mode (971 cm-1). The experiments and theory complement each other to show that the dominate motions of the 1056 cm-1 and 971 cm-1 modes are attributed to the COC (A) and the sulfonate stretch respectively, exactly reverse of the convention used for decades. The salient point is that both peaks result from mechanically coupled internal coordinates of both functional groups. This explains why the 1056 cm-1 and 971 cm -1 peaks shift together with changes in the sulfonate group environment (i.e., ion exchange or membrane dehydration). The assignments, correlated with extensive literature data, and new data showing both peaks vanishing upon rigorous dehydration (i.e. conversion of a C3V deprotonated -SO3- to a C1 -SO3H) of the membrane, were based on the correlation of observed IR peaks with animations of mechanically coupled internal coordinates obtained by DFT calculations. Further, the above methodology was augmented with polarization modulated infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) to elucidate the Nafion ionomers functional groups that participate in self-assembly of Nafion onto Pt surfaces. A model for Nafion adsorption onto Pt shows that the Nafion side-chain sulfonate and CF3 co-adsorbates are structural components of the Nafion-Pt interface. The DFT-spectroscopy method of assigning peaks in terms of mechanically coupled internal coordinates was augmented with ion-exchange-induced shifts for extensive assignments of Nafion IR peaks (explicit and deconvoluted). Chapter 5 focuses on the durability of the membrane electrode assembly (MEAs) in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The MEA catalyst-polymer interfacial region was examined for degradation modes.

  9. Isotope exchange by Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, T.; Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Lyssoivan, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Belonohy, E.; Blackman, T.; Bobkov, V.; Cromb, K.; Drenik, A.; Graham, M.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Loarer, T.; Lomas, P. L.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Oberkofler, M.; Philipps, V.; Plyusnin, V.; Sergienko, G.; Van Eester, D.

    2015-08-01

    The isotopic exchange efficiencies of JET Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) discharges produced at ITER half and full field conditions are compared for JET carbon (C) and ITER like wall (ILW). Besides an improved isotope exchange rate on the ILW providing cleaner plasma faster, the main advantage compared to C-wall is a reduction of the ratio of retained discharge gas to removed fuel. Complementing experimental data with discharge modeling shows that long pulses with high (?240 kW coupled) ICRF power maximizes the wall isotope removal per ICWC pulse. In the pressure range 1-7.5 10-3 Pa, this removal reduces with increasing discharge pressure. As most of the wall-released isotopes are evacuated by vacuum pumps in the post discharge phase, duty cycle optimization studies for ICWC on JET-ILW need further consideration. The accessible reservoir by H2-ICWC at ITER half field conditions on the JET-ILW preloaded by D2 tokamak operation is estimated to be 7.3 1022 hydrogenic atoms, and may be exchanged within 400 s of cumulated ICWC discharge time.

  10. Barcoded materials based on photoluminescent hybrid system of lanthanide ions-doped metal organic framework and silica via ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiang; Yan, Bing

    2016-04-15

    A multicolored photoluminescent hybrid system based on lanthanide ions-doped metal organic frameworks/silica composite host has potential in display and barcode applications. By controlling the stoichiometry of the lanthanides via cation exchange, proportional various lanthanide ions are successfully introduced into metal organic frameworks, whose emission intensity is correspondingly proportional to its amount. The resulting luminescent barcodes depend on the lanthanide ions ratios and compositions. Subsequently, the lanthanide ions located in the channels of metal organic frameworks are protected from any interaction with the environment after the modification of silica on the surface. The optical and thermal stability of the hybrid materials are improved for technological application. PMID:26852345

  11. Gadolinium-hydrogen ion exchange of zirconium phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, D. C.; Power, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The Gd(+3)/H(+) ion exchange on a commercial zirconium phosphate ion exchanger was investigated in chloride, sulfate, and phosphate solutions of Gd(+3) at gadolinium concentrations of 0.001 to 1 millimole per cc and in the pH range of 0 to 3.5. Relatively low Gd(+3) capacities, in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 millimole per g of ion exchanger were found at room temperature. A significant difference in Gd(+3) sorption was observed, depending on whether the ion exchanger was converted from initial conditions of greater or lesser Gd(+3) sorption than the specific final conditions. Correlations were found between decrease in Gd(+3) capacity and loss of exchanger phosphate groups due to hydrolysis during washing and between increase in capacity and treatment with H3PO4. Fitting of the experimental data to ideal ion exchange equilibrium expressions indicated that each Gd(+3) ion is sorbed on only one site of the ion exchanger. The selectivity quotient was determined to be 2.5 + or - 0.4 at room temperature on gadolinium desorption in chloride solutions.

  12. Hydrolyzed Poly(acrylonitrile) Electrospun Ion-Exchange Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Jassal, Manisha; Bhowmick, Sankha; Sengupta, Sukalyan; Patra, Prabir K.; Walker, Douglas I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A potential ion-exchange material was developed from poly(acrylonitrile) fibers that were prepared by electrospinning followed by alkaline hydrolysis (to convert the nitrile group to the carboxylate functional group). Characterization studies performed on this material using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-Transform infra-red spectroscopy, and ion chromatography confirmed the presence of ion-exchange functional group (carboxylate). Optimum hydrolysis conditions resulted in an ion-exchange capacity of 2.39?meq/g. Ion-exchange fibers were used in a packed-bed column to selectively remove heavy-metal cation from the background of a benign, competing cation at a much higher concentration. The material can be efficiently regenerated and used for multiple cycles of exhaustion and regeneration. PMID:24963270

  13. The use of fibrous ion exchangers in gold hydrometallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautzmann, R. M.; Sampaio, C. H.; Cortina, J. L.; Soldatov, V.; Shunkevich, A.

    2002-10-01

    This article examines a family of ion-exchange fibers, FIBAN, containing primary and secondary amine groups. These ion exchangers have a fiber diameter of 20 40 ?m, high osmotic and mechanic stability, a high rate of adsorption and regeneration, and excellent dynamic characteristics as filtering media. Inparticular, this article discusses the use of FIBAN fibrous ion exchangers in the recovery of gold cyanide andbase-metal cyanides (copper and mercury) from mineral-leaching solutions. The influence of polymer structure and water content on their extraction ability is described, along with key parameters of gold hydrometallurgy such as extraction efficiency, selectivity, pH dependence, gold cyanide loading, kinetics, and stripping.

  14. Ion exchange properties of Japanese natural zeolites in seawater.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    Ion exchange properties of five different Japanese natural zeolites in seawater were examined. Sodium ions could be reduced by all zeolites, although anions, Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-), in seawater showed barely changes. Natural zeolite desalination treatment mainly depends on the ion exchange between Na(+), K(+) and Mg(2+) in seawater and Ca(2+) in natural zeolite. This study found that mordenite is superior to clinoptilolite for use in Na(+) reduction. Mordenite with high cation exchange capacity containing Ca(2+) resulted in the highest Na(+) reduction from seawater. PMID:23303099

  15. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  16. Cesium Ion Exchange Loading Kinetics Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-11-02

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (2 to 8 M) due to caustic leaching and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of linear load velocity (4, 6, 8 cm/min), initial sodium concentration (2, 5, 8 M), initial sodium-to-cesium ratio (1.4E+05, 2.1E+05, 2.8E+05 mol/mol), initial sodium-to-hydroxide ratio (2.0, 3.0, 4.0 mol/mol), and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45°, 50°, 55°, 60°, 65°, 75°C). Testing was performed using a~2mL column packed with SRF resin with feed flowing through it in an up-flow pattern. Samples were taken at set intervals and the data analyzed to help understand the impact of these conditions on the SRF resin performance. It was found that the loading kinetics were not significantly impacted by the sodium concentration over the range tested. However, the loading kinetics were impacted by the linear load velocity. These results indicated that at the test temperature, the adsorption of cesium is strongly dependent on mass transfer through the film and not significantly impacted by interparticle diffusion. Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45°C. Above 60°C the resin appears to not load at all.

  17. Concept of advanced spent fuel reprocessing based on ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Nogami, Masanobu; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Ozawa, Masaki |; Koyama, Shinichi; Mimura, Hitosi; Fujita, Reiko

    2007-07-01

    Reprocessing based on ion exchange separation is proposed as a safe, proliferation-resistant technology. Tertiary pyridine resin was developed for ion exchange reprocessing. Working medium of the separation system is not nitric acid but hydrochloric acid aqueous solution. The system does not involve strong oxidizing reagent, such as nitric acid but involve chloride ions which works as the week neutron absorbers. The system can be operated at ambient temperatures and pressure. Thus the HCl-ion-exchange reprocessing is regarded as an inherently safe technology. Another advantage of HCl ion-exchange reprocessing is the proliferation-resistant nature. Both U(VI) and Pu(IV) ions are adsorbed in the pyridine type anion exchange resin at relatively high HCl concentration of 6 M. At this condition, the adsorption distribution coefficient of Pu(IV) is smaller than that of U(VI). When uranium is eluted from the resin in the column, plutonium is simultaneously eluted from the column; Pu is recovered with uranium in the front part of uranium adsorption band. Pu(IV) can not be left in the resin after elution of uranium. The use of HCl in the ion-exchange reprocessing causes the problem of the plant materials. Sophisticated material technology is necessary to realize the ion exchange reprocessing using HCl. The technology is so sophisticated that only highly developed countries can hold the technology, thus the technology holding countries will be limited. The plant, therefore, cannot be built under hidden state. In addition, another merit of the process would be the simplicity in operation. One phase, i.e., ion exchange resin is immobile, and the aqueous solution is the only mobile phase. Plant operation is made by the control of one aqueous solution phase. The plant simplicity would ease the international safeguard inspection efforts to be applicable to this kind of reprocessing plant. The present work shows the basic concept of ion exchange reprocessing using HCl medium. Furthermore, the ion exchange is appropriate for multi-element mutual separation rather than single element extraction. In the future, ion exchange reprocessing would be expected to be the comprehensive separation process for spent fuels to recover precious and usable elements and to reduce the amount of wastes. (authors)

  18. Charge exchange of He +-ions with aluminium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rund, S.; Primetzhofer, D.; Markin, S. N.; Goebl, D.; Bauer, P.

    2011-06-01

    Charge exchange of 4He + and 3He + ions with surfaces of polycrystalline aluminium and Al(1 1 1) was investigated in the low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) regime. Ion spectra were recorded for primary energies ranging from 280 to 4000 eV by using an electrostatic analyzer (ESA). A very low threshold energy Eth for collision induced charge exchange (CI) was deduced from the shape of experimental spectra. Ion fractions P+ were evaluated. No systematic difference in P+ was observed for both, the two surfaces investigated and the two different projectiles.

  19. Interpenetrating polymer network ion exchange membranes and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Danesi, Pier R.; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1989-01-01

    Interpenetrating polymer network ion exchange membranes include a microporous polymeric support film interpenetrated by an ion exchange polymer and are produced by absorbing and polymerizing monomers within the support film. The ion exchange polymer provides ion exchange ligands at the surface of and throughout the support film which have sufficient ligand mobility to extract and transport ions across the membrane.

  20. Inorganic ion exchange evaluation and design: Silicotitanate ion exchange waste conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, M.L.; Bunker, B.C.

    1995-03-01

    Ion exchange materials are being evaluated for removing Cs, SR from tank waste. Thermal conversion of a variety of compositions within the Cs{sub 2}O-TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} phase diagram yielded both glass and crystalline materials, some of which show low leach rates and negligible Cs losses during heat treatment. A new material, CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}, with a structure isomorphous to pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}) has been identified. This material represents a new class of crystalline zeolite materials which contain large amounts of titanium. Direct conversion of Cs loaded silicotitanate ion exchangers to CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is an excellent alternative to dissolving the Cs-loaded or Cs-eluted exchangers in borosilicate glass because: CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is formed using a simple, one step heat treatment. The unique crystalline pollucite-like structure of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} traps Cs, and exhibits extremely low Cs leach rates. CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is converted to solid waste at a low processing temperature of 700 to 800 C (nominal melter operating temperatures are 1150 C). CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6} concentrates the waste, thus generating lower volumes of expensive HLW. Cs losses due to volatilization during processing of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} are extremely low.

  1. FRACTIONATION OF COMPLEX MIXTURES USING AND ION-EXCHANGE METHODOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fractionation of particle emission extracts captured from complex combustion mixtures gas performed upon environmental samples using an ion-exchange technique. aptured emissions from hazardous waste, municipal and medical/pathological incinerators along with urban air imputed by ...

  2. WASTEWATER DEMINERALIZATION BY CONTINUOUS COUNTER-CURRENT ION EXCHANGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wastewater demineralization study employing a 38 lpm (10 gpm) continuous counter-current ion exchange pilot plant, manufactured by the Chemical Separations Corporation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been conducted at the County Sanitation Districts, Pomona Research Facility, Pomona...

  3. Application of pressurized ion exchange to separations of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.O.

    1980-01-01

    High-pressure ion exchange chromatography, used first for nucleic acid separations, was applied to the production of the heavier actinides, particularly the transcurium elements. Its use at the TRU plant is described. Future developments are considered briefly. (DLC)

  4. Ion Exchange Separation of the Oxidation State of Vanadium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Richard

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment that emphasizes the discrete nature of the different oxidation states of vanadium by the separation of ammonium metavanadate into all four species by ion exchange chromatography. (CS)

  5. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  6. Zirconium(IV) Phosphonate-Phosphates as Efficient Ion-Exchange Materials.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Rita; Martin, Caroline H; Clearfield, Abraham

    2016-02-15

    Layered metal phosphonate-phosphate hybrid materials are known to be ion-exchange materials. Hybrids with zirconium metal centers were synthesized at varying phosphonate-phosphate ratios in order to explore the function and charge preference. The zirconium hybrid materials were found to have a range of applicable uses with preference for highly charged ions (3+) over lower charged ions (1+ and 2+). The addition of a large excess of phosphate altered the selectivity, and these materials were able to remove all ions from solution regardless of charge. In this paper, we describe newly synthesized compounds that are simple to prepare, reproducible, stable, and offer a variety of separation schemes. PMID:26821183

  7. Water softening by combination of ultrasound and ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Entezari, M H; Tahmasbi, M

    2009-03-01

    Ion exchange resin used in this work was styrene-divinylbenzene co-polymer with sulfonic acid group as a strong acid cation resin. This resin is particularly well suited for the removal of water hardness. In water treatment, commonly used softening processes are chemical precipitation and ion exchange. In this study, a combination of ultrasound and ion exchange was applied for reducing the hardness of water. The rate of exchange or kinetics of ion exchange is governed by several parameters. Therefore, important variables such as intensity of ultrasound, amount of resin, concentration of ions and contact time were investigated. The experimental data related to the removal of magnesium and calcium ions were fitted properly with Langmuir model. The kinetic of removal for both ions was pseudo-first-order. In point of mechanism, the internal porous and film diffusion were both effective in the process. The capacity of sorption and the velocity of removal were higher in the presence of ultrasound than control method and this is related to the cavitation process. PMID:19014894

  8. Radioactive halos and ion microprobe measurement of Pb isotope ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation was to obtain, if possible, the Pb isotope ratios of both lunar and meteoritic troilite grains by utilizing ion microprobe techniques. Such direct in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios would eliminate contamination problems inherent in wet chemistry separation procedures, and conceivably determine whether lunar troilite grains were of meteoritic origin. For comparison purposes two samples of meteoritic troilite were selected (one from Canyon Diablo) for analysis along with two very small lunar troilite grains (approximately 50-100 microns). It was concluded that the ion microprobe as presently operating, does not permit the in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios in lunar or meteoritic troilite. On the basis of these experiments no conclusions could be drawn as to the origin of the lunar troilite grains.

  9. ELUTION OF URANIUM VALUES FROM ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, R.H.

    1959-11-24

    A process is described for eluting complex uranium ions absorbed on ion exchange resins. The resin is subjected to the action of an aqueous eluting solution contuining sulfuric acid and an alkali metal, ammonium, or magnesium chloride or nitrate, the elution being carried out until the desired amount of the uranium is removed from the resin.

  10. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  11. Coccolith B/Ca ratios using SIMS ion probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, H.; Shimizu, N.; Langer, G.

    2009-04-01

    B/Ca ratios are proposed as a paleo-carbonate ion or paleo-pH proxy due to the preferential incorporation of borate ion into the calcite lattice, relative to boric acid which is the dominant species of B at lower pH. The relative importance of cellular regulation vs external pH on the carbonate B/Ca remains to be characterized for most organisms. Here we describe initial results of B/Ca analyses of coccoliths produced in laboratory culture under variable carbonate ion concentrations. Due to the impossibility of physically separating the micron-sized coccoliths from non-coccolith sediment material in quantities large enough for TIMS or ICP-MS analysis of B/Ca, eventual analysis of coccolith B/Ca from the fossil record will need to be conducted on individually picked coccoliths on the ion probe as is currently done for other trace element (eg. Sr/Ca) ratios. Hence, we employ the CAMECA IMS 1280 ion probe at the Northeast National Ion Microprobe Facility at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to measure B/Ca in coccoliths from cultures. We evaluated cleaning methods using a synthetic cleaning target (crushed marble) contaminated with noncalcifying algae. Cleaning is crucial for obtaining accurate B/Ca ratios and precluding sample charging. B/Ca ratios of different genera of modern coccoliths range from 5 to 25 umol/mol, 3 to 10fold lower than planktic foraminifera or abiogenic calcite precipitated in seawater in the same pH range. These low ratios suggest much more restricted uptake of B into the algae cell in the vesicle calcification used by coccolithophores, compared with the seawater vacuole calcification typical of foraminifera. Different coccolith species grown at the same pH exhibit different B/Ca ratios. One species, Coccolithus pelagicus, cultured at a range of pH conditions from 7.7 to 8.4, exhibits no significant change in B/Ca ratios across the range of pH. One explanation is pH homeostasis at the calcification site. In possible support of pH homeostasis, the degree of calcification of this species was insensitive to variable CO2 and pH conditions in published experiments. We will also present results from strains of Emiliania huxleyi grown at different pH, for which more acidic pH resulted in depressed calcification.

  12. Columnar studies with selective ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    McGarvey, F.X.; Gottlieb, M.C.

    1981-12-01

    Secondary recovery of oil using water or steam injection to pressurize the strata has highlighted the water softening process using acidic cation exchangers which are regenerated with brine followed by a polishing weakly acidic cation exchanger. Development of a program to produce bries with low hardness suitable for secondary oil recovery is described. Results of laboratory tests with various resins for softening brines are presented. Calculations for a typical plant using Ionac SR-1 to soften a 25% brine are included. (BLM)

  13. Observations of solar wind ion charge exchange in the comet Halley coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Goldstein, B. E.; Goldstein, R.; Neugebauer, M.; Ip, W.-H.; Balsiger, H.; Reme, H.

    1991-01-01

    Giotto Ion Mass Spectrometer/High Energy Range Spectrometer (IMS/HERS) observations of solar wind ions show charge exchange effects and solar wind compositional changes in the coma of comet Halley. As the comet was approached, the He(++) to proton density ratio increased until about 1 hour before closest approach after which time it decreased. Abrupt increases in this ratio were also observed in the beginning and near the end of the so-called Mystery Region (8.6 - 5.5(10)(exp 5) km from the comet along the spacecraft trajectory). These abrupt increases in the density ratio were well correlated with enhanced fluxes of keV electrons as measured by the Giotto plasma electron spectrometer. The general increase and then decrease of the He(++) to proton density ratio is quantitatively consistent with a combination of the addition of protons of cometary origin to the plasma and loss of plasma through charge exchange of protons and He(++). In general agreement with the solar wind proton and He(++) observations, solar wind oxygen and carbon ions were observed to charge exchange from higher to lower charge states with decreasing distance to the comet. The more abrupt increases in the He(++) to proton and the He(++) to O(6+) density ratios in the mystery region require a change in the solar wind ion composition in this region while the correlation with energetic electrons indicates processes associated with the comet.

  14. Desalination of brackish waters using ion exchange media.

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, Jason D.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn

    2005-01-01

    An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of {approx} 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x+2y}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}O{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of {approx}2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = {approx}11,000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

  15. Desalination of brackish waters using ion-exchange media

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, J.D.; Philips, M.L.F.; Voigt, J.A.; Moore, D.; Axness, M.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Nenoff, T.M.

    2006-06-21

    An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of around 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x}+2yAl{sub x}Si{sub 1}-xO{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of around to 2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = similar to 11 000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

  16. Exchange and reduction of Cu(2+) ions in clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Iznaga, I Rodrguez; Petranovskii, V; Fuentes, G Rodrguez; Mendoza, C; Aguilar, A Bentez

    2007-12-15

    The ion-exchange and reduction processes for Cu(2+) ions in clinoptilolite from the Caimanes deposit (Moa, Cuba) were studied at different temperatures. The ion-exchange studies were done to determine the kinetic parameters of Cu(2+) removal from solution by this clinoptilolite modified previously to NH(+)(4) form, and thermodynamic parameters of Cu(2+) elution from zeolite using NH(4)Cl solution. The results show that temperature increase favors the exchange and that it is a reversible process. The external diffusion rate appreciably increases with temperature, while, the internal diffusion coefficient rises relatively little. This means that besides ion exchange other processes (such as precipitation of the low-solubility phase and/or salt adsorption) occur, which cause copper removal from solution and affect the intracrystalline diffusion of the ions. For steric reasons the exchange of [Cu(H(2)O)(6)](2+) ions from a solution must occur with a number of water molecules n smaller than 6 (6 > n > or = 0). Cu(2+) reduction by hydrogen and the formation of Cu-particles in the clinoptilolite were verified. The Cu(2+) reduction mechanism is complex, indirect, and sensitive to reduction temperature; consequently, Cu(+)(n) states intermediate between Cu(2+) and Cu(0) should be present in the reduced samples. PMID:17897668

  17. Electrical and magnetic properties of ion-exchangeable layered ruthenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Wataru . E-mail: wsugi@shinshu-u.ac.jp; Omoto, Masashi; Yokoshima, Katsunori; Murakami, Yasushi; Takasu, Yoshio

    2004-12-01

    An ion-exchangeable ruthenate with a layered structure, K{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 2.1}, was prepared by solid-state reactions. The interlayer cation was exchanged with H{sup +}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NH{sub 3}{sup +}, and ((C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N{sup +}) through proton-exchange, ion-exchange, and guest-exchange reactions. The electrical and magnetic properties of the products were characterized by DC resistivity and susceptibility measurements. Layered K{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 2.1} exhibited metallic conduction between 300 and 13K. The products exhibited similar magnetic behavior despite the differences in the type of interlayer cation, suggesting that the ruthenate sheet in the protonated form and the intercalation compounds possesses metallic nature.

  18. ION EXCHANGE PERFORMANCE OF TITANOSILICATES, GERMANATES AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Alsobrook, A.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-04-24

    This report presents a summary of testing the affinity of titanosilicates (TSP), germanium-substituted titanosilicates (Ge-TSP) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid solution. The K-TSP ion exchanger exhibited the highest affinity for lanthanides in dilute nitric acid solutions. The Ge-TSP ion exchanger shows promise as a material with high affinity, but additional tests are needed to confirm the preliminary results. The MWCNT exhibited much lower affinities than the K-TSP in dilute nitric acid solutions. However, the MWCNT are much more chemically stable to concentrated nitric acid solutions and, therefore, may candidates for ion exchange in more concentrated nitric acid solutions. This technical report serves as the deliverable documenting completion of the FY13 research milestone, M4FT-13SR0303061 – measure actinide and lanthanide distribution values in nitric acid solutions with sodium and potassium titanosilicate materials.

  19. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 172926M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.00.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm. PMID:26748867

  20. Separation of ions on columns of cerium(IV) silicate, a new ion exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ghannadi-Marageh, M.; Husain, S.W.; Khanchi, A.R.; Ahmady, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Six different samples of a new inorganic ion exchanger, cerium(IV) silicate, have been prepared under varying conditions. Ion-exchange capacity, IR, X-ray, thermogravimetry, composition, and distribution coefficients of many metal ions have been studied and discussed. Separations of Cr{sup III}-V{sup V}, Cu{sup II}-Bi{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}-Cr{sup VI}, and Cr{sup III}-Cr{sup VI} have been developed on columns of this ion exchanger.

  1. In Situ Investigations of Ion Exchange Processes in Microporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Parise, J. B.; Hanson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism by which ions exchange in microporous and layered solids, such as zeolites and clays for example, has important implications in areas as diverse as soil fertility and environmental remediation. A detailed characterization of the ion-exchange pathway, the structural consequences of ion exchange and the specific sites involved in the course of exchange, is desirable. A probe that is both time- and structure-sensitive allows resolution of which specific sites are involved, along with the effects of different cation types on the uptake and release of ions. In order to discern the mechanism of ion exchange, it is necessary not only to observe the course of the reaction, which can now be done routinely using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction at synchrotron sources, but also to collect dynamic diffraction data of sufficient quality to allow structure refinement using Rietveld structure refinement techniques. This at present requires the collection of monochromatic data. Tradeoffs between time-resolution, peak-to-background discrimination and structural resolution are often required and depend on the problem at hand. We have developed a number of strategies for in situ ion exchange techniques that probe both structural and kinetic information from dynamic solid media. Examples include investigations of the site-specific ion-exchange mechanism in zeolite LSX using a combination of ex situ and in situ time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, Iterative Target Transformation Factor Analysis (ITTFA) and Rietveld structural refinements. Measurement of competitive ion depletion curves showed that the newly synthesized gallosilicate TsG-1 is more selective for Sr than mineral clinoptilolite, and the structural pathway of Sr-exchange in TsG-1 was monitored by in situ and ex situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. In those cases where full structure refinement is desirable using less than optimal powder diffraction data, we found it necessary to first obtain excellent models from partially and fully ion exchanged materials, preferably from single crystal data. These allow the setting of realistic constraints on interatomic distances to supplement data with high time-resolution.

  2. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1997-09-23

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a well-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  3. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Marsh, S. Fredric (Los Alamos, NM); Bartsch, Richard A. (Lubbock, TX)

    1997-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a ell-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  4. Hydrous oxide ion-exchange compound catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, Howard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A catalytic material of improved activity which comprises a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal or quaternary ammonium titanate, zirconate, niobate, or tantalate, in which the metal or ammonium cations have been exchange with a catalytically effective quantity of a catalyst metal, and which has been subsequently treated with a solution of a Bronsted acid.

  5. SELENIUM OXIDATION AND REMOVAL BY ION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Strong-base anion exchange was evaluated as a process for the removal of trace quantities of selenium from groundwater. The efficiency of the process was found to be dependent on the oxidation state of selenium, with the selenate anion (Se(VI)) having a greater affinity for the a...

  6. THERMODYNAMICS OF ION-EXCHANGED NATURAL CLINOPTILOLITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural clinoptilolite from Castle Creek, Idaho, and its cation-exchanged variants (Na-Cpt, NaK-Cpt, K-Cpt, and Ca-Cpt) were studied by high-temperature calorimetry. The hydration enthalpy for all clinoptilolites is about -30 kJ/mol H2O (liquid water reference state) at 25 C. T...

  7. Cementation of residue ion exchange resins at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, D.F.; Beckman, T.D.; Madore, C.M.

    1998-03-03

    Ion exchange resins have been used to purify nitric acid solutions of plutonium at Rocky Flats since the 1950s. Spent ion exchange resins were retained for eventual recovery of residual plutonium, typically by incineration followed by the aqueous extraction of plutonium from the resultant ash. The elimination of incineration as a recovery process in the late 1980s and the absence of a suitable alternative process for plutonium recovery from resins led to a situation where spent ion exchange resins were simply placed into temporary storage. This report describes the method that Rocky Flats is currently using to stabilize residue ion exchange resins. The objective of the resin stabilization program is: (1) to ensure their safety during interim storage at the site, and (2) to prepare them for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Included in the discussion is a description of the safety concerns associated with ion exchange resins, alternatives considered for their stabilization, the selection of the preferred treatment method, the means of implementing the preferred option, and the progress to date.

  8. Properties of a Novel Ion-Exchange Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol M.; Philipp, Warren H.; Tanner, Stephen P.; Gorse, Joseph; Lusk, Amy; Taylor, Jason; Dickens, Jason

    2002-01-01

    A new ion-exchange material (based on polyacrylic acid) and some of its analytical applications have been reported. This paper contains data on the ion-exchange properties of the film form of the material and its potential application to the decontamination of waste water and drinking water. The film has a high exchange capacity of 5 to 6 meq/g and a pK(sub a) of 5.7. The calcium form is the most effective for removing metal ions from solution, and the optimum pH range is between 5 and 7. The exchange rates are slower for the film than for bead and powder forms of the ion-exchange material; otherwise, the properties are similar. The film is effective when hard water solutions are employed and also when metal ions are in the complex matrix of waste water from electroplating. The film can be used in flow systems having a flow channel large enough to allow passage of turbid solutions.

  9. Properties of a Novel Ion-Exchange Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol M.; Philipp, Warren H.; Tanner, Stephen P.; Gorse, Joseph; Lusk, Amy; Taylor, Jason; Dickens, Jason

    2004-01-01

    A new ion-exchange material (based on polyacrylic acid) and some of its analytical applications have been reported. This paper contains data on the ion-exchange properties of the film form of the material and its potential application to the decontamination of waste water and drinking water. The film has a high exchange capacity of 5 to 6 meq/g and a pK(sub a) of 5.7. The calcium form is the most effective for removing metal ions from solution, and the optimum pH range is between 5 and 7. The exchange rates are slower for the film than for bead and powder forms of the ion-exchange material; otherwise, the properties are similar. The film is effective when hard water solutions are employed and also when metal ions are in the complex matrix of waste water from electroplating. The film can be used in flow systems having a flow channel large enough to allow passage of turbid solutions.

  10. On the electron-ion temperature ratio established by collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco; Broersen, Sjors; Bykov, Andrei; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often collisionless shocks, in which the changes in plasma flow and temperatures across the shock are established not through Coulomb interactions, but through electric and magnetic fields. An open question about collisionless shocks is whether electrons and ions each establish their own post-shock temperature (non-equilibration of temperatures), or whether they quickly equilibrate in the shock region. Here we provide a simple, thermodynamic, relation for the minimum electron-ion temperature ratios that should be expected as a function of Mach number. The basic assumption is that the enthalpy-flux of the electrons is conserved separately, but that all particle species should undergo the same density jump across the shock, in order for the plasma to remain charge neutral. The only form of additional electron heating that we allow for is adiabatic heating, caused by the compression of the electron gas. These assumptions result in an analytic treatment of expected electron-ion temperature ratio that agrees with observations of collisionless shocks: at low sonic Mach numbers, Ms ? 2, the electron-ion temperature ratio is close to unity, whereas for Mach numbers above Ms ? 60 the electron-ion temperature ratio asymptotically approaches a temperature ratio of Te/Ti = me/ ? mi ?. In the intermediate Mach number range the electron-ion temperature ratio scales as Te/Ti ? Ms-2. In addition, we calculate the electron-ion temperature ratios under the assumption of adiabatic heating of the electrons only, which results in a higher electron-ion temperature ratio, but preserves the Te/Ti ? Ms-2 scaling. We also show that for magnetised shocks the electron-ion temperature ratio approaches the asymptotic value Te/Ti = me/ ? mi ? for lower magnetosonic Mach numbers (Mms), mainly because for a strongly magnetised shock the sonic Mach number is larger than the magnetosonic Mach number (Mms ? Ms). The predicted scaling of the electron-ion temperature ratio is in agreement with observational data for magnetosonic Mach numbers between 2 and 10, but for supernova remnants the relation requires that the inferred Mach numbers for the observations are overestimated, perhaps as a result of upstream heating in the cosmic-ray precursor. In addition to predicting a minimal electron-ion temperature ratio, we also heuristically incorporate ion-electron heat exchange at the shock, quantified with a dimensionless parameter ?, which is the fraction of the enthalpy-flux difference between electrons and ions that is used for equilibrating the electron and ion temperatures. Comparing the model to existing observations in the solar system and supernova remnants suggests that the data are best described by ? ? 5%, but also provides a hint that the Mach number of some supernova remnant shocks may have been overestimated; perhaps as a result of heating in the cosmic-ray precursor.

  11. Charge exchange and spectroscopy with isolated highly-charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    2012-06-01

    Compact ion traps can be useful in facilitating the study and manipulation of highly charged ions isolated in a controlled environment. Various ions of interest, including bare nuclei, are produced in the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT), extracted through a beamline that selects a single charge/mass species, then captured in a compact permanent magnet Penning trapootnotetextJ.N. Tan, S.M. Brewer, and N.D. Guise, at this meeting (poster). or RF trap. The isolated ions are detected optically or by ejection to a fast time-of-flight microchannel plate detector. In this room-temperature apparatus, demonstrated ion storage lifetimes exceed one second for species including Ne^10+ and Ar^13+, sufficiently long to measure certain metastable lifetimes via fluorescence detection,ootnotetextS.M. Brewer, N.D. Guise, and J.N. Tan, at this meeting. and to observe charge-exchange processes between trapped ions and residual background gas. A beam of Rydberg rubidium atoms, under development, may enable production of hydrogenlike ions in circular Rydberg states, via charge exchange with trapped bare nuclei; such one-electron ions are attractive for tests of theory and fundamental metrology.ootnotetextU.D. Jentschura, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160404 (2008). Other applications include spectroscopic studies of trapped highly charged ions relevant to atomic physics, astrophysics, and plasmas.

  12. MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-09-20

    This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

  13. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  14. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, Howard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stohl, Frances V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  15. Development and evaluation of ion exchange hollow fibers. [vinyl copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    An ion exchange hollow fiber impregnated with a vinylpyridine base was developed. The basic exchange resin used to impart the necessary permselectivity to the hollow fiber is a copolymer of vinylpyridine and dibromoethane prepared according to Rembaum. A slight pressure was used to impregnate the exchange monomer mixture into the void structure of the fiber wall, and with maintenance of subambient temperatures, the rate of cross-linking is slow enough to allow the growing polymer to permeate the wall structure before significant increase in polymer molecular weight. These ion exchange fibers are produced from polyacrylonitrile hollow fibers with an appropriate wall structure that enables the impregnating vinylpyridine monomer mixture to form a truly semipermeable anion barrier after curing.

  16. Evaluation of electrochemical ion exchange for cesium elution

    SciTech Connect

    Bontha, J.D.; Kurath, D.E.; Surma, J.E.; Buehler, M.F.

    1996-04-01

    Electrochemical elution was investigated as an alternative method to acid elution for the desorption of cesium from loaded ion exchange resins. The approach was found to have several potential advantages over existing technologies, in particular, electrochemical elution eliminates the need for addition of chemicals to elute cesium from the ion exchange resin. Also, since, in the electrochemical elution process the eluting solution is not in direct contact with the ion exchange material, very small volumes of the eluting solution can be used in a complete recycle mode in order to minimize the total volume of the cesium elute. In addition, the cesium is eluted as an alkaline solution that does not require neutralization with caustic to meet the tank farm specifications. Other advantages include easy incorporation of the electrochemical elution process into the present cesium recovery schemes.

  17. Bend stresses arising from ion-exchange diffusion in glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Babukova, M.V.; Glebov, L.B.; Nikonorov, N.V.; Petrovskii, G.T.

    1985-11-01

    This paper demonstrates experimental confirmation of the presence of gigastresses arising under ion exchange, for the purpose of providing data relating to the magnitudes of stress greater than 1 GPa in these ion-exchange layers. To determine the stresses, a bend method was used on a specimen under nonuniform load. Small values of bend were determined on an IT-70 inferometer. With larger values of bend the radius of curvature of the surface was determined by measuring the focal distance in the beam of a He-Ne laser reflected from the specimen. Bending is observed in silicate glass subjected to unilateral ion-exchange diffusion of K/sup +/. It is shown that the bending of the specimens is caused by compressive stresses arising in the diffusion layer and having a value of greater than 1.5 GPa. The changes in the refractive index (RI) in the diffusion layer are determined primarily by the photoelastic effect.

  18. Charge-exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The charge exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster was investigated experimentally using both 5 cm and 15 cm thrusters. Results are shown for wide ranges of radial distance from the thruster and angle from the beam direction. Considerations of test environment, as well as distance from the thruster, indicate that a valid simulation of a thruster on a spacecraft was obtained. A calculation procedure and a sample calculation of charge exchange plasma density and saturation electron current density are included.

  19. The many faces of ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    McNutty, J.T.

    1997-06-01

    Ion-exchange resins have been used commercially for over 60 years. Softening and demineralization of water for boiler feed and process use were then, and continue to be, the most familiar and widespread applications of ion-exchange resins throughout the chemical process industries (CPI). Several types of membrane-based technologies, such as electrodialysis, reverse osmosis and, more recently, electrodeionization are recognized as alternative methods for water treatment. Yet, modern versions of ion-exchange resins remain a major player in water treatment. In addition, these versatile materials can be found performing a wide range of tasks in both aqueous and nonaqueous environments. Some of these diverse applications include: acid or base catalysis; manufacture of high-purity solvents and reagent chemicals; separation of by-products of fermentation processes; deacidification of organic solvents; high-purity water production for semiconductor manufacture; recovery of valuable waste from dilute process effluents; controlled release of pharmaceutical products; and chromatography, both on the analytical and the industrial scale. The key to understanding the potential of ion-exchange resins is to look beyond their exchange and adsorptive characteristics, and to see their fundamental nature. In other words, it`s necessary to first consider them as spherical, particulate reactive polymers that perform chemical reactions.

  20. Polyamines and Pectins (I. Ion Exchange and Selectivity).

    PubMed Central

    Messiaen, J.; Cambier, P.; Van Cutsem, P.

    1997-01-01

    The ion-binding and -exchange properties of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine on purified walls of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cell suspensions were investigated by producing ion-exchange isotherms and comparing them with the behavior of Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+. The cation exchange capacity of the carrot cell walls was 0.8 equivalent kg-1 dry matter, and the ionic selectivity sequence of the walls for polyamines followed the sequence spermine4+ > spermidine3+ [almost equal to] Ca2+ > putrescine2+. The polyamines were subjected to only electroselectivity and probably did not induce any favorable supramolecular conformation of pectin like the one induced by Ca2+. Triangular ion exchanges were also performed with three diamines: ethanediamine, butanediamine, and octanediamine. The shorter the diamine, the higher the total adsorption and selectivity of the exchange. The lower selectivity of the cell wall for putrescine was partly attributed to its inability to access and displace Ca2+ from higher affinity sites within dimerized pectic sequences. The polyamine adsorption and exchange on pectic sequences could result in pectic signal modulation in pathogenesis and in differentiation. PMID:12223613

  1. Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

  2. Ion exchange with natural zeolites: an alternative for water softening?

    PubMed

    Cinar, S; Beler-Baykal, B

    2005-01-01

    Possibility of using natural zeolites for water softening was investigated. Quantitative data regarding separation of calcium from water at various levels of hardness through ion exchange with the ammonium selective natural zeolite clinoptilolite is reported. Capacity of the zeolite towards calcium removal in the presence of ammonium at low concentrations and calcium at higher concentrations, and breakthrough characteristics are presented. The results have revealed that removal of calcium, and hence hardness, through ion exchange with clinoptilolite under those circumstances is a promising alternative, with surface capacities reaching 11 mg calcium/g clinoptilolite. PMID:16114619

  3. Second-order schedules of token reinforcement with pigeons: effects of fixed- and variable-ratio exchange schedules.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, T A; Hackenberg, T D; Vaidya, M

    2001-01-01

    Pigeons' key pecks produced food under second-order schedules of token reinforcement, with light-emitting diodes serving as token reinforcers. In Experiment 1, tokens were earned according to a fixed-ratio 50 schedule and were exchanged for food according to either fixed-ratio or variable-ratio exchange schedules, with schedule type varied across conditions. In Experiment 2, schedule type was varied within sessions using a multiple schedule. In one component, tokens were earned according to a fixed-ratio 50 schedule and exchanged according to a variable-ratio schedule. In the other component, tokens were earned according to a variable-ratio 50 schedule and exchanged according to a fixed-ratio schedule. In both experiments, the number of responses per exchange was varied parametrically across conditions, ranging from 50 to 400 responses. Response rates decreased systematically with increases in the fixed-ratio exchange schedules, but were much less affected by changes in the variable-ratio exchange schedules. Response rates were consistently higher under variable-ratio exchange schedules than tinder comparable fixed-ratio exchange schedules, especially at higher exchange ratios. These response-rate differences were due both to greater pre-ratio pausing and to lower local rates tinder the fixed-ratio exchange schedules. Local response rates increased with proximity to food under the higher fixed-ratio exchange schedules, indicative of discriminative control by the tokens. PMID:11599637

  4. Second-order schedules of token reinforcement with pigeons: effects of fixed- and variable-ratio exchange schedules.

    PubMed

    Foster, T A; Hackenberg, T D; Vaidya, M

    2001-09-01

    Pigeons' key pecks produced food under second-order schedules of token reinforcement, with light-emitting diodes serving as token reinforcers. In Experiment 1, tokens were earned according to a fixed-ratio 50 schedule and were exchanged for food according to either fixed-ratio or variable-ratio exchange schedules, with schedule type varied across conditions. In Experiment 2, schedule type was varied within sessions using a multiple schedule. In one component, tokens were earned according to a fixed-ratio 50 schedule and exchanged according to a variable-ratio schedule. In the other component, tokens were earned according to a variable-ratio 50 schedule and exchanged according to a fixed-ratio schedule. In both experiments, the number of responses per exchange was varied parametrically across conditions, ranging from 50 to 400 responses. Response rates decreased systematically with increases in the fixed-ratio exchange schedules, but were much less affected by changes in the variable-ratio exchange schedules. Response rates were consistently higher under variable-ratio exchange schedules than tinder comparable fixed-ratio exchange schedules, especially at higher exchange ratios. These response-rate differences were due both to greater pre-ratio pausing and to lower local rates tinder the fixed-ratio exchange schedules. Local response rates increased with proximity to food under the higher fixed-ratio exchange schedules, indicative of discriminative control by the tokens. PMID:11599637

  5. Insoluble polyelectrolyte and ion-exchange hollow fiber impregnated therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The number of quaternary sites and ion exchange capacity of a polyquaternary, cross linked, insoluble copolymer of a vinyl pyridine and a dihalo organic compound is increased by about 15-35% by reaction of the polymer with an amine followed by quaternization, if required. The polymer forms spontaneously in the presence of a substrate such as within the pores of a hollow fiber. The improved resin impregnated fiber may be utilized to remove ions from waste or process steams.

  6. Ultra-high aspect ratio replaceable AFM tips using deformation-suppressed focused ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Savenko, Alexey; Yildiz, Izzet; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bggild, Peter; Bartenwerfer, Malte; Krohs, Florian; Oliva, Maria; Harzendorf, Torsten

    2013-11-22

    Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio exchangeable and customizable tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) using lateral focused ion beam (FIB) milling is presented. While on-axis FIB milling does allow high aspect ratio (HAR) AFM tips to be defined, lateral milling gives far better flexibility in terms of defining the shape and size of the tip. Due to beam-induced deformation, it has so far not been possible to define HAR structures using lateral FIB milling. In this work we obtain aspect ratios of up to 45, with tip diameters down to 9nm, by a deformation-suppressing writing strategy. Several FIB milling strategies for obtaining sharper tips are discussed. Finally, assembly of the HAR tips on a custom-designed probe as well as the first AFM scanning is shown. PMID:24149369

  7. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Geise, Geoffrey M; Cassady, Harrison J; Paul, Donald R; Logan, Bruce E; Hickner, Michael A

    2014-10-21

    Membrane potential and permselectivity are critical parameters for a variety of electrochemically-driven separation and energy technologies. An electric potential is developed when a membrane separates electrolyte solutions of different concentrations, and a permselective membrane allows specific species to be transported while restricting the passage of other species. Ion exchange membranes are commonly used in applications that require advanced ionic electrolytes and span technologies such as alkaline batteries to ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis, but membranes are often only characterized in sodium chloride solutions. Our goal in this work was to better understand membrane behaviour in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate, which is of interest for closed-loop energy generation processes. Here we characterized the permselectivity of four commercial ion exchange membranes in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and ammonium bicarbonate. This stepwise approach, using four different ions in aqueous solution, was used to better understand how these specific ions affect ion transport in ion exchange membranes. Characterization of cation and anion exchange membrane permselectivity, using these ions, is discussed from the perspective of the difference in the physical chemistry of the hydrated ions, along with an accompanying re-derivation and examination of the basic equations that describe membrane potential. In general, permselectivity was highest in sodium chloride and lowest in ammonium bicarbonate solutions, and the nature of both the counter- and co-ions appeared to influence measured permselectivity. The counter-ion type influences the binding affinity between counter-ions and polymer fixed charge groups, and higher binding affinity between fixed charge sites and counter-ions within the membrane decreases the effective membrane charge density. As a result permselectivity decreases. The charge density and polarizability of the co-ions also appeared to influence permselectivity leading to ion-specific effects; co-ions that are charge dense and have low polarizability tended to result in high membrane permselectivity. PMID:25198913

  8. SELENIUM REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Strong-base anion exchangers were shown to remove selenate and selenite ions from drinking water. Because selenium species are usually present at low concentrations, the efficiency of removal is controlled by the concentration of the common drinking water anions, the most importa...

  9. ION-EXCHANGE PROCESSES AND MECHANISMS IN GLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent performance assessment calculations of a disposal system at Hanford, Washington for low activity waste glass show that a Na ion-exchange reaction can effectively increase the radionuclide release rate by over a factor of 1000 and so is a major factor that currently limits ...

  10. Immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cementitious matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Ramallo, T.; Pahissa, M.H. de; Lavalle, M.; Varani, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the strategy used in the spent ion exchange resins conditioning towards its final disposal as well as the evaluation test results obtained in its immobilization into selected cementitious matrices. Cement formulations have been developed based on blends of Portland cement and ground granulated blast furnace slag with and without zeolite.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF INORGANIC ION EXCHANGERS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is concerned with the development of highly selective inorganic ion exchangers for the removal of primarily Cs+ and Sr2+ from nuclear tank waste and from groundwater. In this study, we will probe the, origins of selectivity through detailed structural studies and th...

  12. Determination of boron in silicates after ion exchange separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1955-01-01

    Existing methods for the determination of boron in silicates are not entirely satisfactory. Separation as the methyl ester is lengthy and frequently erratic. An accurate and rapid method applicable to glass, mineral, ore, and water samples uses ion exchange to remove interfering cations, and boron is determined titrimetrically in the presence of mannitol, using a pH meter to indicate the end point.

  13. Method and solvent composition for regenerating an ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Even, William R.; Irvin, David J.; Irvin, Jennifer A.; Tarver, Edward E.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Wang, James C. F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and composition for removing perchlorate from a highly selective ion exchange resin is disclosed. The disclosed approach comprises treating the resin in a solution of super critical or liquid carbon dioxide and one or more quaternary ammonium chloride surfactant compounds.

  14. EVALUATING ION EXCHANGE FOR REMOVING RADIUM FROM GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article focuses on the results of bench and pilot-scale studies of ion exchange processes for radium removal from groundwater in Lemont, Ill. atch and column studies indicated a very high resin selectivity for radium compared with common cations. xhaustion-regeneration studi...

  15. EVALUATING ION EXCHANGE FOR REMOVING RADIUM FROM GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article, the second in a series, focuses on the results of bench- and pilot-scale studies of ion exchange processes for radium removal from groundwater in Lemont, Ill. Batch and column studies indicated a very high resin selectivity for radium compared with common cations. E...

  16. Thermal Analysis for Ion-Exchange Column System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si Y.; King, William D.

    2012-12-20

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium either in a column configuration or distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the design and operation of a waste treatment process focused on treating dissolved, high-sodium salt waste solutions for the removal of specific radionuclides. The ion exchange column will be installed inside a high level waste storage tank at the Savannah River Site. After cesium loading, the ion exchange media may be transferred to the waste tank floor for interim storage. Models were used to predict temperature profiles in these areas of the system where the cesium-loaded media is expected to lead to localized regions of elevated temperature due to radiolytic decay. Normal operating conditions and accident scenarios (including loss of solution flow, inadvertent drainage, and loss of active cooling) were evaluated for the ion exchange column using bounding conditions to establish the design safety basis. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. In-tank modeling results revealed that an idealized hemispherical mound shape leads to the highest tank floor temperatures. In contrast, even large volumes of CST distributed in a flat layer with a cylindrical shape do not result in significant floor heating.

  17. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...,” February 4, 1998, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ion-exchange resins. 173.25 Section 173.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  18. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ion-exchange resins. 173.25 Section 173.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for...

  19. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ion-exchange resins. 173.25 Section 173.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for...

  20. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...,” February 4, 1998, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ion-exchange resins. 173.25 Section 173.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  1. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...,” February 4, 1998, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ion-exchange resins. 173.25 Section 173.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  2. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants...

  3. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants...

  4. Separation of americium from curium by oxidation and ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jonathan D; Shehee, Thomas C; Clearfield, Abraham; Hobbs, David T

    2012-08-21

    Nuclear energy has the potential to be a clean alternative to fossil fuels, but in order for it to play a major role in the US, many questions about the back end of the fuel cycle must be addressed. One of these questions is the difficult separation of americium from curium. Here, we report the oxidation of Am in two systems, perchloric acid and nitric acid and the affect of changing the acid has on the oxidation. K(d) values were observed and a direct separation factor was calculated and was seen to be as high as 20 for four metal(IV) pillared phosphate phosphonate inorganic organic hybrid ion exchange materials. These ion exchangers are characterized by very low selectivity for cations with low charge but extremely high uptake of ions of high charge. PMID:22827724

  5. Poisson-Fermi Modeling of the Ion Exchange Mechanism of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinn-Liang; Hsieh, Hann-Jeng; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-03-17

    The ion exchange mechanism of the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) crystallized by Liao et al. in 2012 is studied using the Poisson-Fermi theory developed by Liu and Eisenberg in 2014. A cycle of binding and unbinding is proposed to account for the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange function of the NCX molecule. Outputs of the theory include electric and steric fields of ions with different sizes, correlations of ions of different charges, and polarization of water, along with number densities of ions, water molecules, and interstitial voids. We calculate the electrostatic and steric potentials of the four binding sites in NCX, i.e., three Na(+) binding sites and one Ca(2+) binding site, with protein charges provided by the software PDB2PQR. The energy profiles of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions along their respective Na(+) and Ca(2+) pathways in experimental conditions enable us to explain the fundamental mechanism of NCX that extrudes intracellular Ca(2+) across the cell membrane against its chemical gradient by using the downhill gradient of Na(+). Atomic and numerical details of the binding sites are given to illustrate the 3 Na(+):1 Ca(2+) stoichiometry of NCX. The protein NCX is a catalyst. It does not provide (free) energy for transport. All energy for transport in our model comes from the ions in surrounding baths. PMID:26906748

  6. Properties, ion-exchange behavior, and analytical applications of cerium phosphate cation exchangers suitable for column use

    SciTech Connect

    Nilchi, A.; Maragheh, M.G.; Khanchi, A.R.

    1999-06-01

    Some investigations on the preparative procedure of cerium phosphate cation exchangers suitable for column use are reported. A number of novel forms of cerium phosphate compounds in the presence of different salts are synthesized. The properties of these inorganic ion exchangers have been characterized on the basis of chemical analysis, UV, thermal, IR and x-ray diffraction methods. Their ion-exchange properties, chemical stability, and selectivity for certain ions are investigated.

  7. Membrane consisting of polyquaternary amine ion exchange polymer network interpenetrating the chains of thermoplastic matrix polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Wallace, C. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An ion exchange membrane was formed from a solution containing dissolved matrix polymer and a set of monomers which are capable of reacting to form a polyquaternary ion exchange material; for example vinyl pyride and a dihalo hydrocarbon. After casting solution and evaporation of the volatile component's, a relatively strong ion exchange membrane was obtained which is capable of removing anions, such as nitrate or chromate from water. The ion exchange polymer forms an interpenetrating network with the chains of the matrix polymer.

  8. Enigmatic ion-exchange behavior of myo-inositol phosphates.

    PubMed

    Shelor, C Phillip; Liao, Hongzhu; Kadjo, Akinde Florence; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2015-05-01

    The separation of myo-inositol mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, pentakis-, and hexakisphosphate (InsP1, InsP2, InsP3, InsP4, InsP5, InsP6) was carried out using hydroxide eluent ion chromatography. Acid hydrolysis of InsP6 (phytate) was used to prepare a distribution of InsPs, ranging from InsP1 to InsP5's and including unhydrolyzed InsP6. Counting all possible positional isomers (many of which have stereoisomers that will not be separable by conventional ion exchange), 40 chromatographically separable peaks are possible; up to 22 were separated and identified by mass spectrometry. InsPs show unusual ion-exchange behavior in two respects: (a) the retention order is not monotonically related with the charge on the ion and (b) at the same hydroxide eluent concentration, retention is greatly dependent on the eluent metal cation. The retention of InsP3-InsP6 was determined to be controlled by steric factors while elution was influenced by eluent cation complexation. These highly phosphorylated InsPs have a much greater affinity for alkali metals (Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+)) than quaternary ammonium ions. This difference in cation affinity was exploited to improve separation through the use of a tetramethylammonium hydroxide-sodium hydroxide gradient. PMID:25865157

  9. Ion exchange at the critical point of solution.

    PubMed

    Savoy, J D; Baird, J K; Lang, J R

    2016-03-11

    A mixture of isobutyric acid (IBA)+water has an upper critical point of solution at 26.7°C and an IBA concentration of 4.40M. We have determined the Langmuir isotherms for the hydroxide form of Amberlite IRN-78 resin in contact with mixtures of IBA+water at temperatures, 27.0, 29.0, 31.0 and 38.0°C, respectively. The Langmuir plot at 38.0°C forms a straight line. At the three lower temperatures, however, a peak in the Langmuir plot is observed for IBA concentrations in the vicinity of 4.40M. We regard this peak to be a critical effect not only because it is located close to 4.40M, but also because its height becomes more pronounced as the temperature of the isotherm approaches the critical temperature. For concentrations in the vicinity of the peak, the data indicate that the larger isobutyrate ion is rejected by the resin in favor of the smaller hydroxide ion. This reversal of the expected ion exchange reaction might be used to separate ions according to size. Using the Donnan theory of ion exchange equilibrium, we link the swelling pressure to the osmotic pressure. We show that the peak in the Langmuir plot is associated with a maximum in the "osmotic" energy. This maximum has its origin in the concentration derivative of the osmotic pressure, which goes to zero as the critical point is approached. PMID:26884137

  10. A Revised Stern Equation for Ion Exchange at Charged Membranes.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Rivas; Fillous; Villegas

    2001-01-15

    We revised the classical Stern equation for ion exchange at charged membranes using the statistical mechanics concept of chemical potential and ion activity in nonhomogeneous systems. Our proposed equation does not require an iterative procedure to obtain the self-regulated surface charge at the membranes. We predict significant differences with the classical results. When compared with experimental results, our approach not only gives a better fit but also predicts dissociation constants that are physically more reasonable than those from the classical approach. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11121281

  11. RECENT ADVANCES IN ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS AND PROCESSES FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this article was to summarize the recent advances in ion exchange technology for the metal finishing industry. Even though the ion exchange technology is mature and is widely employed in the industry, new applications, approaches and ion exchange materials are emergi...

  12. Treatment of low-activity-level process wastewaters by Continuous Countercurrent Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.; Watson, J.S.; Robinson, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses application of the Thomas model for predicting breakthrough curves from ion exchange column tests, methods for scale-up of experimental small-scaled ion exchange columns to industrial scale columns, and methods for predicting effluent compositions in a continuous countercurrent ion exchange system. 20 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Sorption properties of radiation-cross-linked polymer hydrogels containing ion-exchange fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvova, M. A.; Zhevnyk, V. D.; Pak, V.; Borodin, Y. V.; Kachina, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    Polymer hydrogel modification for soft contact lenses by ion-exchange fibers was studied in this work. The obtained results showed that the ion-exchange fiber modifiers have a number of advantages as compared with ion-exchange resin modifiers.

  14. Hybrid metallic ion-exchanged waveguides for SPR biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bonnault, S.; Bucci, D.; Zermatten, P.. J.; Charette, P. G.; Broquin, J. E.

    2015-02-01

    Glass substrates have been used for decades to create biosensors due to their biocompatibility, low thermal conductivity, and limited fluorescence. Among the different types of sensors, those based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) allow exploitation of the sensing lightwave at the vicinity of the sensor surface where small entities such as DNA or proteins are located. In this paper, ion-exchanged waveguides and SPR are combined to create a multianalyte optical sensor integrated onto glass. First the principle of operation is introduced, then the theoretical analysis and design of the sensing element. Simulations have been carried out using the Aperiodic Fourier Modal Method (AFMM) and a custom software that handles ion-exchange index-profiles. Fabrication and characterization processes are also presented. Finally the first experimental spectra are displayed and discussed. The sensor presents a bulk sensibility of 5000nm/RIU.

  15. Radiation degradation in EPICOR-2 ion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Johnson, D.A.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1990-09-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data base Development -- EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating chemical and physical conditions for organic ion exchange resins contained in several EPICOR-II prefilters. Those prefilters were used during cleanup of contaminated water from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station after the March 1979 accident. The work was performed by EG G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho Engineering Laboratory. This is the final report of this task and summarizes results and analyses of three samplings of ion exchange resins from prefilters PF-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins supplied by Epicor, Inc. to determine the extent of degradation due to the high internal radiation dose received by the organic resins. Results also are compared with those of other researchers. 18 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Long, R.S.; Bailes, R.H.

    1958-04-15

    A process for the recovery of certain metallic ions from aqueous solutions by ion exchange techniques is described. It is applicable to elements such as vanadium, chromium, nnanganese, and the like, which are capable of forming lower valent cations soluble in aqueous solutions and which also form ldgher valent anions soluble in aqueous acidic solutions. For example, small amounts of vanadium occurring in phosphoric acid prepared from phosphate rock may be recovered by reducing the vanadium to a trivalent cation adsorbing; the vanadium in a cationic exchange resin, then treating the resin with a suitable oxidizing agent to convert the adsorbed vanadium to a higher valent state, and finally eluting; the vanadium as an anion from the resin by means of an aqueous acidic solution.

  17. Radon (222Rn) in ground water of fractured rocks: a diffusion/ion exchange model.

    PubMed

    Wood, Warren W; Kraemer, Thomas F; Shapiro, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Ground waters from fractured igneous and high-grade sialic metamorphic rocks frequently have elevated activity of dissolved radon (222Rn). A chemically based model is proposed whereby radium (226Ra) from the decay of uranium (238U) diffuses through the primary porosity of the rock to the water-transmitting fracture where it is sorbed on weathering products. Sorption of 226Ra on the fracture surface maintains an activity gradient in the rock matrix, ensuring a continuous supply of 226Ra to fracture surfaces. As a result of the relatively long half-life of 226Ra (1601 years), significant activity can accumulate on fracture surfaces. The proximity of this sorbed 226Ra to the active ground water flow system allows its decay progeny 222Rn to enter directly into the water. Laboratory analyses of primary porosity and diffusion coefficients of the rock matrix, radon emanation, and ion exchange at fracture surfaces are consistent with the requirements of a diffusion/ion-exchange model. A dipole-brine injection/withdrawal experiment conducted between bedrock boreholes in the high-grade metamorphic and granite rocks at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States (42 degrees 56'N, 71 degrees 43'W) shows a large activity of 226Ra exchanged from fracture surfaces by a magnesium brine. The 226Ra activity removed by the exchange process is 34 times greater than that of 238U activity. These observations are consistent with the diffusion/ion-exchange model. Elutriate isotopic ratios of 223Ra/226Ra and 238U/226Ra are also consistent with the proposed chemically based diffusion/ion-exchange model. PMID:15318778

  18. Radon (222Rn) in ground water of fractured rocks: A diffusion/ion exchange model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.; Kraemer, T.F.; Shapiro, A.

    2004-01-01

    Ground waters from fractured igneous and high-grade sialic metamorphic rocks frequently have elevated activity of dissolved radon (222Rn). A chemically based model is proposed whereby radium (226Ra) from the decay of uranium (238U) diffuses through the primary porosity of the rock to the water-transmitting fracture where it is sorbed on weathering products. Sorption of 226Ra on the fracture surface maintains an activity gradient in the rock matrix, ensuring a continuous supply of 226Ra to fracture surfaces. As a result of the relatively long half-life of 226Ra (1601 years), significant activity can accumulate on fracture surfaces. The proximity of this sorbed 226Ra to the active ground water flow system allows its decay progeny 222Rn to enter directly into the water. Laboratory analyses of primary porosity and diffusion coefficients of the rock matrix, radon emanation, and ion exchange at fracture surfaces are consistent with the requirements of a diffusion/ion- exchange model. A dipole-brine injection/withdrawal experiment conducted between bedrock boreholes in the high-grade metamorphic and granite rocks at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States (42??56???N, 71??43???W) shows a large activity of 226Ra exchanged from fracture surfaces by a magnesium brine. The 226Ra activity removed by the exchange process is 34 times greater than that of 238U activity. These observations are consistent with the diffusion/ion-exchange model. Elutriate isotopic ratios of 223Ra/226Ra and 238U/226Ra are also consistent with the proposed chemically based diffusion/ion-exchange model.

  19. Calculation of the exchange ratio for the Adaptive Maneuvering Logic program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.; Erzberger, H.

    1985-01-01

    Improvements were made to the Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML) computer program, a computer-generated, air-to-air combat opponent. The primary improvement was incorporating a measure of performance, the exchange ratio, defined as the statistical measure of number of enemy kills divided by number of friendly losses. This measure was used to test a new modification of the AML's combat tactics. When the new version of the AML competed against the old version, the new version won with an exchange ratio of 1.4.

  20. Cyanide recycling using strong-base ion-exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Versiane Albis; Ciminelli, Virgnia S. T.; Costa, Renato De Souza

    1998-10-01

    Among the techniques available to recover cyanide and metal cyanocomplexes from diluted streams, ion-exchange resins seem attractive because of the possibility of treating either pulps or clear solutions with this process. This article discusses the results of adsorption and elution of metal cyanocomplexes obtained with industrial effluents and selected data from the literature. The behavior of iron and copper cyanocomplexes during elution is emphasized.

  1. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  2. Water Exchange Rates and Molecular Mechanism around Aqueous Halide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-07-17

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to systematically study the water-exchange mechanism around aqueous chloride, bromide, and iodide ions. Transition state theory, Grote-Hynes theory, and the reactive flux method were employed to compute water exchange rates. We computed the pressure dependence of rate constants and the corresponding activation volumes to investigate the mechanism of the solvent exchange event. The activation volumes obtained using the transition state theory rate constants are negative for all the three anions, thus indicating an associative mechanism. Contrary to the transition state theory results, activation volumes obtained using rate constants from Grote-Hynes theory and the reactive flux method are positive, thus indicating a dissociative mechanism. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this work. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  3. Thermal analysis for ion-exchange column system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; King, W. D.

    2012-07-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silico-titanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. (authors)

  4. Ion exchange extraction of heavy metals from wastewater sludges.

    PubMed

    Al-Enezi, G; Hamoda, M F; Fawzi, N

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals are common contaminants of some industrial wastewater. They find their way to municipal wastewaters due to industrial discharges into the sewerage system or through household chemicals. The most common heavy metals found in wastewaters are lead, copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, mercury, arsenic, and chromium. Such metals are toxic and pose serious threats to the environment and public health. In recent years, the ion exchange process has been increasingly used for the removal of heavy metals or the recovery of precious metals. It is a versatile separation process with the potential for broad applications in the water and wastewater treatment field. This article summarizes the results obtained from a laboratory study on the removal of heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludges obtained from Ardhiya plant in Kuwait. Data on heavy metal content of the wastewater and sludge samples collected from the plant are presented. The results obtained from laboratory experiments using a commercially available ion exchange resin to remove heavy metals from sludge were discussed. A technique was developed to solubilize such heavy metals from the sludge for subsequent treatment by the ion exchange process. The results showed high efficiency of extraction, almost 99.9%, of heavy metals in the concentration range bound in wastewater effluents and sludges. Selective removal of heavy metals from a contaminated wastewater/sludge combines the benefits of being economically prudent and providing the possibility of reuse/recycle of the treated wastewater effluents and sludges. PMID:15027828

  5. Evaluation of Elution Parameters for Cesium Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, Ingrid E.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.; Cook, Bryan J.; Blanchard, David L.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2006-08-28

    Cesium ion exchange is one of the planned processes for treating and disposing of waste at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Radioactive supernatant liquids from the waste tanks will undergo ultrafiltration, followed by cesium ion exchange using a regenerable organic ion exchange resin. Two resins, SuperLig?644 and a Resorcinol-formaldehyde resin are being evaluated for cesium removal and cesium elution characteristics. The main purpose of this study is to optimize the cesium elution to provide a resin which after undergoing elution would meet the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant processing and resin disposal criteria. Columns of each resin type were loaded to greater or equal to 90% breakthrough with a Hanford waste stimulant and eluted with nitric acid. The temperature, flow rate and nitric acid concentration were varied to determine the optimal elution conditions. Temperature and eluant flow rate were the most important elution parameters. As would be predicted based upon kinetic consideration alone, decreasing the eluant flow rate and increasing the temperature provided the optimal elution conditions. Varying the nitric acid concentration did not have a significant effect on the elution; however, elutions performed using both high acid concentration (1M) and elevated temperature (45 C) resulted in resin degradation, causing gas generation and resin bed disruption.

  6. Ion time-of-flight determinations of doubly to singly ionized mercury ion ratios from a mercury electron bombardment discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Kemp, R. F.; Hall, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    Doubly to singly charged mercury ion ratios in electron bombardment ion thruster exhaust beams have been determined as functions of bombardment discharge potential, thrust beam current, thrust beam radial position, acceleration-deceleration voltage ratio, and propellant utilization fraction. A mathematical model for two-step ionization processes has been derived, and calculated ion ratios are compared to observed ratios. Production of Hg(++) appears to result primarily from sequential ionization of Hg(+) in the discharge. Experimental and analytical results are presented, and design, construction, and operation features of an electrostatic deflection ion time-of-flight analyzer for the determination of the above-mentioned ratios are reviewed.

  7. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin - 12088

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, R.L.; Rinehart, D.E.; Brown, G.N.; Peterson, R.A.

    2012-07-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing Cs-137. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50 deg. C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow at elevated temperature (45 deg., 50 deg., 55 deg., 60 deg., 65 deg., 75 deg. C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45 deg. C. Above 60 deg. C the resin appears to not load at all. It was observed that the resin disintegrated at 75 deg. C until not much was left and partially disintegrated at 65 deg. C, which caused the column to plug in both tests after ∼336 hours. The results indicate that WTP will lose resin loading capacity if the ion exchange process is performed above 25 deg. C, and the resin will disintegrate above 65 deg. C. Therefore, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures to perform the ion exchange process with this resin. PNNL and WTP are currently evaluating the operating limits of the resin in further detail. Aging in 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} also caused the resin to lose capacity above 25 deg. C and to completely dissolve at 55 deg. C. Again, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures when eluting the resin with nitric acid in order to maintain resin loading capacity and avoid disintegration of the resin. (authors)

  8. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Jiang, Weilin; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-11-03

    Iron oxide films were deposited onto Si substrates using ion-beam-assisted deposition. The films were ~300 nm thick polycrystalline magnetite with an average crystallite size of ~6 nm. Additionally, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite. However, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction both indicate that the films are single-phase magnetite. Since no direct evidence of a second phase could be found, exchange bias likely arises due to defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples have such small grains, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field. The high energy deposition process results in an oxygen-rich, argon-containing magnetite film with low temperature exchange bias due to defects at the high concentration of grain boundaries.

  9. Charge exchange measurements with an x-ray calorimeter at an electron beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele L.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, F. Scott

    2013-09-01

    We present K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized Mg acquired with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer at a resolution of 4.5 eV in charge exchange recombination experiments using the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap. We measured the Doppler width of Mg11+ Lyα in the same experiments using a high resolution crystal spectrometer, giving an estimate of the ion temperature. We find hardness ratios for Mg11+ ranging from 0.6 to 1.6, depending on the neutral gas target. In most of the experiments, the ion temperature was ˜ 10-15 eV amu-1, indicating that the variations in hardness ratio are intrinsic to the choice of neutral target gas, and are not simply a consequence of variations in the collision velocity resulting from evaporative cooling of the trapped ions. The spectral variations show that high resolution x-ray spectroscopy is highly diagnostic of charge exchange reactions, but requires well-developed theory to interpret.

  10. Indirect UV detection-ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography of common inorganic ions with sulfosalicylic acid eluent.

    PubMed

    Kozaki, Daisuke; Mori, Masanobu; Nakatani, Nobutake; Arai, Kaori; Masuno, Tomoe; Koseki, Masakazu; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe indirect UV detection-ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography (IEC/CEC) on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) using sulfosalicylic acid as the eluent. The goal of the study was to characterize the peaks detected by UV detector. The peak directions of analyte ions in UV at 315 nm were negative because the molar absorbance coefficients of analyte anions and cations were lower than that of the sulfosalicylic acid eluent. Good chromatographic resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios of analyte ions were obtained for the separations performed using 1.1 mM sulfosalicylic acid and 1.5 mM 18-crown-6 as the eluent. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the peak areas ranged from 0.6 to 4.9%. Lower detection limits of the analytes were achieved using indirect UV detection at 315 nm (0.23 - 0.98 ?M) than those obtained with conductometric detection (CD) (0.61 - 2.1 ?M) under the optimized elution conditions. The calibration curves were linear in the range from 0.01 to 1.0 mM except for Cl(-), which was from 0.02 to 2.0 mM. The present method was successfully applied to determine common inorganic ions in a pond water sample. PMID:23303096

  11. Structural Insight into the Ion-Exchange Mechanism of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jun; Li, Hua; Zeng, Weizhong; Sauer, David B.; Belmares, Ricardo; Jiang, Youxing

    2012-06-19

    Sodium/calcium (Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}) exchangers (NCX) are membrane transporters that play an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} for cell signaling. We demonstrated the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}-exchange function of an NCX from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX{_}Mj) and report its 1.9 angstrom crystal structure in an outward-facing conformation. Containing 10 transmembrane helices, the two halves of NCX{_}Mj share a similar structure with opposite orientation. Four ion-binding sites cluster at the center of the protein: one specific for Ca{sup 2+} and three that likely bind Na{sup +}. Two passageways allow for Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} access to the central ion-binding sites from the extracellular side. Based on the symmetry of NCX{_}Mj and its ability to catalyze bidirectional ion-exchange reactions, we propose a structure model for the inward-facing NCX{_}Mj.

  12. Performance evaluation of ion-exchange chromatography in capillary format.

    PubMed

    Eghbali, Hamed; Bruggink, Cees; Agroskin, Yury; Pohl, Christopher A; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2012-12-01

    The performance of a recently introduced capillary ion-exchange chromatography system was explored. Experiments were conducted in isocratic mode with a commercial capillary anion-exchange column (id = 0.4 mm, L = 15 cm) using a five-anion standard mixture. The achieved results were compared to the performance of a standard bore ion-exchange system (id = 4 mm, L = 15 cm), which was considered as a reference. The first-generation capillary columns exhibited a minimal reduced plate-height value below two witnessing a good packing quality and system performance. However, compared to the standard bore system the capillary system displayed an increased apparent C-term which could be due to a difference in packing morphology and/or possible external band-broadening contributions. For fast separations, the standard bore system outperformed the capillary system, while for complex separations both systems performed nearly equally well. In addition, the retention characteristics of the capillary system were investigated. To illustrate the suitability of the capillary system, the analysis of real-world water samples originating from two local Belgian rivers was demonstrated. PMID:23125111

  13. Origin of Selectivity in Tunnel Type Inorganic Ion Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, Abraham; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Medvedev, Dmitri; Delgado, Jose; Nyman, May

    2004-03-29

    The removal of highly radioactive species 137Cs and 90Sr from Weapon's Grade Tank Waste is a daunting task. The tanks normally are 5-7M in Na+, 1-3M in NaOH but only {approx}10-5M in the targeted species. Nevertheless several sorbents and ion exchangers have been found that are sufficiently selective to be considered for remediation purposes. We are involved in a collaborative study, joint with personnel at the Westinghouse Research Center, Sandia National Laboratory and University of Notre Dame to uncover the origins of this selectivity in these compounds. The presentation will be concerned with the framework of titanium silicates with the sitinikite and pharmacosiderite structures. Both compounds have been synthesized as pure titanium silicates or as Nb and Ge substituted forms. Their structures in the sodium and proton forms as well as the Cs+ and Sr2+ ion forms will be described together with insight into the exchange mechanism as determined by in situ X-ray studies of Cs+ exchange utilizing synchrotron radiation.

  14. Continuous ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    A pressurized continuous annular chromatograph (CAC) has been developed for truly continuous ion exchange preparative separations. This device utilizes a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material, fixed multiple feed points, and fixed withdrawal locations. Most of our investigations have been performed with a 28-cm-diam by 60-cm-long CAC, but a larger model has recently been designed and constructed. A detailed study has been made of the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a simulated carbonate leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Recent studies have investigated the ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium from a sulfate feed solution. Nuclear reactor-grade zirconium, containing < 0.01 wt % hafnium, and hafnium, containing < 1% zirconium, have been continuously prepared using cation exchange resin in the pressurized CAC. This device, because of its continuous feed and product withdrawal, its adaptability to largescale operations, and its ability to separate many components, is expected to make chromatography a more competitive process in the industrial sector.

  15. Observations of solar wind ion charge exchange in the Comet Halley coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Goldstein, B. E.; Goldstein, R.; Neugebauer, M.; Ip, W.-H.; Balsiger, H.; Reme, H.

    1991-01-01

    Giotto Ion Mass Spectrometer/High Energy Range Spectrometer (IMS/HERS) observations of solar wind ions show charge exchange effects and solar wind compositional changes in the coma of Comet Halley. As the comet was approached, the He(2+) to proton density ratio increased from 2.5 percent in the solar wind to about 4 percent about 1 hr before closest approach after which time it decreased to about 1 percent. Abrupt increases in this ratio from 2.5 to 4.5 percent were also observed in the beginning and near the end of the so-called Mystery Region. These abrupt increases in the density ratio were well correlated with enhanced fluxes of keV electrons as measured by the Giotto plasma electron spectrometer. The general increase and then decrease of the He(2+) to proton density ratio is quantitatively consistent with a combination of the addition of protons of Cometary origin to the plasma and loss of plasma through charge exchange of protons and He(2+).

  16. Ion-exchange equilibrium of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid on a strong anionic exchanger.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglan; Ke, Xu; Zhang, Xudong; Zhuang, Wei; Zhou, Jingwei; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-09-15

    N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is a high value-added product widely applied in the food industry. A suitable equilibrium model is required for purification of Neu5Ac based on ion-exchange chromatography. Hence, the equilibrium uptake of Neu5Ac on a strong anion exchanger, AD-1 was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The uptake of Neu5Ac by the hydroxyl form of the resin occurred primarily by a stoichiometric exchange of Neu5Ac(-) and OH(-). The experimental data showed that the selectivity coefficient for the exchange of Neu5Ac(-) with OH(-) was a non-constant quantity. Subsequently, the Saunders' model, which took into account the dissociation reactions of Neu5Ac and the condition of electroneutrality, was used to correlate the Neu5Ac sorption isotherms at various solution pHs and Neu5Ac concentrations. The model provided an excellent fit to the binary exchange data for Cl(-)/OH(-) and Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-), and an approximate prediction of equilibrium in the ternary system Cl(-)/Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-). This basic information combined with the general mass transfer model could lay the foundation for the prediction of dynamic behavior of fixed bed separation process afterwards. PMID:25863634

  17. Position-specific measurement of oxygen isotope ratios in cellulose: Isotopic exchange during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, John S.; Cheng, Shuying; Juchelka, Dieter; Loader, Neil J.; McCarroll, Danny; Switsur, V. Roy; Gautam, Lata

    2013-07-01

    We describe the first reported method for the measurement of oxygen isotope ratios at each position in the glucose units of the cellulose molecule. The overall process comprises a series of synthetic organic sequences, by which ?-cellulose is hydrolysed to glucose, and oxygen atoms at specific positions in the glucose molecule are removed in samples of benzoic acid for measurement of ?18O. Values of ?18O at specific positions in cellulose are calculated from these ?18O values and the overall ?18O value of the cellulose. We apply the method to determine the degree to which oxygen atoms at each position undergo isotopic exchange with water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, such as occurs in the cambium of trees. To do this we extract ?-cellulose from wheat seedlings germinated in the dark in aqueous media of differing oxygen isotope ratios. Results indicate that oxygen atoms at positions 5 and 6 (O-5 and O-6 respectively) undergo around 80% exchange with medium water, O-3 undergoes around 50% exchange, and O-2 and O-4 do not undergo isotopic exchange. The results have important implications for extracting palaeoclimatic records from oxygen isotope time series obtained from tree ring cellulose. As O-5 and O-6 undergo significant exchange with medium water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, oxygen isotopes at these positions in tree ring cellulose should carry a predominantly trunk (source) water signal. On the other hand, O-2 and O-4 should retain the isotopic signature of leaf water in tree ring cellulose. Our method therefore potentially enables the separate reconstruction of past temperature and humidity data from oxygen isotope ratios of tree ring cellulose - something that has hitherto not been possible. The measured degrees of isotopic exchange are to some extent unexpected and cannot be fully explained using current biochemical mechanisms, suggesting that knowledge of these processes is incomplete.

  18. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  19. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, T.N. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass.

  20. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-05-23

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature.

  1. Truly incomplete and complex exchanges in prematurely condensed chromosomes of human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to energetic heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon silicon ions, or iron ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Incomplete and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. To verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole-chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after irradiation with the heavy ions of high LET, and consequently the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/microm, the highest LET included in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon iron ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique, which allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy iron ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges; these ratios were higher than those obtained after exposure to 6 Gy gamma rays. After 0.7 Gy of iron ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, which is a likely indication of the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single iron-ion track.

  2. Extraction and ion-exchange behavior of mendelevium (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Buklanov, G.V.; Pkhar, Z.Z.; Lebedev, I.A.; Katargin, N.V.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-09-01

    Medelevium-256 was obtained via multinucleon transfer reactions upon irradiation of /sup 249/Bk by /sup 22/Ne ions from the extracted beam of a U-300 cyclotron. In order to extract mendelevium and separate it from the products of nuclear reactions, an express ion-exchange method using one column with cationite and zinc amalgam in a solution of 1 mole/liter HCl as the eluent was developed. It was shown that under these conditions mendelevium is reduced and washes out as an alkaline earth element. On the basis of the location of the peaks of the elution curves of Sr/sup 2+/, Eu/sup 2+/, and Md/sup 2+/, the value of the ionic radium of Md/sup 2+/ is estimated and is used to estimate the heat of hydration.

  3. Electrically switched cesium ion exchange. FY 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Sukamto, J.P.H.; Schwartz, D.T.; Haight, S.M.; Genders, D.

    1996-12-01

    An electrochemical method for metal ion separations, called Electrically Switched Ion Exchange, is described. Direct oxidation and reduction of an electroactive film attached to an electrode surface is used to load and unload the film with alkali metal cations. The electroactive films under investigation are Ni hexacyanoferrates, which are deposited on the surface by applying an anodic potential to a Ni electrode in a solution containing the ferricyanide anion. Reported film preparation procedures were modified to produce films with improved capacity and stability. Electrochemical behavior of the derivatized electrodes were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and chronocoulometry. The films show selectivity for Cs in concentrated sodium solutions. Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor changes in oxidation state of the film and imaging experiments have demonstrated that the redox reactions are spatially homogenous across the film. Requirements for a bench scale unit were identified.

  4. ION EXCHANGE SUBSTANCES BY SAPONIFICATION OF ALLYL PHOSPHATE POLYMERS

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, J.

    1959-04-14

    An ion exchange resin having a relatively high adsorption capacity tor uranyl ion as compared with many common cations is reported. The resin comprises an alphyl-allyl hydrogen phosphate polymer, the alphyl group being either allyl or a lower alkyl group having up to 5 carbon atoins. The resin is prepared by polymerizing compounds such as alkyl-diallyl phosphate and triallyl phosphate in the presence of a free radical generating substance and then partially hydrolyzing the resulting polymer to cause partial replacement of organic radicals by cations. A preferred free radical gencrating agent is dibenzoyl peroxide. The partial hydrolysis is brought about by refluxing the polymer with concentrated aqueous NaOH for three or four hours.

  5. Solid Phase Luminescence of Several Rare Earth Ions on Ion-Exchange Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Stephen P.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The development and characterization of a novel ion-exchange film for solid-phase fluorometry and phosphorimetry is reported. This new cation-exchange material is suitable for spectroscopic applications in the ultraviolet and visible regions. It is advantageous because it, as a single entity, is easily recovered from solution and mounted in the spectrofluorometers. After preconcentration on the film, the luminescence intensity of lanthanide ions is several orders of magnitude greater than that of the corresponding solution, depending on the volume of solution and the amount of film. This procedure allows emission spectral measurements and determination of lanthanide ions at solution concentrations of < 5 (micro)g/L. The film may be stored for subsequent reuse or as a permanent record of the analysis. The major drawback to the use of the film is slow uptake of analyte due to diffusion limitations.

  6. Drug loading and release properties of ion-exchange resin complexes as a drug delivery matrix.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong Hoon; Park, Kinam

    2008-09-01

    Complexes of ion-exchange resins and dextromethorphan (DM), a model drug, were prepared using different methods including a batch and a column method with different functional groups, ion-exchange capacity, degree of crosslinking, and resin particle size. Drug loading efficiency, release profiles, and scanning electron micrographs were also investigated. Most of the functional groups of resins were loaded with DM after the completion of a double batch method and it was recommended for drug loading into the ion-exchange resin. Using a column method, drug loading could be monitored by simply measuring changes in the pH of the reaction medium since as complex formation reached completion, the pH returned to the initial pH of the eluent due to the limited amount of functional groups available for the exchange. DM could be loaded up to the ratio of 3 (drug): 1 (resin), depending on the physicochemical properties of the resin. As the crosslinking ratio and particle size increased, the drug loading and release rate decreased due to the reduced effective diffusion coefficient and surface area. Assuming that the resin particles are uniform spheres of radius r, release mechanism was evaluated using plots of a Bt-t relationship, where B (=pi(2)D(i)/r(2)) and t are the rate constant and time, respectively. D(i) represents the effective diffusion coefficient of DM inside the resin. The Bt-t plots displayed a straight line indicating that the diffusion of DM in the resin matrix is the rate-controlling step. PMID:18565701

  7. Anion selective membrane. [ion exchange resins and ion exchange membrane electrolytes for electrolytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. S.; Geoffroy, R. R.; Hodgdon, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental anion permselective membranes were prepared and tested for their suitability as cell separators in a chemical redox power storage system being developed at NASA-Lewis Research Center. The goals of long-term (1000 hr) oxidative and thermal stability at 80 C in FeCl3 and CrCl3 electrolytes were met by most of the weak base and strong base amino exchange groups considered in the program. Good stability is exhibited by several of the membrane substrate resins. These are 'styrene' divinylbenzene copolymer and PVC film. At least four membrane systems produce strong flexible films with electrochemical properties (resistivity, cation transfer) superior to those of the 103QZL, the most promising commercial membrane. The physical and chemical properties of the resins are listed.

  8. The Ion-induced Charge-exchange X-ray Emission of the Jovian Auroras: Magnetospheric or Solar Wind Origin?

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Yawei; Schultz, David Robert; Kharchenko, Vasili A; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cravens, Thomas E. E.; Lisse, Carey M.; Dalgarno, A.

    2009-01-01

    A new and more comprehensive model of charge-exchange induced X-ray emission, due to ions precipitating into the Jovian atmosphere near the poles, has been used to analyze spectral observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The model includes for the first time carbon ions, in addition to the oxygen and sulfur ions previously considered, in order to account for possible ion origins from both the solar wind and the Jovian magnetosphere. By comparing the model spectra with newly reprocessed Chandra observations, we conclude that carbon ion emission provides a negligible contribution, suggesting that solar wind ions are not responsible for the observed polar X-rays. In addition, results of the model fits to observations support the previously estimated seeding kinetic energies of the precipitating ions ( 0.7-2 MeV/u), but infer a different relative sulfur to oxygen abundance ratio for these Chandra observations.

  9. THE ION-INDUCED CHARGE-EXCHANGE X-RAY EMISSION OF THE JOVIAN AURORAS: MAGNETOSPHERIC OR SOLAR WIND ORIGIN?

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Yawei; Schultz, David R.; Kharchenko, Vasili A.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Lisse, Carey M. E-mail: schultzd@ornl.gov E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu

    2009-09-10

    A new and more comprehensive model of charge-exchange induced X-ray emission, due to ions precipitating into the Jovian atmosphere near the poles, has been used to analyze spectral observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The model includes for the first time carbon ions, in addition to the oxygen and sulfur ions previously considered, in order to account for possible ion origins from both the solar wind and the Jovian magnetosphere. By comparing the model spectra with newly reprocessed Chandra observations, we conclude that carbon ion emission provides a negligible contribution, suggesting that solar wind ions are not responsible for the observed polar X-rays. In addition, results of the model fits to observations support the previously estimated seeding kinetic energies of the precipitating ions ({approx}0.7-2 MeV u{sup -1}), but infer a different relative sulfur-to-oxygen abundance ratio for these Chandra observations.

  10. Evaluation of Ion Exchange Materials in K Basin Floor Sludge and Potential Solvents for PCB Extraction from Ion Exchange Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.J.; Klinger, G.S.; Bredt, P.R.

    1999-04-10

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. These small amounts are significant from a regulatory standpoint. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). Chemical pretreatment is required to address criticality issues and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Eleven technologies have been evaluated (Papp 1997) as potential pretreatment methods. Based on the evaluations and engineering studies and limited testing, Fluor Daniel Hanford recommended solvent washing of the K Basin sludge, followed by nitric acid dissolution and, potentially, peroxide addition (FDH 1997). The solvent washing (extraction) and peroxide addition would be used to facilitate PCB removal and destruction. Following solvent extraction, the PCBs could be distilled and concentrated for disposal as a low-level waste. The purpose of the work reported here was to continue investigating solvent extraction, first by better identifying the ion exchange materials in the actual sludge samples and then evaluating various solvents for removing the PCBs or possibly dissolving the resins. This report documents some of the process knowledge on ion exchange materials used and spilled in the K Basins and describes the materials identified from wet sieving KE Basin floor and canister sludge and the results of other analyses. Several photographs are included to compare materials and illustrate material behavior. A summary of previous tests on solvent extraction of PCB surrogates from simulant K Basin sludge is also given.

  11. Formation of metallic nanostructures on the surface of ion- exchange glass by focused electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarenko, F. E.; Zhukov, M. V.; Mukhin, I. S.; Golubok, A. O.; Sidorov, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a new method for formation of metallic nanostructures on the surface of ion-exchange glass. The method is based on the interaction of a focused electron beam with ions in ion-exchange glass. In experiments nanostructures with different shapes were obtained, depending on the electrons irradiation conditions.

  12. Ion exchange separation of chromium from natural water matrix for stable isotope mass spectrometric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Bassett, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for separating the Cr dissolved in natural water from matrix elements and determination of its stable isotope ratios using solid-source thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The separation method takes advantage of the existence of the oxidized form of Cr as an oxyanion to separate it from interfering cations using anion-exchange chromatography, and of the reduced form of Cr as a positively charged ion to separate it from interfering anions such as sulfate. Subsequent processing of the separated sample eliminates residual organic material for application to a solid source filament. Ratios for 53Cr/52Cr for National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 979 can be measured using the silica gel-boric acid technique with a filament-to-filament standard deviation in the mean 53Cr/52Cr ratio for 50 replicates of 0.00005 or less. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of radionuclide release from spent ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Su, S.I.; Yim, M.S.

    2000-04-01

    Ion-exchange resins represent one of the most important waste streams in low-level waste management due to the unstabilized nature of the waste form and the large amount of radioactivity contained. To describe the release of radionuclides from ion-exchange resins stored in a disposal facility, a mechanistic release model was developed. The model is based on description of radionuclide migration both in the resin bead phase and the bulk pore water phase within waste containers. This modeling setup provides the capability to describe all the major physical processes taking place for the release of radionuclides. Because of the difficulty in obtaining analytical solutions, the numerical solution approach was employed in this model. The new resin release model was used to examine key processes and parameters in describing radionuclide release. These were found to be diffusion within the bulk pore water phase, flow rate of infiltrating leachant water, concentration of counterions of the leachant water, and sorption during the transport in the bulk pore water phase. Some parameters were found to have little impact in describing the release. These include the interdiffusion coefficient within resin beads and the density and radius of resin beads. Existing simplified modeling approaches were also compared with the new resin release model, and validities of using these simplified models are discussed.

  14. Low-level liquid waste decontamination by ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.O.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.

    1991-12-01

    Improved processes are being developed to treat contaminated liquid wastes that have been and continue to be generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both inorganic and organic ion-exchange methods have given promising results. Nickel and cobalt hexacyanoferrate(2) compounds are extremely selective for cesium removal, with distribution coefficients in excess of 10{sup 6} and remarkable insensitivity to competition from sodium and potassium. They tend to lose effectiveness at pH > {approximately}11, but some formulations are useful for limited periods of time up to pH {approximately}13. Sodium titanate is selective for strontium removal at high pH. The separations are so efficient that simple batch processes can yield large decontamination factors while generating small volumes of solid waste. A resorcinol-based resin developed at the Savannah River Site gave superior cesium removal, compared with other organic ion exchangers; the distribution coefficient was limited primarily by competition from potassium and was nearly independent of sodium. The optimum pH was {approximately}12.5. It was much less effective for strontium removal, which was limited by competition from sodium. 8 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Partitioning of mobile ions between ion exchange polymers and aqueous salt solutions: importance of counter-ion condensation.

    PubMed

    Kamcev, Jovan; Galizia, Michele; Benedetti, Francesco M; Jang, Eui-Soung; Paul, Donald R; Freeman, Benny D; Manning, Gerald S

    2016-02-17

    Equilibrium partitioning of ions between a membrane and a contiguous external solution strongly influences transport properties of polymeric membranes used for water purification and energy generation applications. This study presents a theoretical framework to quantitatively predict ion sorption from aqueous electrolytes (e.g., NaCl, MgCl2) into charged (i.e., ion exchange) polymers. The model was compared with experimental NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 sorption data in commercial cation and anion exchange membranes. Ion sorption in charged polymers was modeled using a thermodynamic approach based on Donnan theory coupled with Manning's counter-ion condensation theory to describe non-ideal behavior of ions in the membrane. Ion activity coefficients in solution were calculated using the Pitzer model. The resulting model, with no adjustable parameters, provides remarkably good agreement with experimental values of membrane mobile salt concentration. The generality of the model was further demonstrated using literature data for ion sorption of various electrolytes in charged polymers, including HCl sorption in Nafion. PMID:26840776

  16. D/H ratios and hydrogen exchangeability of type-II kerogens with increasing thermal maturity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lis, G.P.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of non-exchangeable hydrogen (??Dn) and of carbon were measured in type-II kerogens from two suites of Late Devonian to Early Mississippian black shale, one from the New Albany Shale (Illinois Basin) and the other from the Exshaw Formation (Alberta Basin). The largely marine-derived organic matter had similar original stable isotope ratios, but today the suites of kerogens express gradients in thermal maturity that have altered their chemical and isotopic compositions. In both suites, ??D n values increase with maturation up to a vitrinite reflectance of Ro 1.5%, then level out. Increasing ??Dn values suggest isotopic exchange of organic hydrogen with water-derived deuterium and/or preferential loss of 1H-enriched chemical moieties from kerogen during maturation. The resulting changes in ??Dn values are altering the original hydrogen isotopic paleoenvironmental signal in kerogen, albeit in a systematic fashion. The specific D/H response of each kerogen suite through maturation correlates with H/C elemental ratio and can therefore be corrected to yield paleoenvironmentally relevant information for a calibrated system. With increasing thermal maturity, the abundance of hydrogen in the kerogen that is isotopically exchangeable with water hydrogen (expressed as Hex, in % of total hydrogen) first decreases to reach a minimum at Ro ??? 0.8-1.1%, followed by a substantial increase at higher thermal maturity. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced DOC removal using anion and cation ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Arias-Paic, Miguel; Cawley, Kaelin M; Byg, Steve; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Hardness and DOC removal in a single ion exchange unit operation allows for less infrastructure, is advantageous for process operation and depending on the water source, could enhance anion exchange resin removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Simultaneous application of cationic (Plus) and anionic (MIEX) ion exchange resin in a single contact vessel was tested at pilot and bench scales, under multiple regeneration cycles. Hardness removal correlated with theoretical predictions; where measured hardness was between 88 and 98% of the predicted value. Comparing bench scale DOC removal of solely treating water with MIEX compared to Plus and MIEX treated water showed an enhanced DOC removal, where removal was increased from 0.5 to 1.25 mg/L for the simultaneous resin application compared to solely applying MIEX resin. A full scale MIEX treatment plant (14.5 MGD) reduced raw water DOC from 13.7 mg/L to 4.90 mg/L in the treated effluent at a bed volume (BV) treatment rate of 800, where a parallel operation of a simultaneous MIEX and Plus resin pilot (10 gpm) measured effluent DOC concentrations of no greater than 3.4 mg/L, even at bed volumes of treatment 37.5% greater than the full scale plant. MIEX effluent compared to simultaneous Plus and MIEX effluent resulted in differences in fluorescence intensity that correlated to decreases in DOC concentration. The simultaneous treatment of Plus and MIEX resin produced water with predominantly microbial character, indicating the enhanced DOC removal was principally due to increased removal of terrestrially derived organic matter. The addition of Plus resin to a process train with MIEX resin allows for one treatment process to remove both DOC and hardness, where a single brine waste stream can be sent to sewer at a full-scale plant, completely removing lime chemical addition and sludge waste disposal for precipitative softening processes. PMID:26624231

  18. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Safdar; Shimizu, Erina; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2015-07-01

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations.

  19. Principles of fuel ion ratio measurements in fusion plasmas by collective Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stejner, M.; Nielsen, S. K.; Bindslev, H.; Korsholm, S. B.; Salewski, M.

    2011-06-01

    For certain scattering geometries collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements are sensitive to the composition of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. CTS therefore holds the potential to become a new diagnostic for measurements of the fuel ion ratioi.e. the tritium to deuterium density ratio. Measurements of the fuel ion ratio will be important for plasma control and machine protection in future experiments with burning fusion plasmas. Here we examine the theoretical basis for fuel ion ratio measurements by CTS. We show that the sensitivity to plasma composition is enhanced by the signatures of ion cyclotron motion and ion Bernstein waves which appear for scattering geometries with resolved wave vectors near perpendicular to the magnetic field. We investigate the origin and properties of these features in CTS spectra and give estimates of their relative importance for fuel ion ratio measurements.

  20. Sorption of uranyl ions from various acido systems by amphoteric epoxy amine ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Rychkov, V.N.; Radionov, B.K.; Molochnikov, L.S.

    1995-03-01

    Sorption of uranyl ions by epoxy amine ampholytes with N-monomethylenephosphonic acid groups modified with pyridine or quaternary ammonium groups was studied under dynamic conditions. Heterocyclic nitrogen favors sorption of uranyl ion from fluoride, sulfate, and fluoride-sulfate solutions. The ESR studies of mono- and bimetallic forms of nitrogen-containing ampholytes with copper(II) as paramagnetic marker revealed the characteristics of uranium(VI) interaction with cation- and anion-exchange groups and its dependence on the fluoride content in solution.

  1. Comparison of inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium, strontium, and transuranic elements from K-basin water

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; DesChane, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    The work presented in this report was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the Efficient Separations and Crosscutting Program (ESP), Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this work was to investigate radionuclide uptake by several newly produced ion exchange materials under actual waste conditions, and to compare the performance of those materials with that of commercially available ion exchangers. The equilibrium uptake data presented in this report are useful for identifying potential materials that are capable of removing cesium and strontium from 105-KE Basin water. The data show the relative selectivities of the ion exchange materials under similar operating conditions. Additional flow studies are needed to predict material capacities and to develop complete ion exchange process flow sheets. The materials investigated in this study include commercially available ion exchangers such as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 (manufactured by UOP), clinoptilolite (a naturally occurring zeolite), and materials produced on an experimental basis by AlliedSignal (biotites and nonatitanates), 3M (hexacyanoferrates), Selion Technologies, Inc. (hexacyanoferrates and titanates), and Texas A&M University (pharmacosiderites, biotites, and nonatitanates). In all, the performance of 14 ion exchange materials was evaluated at two solution-to-exchanger mass ratios (i.e., 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5}) using actual 105-KE Basin water. Evaluation consisted of determining cesium and strontium batch distribution coefficients, loading, and decontamination factors. Actual 105-KE Basin water was obtained from a sample collected during the sludge dissolution work conducted by PNNL in FY 1996. This sample was taken from the bottom of the basin and contained significantly higher concentrations of the radioactive constituents than do samples taken from the top of the basin.

  2. Planar optical waveguides fabricated by Ag+/K+-Na+ ion exchange in soda lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, Ahmad; Gregorius, Seran Daton; Widhianingsih, Ika; Lestari, Siti; Suryawan, Joko

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the optical properties of the optical planar waveguides in a soda lime glass fabricated by ion exchange. Planar waveguide fabrication was carried out by immersing the soda lime glass in molten 100 % AgNO3 bath for different duration (ranging from 15 minutes to 735 minutes) and at temperature of 280°C. The results show that the surface refractive index values of the ion exchanged glasses are independent of both the ion exchange duration and temperature. The number of modes and the effective diffusion depth, however, increase with increasing the duration of ion exchange process.

  3. Exploiting the ion-exchange ability of titanate nanotubes in a model water softening process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madarsz, Dniel; Szenti, Imre; Spi, Andrs; Halsz, Jnos; Kukovecz, kos; Knya, Zoltn

    2014-01-01

    Titanate nanotubes were utilized in Ca2+ and Mg2+ removal in a continuous ion-exchange unit. Three consecutive water softening-regeneration cycles were performed. The highest measured value of the total ion-exchange capacity was 1.2 mmol g-1 which decreased to 0.66 mmol g-1 in the third cycle. The capacity loss was due to the irreversible binding of Ca2+ ions to very strong adsorption sites, while the Mg2+/Na+ exchange was reversible. A relatively fast initial adsorption step and a subsequent slower concentration decrease were the two processes that governed the kinetics of the ion exchange reaction.

  4. Small Column Ion Exchange Design and Safety Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, T.; Rios-Armstrong, M.; Edwards, R.; Herman, D.

    2011-02-07

    Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) is a transformational technology originally developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM-30) office and is now being deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to significantly increase overall salt processing capacity and accelerate the Liquid Waste System life-cycle. The process combines strontium and actinide removal using Monosodium Titanate (MST), Rotary Microfiltration, and cesium removal using Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST, specifically UOP IONSIV{reg_sign}IE-911 ion exchanger) to create a low level waste stream to be disposed in grout and a high level waste stream to be vitrified. The process also includes preparation of the streams for disposal, e.g., grinding of the loaded CST material. These waste processing components are technically mature and flowsheet integration studies are being performed including glass formulations studies, application specific thermal modeling, and mixing studies. The deployment program includes design and fabrication of the Rotary Microfilter (RMF) assembly, ion-exchange columns (IXCs), and grinder module, utilizing an integrated system safety design approach. The design concept is to install the process inside an existing waste tank, Tank 41H. The process consists of a feed pump with a set of four RMFs, two IXCs, a media grinder, three Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), and all supporting infrastructure including media receipt and preparation facilities. The design addresses MST mixing to achieve the required strontium and actinide removal and to prevent future retrieval problems. CST achieves very high cesium loadings (up to 1,100 curies per gallon (Ci/gal) bed volume). The design addresses the hazards associated with this material including heat management (in column and in-tank), as detailed in the thermal modeling. The CST must be size reduced for compatibility with downstream processes. The design addresses material transport into and out of the grinder and includes provisions for equipment maintenance including remote handling. The design includes a robust set of nuclear safety controls compliant with DOE Standard (STD)-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process. The controls cover explosions, spills, boiling, aerosolization, and criticality. Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) including seismic event, tornado/high wind, and wildland fire are considered. In addition, the SCIX process equipment was evaluated for impact to existing facility safety equipment including the waste tank itself. SCIX is an innovative program which leverages DOE's technology development capabilities to provide a basis for a successful field deployment.

  5. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of nano-composite ion-exchanger; its adsorption behavior.

    PubMed

    Nabi, S A; Shahadat, Mohammad; Bushra, Rani; Shalla, A H; Azam, A

    2011-10-01

    A novel organic-inorganic nanocomposite cation-exchanger has been synthesized via sol-gel method. It was characterized on the basis of FTIR, XRD, SEM, TEM, AFM and Raman studies. The structural studies reveal semi-crystalline nature of the material with the particle size ranging from 1-5 nm. Physiochemical properties such as ion-exchange capacity, chemical and thermal stability of composite material have also been determined. Bifunctional behavior of the material has been indicated by its pH titrations curves. The nanocomposite material exhibits improved thermal stability, higher ion-exchange capacity and better selectivity for toxic heavy metals. The ion-exchange material shows an ion-exchange capacity of 1.8 meq g(-1) for Na(+) ions. Sorption behavior of metal ions on the material was studied in different solvents. The cation exchanger was found to be selective for Pb(II), Hg(II) and Zr(IV) ions. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) for Pb(II) ion was found to be 0.85 and 2.85 ?g L(-1). Analytically important separations of heavy metal ions in synthetic mixtures as well as industrial effluents and natural water were achieved with the exchanger. The practical utility of polyanilineZr(IV)sulphosalicylate cation exchanger has been established for the analysis and recovery of heavy metal ions in environmental samples. PMID:21640566

  7. Photoluminescence response of terbium-exchanged MFI-type materials to Si/Al ratio, texture, and hydration state.

    PubMed

    Tiseanu, Carmen; Kumke, Michael U; Parvulescu, Vasile I; Gessner, André; Gagea, Bogdan C; Martens, Johan A

    2006-12-28

    Terbium-exchanged MFI zeolite type materials, i.e., microporous-mesoporous Zeotile-1 with the Si/Al ratio in the range 33-200, Zeogrid with the Si/Al ratio of 75, and nanocrystalline MFI with the Si/Al ratio of 75, were prepared via an ion exchange procedure. All of these zeolites were investigated by means of time-resolved photoluminescence techniques in various hydration states: as-synthesized (hydrated), calcined (heated at 450 degrees C in air), and rehydrated (after a six-month exposure to the atmospheric moisture). The photoluminescence decays and spectra were analyzed by discrete exponential fitting, distribution lifetimes analysis, and area-normalized time-resolved photoluminescence spectra. The results sustained a single average terbium species coordinated to both water molecules and framework oxygens in the hydrated zeolites. The framework contribution increased with the Si/Al ratio in Zeotile-1 and was greatest for the nanocrystalline MFI zeolite. For the calcined Zeotile-1 and Zeogrid, two main terbium species of different environments were found. For the nanocrystalline Tb3+-MFI, a distinct number of species could not be inferred, indicating a more heterogeneous distribution. Rehydration further differentiated among the Tb3+-exchanged zeolites. Photoluminescence line shape and decay of Tb3+-Zeotile-1 were between those of the hydrated and calcined states indicating a slow rehydration rate in contrast with the photoluminescence properties of Tb3+-MFI, which fully recovered the values of the hydrated state. Tb3+-Zeogrid presented an intermediate case: while the PL line shape was fully restored to that measured for the hydrated sample, the decay was still longer than that measured with the hydrated sample. Terbium photoluminescence response related to zeolite texture, Si/Al ratio, and hydration state suggest different sitting and location of terbium in Zeotile-1, Zeogrid, and nanocrystalline MFI materials. In mesoporous Zeotile-1 and Zeogrid, the results sustained two types of terbium sites: one on the internal surface of mesopores, the other inside the pores, while for the nanocrystalline MFI, terbium sites inside the pores predominate. PMID:17181210

  8. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    SciTech Connect

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species.

  9. Molecular exchange of metal ions and tissular calcium overload.

    PubMed

    Anghileri, Leopold J; Thouvenot, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo, mouse tissues assayed for 45Ca2+ uptake have shown that ATP increases the Ca2+ take-up in the presence of lactates of iron and aluminum, but this effect is absent with the citrates. The in vitro metal ion exchange with ATP has been demonstrated by electrophoresis and by chromatography. It is considered the cause of the increased capacity of ATP to modify the cellular effects of lactates. The in vitro modifications of Ca2+ uptake by lactates when in the presence of ATP are much more important than those of citrate. In general, aluminum compounds show a higher Ca2+ uptake and, coincidentally, they have shown a higher carcinogenic capacity than iron ATP. PMID:15235153

  10. Copper ion-exchanged channel waveguides optimization for optical trapping.

    PubMed

    Reshak, A H; Khor, K N; Shahimin, M M; Murad, S A Z

    2013-08-01

    Optical trapping of particles has become a powerful non-mechanical and non-destructive technique for precise particle positioning. The manipulation of particles in the evanescent field of a channel waveguide potentially allows for sorting and trapping of several particles and cells simultaneously. Channel waveguide designs can be further optimized to increase evanescent field prior to the fabrication process. This is crucial in order to make sure that the surface intensity is sufficient for optical trapping. Simulation configurations are explained in detail with specific simulation flow. Discussion on parameters optimization; physical geometry, optical polarization and wavelength is included in this paper. The effect of physical, optical parameters and beam spot size on evanescent field has been thoroughly discussed. These studies will continue toward the development of a novel copper ion-exchanged waveguide as a method of particle sorting, with biological cell propulsion studies presently underway. PMID:23726859

  11. Charge-exchange collisions between ultracold fermionic lithium atoms and calcium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haze, Shinsuke; Saito, Ryoichi; Fujinaga, Munekazu; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Charge-exchange collisions between ultracold fermionic 6Li atoms and Ca40+ ions are observed in the millikelvin temperature range. The reaction product of the charge-exchange collision is identified via mass spectrometry during which the motion of the ions is excited parametrically. The cross sections of the charge-exchange collisions between 6Li atoms in the ground state and Ca40+ ions in the ground and metastable excited states are determined. Investigation of the inelastic collision characteristics in the atom-ion mixture is an important step toward ultracold chemistry based on ultracold atoms and ions.

  12. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; McCloy, John S.

    2014-11-07

    Iron oxide films were produced using ion-beam-assisted deposition, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction indicate single-phase magnetite. However, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite, suggesting greater than normal disorder. Low temperature magnetometry and first-order reversal curve measurements show strong exchange bias, which likely arises from defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples contain grains ?6?nm, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field.

  13. Peptide Orientation Affects Selectivity in Ion-Exchange Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Andrew J.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Smith, Richard D.; Mechtler, Karl; Mitulovic, Goran; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J.

    2010-06-15

    Here we demonstrate that separation of proteolytic peptides, having the same net charge and one basic residue, is affected by their specific orientation toward the stationary phase in ion-exchange chromatography. In electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) with an anion-exchange material, the C-terminus of the peptides is, on average, oriented toward the stationary phase. In cation exchange, the average peptide orientation is the opposite. Data with synthetic peptides, serving as orientation probes, indicate that in tryptic/Lys-C peptides the C-terminal carboxyl group appears to be in a zwitterionic bond with the side chain of the C-terminal Lys/Arg residue. In effect, the side chain is then less basic than the N-terminus, accounting for the specific orientation of tryptic and Lys-C peptides. Analyses of larger sets of peptides, generated from lysates by either Lys-N, Lys-C, or trypsin, reveal that specific peptide orientation affects the ability of harged side chains, such as phosphate residues, to influence retention. Phosphorylated residues that are remote in the sequence from the binding site affect retention less than those that are closer. When a peptide contains multiple charged sites, then orientation is observed to be less rigid and retention tends to be governed by the peptide’s net charge rather than its sequence. These general observations could be of value in confirming a peptide’s identification and, in particular, phosphosite assignments in proteomics analyses. More generally, orientation accounts for the ability of chromatography to separate peptides of the same compositionbut different sequence.

  14. Peptide Orientation Affects Selectivity in Ion-Exchange Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Andrew J.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Smith, R. D.; Mechtler, Karl; Mitulovic, Goran; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J.

    2010-06-15

    Here we demonstrate that separation of proteolytic peptides, having the same net charge and one basic residue, is affected by their specific orientation toward the stationary phase in ion-exchange chromatography. In electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) with an anion-exchange material, the C-terminus of the peptides is, on average, oriented toward the stationary phase. In cation exchange, the average peptide orientation is the opposite. Data with synthetic peptides, serving as orientation probes, indicate that in tryptic/ Lys-C peptides the C-terminal carboxyl group appears to be in a zwitterionic bond with the side chain of the C-terminal Lys/Arg residue. In effect, the side chain is then less basic than the N-terminus, accounting for the specific orientation of tryptic and Lys-C peptides. Analyses of larger sets of peptides, generated from lysates by either Lys-N, Lys-C, or trypsin, reveal that specific peptide orientation affects the ability of charged side chains, such as phosphate residues, to influence retention. Phosphorylated residues that are remote in the sequence from the binding site affect retention less than those that are closer. When a peptide contains multiple charged sites, then orientation is observed to be less rigid and retention tends to be governed by the peptide’s net charge rather than its sequence. These general observations could be of value in confirming a peptide’s identification and, in particular, phosphosite assignments in proteomics analyses. More generally, orientation accounts for the ability of chromatography to separate peptides of the same composition but different sequence.

  15. Kinetics of cadmium ion sorption on ion exchange and chelating resins

    SciTech Connect

    Bilba, D.; Bilba, N.; Albu, M.

    1999-11-01

    Cadmium sorption from aqueous solutions on sulfonic (C-150) and iminodiacetic (S-930) Purolite macroporous resins was investigated. The influence of operating variables such as initial pH, Cd(II) concentration, time and temperature on the equilibrium parameters was measured. The ion preference and sorption ability of resins, i.e., binding constant (b) and saturation capacity (x{sub m}), derived from sorption isotherm, depend on the functional group structure. The Cd(II) uptake is only particle diffusion controlled. The kinetic parameters, i.e., t{sub 1/2} values for 50% attainment of equilibrium sorption, rate constant ({bar K}) and diffusion coefficient ({bar D}) are higher on the sulfonic resin. The moving boundary particle diffusion model fits the entire ion sorption process on chelating resin, but only the initial sorption on the sulfonic resin, confirming the difference in chemistry between chelation and ion exchange.

  16. Selective Sensing of Multi-Inorganic Ions Using Ion Exchange Fiber Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Saori; Aoki, Hidemitsu; Kumeta, Kazuhiro; Hata, Yasuto; Kimura, Chiharu; Sugino, Takashi

    2009-04-01

    A biological and chemical sensor with a rapid response has been required for monitoring our health conditions and the purity of tap water for personal use. We have succeeded in the selective detection of multi-inorganic ions simultaneously using an ion-exchange fiber film. A kind of ion in a solution containing two kinds of cation could be detected by measuring the difference of adsorption force to the film. Moreover, we have succeeded in simultaneous sensing with concentrations as low as 10-5 mol/l using double layered films of cation and anion. Using the fiber film, we can easily achieve multi-layered structure stack and integration into the sensing devices. There is a high potentiality that the film is applicable to a high-performance device for biological sensing.

  17. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns Using Experimental Data from SRS Simulated Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-15

    Non-elutable ion exchange using crystalline silicotitanate is being considered for removing cesium from Savannah River Site radioactive waste. The construction cost of this process depends strongly on the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications.

  18. REMOVAL OF URANIUM FROM DRINKING WATER BY ION EXCHANGE AND CHEMICAL CLARIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot demonstration was conducted of ion exchange and chemical clarification equipment for removing uranium from drinking water. Four commercial-type ion exchange columns and a prefiltering and regeneration solution system were constructed along with a pilot-scale chemical clar...

  19. Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment, chemical recovery, separation, purification, catalysis, desalination, and ore treatment. Regeneration and disposal of ion exchange resins are also covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment, chemical recovery, separation, purification, catalysis, desalination, and ore treatment. Regeneration and disposal of ion exchange resins are also covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  1. High speed ion exchange techniques for neptunium, plutonium, and uranium impurity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, III, S L

    1988-01-01

    Rapid, efficient ion exchange separations can be performed 10 to 15 times faster than conventional flow rates by using a modified commercial vacuum extraction system and small particle resins. At the Savannah River Plant (SRP), these techniques are being applied to make ion exchange separation techniques more rapid and thus more practical for routine laboratory applications.

  2. Nanomaterials-Enhanced Electrically Switched Ion Exchange Process for Water Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Jun; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of our work is to develop an electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) system based on conducting polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites as a new and cost-effective approach for removal of radioactive cesium, chromate, and perchlorate from contaminated groundwater. The ESIX technology combines ion exchange and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible method for the removal of target species from wastewater. In this technique, an electroactive ion exchange layer is deposited on a conducting substrate, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulation of the potential of the layer. ESIX offers the advantages of highly-efficient use of electrical energy combined with no secondary waste generation. Recently, we have improved upon the ESIX process by modifying the conducting substrate with carbon nanotubes prior to the deposition of the electroactive ion exchanger. The nanomaterial-based electroactive ion exchange technology will remove cesium-137, chromate, and perchlorate rapidly from wastewater. The high porosity and high surface area of the electroactive ion exchange nanocomposites results in high loading capacity and minimize interferences for non-target species. Since the ion adsorption/desorption is controlled electrically without generating a secondary waste, this electrically active ion exchange process is a green process technology that will greatly reduce operating costs.

  3. Tube vibration in industrial size test heat exchanger (pitch-to-diameter ratio 1. 42)

    SciTech Connect

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J.M.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1986-12-01

    Continuing an ongoing experimental program, typical industrial shell-and-tube heat exchanger configurations were investigated systematically for the occurrence of potentially damaging tube vibration as a function of flowrate. Results from shellside water flow tests of nine additional exchanger configurations are reported. Eight test cases covered tube bundles with four different triangular and square layouts with a pitch-to-diameter ratio (P/D) of 1.42 to provide comparison with previous P/D = 1.25 tests. Two baffle edge orientations were tested. An additional test case involved a design fix. The testing focused on identifying the lowest critical flowrates that initiate fluidelastic instability and/or large amplitude tube motion, and finding the location within the bundle of the tubes where these responses were first experienced. The threshold flowrates were determined by a combination of methods based on sensory observations, vibration amplitude data, and frequency response information. Instability criteria were preliminarily evaluated. Overall shellside pressure drop and incremental pressure drops across sections of the exchanger are reported for all configurations.

  4. Intermediate-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.D.

    2001-02-15

    Ion exchange tests have been completed at the Savannah River Technology Center for British Nuclear Fuels Limited, Inc. as part of the Hanford River Protection Project. Radioactive cesium and technetium (pertechnetate form only) were removed by ion exchange from a sample of Envelope C salt solution from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102 (sample volume: approximately 17 L at 4.8 M Na plus). The original sample was diluted and subjected to strontium/transuranics (Sr/TRU) precipitation and filtration processes before ion exchange processing was performed. Batch contact and column tests for the ion exchange removal of cesium and technetium were then completed on the Sr/TRU-decontaminated product. Previous ion exchange tests were conducted on a smaller portion (0.5 L) of the Tank 241-AN-102 supernate sample, which had been similarly pretreated, and the results were reported in a separate document.

  5. Intermediate-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.D.

    2001-09-10

    Ion exchange tests have been completed at the Savannah River Technology Center for British Nuclear Fuels Limited, Inc. as part of the Hanford River Protection Project. Radioactive cesium and technetium (pertechnetate form only) were removed by ion exchange from a sample of Envelope C salt solution from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102 (sample volume: approximately 18 L at 4.8 M Na plus). The original sample was diluted and subjected to strontium/transuranics (Sr/TRU) precipitation and filtration processes before ion exchange processing was performed. Batch contact and column tests for the ion exchange removal of cesium and technetium were then completed on the Sr/TRU-decontaminated product. Previous ion exchange tests were conducted on a smaller portion (0.5 L) of the Tank 241-AN-102 supernate sample, which had been similarly pretreated, and the results were reported in a separate document.

  6. Ion-exchange selectivities of periderm and cuticular membranes toward alkali cations

    SciTech Connect

    Ersoz, M.; Duncan, H.J.

    1994-08-01

    The ion-exchange selectivities of lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium on isolated potato periderm (Solanum tuberosum) and pear fruit cuticular membranes were investigated; the general order of preference both for cation selectivities and ion-exchange capacities was lithium > sodium > potassium > cesium. The potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes exhibited a behavior typical of ion-exchange resins of the weak acid type. At constant pH 7, the ion-exchange capacities of periderm and cuticular membranes increased with hydrated ionic radius, and also with increasing pH and neutral salt concentration, and decreased with crystal ionic radius. Counterion selectivities also exhibited the same behavior. The ion-exchange properties are discussed in terms of the structure and function of potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes.

  7. Truly Incomplete and Complex Chromosomal Exchanges in Human Fibroblast Cells Exposed In Situ to Energetic Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG 1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Incomplete and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allow identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, which is a likely indication of the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track.

  8. Physicochemical basis of the ion-exchange separation of gold cyanide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononova, O. N.; Kononov, Yu. S.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism of the separation of gold cyanide complexes is discussed, along with ion exchanger selection, selectivity, elution, and industrial applications. The ion-exchange mechanism for the sorption of gold cyanide complexes is established, and a criterion is suggested for selecting the anion exchanger for their extraction (specifically, the p K a of the anion exchanger). The selectivity of the sorption of gold cyanide complexes by anion exchangers with rarely distributed ionogenic groups is demonstrated. A procedure for the elution of gold cyanide complexes using alkaline solutions is developed.

  9. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients following an interruption of flow to the column were calculated. The transient calculations were terminated after the maximum resin bed temperature reached the Technical Standard of 60 C, which was set to prevent significant resin degradation. The LANL column differs from the FWR column in that it has a significantly smaller radius, 3.73 cm nominal versus approximately 28 cm. It follows that natural convection removes heat much more effectively from the LANL column, so that the column may reach thermal equilibrium. Consequently, the calculations for a flow interruption were extended until an approach to thermal equilibrium was observed. The LANL ion exchange process also uses a different resin than was used in the FWR column. The LANL column uses Reillex HPQ{trademark} resin, which is more resistant to attack by nitric acid than the Ionac 641{trademark} resin used in the FWR column. Heat generation from the resin oxidation reaction with nitric acid is neglected in this analysis since LANL will be treating the resin to remove the LTE prior to loading the resin in the columns. Calculations were performed using a finite difference computer code, which incorporates models for absorption and elution of plutonium and for forced and natural convection within the resin bed. Calculations for normal column operation during loading were performed using an initial temperature and a feed temperature equal to the ambient air temperature. The model for the normal flow calculations did not include natural convection within the resin bed. The no flow calculations were started with the temperature and concentration profiles at the end of the loading stage, when there would be a maximum amount of plutonium either adsorbed on the resin or in the feed solution in the column.

  10. Application of the new thermodynamic approach to the description of superequivalent sorption by ion exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, O. N.

    2014-08-01

    Using the example of sorption systems with the participation of amino acids, it is shown that the novel thermodynamic approach to describing superequivalent sorption as a combination of ion exchange and nonexchangeable absorption allows us to adequately describe such equilibria. Results from calculating the activity coefficients of components of a sorbent phase and the thermodynamic constants of ion exchange equilibrium and the superequivalent absorption of phenylalanine by AV-17-8 anion exchange resin are presented.

  11. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  12. The effect of electron beam irradiation on silver-sodium ion exchange in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, Alexander I.; Prosnikov, Mikhail A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown experimentally that electron irradiation of sodium-silicate glasses makes possible the control of the subsequent ion exchange Ag+ ↔ Na+ process in a salt melt. The reason of this effect is the negatively charged regions formation in a glass volume during electron irradiation. The electric field, produced by these regions in glass volume, results in positive Na+ ions field migration into them. The spatial redistribution of Na+ ions results in the decrease of the ion exchange efficiency, or the ion exchange can be even blocked. This led to the decrease of the luminescence intensity of neutral silver molecular clusters in the irradiated zone, and effect on the silver nanoparticles formation during the subsequent thermal treatment. The observed effects can be used for the control of ion exchange processes during integrated optics devices fabrication, and for the electron-beam recording of optical information.

  13. THERMAL MODELING OF ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS WITH SPHERICAL RF RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2009-12-30

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal performance of RF columns fully loaded with radioactive cesium. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated during Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process upset conditions with a focus on implementation at Hanford. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results will provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on RF. The current full-scale design for the SCIX system includes a central cooling tube, and one objective of these calculations was to examine its elimination to simplify the design. Results confirmed that a column design without a central cooling tube is feasible for RF, allowing for the possibility of significant design simplifications if it can be assumed that the columns are always filled with liquid. With active cooling through the four outer tubes, the maximum column diameter expected to maintain the temperature below the assumed media and safety limits is 26 inches, which is comparable to the current design diameter. Additional analysis was conducted to predict the maximum column temperatures for the previously unevaluated accident scenario involving inadvertent drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, with retention of the ion exchange media and cesium in the column. As expected, much higher maximum temperatures are observed in this case due to the poor heat transfer properties of air versus liquid. For this hypothetical accident scenario involving inadvertent and complete drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, the modeling results indicate that the maximum temperature within a 28 inch diameter RF column with external cooling is expected to exceed 250 C within 2 days, while the maximum temperature of a 12 inch column is maintained below 100 C. In addition, the calculation results demonstrate that the cooling tube system external to an air-filled column is not highly effective at reducing the maximum temperature, but the baseline design using a central cooling tube inside the column provides sufficient cooling to maintain the maximum temperature near the assumed safety limit.

  14. Ion Exchange Technology Development in Support of the Urine Processor Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Julie; Broyan, James; Pickering, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The urine processor assembly (UPA) on the International Space Station (ISS) recovers water from urine via a vacuum distillation process. The distillation occurs in a rotating distillation assembly (DA) where the urine is heated and subjected to sub-ambient pressure. As water is removed, the original organics, salts, and minerals in the urine become more concentrated and result in urine brine. Eventually, water removal will concentrate the urine brine to super saturation of individual constituents, and precipitation occurs. Under typical UPA DA operating conditions, calcium sulfate or gypsum is the first chemical to precipitate in substantial quantity. During preflight testing with ground urine, the UPA achieved 85% water recovery without precipitation. However, on ISS, it is possible that crewmember urine can be significantly more concentrated relative to urine from ground donors. As a result, gypsum precipitated in the DA when operating at water recovery rates at or near 85%, causing the failure and subsequent re14 NASA Tech Briefs, September 2013 placement of the DA. Later investigations have demonstrated that an excess of calcium and sulfate will cause precipitation at water recovery rates greater than 70%. The source of the excess calcium is likely physiological in nature, via crewmembers' bone loss, while the excess sulfate is primarily due to the sulfuric acid component of the urine pretreatment. To prevent gypsum precipitation in the UPA, the Precipitation Prevention Project (PPP) team has focused on removing the calcium ion from pretreated urine, using ion exchange resins as calcium removal agents. The selectivity and effectiveness of ion exchange resins are determined by such factors as the mobility of the liquid phase through the polymer matrix, the density of functional groups, type of functional groups bound to the matrix, and the chemical characteristics of the liquid phase (pH, oxidation potential, and ionic strength). Previous experience with ion exchange resins has demonstrated that the most effective implementation for an ion exchange resin is a cartridge, or column, in which the resin is contained. Based on the results of equilibrium and sub-scale dynamic column testing, a possible solution for mitigating the calcium precipitation issue on the ISS has been identified. From an original pool of 13 ion exchange resins, two candidates have been identified that demonstrate substantial calcium removal on the sub-scale. The dramatic reduction in resin performance from published calcium uptake demonstrates the need for thorough evaluation of resins at the low pH and strong oxidizing environment present in the UPA. Chemical variations in the influent (calcium concentrations and pretreatment dosing) appear to have a noticeable impact on the calcium capacity of the resin. Low calcium concentrations and high pretreatment dosing will likely result in a decrease in calcium capacity. Conversely, low pre trea t - ment dosing will likely result in an increase in calcium capacity. In contrast, investigations at a variety of flow rates, length-to-diameter ratios, resin volumes, and flow regimes (continuous versus pulsed) show that changes in physical parameters do not have substantial impacts on resin performance in the very low specific velocity ranges of interest. This result is particularly useful because most commercial applications at higher specific velocities do show a relatively strong relationship between flow and capacity. The lack of a strong relationship will allow more flexibility in the implementation of an ion exchange bed for flight. Verification of subscale tests with flight-scale resin beds is recommended prior to implementation in the on-orbit UPA.

  15. Lead Removal From Synthetic Leachate Matrices by a Novel Ion-Exchange Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Hovanitz, Edward S.; Chi, Sulan

    2002-01-01

    This report discusses the application of a novel polyacrylate-based ion-exchange material (IEM) for the removal of lead (Pb) ions from water. Preliminary testing includes the establishment of the operating pH range, capacity information, and the effect of calcium and anions in the matrix. Batch testing with powder indicates slightly different optimal operational conditions from those used for column testing. The ion exchanger is excellent for removing lead from aqueous solutions.

  16. Integration of ion-exchange and nanofiltration processes for recovering Cr(III) salts from synthetic tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gando-Ferreira, Licnio M; Marques, Joana C; Quina, Margarida J

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the possibility of integrating both ion-exchange (IX) and nanofiltration (NF) processes for the recovery of Cr(III) salts from a synthetic solution prepared with concentrations of Cr(III), [Formula: see text] and Cl(-) in the range of industrial effluents of tanneries. Ion exchange should be used as a pre-treatment for uptaking Cl(-) ions from the effluent, and thereafter the treated solution is fed to an NF unit to recover chromium sulphate salt for reuse in the tanning bath. The strong anionic resin Diaion PA316 was selected for evaluating chloride-sulphate ion-exchange equilibrium, with respect to mass of resin, NaCl concentration, temperature and ratio [Formula: see text]. It was observed that the separation factor, [Formula: see text], depends on the total electrolyte concentration and the ratio [Formula: see text] plays a role as well. Moreover, it was determined that the resin prefers sulphate over chloride since [Formula: see text] is less than 1. The performance of the NF process is dependent on [Formula: see text] and the rejection of Cr(III) may decrease from 90% to 70% as the ratio increases from 0.5 to 2. Regarding the integration of both IX and NF, the feed solution after treatement with the resin was fed to NF where the ratio of [Formula: see text] led to the best operating conditions for this process (90% of Cr(III) rejection and up to 77% for [Formula: see text] ions). This strategy may be considered as a sustainable approach since it permits to obtain a solution enriched in Cr(III) salt for reuse in the tanning process, thus contributing to environmental protection. PMID:25750988

  17. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  18. Ion Exchange Resin and Clay Vitrification by Plasma Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz A, Laura V.

    2006-12-04

    The lack of treatment of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) lead us to propose a vitrification process based on a plasma discharge; this technique incorporates LILRW into a matrix glass composed of ceramic clays material. The Mexican Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), uses an ion exchange resin IRN 150 (styrene-divinilbence copolymer) in the TRIGA MARK III nuclear reactor. The principal objective of this resin is to absorb particles containing heavy metals and low-level radioactive particles. Once the IRN 150 resin filter capacity has been exceeded, it should be replaced and treated as LILRW. In this work, a transferred plasma system was realized to vitrify this resin taking advantage of its high power density, enthalpy and chemical reactivity as well as its rapid quenching and high operation temperatures. In order to characterize the morphological structure of these clay samples, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques were applied before and after the plasma treatment.

  19. Ion-exchange chromatography for the characterization of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Beck, Alain; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-09-10

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEX) is a historical technique widely used for the detailed characterization of therapeutic proteins and can be considered as a reference and powerful technique for the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of charge heterogeneity. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of theoretical and practical aspects of modern IEX applied for the characterization of therapeutic proteins including monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) and antibody drug conjugates (ADCs). The section on method development describes how to select a suitable stationary phase chemistry and dimensions, the mobile phase conditions (pH, nature and concentration of salt), as well as the temperature and flow rate, considering proteins isoelectric point (pI). In addition, both salt-gradient and pH-gradient approaches were critically reviewed and benefits as well as limitations of these two strategies were provided. Finally, several applications, mostly from pharmaceutical industries, illustrate the potential of IEX for the characterization of charge variants of various types of biopharmaceutical products. PMID:25800161

  20. Glass ion-exchange technology for wavelength management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruschin, Shlomo; Hurwitz, G.; Hurwitz, T.; Kepten, Avishai; Arad, E.; Soreq, Y.; Eckhouse, Shimon

    2003-04-01

    We report the achievement of buried single-mode waveguides in special Boro-Aluminum-Silicate glass. The waveguides are characterized by very low propogation loss (<.01dB/cm) and negligible birefringence. The optical mode at the input and output ports is essentially identical to the mode of a standard single-mode optical fiber. We fabricated and tested several devices and report here 18 and 116 powers spitters and an interleaver defined for a 100GHz DWDM network. Due to the low birefringence of the waveguides, the TE and TM responses of the device are undistinguishable by customary characterization equipment. In addition we report a technique for permanent trimming of the otpical circuit by localized heating. This unique advantage of ion-exchange technology, allowed us the adjustment of devices' parameters at post-fabrication stage. As an example, the trimming of a 22 directional coupler manifested here in the control of coupling coefficient value over a wide range (0.04-1.5). The process control was such that a target value of 0.5 for the coefficient was accurately attained. The same process enabled us the tuning of the interleaver to the ITU grid within 10pm accuracy.

  1. Selectivity of ion exchangers in extracting cesium and rubidium from alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovnikova, L. A.; Kargov, S. I.; Gavlina, O. T.; Ivanov, V. A.; Al'tshuler, G. N.

    2013-01-01

    We compare the ion exchange selectivity of phenol-type sorbents based on phenol formaldehyde resins, products of condensation of diatomic phenols with formaldehyde, and crosslinked polymer based on C-phenyl[4]resorcinarene resin, for cesium and rubidium ions. It is shown that phenol formaldehyde sorbents are the ones most selective. The interaction of alkali metal cations with the anion of calix[4]arene is investigated via quantum-chemical modeling. It is shown that the selectivity toward cesium and rubidium ions in ion exchangers of the phenolic type is not due to specific interactions of ions with phenolic groups.

  2. Growth Rate of Calcite Steps as a Function of Aqueous Calcium-to-Carbonate Ratio: Independent Attachment and Detachment of Calcium and Carbonate Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G; Grantham, Ms. Meg

    2010-01-01

    Growth rates of monolayer-height steps on the {1014} calcite surface have been measured as a function of the aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio. The maximum growth rates of the two common crystallographic orientations were found to deviate from the ideal stoichiometric ratio of 1:1, and dissolution features were observed under supersaturated solutions containing high calcium-to-carbonate ratios. To explain these phenomena, a theory is applied that treats the rates of attachment and detachment of aqueous calcium and carbonate ions separately. The resultant attachment rate constants are 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the water exchange rate of the constituent aqueous ions, suggesting that ligand-exchange processes may directly drive attachment. The broader implication is that the saturation state alone is not adequate to fully describe the rates of the multiple, independent reactions that occur on mineral surfaces under these conditions.

  3. Stabilization of copper nanoparticles with volume- and surface-distribution inside ion-exchange matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, T. A.; Sakardina, E. A.; Kalinichev, A. I.; Zolotukhina, E. V.

    2015-09-01

    Nanocomposites characterized by the surface and volume distributions of deposited copper nanoparticles are obtained via the chemical deposition of copper onto sulfonic acid and carboxylic cation exchanger and strongly basic anion exchanger matrices. The electrode behavior of the synthesized composites in CuSO4 solution is studied by open-circuit chronopotentiometry. The effect the nature of the fixed centers of the ion-exchange matrix has on the initial state of metallic particles and the processes that occur in solutions of their metal ions is established from the deviation of the nanocomposites' electrode potential from the potential of a compact electrode and the nature of its change over time. It is shown that the mechanism behind the interaction of the matrix and metal ions (ion exchange, non-exchange absorption, complexation) determines not only the initial size and distribution of metal particles, but also the rate at which they achieve aggregative stability.

  4. Use of petroleum reside for production of ion exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Pokonova, Y.V.

    1995-03-10

    Weakly acidic commercial cation exchangers with a static exchange capacity of 4.8-6.7 meq{center_dot}{sup -1} and a mechanical strength of 90% have been synthesized from petroleum asphaltites, resorcinol, and furfural.

  5. Removal of fluoride from spent pot liner leachate using ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, G.; Kumar, B.; Sen, P.K.; Majumdar, J.

    1999-01-01

    Spent pot liner (SPL), a hazardous solid waste produced at cell houses of aluminum smelters, is a potential source of fluoride pollution. Leachates collected from SPL disposal sites were found to contain fluoride at considerable concentration levels. This paper reports a study of selective fluoride removal following laboratory-prepared, ion-exchange treatment. Spent pot liner leachates were pretreated with lime to bring the fluoride level down to approximately 10 mg/L for economic and effective working of the ion exchanger. The detailed ion-exchange treatment study for removal of fluoride was carried out on synthetic SPL leachates and the optimum treatment thus developed was applied on natural SPL leachates. Bench-scale studies were carried out at various flow rates and pHs and in the presence of other ions commonly available in the SPL leachates. The prepared exchanger reduced the level of fluoride from approximately 10 mg/L to less than 1 mg/L. Results indicate that the extraction was 100% up to 6-mL/min flow rate through the ion exchanger and it works efficiently in the pH range of 7 to 10. There is no effect of the other ions present in leachates on removal of fluoride. The exchanger has good capacity to exchange and can be recharged by eluting fluoride sorbed on the exchanger using two molar hydrochloric acid.

  6. Investigation of the resistance of some naturally occurring and synthetic inorganic ion exchangers against gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilchi, A.; Khanchi, A.; Ghanadi Maragheh, M.; Bagheri, A.

    2003-02-01

    The effect of various doses of gamma radiation on the ion-exchange capacity, distribution coefficient values, elution behaviour, physical effect, pH titration and infrared spectra of some synthetic inorganic ion exchangers, namely the cerium substituted phosphates; and naturally occurring inorganic ion exchangers, zeolites from different parts of Iran, have been studied systematically. No significant change has been observed in the ion-exchange capacity (with the exception of CeP(Na), CeP(Di·Na) and zeolite 5 (deposits of arababad talas)), elution behaviour, physical effect, chemical stability and the infrared spectra of the synthetic ion exchangers irradiated upto a total dose of 200 kGy, while a change has been observed in the pH-titration and distribution behaviour. The increase in pH is sharper for irradiated samples with divalent cations than for the normal samples. Furthermore, the Kd values, and hence the selectivity towards certain cations increase with the total dose absorbed, reaching its optimum selectivity with the dose of 50-100 kGy. The natural zeolites chosen for these studies, show, similar pattern to those of synthetic ion exchangers, and in some cases an extremely high selectivity toward certain cations, like Be II. These make, zeolites, which are naturally occurring ion exchangers more viable economically, and extremely useful alternative in this industry.

  7. Adsorbents/ion exchangers-PVA blend membranes: Preparation, characterization and performance for the removal of Zn2+ by electrodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprarescu, Simona; Radu, Anita-Laura; Purcar, Violeta; Ianchis, Raluca; Sarbu, Andrei; Ghiurea, Marius; Nicolae, Cristian; Modrogan, Cristina; Vaireanu, Danut-Ionel; Périchaud, Alain; Ebrasu, Daniela-Ion

    2015-02-01

    The present paper was aimed at studying the possibility of zinc (Zn) removal from the wastewater discharged from zinc electroplating processes. In order to save industrial and environmental resources, the concentrated solution could be reused after electrodialysis process. A mini-electrodialysis system with three cylindrical compartments and different membranes containing various resins (Purolite A500 and Hypersol-Macronet MN500) was employed, which can be further applied for the treatment of synthetic effluent which contained zinc ions. The electrodialysis system was operated at constant voltage using different concentrations of synthetic solutions of zinc ions, without and with electrolyte recirculation for 1.5 h. The pH and conductivity of solutions were measured before and after the electrodialysis process occurs. Also the removal ratio (Rr) and mass flow (J) of zinc ions, energy consumption (EC) and current efficiency (CE) were determined. It was found that electrodialysis treatment generated a very low conductivity solution, enabling its reuse as rinse water. According to the obtained results when using a membrane pair with higher ion exchange capacity (IEC) the removal ratio is improved (over 80%). The physico-chemical, structural and mechanical properties of prepared membranes were registered, before and after electrodialysis process takes place, by means of complementary analytical techniques, namely, ion-exchange capacity, water content and thickness measurements. Furthermore analysis were also carried out by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

  8. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI - omega plot analysis of RF-spillover-corrected inverse CEST ratio asymmetry for simultaneous determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhua; Xiao, Gang; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Ran, Chongzhao; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to labile proton concentration and exchange rate, thus allowing measurement of dilute CEST agent and microenvironmental properties. However, CEST measurement depends not only on the CEST agent properties but also on the experimental conditions. Quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis has been proposed to address the limitation of the commonly used simplistic CEST-weighted calculation. Recent research has shown that the concomitant direct RF saturation (spillover) effect can be corrected using an inverse CEST ratio calculation. We postulated that a simplified qCEST analysis is feasible with omega plot analysis of the inverse CEST asymmetry calculation. Specifically, simulations showed that the numerically derived labile proton ratio and exchange rate were in good agreement with input values. In addition, the qCEST analysis was confirmed experimentally in a phantom with concurrent variation in CEST agent concentration and pH. Also, we demonstrated that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (P < 0.01) while the pH-dependent exchange rate followed a dominantly base-catalyzed exchange relationship (P < 0.01). In summary, our study verified that a simplified qCEST analysis can simultaneously determine labile proton ratio and exchange rate in a relatively complex in vitro CEST system. PMID:25615718

  9. Cation immobilization in pyrolyzed simulated spent ion exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Vittorio; Bianchi, Hugo L.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    2012-05-01

    Significant quantities of spent ion exchange resins that are contaminated by an assortment of radioactive elements are produced by the nuclear industry each year. The baseline technology for the conditioning of these spent resins is encapsulation in ordinary Portland cement which has various shortcomings none the least of which is the relatively low loading of resin in the cement and the poor immobilization of highly mobile elements such as cesium. The present study was conducted with cationic resin samples (Lewatit S100) loaded with Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Ni2+ in roughly equimolar proportions at levels at or below 30% of the total cation exchange capacity. Low temperature thermal treatment of the resins was conducted in inert (Ar), or reducing (CH4) gas atmospheres, or supercritical ethanol to convert the hydrated polymeric resin beads into carbonaceous materials that contained no water. This pyrolytic treatment resulted in at least a 50% volume reduction to give mechanically robust spherical materials. Scanning electron microscope investigations of cross-sections of the beads combined with energy dispersive analysis showed that initially all elements were uniformly distributed through the resin matrix but that at higher temperatures the distribution of Cs became inhomogeneous. Although Cs was found in the entire cross-section, a significant proportion of the Cs occurred within internal rings while a proportion migrated toward the outer surfaces to form a crustal deposit. Leaching experiments conducted in water at 25 °C showed that the divalent contaminant elements were very difficult to leach from the beads heated in inert atmospheres in the range 200-600 °C. Cumulative fractional loses of the order of 0.001 were observed for these divalent elements for temperatures below 500 °C. Regardless of the processing temperature, the cumulative fractional loss of Cs in water at 25 °C reached a plateau or steady-state within the first 24 h increasing only marginally up 120 h. For unheated beads, a steady-state was reached at a cumulative fractional Cs loss of about 0.0045 while for beads heated to 400 °C the steady-state was reached at a value of 0.1. Under comparable conditions leaching of Sr, Co and Ni were close to the detection limits. It is concluded that the fraction of the Cs inventory that was more readily leached derived mainly from Cs phases in the crustal deposit.

  10. Ion exhange and molecular sorption of oxalic acid with a highly basic anion exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisilova, E. V.; Oros, G. Yu.; Krisilov, A. V.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio modeling of a matrix fragment of resin and geometry optimization of the molecular structure of oxalic acid were performed. The isotherm of oxalic acid sorption with AV-17-8 anion exchange resin was obtained by the variable concentrations technique. The ion-exchange and molecular components of sorbate fixation with the ion exchanger were determined. The hydration of the highly basic anion exchanger that absorbed different quantities of dicarboxylic acid was evaluated by the centrifuging method. The dependence of the amount of water and sorbate concentration in the resin was linear antibatic.

  11. Ion exchange in the atomic energy industry with particular reference to actinide and fission product separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, I.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviewed are some of the uses of ion exchange processes used by the nuclear industry for the period April, 1978 to April, 1983. The topics dealt with are: thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, cesium and actinide-lanthanide separations; the higher actinides - Cm, Bk, Cf, Es and Fm; fission products; ion exchange in the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Consideration is given to safety in the use of ion exchangers and in safe methods of disposal of such materials. Full scale and pilot plant process descriptions are included as well as summaries of laboratory studies. 130 references.

  12. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI - RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for development of quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that the omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST (PARACEST) MRI. However, the use of omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct RF saturation (spillover) effects owing to their relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the RF spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot are in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increases linearly with creatine concentration (P< 0.01), with little difference in their exchange rate (P=0.32). In summary, our study extended the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI. PMID:24706610

  13. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Gula, Michael J.; Xue, Sui; Harvey, James T.

    2002-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  14. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato

    2001-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  15. Measurement of isotope ratio of Ca{sup +} ions in a linear Paul Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Y.; Minamino, K.; Nagamoto, D.; Hasegawa, S.

    2009-03-17

    Measurement of isotope ratios of Calcium is very useful in many fields. So we demonstrated the measurement of isotope ratios of {sup 40}Ca{sup +}(abundance 96.4%) to {sup 44}Ca{sup +}(2.09%) ions in a linear Paul trap with several laser lights tuning to the isotope shifts. And we found that the experimental parameters had large influences on the measurement of the isotope ratios.

  16. Charge-to-mass-ratio-dependent ion heating during magnetic reconnection in the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Almagri, A. F.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Terry, P. W.; Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ; Craig, D.

    2013-05-15

    Temperature evolution during magnetic reconnection has been spectroscopically measured for various ion species in a toroidal magnetized plasma. Measurements are made predominantly in the direction parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field. It is found that the increase in parallel ion temperature during magnetic reconnection events increases with the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion species. This trend can be understood if the heating mechanism is anisotropic, favoring heating in the perpendicular degree of freedom, with collisional relaxation of multiple ion species. The charge-to-mass ratio trend for the parallel temperature derives from collisional isotropization. This result emphasizes that collisional isotropization and energy transfer must be carefully modeled when analyzing ion heating measurements and comparing to theoretical predictions.

  17. An age-dependent alteration of the respiratory exchange ratio in the db/db mouse

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye-Min; Kim, Hae Rim; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Byun, Yong Sub; Won, Young-Suk; Yoon, Won-Ki; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Kang, Jong-Goo

    2015-01-01

    The leptin receptor-deficient db/db mouse is a rodent model of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Diabetes in db/db mice shows an age-dependent progression, with early insulin resistance followed by an insulin secretory defect resulting in profound hyperglycemia. However, there is insufficient data on agedependent changes of energy metabolism in db/db mice. We demonstrated an age-dependent decrease in the respiratory exchange ratio (RER), calculated by a ratio of VO2/VCO2, in db/db mice. The RER determined by indirect calorimetry, was 1.03 in db/db mice under 6 weeks of age, which were similar to those in heterozygote (db/+) and wild-type (+/+) mice. However, RER decreased from approximately 0.9 to 0.8 by 10 weeks of age and subsequently returned to approximately 0.9 at 22 weeks of age. The changes in RER were concurrent with the alterations in body weight and blood glucose level. However, other metabolic indicators such as glucose tolerance, changes in body fat mass, and urinary glucose levels, did not change with age. The results suggested that the energy source utilized in db/db mice changed with the age-related progression of diabetes. PMID:25806077

  18. Observation of highly disparate K -shell x-ray spectra produced by charge exchange with bare mid-Z ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele L.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, F. Scott

    2014-11-01

    We performed charge-exchange experiments with the electron-beam ion trap and an x-ray calorimeter spectrometer at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We compare the relative strength of the high-n Lyman series emission for different combinations of ions and neutral gases. Theoretical predictions show good agreement with experimental data on the relative capture cross section as a function of principal quantum number n ; however, the few published predictions of the distribution of captures as a function of orbital angular momentum l do not agree with experiments. Our experimental results show that the relative strength of high-n Lyman series emission varies more widely than previous experiments have found and models predict. We find that hardness ratios from charge exchange with helium and molecular hydrogen are more disparate than charge exchange with many-electron neutral species, which is likely due to differences in the relative importance of multielectron capture. We also find that there is no clear scaling of the hardness ratio with the ionization potential of the neutral species, the number of valence electrons in the neutral species, or the atomic number of the ion.

  19. Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using Hydrous Crystalline Silicotitanate Material

    SciTech Connect

    HAMM, LUTHER L.

    2004-07-27

    For the current pretreatment facility design of the River Protection Project (RPP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), the removal of cesium from low activity waste (LAW) is achieved by ion-exchange technology based on SuperLig(R) 644 resin. Due to recent concerns over potential radiological and chemical degradation of SuperLig(R) 644 resin and increased pressure drops observed during pilot-scale column studies, an increased interest in developing a potential backup ion-exchanger material has resulted. Ideally, a backup ion-exchanger material would replace the SuperLig(R) 644 resin and have no other major impacts on the pretreatment facility flowsheet. Such an ideal exchanger has not been identified to date. However, Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion-exchanger materials have been studied for the removal of cesium from a variety of DOE wastes over the last decade. CST ion-exchanger materials demonstrate a high affinity for cesium under high alkalinity conditions and have been under investigation for cesium removal specifically at Hanford and SRS during the last six years. Since CST is an inorganic based material (with excellent properties in regard to chemical, radiological, and thermal stability) that is considered to be practically non-elutable (while SuperLig(R) 644 is an organic based elutable resin), the overall pretreatment facility flowsheet would be impacted in various ways. However, the CST material is still being considered as a potential backup ion-exchanger material. The performance of a proposed backup ion-exchange column using IONSIV IE-911 (CST in its engineered-form) material for the removal of cesium from Hanford high level radioactive alkaline waste is discussed. This report focuses attention on the ion-exchange aspects and addresses the loading phase of the process cycle.

  20. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E.; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R.; Brown, Jeffery M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra.

  1. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R; Brown, Jeffery M; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26810432

  2. Enhanced capacity and stability for the separation of cesium in electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Tawfic, A.F.; Dickson, S.E.; Kim, Y.; Mekky, W.

    2015-03-15

    Electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) can be used to separate ionic contaminants from industrial wastewater, including that generated by the nuclear industry. The ESIX method involves sequential application of reduction and oxidation potentials to an ion exchange film to induce the respective loading and unloading of cesium. This technology is superior to conventional methods (e.g electrodialysis reversal or reverse osmosis) as it requires very little energy for ionic separation. In previous studies, ESIX films have demonstrated relatively low ion exchange capacities and limited film stabilities over repeated potential applications. In this study, the methodology for the deposition of electro-active films (nickel hexacyanoferrate) on nickel electrodes was modified to improve the ion exchange capacity for cesium removal using ESIX. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the ion exchange capacity and stability. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the modified film surfaces. Additionally, the films were examined for the separation of cesium ions. This modified film preparation technique enhanced the ion exchange capacity and improves the film stability compared to previous methods for the deposition of ESIX films. (authors)

  3. Salt Processing Through Ion Exchange at the Savannah River Site Selection of Exchange Media and Column Configuration - 9198

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, Renee; Punch, Timothy; McCabe, Daniel

    2009-02-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed, modeled, and tested several different ion exchange media and column designs for cesium removal. One elutable resin and one non-elutable resin were considered for this salt processing application. Deployment of non-elutable Crystalline Silicotitanate and elutable Resorcinol Formaldehyde in several different column configurations were assessed in a formal Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE). Salt solutions were selected that would allow a grouping of non-compliant tanks to be closed. Tests were run with the elutable resin to determine compatibility with the resin configuration required for an in-tank ion exchange system. Models were run to estimate the ion exchange cycles required with the two resins in several column configurations. Material balance calculations were performed to estimate the impact on the High Level Waste (HLW) system at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Conceptual process diagrams were used to support the hazard analysis. Data from the hazard analysis was used to determine the relative impact on safety. This report will discuss the technical inputs, SEE methods, results and path forward to complete the technical maturation of ion exchange.

  4. Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction: Supramolecular Aspects of Solvent Exchange Volume 21

    SciTech Connect

    Gloe, Karsten; Tasker, Peter A; Oshima, Tatsuya; Watarai, Hitoshi; Nilsson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Preface The theme of supramolecular chemistry (SC), entailing the organization of multiple species through noncovalent interactions, has permeated virtually all aspects of chemical endeavor over the past several decades. Given that the observed behavior of discrete molecular species depends upon their weak interactions with one another and with matrix components, one would have to conclude that SC must indeed form part of the fabric of chemistry itself. A vast literature now serves to categorize SC phenomena within a body of consistent terminology. The word supramolecular itself appears in the titles of dozens of books, several journals, and a dedicated encyclopedia. Not surprisingly, the theme of SC also permeates the field of solvent extraction (SX), inspiring the framework for this volume of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction. It is attempted in the six chapters of this volume to identify both how supramolecular behavior occurs and is studied in the context of SX and how SC is influencing the current direction of SX. Researchers and practitioners have long dealt with supramolecular interactions in SX. Indeed, the use of polar extractant molecules in nonpolar media virtually assures that aggregative interactions will dominate the solution behavior of SX. Analytical chemists working in the 1930s to the 1950s with simple mono- and bidentate chelating ligands as extractants noted that extraction of metal ions obeyed complicated mass-action equilibria involving complex stoichiometries. As chemists and engineers developed processes for nuclear and hydrometallurgical applications in the 1950s and 1960s, the preference for aliphatic diluents only enhanced the complexity and supramolecular nature of extraction chemistry. Use of physical techniques such as light scattering and vapor-pressure measurements together with various spectroscopic methods revealed organic-phase aggregates from well-defined dimers to small aggregates containing a few extractant molecules to large inverse micelles swollen with water molecules. Extraction systems involving long-chain cations such as alkylammonium species or long-chain anions such as sulfonates or carboxylates proved especially prone to extensive aggregate formation. The related phenomenon of third-phase formation in SX systems, long misunderstood, is now yielding to spectroscopic and scattering techniques showing extensive long-range organization. Over the last 50 years, tools for studying the structure and thermodynamics of aggregation have grown increasingly sophisticated, leading to a rich and detailed understanding of what we can now recognize as SC phenomena in SX. In the 1970s and 1980s, the rapid growth of SC elicited a paradigm shift in SX. The influence of SC principles had two major effects on the course of SX research. First, it provided a framework for understanding the supramolecular behavior that was already well appreciated in the field of SX, though earlier without the SC terminology. Second, it provided the conceptual tools to control supramolecular behavior in SX, direct it for intended functionality, and to simplify it. Extraction by designed reagents has been steadily progressing ever since, with commercial applications emerging to successfully validate this approach. With the discovery of crown ethers in the late 1960s, the advancement of extractant design has fruitfully employed the concept of inclusion. While considerable initial progress occurred with such molecules, especially because of their affinity and selectivity for alkali and alkaline earth metals, other molecular platforms such as calixarenes have proven more versatile. Multidentate receptors for partial to full inclusion of cations, anions, ion pairs, as well as neutral species, have now become commonplace for selective extraction. This volume of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction examines how the principles of SC are being employed both in advancing the design of new highly selective SX systems and in understanding aggregation phenomena in SX systems. Chapter 1 discusses the nature and definition of SC and how it is used generally in design of novel SX reagents. Major approaches using SC principles are outlined and illustrated. Chapter 2 expands upon the theme of ion-pair recognition and introduces outer-sphere recognition of metal complexes, a novel idea with the potential for structural control of solvation, casting a new light on solvent modifiers. Chapter 3 reviews the large literature of calixarenes as extraction reagents for metal ions, where the synthetic versatility of this family of compounds has produced vast possibilities for inclusion and selective separations. Chapter 4 extends such chemistry to extraction of biomolecules, where the potential for selective separations is only beginning to be explored through site recognition in macromolecules. In Chapter 5, a detailed examination of the liquid-liquid interface as an expression of supramolecular phenomena i...

  5. Experimental Findings On Minor Actinide And Lanthanide Separations Using Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.; Clearfield, A.

    2013-09-17

    This project seeks to determine if inorganic or hybrid inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective americium and curium separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of the tested ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. During FY13, experimental work focused in the following areas: (1) investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium and (2) synthesis, characterization and testing of ion-exchange materials. Ion-exchange materials tested included alkali titanates, alkali titanosilicates, carbon nanotubes and group(IV) metal phosphonates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of Am(III). Experimental findings indicated that Pu(IV) is oxidized to Pu(VI) by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of plutonium affects the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used. Tests also explored the influence of nitrite on the oxidation of Am(III). Given the formation of Am(V) and Am(VI) in the presence of nitrite, it appears that nitrite is not a strong deterrent to the oxidation of Am(III), but may be limiting Am(VI) by quickly reducing Am(VI) to Am(V). Interestingly, additional absorbance peaks were observed in the UV-Vis spectra at 524 and 544 nm in both nitric acid and perchloric acid solutions when the peroxydisulfate was added as a solution. These peaks have not been previously observed and do not correspond to the expected peak locations for oxidized americium in solution. Additional studies are in progress to identify these unknown peaks. Three titanosilicate ion exchangers were synthesized using a microwave-accelerated reaction system (MARS�) and determined to have high affinities for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid. The K-TSP ion exchanger exhibited the highest affinity for lanthanides in dilute nitric acid solutions. The Ge-TSP ion exchanger shows promise as a material with high affinity, but additional tests are needed to confirm the preliminary results. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes exhibited low, but measureable affinities for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid solutions (pH 3 and 6). The MWCNT exhibited much lower affinities than the K-TSP in dilute nitric acid solutions. However, the MWCNT are much more chemically stable in concentrated nitric acid solutions and, therefore, may be candidates for ion exchange in more concentrated nitric acid solutions.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and analytical application of hybrid; acrylamide zirconium (IV) arsenate a cation exchanger, effect of dielectric constant on distribution coefficient of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Syed A; Shalla, Aabid H

    2009-04-30

    A new hybrid inorganic-organic cation exchanger acrylamide zirconium (IV) arsenate has been synthesized, characterized and its analytical application explored. The effect of experimental parameters such as mixing ratio of reagents, temperature, and pH on the properties of material has been studied. FTIR, TGA, X-ray, UV-vis spectrophotometry, SEM and elemental analysis were used to determine the physiochemical properties of this hybrid ion exchanger. The material behaves as a monofunctional acid with ion-exchange capacity of 1.65 meq/g for Na(+) ions. The chemical stability data reveals that the exchanger is quite stable in mineral acids, bases and fairly stable in organic solvents, while as thermal analysis shows that the material retain 84% of its ion-exchange capacity up to 600 degrees C. Adsorption behavior of metal ions in solvents with increasing dielectric constant has also been explored. The sorption studies reveal that the material is selective for Pb(2+) ions. The analytical utility of the material has been explored by achieving some binary separations of metal ions on its column. Pb(2+) has been selectively removed from synthetic mixtures containing Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), Al(3+), Ni(2+), Fe(3+). In order to demonstrate practical utility of the material quantitative separation of the Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) in brass sample has been achieved on its columns. PMID:18722710

  7. Preparation of ion exchanger layered electrodes for advanced membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Young; Seo, Seok-Jun; Yun, Sung-Hyun; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2011-11-01

    A noble electrode for capacitive deionization (CDI) was prepared by embedding ion exchanger onto the surface of a carbon electrode to practice membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI). Bromomethylated poly (2, 6-dimethyl-1, 4-phenylene oxide) (BPPO) was sprayed on carbon cloth followed by sulfonation and amination to form cation exchange and anion exchange layers, respectively. The ion exchange layers were examined by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR). The SEM image showed that the woven carbon cloth was well coated and connected with BPPO. The FT-IR spectrum revealed that sulfonic and amine functional groups were attached on the cationexchange and anionexchange electrodes, respectively. The advantages of the developed carbon electrodes have been successively demonstrated in a batch and a continuous mode CDI operations without ion exchange membranes for salt removal using 100 mg/L NaCl solution. PMID:21777933

  8. Spatial distributions of scandium in granules of different ion-exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Komarova, N.I.; Molchanova, T.V.; Rodionov, V.V.; Vodolazov, L.I.

    1992-01-20

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPM) using an electron probe with high local sensitivity in nondestructive action on the sample, which is important in the analysis of ion-exchange materials, are efficient methods for physicochemical studies. SEM and EPM make it possible to study the spatial distribution of elements, characteristics of their absorption by ion-exchange materials, and establish the mechanisms of physicochemical transformations, the composition of microsections of granules, etc.. Effective ion-exchangers for extraction of scandium from sulfuric acid solutions were selected, and the characteristics of sorption absorption of scandium and the accompanying elements on these ion-exchangers were investigated by SEM and EPM. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  9. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  10. Ion-exchange chromatography separation applied to mineral recycle in closed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E.; Spitze, L. A.; Wong, F. W.; Wydeven, T.; Johnson, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) program, a study is being made of mineral separation on ion-exchange columns. The purpose of the mineral separation step is to allow minerals to be recycled from the oxidized waste products of plants, man, and animals for hydroponic food production. In the CELSS application, relatively large quantities of minerals in a broad concentration range must be recovered by the desired system, rather than the trace quantities and very low concentrations treated in analytical applications of ion-exchange chromatography. Experiments have been carried out to assess the parameters pertinent to the scale-up of ion-exchange chromatography and to determine feasibility. Preliminary conclusions are that the column scale-up is in a reasonable size range for the CELSS application. The recycling of a suitable eluent, however, remains a major challenge to the suitability of using ion exchange chromatography in closed systems.

  11. Equilibrium data for cesium ion exchange of Hanford CC and NCAW tank waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Hanford alkaline waste storage-tank contents will be processed to remove the soluble salts. A major fraction of these solutions will require cesium recovery to produce a low-level waste (LLW). The technology for decontamination of high-level alkaline waste and sludge wash waters is being developed. At the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied several ion exchange materials for the recovery of cesium from Hanford waste tanks. The WHC program was divided into tow main tasks, (1) to obtain equilibrium data for cesium ion exchange, and (2) to evaluate ion exchange column performance. The subject of this letter report is the measurement of batch distribution coefficients for several ion exchange media for a range of operating conditions for two types of waste; complexant concentrate (CC) and neutralized current acid waste (NCAW).

  12. Removal of uranium, arsenic, and nitrate by continuously regenerated ion exchange process

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.; Awad, J.; Panahi, Z.

    1996-11-01

    Groundwater is the major source of water supply for the City of Riverside (the City). Groundwater from some of the local wells contains high levels of uranium, arsenic, and nitrate. The City is evaluating treatment technologies that can remove these contaminants, in order to be prepared to select appropriate treatment technologies when groundwater treatment is required. Treatment technologies identified by the USEPA as best available technology (BAT) for uranium and arsenic removal are coagulation/filtration, lime softening, ion exchange, and reverse osmosis. Among these technologies, ion exchange is the most cost-effective and suitable for wellhead treatment applications. Ion exchange is also effective for nitrate removal. An ion exchange pilot study was conducted for the removal of uranium, arsenic and nitrate from groundwater. This paper presents a summary of the tests results, conceptual design criteria, and preliminary cost estimate for a full-scale facility.

  13. Polymer modification of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Yang, J.J.; Shreeve, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) resin is a candidate regenerable ion-exchange resin for removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Previous investigations into the structure/function relationships of R-F resin have shown that the R-F resin undergoes facile oxidation to produce para-quinones, with loss of ion-exchange sites, hence lowered performance of the resin for cesium ion-exchange. In this report, we give the results of our studies into polymer resins prepared using 4-methylresorcinol and 4-fluororesorcinol. The reaction of 4-methylresorcinol with formaldehyde formed oligomeric structures, while a mixture of 4-fluororesorcinol, phenol, and formaldehyde produced a non-soluble resin in aqueous/alkaline conditions. The 4-fluororesorcinol resin underwent significant nucleophilic displacement of the fluorine substituent to give oxidized resins with lower ion-exchange performance.

  14. The Determination of Calcium in Dietary Supplement Tablets by Ion-Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Mark L.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental simple ion-exchange experiment in which the amount of calcium present in dietary supplement tablets has been developed is described and some typical student results for several brands of tablets are presented. (JN)

  15. Experimental Ion Exchange Column With SuperLig 639 And Simulant Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, Megan; Nash, C.

    2013-08-26

    SuperLig®639 ion exchange resin was tested as a retrieval mechanism for pertechnetate, through decontamination of a perrhenate spiked 5M Simple Average Na{sup +} Mass Based Simulant. Testing included batch contacts and a three-column ion exchange campaign. A decontamination of perrhenate exceeding 99% from the liquid feed was demonstrated. Analysis of the first formulation of a SBS/WESP simulant found unexpectedly low concentrations of soluble aluminum. Follow-on work will complete the formulation.

  16. Ion-exchange material and method of storing radioactive wastes

    DOEpatents

    Komarneni, S.; Roy, D.M.

    1983-10-31

    A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt, and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatible with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

  17. Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

  18. Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry with Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange and Top-Down MS for Peptide Ion Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Maleki, Hossein; Arndt, James R.; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2014-12-01

    The gas-phase conformations of electrosprayed ions of the model peptide KKDDDDIIKIIK have been examined by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. [M+4H]4+ ions exhibit two conformers with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 471 Å2. [M+3H]3+ ions exhibit a predominant conformer with a collision cross section of 340 Å2 as well as an unresolved conformer (shoulder) with a collision cross section of ~367 Å2. Maximum HDX levels for the more compact [M+4H]4+ ions and the compact and partially-folded [M+3H]3+ ions are ~12.9, ~15.5, and ~14.9, respectively. Ion structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) suggest that this ordering of HDX level results from increased charge-site/exchange-site density for the more compact ions of lower charge. Additionally, a new model that includes two distance calculations (charge site to carbonyl group and carbonyl group to exchange site) for the computer-generated structures is shown to better correlate to the experimentally determined per-residue deuterium uptake. Future comparisons of IMS-HDX-MS data with structures obtained from MDS are discussed with respect to novel experiments that will reveal the HDX rates of individual residues.

  19. Conversion of ion exchange resin to various functional resins and the application in the field of pharmaceutical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Morio

    Ion exchange resins are widely used for separating ions in the solution, desalination, removal of impurities, and etc. Giving a new function to these ion exchange resins enables the application in more various fields. Until now, we carried out the research work about the following 5 project.: (1) Conversion of ion exchange resins into selective adsorbents by using low molecular reagents, which possess capabilities of a selective reaction with target ions, ion exchange reaction with the ion exchange resin and strong physical adsorption to the ion exchange resin. (2) Synthesis of resins for ion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (IEHPLC) and the analysis of biomaterials. (3) Development of insoluble macromolecular Sn(II) complex based on the aminophosphonic acid type ion exchange resin and its application to the 99mTc labeling of proteins. (4) Development of a new 68Ge-68Ga generator using N-methylglucamine type organic polymer as the adsorbent for 68Ge and production of 68Ga for PET. (5) Preparation of an ion-exchangeable polymer bead wrapped with bilayer membrane structures. In this paper, the application of various functional resins prepared based on ion exchange resin in the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been summarized.

  20. OPERATING A SMALL FULL-SCALE ION EXCHANGE SYSTEM FOR URANIUM REMOVAL (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The design and operation of a small full-scale ion exchange system used to remove uranium from well water in the foothills west of Denver, Colorado, are described. Consistent removal of uranium was accomplished by anion exchange treatment at a reasonable cost. Because of a lack o...

  1. Ion exchange selectivity for cross-linked polyacrylic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The ion separation factors for 21 common metal ions with cross-linked polyacrylic acid were determined as a function of pH and the percent of the cross-linked polyacrylic acid neutralized. The calcium ion was used as a reference. At a pH of 5 the decreasing order of affinity of the ions for the cross-linked polyacrylic acid was found to be: Hg++, Fe+++, Pb++, Cr+++, Cu++, Cd++, Al+++, Ag+, Zn++, Ni++, Mn++, Co++, Ca++, Sr++, Ba++, Mg++, K+, Rb+, Cs+, Na+, and Li+. Members of a chemical family exhibited similar selectivities. The Hg++ ion appeared to be about a million times more strongly bound than the alkali metal ions. The relative binding of most of the metal ions varied with pH; the very tightly and very weakly bound ions showed the largest variations with pH. The calcium ion-hydrogen ion equilibrium was perturbed very little by the presence of the other ions. The separation factors and selectivity coefficients are discussed in terms of equilibrium and thermodynamic significance.

  2. ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D.

    2011-08-03

    SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLED SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2010-02-23

    This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two {approx}11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first work to quantify mercury on sRF resin. Resin mercury content is important in plans for the disposition of used sRF resin. Mercury speciation in high level waste (HLW) is unknown. It may be partly organic, one example being methyl mercury cation. Further study of the resin's affinity for mercury is recommended.

  4. Increasing RO efficiency by chemical-free ion-exchange and Donnan dialysis: Principles and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Vanoppen, Marjolein; Stoffels, Griet; Demuytere, Clestin; Bleyaert, Wouter; Verliefde, Arne R D

    2015-09-01

    Ion-exchange (IEX) and Donnan dialysis (DD) are techniques which can selectively remove cations, limiting scaling in reverse osmosis (RO). If the RO concentrate could be recycled for regeneration of these pre-treatment techniques, RO recovery could be largely increased without the need for chemical addition or additional technologies. In this study, two different RO feed streams (treated industrial waste water and simple tap water) were tested in the envisioned IEX-RO and DD-RO hybrids including RO concentrate recycling. The efficiency of multivalent cation removal depends mainly on the ratio of monovalent to multivalent cations in the feed stream, influencing the ion-exchange efficiency in both IEX and DD. Since the mono-to-multivalent ratio was very high in the waste water, the RO recovery could potentially be increased to 92%. For the tap water, these high RO recoveries could only be reached by adding additional NaCl, because of the low initial monovalent to multivalent ratio in the feed. In both cases, the IEX-RO hybrid proved to be most cost-efficient, due to the high current cost of the membranes used in DD. The membrane cost would have to decrease from 300 /m to 10-30 /m - comparable to current reverse osmosis membranes - to achieve a comparable cost. In conclusion, the recycling of RO concentrate to regenerate ion exchange pre-treatment techniques for RO is an interesting option to increase RO recovery without addition of chemicals, but only at high monovalent/multivalent cation-ratios in the feed stream. PMID:25996753

  5. Neutral atomic oxygen beam produced by ion charge exchange for Low Earth Orbital (LEO) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Brdar, Marko; Olen, Carl; Stidham, Curt

    1987-01-01

    A low energy neutral atomic oxygen beam system was designed and is currently being assembled at the Lewis Research Center. The system utilizes a 15 cm diameter Kaufman ion source to produce positive oxygen ions which are charge exchange neutralized to produce low energy (variable from 5 to 150 eV) oxygen atoms at a flux simulating real time low Earth orbital conditions. An electromagnet is used to direct only the singly charged oxygen ions from the ion source into the charge exchange cell. A retarding potential grid is used to slow down the oxygen ions to desired energies prior to their charge exchange. Cryogenically cooled diatomic oxygen gas in the charge exchange cell is then used to transfer charge to the oxygen ions to produce a neutral atomic oxygen beam. Remaining non-charge exchanged oxygen ions are then swept from the beam by electromagnetic or electrostatic deflection depending upon the desired experiment configuration. The resulting neutral oxygen beam of 5 to 10 cm in diameter impinges upon target materials within a sample holder fixture that can also provide for simultaneous heating and UV exposure during the atomic oxygen bombardment.

  6. A review of studies on ion thruster beam and charge-exchange plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Various experimental and analytical studies of the primary beam and charge-exchange plasmas of ion thrusters are reviewed. The history of plasma beam research is recounted, emphasizing experiments on beam neutralization, expansion of the beam, and determination of beam parameters such as electron temperature, plasma density, and plasma potential. The development of modern electron bombardment ion thrusters is treated, detailing experimental results. Studies on charge-exchange plasma are discussed, showing results such as the relationship between neutralizer emission current and plasma beam potential, ion energies as a function of neutralizer bias, charge-exchange ion current collected by an axially moving Faraday cup-RPA for 8-cm and 30-cm ion thrusters, beam density and potential data from a 15-cm ion thruster, and charge-exchange ion flow around a 30-cm thruster. A 20-cm thruster electrical configuration is depicted and facility effects are discussed. Finally, plasma modeling is covered in detail for plasma beam and charge-exchange plasma.

  7. Intensification of ammonia removal from waste water in biologically active zeolitic ion exchange columns.

    PubMed

    Almutairi, Azel; Weatherley, Laurence R

    2015-09-01

    The use of nitrification filters for the removal of ammonium ion from waste-water is an established technology deployed extensively in municipal water treatment, in industrial water treatment and in applications such as fish farming. The process involves the development of immobilized bacterial films on a solid packing support, which is designed to provide a suitable host for the film, and allow supply of oxygen to promote aerobic action. Removal of ammonia and nitrite is increasingly necessary to meet drinking water and discharge standards being applied in the US, Europe and other places. Ion-exchange techniques are also effective for removal of ammonia (as the ammonium ion) from waste water and have the advantage of fast start-up times compared to biological filtration which in some cases may take several weeks to be fully operational. Here we explore the performance of ion exchange columns in which nitrifying bacteria are cultivated, with the goal of a "combined" process involving simultaneous ion-exchange and nitrification, intensified by in-situ aeration with a novel membrane module. There were three experimental goals. Firstly, ion exchange zeolites were characterized and prepared for comparative column breakthrough studies for ammonia removal. Secondly effective in-situ aeration for promotion of nitrifying bacterial growth was studied using a number of different membranes including polyethersulfone (PES), polypropylene (PP), nylon, and polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE). Thirdly the breakthrough performance of ion exchange columns filled with zeolite in the presence of aeration and in the presence of nitrifying bacteria was determined to establish the influence of biomass, and aeration upon breakthrough during ammonium ion uptake. The methodology adopted included screening of two types of the naturally occuring zeolite clinoptilolite for effective ammonia removal in continuous ion-exchange columns. Next, the performance of fixed beds of clinoptilolite in the presence of nitrifying bacteria is compared to that in columns in which only ion exchange is occurring. The aeration performance of each of the chosen membranes was compared experimentally using a newly developed membrane support module which is also described. Comparison of ammonia removal in columns equipped with in-situ aeration using each membrane was undertaken and the breakthrough characteristics determined. The results showed that ammonia removal in the presence of the nitrifiers was significantly intensified. Column operation with membrane aeration showed further enhancement of ammonia removal. The greatest enhancement was observed in the case of the polyethersulfone membrane (PES). It is concluded that combined nitrification and ion-exchange is significantly intensified in packed columns by in-situ aeration using a novel membrane module. There is significant potential for extending the ion-exchange cycle time and thus potential cost reduction. PMID:26112985

  8. Variable-ratio matching with fine balance in a study of the Peer Health Exchange.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Samuel D; Yoon, Frank; Keele, Luke

    2015-12-30

    In some observational studies of treatment effects, matched samples are created so treated and control groups are similar in terms of observable covariates. Traditionally, such matched samples consist of matched pairs. However, alternative forms of matching may have desirable features. One strategy that may improve efficiency is to match a variable number of control units to each treated unit. Another strategy to improve balance is to adopt a fine balance constraint. Under a fine balance constraint, a nominal covariate is exactly balanced, but it does not require individually matched treated and control subjects for this variable. Here, we propose a method to allow for fine balance constraints when each treated unit is matched to a variable number of control units, which is not currently possible using existing matching network flow algorithms. Our approach uses the entire number to first determine the optimal number of controls for each treated unit. For each stratum of matched treated units, we can then apply a fine balance constraint. We then demonstrate that a matched sample for the evaluation of the Peer Health Exchange, an intervention in schools designed to decrease risky health behaviors among youths, using a variable number of controls and fine balance constraint is superior to simply using a variable-ratio match. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26182888

  9. Water exchange dynamics around H3O+ and OH- ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-05-01

    In this letter, we report the first computer simulation of the dynamics of water exchanging between the first and second solvation shells of H3O+. Employing different rate theories for chemical reactions such as the transition state theory, the Grote-Hynes theory, the reactive flux method, and the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, we calculate the solvent exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations that account for explicit polarization effects. In addition, we also study water exchanges around OH- and find that the corresponding time scale is much smaller than that for H3O+.

  10. Quantifying exchange coupling in f-ion pairs using the diamagnetic substitution method

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Walter, Marc D.

    2010-04-01

    One of the challenges in the chemistry of actinide and lanthanide (f-ion) is quantifying exchange coupling between f-ions. While qualitative information about exchange coupling may be readily obtained using the diamagnetic substitution approach, obtaining quantitative information is much more difficult. This article describes how exchange coupling may be quantified using the susceptibility of a magnetically isolated analog, as in the diamagnetic substitution approach, along with the anisotropy of the ground state as determined by EPR spectroscopy. Several examples are used to illustrate and test this approach.

  11. Donnan dialysis of transition metal ions using anion exchange membrane modified with Xylenol Orange

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicka, B.; Brajter, K.; Trojanowicz, M.; Kado, B. )

    1991-01-01

    A chelating ion-exchange membrane was obtained by modification of a PTFE-based anion-exchange membrane with Xylenol Orange. Its utility for dialysis of Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), and Zn(II) was investigated by using receiver solutions without and with iminodiacetate. 1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetraacetic acid, and tetraethylenepentamine. In comparison to commercial PTFE cation-exchange membranes, modified chelating membranes exhibit for the metal ions investigated a larger differentiation of retention in the membrane phase and transport-to-receiver solution depending on the modifier used and the composition of the receiver solution.

  12. Advanced Ion Exchange Softening. Training Module 2.212.4.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, L. D.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the operation of an ion exchange softening system. It includes objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts and transparency masters. This is the third level of a three module series. This module considers the theory of ion

  13. Metal-air cell with ion exchange material

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2015-08-25

    Embodiments of the invention are related to anion exchange membranes used in electrochemical metal-air cells in which the membranes function as the electrolyte material, or are used in conjunction with electrolytes such as ionic liquid electrolytes.

  14. Development of a transparent, non-cytotoxic, silver ion-exchanged glass with antimicrobial activity and low ion elution.

    PubMed

    Shim, Gyu-In; Kim, Seong-Hwan; Eom, Hyung-Woo; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Se-Young

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial, cytotoxicity, skin irritation, and ion elution behaviors of glass doped with silver ions with respect to its application to electronic equipment such as phones and tablet screens. The microbes tested were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Penicillium funiculosum. AgNO3 powder was spread on both sides of aluminosilicate glass, and it was heated to 250-280C for 10min. Under optimized heating conditions (260C, 10min), the antimicrobial activity of ion-exchanged glass against bacteria and fungi was over 99.9% after 24 weeks. The glass failed to irritate the skin of experimental animals and was considered non-cytotoxic. The maximum amount of Ag ions that were eluted from the ion-exchanged glass into drinking water was measured at 0.0370.003?gL(-1), an amount which is several orders of magnitude below the standard limit of 0.1mgL(-1) in drinking water. Ag ion-exchanged glass had characteristics suitable for use as a display screen, such as a light transmittance of 90% and a surface roughness of 0.704nm. Our findings suggest that glass doped with silver ions is more hygienic than non-doped glass is, and should be applied to display screens and glassware. PMID:25837509

  15. High magnetic field, large-volume magnetic multipole ion source producing hydrogen ion beams with high proton ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Yoshikazu; Horiike, Hiroshi; Mizuhashi, Kiyoshi

    1984-01-01

    In order to enhance the proton fraction in hydrogen ion beams, a high magnetic field, large-volume magnetic multipole ion source has been designed and tested. The plasma source is made of a water-cooled rectangular copper chamber, which is surrounded by a set of mild steel strips and samarium-cobalt magnets arranged in a continuous line-cusp geometry. The magnetic field at the inner wall surface is 2.7 kG. This strong magnetic field enables us to enlarge the chamber volume without increasing the ion loss area. Large plasma volume and small ion loss area increase the ion confinement time and enhance the proton yield. The proton fraction in the beams, as measured by both a magnetic momentum mass analyzer and a optical spectrometer, is found to be more than 90% at an ion beam current of 28 A ( j=250 mA/cm2). This source is also operated with a weak magnetic field (0.6 kG) by replacing the samarium-cobalt magnets with AlNiCo magnet, in which case the proton fraction decreases to 80%. These experimental values are in good agreement with the values predicted by a simple scaling equation of the proton ratio on the plasma volume and the ion loss area.

  16. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions using pressurized ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution pressurized ion exchange has been used successfully to study and separate hafnium and zirconium sulfate complexes by chromatographic elution from Dowex 50W-X8 (15 to 25 ..mu..m) resin with sulfuric acid solutions. Techniques were developed to continuously monitor the column effluents for zirconium and hafnium by reaction with fluorometric and colorimetric reagents. Since neither reagent was specific for either metal ion, peak patterns were initially identified by using the stable isotopes /sup 90/Zr and /sup 180/Hf as fingerprints of their elution position. Distribution ratios for both zirconium and hafnium decrease as the inverse fourth power of the sulfuric acid concentration below 2N and as the inverse second power at higher acid concentration. The hafnium-to-zirconium separation factor is approximately constant (approx. 8) over the 0.5 to 3N range. Under certain conditions, an unseparated fraction was observed that was not retained by the resin. The amount of this fraction which is thought to be a polymeric hydrolysis product appears to be a function of metal and sulfuric acid concentrations. Conditions are being sought to give the highest zirconium concentration and the lowest acid concentration that can be used as a feed material for commercial scale-up in the continuous annular chromatographic (CAC) unit without formation of the polymer.

  17. Electron and energy transfer as probes of interparticle ion-exchange reactions in zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, E.S.; Snowden, P.T.; Kim, Y.I.; Mallouk, T.E. )

    1993-08-19

    Photoinduced electron transfer and energy transfer reactions of tris(2,2[prime]-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]) with methylviologen (MV[sup 2+]) and tris(2,2[prime]-bipyridyl)osmium(II) (Os(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]) ion-exchanged onto/into separate zeolite Y particles were studied by emission spectroscopy. The kinetics of interparticle exchange were probed by observing the quenching of the MLCT excited state of-Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] by mobile MV[sup 2+] or OS(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] ions. The exchange reactions occur on time scales of seconds to hours, depending on the ionic strength of the surrounding medium. The time-dependent luminescence data were fitted to a dispersed kinetics model, from which average rate constants for the exchange reactions could be extracted. Time constants for interparticle exchange of MV[sup 2+] and Os(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] ions, in the range 10[sup 3]-10[sup 5] s at electrolyte concentrations of 0.1-3 mM, are significantly longer than the time scales (10[sup [minus]7]-10[sup 1] s) of most electrochemical and photochemical intrazeolitic reactions involving these and similar electroactive ions. These results argue for reaction mechanisms that invoke intrazeolite electron transfer, rather than exchange of electroactive ions followed by solution-phase electron transfer, in these systems. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Desalination by electrodialysis with the ion-exchange membrane prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong-Ho; Han Jeong, Young; Jeong Ryoo, Jae; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2001-01-01

    Ion-exchange membranes modified with the triethylamine [-N(CH 2CH 3) 3] and phosphoric acid (-PO 3 H) groups were prepared by radiation-induced grafting of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto the polyolefin nonwavon fabric (PNF) and subsequent chemical modification of poly(GMA) graft chains. The physical and chemical properties of the GMA-grafted PNF and the PNF modified with ion-exchange groups were investigated by SEM, XPS, TGA, and DSC. Furthermore, electrochemical properties such as specific electric resistance, transport number of K +, and desalination were examined. The grafting yield increased with increasing reaction time and reaction temperature. The maximum grafting yield was obtained with 40% (vol.%) monomer concentration in dioxane at 60C. The content of the cation- and anion-exchange group increased with increasing grafting yield. Electrical resistance of the PNF modified with TEA and -PO 3 H group decreased, while the water uptake (%) increased with increasing ion-exchange group capacities. Transport number of the PNF modified with ion-exchange group were the range of ca. 0.82-0.92. The graft-type ion-exchange membranes prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization were successfully applied as separators for electrodialysis.

  19. Separation of hemicellulose-derived saccharides from wood hydrolysate by lime and ion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojun; Zhuang, Jingshun; Fu, Yingjuan; Tian, Guoyu; Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua

    2016-04-01

    A combined process of lime treatment and mixed bed ion exchange was proposed to separate hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDS) from prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) of lignocellulose as value added products. The optimization of lime treatment achieved up to 44.2% removal of non-saccharide organic compounds (NSOC), mainly colloidal substances, with negligible HDS degradation at 0.5% lime level and subsequent neutralization by phosphoric acid. The residual NSOC and calcium ions in lime-treated PHL were eliminated by mixed bed ion exchange. The breakthrough curves of HDS and NSOC showed selective retention toward NSOC, leading to 75% HDS recovery with 95% purity at 17 bed volumes of exchange capacity. In addition, macroporous resin showed higher exchange capacity than gel resin as indicated by the triple processing volume. The remarkable selectivity of the combined process suggested the feasibility for HDS separation from PHL. PMID:26859331

  20. Pb(II) biosorption using chitosan and chitosan derivatives beads: equilibrium, ion exchange and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Ngah, W S Wan; Fatinathan, S

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the adsorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution onto chitosan, chitosan-GLA and chitosan-alginate beads. Several important parameters influencing the adsorption of Pb(II) ions such as initial pH, adsorbent dosage and different initial concentration of Pb(II) ions were evaluated. The mechanism involved during the adsorption process was explored based on ion exchange study and using spectroscopic techniques. The adsorption capacities obtained based on non-linear Langmuir isotherm for chitosan, chitosan-GLA and chitosan-alginate beads in single metal system were 34.98, 14.24 and 60.27 mg/g, respectively. However, the adsorption capacity of Pb(II) ions were reduced in the binary metal system due to the competitive adsorption between Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions. Based on the ion exchange study, the release of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+ ions played an important role in the adsorption of Pb(II) ions by all three adsorbents but only at lower concentrations of Pb(II) ions. Infrared spectra showed that the binding between Pb(II) ions and the adsorbents involved mostly the nitrogen and oxygen atoms. All three adsorbents showed satisfactory adsorption capacities and can be considered as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:20614774

  1. Ionic strength and ion ratio effects on the single crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, J.D.; Briedis, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Single crystal growth rates of calcium oxalate monohydrate, CaC/sub 2/O/sub 4/ . H/sub 2/O, were measured as a function of ionic strength and of calcium to oxalate free ion ratio. The photomicroscopic technique was used which allowed measurement of the growth rates of individual faces of single crystals. The amounts of reagents required to maintain a constant relative supersaturation of 3.7 for all experiments were determined using an iterative computer algorithm which allowed the use of various background electrolytes, ionic strength, and free ion ratios. For a range of ionic strengths of I = .0024 to 0.5 for each of the background electrolytes KCl, LiCl, and KClO/sub 4/, and a free ion ratio (Ca/sup 2+/)/(C/sub 2/O/sub 4//sup 2-/) = 1, facial growth rate showed a steady increase with ionic strength towards an asymptotic maximum. The curves of growth rate, R, versus ionic strength followed approximately the form R = k I/sup n/ with 0 < n < 1, suggesting a mechanism of growth enhancement with increasing ionic strength by compression of the electrical double layer at the crystal/solution interface. For a range of free ion ratios (Ca/sup 2+/)/(C/sub 2/O/sub 4//sup 2-/) = 0.01 to 100 and an ionic strength of I = 0.15 M, the observed growth rate showed a maximum at equimolar free ion conditions, with decreasing growth rates observed at lower and higher ion ratios. This growth rate maximum was not apparent under conditions with no added background electrolyte. These results indicate that relative supersaturation as usually used for crystal growth may not be the complete or appropriate driving force for describing electrolyte crystal growth.

  2. Extraction of steroidal glucosiduronic acids from aqueous solutions by anionic liquid ion-exchangers

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Vernon R.; Litwiller, Robert D.; Goodrich, June E.

    1972-01-01

    A pilot study on the extraction of three steroidal glucosiduronic acids from water into organic solutions of liquid ion-exchangers is reported. A single extraction of a 0.5mm aqueous solution of either 11-deoxycorticosterone 21-glucosiduronic acid or cortisone 21-glucosiduronic acid with 0.1m-tetraheptylammonium chloride in chloroform took more than 99% of the conjugate into the organic phase; under the same conditions, the very polar conjugate, ?-cortol 3-glucosiduronic acid, was extracted to the extent of 43%. The presence of a small amount of chloride, acetate, or sulphate ion in the aqueous phase inhibited extraction, but making the aqueous phase 4.0m with ammonium sulphate promoted extraction strongly. An increase in the concentration of ion-exchanger in the organic phase also promoted extraction. The amount of cortisone 21-glucosiduronic acid extracted by tetraheptylammonium chloride over the pH range of 3.9 to 10.7 was essentially constant. Chloroform solutions of a tertiary, a secondary, or a primary amine hydrochloride also will extract cortisone 21-glucosiduronic acid from water. The various liquid ion exchangers will extract steroidal glucosiduronic acid methyl esters from water into chloroform, although less completely than the corresponding free acids. The extraction of the glucosiduronic acids from water by tetraheptylammonium chloride occurs by an ion-exchange process; extraction of the esters does not involve ion exchange. PMID:5075264

  3. Membrane ion-exchange chromatography for process-scale antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, H L; Fahrner, R L; Xu, Y; Norling, L A; Blank, G S

    2001-01-12

    The large-scale production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies demands economical purification processes with high throughputs. The potential for ion-exchange membrane adsorbers to replace traditional ion-exchange columns was evaluated. Breakthrough capacities of commercially available cation-exchange membranes were determined as a function of flow-rate and layer number. Due to economic and process restrictions, cation-exchange membranes may not currently be advantageous for process-scale antibody purification in a bind and elute mode. However, anion-exchange membranes in a flow-through mode may provide a reasonable alternative to columns for the removal of low levels of impurities such as DNA, host cell protein, and virus. PMID:11217020

  4. Automated resource-saving technology of ion-exchange water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livshits, M.

    2015-01-01

    Stable high quality of the purified water can be provided by adaptive control of water-treatment installations with the observer in a loop of the control system on the basis of observer of ion exchange processes. To obtain this goal the following problems have been solved: the hierarchic structure of water treatment system is developed; the system of water treatment quality criteria for ion exchange processes is developed; the created mathematical model of ionic exchange processes is functionally oriented to application in control system as an observer; methodologies of identification of a mathematical model of ionic exchange processes is developed; verification of the mathematical model of ionic exchange is performed on experimental-industrial basis; automatic control system of water treatment with observer in the loop is developed for low-waste installation of a heat supply system.

  5. Novel ion-exchange membranes for electrodialysis prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuneda, Satoshi; Saito, Kyoichi; Misuhara, Hisashi; Sugo, Takanobu

    1995-11-01

    Ion-exchange membranes have been used to concentrate seawater to produce salt as well as to desalinate brackish water to render it potable. Also, the interest in applications of ion-exchange membranes as separators for electrodialytic desalination of bioproducts and separators in hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells has been growing. Novel ion-exchange membranes containing sulfonic acid (SO{sub 3}H) and trimethyl ammonium [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] groups were prepared by a simple method of radiation-induced cografting of sodium styrene sulfonate (SSS) with acrylic acid (AAc) and vinyl benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (VBTAC) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), onto a polyethylene film with a thickness of 50 {micro}m. The high density graft chain was introduced throughout the polyethylene film. The maximum cation- and anion-exchange capacities of the resultant membranes were 2.5 and 1.3 mol/kg, receptively. These membranes exhibited an electrical resistance one order lower than commercially available ion-exchange membranes; for example, 12 h cografting provided cation- and anion-exchange membranes whose electrical resistances in a 0.5 M NaCl solution were 0.25 and 0.85 {Omega} cm{sup 2}, respectively. From the evaluation of electrodialytic desalination in a batch mode, using a pair of the graft-type ion-exchange membranes, the time required to achieve 99.5% desalination of the initial 0.5 M NaCl solutions was reduced to 85% comparing with that of the commercial ion-exchange membranes.

  6. Orthogonal test design for optimization of synthesis of MTX/LDHs hybrids by ion-exchange method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Su-Qing; Dai, Chao-Fan; Wang, Lin; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-04-01

    Based on orthogonal test design, the factors influencing the synthesis of methotrexate intercalated magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxides (MTX/LDHs for short) by ion-exchange method, such as weight ratio of pristine LDHs to MTX (R for short), exchange temperature, time and pH value were investigated. Of the four controllable independent variables, R had the strongest effect on the crystallinity and the drug-loading capacity and the optimum synthesis conditions considered from the crystallinity and the drug-loading capacity both pointed to the same values, i.e., R=2:1, pH=9.5, temperature of 80 C and exchange time of 3 day. The XRD diffractions indicated that high MTX content was in favor of the formation of intercalated hybrids, while low content lead to the failure of it. TEM photos indicated that the intercalated hybrids all exhibited aggregated hexagonal plates. In order to improve the morphology, two different states of pristine LDHs, i.e., powder and colloid, were chosen to prepare MTX/LDHs hybrids and the results indicated that colloid state of pristine was advantageous to obtain regular particles. The study also revealed that the properties of hybrids obtained at optimum conditions by ion-exchange were superior to that obtained from standard methods, such as co-precipitation method.

  7. Semi-aerobic stabilized landfill leachate treatment by ion exchange resin: isotherm and kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamri, Mohd Faiz Muaz Ahmad; Kamaruddin, Mohamad Anuar; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Foo, Keng Yuen

    2015-03-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the treatability of ion exchange resin (Indion MB 6 SR) for the removal of chromium (VI), aluminium (III), zinc (II), copper (II), iron (II), and phosphate (PO4)3-, chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) and colour from semi-aerobic stabilized leachate by batch test. A range of ion exchange resin dosage was tested towards the removal efficiency of leachate parameters. It was observed that equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir model for metal ions and Freundlich was ideally fit for COD, NH3-N and colour. Intra particle diffusion model, pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order isotherm models were found ideally fit with correlation of the experimental data. The findings revealed that the models could describe the ion exchange kinetic behaviour efficiently, which further suggests comprehensive outlook for the future research in this field.

  8. Ion-exchange sorption and preparative chromatography of biologically active materials

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonov, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the problems of fine physico-chemical biotechnology; types of highly permeable network polyelectrolytes; methods for studying the permeability and porosity of network polyelectrolytes; the conformation state and flexibility of the structural elements of network polyelectrolytes; ion-exchange processes without the sorption of physiologically active substances; ion exchange, hydration, and swelling; nucleosides, nucleotides, alkaloids, sulfonamides, and miscellaneous physiologically active subtances; sharp front formation for the exchange of ions with the same valences; standard quasi-equilibrium frontal chromatography on ionites; sorption kinetics in ionites with structural heterogeneity; experimental investigations of the diffusivities of organic and physiologically active ions in ionite beads; and increasing the efficiency of low-pressure chromatography by using surface-layer and bidispersed ionites.

  9. Ion temperatures in HIP-1 and SUMMA from charge-exchange neutral optical emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures were obtained from observations of the H sub alpha, D sub alpha, and He 587.6 nm lines emitted from hydrogen, deuterium, and helium plasmas in the SUMMA and HIP-1 mirror devices at Lewis Research Center. Steady state discharges were formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical or annular anodes and hollow cathodes located at the peaks of the mirrors. The ion temperatures were found from the Doppler broadening of the charge-exchange components of spectral lines. A statistical method was developed for obtaining scaling relations of ion temperature as a function of current, voltage, and magnetic flux density. Derivations are given that take into account triangular monochromator slit functions, loss cones, and superimposed charge-exchange processes. In addition, the Doppler broadening was found to be sensitive to the influence of drift on charge-exchange cross section. The effects of finite ion-cyclotron radius, cascading, and delayed emission are reviewed.

  10. Biocompatibility Research of a Novel pH Sensitive Ion Exchange Resin Microsphere

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongfei; Shi, Shuangshuang; Pan, Weisan; Sun, Changshan; Zou, Xiaomian; Fu, Min; Feng, Yingshu; Ding, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate biocompatibility and provide in-vivo pharmacological and toxicological evidence for further investigation of the possibility of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere for clinical utilizations. Acute toxicity study and general pharmacological studies were conducted on the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere we prepared. The general pharmacological studies consist of the effects of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere on the nervous system of mice, the functional coordination of mice, the hypnosis of mice treated with nembutal at subliminal dose, the autonomic activities of tested mice, and the heart rate, blood pressure, ECG and breathing of the anesthetic cats. The LD50 of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere after oral administration was more than 18.84 gKg-1. Mice were orally administered with 16 mgKg-1, 32 mgKg-1 and 64 mgKg-1 of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere and there was no significant influence on mice nervous system, general behavior, function coordination, hypnotic effect treated with nembutal at subliminal dose and frequency of autonomic activities. Within the 90 min after 5 mgKg-1, 10 mgKg-1, 20 mgKg-1 pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere was injected to cat duodenum, the heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and ECG of the cats didnt make significant changes in each experimental group compared with the control group. The desirable pharmacological and toxicological behaviors of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere exhibited that it has safe biocompatibility and is possible for clinical use. PMID:25276183

  11. Structure-Property Relationships in Hydroxide-Exchange Membranes with Cation Strings and High Ion-Exchange Capacity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Gu, Shuang; Xiong, Ruichang; Zhang, Bingzi; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2015-12-01

    A series of poly(2,4-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) hydroxide-exchange membranes (HEMs) with cation strings containing a well-defined number of cations (CS-n) and similar, high ion-exchange capacities are synthesized to investigate the effect of cation distribution on key HEM properties. As the number of cations on each string grows, the size of the ionic clusters increases from 10 to 55?nm. Well-connected ion pathways and a hydrophobic framework are observed for n?4. The enhanced phase segregation increases the hydroxide conductivity from CS-1 to CS-6 (30 to 65?mS?cm(-1) ) and suppresses the water uptake (from 143?% to 62?%). Moreover, molar hydroxide conductivities for CS-n membranes show two distinctive stages as n increases: ?23?S?cm(2) ?mol(-1) for n?3; and ?34?cm(2) ?mol(-1) for n?4. PMID:26630241

  12. Structure simulation into a lamellar supramolecular network and calculation of the metal ions/ligands ratio

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Research interest in phosphonates metal organic frameworks (MOF) has increased extremely in the last two decades, because of theirs fascinating and complex topology and structural flexibility. In this paper we present a mathematical model for ligand/metal ion ratio of an octahedral (Oh) network of cobalt vinylphosphonate (Co(vP)H2O). Results A recurrent relationship of the ratio between the number of ligands and the number of metal ions in a lamellar octahedral (Oh) network Co(vP)H2O, has been deducted by building the 3D network step by step using HyperChem 7.52 package. The mathematical relationship has been validated using X ray analysis, experimental thermogravimetric and elemental analysis data. Conclusions Based on deducted recurrence relationship, we can conclude prior to perform X ray analysis, that in the case of a thermogravimetric analysis pointing a ratio between the number of metal ions and ligands number around 1, the 3D network will have a central metal ion that corresponds to a single ligand. This relation is valid for every type of supramolecular network with divalent metal central ion Oh coordinated and bring valuable information with low effort and cost. PMID:22932493

  13. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  14. Ion exchange properties of Wyodak premium coal samples

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.

    1993-08-23

    Low rank coals (lignite and subbituminous) contain exchangeable cations. A sample of {minus}20+200 mesh Argonne Premium Wyodak coal was washed with nitric acid in a burette fitted with a coarse glass frit at the base of the graduations to remove the exchangeable cations from the system. The eluent was passed to a flow-through pH electrode and a titration curve was obtained on a computer file. A series of electrodes (pH, calcium, sodium and potassium) were used in separate experiments to follow the elution from the coal. Some implications for coal structure are also indicated.

  15. Selective separation of sodium ions from a mixture with phenylalanine by Donnan dialysis with a profiled sulfogroup cation exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'eva, V. I.; Goleva, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of separating ions of metal from a mixture with ampholyte (an amino acid) by Donnan dialysis with an MK-40 sulfogroup cation exchange membrane is demonstrated. Conditions ensuring the selectivity and intensity of the mass transfer of sodium ions from a mixture with bipolar phenylalanine ions into a diffusate containing hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange membrane are found.

  16. Ion exchange determines iodine-131 concentration in aqueous samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairman, W. D.; Sedlet, J.

    1967-01-01

    Inorganic radioiodide in aqueous media is analyzed by separating the radioactive iodine-131 as the iodide ion on a silver chloride column. The activity in the final precipitate may be determined by beta or gamma counting.

  17. Effect of ? potential on the ?-/?+ ratio in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wen-Mei; Yong, Gao-Chan; Zuo, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (IBUU) transport model, effects of the ? resonance potential on the free n /p and ?-/?+ ratios in the central collision of 197Au+197Au at beam energies of 200 and 400 MeV/nucleon are studied. It is found that the effect of the ? potential on the ratio of pre-equilibrium free n /p is invisible. The effect of ? isovector potential on the kinetic-energy-integrating ratio of ?-/?+ may be observable only at lower incident beam energies and with stiffer symmetry energy. The strength of the ? isoscalar potential affects the height of the ?-/?+ ratio around the Coulomb peak but does not affect the kinetic-energy-integrating ratio ?-/?+ . In heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies, relating to the question of nonconservation of energy on ? or ? productions, one can replace the ? potential by the nucleon isoscalar potential especially when a soft symmetry energy is employed.

  18. Improvements in macroreticular particles for ion-exchange and gel-permeation chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of chromatographic processes is often limited by the resistance to mass transfer into the exchanger particles. The likelihood of the exchange process being limited by particle diffusion resistance is especially high when one or both of the exchanging ions has a high molecular weight, and thus large molecular size and low mobility within the particles. Separation of ionic species from bioreactors is likely to involve such high molecular weight species and slow diffusion rates. Macroreticular particles are more effective in these applications because the larger specie can diffuse more freely into the inner regions of the particles through large pores. The effects of small viscous flow rates through the larger pores of the macroreticular particle structure are examined in this paper to show how such flow can increase exchange rates. The importance of such flow is evaluated in terms of an effective diffusivity within the particle. The performance of an ion-exchange material can be affected strongly by the dimensions of its internal structure. The approach used to describe and evaluate the performance of ion-exchange materials with high-molecular-weight ions can be applied to macroreticular particles for separation of biological species and polymers by gel permeation. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Numerical modeling of field-assisted ion-exchanged channel waveguides by the explicit consideration of space-charge buildup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, Piotr

    2011-08-01

    A numerical model explicitly considering the space-charge density evolved both under the mask and in the region of optical structure formation was used to predict the profiles of Ag concentration during field-assisted Ag+--Na+ ion exchange channel waveguide fabrication. The influence of the unequal values of diffusion constants and mobilities of incoming and outgoing ions, the value of a correlation factor (Haven ratio), and particularly space-charge density induced during the ion exchange, on the resulting profiles of Ag concentration was analyzed and discussed. It was shown that the incorporation into the numerical model of a small quantity of highly mobile ions other than exclusively Ag+ and Na+ may considerably affect the range and shape of calculated Ag profiles in the multicomponent glass. The Poisson equation was used to predict the electric field spread evolution in the glass substrate. The results of the numerical analysis were verified by the experimental data of Ag concentration in a channel waveguide fabricated using a field-assisted process.

  20. BARIUM AND RADIUM REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER BY ION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the applicability of weak acid exchange resin in the hydrogen form for removal of hardness, barium and radium from groundwater. Weak acid resin in the hydrogen form eliminates the addition of sodium to drinking water. The capac...

  1. Improved hydrous oxide ion-exchange compound catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.

    1986-04-09

    Disclosed is a catalytic material of improved activity which comprises a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal or quaternary ammonium titanate, zirconate, niobate, or tantalate, in which the metal or ammonium cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective quantity of a catalyst metal, and which has been subsequently treated with a solution of a Bronsted acid.

  2. Preparation of catalysts via ion-exchangeable coatings on supports

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.

    1986-04-09

    Disclosed are: new catalytic compositions which comprise an inert support coated with a hydrous alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, or quaternary ammonium titanate, niobate, zirconate, or tantalate, in which the alkali or alkaline earth metal or quaternary ammonium cations have been exchanged for a catalytically effective quantity of a catalytically effective metal.

  3. Sodium-calcium ion exchange in cardiac membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, J P; Sutko, J L

    1979-01-01

    Membrane vesicles isolated from rabbit ventricular tissue rapidly accumulated Ca2+ when an outwardly directed Na+ gradient was formed across the vesicle membrane. Vesicles loaded internally with K+ showed only 10% of the Ca2+ uptake activity observed with Na+-loaded vesicles. Dissipation of the Na+ gradient with the monovalent cation exchange ionophores nigericin or narasin caused a rapid decline in Ca2+ uptake activity. The Ca2+-ionophore A23187 inhibited Ca2+ uptake by Na+-loaded vesicles and enhanced the rate of Ca2+ loss from the vesicles after uptake. Efflux of preaccumulated Ca2+ from the vesicles was stimulated 30-fold by the presence of 50 mM Na+ in the external medium. Na+-dependent uptake and efflux of Ca2+ were both inhibited by La3+. The results indicate that cardiac membrane vesicles exhibit Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity. Fractionation of the vesicles by density gradient centrifugation revealed a close correspondence between Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity and specific ouabain-binding activity among the various fractions. This relationship suggests that the observed Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity derives from the sarcolemmal membranes within the vesicle preparation. PMID:284383

  4. Properties of nickel-cadmium separators. [ion exchange membrances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.

    1977-01-01

    The thickness, moisture content, exchange capacity, tensile strength, diffusion characteristics, stability, and electrical properties are discussed for the 2291 radiation-grafted separator used in military vented nickel cadmium aircraft batteries. A regression analysis of separator resistance as a function of temperature and KOH concentration is included.

  5. NITRATE REMOVAL FROM WATER SUPPLIES BY ION EXCHANGE - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anion exchange using synthetic organic resins is a proven and practical technology for the removal of nitrate from water supplies. However, disposal of the spent regenerant brime solution containing nitrate is a potential problem. Two processes were examined in detail in this rep...

  6. NITRATE REMOVAL FROM WATER SUPPLIES BY ION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anion exchange using synthetic organic resins is a proven and practical technology for the removal of nitrate from water supplies. However, disposal of the spent regenerant brine solution containing nitrate is a potential problem. Two processes were examined in detail in this rep...

  7. Alkaline aluminum phosphate glasses for thermal ion-exchanged optical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Chen, Baojie; Pun, Edwin Yue Bun; Lin, Hai

    2015-04-01

    Alkaline aluminum phosphate glasses (NMAP) with excellent chemical durability for thermal ion-exchanged optical waveguide have been designed and investigated. The transition temperature Tg (470 C) is higher than the ion-exchange temperature (390 C), which is favorable to sustain the stability of the glass structure for planar waveguide fabrication. The effective diffusion coefficient De of K+-Na+ ion exchange in NMAP glasses is 0.110 ?m2/min, indicating that ion exchange can be achieved efficiently in the optical glasses. Single-mode channel waveguide has been fabricated on Er3+/Yb3+ doped NMAP glass substrate by standard micro-fabrication and K+-Na+ ion exchange. The mode field diameter is 9.6 ?m in the horizontal direction and 6.0 ?m in the vertical direction, respectively, indicating an excellent overlap with a standard single-mode fiber. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter ?2 is 5.47 10-20 cm2, implying a strong asymmetrical and covalent environment around Er3+ in the optical glasses. The full width at half maximum and maximum stimulated emission cross section of the 4I13/2 ? 4I15/2 are 30 nm and 6.80 10-21 cm2, respectively, demonstrating that the phosphate glasses are potential glass candidates in developing compact optoelectronic devices. Pr3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+ doped NMAP glasses are promising candidates to fabricate waveguide amplifiers and lasers operating at special telecommunication windows.

  8. Adsorption of three pharmaceuticals on two magnetic ion-exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Yang, Weiben; Zhang, Ziwei; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuping

    2015-05-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments poses potential risks to the ecology and human health. This study investigated the removal of three widely detected and abundant pharmaceuticals, namely, ibuprofen (IBU), diclofenac (DC), and sulfadiazine (SDZ), by two magnetic ion-exchange resins. The adsorption kinetics of the three adsorbates onto both resins was relatively fast and followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Despite the different pore structures of the two resins, similar adsorption patterns of DC and SDZ were observed, implying the existence of an ion-exchange mechanism. IBU demonstrated a combination of interactions during the adsorption process. These interactions were dependent on the specific surface area and functional groups of the resin. The adsorption isotherm fittings verified the differences in the behavior of the three pharmaceuticals on the two magnetic ion-exchange resins. The presence of Cl- and SO4(2-) suppressed the adsorption amount, but with different inhibition levels for different adsorbates. This work facilitates the understanding of the adsorption behavior and mechanism of pharmaceuticals on magnetic ion-exchange resins. The results will expand the application of magnetic ion-exchange resins to the removal of pharmaceuticals in waters. PMID:25968278

  9. Partition Coefficients of Selected Compounds Using Ion Exchange Separation of Cesium From High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, James J.; Blanchard, David L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Urie, Michael W.

    2004-04-24

    The removal of cesium radioisotope (137Cs) from the High Level Waste stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site is a formidable chemical separations challenge for the Waste Treatment Plant. An eluatable organic-based ion exchange resin was selected as the baseline technology (1). The baseline technology design employs a proprietary macrocyclic weak-acid ion exchange resin to adsorb the cesium (137Cs) during the process loading cycle in a fixed bed column design. Following loading, the cesium is eluted from the resin using a nitric acid eluant. Previous work provided limited understanding of the performance of the resin, processed with actual wastes, and under multiple load and elute conditions, which are required for the ion exchange technology to be underpinned sufficiently for resolution of all process-related design issues before flowsheet and construction drawings can be released. By performing multiple ion exchange column tests with waste feeds, and measuring the chemical and radionuclide compositions of the waste feeds, column effluents and column eluants, ion exchange stream composition information can be provided for supporting resolution of selected design issues.

  10. Calculation of exchange constants in spinel ferrites with magnetic S-state ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Xu; He, Yongxue; Yang, Aria; Bernardo, Barbiellini; Harris, Vincent G.; Vittoria, Carmine

    2005-05-01

    The exchange constants in spinel ferrites with S-state ions, including magnesium ferrite, lithium ferrite, and manganese ferrite, were calculated using modified Becke's three-parameter density functional, where the percentage of Hartree-Fock exchange in total exchange was introduced as a variable parameter (w) to match the experimental results of exchange constants by controlling the localization and delocalization of the electrons. Consistently, the scaling factor of the 3d orbitals of ferric ions was also introduced as a variable parameter (?). From the calculation, the values of parameters w and ? matching the experimental results of JAB (nearest-neighbor exchange constant between tetrahedral and octahedral sublattices) were concentrative, while those matching the experimental results of JAA (nearest-neighbor exchange constant inside tetrahedral sublattice) and JBB (nearest-neighbor exchange constant inside octahedral sublattice) were dispersive. Observing that JAB is dominant in most practical ferrimagnetic spinel ferrites and the current accuracy of the measurements of JBB and JAA may be insufficient to support more accurate conclusion, it is suggested that there may be an empirical universal law of parameters w and ? for spinel ferrites with S-state ions.

  11. Tabulation and evaluation of ion exchange data on smectites, certain zeolites and basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, L.V.

    1980-05-01

    An extensive search of the literature has been made for ion exchange data on smectites, certain zeolites and basalt. The data are in the form of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, corrected selectivity coefficients, and distribution coefficients. Room temperature alkali and alkaline earth metal cation ion exchange data for smectites are extensive. Correlation between the exchange free energies of alkali metal cations on Camp Berteau montmorillonite values with their Debeye-Hueckel parameter was found. Significant differences in values of exchange constants for the same reaction on different smectites were noted. While this in part may be attributable to differences in experimental procedures, much of the variance is probably due to differences in charge densities and the effective field strengths of the smectites. Differences in field strength are related to the type and amount of substitution on intercrystalline octahedral and tetrahedral sites. Data on smectites suggest that cation exchange selectivities are very strong functions of temperature. Experiments on the exchange properties of clinoptilolite and mordenite have been generally confined to alkali and alkaline earth cations although data for certain transition metal ions are also available for synthetic mordenite. The temperature dependences of zeolite exchange selectivities remain largely unknown. Distribution coefficients for groundwater-basalt systems have been measured for a variety of elements at temperatures up to 150/sup 0/C. Steady state concentrations are often never achieved either from the sorption or the desorption side. Classical models of ion exchange have been applied successfully to zeolite and smectite exchange reactions. The sorption behavior of a basalt is better treated with models of the interface which take surface ionization and complexation into account.

  12. Self-consistent Equilibrium Model of Low-aspect-ratio Toroidal Plasma with Energetic Beam Ions

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Belova; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.Z. Cheng

    2003-04-09

    A theoretical model is developed which allows the self-consistent inclusion of the effects of energetic beam ions in equilibrium calculations of low-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. A two-component plasma is considered, where the energetic ions are treated using a kinetic Vlasov description, while a one-fluid magnetohydrodynamic description is used to represent the thermal plasma. The model allows for an anisotropic distribution function and a large Larmor radius of the beam ions. Numerical results are obtained for neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Self-consistent equilibria with an anisotropic fast-ion distribution have been calculated for NSTX. It is shown for typical experimental parameters that the contribution of the energetic neutral-beam ions to the total current can be comparable to that of the background plasma, and that the kinetic modifications of the equilibrium can be significant. The range of validity of the finite-Larmor-radius expansion and of the reduced kinetic descriptions for the beam ions in NSTX is discussed. The calculated kinetic equilibria can be used for self-consistent numerical studies of beam-ion-driven instabilities in NSTX.

  13. Charge exchange spectroscopy of multiply charged ions of industrial and astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Hajime

    2013-07-01

    Photon emission spectra have been measured in collisions of multiply charged ions with neutral target gases in keV collision energies. Extreme ultra-violet emission spectra of Xe and Sn ions have contributed to give the atomic data for the understanding of the light source plasmas for the next generation semiconductor lithography. And soft X-ray emission spectra of highly charged O ions have related to the solar wind charge exchange, and the results have been regarded as the useful data for the understanding the collisions of the solar wind ions with the neutral matter within the heliosphere.

  14. Sorption of beryllium from fluorine-containing solutions by amino-phosphonate amphoteric ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Rychkov, V.N.

    1981-10-20

    Sorption of beryllium ions by a series of amino-phosphonate amphoteric ion-exchange resins from BeF/sub 2/ solutions containing HF, NH/sub 4/F.HF, and NH/sub 4/F has been studied. The influence of the salt form of the resin, concentration of fluoride ions, and beryllium content in the original solutions was demonstrated. The mechanism of ion exchange on amphoteric ion-exchangers was postulated on the basis of chemical analysis and sorption and IR-spectroscopic data. Conclusions are drawn regarding the participation of phosphorus-containing groups of the resins in exchange. Data are presented on desorption of complex fluoride ions and beryllium from amphoteric ion-exchange resins by solutions of hydrofluoric, hydrochloric, and sulfuric acids, ammonium fluoride, and ammonium hydrogenfluoride.

  15. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  16. Effect of duty ratio of patterned surface on planarization by gas cluster ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagato, Keisuke; Toyoda, Noriaki; Naito, Hiroki; Tani, Hiroshi; Sakane, Yasuo; Yamada, Isao; Nakao, Masayuki; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya

    2011-04-01

    We studied the effect of the duty ratio, i.e., the ratio of hill width to pitch, of patterned diamondlike carbon (DLC) surfaces on Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) planarization effect. The patterns of 40 nm depth were fabricated on Si substrates by electron beam lithography and CHF3 reactive-ion etching. The pitch of the line-and-space pattern was 300 nm and three duty ratios were adopted. Then, refilling materials were deposited to 50 nm thickness on the patterned substrates. The test samples were irradiated by Ar-GCIB and the resultant surface profiles were measured by atomic force microscopy. The acceleration energy for one cluster was 20 keV. The dose was set in the range from 51014 to 51016 ion/cm2. Although there was a difference in the dose, the patterns clearly disappeared upon irradiating GCIB. The reduction rate of the peak-to-valley height decreased as the width of the hill increased. We indicated that GCIB irradiation is effective for the planarization of patterned surfaces with various duty ratios.

  17. Building 579 waste ion exchange facility characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Sholeen, C.M.; Geraghty, D.C.

    1997-03-01

    External direct surveys were performed for elevated {gamma} levels with a PG2 portable detector connected to a PRM 5-3 meter and for elevated {alpha} and {beta} levels with an NE portable detector. No {gamma} activity above background was detected. Several locations, the floor and west wall of building 579 and the manhole, had low levels of {beta} activity, up to 87 {+-} 49 dis/min. These values are below the allowable residual surface contamination limits for removable beta activity. There is water in the Mixed Bed Exchange Vessel, the Cation Exchange Vessel, the Closed Drain Tank, the manhole and some of the pipes. The accessible internal surfaces of the pipes, tanks and columns had higher levels of {beta} activity up to 172 {+-} 52 dis/min and some {alpha} activity up to 106 {+-} 29 dis/min. After the water is removed from the vessels, tanks, and lines, they should be surveyed to determine whether the areas accessible for smear surveys are representative of the general inside contamination levels. There are elevated levels of radionuclides in the resin from the Cation Exchange Vessel and in the water from the manhole. Since the radionuclide concentrations in the manhole water are less than ten times the site release criteria, it does not need any processing before it is released to the onsite drains. Although there are RCRA metals on the resin in the Cation Exchange Vessel, the amount that is removed during a leaching analysis is below the toxicity Characteristic level. Therefore, the resin is a radioactive waste not a mixed waste.

  18. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...: Distilled water, 5 percent acetic acid, and 50 percent alcohol. Extraction from each sample will not exceed... grapefruit juice to adjust the ratio of citric acid to total solids of the grapefruit juice produced....

  19. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... centimeters of the following solvents: Distilled water, 5 percent acetic acid, and 50 percent alcohol... will be used in the production of grapefruit juice to adjust the ratio of citric acid to total...

  20. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... centimeters of the following solvents: Distilled water, 5 percent acetic acid, and 50 percent alcohol... will be used in the production of grapefruit juice to adjust the ratio of citric acid to total...

  1. Synthesis of polymer ion-exchange hydrogels under ? - irradiation 60Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, V. M.; Zhevnyak, V. D.; Pak, V. Kh; Ananev, V. A.; Borodin, U. V.

    2015-04-01

    We have reported earlier about the modification of ion-exchange hydrogel under the influence of gamma radiation. The optimal absorbed dose of irradiation had been choosen for radiation modification of polymer hydrogels by ionits to produce products with a high content of the gel - fractions and sufficient mechanical properties. The dependence of the static exchange capacity of hydrogels on the type of ionit and its fractional composition had been studied. The dependence of the static exchange capacity of the quantitative composition of the ionit in the volume of the hydrogel had been investigated. The ion-exchange medical eye lenses had been made under selected conditions of synthesis. Their sorption properties had been studied.

  2. Mathematical modeling of salt-gradient ion-exchange simulated moving bed chromatography for protein separations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Gang

    2004-12-01

    The salt-gradient operation mode used in ion-exchange simulated moving bed chromatography (SMBC) can improve the efficiency of protein separations. A detailed model that takes into account any kind of adsorption/ion-exchange equilibrium, salt gradient, size exclusion, mass transfer resistance, and port periodic switching mechanism, was developed to simulate the complex dynamics. The model predictions were verified by the experimental data on upward and downward gradients for protein separations reported in the literature. All design and operating parameters (number, configuration, length and diameter of columns, particle size, switching period, flow rates of feed, raffinate, desorbent and extract, protein concentrations in feed, different salt concentrations in desorbent and feed) can be chosen correctly by numerical simulation. This model can facilitate the design, operation, optimization, control and scale-up of salt-gradient ion-exchange SMBC for protein separations. PMID:15547973

  3. Structural changes of soda-lime silica glass induced by a two-step ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suszynska, M.; Krajczyk, L.; Macalik, B.

    2010-11-01

    Introduction of silver or copper ions in soda-lime silica glass has been investigated by studying the data obtained from optical absorption measurements and the transmission electron microscopy performances. It has been stated that the optical and structural characteristics of the doped specimens are effectively controlled by the dopant concentrations and parameters of both, the ion-exchange procedures and the annealing treatments applied afterwards. By sequential ion exchange of as received specimens in molten baths of Cu2Cl2 and (AgNO3 in NaNO3), the composition and electronic structure of the elemental-nanoclusters have been altered. Moreover, depending on the order of annealing, different microstructures were created in the fabricated composites. Like this, the two-step exchange determines a new engineering way new materials with desired optical properties could be produced.

  4. Characterization of ion exchange stationary phases via pH transition profiles.

    PubMed

    Lendero, Nika; Vidic, Jana; Brne, Peter; Frankovic, Vida; Strancar, Ales; Podgornik, Ales

    2008-03-21

    New non-destructive method for characterization of ion exchange chromatographic columns based on transient pH formed by a step change in ionic strength of buffer solutions was examined. The method was used to distinguish between cation and anion or weak and strong ion exchange chromatographic supports and to determine the capacity of the chromatographic resins. The general scheme to distinguish between most commonly used types of ion exchange chromatographic columns was proposed. The duration of pH transient was shown to be linearly proportional to the total ionic capacity and was used to estimate protein dynamic binding capacity of the resin. The effects of pH, concentration and temperature on transient pH duration were examined. PMID:18262197

  5. Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    CHARLES, NASH

    2004-12-02

    The River Protection Project - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant will use cesium ion exchange to remove 137Cs from Low Activity Waste down to 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW, ILAW product. The project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig, R, 644, SL-644, resin registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT or the Department of Energy approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. To provide an alternative to this sole-source resin supply, the RPP-WTP initiated a three-stage process for selection and qualification of an alternative ion exchange resin for cesium removal in the RPPWTP. It was recommended that resorcinol formaldehyde RF be pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644.

  6. Ion exchange chromatography and radioimmunoassay procedure for measuring opioid peptides and substance P

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstroem, L.; Christensson, I.; Folkesson, R.; Stenstroem, B.; Terenius, L.

    1983-10-01

    The measurements of peptides of the enkephalin, dynorphin and substance P systems is complicated by the number of possible precursor fragments and degradation products that might cross-react with the antisera. By using an ion-exchanger step before radioimmunoassay one can reduce the possibility that observed peptide levels are due to precursors or metabolites. The ion-exchanger method runs with good recovery and its main advantage is that many samples can be run in parallel. The recovery from the ion-exchanger was similar using two different homogenizing media, whereas the measured endogenous levels of (Met) and (Leu)enkephalin were 3-4 fold higher with 1M acetic acid than when a 1:1 MeOH/HCl mixture was used for tissue extraction.

  7. Development and Evaluation of Sustained Release Tablet of Betahistine Hydrochloride Using Ion Exchange Resin Tulsion T344

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Vijay D.; Pawar, Nilesh

    2012-01-01

    An attempt was made to sustain the release of Betahistine hydrochloride by complexation technique using strong cation-exchange resin, Tulsion T344. The drug loading onto ion-exchange resin was optimized for mixing time, activation, effect of pH, swelling time, ratio of drug?:?resin, and temperature. The resinate was evaluated for micromeritic properties and characterized using XRPD and IR. For resinate sustained release tablets were formulated using hydoxypropyl methylcellulose K100M. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, thickness, friability, drug content, weight variation, and in vitro drug release. Tablets thus formulated (Batch T-3) provided sustained release of drug over a period of 12?h. The release of Betahistine HCl from resinate controls the diffusion of drug molecules through the polymeric material into aqueous medium. Results showed that Betahistine HCl was formulated into a sustained dosage form as an alternative to the conventional tablet. PMID:22779010

  8. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  9. Sorption of iron(III) from chromate solution by the aminocarboxylic ion exchanger ANKB-2

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyanova, O.F.; Izmailova, D.R.; Kurolap, N.S.; Uglyanskaya, V.A.

    1986-12-20

    The possibility of iron(III) sorption by the amphoteric ion exchanger ANKB-2 from chromate solution and its superiority over the cation exchanger KU-23 (10/60) have been demonstrated. By means of IR spectroscopy it has been shown that iron(III) sorption from chromate solution by ANKB-2 proceeds via both ionic and coordination reactions. The proportion of these kinds of reaction does not depend on the Cr(VI) content of the initial solution.

  10. Use of multi-transition-metal-ion-exchanged zeolite 13X catalysts in methane emissions abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, K.S.; Chao, C.Y.H.; Kwong, C.W.; Wan, M.P.

    2008-04-15

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas. It has a global warming potential (GWP) 23 times greater than carbon dioxide. Reducing methane emissions would lead to substantial economic and environmental benefits. This study investigated the performance of multi-transition-metal-(Cu, Cr, Ni, and Co)-ion-exchanged zeolite 13X catalysts in methane emissions abatement. The catalytic activity in methane combustion using multi-ion-exchanged catalysts was studied with different parameters including the molar percentage of metal loading, the space velocity, and the inlet methane concentration under atmospheric pressure and at a relatively low reaction temperature of 500 C. The performance of the catalysts was determined in terms of the apparent activation energy, the number of active sites of the catalyst, and the BET surface area of the catalyst. This study showed that multi-ion-exchanged catalysts outperformed single-ion-exchanged and acidified 13X catalysts and that lengthening the residence time led to a higher methane conversion percentage. The enhanced catalytic activity in the multi-ion-exchanged catalysts was attributed to the presence of exchanged transition ions instead of acid sites in the catalyst. The catalytic activity of the catalysts was influenced by the metal loading amount, which played an important role in affecting the apparent activation energy for methane combustion, the active sites, and the BET surface area of the catalyst. Increasing the amount of metal loading in the catalyst decreased the apparent activation energy for methane combustion and also the BET surface area of the catalyst. An optimized metal loading amount at which the highest catalytic activity was observed due to the combined effects of the various factors was determined. (author)

  11. Effect of ion-to-electron mass ratio on the evolution of ion beam driven instability in particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jinhy; Min, Kyoungwook; Lee, Ensang; Parks, George K.

    2012-09-15

    In particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation studies of ion-ion two-stream instability, a reduced ion-to-electron mass ratio is often employed to save computation time. It is tacitly assumed that electrons do not play a significant role in the evolution of the instability as the ion-ion interactions are regarded to occur on time scales much slower than the response time of electrons. However, as the effect of such a reduced mass ratio has never been closely examined, we have studied the evolution of the ion beam driven instability using a one-dimensional electrostatic PIC code by rescaling the simulation parameters according to the ion-electron mass ratio. We made a reference simulation run with a mass ratio of 100 first and compared the results to the simulation results using the real mass ratio with parameters rescaled from those of the reduced mass ratio. External electric fields were applied in these simulations, which accelerated the electrons and excited an ion acoustic type instability, forming electron phase space holes. Merging of the electron holes affected the ion dynamics significantly when the reduced mass ratio was used, while the interplay between the electron and ion dynamics became different depending on the rescaling methods in the case of the real mass ratio. Another simulation test with much enhanced external electric field results in similar mass ratio dependence. The present simulation results clearly show that the reduced mass ratio should be used cautiously in PIC simulations as the electron dynamics can modify the ion instabilities significantly by affecting the ion motions.

  12. Waste treatment by ion-exchange. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning wastewater treatment by ion-exchange techniques. Methods for removing metals, nitrates, phosphates, fluorides, and organic pollutants are described. Applications of this technology to the electroplating, metal finishing, pulp, paper, and other industries are included. The citations examine the commercial feasibility of using ion-exchange methods for pollutant reduction when the process is used alone or in combination with various pretreatment techniques. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Waste treatment by ion-exchange. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning wastewater treatment by ion-exchange techniques. Methods for removing metals, nitrates, phosphates, fluorides, and organic pollutants are described. Applications of this technology to the electroplating, metal finishing, pulp, paper, and other industries are included. The citations examine the commercial feasibility of using ion-exchange methods for pollutant reduction when the process is used alone or in combination with various pretreatment techniques. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Fractionation of Aspergillus niger cellulases by combined ion exchange affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, R.F.; Allen, T.L.; Dykema, P.A.

    1987-02-05

    Eight chemically modified cellulose supports were tested for their ability to adsorb components of the Aspergillus niger cellulase system. At least two of the most effective adsorbents, aminoethyl cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose, were shown to be useful for the fractionation of cellulases. These supports apparently owe their resolving capacity to both ion exchange and biospecific binding effects; however, the relative importance of each effect is unknown. These observations form the basis for a new cellulase fractionation technique, combined ion exchange-affinity chromatography. 22 references.

  15. Summary of Testing of SuperLig 639 at the TFL Ion Exchange Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.L.

    2000-12-19

    A pilot scale facility was designed and built in the Thermal Fluids Laboratory at the Savannah River Technology Center to test ion exchange resins for removing technetium and cesium from simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW). The facility supports the design of the Hanford River Protection Project for BNFL, Inc. The pilot scale system mimics the full-length of the columns and the operational scenario of the planned ion exchange system. Purposes of the testing include confirmation of the design, evaluation of methods for process optimization and developing methods for waste volume minimization. This report documents the performance of the technetium removal resin.

  16. RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN CHEMISTRY FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2010-01-14

    A principal goal at the Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange technology is being considered for cesium removal using a polymer resin made of resorcinol formaldehyde that has been engineered into microspheres. The waste under study is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste; therefore, the resin performance was evaluated with actual dissolved salt waste. The ion exchange performance and resin chemistry results are discussed.

  17. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffó, G. S.; Farina, S. B.; Schulz, F. M.

    2013-07-01

    Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums. The corrosion rate of the steel in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins in the absence of contaminants or in the presence of 2.3 wt.% sulphate content remains low (less than 0.1 μm/year) during the whole period of the study (900 days). The presence of chloride ions increases the corrosion rate of the steel at the beginning of the exposure but, after 1 year, the corrosion rate drops abruptly reaching a value close to 0.1 μm/year. This is probably due to the lack of water to sustain the corrosion process. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years, it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. Cementation of ion-exchange resins does not seem to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums that contained them; even in the case the matrix is highly contaminated with chloride ions.

  18. Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-07-27

    The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low activity and high level waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The ion exchange removal of cesium (Cs) and technetium (Tc) ions is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as pertechnetate), from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Technology Center demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with a similar Hanford tank sample (241-AW-101). Those experiments included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

  19. Ion exchange membrane textile bioreactor as a new alternative for drinking water denitrification.

    PubMed

    Berdous, Dalila; Akretche, Djamal-Eddine; Abderahmani, Ahmed; Berdous, Sakina; Meknaci, Rima

    2014-06-01

    This work enters in the optics of the denitrification of a polluted water by two membrane techniques, the Donnan dialysis (DD) and the ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB), using a conventional barrier, composed by an anion exchange membrane (AEM), and a hybrid barrier, where the AEM is combined to an anion exchange textile (AET). The effects of the hydrodynamic factor and the nature of the carbon source on the transfer and the reduction of nitrate ions were studied. The study results obtained through the DD showed the effectiveness of the hybrid barrier in the recovery and concentration of nitrate ions. This was also recorded during denitrification by the hybrid process, called the ion exchange membrane textile bioreactor (IEMTB), with a significant reduction of nitrates, compared to IEMB, due to the efficiency of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formed at the surface of the AET. Here, the permselectivity of the membrane and the good bioreduction of the pollutants are no longer major conditions to the better performance of the process. The application of IEMTB in the denitrification of groundwater, having a nitrate concentration of 96.67ppm, shows a total reduction of nitrate ions without changing the quality of the water. Indeed, the analysis of the recovered water, or yet the treated water, shows the absence of the bacterium by-products and concentrations in the nitrates and nitrites which are, respectively, equal to 0.020.01 ppm, and inferiors to the detection limit (<0.02 ppm). PMID:24609773

  20. Recovering gold from thiosulfate leach pulps via ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, Michael J.; O'Malley, Glen

    2002-10-01

    Increasing environmental and occupational safety concerns about the use of cyanide in gold processing has increased interest in more acceptable alternative lixiviants, the most promising of which is thiosulfate. However, the thiosulfate process lacks a proven inpulp method of recovering the dissolved gold because activated carbon is not effective for the absorption of the gold-thiosulfate complex. This paper describes work aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of commercially available anion exchange resins for the recovery of gold from thiosulfate leach liquors and pulps.

  1. Denitration of Rocky Flats Ion-Exchange Resins: Recommendation of Denitration Processes, October 19, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob Espinoza; Mary Barr; Wayne Smith

    1998-12-01

    Resin denitration via anion-exchange is an implementable process that can effectively mitigate the hazards associated with stored resins in which the bulk of the nitrate consists of an "exchangeable nitrate" ionically bound to the cationic sites of the anion-exchange resins. Salicylate has been selected as the exchange anion of choice because of its superior selectivity for the Rocky Flats resins and its unique potential for comprehensive recovery and recycle. This report outlines a single recommended resin denigration procedure that is reasonably independent of the resin composition and the current stored form. This procedure is not optimized but rather seeks to `over-treat' the resins so that a single procedure works for the variety of stored resins. The recommended treatment with sodium salicylate reduces resins by 95-99+% the measured exothermic behavior of the ion-exchange.

  2. Implication of the Electron Exchange-Correlation on Fully Nonlinear Quantum Dust Ion-Acoustic Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khireddine, Mebrouk; Leila Ait, Gougam; Mouloud, Tribeche

    2016-01-01

    We examine the effect of the electron exchange-correlation on weak and arbitrary amplitude quantum dust ion-acoustic (QDIA) solitons. The reduced quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model is used. Carrying out a fully nonlinear analysis, it is found that the effect of the exchange-correlation on the main quantities for solitary-wave propagation can be quite important. In particular, it may be noted that the arbitrary amplitude QDIA soliton experiences a spreading as the phenomenon of exchange-correlation becomes effective. Furthermore, our results show that the exchange-correlation effects inhibit the formation of the flat-bottomed solitons and do not favor their emergence. It turns out that exchange-correlation and quantum diffraction may act concurrently to set up the conditions for the existence of the QDIA solitary waves. Our results complement and provide new insight into our previously published work on this problem.

  3. Isotope ratio measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, Maria

    2005-04-01

    The basic principles of secondary ion mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry have been shortly revisited. The applications of both techniques as exploited for the isotope ratio measurements in several matrices have been reviewed. Emphasis has been given to research fields in expansions such as solar system studies, medicine, biology, environment and nuclear forensic. The characteristics of the two techniques are discussed in terms of sensitivity and methodology of quantification. Considerations on the different detection possibilities in SIMS are also presented.

  4. Sorption of beryllium from sulfate solutions by amino-carboxylic amphoteric ion-exchange resins (polyampholytes)

    SciTech Connect

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Tsevin, A.P.; Rychkov, V.N.

    1986-05-10

    In studies of sorption of beryllium ions from BeSO4 solutions by a series of aminocarboxylic polyampholytes the influence of pH and of the H2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and BeSO4 concentrations was demonstrated. The mechanism of the process is postulated on the basis of sorption data and the results of IR-spectroscopic studies. It is concluded that carboxyl groups of polyampholytes take part in ion exchange.

  5. Investigation of phosphate removal using sulphate-coated zeolite for ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Woo; Hong, Seok-Won; Kim, Dong-Ju; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2012-01-01

    Sulphate-coated zeolite (SCZ) was characterized and employed for the removal of phosphate from aqueous solutions using both batch and column tests. Batch experiments were conducted to assess the sulphate dilution ratio, reaction time for coating, surface washing and calcination temperature during the synthesis of SCZ. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-first-order models were suitable to explain the sorption characteristics of phosphate onto the SCZ. Equilibrium tests showed that SCZ was capable of removing phosphate, with a maximum binding energy beta = 30.2 mg g(-1), compared to other adsorbents, such as activated alumina and ion exchange resin. The Thomas model was applied to the adsorption of phosphate to predict the breakthrough curves and the parameters of a column test. The model was found to be suitable for describing the adsorption process of the dynamic behaviour of the SCZ column. The total adsorbed quantity and equilibrium uptake ofphosphate related to the effluent volumes were determined by evaluating the breakthrough curves obtained under the allowed conditions. The results of batch and column experiments, as well as the low cost of the adsorbent, suggested that SCZ could be used as an adsorbent for the efficient and cost-effective removal of phosphate from aqueous solution. PMID:23393974

  6. Experiments with an ion-neutral hybrid trap: cold charge-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. W.; Goodman, D. S.; Sivarajah, I.; Wells, J. E.; Banerjee, S.; Ct, R.; Michels, H. H.; Mongtomery, J. A.; Narducci, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their large trap depths (1 eV or 10,000 K), versatility, and ease of construction, Paul traps have important uses in high-resolution spectroscopy, plasma physics, and precision measurements of fundamental constants. An ion-neutral hybrid trap consisting of two separate but spatially concentric traps [a magneto-optic trap (MOT) for the neutral species and a mass-selective linear Paul trap for the ionic species] is an ideal apparatus for sympathetic cooling. However, over the past few years, hybrid traps have proven most useful in measuring elastic and charge-exchange rate constants of ion-neutral collisions over a wide temperature range from kilo-Kelvin to nano-Kelvin. We report some initially surprising results from a hybrid trap system in our laboratory where we have loaded the Paul trap with Ca+ ions in the presence of a Na MOT (localized dense gas of cold Na atoms). We find a strong loss of Ca+ ions with MOT exposure, attributed to an exothermic, non-resonant ion-neutral charge-exchange process with an activation barrier, which leads to the formation of Na+ ions. We propose a detailed mechanism for this process. We obtain an estimated measure of the rate constant for this charge exchange of 2 10-11 cm3/s, much less than the Langevin rate, which suggests that the Langevin assumption of unit efficiency in the reaction region is not correct in this case.

  7. Ion exchanger in the brain: Quantitative analysis of perineuronally fixed anionic binding sites suggests diffusion barriers with ion sorting properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Markus; Reinert, Tilo; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Wagner, Friedrich E.; Trger, Wolfgang; Reinert, Anja; Jger, Carsten; Brckner, Gert; Arendt, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) are a specialized form of brain extracellular matrix, consisting of negatively charged glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins and proteoglycans in the direct microenvironment of neurons. Still, locally immobilized charges in the tissue have not been accessible so far to direct observations and quantifications. Here, we present a new approach to visualize and quantify fixed charge-densities on brain slices using a focused proton-beam microprobe in combination with ionic metallic probes. For the first time, we can provide quantitative data on the distribution and net amount of pericellularly fixed charge-densities, which, determined at 0.40.5?M, is much higher than previously assumed. PNs, thus, represent an immobilized ion exchanger with ion sorting properties high enough to partition mobile ions in accord with Donnan-equilibrium. We propose that fixed charge-densities in the brain are involved in regulating ion mobility, the volume fraction of extracellular space and the viscosity of matrix components.

  8. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Workman, P.; Poole, K.; Erich, D.; Harden, J.

    1998-05-01

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper.

  9. Kinetic electron and ion instability of the lunar wake simulated at physical mass ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt Hutchinson, Ian H. Zhou, Chuteng

    2015-03-15

    The solar wind wake behind the moon is studied with 1D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using a physical ion to electron mass ratio (unlike prior investigations); the simulations also apply more generally to supersonic flow of dense magnetized plasma past non-magnetic objects. A hybrid electrostatic Boltzmann electron treatment is first used to investigate the ion stability in the absence of kinetic electron effects, showing that the ions are two-stream unstable for downstream wake distances (in lunar radii) greater than about three times the solar wind Mach number. Simulations with PIC electrons are then used to show that kinetic electron effects can lead to disruption of the ion beams at least three times closer to the moon than in the hybrid simulations. This disruption occurs as the result of a novel wake phenomenon: the non-linear growth of electron holes spawned from a narrow dimple in the electron velocity distribution. Most of the holes arising from the dimple are small and quickly leave the wake, approximately following the unperturbed electron phase-space trajectories, but some holes originating near the center of the wake remain and grow large enough to trigger disruption of the ion beams. Non-linear kinetic-electron effects are therefore essential to a comprehensive understanding of the 1D electrostatic stability of such wakes, and possible observational signatures in ARTEMIS data from the lunar wake are discussed.

  10. Tracing isospin with the {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} ratio in central heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ming; Xiao Zhigang; Zhu Shengjiang

    2010-10-15

    Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent hadronic transport model, we have investigated the isospin mixing with the probe of the {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} ratio in central isospin asymmetric {sup 96}Ru+{sup 96}Zr collision at an incident energy of 400 MeV/u. The isospin equilibrium is not reached according to the asymmetrical distribution of the {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} ratio with rapidity. In comparison with the nucleon observable, it suggests that the pion ratio {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} is a promising observable to probe the relaxation of isospin degree of freedom in central heavy ion collisions without being strongly affected by the surface effect. Because of the small system size and rather strong effect of rescattering on pions, the isospin mixing shows insignificant dependence on the stiffness of the symmetry energy in the relevant colliding system.

  11. Development of a Waste Water Regenerative System - Using Sphagnum Moss Ion-exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeon, M.; Wheeler, R.; Leahy, Jj

    The use of inexpensive, light weight and regenerative systems in an enclosed environment is of great importance to sustained existence in such habitats as the International Space Station, Moon or even Mars. Many systems exist which utilise various synthetic ion exchangers to complete the process of waste water clean-up. These systems do have a very good exchange rate for cations but a very low exchange rate for anions. They also have a maximum capacity before they need regeneration. This research proposes a natural alternative to these synthetic ion-exchangers that utilises one of natures greatest ion-exchangers, that of Sphagnum Moss. Sphagna can be predominantly found in the nutrient poor environment of Raised Bogs, a type of isolated wetland with characteristic low pH and little interaction with the surrounding water table. All nutrients come from precipitation. The sphagna have developed as the bog's sponges, soaking up all available nutrients (both cation & anion) from the precipitation and eventually distributing them to the surrounding flora and fauna, through the water. The goal of this research is to use this ability in the processing of waste water from systems similar to isolated microgravity environments, to produce clean water for reuse in these environments. The nutrients taken up by the sphagna will also be utilised as a growth medium for cultivar growth, such as those selected for hydroponics' systems.

  12. Design and performance of an air-cooled ion exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Matthew J., Jr.; Golben, P. Mark; Orlando, John J.; Adlhart, Otto J.

    An ion exchange membrane (IEM) fuel cell combined with hydride storage vessels provides an attractive alternative to secondary batteries. This paper discusses the principals of operation, general design features, and performance characteristics of air-cooled IEM cells. Designs of IEM H2/O2 and H2/air fuel cell systems are described in detail and illustrated with schematic diagrams.

  13. ANNUAL REPORT. NEW METAL NIOBATE AND SILICOTITANATE ION EXCHANGERS: DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project focuses on the synthesis and characterization of silicotitanate- and niobate-based ion exchangers for Cs and Sr removal and their related condensed phases as potential ceramic waste forms, as well as on understanding the structural property relationship and thermodyn...

  14. Synthesis of Anomeric Methyl Fructofuranosides and Their Separation on an Ion-Exchange Resin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurminen, Erkki; Poijarvi, Paivi; Koskua, Katja; Hovinen, Jari

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of d-fructose with methanol in the presence of acid as a catalyst gives a mixture of methyl-[beta]-d-fructopyranoside, methyl-[alpha]-D-fructofuranoside, and methyl-[beta]-d-fructofuranoside, which were separated on an ion exchange column and characterized polarimetrically.

  15. Catalytic activity of rhodium complex immobilized on AN-31 ion exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Parshikova, G.N.; Korneva, L.I.; Kononov, Yu.S.

    1995-08-10

    Immobilized platinum-metal complexes are of interest as heterogeneous catalysts. Ion-exchange resins may be used as supports for catalytically active complexes. However, immobilized metal complexes are often unstable, are washed out from supports, and are lost with reaction products. Secure immobilization of metal complexes on supports is possible, for example, via coordination of the central metal by electron-donor groups of the support. This is the case when platinum metals are sorbed from solutions by nitrogen-containing ion exchangers. Complexes thus immobilized have high catalytic activity. Previously the authors demonstrated that rhodium(III) is sorbed from solutions containing rhodium aqua-chloro complexes as stable complexes with AN-31. These complexes were not desorbed with 10 M hydrochloric acid. Stable amino complexes of transition metals sorbed on ion exchangers are known to be active in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. In this work, the authors have studied catalytic properties of rhodium complex with the ion exchanger under atmospheric pressure at 25-80{degrees}C.

  16. Controlled transdermal delivery of leuprorelin by pulsed iontophoresis and ion-exchange fiber.

    PubMed

    Malinovskaja, Kristina; Laaksonen, Timo; Hirvonen, Jouni

    2014-11-01

    Poor transport efficacy and issues related to biological variation are major concerns in the development of novel iontophoretic devices for the transdermal delivery of therapeutic peptides. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of constant and pulsed current on the transport of nonapeptide leuprorelin acetate across porcine epidermis. Also, the potential of drug delivery system combining iontophoresis and ion-exchange fibers as drug matrices for the delivery of the same peptide was tested. The present study demonstrated the benefit of pulsed current (Tn=2.5910(-4)) over constant current (Tn=1.710(-4)) in terms of more efficient transdermal peptide transport. An increase in the delivery of electroosmotic marker by pulsed current was due to the combined effect of more pronounced electroosmotic transport and reduced inhibition of passive transport. We also showed a promising approach using ion-exchange fibers for controlling the release and iontophoretic transdermal delivery of peptides. Positively charged leuprorelin acetate was bound to the ion-exchange groups of cation-exchange fibers until it was gradually released by mobile counter ions in the external solution. Transdermal flux from acrylic acid grafted Smopex-102 fibers remained higher (Jss=0.71?g/hcm(2)) than from sulfonic acid grafted Smopex-101 fibers (Jss=0.31?g/hcm(2)) due to better drug release. PMID:25173088

  17. Dose consequence analysis for transporting Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) rupture loop ion exchange columns

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, H.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-03

    Ion exchange columns from the 309 Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor rupture loop must be shipped to the solid waste burial ground. The enclosed calculational note documents the calculations used to calculate the absorbed doses expected in the case of a postulated accident.

  18. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ION EXCHANGE AND ACTIVATED ALUMINA PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents a long term performance study of two ion exchange (IE) and two activated alumina (AA) treatment plants to remove arsenic from drinking water. Performance information was collected on these systems that are located in the northeast for one full year. The stud...

  19. Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-07-27

    The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low and high activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The cesium (Cs-137) and technetium (Tc-99) ion exchange removal is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as anionic pertechnetate ) from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Tech nology Center2 demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with an Envelope C sample from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107. Those experiments also included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

  20. High-resolution determination of {sup 147}Pm in urine using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Elchuk, S.; Lucy, C.A.; Burns, K.I.

    1992-10-15

    Ion exchange preconcentration followed by HPLC purification prior to scintillation counting was used to measure the concentration of {sup 147}Pm in urine. the detection limit for this method was found to be 0.1 Bq (3 fg) of {sup 147}Pm in 500 ml of urine.

  1. Updating of sewage - purification facilities of electroplating enterprises with counterflow ion-exchange filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Sorokin, P. D.; Telitsyn, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The paper focuses on work of electroplating sewage-purification facilities of mechanical engineering production; drawbacks caused by specific features of physical and chemical processes of coagulation and technological malfunctions have been revealed. Additional equipment - ion-exchanging filters have been selected on the basis of designed methods, they make it possible for enterprises of mechanical engineering to implement conversion to water rotation systems.

  2. Development and testing of ion exchangers for treatment of liquid wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.; Davidson, D.J.; Chase, C.W.; Egan, B.Z.; Ensor, D.D.; Bright, R.M.; Glasgow, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    This report addresses three areas of waste treatment: (1) treatment of newly generated low-level liquid waste and Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate using inorganic ion exchangers; (2) treatment of processing streams at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC); and (3) removal of radionuclides from organic solutions. Distribution of various radionuclides between simulated waste solutions and several sorbents was determined in batch tests. Inorganic ion exchangers were prepared in the form of microspheres by an intemal gelation process. Microspheres of hydrous titania, hydrous zirconia, hydrous titania containing embedded sodium cobalt hexacyanoferrate, and the corresponding phosphate forms of these materials were prepared. Several zeolites (PDZ-140, PDZ-300, EE-96, CBV-10A) and inorganic ion exchangers (hydrous titania, hydrous zirconia, polyantimanic acid, sodium cobalt hexacyanoferrate) were tested for the removal of cesium and strontium from the acidic simulated Cleanex raffinate generated at REDC. A resorcinol-based ion-exchange resin and three types of sodium titanate were tested for removal of cesium and strontium from the REDC caustic dissolver solution. Hydrous titania, hydrous zirconia, and their corresponding phosphates were tested for the removal of Eu{sup 3+} from various solutions of di-2-ethylbexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in toluene or dodecane.

  3. The development and characterization of ion exchange membranes for selected electrochemical power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C., Jr.; Assink, R. A.

    The work is reviewed on the development and characterization of ion exchange membranes in an effort to improve the efficiency of three flowing electrolyte batteries. The batteries are: (1) NASA's iron chromium redox battery; (2) Lockheed's zinc ferricyanide battery; and (3) Johnson Control's zinc bromine battery. These batteries were developed for solar photovoltaic, utility load leveling, and electric vehicle applications, respectively.

  4. Development and testing of ion exchangers for treatment of liquid wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.; Davidson, D.J.; Chase, C.W.; Egan, B.Z. ); Ensor, D.D.; Bright, R.M.; Glasgow, D.C. )

    1993-03-01

    This report addresses three areas of waste treatment: (1) treatment of newly generated low-level liquid waste and Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate using inorganic ion exchangers; (2) treatment of processing streams at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC); and (3) removal of radionuclides from organic solutions. Distribution of various radionuclides between simulated waste solutions and several sorbents was determined in batch tests. Inorganic ion exchangers were prepared in the form of microspheres by an intemal gelation process. Microspheres of hydrous titania, hydrous zirconia, hydrous titania containing embedded sodium cobalt hexacyanoferrate, and the corresponding phosphate forms of these materials were prepared. Several zeolites (PDZ-140, PDZ-300, EE-96, CBV-10A) and inorganic ion exchangers (hydrous titania, hydrous zirconia, polyantimanic acid, sodium cobalt hexacyanoferrate) were tested for the removal of cesium and strontium from the acidic simulated Cleanex raffinate generated at REDC. A resorcinol-based ion-exchange resin and three types of sodium titanate were tested for removal of cesium and strontium from the REDC caustic dissolver solution. Hydrous titania, hydrous zirconia, and their corresponding phosphates were tested for the removal of Eu[sup 3+] from various solutions of di-2-ethylbexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in toluene or dodecane.

  5. WASTEWATER DEMINERALIZATION BY TWO-STAGE FIXED-BED ION EXCHANGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 9.5 l/min (2.5 gpm) two-stage fixed bed ion exchange process (primary cation - primary anion - secondary cation - secondary anion) was operated on a feed of carbon treated secondary effluent for 48 months at Pomona, California. To achieve high levels of regeneration efficiency ...

  6. Vitrification of Cesium-Laden Organic Ion Exchange Resin in a Stirred Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A; Sargent, T.N.; Overcamp, T.J.; Bickford, D.F.

    1997-07-09

    The goal of this research was a feasibility study for vitrifying the organic ion exchange resin in a stirred-tank melter. Tests were conducted to determine the fate of cesium including the feed, exit glass, and offgas streams and to assess any impact of feeding the resin on the melter or its performance.

  7. SUMMARY REPORT: CONTROL AND TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR THE METAL FINISHING INDUSTRY: ION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technology Transfer ummary Report is one of a series of reports that summarizes a pollution control technology for the metal finishing industry. he 45-page report is intended to promote an understanding of the use of ion exchange in the metal finishing industry. The sections...

  8. Highly-selective and Regenerable Ion Exchange for Perchlorate Remediation, Recovery, and Environmental Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Brown, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has recently emerged as a widespread contaminant found in drinking water and groundwater supplies in the United States and is known to disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting iodide uptake. Among various treatment technologies, the highly-selective and regenerable ion-exchange technology has recently been developed at ORNL for removing ClO4- from contaminated water. The selective ion exchange technology relies on a unique, highly specific resin to trap ClO4- from contaminated water. The treatment system is then regenerated and perchlorate is destroyed. The reaction that destroys ClO4- produces Cl- and Fe(III) that are used to regenerate the resin, resulting in practically zero secondary waste production. In comparison with conventional non-selective ion-exchange technology, this new treatment process is expected to result in not only a reduced O&M cost but also the elimination of the disposal of hazardous wastes containing perchlorate. Additionally, the selective and regenerable ion exchange technology has allowed the quantitative recovery of perchlorate from contaminated water for reuse, or from other environmental matrices such as sediment, groundwater, and salt deposits for perchlorate isotopic and source identification. Naturally-forming perchlorate has been found to contain distinct oxygen and chlorine isotope signatures or anomalies as compared with anthropogenic perchlorate and can thus provide unambiguous identification of the sources of perchlorate contamination as a powerful tool for the forensics of perchlorate in the environment.

  9. ONE MGD ION EXCHANGE PLANT FOR REMOVAL OF NITRATE FROM WELL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A full scale 1 mgd demonstration plant, using ion exchange, for removal of nitrate from well water was built at McFarland, California. The plant has been performing satisfactorily in the semi-automatic mode since October 1983. Full automation of the plant was completed in June 19...

  10. AIE cation functionalized layered zirconium phosphate nanoplatelets: ion-exchange intercalation and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; Miao, Chuanlong; Wang, Xiaodan; Yu, Xianghui; Yu, Jihong; Xu, Ruren

    2013-10-25

    An aggregation-induced emission (AIE) probe, possessing a quaternary tetraphenylethene (TPEN) cation, was successfully intercalated into layered α-zirconium phosphate (α-ZrP) nanosheets by ion-exchange. The hybrid materials emit strong blue emissions in aqueous solution which can be used as an effective fluorescence label for HeLa cells. PMID:24022258

  11. EVALUATION OF ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING ON THE LEACHING OF METALS FROM HOUSEHOLD PLUMBING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 16 month pilot plant study was conducted to determine the effect of ion exchange softening on the leaching of metals from household plumbing materials. wo pipe loop pilot plant systems were assembled. ach system consisted of duplicate loops of lead pipe, copper pipe with 50:50 ...

  12. Basis document for PFP plutonium nitrate ion exchange process in Room 228A

    SciTech Connect

    Risenmay, H.R.

    1997-04-23

    The PFP facility currently has approximately 4300 liters of plutonium nitrate solution in storage. This material will be calcined by the Vertical Denigration Calciner (VDC) located in room 230C. However, part of the material needs to be purified to remove constituents that will interfere with the calcination process. An Ion Exchange process using Reillex{trademark} HPQ anion exchange resin was tested by the Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) (I). The Ion exchange process is to be installed in glovebox HC-7 in room 228A/234-5Z. The plutonium separated from the interfering constituents will be in a concentrated condition ready to be calcined by the VDC in room 230C. The oxide product of the VDC will be placed into the 2736-Z vaults for long term storage.

  13. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  14. Ion exchange substrates for plant cultivation in extraterrestrial stations and space crafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Vladimir

    2012-07-01

    Ion exchange substrates Biona were specially designed at the Belarus Academy of Sciences for plants cultivation in spacecrafts and extraterrestrial stations. The first versions of such substrates have been successfully used in several space experiments and in a long-term experiment in which three soviet test-spacemen spent a full year in hermetic cabin imitating a lunar station cabin (1067-1968). In this experiment the life support system included a section with about one ton of the ion exchange substrate, which was used to grow ten vegetations of different green cultures used in the food of the test persons. Due to failure of a number of Soviet space experiments, decay of the Soviet Union and the following economic crisis the research in this field carried out in Belarus were re-directed to the needs of usual agriculture, such as adaptation of cell cultures, growing seedlings, rootage of cuttings etc. At present ion exchange substrate Biona are produced in limited amounts at the experimental production plant of the Institute of Physical Organic Chemistry and used in a number of agricultural enterprises. New advanced substrates and technologies for their production have been developed during that time. In the presentation scientific principles of preparation and functioning of ion exchange substrates as well as results of their application for cultivation different plants are described. The ion exchange substrate is a mixture of cation and anion exchangers saturated in a certain proportions with all ions of macro and micro elements. These chemically bound ions are not released to water and become available for plants in exchange to their root metabolites. The substrates contain about 5% mass of nutrient elements far exceeding any other nutrient media for plants. They allow generating 3-5 kg of green biomass per kilogram of substrate without adding any fertilizers; they are sterile by the way of production and can be sterilized by usual methods; allow regeneration after exhausting. They can serve without additional fertilizers for several years. Their service in the course of exploitation includes only watering. By appearance granular Biona substrate are solid particles with size 0.5-2 mm. Special varieties of Biona substrates, designed for the spacecrafts to withstand zero-gravity conditions, have been made in form of continuous textile materials

  15. EVALUATION OF ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXIC AND NON-CONVENTIONAL POLLUTANT REDUCTION IN BLEACH PLANT EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was designed to evaluate the applicability of ion exchange technology in reducing the pollutional effects of pulp, paper, and paperboard bleach plant effluents. To gain some perspective on the state-of-the-art concerning ion exchange, a literature review was...

  16. CHROMATE AND COPPER ADSORPTION BY DUAL-FUNCTIONAL ION EXCHANGE RESINS MADE FROM AGRICULTURAL BY-PRODUCTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ion exchange resins commonly have a single functionality for either cations or anions. Resins that have a dual functionality for both cations and anions are uncommon. The objective of this study was to create dual-functional ion exchange resins derived from soybean hulls, sugarcane bagasse and cor...

  17. Degradation mechanism of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) ion exchange membranes under vanadium flow battery medium.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhizhang; Li, Xianfeng; Hu, Jinbo; Xu, Wanxing; Cao, Jingyu; Zhang, Huamin

    2014-10-01

    The degradation mechanism of hydrocarbon ion exchange membranes under vanadium flow battery (VFB) medium was investigated and clarified for the first time. This work will be highly beneficial for improving the chemical stability of hydrocarbon ion exchange membranes, which is one of the most challenging issues for VFB application. PMID:25135611

  18. Energy straggling of low-energy ion beam in a charge exchange cell for negative ion production

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, S.; Sasao, M.; Sugawara, H.; Tanaka, N.; Kisaki, M.; Okamoto, A.; Shinto, K.; Kitajima, S.; Nishiura, M.; Wada, M.

    2008-02-15

    Energy straggling in a charge exchange cell, which is frequently used for negative ion production, was studied experimentally and compared with the results of theoretical evaluation. The change of the energy spectrum of a He{sup +} beam due to charge exchange processes in argon gas was measured in the energy range of 2-6 keV. Energy straggling by multiple collisions is expressed by the energy loss formula due to inelastic and elastic processes. The impact parameter is related to the elastic scattering angle, and the geometry of the charge exchange cell and other components of the beam transportation system determines the maximum acceptable scattering angle. The energy spread was evaluated taking the integral limit over the impact parameter into consideration. The theoretical results showed good agreement with those of actual measurement.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Templated Ion Exchange Resins for the Selective Complexation of Actinide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Uy, O. Manual

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a polymeric extractant for the selective complexation of uranyl ions (and subsequently other actinyl and actinide ions) from aqueous solutions (lakes, streams, waste tanks and even body fluids). Chemical insights into what makes a good complexation site will be used to synthesize reagents tailor-made for the complexation of uranyl and other actinide ions. These insights, derived from studies of molecular recognition include ion coordination number and geometry, ionic size and ionic shape, as well as ion to ligand thermodynamic affinity. Selectivity for a specific actinide ion will be obtained by providing the polymers with cavities lined with complexing ligands so arranged as to match the charge, coordination number, coordination geometry, and size of the actinide metal ion. These cavity-containing polymers will be produced by using a specific ion (or surrogate) as a template around which monomeric complexing ligands will be polymerized. The complexing ligands will be ones containing functional groups known to form stable complexes with a specific ion and less stable complexes with other cations. Prior investigator's approaches for making templated resins for metal ions have had marginal success. We have extended and amended these methodologies in our work with Pb(II) and uranyl ion, by changing the order of the steps, by the inclusion of sonication, by using higher complex loading, and the selection of functional groups with better complexation constants. This has resulted in significant improvements to selectivity. The unusual shape of the uranyl ion suggests that this approach will result in even greater selectivities than already observed for Pb(II). Preliminary data obtained for uranyl templated polymers shows unprecedented selectivity and has resulted in the first ion selective electrode for uranyl ion.

  20. Evaluation of Selective Ion Exchange Resins for Removal of Mercury from the H-Area Water Treatment Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2000-09-05

    This study investigated the ability of seven ion exchange (IX) resins, some of which were mercury specific, to remove mercury in H-Area WTU waters from three sources (Reverse Osmosis (RO) Feed, RO Permeate from Train A, and a mercury ''hot spot'' extraction well HEX 18). Seven ion exchange resins, including ResinTech CG8 and Dowex 21K (the cation and anion exchange resins currently used at the H-Area WTU) were screened against five alternative ion exchange materials plus an experimental blank. Mercury decontamination factors (DFs), mercury breakthrough, and post-test contaminant concentrations of IX resins were determined for each IX material tested.

  1. Reverse electrodialysis using bipolar ion-exchange membranes as a source of electric energy

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovarov, N.Ya.; Greben`, V.P.; Kovarskii, N.Ya.

    1994-06-01

    It is established that, in the regime of the H{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}} ions recombination, voltage on the bipolar membranes and the efficiency of the latter, as a transformer of chemical energy into electric, increases in the series of ionogen groups contained in the bipolar region. This is due to an increase in the recombination rate constants in the bipolar contact for the H{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}} ions. As the sodium and chlorine ions penetrate the bipolar transition region, they sharply decrease the membrane potential and the voltage drop on the bipolar membranes, because the ionogen groups turn into salt form, which is catalytically inactive in the H{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}} ions recombination reaction. It is shown that the source of current, containing the MB-24 (bipolar), MF-4sk (cation-exchange), and AMV (anion-exchange) ion-exchange membranes, has a specific power of 0.11 W/dm{sup 2} (calculated in terms of one bipolar membrane) and efficiency of 29% for 0.5 M solution of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide, and 0.5 A/dm{sup 2} current density.

  2. In situ remediation of groundwater contaminated by heavy- and transition-metal ions by selective ion-exchange methods.

    PubMed

    Vilensky, Mark Y; Berkowitz, Brian; Warshawsky, Abraham

    2002-04-15

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using ion-exchange resins in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for the remediation of groundwater contaminated by heavy and transition metals. Ion-exchange resins represent an essentially neglected class of materials which may, in addition to iron, activated carbon, and zeolites, prove effective for use in PRBs. Four resins were considered: two commercially available resins, Duolite GT-73 (Rohm and Haas) and Amberlite IRC-748 (Rohm and Haas), and two solvent-impregnated resins (SIRs). The SIRs were prepared from Amberlite IRA-96 (Rohm and Haas) and two different thiophosphoric extractants. All four resins are able to reduce cadmium, lead, and copper concentrations from 1000 microg/L (typical for contaminated groundwaters) to below 5 microg/L. Significantly, all of the resins are effective for the capture of cadmium, copper, and lead, even in the presence of CaCl2 and clay. Because of their high hydraulic conductivity, the use of these resins in clusters of wells, as an alternative to continuous walls, is considered in the design of effective PRBs. Numerical solution of the groundwater flow equations shows that, depending on the well configuration, most (or all) of the contaminated groundwater can pass through the resins. These results demonstrate the possibility of using selective ion-exchange resins as an effective, active material in PRBs for in situ groundwater remediation. PMID:11993887

  3. Electrosorptive desalination by carbon nanotubes and nanofibres electrodes and ion-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibo; Gao, Yang; Pan, Likun; Zhang, Yanping; Chen, Yiwei; Sun, Zhuo

    2008-12-01

    A novel membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) device, integrating both the advantages of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers (CNTs-CNFs) composite film and ion-exchange membrane, was proposed with high removal efficiency, low energy consumption and low cost. The CNTs-CNFs film was synthesized by low pressure and low temperature thermal chemical vapor deposition. Several experiments were conducted to compare desalination performance of MCDI with capacitive deionization (CDI), showing that salt removal of the MCDI system was 49.2% higher than that of the CDI system. The electrosorption isotherms of MCDI and CDI show both of them follow Langmuir adsorption, indicating no change in adsorption behavior when ion-exchange membranes are introduced into CDI system. The better desalination performance of MCDI than that of CDI is due to the minimized ion desorption during electrosorption. PMID:18929385

  4. Molecular secondary ion formation and H/D exchange in amino acid-metal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirikowsky, M.; Holtkamp, D.; Klsener, P.; Kempken, M.; Benninghoven, A.

    1987-04-01

    The secondary ion emission from UHV-prepared amino acid overlayers on metal substrates was investigated. Besides the well-known protonated and deprotonated (M + H) + and (M - H) -, the ions (M - H) + and (M - 3H) - were observed for the substrates Au and Pt. By means of an amino acid, here glycine, in different deuterated states the structure of these ions and some characteristic fragments could be identified. The coadsorption of phenylalanine and completely deuterated glycine on Au resulted in a H/D exchange between these molecules. The interaction of amino acids and H 2/D 2 coadsorbed from the gas phase was investigated for the substrates Au, Pt, Ag, Ni and Cu, but only on Pt surface a significant interaction was found. For the system glycine and coadsorbed H 2/D 2 on Pt the reaction kinetics of the H/D exchange were studied in detail by variation of the target temperature and the amino acid coverage.

  5. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements of ion temperature and plasma rotation in PBX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehnig, K. P.; Fonck, R. J.; Ida, K.; Powell, E. T.

    1985-05-01

    The primary diagnostic on PBX for ion temperature measurements is charge exchange recombination spectroscopy of low Z ions, wherein fast neutrals from the heating neutral beams excite spectral lines from highly excited states (n>4) of hydrogenic O, C, and He via charge exchange collisions with the respective fully stripped ions. Since the neutral beams on PBX provide relatively low-velocity neutrals (i.e., D beams at 44 keV), best signals are obtained using the near-UV lines of O7+ (e.g., n=8-7, 2976 ). Off-line analysis of the Doppler broadened and shifted line profiles includes nonlinear least-squares fitting to a model line profile, while a simplified on-line fast analysis code permits between-shot data analysis.

  6. Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements of ion temperature and plasma rotation in PBX

    SciTech Connect

    Jaehnig, K.P.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Powell, E.T.

    1984-11-01

    The primary diagnostic on PBX for ion temperature measurements is charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy of low Z ions, wherein fast neutrals from the heating neutral beams excite spectral lines from highly excited states (n greater than or equal to 4) of hydrogenic 0, C, and He via charge-exchange collisions with the respective fully stripped ions. Since the neutral beams on PBX provide relatively low velocity neutrals (i.e., D/sup 0/ beams at 44 keV), the best signals are obtained using the near-uv lines of 0/sup 7 +/ (e.g., n = 8-7, 2976 A). Off-line analysis of the Doppler broadened and shifted line profiles includes non-linear least squares fitting to a model line profile, while a simplified on-line fast analysis code permits between-shot data analysis.

  7. Intense charge exchange of laser-plasma ions with the atoms of a pulsed gas jet

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, V M; Boyarintsev, Y L; Melekhov, A V; Posukh, V G; Ponomarenko, A G; Shaikhislamov, I F

    2007-09-30

    The results of experiments on the interaction of a laser plasma with a pulsed gas jet are presented. The charge exchange of ions with neutral particles was realised for the first time under controllable conditions for a density of the reagents of no less than 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The resonance pumping of the C{sup 3+} ion level with n=3 was observed by spectral methods. The structure of the region of intense charge exchange was determined from plasma photographs. The data obtained suggest that experiments on soft X-ray lasing at a C{sup 5+} ion transition are promising. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  8. Ion-exchanged silica-on-silicon structured channel erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers.

    PubMed

    He, Zian; Li, Yigang; Li, Yingfeng; Zhang, Yanwu; Liu, Liying; Xu, Lei

    2011-06-20

    Silica-on-silicon structured channel erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers (EDWAs) were fabricated by a combination of the ion-exchange and sol-gel techniques. A small signal fiber-device-fiber net gain of 0.5 dB at 1531 nm was obtained for a 4 cm long EDWA with an optimized waveguide structure. The low noise figure of 4.0 dB was also achieved. Samples of different waveguide structures and rare-earth ion doping levels were fabricated to compare the EDWA gain properties. The results demonstrate that a better gain spectrum can be obtained by maximizing the distribution overlap of pump and signal mode intensity. The gain performance can be further improved by reducing upconversion efficiency of the EDWA. This work demonstrates that the ion-exchanged silica-on-silicon waveguide structure is an alternative approach for EDWA fabrication. PMID:21691362

  9. Comparison of ion exchange and cw CO2 laser treatment of Nd-doped phosphate laser glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Gong; Chengfu, Li

    1996-05-01

    In recent years, the effect of laser pre-irradiation and ion exchange on glasses surface were widely carried out to stabilize their damage thresholds. But comparison of ion exchange and CW CO2 laser treatment is never studied, this paper is devoted to the investigation of this question. Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses were heated with CW CO2 laser radiation and were strengthened by ion exchange. Laser damage thresholds of the surface were measured with 1064 nm 10 ns pulses focused to small spots irradiation. Both ion exchange treatment and CW CO2 laser treatment result in residual compress stress occurred at surface, peak-to- volley and microcracks decreased in surface appearance, and damage thresholds of surfaces increased by a factor of over 2. Polariscope, reflected optical microscope and atomic force microscope are used for stress, damage morphologies and surface topography analysis on glass surface. It is shown that laser condition mechanism is consistent with ion exchange treatment mechanism.

  10. Ion Exchange Equilibrium and Kinetic Properties of Polyacrylate Films and Applications to Chemical Analysis and Environmental Decontamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    One of the goals of the original proposal was to study how cross-linking affects the properties of an ion exchange material(IEM) developed at Lewis Research Center. However, prior to the start of this work, other workers at LERC investigated the effect of cross-linking on the properties of this material. Other than variation in the ion exchange capacity, the chemical characteristics were shown to be independent of the cross-linking agent, and the degree of cross-linking. New physical forms of the film were developed (film, supported film, various sizes of beads, and powder). All showed similar properties with respect to ion exchange equilibria but the kinetics of ion exchange depended on the surface area per unit mass; the powder form of the IEM exchanging much more rapidly than the other forms. The research performed under this grant was directed towards the application of the IEM to the analysis of metal ions at environmental concentrations.

  11. Comparison of chromatographic ion-exchange resins V. Strong and weak cation-exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Staby, Arne; Jacobsen, Jan H; Hansen, Ronni G; Bruus, Ulla K; Jensen, Inge Holm

    2006-06-23

    Strong and weak cation-exchangers were compared for a number of chromatographic parameters, i.e. pH dependence, efficiency, binding strength, particle size distribution, static and dynamic capacity, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures. Chromatographic resins investigated were Fractogel EMD SO3- (M), Fractogel EMD SE Hicap (M), Fractogel EMD COO- (M), MacroPrep 25S, MacroPrep High S, MacroPrep CM, CM HyperZ, and Matrex Cellufine C-500. Testing was done with three proteins: Anti-FVII Mab (IgG), aprotinin, and lysozyme. For lysozyme and aprotinin with pI above experimental pH, dependence of pH on retention was generally low, though some pronounced decrease of retention with increasing pH was observed for CM HyperZ. For Anti-FVII Mab with pI<7.5, binding was observed on several resins at pH 7.5. Efficiency results present the expected trend of increasing dependence of plate height as a function of increasing flow rate, and the highest flow dependence was observed for Fractogel EMD COO-. Particle size distribution was determined by two independent methods, coulter counting and SEM pictures, with fair agreement. Binding strength data of cation-exchange resins as a function of ionic strength depends on the protein, but binding and elution at high salt concentration may in general be performed with MacroPrep resins. Comparison of dynamic capacity data at 10% break-through and static capacity measurements shows that a very diverse utilization of approximately 25-90% of the total available capacity is employed during chromatographic operation. The effect of competitive binding from yeast fermentation components on dynamic binding capacity of aprotinin was studied showing a significant decrease in binding capacity. Sepharose FF, Toyopearl 650 M, and Ceramic HyperD F strong and weak cation-exchange resins were included in this study. Resins with good pure aprotinin capacity also performed well for aprotinin in fermentation broth, but the highest relative capacity was obtained with MacroPrep High S having a fairly low pure component dynamic capacity. Results of this paper may be used in the selection of resins for further testing in biopharmaceutical protein purification process development. PMID:16678189

  12. Dissociative recombination of water cluster ions with free electrons: Cross sections and branching ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Oejekull, J.; Andersson, P. U.; Pettersson, J. B. C.; Markovic, N.; Thomas, R. D.; Al Khalili, A.; Ehlerding, A.; Oesterdahl, F.; Ugglas, M. af; Larsson, M.; Danared, H.; Kaellberg, A.

    2008-01-28

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of water cluster ions H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} (n=4-6) with free electrons has been studied at the heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING (Manne Siegbahn Laboratory, Stockholm University). For the first time, branching ratios have been determined for the dominating product channels and absolute DR cross sections have been measured in the energy range from 0.001 to 0.7 eV. Dissociative recombination is concluded to result in extensive fragmentation for all three cluster ions, and a maximum number of heavy oxygen-containing fragments is produced with a probability close to unity. The branching ratio results agree with earlier DR studies of smaller water cluster ions where the channel nH{sub 2}O+H has been observed to dominate and where energy transfer to internal degrees of freedom has been concluded to be highly efficient. The absolute DR cross sections for H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} (n=4-6) decrease monotonically with increasing energy with an energy dependence close to E{sup -1} in the lower part of the energy range and a faster falloff at higher energies, in agreement with the behavior of other studied heavy ions. The cross section data have been used to calculate DR rate coefficients in the temperature range of 10-2000 K. The results from storage ring experiments with water cluster ions are concluded to partly confirm the earlier results from afterglow experiments. The DR rate coefficients for H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} (n=1-6) are in general somewhat lower than reported from afterglow experiments. The rate coefficient tends to increase with increasing cluster size, but not in the monotonic way that has been reported from afterglow experiments. The needs for further experimental studies and for theoretical models that can be used to predict the DR rate of polyatomic ions are discussed.

  13. Magnetization reversal and enhanced tunnel magnetoresistance ratio in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions based on exchange spring electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Yin, Xiaolu; Le Roy, D.; Jiang, Jun; Wei, H. X.; Liou, S. H.; Han, X. F.

    2013-04-01

    The [Co/Pt]n multilayer based perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction stacks with wedged Co60Fe20B20 insertions up to 2 nm, and corresponding perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions were magnetically and electrically investigated. The focus is on the influence of CoFeB insertions in the free and reference electrodes on the overall junction magnetization reversal and magnetoresistance response. The exchange spring behavior was revealed as the Co60Fe20B20 spins canting towards the in-plane direction in the [Co/Pt]n/Co60Fe20B20 hard/soft perpendicular magnetic electrodes. The broad range thickness of wedged Co60Fe20B20 insertion enables to reveal the critical transition, in particular, from rigid coupling to exchange spring coupling. With the help of 375°C annealing under 10 kOe magnetic field, the recovery from distinct multi-domain structure to nearly single domain structure was distinctly observed in the unpatterned perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (p-MTJ) films with CoFeB thickness tCFB≥1.5 nm. Meanwhile, for the corresponding patterned perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with AlOx barrier, the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio exhibited an intense enhancement over 100%. The TMR results and spin configurations were illustrated using an exchange spring model in both magnetic electrodes. The presented study shows the benefit of using exchange spring magnetic electrodes in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction on their performance.

  14. Phenol removal from aqueous solution by adsorption and ion exchange mechanisms onto polymeric resins.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Michelle; Valderrama, Csar; Farran, Adriana; Cortina, Jos Luis

    2009-10-15

    The removal of phenol from aqueous solution was evaluated by using a nonfunctionalized hyper-cross-linked polymer Macronet MN200 and two ion exchange resins, Dowex XZ (strong anion exchange resin) and AuRIX 100 (weak anion exchange). Equilibrium experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms at different pHs. The Langmuir model describes successfully the phenol removal onto the three resins. The extent of the phenol adsorption was affected by the pH of the solution; thus, the nonfunctionalized resin reported the maximum loading adsorption under acidic conditions, where the molecular phenol form predominates. In contrast both ion exchange resins reported the maximum removal under alkaline conditions where the phenolate may be removed by a combined effect of both adsorption and ion exchange mechanisms. A theoretical model proposed in the literature was used to fit the experimental data and a double contribution was observed from the parameters obtained by the model. Kinetic experiments under different initial phenol concentrations and under the best pH conditions observed in the equilibrium experiments were performed. Two different models were used to define the controlling mechanism of the overall adsorption process: the homogeneous particle diffusion model and the shell progressive model fit the kinetic experimental data and determined the resin phase mechanism as the rate-limiting diffusion for the phenol removal. Resins charged after the kinetic experiments were further eluted by different methods. Desorption of nonfunctionalized resin was achieved by using the solution (50% v/v) of methanol/water with a recovery close to 90%. In the case of the ion exchange resins the desorption process was performed at different pHs and considering the effect of the competitive ion Cl-. The desorption processes were controlled by the ion exchange mechanism for Dowex XZ and AuRIX 100 resins; thus, no significant effect for the addition of Cl- under acidic conditions was observed, while under alkaline conditions the total recovery increased, specially for Dowex XZ resin. PMID:19679317

  15. Ion-to-Neutral Ratios and Thermal Proton Transfer in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, I.-Chung; Chu, Kuan Yu; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Wu, Shang-Yun; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Chen, Jien-Lian; Gray-Weale, Angus; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2015-07-01

    The ion-to-neutral ratios of four commonly used solid matrices, ?-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), sinapinic acid (SA), and ferulic acid (FA) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) at 355 nm are reported. Ions are measured using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with a time-sliced ion imaging detector. Neutrals are measured using a rotatable quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion-to-neutral ratios of CHCA are three orders of magnitude larger than those of the other matrices at the same laser fluence. The ion-to-neutral ratios predicted using the thermal proton transfer model are similar to the experimental measurements, indicating that thermal proton transfer reactions play a major role in generating ions in ultraviolet-MALDI.

  16. Microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze. 1. Basis of ion exchange selectivity for cesium and strontium.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Christopher S; Luca, Vittorio; Hanna, John V; Pike, Kevin J; Smith, Mark E; Thorogood, Gordon S

    2009-07-01

    The structural basis of selectivity for cesium and strontium of microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phase Na(x)WO(3+x/2).zH(2)O has been studied using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques, 1D and 2D (23)Na magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and radiochemical ion exchange investigations. For the HTB system, this study has shown that scattering techniques alone provide an incomplete description of the disorder and rapid exchange of water (with tunnel cations) occurring in this system. However, 1D and 2D (23)Na MAS NMR has identified three sodium species within the HTB tunnels-species A, which is located at the center of the hexagonal window and is devoid of coordinated water, and species B and C, which are the di- and monohydrated variants, respectively, of species A. Although species B accords with the traditional crystallographic model of the HTB phase, this work is the first to propose and identify the anhydrous species A and monohydrate species C. The population (total) of species B and C decreases in comparison to that of species A with increasing exchange of either cesium or strontium; that is, species B and C appear more exchangeable than species A. Moreover, a significant proportion of tunnel water is redistributed by these cations. Multiple ion exchange investigations with radiotracers (137)Cs and (85)Sr have shown that for strontium there is a definite advantage in ensuring that any easily exchanged sodium is removed from the HTB tunnels prior to exchange. The decrease in selectivity (wrt cesium) is most probably due to the slightly smaller effective size of Sr(2+); namely, it is less of a good fit for the hexagonal window, ion exchange site. The selectivity of the HTB framework for cesium has been shown unequivocally to be defined by the structure of the hexagonal window, ion exchange site. Compromising the geometry of this window even in the slightest way by either (1) varying the cell volume through changes to hydration or sodium content or (2) introducing disorder in the a-b plane through isomorphous substitution of molybdenum is sufficient to reduce the selectivity. Indeed, it is our hypothesis that this applies for all cations which are strongly bound by the HTB framework. PMID:19518108

  17. Development and Deployment of Retrofit PolarisQ Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Whitten, William B.

    2015-11-01

    This report describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) FY15 progress in support of National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Portable Mass Spectrometer project. A retrofit PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometer (RPMS) has been assembled from components of two PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometers used in previous isotope ratio programs. The retrofit mass spectrometer includes a custom Hastelloy vacuum chamber which is about ¼ the size of the standard aluminum vacuum chamber and reduces the instrument weight from the original by nine pounds. In addition, the new vacuum chamber can be independently heated to reduce impurities such as water, which reacts with UF6 to produce HF in the vacuum chamber. The analyzer and all components requiring service are mounted on the chamber lid, facilitating quick and easy replacement of consumable components such as the filament and electron multiplier.

  18. U/Th dating by SHRIMP RG ion-microprobe mass spectrometry using single ion-exchange beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, James L.; Wooden, Joe; Murphy, Fred; Williams, Ross W.

    2005-04-01

    We present a new analytical method for U-series isotopes using the SHRIMP RG (Sensitive High mass Resolution Ion MicroProbe) mass spectrometer that utilizes the preconcentration of the U-series isotopes from a sample onto a single ion-exchange bead. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is capable of producing Th ionization efficiencies in excess of 2%. Analytical precision is typically better than alpha spectroscopy, but not as good as thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma multicollector mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Like TIMS and ICP-MS the method allows analysis of small samples sizes, but also adds the advantage of rapidity of analysis. A major advantage of ion-microprobe analysis is that U and Th isotopes are analyzed in the same bead, simplifying the process of chemical separation. Analytical time on the instrument is 60 min per sample, and a single instrument-loading can accommodate 15-20 samples to be analyzed in a 24-h day. An additional advantage is that the method allows multiple reanalyses of the same bead and that samples can be archived for reanalysis at a later time. Because the ion beam excavates a pit only a few ?m deep, the mount can later be repolished and reanalyzed numerous times. The method described of preconcentrating a low concentration sample onto a small conductive substrate to allow ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is potentially applicable to many other systems.

  19. Cast and 3D printed ion exchange membranes for monolithic microbial fuel cell fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philamore, Hemma; Rossiter, Jonathan; Walters, Peter; Winfield, Jonathan; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-09-01

    We present novel solutions to a key challenge in microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology; greater power density through increased relative surface area of the ion exchange membrane that separates the anode and cathode electrodes. The first use of a 3D printed polymer and a cast latex membrane are compared to a conventionally used cation exchange membrane. These new techniques significantly expand the geometric versatility available to ion exchange membranes in MFCs, which may be instrumental in answering challenges in the design of MFCs including miniaturisation, cost and ease of fabrication. Under electrical load conditions selected for optimal power transfer, peak power production (mean 10 batch feeds) was 11.39 μW (CEM), 10.51 μW (latex) and 0.92 μW (Tangoplus). Change in conductivity and pH of anolyte were correlated with MFC power production. Digital and environmental scanning electron microscopy show structural changes to and biological precipitation on membrane materials following long term use in an MFC. The cost of the novel membranes was lower than the conventional CEM. The efficacy of two novel membranes for ion exchange indicates that further characterisation of these materials and their fabrication techniques, shows great potential to significantly increase the range and type of MFCs that can be produced.

  20. Overloading ion-exchange membranes as a purification step for monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Arick; Bill, Jerome; Tully, Timothy; Radhamohan, Asha; Dowd, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the overloading of ion-exchange membrane adsorbers, a form of frontal chromatography, as the final purification step in the production of mAbs (monoclonal antibodies) produced from CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells. Preferential binding of impurities over antibody product was exploited using commercially available cation- and anion-exchange membranes. Three different antibody feedstreams previously purified over Protein A and ion-exchange column chromatography were tested. Feedstream conductivity and pH were adjusted to induce product and impurity adsorption. Membranes were then overloaded in a normal flow mode, resulting in retention of impurities and breakthrough of purified antibody. Although some amount of the product also binds to the membranes (usually ?30g mAb/l membrane), yields of ?99% were achieved by marginalizing the losses, typically by loading more than 3kg mAb/l membrane. Analyses of the purified pools show consistent removal of impurities despite strong mAbligand interactions and high membrane loadings. The clearance of host cell proteins was affected by pH and conductivity, but was unaffected by flow rate, membrane properties or scale. The importance of the present study lies in our demonstration of an alternative use of ion-exchange membranes for fast, effective and high yielding purification of mAbs. PMID:20497123

  1. 2D fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring ion-exchange membrane based technologies - Reverse electrodialysis (RED).

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Sylwin; Galinha, Claudia F; Crespo, João G; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2016-01-01

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is one of the emerging, membrane-based technologies for harvesting salinity gradient energy. In RED process, fouling is an undesirable operation constraint since it leads to a decrease of the obtainable net power density due to increasing stack electric resistance and pressure drop. Therefore, early fouling detection is one of the main challenges for successful RED technology implementation. In the present study, two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence spectroscopy was used, for the first time, as a tool for fouling monitoring in RED. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) of ion-exchange membrane surfaces and of natural aqueous streams were acquired during one month of a RED stack operation. Fouling evolvement on the ion-exchange membrane surfaces was successfully followed by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy and quantified using principal components analysis (PCA). Additionally, the efficiency of cleaning strategy was assessed by measuring the membrane fluorescence emission intensity before and after cleaning. The anion-exchange membrane (AEM) surface in contact with river water showed to be significantly affected due to fouling by humic compounds, which were found to cross through the membrane from the lower salinity (river water) to higher salinity (sea water) stream. The results obtained show that the combined approach of using 2D fluorescence spectroscopy and PCA has a high potential for studying fouling development and membrane cleaning efficiency in ion exchange membrane processes. PMID:26497936

  2. Characterization of Aluminosilicate Formation on the Surface of a Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Young, James S.; Su, Yali; Li, Liyu; Balmer, M Lou; G W Bailey

    2001-10-30

    Millions of gallons of high-level radioactive waste are contained in underground tanks at U.S. Department of Energy sites such as Hanford and Savannah River. Most of the radioactivity is due to 137Cs and 90Sr, which must be extracted in order to concentrate the waste. An ion exchanger, crystalline silicotitanate IONSIV IE911, is being considered for separation for Cs at the Savannah River Site (SRS). While the performance of this ion exchanger has been well characterized under normal operating conditions, Cs removal at slightly elevated temperatures, such as those that may occur in a process upset, is not clear. Our recent study indicates that during exposure to SRS simulant at 55 degrees Celsius and 80 degrees Celsius, an aluminosilicate coating formed on the exchanger surface. There was concern that the coating would affect its ion exchange properties. A LEO 982 field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and an Oxford ISIS energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDS) were used to characterize the coating.

  3. Preparation of Ion Exchange Films for Solid-Phase Spectrophotometry and Solid-Phase Fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Carol M.; Street, Kenneth W.; Tanner, Stephen P.; Philipp, Warren H.

    2000-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy has dominated the field of trace inorganic analysis because of its high sensitivity and selectivity. The advantages gained by the atomic spectroscopies come with the disadvantage of expensive and often complicated instrumentation. Solid-phase spectroscopy, in which the analyte is preconcentrated on a solid medium followed by conventional spectrophotometry or fluorometry, requires less expensive instrumentation and has considerable sensitivity and selectivity. The sensitivity gains come from preconcentration and the use of chromophore (or fluorophore) developers and the selectivity is achieved by use of ion exchange conditions that favor the analyte in combination with speciative chromophores. Little work has been done to optimize the ion exchange medium (IEM) associated with these techniques. In this report we present a method for making ion exchange polymer films, which considerably simplify the solid-phase spectroscopic techniques. The polymer consists of formaldehyde-crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol with polyacrylic acid entrapped therein. The films are a carboxylate weak cation exchanger in the calcium form. They are mechanically sturdy and optically transparent in the ultraviolet and visible portion of the spectrum, which makes them suitable for spectrophotometry and fluorometry.

  4. Establishing Ion Ratio Thresholds Based on Absolute Peak Area for Absolute Protein Quantification using Protein Cleavage Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Loziuk, Philip L.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry has become central to the field of proteomics and metabolomics. Selected reaction monitoring is a widely used method for the absolute quantification of proteins and metabolites. This method renders high specificity using several product ions measured simultaneously. With growing interest in quantification of molecular species in complex biological samples, confident identification and quantitation has been of particular concern. A method to confirm purity or contamination of product ion spectra has become necessary for achieving accurate and precise quantification. Ion abundance ratio assessments were introduced to alleviate some of these issues. Ion abundance ratios are based on the consistent relative abundance (RA) of specific product ions with respect to the total abundance of all product ions. To date, no standardized method of implementing ion abundance ratios has been established. Thresholds by which product ion contamination is confirmed vary widely and are often arbitrary. This study sought to establish criteria by which the relative abundance of product ions can be evaluated in an absolute quantification experiment. These findings suggest that evaluation of the absolute ion abundance for any given transition is necessary in order to effectively implement RA thresholds. Overall, the variation of the RA value was observed to be relatively constant beyond an absolute threshold ion abundance. Finally, these RA values were observed to fluctuate significantly over a 3 year period, suggesting that these values should be assessed as close as possible to the time at which data is collected for quantification. PMID:25154770

  5. Characterization of cross-linked cellulosic ion-exchange adsorbents: 2. Protein sorption and transport.

    PubMed

    Angelo, James M; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Gantier, Rene; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-03-18

    Adsorption behavior in the HyperCel family of cellulosic ion-exchange materials (Pall Corporation) was characterized using methods to assess, quantitatively and qualitatively, the dynamics of protein uptake as well as static adsorption as a function of ionic strength and protein concentration using several model proteins. The three exchangers studied all presented relatively high adsorptive capacities under low ionic strength conditions, comparable to commercially available resins containing polymer functionalization aimed at increasing that particular characteristic. The strong cation- and anion-exchange moieties showed higher sensitivity to increasing salt concentrations, but protein affinity on the salt-tolerant STAR AX HyperCel exchanger remained strong at ionic strengths normally used in downstream processing to elute material fully during ion-exchange chromatography. Very high uptake rates were observed in both batch kinetics experiments and time-series confocal laser scanning microscopy, suggesting low intraparticle transport resistances relative to external film resistance, even at higher bulk protein concentrations where the opposite is typically observed. Electron microscopy imaging of protein adsorbed phases provided additional insight into particle structure that could not be resolved in previous work on the bare resins. PMID:26905881

  6. Recovery of steroidal glucosiduronic acids from organic solvents containing anionic liquid ion-exchangers

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Vernon R.; Litwiller, Robert D.; Goodrich, June E.

    1972-01-01

    Solutions of anionic liquid ion-exchangers in organic solvents are potentially useful for extracting steroidal glucosiduronic acids from biological fluids and for purifying mixtures of these acids by chromatography. If a glucosiduronic acid is to be isolated in pure form after either of these procedures, it is necessary to separate it from the ion-exchanger. Separation from an organic solution of tetraheptylammonium chloride may be accomplished by extraction with water under the following conditions, which promote transfer of a glucosiduronate to the aqueous phase: (1) an appropriate solvent (diluent) as the organic phase, (2) the presence in the two-phase mixture of an anion such as myristate or dodecyl sulphate to combine with the tetraheptylammonium ion, and (3) an increase of the pH of the aqueous phase in association with the presence of myristate or dodecyl sulphate. The foregoing factors apply also to removal of glucosiduronates from organic solutions of ion exchangers that are hydrochlorides of tertiary, secondary, or primary amines. Since these amines exert progressively less solubilizing effect for glucosiduronates as the pH of the aqueous phase is increased, the conjugates can be released from the organic phase by adjusting the pH to 10 and omitting the myristate or dodecyl sulphate. PMID:5075265

  7. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ?40nm diameter and up to ?2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating by the helium ion beam, it was observed that an original probe shape was transformed. AFM measurement of a reference sample (pitch 100-500 nm, depth 100 nm) of the lines and spaces was performed using the above probes. The conventional probes which did not bring up platinum was not able to get into the ditch enough. Therefore it was found that a salient was big and a reentrant was shallow. On the other hand, the probe which brought up platinum was able to enter enough to the depths of the ditch.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i30-a/DFU075F1F1DFU075F1Fig.1.SHIM image of the AFM probe with the Pt nano-pillar fabricated by ion-beam induced deposition. PMID:25359832

  8. X-ray Signature of Charge Exchange in the Spectra of L-shell Iron Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Schweikhard, L; Liebisch, P; Brown, G V

    2007-01-05

    The X-ray signature of charge exchange between highly charged L-shell iron ions and neutral gas atoms was studied in the laboratory in order to assess its diagnostic utility. Significant differences with spectra formed by electron-impact excitation were observed. In particular, a strong enhancement was found of the emission corresponding to n {le} 4 {yields} n = 2 transitions relative to the n = 3 {yields} n = 2 emission. This enhancement was detectable even with relatively low-resolution X-ray instrumentation (E/{Delta}E {approx} 10) and may enable future identification of charge exchange as a line-formation mechanism in astrophysical spectra.

  9. SuperLig(TM) 644 Ion Exchange Resin Stability in Nitric Acid at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.

    2003-01-06

    In the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plan (RPP-WTP) flowsheet, opportunity exists for the organic SuperLig 644(TM) cation exchange resin to come in contact with concentrated (5 M) nitric acid at elevated temperatures in the acid recovery evaporator. These are similar conditions where other ion exchange resin (albeit usually anion) column explosions have occurred. The objective of these tests was to examine potential hazards by exposing the resin to conditions expected in the facility and examining the composition of the reaction products and their reactivity.

  10. Two-electron exchange interaction between polar molecules and atomic ions Asymptotic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbovanets, Oleksandr M.; Karbovanets, Myroslav I.; Khoma, Mykhaylo V.; Lazur, Volodymyr Yu.

    2015-05-01

    We have described the asymptotic approach for calculation of the two-electron exchange interaction between atomic ion and polar molecule responsible for direct double electron transfer processes. The closed analytic expression for matrix element of exchange interaction has been obtained in the framework of the semiclassical version of the asymptotic theory and point-dipole approximation for description of the polar molecule. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, tefan Matej?ik, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  11. Design of high efficiency fibers for ion exchange and heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Lourdes

    Ion exchange materials coated on glass fiber substrates have a number of advantages over the conventional ion exchange beads. These include simplification of the overall synthesis including faster more efficient functionalization and elimination of toxic solvents. Other benefits include the ability to be fabricated in the form of felts, papers, or fabrics, improving media contact efficiency and enhancing both the rates of reaction and regeneration. In addition, physical and mechanical requirements of strength and dimensional stability are achieved by use of glass fiber substrates. Investigations were focused on design of: (1) polymeric cationic exchange fibers and their application for lead and mercury removal, (2) polymeric anionic exchange fibers and their application for arsenate removal, (3) enhancement of anionic fiber selectivity for monovalent ions over divalent ions through bulkier triaklylamine functional groups, and (4) polymeric mercaptyl fibers for the application of arsenite removal. The design and characterization of a cationic exchange fiber is described. Dynamic mode (breakthrough) experiments for calcium, lead, and mercury ion solutions are also presented. The second system consists of the preparation and characterization of anionic exchange fibers with equilibrium adsorption isotherms and dynamic mode kinetic experiments for arsenate removal. Modification of the resin with bulkier functional groups (trimethylamine, triethylamine, tripropylamine, tributylanmine), thereby effecting a change in the selectivity from divalent species to monovalent species, is considered in the separation of nitrates from sulfates. The ability of a thiol group to bind to the highly toxic arsenite ion (as is done in proteins and enzymes) provided the model used to chemically modify and characterize a polyvinyl alcohol mercaptyl fibrous system, coated on a fiberglass substrate, for the purpose of arsenite (As3+) removal from water. Physical/chemical aspects of naturally occurring thiols and disulfides was used to draw parallels to observations found with the polyvinyl alcohol mercaptyl system and its reactivity towards arsenite. The ability of these systems to chelate arsenite was presented through equilibrium adsorption isotherms. All fibrous systems were characterized through a variety of techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, analytical analysis, and thermal analysis of the copolymer.

  12. Inference of the ring current ion composition by means of charge exchange decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis of the measured ion fluxes during the several day storm recovery period and the assumption that beside hydrogen other ions were present and that the decays were exponential in nature, it was possible to establish three separate lifetimes for the ions. These fitted decay lifetimes are in excellent agreement with the expected charge exchange decay lifetimes for H(+), O(+), and He(+) in the energy and L-value range of the data. This inference technique, thus, establishes the presence of measurable and appreciable quantities of oxygen and helium ions as well as protons in the storm-time ring current. Indications that He(+) may also be present under these same conditions were found.

  13. Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy of the plasma ion temperature at the T-10 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupin, V. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Barsukov, A. G.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Korobov, K. V.; Krasnyanskii, S. A.; Naumenko, N. N.; Nemets, A. R.; Sushkov, A. V.; Tilinin, G. N.

    2013-08-01

    Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) based on a diagnostic neutral beam has been developed at the T-10 tokamak. The diagnostics allows one to measure the ion temperature profile in the cross section of the plasma column. In T-10 experiments, the measurement technique was adjusted and the elements of the CXRS diagnostics for ITER were tested. The used spectroscopic equipment makes it possible to reliably determine the ion temperature from the Doppler broadening of impurity lines (helium, carbon), as well as of the spectral lines of the working gas. The profiles of the plasma ion temperature in deuterium and helium discharges were measured at different plasma currents and densities, including with the use of active Doppler measurements of lines of different elements. The validity and reliability of ion temperature measurements performed by means of the developed CXRS diagnostics are analyzed.

  14. Photocatalytic reduction of nitrate using titanium dioxide for regeneration of ion exchange brine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Doudrick, Kyle; Westerhoff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate is often removed from groundwater by ion exchange (IX) before its use as drinking water. Accumulation of nitrate in IX brine reduces the efficiency of IX regeneration and the useful life of the regeneration brine. For the first time, we present a strategy to photocatalytically reduce nitrate in IX brine, thereby extending the use of the brine. Titanium dioxide (Evonik P90), acting as photocatalyst, reduced nitrate effectively in both synthetic brines and sulfate-removed IX brine when formic acid (FA) was used as the hole scavenger (i.e., electron donor) and the initial FA to nitrate molar ratio (IFNR) was 5.6. Increasing the NaCl level in the synthetic brine slowed the nitrate reduction rate without affecting byproduct selectivity of ammonium and gaseous N species (e.g., N2, N2O). In a non-modified IX brine, nitrate removal was greatly inhibited owing to the presence of sulfate, which competed with nitrate for active surface sites on P90 and induced aggregation of P90 nanoparticles. After removing sulfate through barium sulfate precipitation, nitrate was effectively reduced; approximately 3.6 × 1024 photons were required to reduce each mole of nitrate to 83% N Gases and 17% NH4+. To make optimum use of FA and control the residual FA level in treated brine, the IFNR was varied. High IFNRs (e.g., 4, 5.6) were found to be more efficient for nitrate reduction but left higher residual FA in brine. IX column tests were performed to investigate the impact of residual FA for brine reuse. The residual FA in the brine did not significantly affect the nitrate removal capacity of IX resins, and formate contamination of treated water could be eliminated by rinsing with one bed volume of fresh brine. PMID:23276425

  15. Disease-associated changes in the expression of ion channels, ion receptors, ion exchangers and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins in heart hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, Carolin; Borlak, Juergen . E-mail: borlak@item.fraunhofer.de

    2005-09-15

    The molecular pathology of cardiac hypertrophy is multifactorial with transcript regulation of ion channels, ion exchangers and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins being speculative. We therefore investigated disease-associated changes in gene expression of various ion channels and their receptors as well as ion exchangers, cytoskeletal proteins and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. We also compared experimental findings with results from hypertrophic human hearts, previously published (Borlak, J., and Thum, T., 2003. Hallmarks of ion channel gene expression in end-stage heart failure. FASEB J. 17, 1592-1608). We observed significant (P < 0.05) induction in transcript level of ATP-driven ion exchangers (Atp1A1, NCX-1, SERCA2a), ion channels (L-type Ca{sup 2+}-channel, K{sub ir}3.4, Na{sub v}1.5) and RyR-2 in hypertrophic hearts, while gene expression was repressed in diseased human hearts. Further, the genes coding for calreticulin and calmodulin, PMCA 1 and 4 as well as {alpha}-skeletal actin were significantly (P < 0.05) changed in hypertrophic human heart, but were unchanged in hypertrophic left ventricles of the rat heart. Notably, transcript level of {alpha}- and {beta}-MHC, calsequestrin, K{sub ir}6.1 (in the right ventricle only), phospholamban as well as troponin T were repressed in both diseased human and rat hearts. Our study enabled an identification of disease-associated candidate genes. Their regulation is likely to be the result of an imbalance between pressure load/stretch force and vascular tonus and the observed changes may provide a rational for the rhythm disturbances observed in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

  16. Electron-ion-neutral temperatures and their ratio comparisons over low latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Ananna; Sharma, D. K.; Khurana, M. S.; Aggarwal, M.; Kumar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Annual variations in temperatures of plasma (electron-Te, ion-Ti) using SROSS-C2 satellite and neutral (Tn) using NRLMSIS-00 (neutral atmospheric model); have been investigated and their ratios have been compared over half solar cycle (year 1995-2000, F10.7 ? 72-190). The region under consideration spans over 5-35N geog. latitude and 65-95E geog. longitude in the Indian sector, at an average altitude of 500 km. Te and Ti exhibit similar, while Tn show completely different diurnal features. During nighttime Te, Ti and Tn attain equilibrium with each other, but plasma cools faster than neutrals. Magnitude of Te and Ti reduces, while that of Tn increases with increasing solar activity. Ratio comparisons (Te/Tn, Ti/Tn and Te/Ti) show higher sensitivity of electrons compared to ions and neutrals. Te/Tn, Ti/Tn exhibits linear/direct relationship with solar flux, while Te/Ti doesn't. The deviation of Te, Ti and Tn from equilibrium temperature decreases with increasing solar activity.

  17. Development and validation of a novel modeling framework integrating ion exchange and resin regeneration for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Amini, Adib; O'Neal, Jeremy A; Boyer, Treavor H; Zhang, Qiong

    2015-11-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the process of ion exchange for water treatment. However the modeling of resin regeneration process, which can predict regeneration efficiency and residual stream for determining technology sustainability, was not incorporated into previous models. Therefore a model integrating both ion exchange and resin regeneration considering regeneration efficiency is needed for evaluating and improving ion exchange technology. This study developed an integrated model aiming to simulate ion exchange and resin regeneration in different configurations (fixed bed, fluidized bed) for the first time. The integrated model has been validated via comparing model predictions with experimental data. The impacts of dimensionless groups (i.e. the Pclet number, the diffusion modulus, and the Biot number) on ion exchange breakthrough curve have been analyzed using this model. In addition, this integrated model has been used to optimize the regeneration frequency to improve the overall performance of ion exchange. It demonstrated this integrated model could be a useful tool for further studies in ion exchange technology. PMID:26253896

  18. Understanding the equilibrium ion exchange properties in faujasite zeolite from Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Jeffroy, Marie; Boutin, Anne; Fuchs, Alain H

    2011-12-22

    We have adapted a grand ensemble Monte Carlo simulation method to directly compute, for the first time to our knowledge, univalent cation exchange isotherms in zeolites. The computed isotherms for the exchange of sodium in NaY faujasite by lithium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium ions, respectively, are in good agreement with the experimental ones. They display the three main types of behavior observed in zeolites, namely, a monotonous evolution of selectivity throughout the exchange process (Li(+)), a selectivity reversal (K(+)), and an incomplete exchange (Rb(+) and Cs(+)). The initial stage of the cation exchange is shown to be dominated by the hydration energy of the cations in the external aqueous solution. The final part of the process is often dominated by the cation-framework and cation-cation interactions. A crossover between these two regimes explains the frequently observed reversal of selectivity phenomenon. The incomplete exchange observed in the case of Rb(+) and Cs(+) is shown to correspond to a blocked state of the system for highest accessible composition of the aqueous solution. This stable state is shown not to be linked to an inability of the cesium cations to cross the six-ring window in order to penetrate into the smallest cages. PMID:22050116

  19. Ultra-low vanadium ion diffusion amphoteric ion-exchange membranes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J. B.; Lu, M. Z.; Chu, Y. Q.; Wang, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    An amphoteric ion-exchange membrane (AIEM) from fluoro-methyl sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) bearing content-controlled benzimidazole moiety, was firstly fabricated for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). The AIEM and its covalently cross-linked membrane (AIEM-c) behave the highly suppressed vanadium-ion crossover and their tested VO2+ permeability are about 638 and 1117 times lower than that of Nafion117, respectively. This is further typically verified by the lower VO2+ concentration inside AIEM that is less than half of that inside Nafion117 detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, in addition of the nearly 3 times longer battery self-discharge time. The ultra-low vanadium ion diffusion could be ascribed to the narrower ion transporting channel originated from the acid-base interactions and the rebelling effect between the positively-charged benzimidazole structure and VO2+ ions. It is found that, VRB assembled with AIEM exhibits the equal or higher Coulombic efficiency (99.0% vs. 96.4%), voltage efficiency (90.7% vs. 90.7%) and energy efficiency (89.8% vs. 87.4%) than that with Nafion117 and keeps continuous 220 charge-discharge cycles for over 25 days, confirming that the AIEM of this type is a potentially suitable separator for VRB application.

  20. Modelling Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Kinetics for Removal of Trace Levels of Divalent Cations in Ultrapure Water

    SciTech Connect

    B. Widman

    2003-01-01

    Ion exchanger resin fluid film mass transfer coefficients and the ionic diffusivities from which they are derived are often measured by use of ion exchange resin columns. Such tests, usually run dynamically using short resin beds, are often performed using relatively high (ppm) concentrations of ions to accurately measure output concentrations as a function of flow rate. The testing described herein was performed to determine fluid film ionic diffusivities for cationic concentrations typical of ultrapure water ({le}ppb levels) containing ppm levels of ammonia. Effective ionic diffusivities at these low ionic concentrations and high pHs were needed to complete a computer model (SIMIX) to be used in ion exchange simulations. SIMIX is a generalized multicomponent ion exchange model designed to simulate the removal of divalent cations from ultrapure water.

  1. Electronic Excitations of Slow Ions in a Free Electron Gas Metal: Evidence for Charge Exchange Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primetzhofer, D.; Rund, S.; Roth, D.; Goebl, D.; Bauer, P.

    2011-10-01

    Electronic energy loss of light ions transmitted through nanometer films of Al has been studied at very low ion velocities. For hydrogen, the electronic stopping power S is found to be perfectly proportional to velocity, as expected for a free electron gas. For He, the same is anticipated, but S shows a transition between two distinct regimes, in both of which S is velocity proportionalhowever, with remarkably different slopes. This finding can be explained as a consequence of charge exchange in close encounters between He and Al atoms, which represents an additional energy loss channel.

  2. A photodiode-based neutral particle bolometer for characterizing charge-exchanged fast-ion behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Clary, R.; Smirnov, A.; Dettrick, S.; Knapp, K.; Korepanov, S.; Ruskov, E.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.

    2012-10-15

    A neutral particle bolometer (NPB) has been designed and implemented on Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device in order to spatially and temporally resolve the charge-exchange losses of fast-ion populations originating from neutral beam injection into field-reversed configuration plasmas. This instrument employs a silicon photodiode as the detection device with an integrated tungsten filter coating to reduce sensitivity to light radiation. Here we discuss the technical aspects and calibration of the NPB, and report typical NPB measurement results of wall recycling effects on fast-ion losses.

  3. Hydrogen production in the K-Basin ion exchange columns, modules and cartridge filters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-21

    K-Basin uses ion exchange modules and ion exchange (IX) columns for removing radionuclides from the basin water. When the columns and modules are loaded, they are removed from service, drained and stored. After a few IX columns accumulate in storage, they are moved to a burial box. One of the burial box contains 33 columns and the other, six. The radionuclides act on the liquid left within and adhering to the beads to produce hydrogen. This report describes the generation rate, accumulation rate and significance of that accumulation. This summary also highlights those major areas of concern to the external (to Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC]) reviewers. Appendix H presents the comments made by the external reviewers and, on a separate sheet, the responses to those comments. The concerns regarding the details of the analytical approach, are addressed in Appendix H and in the appropriate section.

  4. Charge-exchange erosion studies of accelerator grids in ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    A particle simulation model is developed to study the charge-exchange grid erosion in ion thrusters for both ground-based and space-based operations. Because the neutral gas downstream from the accelerator grid is different for space and ground operation conditions, the charge-exchange erosion processes are also different. Based on an assumption of now electric potential hill downstream from the ion thruster, the calculations show that the accelerator grid erosion rate for space-based operating conditions should be significantly less than experimentally observed erosion rates from the ground-based tests conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). To resolve this erosion issue completely, we believe that it is necessary to accurately measure the entire electric potential field downstream from the thruster.

  5. Safety Evaluation for Packaging for onsite Transfer of plutonium recycle test reactor ion exchange columns

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.J.

    1995-09-11

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to authorize the use of three U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 7A, Type A metal boxes (Capital Industries Part No. S 0600-0600-1080- 0104) to package 12 Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange columns as low-level waste (LLW). The packages will be transferred from the 309 Building in the 300 Area to low level waste burial in the 200 West Area. Revision 1 of WHC-SD-TP-SEP-035 (per ECN No. 621467) documents that the boxes containing ion exchange columns and grout will maintain the payload under normal conditions of transport if transferred without the box lids

  6. Effects of ion-exchanged cobalt catalysts on the gasification of wood chars in carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, W.F.; Richards, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of several ion-exchanged catalysts on gasification of wood chars in carbon dioxide were described in an earlier paper. Ion-exchanged cobalt and calcium were found to be very effective catalysts of gasification of wood chars (HTT 800/degree/C). In this paper we focus on the activity of cobalt catalysts for gasification of wood chars prepared at different heat treatment temperatures. The gases formed by pyrolysis of low-temperature chars have also been determined by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) using mass spectrometry. This analysis is indicative of structural features of the char and helps to elucidate the chemical transformations occurring in low-temperature chars (HTT 400/degree/C) as they are heated to high temperatures.

  7. Characterization of radioactive ion exchange media waste generated at Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect

    Runion, T.C.; Holzworth, R.E.; Ogle, R.E.; Burton, H.M.; Bixby, W.W.

    1981-10-01

    The March 1979 accident at General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation (GPUNC) Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station Unit 2 (TMI-2), resulted in the transfer of more than 1100 m/sup 3/ of contaminated water to the auxiliary and fuel handling building. The principal sources of the water were the makeup and letdown purification system and the containment building sump. The contaminated water was processed through an ion exchange system designated as EPICOR II. The EPICOR-II System is a three-stage process. The contaminated water passes through a first stage of ion exchange media, designated as prefilters, and then through the second and third stages, designated as demineralizers. The majority of the activity was deposited in the first-stage prefilters, which have a maximum administrative loading limit of 1300 curies. The predominant radionuclides present in the prefilters are cesium and strontium.

  8. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    SciTech Connect

    Wahida, Nurul; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Irwan, M. N.; Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy

    2014-09-03

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs were leached out from the spent resin while {sup 60}Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of Fe(III) ion-exchanged ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerfeld, D.A.; Ellis, W.R. Jr.; Eyring, E.M.

    1992-11-26

    Two new titanium silicate molecular sieves, designated ETS-10 and ETAS-10, have been ion-exchanged with Fe(III). Both products exhibit prominent EPR signals, at g = 6.0 and 4.3, that are assigned to populations of ferric iron on the surface and in the interior cavities, respectively, of the molecular sieve microcrystals. Corollary XPS measurements on these samples indicate that a substantial fraction of the surface iron is present as Fe(II). Chemical modification procedures have been explored in an effort to produce ion-exchanged materials containing no exterior iron. Acid treatment (pH 1.0) proved to be an effective means of achieving this goal in the case of ETS-10-based materials. ETAS-10-based samples do not retain their crystallinity under these conditions. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. An evaluation of organic substance fraction removal during ion exchange with Miex-DOC resin.

    PubMed

    Wolska, Ma?gorzata

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the usefulness of Miex-DOC resin in eliminating organic substances and their fractions from water sources for drinking water was evaluated. The objects of study were samples from three surface water sources and one infiltration water source taken at water treatment plants before treatment in technical conditions. In particular, the effectiveness of removing biodegradable and non-biodegradable fractions as a function of resin dosages and water-resin contact times was evaluated. The ion exchange process with the Miex-DOC resin achieved a high effectiveness in removing aromatic non-biodegradable organic substances, and therefore a reduction in UV254 absorbance. The biodegradable fraction is much less susceptible to removal yet its removal effectiveness allows for a significant reduction in hazards connected with secondary microorganism development. The results of this study indicate the possibility of using ion exchange with the Miex-DOC resin for effective removal of disinfection by-product precursors. PMID:25976333

  11. Integrated Sr/TRU Precipitation and Cs Ion Exchange Process Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2003-11-21

    The objectives of this study are to use batch contact ion exchange testing of SuperLig 644 resin and stimulants of LAW Envelopes A and C to: 1. Examine the effects of resin storage environment on the Cs removal behavior of SuperLig 644 resin from a standard alkaline salt solution 2. Investigate Cs sorption over time to SuperLig 644 resin with simulants of LAW Envelopes A and C. 3.Examine the sorption of Cs as a function of initial Cs concentration. 4. Evaluate the effects of simulants of LAW Envelopes A on the chemical properties of SuperLig 644 resin. 5. Evaluate the effects of simulants of LAW Envelopes A and C on the physical properties of SuperLig 644 resin. 6. Provide data generated from this work for incorporation into the preliminary SRTC ion exchange models, a modeling effort described in a separate test specification.

  12. Protein losses in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gibbins, Betty M.

    2000-01-01

    Protein losses in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction HPLC were examined. The supports were allnon-porous, packed in columns of identical dimensions. Two ion-exchange chromatography (IEC), anion and cation, as well as a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) columns were tested. Proteins included cytochrome c, bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulin G and fibrinogen. Temperature effects on HIC supports were studied for cytochrome c and BSA. Both retention times and recoveries of the proteins were measured. The influence of column residence time on the recovery of proteins were also investigated. We found a linear relationship between the amount of protein recovered and the log of the molecular mass. Retention times also generally increased with temperature for both HIC and IEC. Other trends in retention behavior and recoveries are discussed.

  13. Cesium recovery using Savannah River Laboratory resorcinol-formaldehyde ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Elovich, R.J.; Carson, K.J.

    1990-03-01

    A new ion exchange resin has been developed by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for the recovery of radioactive {sup 137}Cs from alkaline wastes produced by reprocessing fuels from nuclear reactors. The SRL resin is a condensation polymer made from resorcinol and formaldehyde. It has been shown to be stable to chemical and radiation attack in the highly concentrated and caustic supernatant waste. Small-scale testing was completed with excellent results. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was requested to initiate a test program designed to provide additional experimental data needed to support further consideration of the resorcinol-formaldehyde ion exchange treatment for the Savannah River Site (SRS) alkaline waste. 2 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Redox sorption of oxygen on a layered cathode-polarized nanocomposite metal-ion exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, V. S.; Polyanskii, L. N.; Shinkevich, L. A.; Kravchenko, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    The redox sorption of molecular oxygen from a flow of deionized water onto a cathode-polarized granular layer of nanocomposite copper-ion exchanger is considered. A mathematical description of it in terms of external diffusion is given. In contrast to better-known approaches, conditions are created that are as close as possible to the limiting diffusion current; this effect can be achieved by dividing the granular layer into shallow layers, each of which is then polarized with a near-limiting current. This allows water to be obtained with a particular value of deoxygenation close to the theoretically calculated value in stationary sorption membrane electrolyzers equipped with a unit containing a nanocomposite copper-ion exchanger. It is established that the lower deoxygenation value relative to the one calculated from the limiting current is associated with the additional reduction of oxygen with copper nanoparticles.

  15. Brine reuse in ion-exchange softening: salt discharge, hardness leakage, and capacity tradeoffs.

    PubMed

    Flodman, Hunter R; Dvorak, Bruce I

    2012-06-01

    Ion-exchange water softening results in the discharge of excess sodium chloride to the aquatic environment during the regeneration cycle. In order to reduce sodium chloride use and subsequent discharge from ion-exchange processes, either brine reclaim operations can be implemented or salt application during regeneration can be reduced. Both result in tradeoffs related to loss of bed volumes treated per cycle and increased hardness leakage. An experimentally validated model was used to compare concurrent water softening operations at various salt application quantities with and without the direct reuse of waste brine for treated tap water of typical midwestern water quality. Both approaches were able to reduce salt use and subsequent discharge. Reducing salt use and discharge by lowering the salt application rate during regeneration consequently increased hardness leakage and decreased treatment capacity. Single or two tank brine recycling systems are capable of reducing salt use and discharge without increasing hardness leakage, although treatment capacity is reduced. PMID:22866395

  16. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahida, Nurul; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy, Irwan, M. N.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of 134Cs, 137Cs, 152Eu, 54Mn, 58Co, 60Co and 65Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of 152Eu and 134Cs were leached out from the spent resin while 60Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  17. Ion-exchange chromatography method for the purification of genomic DNA fraction from Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Gurin.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wang; Shuhan, Sun; Zhenlin, Hu; Fengjuan, Zhou; Yiling, Ling

    2004-11-25

    The goal of this study was to provide practical strategies for purifying genomic DNA fraction from Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Gurin (BCG-DNA) by ion-exchange chromatography. A multistep process was developed to purify BCG-DNA. The process consisted of sonication, heating, trypsin digestion, ion-exchange chromatography, gel-filter chromatography, and lyophilization. After ion-exchange chromatography, BCG-DNA was highly purified and possessed potent biological effects. The methods described were efficient and had good reproducibility. Further, this was the first reported chromatography method to purify BCG-DNA. PMID:15522708

  18. An exploratory program for using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, A.W.; Dosch, R.G.; Sault, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to investigate the potential of hydrous metal oxide (HMO) ion exchangers, invented at Sandia National Laboratories, as Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. Metals known to be active in F-T synthesis (e.g. Fe, Co) were ion exchanged on hydrous metal oxide supports. Although HMO catalysts based on Zr, Nb, and Ta have been investigated in direct coal liquefaction studies, this effect focused on formulations based on the hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) system. The program has the goals of developing a catalyst with (1) high activity, (2) selectively to fuel range or other useful products, and (3) better properties for use in slurry reactors. The program has three main tasks: (1) catalyst synthesis, to develop methods for preparing catalysts having desirable F-T properties, (2) characterization, to investigate catalysts proving to have desirable properties by a variety of analytical techniques to determine correlations between activity and material properties and (3) testing to determine activity and selectivity of catalysts. This paper discussed results of activity testing of Ruhrchemie catalyst and some catalyst formulations prepared using ion exchange on hydrous titanium oxide and precipitation. For example, at 250{degree}C the Ruhrchemie catalyst converts {approximately}50% of the syngas feed to reaction products. In comparison, iron catalysts prepared by ion exchange and precipitation had conversions ranging from 20 to 50% over a temperature range of 250 to 275{degree}C of the syngas feed. In addition, results are Auger surface analysis of Ruhrchemie catalyst are presented. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Membrane permeation process for dehydration of organic liquid mixtures using sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene membranes

    DOEpatents

    Cabasso, Israel; Korngold, Emmanuel

    1988-01-01

    A membrane permeation process for dehydrating a mixture of organic liquids, such as alcohols or close boiling, heat sensitive mixtures. The process comprises causing a component of the mixture to selectively sorb into one side of sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene (e.g., polyethylene) membranes and selectively diffuse or flow therethrough, and then desorbing the component into a gas or liquid phase on the other side of the membranes.

  20. Electrochemically polymerized N,N-dimethylaniline film with ion-exchange properties as an electrode modifier

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, N.; Ohsaka, T.; Shimizu, T.

    1985-07-01

    Poly(N,N-dimethylaniline) (PDMA) was prepared by electrochemical polymerization of the corresponding monomer and was found to have the structure of an ionene polymer with positively charged sites as quaternary ammonium groups in the polymeric backbone. It is demonstrated that the PDMA film has an anion-exchange character irrespective of the pH of a solution, and coating electrodes with PDMA produces surface which strongly bind multiply charged negative ions. 65 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  1. Repeated use of ion-exchange resin membranes in calcareous soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, S.K.; Belnap, Jayne; Miller, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the consistency of nutrient extraction among repeated cycles of ion-exchange resin membrane use. Two sandy calcareous soils and different equilibration temperatures were tested. No single nutrient retained consistent values from cycle to cycle in all treatments, although both soil source and temperature conferred some influence. It was concluded that the most conservative use of resin membranes is single-use.

  2. Storage and Aging Effects on Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Ion Exchange Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Arm, Stuart T.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.

    2007-09-10

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the alternate Cs ion exchanger, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), for use in the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP).( ) Previous test activities with spherical RF indicate that it has adequate capacity, selectivity, and kinetics to perform in the plant according to the flowsheet needs. It appears to have better elution and hydraulic properties than the existing alternatives: ground-gel RF and SuperLig 644 (SL 644).( ) To date, the spherical RF performance testing has been conducted on freshly manufactured resin (within ~2 months of manufacture). The ion exchange resins will be manufactured and shipped to the WTP up to 1 year before being used in the plant. Changes in the resin properties during storage could reduce the capacity of the resin to remove Cs from low-activity waste solutions. Active sites on organic SL-644 resin have been shown to degrade during storage (Arm et al. 2004). Additional testing was needed to study the effects of storage conditions and aging on spherical RF ion exchange performance. Variables that could have a significant impact on ion exchange resins during storage include storage temperature, medium, and time. BattellePacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to test the effects of various storage conditions on spherical RF resin. Data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to provide direction for suitable storage conditions and manage the spherical RF resin stock. Storage test conditions included wet and dry resin configurations under nitrogen at three temperatures. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan( ) TSS A-219 to evaluate the impact of storage conditions on RF resin performance. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  3. Development and properties of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchangers for radioactive waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Brown, N.E.

    1997-04-01

    Crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) are a new class of ion exchangers that were jointly invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University. One particular CST, known as TAM-5, is remarkable for its ability to separate parts-per-million concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions (pH> 14) containing high sodium concentrations (>5M). It is also highly effective for removing cesium from neutral and acidic solutions, and for removing strontium from basic and neutral solutions. Cesium isotopes are fission products that account for a large portion of the radioactivity in waste streams generated during weapons material production. Tests performed at numerous locations with early lab-scale TAM-5 samples established the material as a leading candidate for treating radioactive waste volumes such as those found at the Hanford site in Washington. Thus Sandia developed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partnership with UOP, a world leader in developing, commercializing, and supplying adsorbents and associated process technology to commercialize and further develop the material. CSTs are now commercially available from UOP in a powder (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-910 ion exchanger) and granular form suitable for column ion exchange operations (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 ion exchanger). These materials exhibit a high capacity for cesium in a wide variety of solutions of interest to the Department of Energy, and they are chemically, thermally, and radiation stable. They have performed well in tests at numerous sites with actual radioactive waste solutions, and are being demonstrated in the 100,000 liter Cesium Removal Demonstration taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with Melton Valley Storage Tank waste. It has been estimated that applying CSTs to the Hanford cleanup alone will result in a savings of more than $300 million over baseline technologies.

  4. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  5. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies of Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Accurate studies of low energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H like, and He like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H like ions of C, N, O and fully stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV u 20 keV u) and compared to previous H oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV u 3.3 keV u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  6. Effect of calcium/sodium ion exchange on the osmotic properties and structure of polyelectrolyte gels.

    PubMed

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2015-12-01

    We discuss the main findings of a long-term research program exploring the consequences of sodium/calcium ion exchange on the macroscopic osmotic and elastic properties, and the microscopic structure of representative synthetic polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylate, (polyacrylic acid)) and biopolymer gels (DNA). A common feature of these gels is that above a threshold calcium ion concentration, they exhibit a reversible volume phase transition. At the macroscopic level, the concentration dependence of the osmotic pressure shows that calcium ions influence primarily the third-order interaction term in the Flory-Huggins model of polymer solutions. Mechanical tests reveal that the elastic modulus is practically unaffected by the presence of calcium ions, indicating that ion bridging does not create permanent cross-links. At the microscopic level, small-angle neutron scattering shows that polyacrylic acid and DNA gels exhibit qualitatively similar structural features in spite of important differences (e.g. chain flexibility and chemical composition) between the two polymers. The main effect of calcium ions is that the neutron scattering intensity increases due to the decrease in the osmotic modulus. At the level of the counterion cloud around dissolved macroions, anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering measurements made on DNA indicate that divalent ions form a cylindrical sheath enveloping the chain, but they are not localized. Small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering provide complementary information on the structure and interactions in polymer solutions and gels. PMID:26614803

  7. Quantification of ions with identical mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios by velocity-map imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bull, James N; Lee, Jason W L; Vallance, Claire

    2013-09-01

    By integrating a velocity-map imaging lens and position sensitive detector into an electron-impact time-of-flight mass spectrometer, it becomes possible to record ion kinetic energy release (KER) distributions for each fragment ion alongside the time-of-flight mass spectrum. The KER distributions allow ions of identical mass-to-charge ratio to be distinguished and quantified. PMID:23860732

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Phosphate-coated Mesoporous Titania and Cd-doping of Same via Ion-Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2007-06-01

    Phosphate-based mesoporous TiO2 materials were prepared by surfactant-directed method using an alkylphosphate surfactant, which produced a mesoporous titania with high surface area (~200 m2/g) and a phosphate monolayer interface. Calcination of the as-synthesized greenbody in an ozone atmosphere generated materials with higher surface area, and higher purity, than did calcination in air. These interfacial phosphate groups are convenient functionality for chemically modifying the surface via ion-exchange processes. High doping ratios of P/Ti (0.47-0.69) and Cd/P (0.37-0.40) were observed. Materials were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, TEM, and XPS.

  9. Charge-exchange plasma environment for an ion drive spacecraft. [a model for describing mercury ion engines and its effect on spacecraft subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The charge exchange plasma environment around a spacecraft that uses mercury ion thrusters for propulsion is described. The interactions between the plasma environment and the spacecraft are determined and a model which describes the propagation of the mercury charge exchange plasma is discussed. The model is extended to describe the flow of the molybdenum component of the charge exchange plasma. The uncertainties in the models for various conditions are discussed and current drain to the solar array, charge exchange plasma material deposition, and the effects of space plasma on the charge exchange plasma propagation are addressed.

  10. Chiral separation of new designer drugs (Cathinones) on chiral ion-exchange type stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Wolrab, Denise; Frühauf, Peter; Moulisová, Alena; Kuchař, Martin; Gerner, Christopher; Lindner, Wolfgang; Kohout, Michal

    2016-02-20

    We present the enantioseparation of new designer drugs from the cathinone family on structurally different chiral ion-exchange type stationary phases. A novel strong cation-exchange type chiral stationary phase was synthesized and its performance compared with previously reported ion-exchange type chiral stationary phases. The influence of structural elements of the chiral selectors on their chromatographic performance was studied and the possibilities of tuning chromatographic parameters by varying the polarity of the employed mobile phases were determined. Evidence is provided that a change in mobile phase composition strongly influences the solvation shell of the polarized and polarizable units of the selectors and analytes, as well as ionizable mobile phase additives. Furthermore, the structural features of the selectors (e.g. the size of aromatic units and their substitution pattern) are shown to play a key role in the effective formation of diastereomeric complexes with analytes. Thus, we have achieved the enantioseparation of all test analytes with a mass spectrometry-compatible mobile phase with a chiral strong cation-exchange type stationary phase. PMID:26765268

  11. Effect of ionophores on the rate of intramolecular cation exchange in durosemiquinone ion pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Mcguyer, C. A.; Gutierrez, A. R.; Shannon, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the ionophores 15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6), dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) and cryptand 222 (C222) on intramolecular cation exchange in ion pairs of the sodium salt of the durosemiquinone anion in benzene solution are investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the 18C6 and 15C5 complexes with durosemiquinone reduced by contact with a sodium mirror show an alternating line width which indicates that the sodium ion is being exchanged between equivalent sites near the oxygens of the semiquinone with activation energies of 8.7 and 6.0 kcal/mole and Arrhenius preexponential factors of 9 x 10 to the 12th/sec and 10 to the 12th/sec, respectively. Spectra obtained for the DBC complexes show no evidence of exchange, while those of C222 indicate rapid exchange. It is also noted that the hyperfine splitting constants measured do not change over the 50-K temperature interval studied.

  12. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE WASTE REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2010-07-12

    The small column ion exchange (SCIX) process treats low curie salt (LCS) waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into the CST bed. A CST column loaded with radioactive cesium will generate significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs of the CST sorption column can not handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally within the column and degrade the performance of the ion-exchange process. The CST starts to degrade at about 80 to 85 C, and the CST completely changes to another material above 120 C. In addition, the process solution will boil around 130 C. If the column boiled dry, the sorbent could plug the column and require replacement of the column module. The objective of the present work is to compute temperature distributions across the column as a function of transit time after the initiation of accidents when there is loss of the salt solution flow in the CST column under abnormal conditions of the process operations. In this situation, the customer requested that the calculations should be conservative in that the model results would show the maximum centerline temperatures achievable by the CST design configurations. The thermal analysis results will be used to evaluate the fluid temperature distributions and the process component temperatures within the ion exchange system. This information will also assist in the system design and maintenance.

  13. Haemocompatibility and ion exchange capability of nanocellulose polypyrrole membranes intended for blood purification

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz, Natalia; Carlsson, Daniel O.; Hong, Jaan; Larsson, Rolf; Fellstrm, Bengt; Nyholm, Leif; Strmme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Composites of nanocellulose and the conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) are presented as candidates for a new generation of haemodialysis membranes. The composites may combine active ion exchange with passive ultrafiltration, and the large surface area (about 80 m2 g?1) could potentially provide compact dialysers. Herein, the haemocompatibility of the novel membranes and the feasibility of effectively removing small uraemic toxins by potential-controlled ion exchange were studied. The thrombogenic properties of the composites were improved by applying a stable heparin coating. In terms of platelet adhesion and thrombin generation, the composites were comparable with haemocompatible polymer polysulphone, and regarding complement activation, the composites were more biocompatible than commercially available membranes. It was possible to extract phosphate and oxalate ions from solutions with physiological pH and the same tonicity as that of the blood. The exchange capacity of the materials was found to be 600 26 and 706 31 ?mol g?1 in a 0.1 M solution (pH 7.4) and in an isotonic solution of phosphate, respectively. The corresponding values with oxalate were 523 5 in a 0.1 M solution (pH 7.4) and 610 1 ?mol g?1 in an isotonic solution. The heparinized PPycellulose composite is consequently a promising haemodialysis material, with respect to both potential-controlled extraction of small uraemic toxins and haemocompatibility. PMID:22298813

  14. IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

    2011-11-07

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

  15. Poly(methyl methacrylate) as incorporation medium for spent ion-exchange resin. II. Simulated resin

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattas, N.K.; Ikladious, N.E.; Eskander, S.B.

    1983-05-01

    The incorporation and final containment of spent ion-exchange resins into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was investigated in the present study. Test blocks of PMMA with 50% incorporated inactive resin were subjected to radiation doses of 10/sup 5/-10/sup 7/ rad at a dose rate of 50 rad/s. The high radiation doses impaired the mechanical properties of the final products. Both compressive strength and hardness decreased with increasing the particle size of the ion-exchange resin. DTA diagrams showed the thermal instability of the final solidification product at about 400/sup 0/C. Leaching experiments on incorporated blocks of active resins labelled with Cs-137 and Ce-144 showed that cesium activity was more released in leachant solutions than was cerium activity. Cumulative leaching rates for both Cs and Ce were lower in deionized water than in underground water. The mechanical, thermal, and leaching data obtained illustrate the suitability of PMMA for immobilization of spent ion-exchange resins with low specific activity.

  16. Engineering study for the treatment of spent ion exchange resin resulting from nuclear process applications

    SciTech Connect

    Place, B.G.

    1990-09-01

    This document is an engineering study of spent ion exchange resin treatment processes with the purpose of identifying one or more suitable treatment technologies. Classifications of waste considered include all classes of low-level waste (LLW), mixed LLW, transuranic (TRU) waste, and mixed TRU waste. A total of 29 process alternatives have been evaluated. Evaluation parameters have included economic parameters (both total life-cycle costs and capital costs), demonstrated operability, environmental permitting, operational availability, waste volume reduction, programmatic consistency, and multiple utilization. The results of this study suggest that there are a number of alternative process configurations that are suitable for the treatment of spent ion exchange resin. The determinative evaluation parameters were economic variables (total life-cycle cost or capital cost) and waste volume reduction. Immobilization processes are generally poor in volume reduction. Thermal volume reduction processes tend to have high capital costs. There are immobilization processes and thermal volume reduction processes that can treat all classifications of spent ion exchange resin likely to be encountered. 40 refs., 19 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. Simulation model for overloaded monoclonal antibody variants separations in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Ströhlein, Guido; Lattuada, Marco; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-08-31

    A model was developed for the design of a monoclonal antibody charge variants separation process based on ion-exchange chromatography. In order to account for a broad range of operating conditions in the simulations, an explicit pH and salt concentration dependence has been included in the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The reliability of this model was tested using experimental chromatographic retention times as well as information about the structural characteristics of the different charge variants, e.g. C-terminal lysine groups and deamidated groups. Next, overloaded isocratic elutions at various pH and salt concentrations have been performed to determine the saturation capacity of the ion-exchanger. Furthermore, the column simulation model was applied for the prediction of monoclonal antibody variants separations with both pH and salt gradient elutions. A good prediction of the elution times and peak shapes was observed, even though none of the model parameters was adjusted to fit the experimental data. The trends in the separation performance obtained through the simulations were generally sufficient to identify the most promising operating conditions. The predictive column simulation model thus developed in this work, including a set of parameters determined through specific independent experiments, was experimentally validated and offers a useful basis for a rational optimization of monoclonal antibody variants separation processes on ion-exchange chromatography. PMID:22795935

  18. Impact of natural organic matter properties on the kinetics of suspended ion exchange process.

    PubMed

    Bazri, Mohammad Mahdi; Mohseni, Madjid

    2016-03-15

    Removal kinetics of four standard organic matter isolates under the application of strongly basic ion exchange resins (IEX) in suspended mode was studied under commercial application conditions. Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM), SR fulvic acid (SRFA), and Pony Lake fulvic acid (PLFA) were greatly removed (>90%) and highly preferred by IEX resins (α > 5, over Cl(-), and HCO3(-)) while SR humic acid (SRHA) was the least preferred organic structure among the four isolates studied (α ≈ 1). Moreover, the efficacy of removal for fulvic acids (i.e., SRFA, PLFA) was consistent over consecutive reuse of IEX resins (i.e., loading cycles) whereas it decreased for SRNOM and SRHA over the course of operation. The stoichiometric correlation between the chloride released from the resins as a result of organic molecules uptake indicated that ion exchange was the dominant mechanism. Results obtained indicated that molecular weight and charge density of isolates played a major role in the performance of ion exchange process for organic matter removal. Furthermore, various empirical and physical models were evaluated using the experimental data and pore diffusion was found to be the rate-liming step during the uptake of organic matters; hence, it was used as the appropriate model to predict the kinetics of removal. Consequently, free liquid diffusivities and effective pore diffusion coefficients of organic molecules were estimated and findings were in agreement with the literature data that were obtained from spectrophotometric methods. PMID:26774263

  19. Anaerobic-ion exchange (AN-IX) process for local-scale nitrogen recovery from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel P; Smith, Nathaniel T

    2015-11-01

    An anaerobic-ion exchange (AN-IX) process was developed for point-of-origin recovery of nitrogen from household wastewater. The process features upflow solids-blanket anaerobic treatment (ammonification) followed by ammonium ion exchange onto natural zeolite. The AN-IX system is configured as a series of linked upflow chambers that operate passively without energy input, and is amenable to intermittent and seasonal operation. A 57L prototype was operated for over 1.8 years treating actual wastewater under field conditions. Total nitrogen removal exceeded 96% through the first 160 days of operation and effluent ammonium nitrogen remained below detection for 300 days. Ion exchange chambers exhibited sequential NH4(+)-N breakthrough over extended operation and complete media exhaustion was approached at Day 355. The ammonium capacity of zeolite was estimated as 13.5mg NH4(+)-N per gram dry weight. AN-IX is a resilient and cost effective process for local-scale nitrogen recovery and reuse, suitable for small scale and larger systems. PMID:26253916

  20. Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    CHARLES, NASH

    2005-02-27

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will use cesium ion exchange to remove Cs-137 from Low Activity Waste (LAW) down to a maximum activity of 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW (ILAW) product. The WTP Project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig(R) 644 (SL-644) resin (registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT) or a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. The WTP Project is conducting a three-stage process for selecting and qualifying an alternative ion exchange resin. Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) is being pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644, to provide a backup resin supply. Resin cost relative to SL-644 is a primary driver. Phase I of the testing plan examined the viability of RF resin and recommended that a spherical form of RF resin be examined further. Phases II and III, now underway, include batch testing to determine the isotherm of this resin, kinetics to address the impacts of bead diameter and high sodium feed levels on processing Hanford waste with the resin, and multicycle column testing to determine how temperature and chemical cycling affects waste processing. Phases II and III also examine resin performance against simulated WTP feeds, radiolytic and thermal stability, and scale-up to pilot scale performance. We will discuss early results obtained from Phase II testing here.