Science.gov

Sample records for ratio pyrometer system

  1. Design, Fabrication and Testing of an Infrared Ratio Pyrometer System for the Measurement of Gasifier Reaction Chamber Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Leininger

    2005-03-31

    Texaco was awarded contract DE-FC26-99FT40684 from the U.S. DOE to design, build, bench test and field test an infrared ratio pyrometer system for measuring gasifier temperature. The award occurred in two phases. Phase 1, which involved designing, building and bench testing, was completed in September 2000, and the Phase 1 report was issued in March 2001. Phase 2 was completed in 2005, and the results of the field test are contained in this final report. Two test campaigns were made. In the first one, the pyrometer was sighted into the gasifier. It performed well for a brief period of time and then experienced difficulties in keeping the sight tube open due to a slag accumulation which developed around the opening of the sight tube in the gasifier wall. In the second test campaign, the pyrometer was sighted into the top of the radiant syngas cooler through an unused soot blower lance. The pyrometer experienced no more problems with slag occlusions, and the readings were continuous and consistent. However, the pyrometer readings were 800 to 900 F lower than the gasifier thermocouple readings, which is consistent with computer simulations of the temperature distribution inside the radiant syngas cooler. In addition, the pyrometer readings were too sluggish to use for control purposes. Additional funds beyond what were available in this contract would be required to develop a solution that would allow the pyrometer to be used to measure the temperature inside the gasifier.

  2. DESIGN, FABRICATION AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF GASIFIER REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas F. Leininger; Hua-Min Huang

    2004-01-01

    ChevronTexaco has shipped the pyrometer system to Tampa, Florida. Polk Power is in the process of installing the mechanical, electrical and instrumentation of the pyrometer system as well as integrating the instrumentation to the test site Distributed Control System. The startup and field testing of the system will begin afterwards.

  3. Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quince, Asia N. (Inventor); Stein, Alexander (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A non-contact pyrometer and method for calibrating the same are provided. The pyrometer includes a radiation sensor configured to measure at least a portion of a radiance signal emitted from a target medium and output a voltage that is a function of an average of the absorbed radiance signal, and an optical window disposed proximate the radiation sensor and configured to control a wavelength range of the radiance signal that reaches the radiation sensor. The pyrometer may further include a reflective enclosure configured to receive the target medium therein, wherein the radiation sensor and the optical window are disposed within the reflective enclosure, an amplifier in communication with an output of the radiation sensor, and a data acquisition system in communication with an output of the amplifier.

  4. DESIGN, FABRICATION AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF GASIFIER REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas F. Leininger; Hua-Min Huang

    2003-10-01

    Polk Power and ChevronTexaco have signed the cooperative agreement at the end of reporting period. ChevronTexaco is shipping the pyrometer system to Tampa, Florida. Polk Power will start the modification fieldwork and installation of the system. The testing will start when the next opportunity is available.

  5. DESIGN, FABRICATION, ASSEMBLY AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Leininger

    2001-03-31

    Reliable measurement of gasifier reaction chamber temperature is important for the proper operation of slagging, entrained-flow gasification processes. Historically, thermocouples have been used as the main measurement technique, with the temperature inferred from syngas methane concentration being used as a backup measurement. While these have been sufficient for plant operation in many cases, both techniques suffer from limitations. The response time of methane measurements is too slow to detect rapid upset conditions, and thermocouples are subject to long-term drift, as well as slag attack, which eventually leads to failure of the thermocouple. Texaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) has developed an infrared ratio pyrometer system for measuring gasifier reaction chamber temperature. This system has a faster response time than both methane and thermocouples, and has been demonstrated to provide reliable temperature measurements for longer periods of time when compared to thermocouples installed in the same MTC gasifier. In addition, the system can be applied to commercial gasifiers without any significant scale-up issues. The major equipment items, the purge system, and the safety shutdown system in a commercial plant are essentially identical to the prototypes at MTC. The desired result of this DOE program is ''a bench-scale prototype, either assembled or with critical components (laboratory) tested in a convincing manner.'' The prototype of the pyrometer system (including gasifier optical access port) that was designed, assembled and tested for this program, has had previous prototypes that have been built and successfully tested under actual coal and coke gasification conditions in three pilot units at MTC. It was the intent of the work performed under the auspices of this program to review and update the existing design, and to fabricate and bench test an updated system that can be field tested in one or more commercial gasifiers during a follow on phase of this program. For all intents and purposes, the development, bench testing and pilot unit testing of this temperature measurement system has already been done, and was mostly a matter of getting the hardware ready for a commercial field test. The benefits of field-testing are (1) Texaco will gain long-term commercial operating experience and (2) commercial gasifier operators will gain confidence that this system can perform reliably under true commercial plant conditions. This work was performed by Texaco at its Montebello Technology Center in South El Monte, California.

  6. High resolution color band pyrometer ratioing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); Henry, Paul K. (Inventor); LoGiurato, D. Daniel (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The sensing head of a two-color band ratioing pyrometer of a known type using a fiber optic cable to couple radiation to dual detector photodiodes is improved to have high spatial resolution by focusing the radiation received through an objective lens (i.e., by focusing the image of a target area) onto an opaque sheet spaced in front of the input end of the fiber optic cable. A two-mil hole in that sheet then passes radiation to the input end of the cable. The detector has two channels, one for each color band, with an electronic-chopper stabilized current amplifier as the input stage followed by an electronic-chopper stabilized voltage amplifier.

  7. PYROLASER - PYROLASER OPTICAL PYROMETER OPERATING SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E.

    1994-01-01

    The PYROLASER package is an operating system for the Pyrometer Instrument Company's Pyrolaser. There are 6 individual programs in the PYROLASER package: two main programs, two lower level subprograms, and two programs which, although independent, function predominantly as macros. The package provides a quick and easy way to setup, control, and program a standard Pyrolaser. Temperature and emissivity measurements may be either collected as if the Pyrolaser were in the manual operations mode, or displayed on real time strip charts and stored in standard spreadsheet format for post-test analysis. A shell is supplied to allow macros, which are test-specific, to be easily added to the system. The Pyrolaser Simple Operation program provides full on-screen remote operation capabilities, thus allowing the user to operate the Pyrolaser from the computer just as it would be operated manually. The Pyrolaser Simple Operation program also allows the use of "quick starts". Quick starts provide an easy way to permit routines to be used as setup macros for specific applications or tests. The specific procedures required for a test may be ordered in a sequence structure and then the sequence structure can be started with a simple button in the cluster structure provided. One quick start macro is provided for continuous Pyrolaser operation. A subprogram, Display Continuous Pyr Data, is used to display and store the resulting data output. Using this macro, the system is set up for continuous operation and the subprogram is called to display the data in real time on strip charts. The data is simultaneously stored in a spreadsheet format. The resulting spreadsheet file can be opened in any one of a number of commercially available spreadsheet programs. The Read Continuous Pyrometer program is provided as a continuously run subprogram for incorporation of the Pyrolaser software into a process control or feedback control scheme in a multi-component system. The program requires the Pyrolaser to be set up using the Pyrometer String Transfer macro. It requires no inputs and provides temperature and emissivity as outputs. The Read Continuous Pyrometer program can be run continuously and the data can be sampled as often or as seldom as updates of temperature and emissivity are required. PYROLASER is written using the Labview software for use on Macintosh series computers running System 6.0.3 or later, Sun Sparc series computers running OpenWindows 3.0 or MIT's X Window System (X11R4 or X11R5), and IBM PC or compatibles running Microsoft Windows 3.1 or later. Labview requires a minimum of 5Mb of RAM on a Macintosh, 24Mb of RAM on a Sun, and 8Mb of RAM on an IBM PC or compatible. The Labview software is a product of National Instruments (Austin,TX; 800-433-3488), and is not included with this program. The standard distribution medium for PYROLASER is a 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. It is also available on a 3.5 inch 720K MS-DOS format diskette, a 3.5 inch diskette in UNIX tar format, and a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. An electronic copy of the documentation in Macintosh WordPerfect version 2.0.4 format is included on the distribution medium. Printed documentation is included in the price of the program. PYROLASER was developed in 1992.

  8. Development of a Multi-Point Pyrometer System (MPPS) for measuring surface temperature and emissivity

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, R.D.; Jang, Ping-Rey

    1993-06-01

    In support of the US DOE MHD research program, the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) has been actively engaged in developing and applying advanced optical diagnostic techniques and instrumentation systems to high temperature coal-fired gas streams for over a decade. One of the earliest diagnostic systems developed by DIAL was a two color pyrometer (TCP). In this system, two commercial single-color pyrometers and a microprocessor system were used to form a TCP which can make accurate measurements of surfaces of unknown emissivity and temperature. This system has been used extensively to make measurements in support of the national MHD program. This report describes this system.

  9. Study of the Performance of a Streaked Optical Pyrometer System for Temperature Measurement of Shocked Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Huige; Liu, Yonggang; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Dong; Ding, Yongkun; Zhao, Bin; Hu, Guangyue; Zheng, Jian

    2014-06-01

    A streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) is developed and calibrated for the measurement of the temperature of shocked materials. In order to achieve a higher relative sensitivity, a one-channel scheme is adopted for the system. The system is calibrated with a shocked step-shaped aluminum sample in the SG-III prototype laser facility. The relation between the count number in the detection system and the sample temperature is thus obtained, which can be adopted to infer the temperature of any shocked materials in future experiments.

  10. Streaked Optical Pyrometer System for Laser-Driven Shock-Wave Experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Boehly, T.R.; Melchior, Meyerhofer, D.D.; Celliers, P.M.; Eggert, J.H.; Hicks, D.G.; Sorce, C.M.; Oertel, J.A.; Emmel, P.M.

    2007-03-23

    The temperature of laser-driven shock waves is of interest to inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics. We report on a streaked optical pyrometer that measures the self-emission of laser-driven shocks simultaneously with a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Together these diagnostics are used to obtain the temporally and spatially resolved temperatures of ~Mbar shocks driven by the OMEGA laser. We provide a brief description of the diagnostic and how it is used with VISAR. Key spectral calibration results are discussed and important characteristics of the recording system are presented.

  11. Upgrades to the VISAR-streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) system on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, A. M.; Millot, M.; Seppala, L. G.; Frieders, G.; Zeid, Z.; Christensen, K.; Celliers, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) is a critical diagnostic in Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density research as it has the ability to track shock fronts or interfaces moving 0.1-100 km/s with great accuracy. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the VISAR has recently been used successfully for implosion tuning and equation of state measurements. However, the initial design of the companion Streaked Optical Pyrometer (SOP) to measure spectral radiance - hence shock temperature - suffers from large background levels and poor spatial resolution. We report on an upgrade to improve the spatial resolution in the 560-640nm band by using custom lenses and replacing the Dove prism with a K-mirror and implementing a gating-circuit for the streak camera to reduce background signal. We envision that upgraded SOP will provide high quality data collection matching NIF VISAR's standards.

  12. Improvements to the three-color optical CCD-based pyrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Tairan; Zhao Huan; Zeng Jun; Wang Zhe; Zhong Maohua; Shi Congling

    2010-11-01

    We put forward an improved three-color measurement scheme with a color CCD sensor using the combination of effective wavelengths and blackbody calibrations. The process of effective wavelengths realizes the separation of the emissivity function from the measurement integral equation. This improved method not only effectively avoids errors arising from the traditional process adopting the basic wavelengths, but also simplifies the complex integral calculations. For a blackbody or graybody, the measurement performance of the pyrometer was experimentally investigated from the point of the temperature sensitivity. The results show that narrowing the spectrum bandwidth with different bandpass spectral filters may improve the temperature sensitivities. The spectrum adjustment not only makes the linear emissivity more suitable in the narrower waveband, but also reduces the numerical uncertainty of the effective wavelengths. For nongray objects, the effects of the numerical uncertainty of the effective wavelengths to measurements were quantificationally evaluated at different measurement conditions (different temperatures, emissivities, and spectrums). The results indicate that the reference values of 584, 555, and 511nm or 607, 560, and 506nm of the effective wavelengths are reasonable for the present system with the modified spectral response using Filter 1 or Filter 2. The maximum calculation errors arising from the reference effective wavelengths are less than 1.6%. In this paper, the technical realization steps of the improved method are also described. The measurement experiments of a metal sample in hot environments were carried out to further verify the applicability of this improved CCD-based pyrometer. The results agreed well with the spectrometer-based results.

  13. The use of optical pyrometers in axial flow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, R.R.; Przirembel, H.R.; Clevenger, D.H.; Lang, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    An optical pyrometer system that can be used to measure metal temperatures over an extended range of temperature has been developed. Real-time flame discrimination permits accurate operation in the gas turbine environment with high flame content. This versatile capability has been used in a number of ways. In experimental engines, a fixed angle pyrometer has been used for turbine health monitoring for the automatic test stand abort system. Turbine blade creep capability has been improved by tailoring the burner profile based on measured blade temperatures. Fixed and traversing pyrometers were used extensively during engine development to map blade surface temperatures in order to assess cooling effectiveness and identify optimum configurations. Portable units have been used in turbine field inspections. A new low temperature pyrometer is being used as a diagnostic tool in the alternate turbopump design for the Space Shuttle main engine. Advanced engine designs will incorporate pyrometers in the engine control system to limit operation to safe temperatures.

  14. The use of optical pyrometers in axial flow turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, R. R.; Przirembel, H. R.; Clevenger, D. H.; Lang, J. L.

    1989-07-01

    An optical pyrometer system that can be used to measure metal temperatures over an extended range of temperature has been developed. Real-time flame discrimination permits accurate operation in the gas turbine environment with high flame content. This versatile capability has been used in a number of ways. In experimental engines, a fixed angle pyrometer has been used for turbine health monitoring for the automatic test stand abort system. Turbine blade creep capability has been improved by tailoring the burner profile based on measured blade temperatures. Fixed and traversing pyrometers were used extensively during engine development to map blade surface temperatures in order to assess cooling effectiveness and identify optimum configurations. Portable units have been used in turbine field inspections. A new low temperature pyrometer is being used as a diagnostic tool in the alternate turbopump design for the Space Shuttle main engine. Advanced engine designs will incorporate pyrometers in the engine control system to limit operation to safe temperatures.

  15. Measurement of turbine blade temperature using pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.; Du, C.

    1985-09-01

    This paper presents the study of application of a self-made turbine blade pyrometer to measuring rotating turbine blade temperatures in a bed testing aeroengine. The study includes the temperature measuring principle and the pyrometer system; installation and adjustment of the double ball-floating type configuration optical head which goes through four different high temperatures bulkheads; and measurement of three kinds of temperature (the average blade temperature Ta, the average peak blade temperature Tap, and the maximum peak blade temperature Tmp) for all rotor blades of the turbine first stage. The experimental data analysis reveals that the first attempt of application of this pyrometer is successful. The measurement errors in the temperature range of 550-1200 C are within + or - 1 percent of calculated blade temperatures.

  16. A multicolor imaging pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    A multicolor imaging pyrometer was designed for accurately and precisely measuring the temperature distribution histories of small moving samples. The device projects six different color images of the sample onto a single charge coupled device array that provides an RS-170 video signal to a computerized frame grabber. The computer automatically selects which one of the six images provides useful data, and converts that information to a temperature map. By measuring the temperature of molten aluminum heated in a kiln, a breadboard version of the device was shown to provide high accuracy in difficult measurement situations. It is expected that this pyrometer will ultimately find application in measuring the temperature of materials undergoing radiant heating in a microgravity acoustic levitation furnace.

  17. Fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Tan, Peng; Pang, Chuanhe; Zhao, Huan; Shen, Yi

    2011-06-01

    A fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was developed for the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra from 200 nm to 1700 nm using a CCD detector and an InGaAs detector. The pyrometer system conveniently and quickly provides the sufficient choices of multiple measurement wavelengths using optical diffraction, which avoids the use of narrow-band filters. Flexible optical fibers are used to transmit the radiation so the pyrometer can be used for temperature measurements in harsh environments. The setup and calibrations (wavelength calibration, nonlinearity calibration, and radiation response calibration) of this pyrometer system were described. Development of the multi-wavelength pyrometer involved optimization of the bandwidth and temperature discrimination of the multiple spectra data. The analysis results showed that the wavelength intervals, ΔλCCD = 30 nm and ΔλInGaAs = 50 nm, are the suitable choices as a tradeoff between the simple emissivity model assumption and the multiple signal discrimination. The temperature discrimination was also quantificationally evaluated for various wavelengths and temperatures. The measurement performance of the fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was partially verified through measurements with a high-temperature blackbody and actual hot metals. This multi-wavelength pyrometer can be used for remote high-temperature measurements.

  18. C2 Swan spectrum used as a molecular pyrometer in transferred arc and the influence noise to signal ratio on the temperature values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, H.

    2014-05-01

    The C2 Swan system molecular emission spectrum is frequently observed in arc plasmas containing hydrocarbons. The spectra emitted from 5 kw in the transferred arc reactor at atmospheric pressure by CH4/CO2/Ar mixture are recorded with the help of an optical system consisting of a linear CCD array coupled with 2m spectrometer. The rotational temperature of 4300±300K is found from the experimental Abel inverted spectra in the arc center after a point-to-point comparison of the spectrum with a computer simulated one. The influence of the noise to signal ratio has been studied, if the noise to signal ratio is about 10% we found an error of 7% at temperature 3000K and 10% at 6000K.

  19. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, J. E.; Marrese-Reading, C. M.; Thornber, B.; Dang, L.; Johnson, L. K.; Katz, I.

    2007-09-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed.

  20. Multicolor pyrometer for materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, M. B.; Frank, J.; Baker, J. E.; Foutter, R. R.; Beerman, H.; Allen, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), under contract to NASA JPL, during a 2.5-year SBIR Phase 2 Program. The program goals were to design, construct, and program a prototype passive imaging pyrometer capable of measuring, as accurately as possible, and controlling the temperature distribution across the surface of a moving object suspended in space. These goals were achieved and the instrument was delivered to JPL in November 1989. The pyrometer utilizes an optical system which operates at short wavelengths compared to the peak of the black-body spectrum for the temperature range of interest, thus minimizing errors associated with a lack of knowledge about the heated sample's emissivity. To cover temperatures from 900 to 2500 K, six wavelengths are available. The preferred wavelength for measurement of a particular temperature decreases as the temperature increases. Images at all six wavelengths are projected onto a single CCD camera concurrently. The camera and optical system have been calibrated to relate the measured intensity at each pixel to the temperature of the heated object. The output of the camera is digitized by a frame grabber installed in a personal computer and analyzed automatically to yield temperature information. The data can be used in a feedback loop to alter the status of computer-activated switches and thereby control a heating system.

  1. Laser Pyrometer For Spot Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Allen, J. L.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Laser pyrometer makes temperature map by scanning measuring spot across target. Scanning laser pyrometer passively measures radiation emitted by scanned spot on target and calibrated by similar passive measurement on blackbody of known temperature. Laser beam turned on for active measurements of reflectances of target spot and reflectance standard. From measurements, temperature of target spot inferred. Pyrometer useful for non-contact measurement of temperature distributions in processing of materials.

  2. Uncertainty of Pyrometers in a Casting Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, D.K.; Elkins, J.E.; Fleenor, R.M.; Morrision, J.M.; Sherrill, M.W.; Seiber, L.E.

    2001-12-07

    This work has established uncertainty limits for the EUO filament pyrometers, digital pyrometers, two-color automatic pyrometers, and the standards used to certify these instruments (Table 1). If symmetrical limits are used, filament pyrometers calibrated in Production have certification uncertainties of not more than {+-}20.5 C traceable to NIST over the certification period. Uncertainties of these pyrometers were roughly {+-}14.7 C before introduction of the working standard that allowed certification in the field. Digital pyrometers addressed in this report have symmetrical uncertainties of not more than {+-}12.7 C or {+-}18.1 C when certified on a Y-12 Standards Laboratory strip lamp or in a production area tube furnace, respectively. Uncertainty estimates for automatic two-color pyrometers certified in Production are {+-}16.7 C. Additional uncertainty and bias are introduced when measuring production melt temperatures. A -19.4 C bias was measured in a large 1987 data set which is believed to be caused primarily by use of Pyrex{trademark} windows (not present in current configuration) and window fogging. Large variability (2{sigma} = 28.6 C) exists in the first 10 m of the hold period. This variability is attributed to emissivity variation across the melt and reflection from hot surfaces. For runs with hold periods extending to 20 m, the uncertainty approaches the calibration uncertainty of the pyrometers. When certifying pyrometers on a strip lamp at the Y-12 Standards Laboratory, it is important to limit ambient temperature variation (23{+-}4 C), to order calibration points from high to low temperatures, to allow 6 m for the lamp to reach thermal equilibrium (12 m for certifications below 1200 C) to minimize pyrometer bias, and to calibrate the pyrometer if error exceeds vendor specifications. A procedure has been written to assure conformance.

  3. IR optical fiber-based noncontact pyrometer for drop tube instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. G.; Moneyhun, S.; Saleh, W.; Sudeora, S.; Claus, R. O.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a two color pyrometer with infrared optical fiber bundles for collection of the infrared radiation is described. The pyrometer design is engineered to facilitate its use for measurement of the temperature of small, falling samples in a microgravity materials processing experiment using a 100 meter long drop tube. Because the samples are small and move rapidly through the field of view of the pyrometer, the optical power budget of the detection system is severly limited. Strategies for overcoming this limitation are discussed.

  4. Multi-band pyrometer uncertainty analysis and improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongjun; Zhang, Xuecong; Cai, Jing; Wang, Zhongyu

    2010-12-01

    According to the energy ratio value of multi-band radiating from the measured surface, the 'true' temperature can be calculated by multi-band pyrometer. Multi-band pyrometer has many advantages: it can hardly be affected by the emission of measured surface and the environment radiation, and it has higher Signal-to-Noise Ratio and higher temperature measurement accuracy. This paper introduces the principle of a multi-band pyrometer and the uncertainty of measurement result is evaluated by using Monte-Carlo Method (MCM). The result shows that the accuracy of effective wavelength is the largest source of uncertainty and the other main source is reference temperature. When using ordinary blackbody furnace with continuous temperature, which can provide reference temperature and calibrate effective wavelength, the uncertainty component is 2.17K and 2.48K respectively. The combined standard uncertainty is 3.30K. A new calibration method is introduced. The effective wavelength is calibrated by monochromator, and the reference temperature is provided by fixed point black body furnace. The uncertainty component is decreased to 0.73K and 0.12K respectively. The measurement uncertainty is decreased to 0.74K. The temperature measurement accuracy is enhanced.

  5. A Self Calibrating Emissivity and/or Transmissivity Independent Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Pyrometer is a favorite method to do remote temperature measurement in research and development. One-color, two-color and the disappearing filament pyrometers are most common, multicolor and multiwavelength pyrometers are being introduced recently. All these pyrometers invariably require, in one form or another, information concerning emissivity, the medium transmissivity, their ratio at some two spectral regions, the instrument's calibration constant, etc. for their operation. This information can come from hand books, from the manufacturer or in some instances, from results of dedicated separate experiments. Often this information is sample or instrument specific. Sometimes this information, though obtained from a special experiment, is obtained using a separate sample rather than the one pursued for temperature measurement. Then, there would be the question of variability from sample to sample and variability from batch to batch in the sample used. Also, previously determined calibrations can change with time, and the only way to reduce uncertainty is to perform the calibration more frequently or even immediately before the experiment. We have developed a multiwavelength pyrometer, which eliminates the need to supply the necessary emissivity and/or transmissivity information and the instrument calibration constants ahead of time. The pyrometer calibrates itself from its first cycle data.

  6. Self-calibrated active pyrometer for furnace temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The pyrometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave receiver including a millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. In an alternative embodiment, a translatable base plate and a visible laser beam allow slow mapping out of interference patterns and obtaining peak values therefor. The invention also includes a waveguide having a replaceable end portion, an insulating refractory sleeve and/or a source of inert gas flow. The pyrometer may be used in conjunction with a waveguide to form a system for temperature measurements in a furnace. The system may employ a chopper or alternatively, be constructed without a chopper. The system may also include an auxiliary reflector for surface emissivity measurements.

  7. DESIGN, FABRICATION AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF GASIFIER REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas F. Leininger; Hua-Min Huang

    2003-07-01

    Polk Power has decided that the Texaco gasification unit will not be sold to a third party. Therefore, including the ownership transfer of the Texaco gasification unit in the agreement is not an issue any more. The cooperative agreement between Texaco and Polk Power has been revised several times in this quarter. Polk power is making comments on the last draft that Texaco sent to them. The modification fieldwork and testing will start once the cooperative agreement is signed with Polk Power.

  8. DESIGN, FABRICATION AND BENCH TESTNG OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF GASIFIER REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas F. Leininger; Hua-Min Huang

    2003-04-01

    The cooperative agreement between Texaco and Polk Power has been revised by Polk Power and ChevronTexaco several times already. Lawyers from both Polk Power and ChevronTexaco are in the process to include the issues related to the ownership transfer of the Texaco gasification unit in the agreement and finalize the draft. The modification fieldwork and testing will start once the cooperative agreement is signed with Polk Power.

  9. Noncontact true temperature measurement. [of levitated sample using laser pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark C.; Allen, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A laser pyrometer has been developed for acquiring the true temperature of a levitated sample. The laser beam is first expanded to cover the entire cross-sectional surface of the target. For calibration of such a system, the reflectivity signal of an ideal 0.95 cm diameter gold-coated sphere (reflectivity = 0.99) is used as the reference for any other real targets. The emissivity of the real target can then be calculated. The overall system constant is obtained by passively measuring the radiance of a blackbody furnace (emissivity = 1.0) at a known, arbitrary temperature. Since the photo sensor used is highly linear over the entire operating temperature range, the true temperature of the target can then be computed. Preliminary results indicate that true temperatures thus obtained are in excellent correlation with thermocouple measured temperatures.

  10. Development of three-wavelength CCD image pyrometer used for the temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi; Bai, Haicheng

    2014-02-01

    This paper develops an imaging based three-color pyrometer for the monitoring of temperature distribution in a continuous casting billet. A novel optical device, together with an embedded electronic system, is designed to sequentially collect a dark image and three thermal images with specified wavelengths on a same monochromatic charge-coupled-device (CCD). The three thermal images provide the basis for the determination of target temperature, while the dark image is used to online eliminate the dark noise of CCD with a differential method. This image pyrometer is not only independent of target emissivity but also overcomes the dissimilarity of measuring accuracy between the micro-sensors of CCD resulted from the non-uniformity of pixels' intensity response and the vignetting of optical system. Furthermore, a precise two-color temperature field measuring model on the CCD pyrometer is established, based on which a self-adaptive light-integration mechanism is presented. Compared with the traditional fixed light-integration method, the measuring range of the pyrometer is greatly extended and its sensitivity in low temperature segment is improved. The test results in a steel factory demonstrate that the pyrometer is capable of meeting the requirement of surface temperature measurements about casting billets. Reliability and accuracy of measurement results are also discussed herein. PMID:24593387

  11. Development of three-wavelength CCD image pyrometer used for the temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhi; Bai, Haicheng

    2014-02-15

    This paper develops an imaging based three-color pyrometer for the monitoring of temperature distribution in a continuous casting billet. A novel optical device, together with an embedded electronic system, is designed to sequentially collect a dark image and three thermal images with specified wavelengths on a same monochromatic charge-coupled-device (CCD). The three thermal images provide the basis for the determination of target temperature, while the dark image is used to online eliminate the dark noise of CCD with a differential method. This image pyrometer is not only independent of target emissivity but also overcomes the dissimilarity of measuring accuracy between the micro-sensors of CCD resulted from the non-uniformity of pixels’ intensity response and the vignetting of optical system. Furthermore, a precise two-color temperature field measuring model on the CCD pyrometer is established, based on which a self-adaptive light-integration mechanism is presented. Compared with the traditional fixed light-integration method, the measuring range of the pyrometer is greatly extended and its sensitivity in low temperature segment is improved. The test results in a steel factory demonstrate that the pyrometer is capable of meeting the requirement of surface temperature measurements about casting billets. Reliability and accuracy of measurement results are also discussed herein.

  12. Method and Apparatus for Polaradiometric Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abtahi, Ali A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A radiation pyrometer for measuring the true temperature of a body is provided by detecting and measuring thermal radiation from the body based on the principle that the effects of angular emission I(sub 1) and reflection I(sub 2) on the polarization states p and s of radiation are complementary such that upon detecting the combined partial polarization state components I(sub p) = I(sub 1p) + I(sub 2p) and I(sub s) = I(sub 1s) + I(sub 2s) and adjusting the intensity of the variable radiation source of the reflected radiation I(sub 2) until the combined partial radiation components I(sub p) and I(sub s) are equal, the effects of emissivity as well as diffusivity of the surface of the body are eliminated, thus obviating the need for any post processing of brightness temperature data.

  13. Multicolor pyrometer for materials processing in space, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, Michael; Frank, Jonathan; Beerman, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The program goals were to design, construct, and program a prototype passive imaging pyrometer capable of measuring, as accurately as possible, the temperature distribution across the surface of a moving object suspended in space.

  14. Shock Temperatures of Soda Lime Glass Measured by an Optical Pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takamichi; Sekine, Toshimori; Fat'yanov, O. V.; Takazawa, Eiichi; Zhu, Y. Q.

    1997-07-01

    An optical pyrometer has been used to measure shock temperatures of soda lime glass in a pressure range 58-110 GPa. This pyrometer consists of two parts, i.e., an OMA which provides a radiation spectrum over a visible range ( ~500 nm window) and a 4-channel PMT system which provides a time-dependent behavior of shock temperatures. The measured radiation spectra are compared with black body radiation curves to estimate the shock temperatures and emissivities. The obtained shock temperarures for the above pressure range are 2800-5500 K and nearly a linear relationship between the shock temperature and the shock pressure has been observed. It seems that obtained temperatures represent melted glass temperatures. Shock properties such as shock velocity and particle velocity of soda lime glass can be estimated and compared with those of crystal quartz and fused quartz.

  15. Temperature Measurement of Ceramic Materials Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    1999-01-01

    The surface temperatures of several pure ceramic materials (alumina, beryllia, magnesia, yittria and spinel) in the shape of pellets were measured using a multiwavelength pyrometer. In one of the measurements, radiation signal collection is provided simply by an optical fiber. In the other experiments, a 4.75 inch (12 cm) parabolic mirror collects the signal for the spectrometer. Temperature measurement using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer for these ceramic materials is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which varies with both temperature and wavelength. In at least one of the materials, yittria, the detected optical emission increased as the temperature was decreased due to such emissivity variation. The reasons for such changes are not known. The multiwavelength pyrometer has demonstrated its ability to measure surface temperatures under such conditions. Platinum electrodes were embedded in the ceramic pellets for resistance measurements as the temperature changed.

  16. Characteristic ratio assignment in fractional order systems.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Mohammad; Haeri, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    In this paper the characteristic ratios and generalized time constant are defined for all-pole commensurate fractional order systems. The sufficient condition for stability of these systems in terms of their characteristic ratios is obtained. Also an analytical approach for characteristic ratio assignment (CRA) to have a non-overshooting fast closed loop step response is introduced. The proposed CRA method is then employed to design a fractional order controller. Computer simulation results are presented to illustrate the performance of the CRA based designed fractional order controllers. PMID:20619834

  17. Temperature measurement in WTE boilers using suction pyrometers.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Najafi, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE) plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR) pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty. PMID:24248279

  18. Temperature Measurement in WTE Boilers Using Suction Pyrometers

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Najafi, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE) plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR) pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty. PMID:24248279

  19. Direct emissivity measurements on liquids and corrections to multi-color pyrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Optical pyrometry provides a means for non-contact temperature measurements whose accuracy depends on the accuracy with which specimen emittance is known. Two methods for obtaining the required emittance data are discussed in which the emittance is determined from measurements of the wavelength or polarization dependence of light emitted by the specimen. The spectral technique, multi-color pyrometry, yields apparent values for specimen emittance and temperature from emitted intensity measurements at two or more wavelengths. Emittance corrections cannot be eliminated by increasing the number of spectral intensity measurements required by an n-color pyrometer. Even if this were possible, the accuracy of temperature measurements by n-color pyrometry decreases with n such that pyrometers that require four intensity measurements would be impractical. In contrast, emittance values and corrections for one-color pyrometers can be accurately measured by the polarized light technique. The polarized light technique involves measurement of the degree of polarization for light emitted at an angle of 45 deg to the specimen normal. The reflectivities (r) for light polarized parallel (p) and normal (n) to the plane of emission are related by r(p) = r(n) squared. This leads to a simple relation between the intensity ratio for light emitted in the two polarized states and the emittance, i.e., e(n) = 2 - I(p)/I(n). The true specimen temperature is also obtained if absolute intensities are measured. Delvelopment of the polarized light technique in combination with one-color optical pyrometry is recommended to achieve accurate non-contact temperature measurements on liquids.

  20. Application of the Self Calibrating Emissivity and/or Transmissivity Independent Multiwavelength Pyrometer in an Intense Ambient Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    The NASA self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer is a recent addition to the list of pyrometers used in remote temperature measurement in research and development. The older one-color, two-color, and the disappearing filament pyrometers, as well as the multicolor and early multiwavelength pyrometers, all do not operate successfully in situations in which strong ambient radiation coexists with radiation originating from the measured surface. In such situations radiation departing from the target surface arrives at the pyrometer together with radiation coming from another source either directly or through reflection. Unlike the other pyrometers, the self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer can still calibrate itself and measure the temperatures in this adverse environment.

  1. Multi-color pyrometer for materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Spencer, Mark N.; Wolk, Nancy E.; Werner, Jennifer S.; Miranda, Henry A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The design, construction and calibration of a computer-linked multicolor pyrometer is described. The device was constructed for ready adaptation to a spacecraft and for use in the control of thermal processes for manufacturing materials in space. The pyrometer actually uses only one color at a time, and is relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the heated object's emissivity because the product of the color and the temperature has been selected to be within a regime where the radiant energy emitted from the body increases very rapidly with temperature. The instrument was calibrated and shown to exceed its design goal of temperature measurements between 300 and 2000 C, and its accuracy in the face of imprecise knowledge of the hot object's emissivity was demonstrated.

  2. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes that can identify origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, environmental habitability and biology [1]. For the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite, for example, the (sup 1)(sup 3)C/(sup 1)(sup 2)C ratio identifies it as a Mars (SNC) meteorite; the ??K/??Ar ratio tells us the last time the rock cooled to solid, namely 4 Gya; isotope ratios in (sup 3)He, (sup 2)(sup 1)Ne and (sup 3)?Ar show it was in space (cosmic ray exposure) for 10-20 million years; (sup 1)?C dating that it sat in Antarctica for 13,000 years before discovery; and clumped isotope analysis of (sup 1)?O(sup 1)(sup 3)C(sup 1)?O in its carbonate that it was formed at 18+/-4 ?C in a near-surface aqueous environment [2]. Solar System Formation

  3. CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2011-02-23

    The main function of the CO instrument is to provide continuous accurate measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratio at the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) 60-meter tower (36.607 °N, 97.489 °W, 314 meters above sea level). The essential feature of the control and data acquisition system is to record signals from a Thermo Electron 48C and periodically calibrate out zero and span drifts in the instrument using the combination of a CO scrubber and two concentrations of span gas (100 and 300 ppb CO in air). The system was deployed on May 25, 2005.

  4. Hydraulic system for a ratio change transmission

    DOEpatents

    Kalns, Ilmars

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  5. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  6. Use of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer in Several Elevated Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    2001-01-01

    A multiwavelength pyrometer was developed for applications unique to aerospace environments. It was shown to be a useful and versatile technique for measuring temperature, even when the emissivity is unknown. It has also been used to measure the surface temperatures of ceramic zircomia thermal barrier coatings and alumina. The close agreement between pyrometer and thin film thermocouple temperatures provided an independent check. Other applications of the multiwavelength pyrometer are simultaneous surface and bulk temperature measurements of a transparent material, and combustion gas temperature measurement using a special probe interfaced to the multiwavelength pyrometer via an optical fiber. The multiwavelength pyrometer determined temperature by transforming the radiation spectrum in a broad wavelength region to produce a straight line (in a certain spectral region), whose intercept in the vertical axis gives the temperature. Implicit in a two-color pyrometer is the assumption of wavelength independent emissivity. Though the two data points of a two-color pyrometer similarly processed would result immediately in a similar straight line to give the unknown temperature, the two-color pyrometer lacks the greater data redundancy of the multiwavelength pyrometer, which enables it to do so with improved accuracy. It also confirms that emissivity is indeed wavelength independent, as evidenced by a multitude of the data lying on a simple straight line. The multiwavelength pyrometer was also used to study the optical transmission properties of a nanostructured material from which a quadratic exponential functional frequency dependence of its spectral transmission was determined. Finally, by operating the multiwavelength pyrometer in a very wide field of view mode, the surface temperature distribution of a large hot surface was obtained through measurement of just a single radiation spectrum.

  7. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: a pyrometer for measuring ground temperature on Mars.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Zorzano, María P; Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Esteban, Blanca; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS), an instrument aboard NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor's main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment. PMID:22163405

  8. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Zorzano, María P.; Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Esteban, Blanca; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS), an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment. PMID:22163405

  9. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2012-10-01

    We will overview how stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary processes identifying origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, habitability, and biology.

  10. Optical pyrometer based on the gas phase photoacoustic effect.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangling; Diebold, Gerald J

    2016-05-15

    A photoacoustic cell containing an infrared active gas and equipped with a pair of infrared transmitting windows that alternately views two bodies at different temperatures through a pair of chopping wheels acts as a differential detector of the radiation emitted by the two bodies. A theory for the photoacoustic signal shows that the device acts to monitor the difference in the incidances between the two bodies integrated over the absorptions of the gas in the cell. Experiments are reported showing that the response of the pyrometer depends on the relative temperatures of heated bodies, the absorption coefficient of the gas in the cell, and the modulation frequency of the chopping wheels. The instrument is shown to be a sensitive detector of a null in the integrated incidance of the two bodies. PMID:27176967

  11. Multi-spectral pyrometer for gas turbine blade temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi

    2014-09-01

    To achieve the highest possible turbine inlet temperature requires to accurately measuring the turbine blade temperature. If the temperature of blade frequent beyond the design limits, it will seriously reduce the service life. The problem for the accuracy of the temperature measurement includes the value of the target surface emissivity is unknown and the emissivity model is variability and the thermal radiation of the high temperature environment. In this paper, the multi-spectral pyrometer is designed provided mainly for range 500-1000°, and present a model corrected in terms of the error due to the reflected radiation only base on the turbine geometry and the physical properties of the material. Under different working conditions, the method can reduce the measurement error from the reflect radiation of vanes, make measurement closer to the actual temperature of the blade and calculating the corresponding model through genetic algorithm. The experiment shows that this method has higher accuracy measurements.

  12. Evaluation and comparison of three IR detectors and three amplifier designs for a new high-speed IR pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. A.; Borror, S.; Obst, A. W.; Payton, J. R.; Seifter, A.

    2005-08-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a high-speed, four-wavelength, infrared (IR) pyrometer has been used for surface temperature measurements in shock-physics experiments for several years. The pyrometer uses solid-state detectors and a single fiber-optic cable for transmission of light from the target surface to the detectors. This instrument has recently been redesigned for an upcoming experiment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Three different IR detectors (two HgCdTe variants as well as the existing InSb chip) were compared for sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio, and bandwidth. Of major concern was detector amplifier recovery time from overload saturation. In shock-physics experiments, a short but very bright precursor frequently accompanies shock breakout (often from trapped air). This precursor can saturate the amplifier and may "swamp-out" the signal of interest before the amplifier recovers. With this in mind, we evaluated two new amplifier designs by the Perry Amplifier Company for linearity, signal-to-noise characteristics, gain, and saturation recovery time. This paper describes experimental setup for detector comparison and results obtained. Furthermore, we discuss new amplifier design and suitability for high-speed infrared pyrometry in shock physics experiments.

  13. Evaluation and comparison of three IR detectors and three amplifier designs for a new, high-speed IR pyrometer

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Young, S. Borrora, A.W. Obst, J.R. Payton, A. Seifter

    2005-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a high-speed, four-wavelength, infrared (IR) pyrometer has been used for surface temperature measurements in shock-physics experiments for several years. The pyrometer uses solid state detectors and a single fiber-optic cable for transmission of light from the target surface to the detectors. This instrument has recently been redesigned for an upcoming experiment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Three different IR detectors (two HgCdTe variants as well as the existing InSb chip) were compared for sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio, and bandwidth. Of major concern was detector amplifier recovery time from overload saturation. In shock physics experiments, a short but very bright precursor frequently accompanies shock breakout (often from trapped air). This precursor can saturate the amplifier and may ''swamp-out'' the signal of interest before the amplifier recovers. With this in mind, we evaluated two new amplifier designs by the Perry Amplifier Company for linearity, signal-to-noise characteristics, gain, and saturation recovery time. This paper describes experimental setup for detector comparison and results obtained. Furthermore, we discuss new amplifier design and suitability for highspeed infrared pyrometry in shock physics experiments.

  14. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-08-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus.

  15. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  16. Use of a variable exposure photographic pyrometer to measure surface temperatures on a hemispherical-face model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.; Henley, W. C., Jr.; Snow, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a photographic pyrometer for nonintrusive measurement of high temperature surfaces in a wind tunnel test is described. The advantages of the pyrometer for measuring surfaces whose unique shape makes use of thermocouples difficult are pointed out. The use of computer operated densitometers or optical processors for the data reduction is recommended.

  17. Concept of planetary gear system to control fluid mixture ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgroarty, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanical device senses and corrects for fluid flow departures from the selected flow ratio of two fluids. This system has been considered for control of rocket engine propellant mixture control but could find use wherever control of the flow ratio of any two fluids is desired.

  18. Methodology on high ratio multiple configuration systems in image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua; Ding, Quanxin; Zhou, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    The method of a multiple configuration on high ratio systems in image sensor is an important subject. In such an experimental configuration, for aim to break through to large ratio multiple configuration systems bottlenecks, achieve the field of continuous transformation, effect system close to the theoretical limit and configuration dexterity, such as the purpose, method in the design of the integrated sensor system process, the core technology of such a system are thoroughly analyzed and the factors important to the compromise. Theory is studied based on the theory of Gaussian optical system error distribution and comprehensive balancing algorithm; Global optimization method, developed at a system design thought and the optimization model. Results solved the MTF matching problem, research and evaluations shows that the zoom ratio of more than one hundred results in system MTF and so on as qualitative criterion to achieve requirements.

  19. Multi-channel optical pyrometer for sub-nanosecond temperature measurements at NDCX-I/II

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Waldron, W.L.

    2011-04-13

    We present a detailed technical description of a fast multi-channel pyrometer designed for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments with intense heavy ion beams at the neutralized-drift-compression-experiment linear accelerator (NDCX-I/II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The unique features of the described instrument are its sub-nanosecond temporal resolution (100 ps rise-time) and a broad range, 1,500 K - 12,000 K of measurable brightness temperatures in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. The working scheme, calibration procedure, experimental data obtained with the pyrometer and future applications are presented.

  20. Multi-spectral pyrometer for narrow space with high ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Xiao, Yihan; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-08-01

    A fiber-optic multi-spectral pyrometer with high spatial and temporal resolution has been applied to measure temperatures of the range from 700 to 1200 K. In a narrow space, the important problems in temperature measurement include the unknown emissivity on target surface and the thermal radiation from the high ambient temperature. This paper analyzed several critical issues affecting the multi-spectral pyrometer and calculated the corresponding model through genetic algorithm. The experiment result showed that this method has high accuracy and the measurement error is 0.44 %.

  1. Deep, Low Mass Ratio Overcontact Binary Systems. V. The Lowest Mass Ratio Binary V857 Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Soonthornthum, B.; Yuan, J.-Z.; Yang, Y.-G.; He, J.-J.

    2005-09-01

    Charge-coupled device (CCD) photometric light curves in the B, V, and R bands of the complete eclipsing binary star V857 Her are presented. It is shown that the light curves of the W UMa-type binary are symmetric and of A type according to Binnendijk's classification. Our four epochs of light minimum along with others compiled from the literature were used to revise the period and study the period change. Weak evidence indicates that the orbital period of V857 Her may show a continuous increase at a rate of dP/dt=+2.90×10-7 days yr-1. The photometric parameters of the system were determined with the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. It is shown that V857 Her is a deep overcontact binary system with f=83.8%+/-5.1%. The derived mass ratio of q=0.06532+/-0.0002 suggests that it has the lowest mass ratio among overcontact binary systems. As the orbital period increases, the decrease of the mass ratio will cause it to evolve into a single rapidly rotating star when it meets the more familiar criterion that the orbital angular momentum be less than 3 times the total spin angular momentum. To understand the evolutionary state of the system, long-term photometric monitoring and spectroscopic observations will be required.

  2. In-flight particle pyrometer for thermal spray processes. Final report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    The objective of the project was to produce an industrial hardened particle temperature sensor. In general the thermal spray community believes that the particle temperature and velocity prior to impact on the substrate are two of the predominant parameters which effect coating quality. Prior to the full scale prototyping of such an instrument it was necessary to firmly establish the relationship between operating parameters, particle temperature and coating characteristics. It was shown in the first year of this project that the characteristics and consistency of the coatings formed are directly determined by particle velocity and temperature at impact. For the HVOF spray process the authors have also shown that the particle velocity is determined primarily by chamber pressure, while stoichiometry (the ratio of oxygen to fuel) has a minor influence. Hence, particle velocity can be controlled by maintaining the chamber pressure at a set point. Particle temperature, on the other hand is primarily a function of stoichiometry. Therefore particle velocity and temperature can be independently controlled. In the second year (FY-94), an industrial hardened prototype particle temperature sensor (In-flight Particle Pyrometer) was produced. The IPP is a two-color radiation pyrometer incorporating improvements which make the device applicable to the measurement of in-flight temperature of particles over a wide range of operating conditions in thermal spray processes. The device is insensitive to particulate loading (particle feed rate), particle composition, particle size distribution, and provides an ensemble average particle temperature. The sensor head is compact and coupled to the electronics via a fiber optic cable. Fiber optic coupling allows maximum flexibility of deployment while providing isolation of the electronics from electromagnetic interference and the hot, particulate laden environment of a typical spray booth. The device is applicable to all thermal spray processes, including plasma spray, HVOF, twin wire arc, and liquid metal fed processes, as well as other more conventional high temperature processes such as crucible or hearth melting.

  3. The distribution of period ratios in Kepler planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Hwang, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler's multi-planet systems are a valuable tool to understand the architectures and dynamics of the inner parts of planetary systems. I present an analysis of the distribution of orbital period ratios from candidate systems identified in the Quarter 8 catalog (Burke et al. 2014). This distribution is corrected for the effects of geometric transit probabilities and the completeness of the data reduction pipeline. We find that the distribution of period ratios falls as a power law with exponent -1.26 ± 0.05. We also identify a new, statistically significant feature near a period ratio of 2.2. These observations may provide insights into the formation and evolution of these systems.

  4. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  5. Volume-ratio calibration system for vacuum gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Volume-ratio calibration system consists of a gas source, high pressure gauge, small volume tank, large volume chamber, plus appropriate piping, valves, and vacuum source. This system used in conjunction with commercial vacuum gauges evaluates its ability to accurately produce desired pressures in the .000001 to .01 torr range.

  6. Video imaging system and thermal mapping of the molten hearth in an electron beam melting furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Miszkiel, M.E.; Davis, R.A.; Van Den Avyle, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    This project was initiated to develop an enhanced video imaging system for the Liquid Metal Processing Laboratory Electron Beam Melting (EB) Furnace at Sandia and to use color video images to map the temperature distribution of the surface of the molten hearth. In a series of test melts, the color output of the video image was calibrated against temperatures measured by an optical pyrometer and CCD camera viewing port above the molten pool. To prevent potential metal vapor deposition onto line-of-sight optical surfaces above the pool, argon backfill was used along with a pinhole aperture to obtain the vide image. The geometry of the optical port to the hearth set the limits for the focus lens and CCD camera`s field of view. Initial melts were completed with the pyrometer and pinhole aperture port in a fixed position. Using commercially available vacuum components, a second flange assembly was constructed to provide flexibility in choosing pyrometer target sights on the hearth and to adjust the field of view for the focus lens/CCD combination. RGB video images processed from the melts verified that red wavelength light captured with the video camera could be calibrated with the optical pyrometer target temperatures and used to generate temperature maps of the hearth surface. Two color ratio thermal mapping using red and green video images, which has theoretical advantages, was less successful due to probable camera non-linearities in the red and green image intensities.

  7. A cooled-gas pyrometer for use in hypersonic engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A cooled-gas pyrometer designed for application in a hypersonic research engine program was fabricated and tested. Design and operational considerations and calibration data are presented. The probe was tested in a rocket-engine exhaust stream operating at Mach 2 and 2300 K. Test temperature measurements agreed to within 2 percent with a radiation shielded thermocouple probe.

  8. Seven-wavelength pyrometer for determining surface temperature of ablation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, H.

    1985-01-01

    Results which were achieved by a seven-wavelength pyrometer last year are reported in this paper. These studies are directed toward the development of a method for determining the real surface temperature of thermal protection materials and for evaluating its emittance under varieties of reentry environment. A description of the data processing method and apparatus is also included.

  9. Heavy ion beam probe systems for tight aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, A.V.; Zimeleva, L.G.; Krupnik, L.I.; Nedzelskij, I.S.; Trofimenko, Y.V.; Minaev, V.B.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the specific features of the application of heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) systems to tight aspect ratio tokamaks. We present and compare the HIBP projects for the TUMAN-3, GLOBUS, and COMPASS, where the inner part of the plasma is not available for regular chord diagnostics, so the HIBP becomes very desirable. All existing tight aspect ratio facilities and projects have a low (less than 1.9 T) toroidal field that requires a comparatively low beam energy range. The natural elongation and triangularity in tight aspect ratio tokamaks require an accurate calculation of the three-dimensional magnetic field for probing optimization. In comparison with traditional tokamaks, the detector grids have a wider energy interval. In general, the trajectories and detector grids for tight aspect ratio tokamaks become similar to the stellarator ones. Traditional and new probing schemes are suggested and discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  11. The period ratio distribution of Kepler's candidate multiplanet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Hwang, Jason A.

    2015-04-01

    We calculate and analyse the distribution of period ratios observed in systems of Kepler exoplanet candidates including studies of both adjacent planet pairs and all planet pairs. These distributions account for both the geometrical bias against detecting more distant planets and the effects of incompleteness due to planets missed by the data reduction pipeline. In addition to some of the known features near first-order mean-motion resonances (MMRs), there is a significant excess of planet pairs with period ratios near 2.2. The statistical significance of this feature is assessed using Monte Carlo simulation. We also investigate the distribution of period ratios near first-order MMR and compare different quantities used to measure this distribution. We find that beyond period ratios of ˜2.5, the distribution of all period ratios follows a power law with an exponent -1.26 ± 0.05. We discuss implications that these results may have on the formation and dynamical evolution of Kepler-like planetary systems-systems of sub-Neptune/super-Earth planets with relatively short orbital periods.

  12. Short wavelengths active bichromatic pulsed pyrometer for solids and liquids designed for measurements in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navello, L.; Lebedinsky, J.; Offret, J. P.; Serio, B.; Davin, T.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Optical passive methods for temperature measurements such as thermography or optical pyrometry are very interesting because they allow a non-intrusive measurement when the emissivity is known. The knowledge of this coefficient is critical for determining the actual temperature of a surface from the thermal radiation emitted in a wavelength band. The bichromatic pulsed pyrometer allows to overcome the knowledge of this parameter provided that precautions are taken in the choice of the values of wavelengths. When the object to be measured is placed in harsh environments, such passive optical methods are greatly disturbed by the presence of an optically absorbing medium. They are also distorted when the measured objects are located in very hot environments emitting intense disturbing radiation. In this study, we present an active bichromatic radiometric method for measuring the temperature of a surface in harsh environments. The method is based on a localized excitation by a modulated laser source in the infrared range. Detecting the temperature modulation, which is correlated with the excitation, is performed using a lock-in amplifier able to extract the signal embedded in a noise up to a million times superior. Working at short wavelengths (visible range and near infrared range) offers a large dynamic range and minimizes the error due to variations in emissivity with the wavelength. This system collects the radiation emitted by the object at a distance from a few meters up to dozens of meters depending on the configuration of the optical system. Both the principle and the design of the active bichromatic optical surface thermometer are presented and discussed. To demonstrate the method, results obtained on a molten ceramic stream are presented.

  13. DETECTION OF LOW-MASS-RATIO STELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gullikson, Kevin; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    O- and B-type stars are often found in binary systems, but the low binary mass-ratio regime is relatively unexplored due to observational difficulties. Binary systems with low mass ratios may have formed through fragmentation of the circumstellar disk rather than molecular cloud core fragmentation. We describe a new technique sensitive to G- and K-type companions to early B stars, a mass ratio of roughly 0.1, using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra. We apply this technique to a sample of archived VLT/CRIRES observations of nearby B stars in the CO bandhead near 2300 nm. While there are no unambiguous binary detections in our sample, we identify HIP 92855 and HIP 26713 as binary candidates warranting follow-up observations. We use our non-detections to determine upper limits to the frequency of FGK stars orbiting early B-type primaries.

  14. Detection of Low-Mass-ratio Stellar Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    O- and B-type stars are often found in binary systems, but the low binary mass-ratio regime is relatively unexplored due to observational difficulties. Binary systems with low mass ratios may have formed through fragmentation of the circumstellar disk rather than molecular cloud core fragmentation. We describe a new technique sensitive to G- and K-type companions to early B stars, a mass ratio of roughly 0.1, using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra. We apply this technique to a sample of archived VLT/CRIRES observations of nearby B stars in the CO bandhead near 2300 nm. While there are no unambiguous binary detections in our sample, we identify HIP 92855 and HIP 26713 as binary candidates warranting follow-up observations. We use our non-detections to determine upper limits to the frequency of FGK stars orbiting early B-type primaries.

  15. A sensitive time-resolved radiation pyrometer for shock-temperature measurements above 1500 K

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B. ); Ahrens, T.J. )

    1989-12-01

    An optical system has been developed which can determine time-resolved temperatures in shocked materials by measuring the spectral radiance of light emitted from shocked solid samples in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range (0.5--1.0 {mu}m). It can measure temperatures as low as 1500 K and has been successfully used to observe shock-induced chemical reactions in powder samples. The high sensitivity of this radiation pyrometer can be attributed to the large angular aperture (0.06 sr), the large bandwidth per channel (up to 0.1 {mu}m), the large photodiode detection areas (1.0 cm{sup 2} ), and the small number of calibrated channels (4) among which light is divided. Improved calibration techniques, as well as the layout of the instrument, eliminate certain sources of error encountered in previous shock-temperature experiments. Errors in the measured spectral radiance were reduced by: (1) recalibration before every experiment to account for changes in optical components; (2) direct calibration of voltage recorded at each digitizer to prevent transfer error by an intermediate step; (3) use of a spectral irradiance calibration lamp to exclude errors due to spatial inhomogeneities associated with spectral radiance sources; and (4) obtaining a large spatial average of light at each wavelength from the same portion of the sample to eliminate errors from possible inhomogeneities in the sample. The magnitude each of these errors could previously contribute was 1%--2% of the total signal. Absolute temperature uncertainties, determined from the standard deviation of the measured spectral radiances from the least-squares-fit values, are typically about 5%. Emissivities are poorly constrained by spectral radiance data because of a weak functional dependence, and uncertainties can easily exceed 50% for temperatures of around 2000 K.

  16. High ratio long-wave infrared continuous zoom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Sun, Quan; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Hao; Huan, Kewei; Shi, Xiao-guang

    2013-09-01

    As infrared zoom systems change the focal length continuously, remain images stability and keep good image quality during the process of zoom, it is widely applied to infrared navigation, infrared detection, infrared-guided etc vehicular and airborne area. In order to satisfy the growing demand of infrared continuous zoom system, a zoom ratio of ten times long-wave infrared continuous zoom optical system that based on an uncooled detector was designed. System guided by the zoom theory of positive groups of compensation, calculated the initial structure of the system and according to the system of optical parameters with using ZEMAX software for optical design did an aberration balance and optimized, then the optical system image quality was systematically analyzed and evaluated. The result showed that the modulation transfer function (MTF) was above 0.4 within the whole focal range at spatial frequency 16 lp/mm, the root mean square radius of maximum dispersion spot was smaller than a pixel dimension and it met the requirements of the system imaging quality when F/# was 2, continuous zoom range was from 40 mm to 400 mm and the image size was 12 mm. The design of the system realized the requirements of compact structure, large zoom ratio, easily assembled and excellent image quality to optical system for infrared imaging.

  17. Calibration of an intensity ratio system for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, H. T.; Tang, K. C.

    1989-03-01

    An intensity ratio method for 3D imaging is proposed with error analysis given for assessment and future improvements. The method is cheap and reasonably fast as it requires no mechanical scanning or laborious correspondence computation. One drawback of the intensity ratio methods which hamper their widespread use is the undesirable change of image intensity. This is usually caused by the difference in reflection from different parts of an object surface and the automatic iris or gain control of the camera. In our method, gray-level patterns used include an uniform pattern, a staircase pattern and a sawtooth pattern to make the system more robust against errors in intensity ratio. 3D information of the surface points of an object can be derived from the intensity ratios of the images by triangulation. A reference back plane is put behind the object to monitor the change in image intensity. Errors due to camera calibration, projector calibration, variations in intensity, imperfection of the slides etc. are analyzed. Early experiments of the system using a newvicon CCTV camera with back plane intensity correction gives a mean-square range error of about 0.5 percent. Extensive analysis of various errors is expected to yield methods for improving the accuracy.

  18. Pyrometer mount for a closed-circuit thermal medium cooled gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Raymond Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence; Burns, James Lee; Fulton, John Robert

    2002-01-01

    A steam-cooled second-stage nozzle segment has an outer band and an outer cover defining a plenum therebetween for receiving cooling steam for flow through the nozzles to the inner band and cover therefor and return flow through the nozzles. To measure the temperature of the buckets of the stage forwardly of the nozzle stage, a pyrometer boss is electron beam-welded in an opening through the outer band and TIG-welded to the outer cover plate. By machining a hole through the boss and seating a linearly extending tube in the boss, a line of sight between a pyrometer mounted on the turbine frame and the buckets is provided whereby the temperature of the buckets can be ascertained. The welding of the boss to the outer band and outer cover enables steam flow through the plenum without leakage, while providing a line of sight through the outer cover and outer band to measure bucket temperature.

  19. Temperature measurement involving nanostructured thermal barrier coating using a multiwavelength pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    It has been reported that erroneous results were obtained when a conventional pyrometer was used to measure the surface temperature of turbine engine components. Temperatures discrepancies were observed in components which were identical, except that one had its measured surface covered by a nanostructured thermal barrier coating (TBC) whereas the other component's surface was not so coated. These components were placed in an identical environment, receiving identical heat fluxes. A pyrometer measured the TBC covered surface hundreds degrees lower. These coatings were about 25 (mu)m thick, consisting of hundreds of layers of finer structures. The TBC's had very low thermal conductivity, heat flux calculations indicated that the temperatures of the coated surface should exhibit much higher temperature than the uncoated surface. Because these coatings were transparent to radiation from the visible to the infrared region, the temperatures measured by the pyrometer should be the temperature of the covered surface. Turbo components' performance and service life depend critically on the temperatures that it would experience; it is therefore important to know accurately and confidently the real surface temperature. Out of these concerns, an investigation into the measurement of nanostructured material surface temperature was carried out.

  20. Near-infrared two-color pyrometer for determining ignition temperatures of metals and metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K.; Branch, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    A two-color pyrometer has been designed, constructed, and used to measure the ignition temperatures of metals and metal alloys. Cylindrical metal and metal alloy specimens were ignited by a focused cw CO2 laser beam in a cool, static, pure oxygen environment. The pyrometer operates in the near-infrared at two narrow spectral regions, with a nominal bandwidth of 10 nm centered at 0.9051 and 1.06 micron, and has a temperature range from 1000 to 4000 K. In the present design the temperature of a spot, about 0.5 mm in diameter, can be recorded with a maximum time resolution of 25 microseconds and with an accuracy of a few percent. Results of CO2 laser ignition of cylindrical specimens of 6061 aluminum alloy and 302 SS in a pure oxygen environment were obtained from the two-color pyrometer and were compared with those obtained from a thermocouple placed inside the specimen near the laser-irradiated surface.

  1. Two-Step Calibration of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer for High Temperature Measurement Using a Quartz Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    There is no theoretical upper temperature limit for pyrometer application in temperature measurements. NASA Glenn's multiwavelength pyrometer can make measurements over wide temperature ranges. However, the radiation spectral response of the pyrometer's detector must be calibrated before any temperature measurement is attempted, and it is recommended that calibration be done at temperatures close to those for which measurements will be made. Calibration is a determination of the constants of proportionality at all wavelengths between the detector's output (voltage) and its input signals (usually from a blackbody radiation source) in order to convert detector output into radiation intensity. To measure high temperatures, the detectors are chosen to be sensitive in the spectral range from 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers. A blackbody furnace equilibrated at around 1000 C is often used for this calibration. Though the detector may respond sensitively to short wavelengths radiation, a blackbody furnace at 1000 C emits only feebly at very short wavelengths. As a consequence, the calibration constants that result may not be the most accurate. For pyrometry calibration, a radiation source emitting strongly at the short wavelengths is preferred. We have chosen a quartz halogen lamp for this purpose.

  2. Characterizing the Period Ratio Distribution of Kepler Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, James L.; Ragozzine, Darin

    2016-01-01

    Many of the exoplanetary systems discovered by the Kepler space telescope demonstrate unusual properties which need to be explored in order to better understand planetary system formation and evolution. Among these interesting properties is an excess in the number of planets orbiting in resonance or near-resonance with their neighbors. The prevailing assumption in the planetary sciences community is that these are real features of the exoplanet population, but many theories developed on this assumption produce a resonance structure quite different from what we see. In our work we explore the possibility that the actual resonances may not be as we observe them, and may instead be explained by a combination of real resonance features and/or observational bias resulting from geometric effects. In particular, if the near-resonant systems have a different inclination distribution than other systems, then it is possible for them to be over or under-represented.We analyze the existing Kepler data and generate models which approximately represent the empirical period ratio distribution. The 2:1 and 3:2 just-wide-of-resonance excesses are included in the model, along with the deficit of period ratios just short of the 2:1 resonance. We test the Kepler data set against these models using the Python emcee package in order to determine the best-fit parameters for each model. We then address the inclination distribution question by generating two-planet systems with different inclination distributions for the near-resonant systems. We use the CORBITS package (https://github.com/jbrakensiek/CORBITS, Brakensiek & Ragozzine, submitted) to determine the probability of detecting both planets in transit. These tests adjust the relative sizes of the resonance excesses as well as orbital parameters (primarily inclination and nodal alignments) in order to determine which combinations of parameters would create in an observational bias resulting in the resonance excesses seen in the Kepler data.Initial results using first-approximation synthetic data show that some of the observed resonance excesses can be created in the observed data purely from geometric effects resulting from inclination varying as a function of period ratio.

  3. Radiation pyrometer for gas turbine blades. [in LOX turbopump engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohy, D. A.; Compton, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    A turbine blade temperature measuring system for liquid oxygen turbopumps is reported. The system includes a three mode, two-input optical signal processor, interconnecting cable, and four sensor heads. Two of the heads are aperture type, while the other two are lens type. This system is applicable to a temperature range of 1400 to 2200 F.

  4. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly proposed for embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side ('bevel') did produce up to 3dB more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side ('slant') produced up to 2dB more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron ('notch') produced up to 2dB increase in the noise. Having internal walls ('septae') within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  5. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly found in embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side (bevel) did produce up to 3 decibels more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side (slant) produced up to 2 decibels more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron (notch) produced up to 2decibels increase in the noise. Having internal walls (septae) within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed electric propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  6. Design and fabrication of an infrared optical pyrometer ASIC as a diagnostic for shock physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jared

    Optical pyrometry is the sensing of thermal radiation emitted from an object using a photoconductive device to convert photons into electrons, and is an important diagnostic tool in shock physics experiments. Data obtained from an optical pyrometer can be used to generate a blackbody curve of the material prior to and after being shocked by a high speed projectile. The sensing element consists of an InGaAs photodiode array, biasing circuitry, and multiple transimpedance amplifiers to boost the weak photocurrent from the noisy dark current into a signal that can eventually be digitized. Once the circuit elements have been defined, more often than not commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components are inadequate to satisfy every requirement for the diagnostic, and therefore a custom application specific design has to be considered. This thesis outlines the initial challenges with integrating the photodiode array block with multiple COTS transimpedance amplifiers onto a single chip, and offers a solution to a comparable optical pyrometer that uses the same type of photodiodes in conjunction with a re-designed transimpedance amplifier integrated onto a single chip. The final design includes a thorough analysis of the transimpedance amplifier along with modeling the circuit behavior which entails schematics, simulations, and layout. An alternative circuit is also investigated that incorporates an approach to multiplex the signals from each photodiode onto one data line and not only increases the viable real estate on the chip, but also improves the behavior of the photodiodes as they are subjected to less thermal load. The optical pyrometer application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for shock physic experiments includes a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) with a 100 kΩ gain operating at bandwidth of 30 MHz, and an input-referred noise RMS current of 50 nA that is capable of driving a 50 Ω load.

  7. Calibration of fiber-optic shock pyrometer using high-power coiled tungsten lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-06-01

    Comparison of all known calibration sources indicates that coiled standards of spectral irradiance, despite their very non-uniform brightness, are currently the best practical choice for accurate shock temperature measurements above 3000 K by optical pyrometry. We review all three documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to a coiled lamp and show that only one technique, with no fiber-optics employed, is free of major radiometric errors. We report the development of a new, accurate to 5% and precise to 1-1.5% calibration procedure for the modified Caltech 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution combined open beam and fiber-coupled instrument. A designated central area of an 0.7x demagnified image of 900 W coiled-coil lamp filament is used, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. The results of two slightly different cross-calibrations are reported and the procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of NewFocus 1801 amplified photodetectors. The most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic pyrometer using a coiled irradiance standard lamp are discussed. All these conditions are validated in actual radiometric tests and shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO.

  8. Surface heat flux data from energy balance Bowen ratio systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Coulter, R.L.

    1995-06-01

    The 350 {times} 400 km domain of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program`s Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in the southern Great Plains is equipped with 10 energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) stations at grassland sites; they measure the net radiation, ground heat flux, and temperature/humidity differences between 1.0 and 2.0 m heights. The latter differences provide estimates of the geometric Bowen ratio ({beta}), which are used to estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes. This paper addresses the problem that occurs when the value of {beta} is near {minus}1 and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the EBBR stations in collecting energy flux data at the CART site.

  9. A high-speed, four-wavelength infrared pyrometer for low temperature shock physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, A.; Boboridis, K.; Payton, J. R.; Obst, A. W.

    2004-01-01

    In addition to the standard problems associated with contactless temperature measurements, pyrometry in shock physics experiments has many additional concerns. These include background temperatures which are often higher than the substrate temperature, non-uniform sample temperature due to hotspots and ejecta, fast sample motion up to several km s{sup -1}, fast-changing sample emissivity at shock breakout, and very short measurement times. We have designed a four channel, high speed near-infrared (NIR) pyrometer for measurements in the 400 to 1000K blackbody temperature regime. The front end optics are specific to each experiment, utilizing preferably reflective optics in order to mitigate spectral dispersion. Next-generation instruments under development are also discussed.

  10. [Development of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Dai, Jing-Min; Wang, Qing-Wei

    2008-11-01

    The plume temperature of a solid propellant rocket engine (SPRE) is a fundamental parameter in denoting combustion status. It is necessary to measure the temperature along both the axis and the radius of the engine. In order to measure the plume temperature distribution of a solid propellant rocket engine, the multi-spectral thermometry has been approved. Previously the pyrometer was developed in the Harbin Institute of Technology of China in 1999, which completed the measurement of SPRE plume temperature and its distribution with multi-spectral technique in aerospace model development for the first time. Following this experience, a new type of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer used in the ground experiments of SPRE plume temperature measurement was developed. The main features of the instrument include the use of a dispersing prism and a photo-diode array to cover the entire spectral band of 0.4 to 1.1 microm. The optic fibers are used in order to collect and transmit the thermal radiation fluxes. The instrument can measure simultaneously the temperature and emissivity of eight spectra for six uniformly distributed points on the target surface, which are well defined by the hole on the field stop lens. A specially designed S/H (Sample/Hold) circuit, with 48 sample and hold units that were triggered with a signal, measures the multi-spectral and multi-target outputs. It can sample 48 signals with a less than 10ns time difference which is most important for the temperature calculation. PMID:19271529

  11. Control system and method for a power delivery system having a continuously variable ratio transmission

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.A.

    1984-07-10

    A control system and method for a power delivery system, such as in an automotive vehicle, having an engine coupled to a continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT). Totally independent control of engine and transmission enable the engine to precisely follow a desired operating characteristic, such as the ideal operating line for minimum fuel consumption. CVT ratio is controlled as a function of commanded power or torque and measured load, while engine fuel requirements (e.g., throttle position) are strictly a function of measured engine speed. Fuel requirements are therefore precisely adjusted in accordance with the ideal characteristic for any load placed on the engine. 4 figs.

  12. Control system and method for a power delivery system having a continuously variable ratio transmission

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Andrew A.

    1984-01-01

    A control system and method for a power delivery system, such as in an automotive vehicle, having an engine coupled to a continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT). Totally independent control of engine and transmission enable the engine to precisely follow a desired operating characteristic, such as the ideal operating line for minimum fuel consumption. CVT ratio is controlled as a function of commanded power or torque and measured load, while engine fuel requirements (e.g., throttle position) are strictly a function of measured engine speed. Fuel requirements are therefore precisely adjusted in accordance with the ideal characteristic for any load placed on the engine.

  13. An identification method for damping ratio in rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weimin; Li, Qihang; Gao, Jinji; Yao, Jianfei; Allaire, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Centrifugal compressor testing with magnetic bearing excitations is the last step to assure the compressor rotordynamic stability in the designed operating conditions. To meet the challenges of stability evaluation, a new method combining the rational polynomials method (RPM) with the weighted instrumental variables (WIV) estimator to fit the directional frequency response function (dFRF) is presented. Numerical simulation results show that the method suggested in this paper can identify the damping ratio of the first forward and backward modes with high accuracy, even in a severe noise environment. Experimental tests were conducted to study the effect of different bearing configurations on the stability of rotor. Furthermore, two example centrifugal compressors (a nine-stage straight-through and a six-stage back-to-back) were employed to verify the feasibility of identification method in industrial configurations as well.

  14. Design of high ratio middle infrared continuous zoom optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zheyuan; Cao, Jianzhong; Yang, Hongtao; Qu, Enshi; Wu, Dengshan

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, the demand for infrared zoom systems is increasing in proportion with the development of infrared technology and its applications. To meet this demand a variety of zoom lenses have been designed. Infrared cameras operating in the 3-5μm spectral band are used in a wide variety of applications such as targeting, rescue, guidance and surveillance systems as well as other equipment. This paper using cool 320×240 detector with staring focal plane array and secondary imaging, a mid-wave optical system using mechanical-compensated with large-aperture and a zoom range of 10:1 is designed. The Pixel Dimensions of the detector is 30μm, and the wavelength between 3.7μm ~4.8μm.The system adopts negative group variable times and positive group of compensation which can realize 33mm~330mm continuous zoom and FOV =20.61°~2.08° ,it consists of 7 lenses including 3 aspheric surface. The length of the system is 262mm with the reflection mirror multipass optical path. The results show that the modulation transfer function(MTF)are above 0.4 within the whole focal range at spatial frequency of 17 lp/mm, and Root Mean Square (RMS) value of spot diameter were smaller than the Pixel Dimensions. After the image quality being optimized, the narcissus analysis is done and 100% cold shield efficiency is obtained. Finallythe monotonic and smooth Cam curve is given. The curve shows that the imaging plane is stable and the cam is easy to process. The system has advantages of simple structure, high image quality and short zoom path etc.

  15. A two-color spatial-scanning pyrometer for the determination of temperature profiles in combustion synthesis reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi-Tamburini, U.; Campari, G.; Spinolo, G.; Lupotto, P.

    1995-10-01

    This article describes a new two-color pyrometer able to obtain multiple temperature reading using charge couple device type sensors. The device was tailored to fit the characteristics of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis processes in order to be able to detect temperature profiles and propagation rates of the combustion front. The light intensities at the two working wavelengths and the relative temperature profile are detected in 512 or 1024 points on the sample surface. The time between the acquisition of two profiles can be varied between 100 ms and 10 s. The pyrometer is interfaced with the BUS of a PC and is fully software programmable. The constructive details, procedure for sensors alignment, and temperature calibration are described. Few examples of applications are discussed.

  16. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  17. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  18. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  19. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  20. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  1. Mechanically compensated type for midwave infrared zoom system with a large zoom ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhou; Ying, Liu; Qiang, Sun; Chun, Li; Xiaolong, Zhang; Jianbo, Huang

    2013-01-01

    In some circumstances, there is a need for a midwave infrared (MWIR) zoom system with a large zoom ratio. Using traditional four-component mechanically compensated types of MWIR zoom systems cannot achieve a large zoom ratio. To meet this demand, we describe a six-component mechanically compensated type. The thin-lens theory of this type is developed and equations are presented. Using the six-component mechanically compensated type, a MWIR continuous zoom system with a zoom ratio of 45 is designed, and it has high image quality over the entire zoom range.

  2. Influence of Ventilation Ratio on Desiccant Air Conditioning System's Efficiency Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thien Nha; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao; Hamamoto, Yoshinori

    Ventilation air is a concern for engineers since ventilated air controls indoor air contamination; additional ventilation, however, increases the energy consumption of buildings. The study investigates the energy efficiency performance of the desiccant dehumidification air conditioning system in the context of ventilation for a hot-humid climate such as summer in Japan. The investigation focuses on the variable ratio of ventilation air as required by the application of air conditioning system. The COP of the desiccant air conditioning system is determined. The evaluation is subsequently performed by comparing the desiccant based system with the conventional absorption cooling system and the vapor compression cooling system. Based on 12 desiccant rotor simulations, it is found that the desiccant regeneration temperature required varies between 47°C to 85°C as ventilation ratio increases from 0. 0 to 100%, and up to 52. 5°C as the ventilation ratio achieves 14%. The heat required for regenerating desiccant accounts for 55% and higher of the system's total heat consumption; the system is expected to be energy efficient by using wasted heat from the absorption chiller for desiccant regeneration; and its energy efficiency expands as the ratio of ventilation air rises above 15% compared with the conventional absorption cooling system. The energy efficiency also benefits as the ratio rises beyond 70% against the conventional vapor compression cooling system.

  3. Temporal trends in nitrogen isotope ratios of winter flounder collected from Rhode Island coastal systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (15N) were measured in muscle tissue of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA, including Narragansett Bay, Narrow River and three coastal lagoons. Fish collect...

  4. Performance of the Bowen ratio systems on a 22 deg slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nie, D.; Flitcroft, I.; Kanemasu, E. T.

    1990-01-01

    The Bowen ratio energy balance technique was used to assess the energy fluxes on inclined surfaces during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). Since air flow over sloping surface may differ from that over flat terrain, it is important to examine whether Bowen ratio measurements taken on sloping surfaces are valid. In this study, the suitability of using the Bowen ratio technique on sloping surfaces was tested by examining the assumptions that the technique requires for valid measurements. This was accomplished by studying the variation of Bowen ratio measurements along a selected slope at the FIFE site. In September 1988, four Bowen ratio systems were set up in a line along the 22 degree north-facing slope with northerly air flow (wind went up the slope). In July of 1989, six Bowen ratio systems were similarly installed with southerly air flow (the wind went down slope). Results indicated that, at distances between 10 to 40 meters from the top of the slope, no temperature or vapor pressure gradient parallel to the slope was detected. Uniform Bowen ratio values were obtained on the slope, and thus the sensible or latent heat flux should be similar along the slope. This indicates that the assumptions for valid flux measurements are reasonably met at the slope. The Bowen ratio technique should give the best estimates of the energy fluxes on slopes similar to that in this study.

  5. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp.

    PubMed

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30,000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen irradiance standard lamp. PMID:26520933

  6. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen irradiance standard lamp.

  7. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen irradiance standard lamp.

  8. Temperature Measurement of a Miniature Ceramic Heater in the Presence of an Extended Interfering Background Radiation Source Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Temperature measurement of small (millimeter size) objects is generally difficult and demanding. Measurement involving ceramic materials using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which may vary with both temperature and wavelength. Pyrometry applications in an environment with an interfering radiation source of extended dimension adds extra complexity to the process. We show that the multiwavelength pyrometer successfully measured the temperatures of a millimeter (mm) size ceramic heater under these demanding conditions.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder as indicators of inputs to estuarine systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in the muscle tissues of young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. These systems included three coastal lagoons (Ni...

  10. The Determination of Heat Capacity Ratios in a Simple Open System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Glen L.

    2007-01-01

    A virtually closed system is treated as open and compared to known results. The classic experiment of Clement and Desormes provides the conceptual framework for this open system approach in determining the molar heat capacity ratios, lambda. This alternate view, extends the theoretical treatment beyond the first law of thermodynamics for closed…

  11. A system for estimating bowen ratio And evaporation from waste lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low cost system was deployed above a swine waste lagoon to obtain estimates of Bowen ratios and characterize lagoon temperatures. The system consisted of humidity and temperature sensors and anemometers deployed above the lagoon, water temperature sensors, and a meteorological station located by t...

  12. On the Planetary Orbital Period Ratio Distribution In Multiple Planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ji-Wei

    2014-04-01

    Many multiple planet systems have been found by both radial velocity (RV) and transit surveys, such as the Kepler mission. Period ratio distribution of these planet candidates show that they do not prefer to be in or near Mean Motion Resonance (MMR). Nevertheless, there are small but significant excesses of candidate pairs both spaced slightly exterior to exact resonance, particular near the first order of MMR, such as 2:1 and 3:2. Here, we first review recent observational constraints on these multiple transiting systems and theoretical models, which attempt to understand their period ratio distributions. Then we identify a statistical effect based on an intrinsic asymmetry associated with MMR, and find it play an important role in shaping the period ratio distribution near MMR. Last but least, we also find such an intrinsic asymmetry is existing in asteroids of our solar system.

  13. Development of a System to Measure Recrystallization Ratio of Plate Steel Using Laser-Based Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Y.; Yamada, H.; Hamada, N.; Lim, C. S.; Yi, J. K.; Hong, S. T.; Choi, S. G.; Oh, K. J.

    2007-03-21

    In this study, a material property measurement system of plate steel using laser-based ultrasonics has been developed. The system consists of pulsed Nd:YAG laser for ultrasonic generation, CW single frequency laser and Fabry-Perot interferometer for ultrasonic detection. The system generates and detects shear waves and precisely calculates anisotropy parameter values of shear wave velocities of test samples. At first, the relationship between anisotropy parameter and recrystallization ratio was investigated in the laboratory experiments. Quenching the test samples just after the ultrasonic measurement, recrystallization ratio values were measured by the conventional microscopic method. According to the experimental results, the anisotropy parameter values showed a good correlation with actual recrystallization ratio values. To evaluate the applicability of the system to real steel production line, the system was installed in hot rolling pilot plant of plate steel. As the results, it was demonstrated that the system could measure the recrystallization ratio using the anisotropy parameter values of shear wave velocities, even in the environment of hot rolling pilot plant.

  14. Immune system-tumour efficiency ratio as a new oncological index for radiotherapy treatment optimization.

    PubMed

    Sotolongo-Grau, O; Rodríguez-Pérez, D; Santos-Miranda, J A; Sotolongo-Costa, O; Antoranz, J C

    2009-12-01

    A dynamical system model for tumour-immune system interaction together with a method to mimic radiation therapy are proposed. A large population of virtual patients is simulated following an ideal radiation treatment. A characteristic parameter, the immune system-tumor efficiency ratio (ISTER) is introduced. ISTER dependence of treatment success and other features are studied. Radiotherapy treatment dose optimization, following ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) criterion, as well as a patient classification are drawn from the statistics results. PMID:19584118

  15. Disturbance rejection performance analyses of closed loop control systems by reference to disturbance ratio.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Baris Baykant; Deniz, Furkan Nur; Keles, Cemal; Tan, Nusret

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems by means of reference to disturbance ratio (RDR). The RDR analysis calculates the ratio of reference signal energy to disturbance signal energy at the system output and provides a quantitative evaluation of disturbance rejection performance of control systems on the bases of communication channel limitations. Essentially, RDR provides a straightforward analytical method for the comparison and improvement of implicit disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems. Theoretical analyses demonstrate us that RDR of the negative feedback closed loop control systems are determined by energy spectral density of controller transfer function. In this manner, authors derived design criteria for specifications of disturbance rejection performances of PID and fractional order PID (FOPID) controller structures. RDR spectra are calculated for investigation of frequency dependence of disturbance rejection capacity and spectral RDR analyses are carried out for PID and FOPID controllers. For the validation of theoretical results, simulation examples are presented. PMID:25311160

  16. An experimental system for spectral line ratio measurements in the TJ-II stellarator.

    PubMed

    Zurro, B; Baciero, A; Fontdecaba, J M; Peláez, R; Jiménez-Rey, D

    2008-10-01

    The chord-integrated emissions of spectral lines have been monitored in the TJ-II stellarator by using a spectral system with time and space scanning capabilities and relative calibration over the entire UV-visible spectral range. This system has been used to study the line ratio of lines of different ionization stages of carbon (C(5+) 5290 A and C(4+) 2271 A) for plasma diagnostic purposes. The local emissivity of these ions has been reconstructed, for quasistationary profiles, by means of the inversion Fisher method described previously. The experimental line ratio is being empirically studied and in parallel a simple spectroscopic model has been developed to account for that ratio. We are investigating whether the role played by charge exchange processes with neutrals and the existence of non-Maxwellian electrons, intrinsic to Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) heating, leave any distinguishable mark on this diagnostic method. PMID:19044682

  17. An experimental system for spectral line ratio measurements in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Jimenez-Rey, D.; Pelaez, R.

    2008-10-15

    The chord-integrated emissions of spectral lines have been monitored in the TJ-II stellarator by using a spectral system with time and space scanning capabilities and relative calibration over the entire UV-visible spectral range. This system has been used to study the line ratio of lines of different ionization stages of carbon (C{sup 5+} 5290 A and C{sup 4+} 2271 A) for plasma diagnostic purposes. The local emissivity of these ions has been reconstructed, for quasistationary profiles, by means of the inversion Fisher method described previously. The experimental line ratio is being empirically studied and in parallel a simple spectroscopic model has been developed to account for that ratio. We are investigating whether the role played by charge exchange processes with neutrals and the existence of non-Maxwellian electrons, intrinsic to Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) heating, leave any distinguishable mark on this diagnostic method.

  18. Control system and method for a power delivery system having a continuously variable ratio transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.

    1987-02-10

    A CVT control method is described comprising the steps of: delivering a signal indicative of a reference transmission gear ratio to a driver means of a stepless variable speed gear according to signals produced by detecting running conditions of a vehicle to which the method is applied; judging the vehicle to decelerate, according to both a signal produced in response to the accelerator pedal of the vehicle and a signal indicative of the transmission gear ratio of the vehicle; and modifying the signal indicative of the reference transmission gear ratio so as to conform to the transmission gear ratio determined by the speed of the vehicle, according to both a signal produced by the judgment made as described above and a signal indicative of the speed of the vehicle.

  19. Disk-Planets Interactions and the Diversity of Period Ratios in Kepler's Multi-planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruteau, Clement; Papaloizou, John C. B.

    2013-11-01

    The Kepler mission is dramatically increasing the number of planets known in multi-planetary systems. Many adjacent planets have orbital period ratios near resonant values, with a tendency to be larger than required for exact first-order mean-motion resonances. This feature has been shown to be a natural outcome of orbital circularization of resonant planetary pairs due to star-planet tidal interactions. However, this feature holds in multi-planetary systems with periods longer than 10 days, in which tidal circularization is unlikely to provide efficient divergent evolution of the planets' orbits to explain these orbital period ratios. Gravitational interactions between planets and their parent protoplanetary disk may instead provide efficient divergent evolution. For a planet pair embedded in a disk, we show that interactions between a planet and the wake of its companion can reverse convergent migration and significantly increase the period ratio from a near-resonant value. Divergent evolution due to wake-planet interactions is particularly efficient when at least one of the planets opens a partial gap around its orbit. This mechanism could help account for the diversity of period ratios in Kepler's multiple systems from super-Earth to sub-Jovian planets with periods greater than about 10 days. Diversity is also expected for pairs of planets massive enough to merge their gap. The efficiency of wake-planet interactions is then much reduced, but convergent migration may stall with a variety of period ratios depending on the density structure in the common gap. This is illustrated for the Kepler-46 system, for which we reproduce the period ratio of Kepler-46b and c.

  20. DISK-PLANETS INTERACTIONS AND THE DIVERSITY OF PERIOD RATIOS IN KEPLER'S MULTI-PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Baruteau, Clement; Papaloizou, John C. B. E-mail: J.C.B.Papaloizou@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2013-11-20

    The Kepler mission is dramatically increasing the number of planets known in multi-planetary systems. Many adjacent planets have orbital period ratios near resonant values, with a tendency to be larger than required for exact first-order mean-motion resonances. This feature has been shown to be a natural outcome of orbital circularization of resonant planetary pairs due to star-planet tidal interactions. However, this feature holds in multi-planetary systems with periods longer than 10 days, in which tidal circularization is unlikely to provide efficient divergent evolution of the planets' orbits to explain these orbital period ratios. Gravitational interactions between planets and their parent protoplanetary disk may instead provide efficient divergent evolution. For a planet pair embedded in a disk, we show that interactions between a planet and the wake of its companion can reverse convergent migration and significantly increase the period ratio from a near-resonant value. Divergent evolution due to wake-planet interactions is particularly efficient when at least one of the planets opens a partial gap around its orbit. This mechanism could help account for the diversity of period ratios in Kepler's multiple systems from super-Earth to sub-Jovian planets with periods greater than about 10 days. Diversity is also expected for pairs of planets massive enough to merge their gap. The efficiency of wake-planet interactions is then much reduced, but convergent migration may stall with a variety of period ratios depending on the density structure in the common gap. This is illustrated for the Kepler-46 system, for which we reproduce the period ratio of Kepler-46b and c.

  1. Bionomic Exploitation of a Ratio-Dependent Predator-Prey System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiti, Alakes; Patra, Bibek; Samanta, G. P.

    2008-01-01

    The present article deals with the problem of combined harvesting of a Michaelis-Menten-type ratio-dependent predator-prey system. The problem of determining the optimal harvest policy is solved by invoking Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. Dynamic optimization of the harvest policy is studied by taking the combined harvest effort as a dynamic…

  2. Optimization of Gear Ratio in the Tidal Current Generation System based on Generated Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoi, Kazuhisa; Shiono, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    It is possible to predict generating power of the tidal current generation, because of the tidal current's periodicity. Tidal current generation is more advantageous than other renewable energy sources, when the tidal current generation system is connected to the power system and operated. In this paper, we propose a method used to optimize the gear ratio and generator capacity, that is fundamental design items in the tidal current generation system which is composed of Darrieus type water turbine and squirrel-cage induction generator coupled with gear. The proposed method is applied to the tidal current generation system including the most large-sized turbine that we have developed and studied. This paper shows optimum gear ratio and generator capacity that make generated energy maximum, and verify effectiveness of the proposed method. The paper also proposes a method of selecting maximum generating current velocity in order to reduce the generator capacity, from the viewpoint of economics.

  3. Multicanonical Determination of the Symbol Error Ratio of WDM Polarization Multiplexed QPSK Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, George; Yevick, David

    2014-12-01

    The multicanonical method is applied to the calculation of the symbol error ratio (SER) as a function of the optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) at the receiver for a polarization multiplexed quadrature phase shift keying (PM-QPSK) wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) system. We improve upon previous calculations by including polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and subsequently verifying the numerical accuracy of our calculations. Our numerical studies demonstrate that acceptable accuracy can be achieved even when advancing the polarization through the fiber with relatively large propagation step lengths.

  4. Evaluation of denitrification-nitrification biofilter systems in treating wastewater with low carbon: nitrogen ratios.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjin; Bae, Wookeun; Kim, Moonil; Kim, Jong-Oh; Chung, Jinwook

    2015-01-01

    A two-stage biological aerated/anoxic filter (BAF) system for denitrification-nitrification was developed to increase nitrogen removal in the treatment of municipal wastewater with low carbon:nitrogen (C/N) ratio [Formula: see text]. This system exhibited a high denitrification efficiency (67%), despite the low C/N ratio, and the ratio of reduced nitrate to consumed organic compounds was greater than the theoretical value due to the minimization of the conversion of organic carbon to biomass growth, the maintenance of low levels of dissolved oxygen in recycled water, and the maximization of use of organic carbon biosorbed inside biomass in the denitrification BAF. The maximum rate of nitrogen removal was achieved at a recycle ratio of 170%, and the headloss in two BAFs was maintained after a 24-h backwash. Biological nitrogen removal in a two-stage BAF system was possible in a short hydraulic retention time (1.2 h) because the maximum reaction rates of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in each column were achieved. PMID:25287910

  5. Influence of tire dynamics on slip ratio estimation of independent driving wheel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianqiu; Song, Ziyou; Wei, Yintao; Ouyang, Minggao

    2014-11-01

    The independent driving wheel system, which is composed of in-wheel permanent magnet synchronous motor(I-PMSM) and tire, is more convenient to estimate the slip ratio because the rotary speed of the rotor can be accurately measured. However, the ring speed of the tire ring doesn't equal to the rotor speed considering the tire deformation. For this reason, a deformable tire and a detailed I-PMSM are modeled by using Matlab/Simulink. Moreover, the tire/road contact interface(a slippery road) is accurately described by the non-linear relaxation length-based model and the Magic Formula pragmatic model. Based on the relatively accurate model, the error of slip ratio estimated by the rotor rotary speed is analyzed in both time and frequency domains when a quarter car is started by the I-PMSM with a definite target torque input curve. In addition, the natural frequencies(NFs) of the driving wheel system with variable parameters are illustrated to present the relationship between the slip ratio estimation error and the NF. According to this relationship, a low-pass filter, whose cut-off frequency corresponds to the NF, is proposed to eliminate the error in the estimated slip ratio. The analysis, concerning the effect of the driving wheel parameters and road conditions on slip ratio estimation, shows that the peak estimation error can be reduced up to 75% when the LPF is adopted. The robustness and effectiveness of the LPF are therefore validated. This paper builds up the deformable tire model and the detailed I-PMSM models, and analyzes the effect of the driving wheel parameters and road conditions on slip ratio estimation.

  6. Instabilities with polyacrylamide solution in small and large aspect ratios Taylor-Couette systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smieszek, M.; Crumeyrolle, O.; Mutabazi, I.; Egbers, C.

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the stability of viscoelastic polyacrylamide solution in Taylor-Couette system with different aspect ratios. The first instability modes observed in a Taylor-Couette system with Γ = 10 were TVF and WVF, as for Newtonian fluid. At higher Taylor numbers moving vortices occur, a wavy mode with non-stationary vortex size. In the Taylor-Couette system with Γ = 45.9 we note a coexistence of various instability modes. In addition to TVF, counterpropagating waves developed at the transition from the base state flow. At higher Taylor number values Taylor vortices of different sizes occurred. Reduced amplitude Wavy vortex flow has also been observed.

  7. Effects of dietary n-6:n-3 ratio on immune and reproductive systems of pullet chicks.

    PubMed

    Pilevar, M; Arshami, J; Golian, A; Basami, M R

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of dietary n-6:n-3 ratio on immune and reproduction systems of Leghorn pullet chicks. A total of 216 Hy-Line W-36 pullet chicks (1 d old) were randomly assigned to 3 diets (n-6:n-3 ratios of 10, 6, and 2) until 22 wk of age. The Optomega-50 (Optivite International Ltd., Nottinghamshire, UK) containing 50% salmon fish oil was used as an n-3 source. Pullets were injected with SRBC suspension at 6 and 9 wk and anti-SRBC titers were measured 7 and 14 d after each immunization. The antibody (Ab) titers for Newcastle disease (ND), avian influenza, infectious bronchitis (IB), and infectious bursal disease (IBD) were determined at 4, 6, 10, 14, and 18 wk of age. Pullets fed diet with the n-6:n-3 ratio of 2 had higher feed consumption and lower BW gain (P < 0.05) compared those fed diets with the ratios of 6 and 10. The results demonstrated that the different dietary n-6:n-3 ratios did not have a significant effect on the anti-SRBC titers in pullets serum (P > 0.05). The Ab production against avian influenza vaccine was increased in pullets fed diet containing the n-6:n-3 ratio of 10 at wk 10 and 14 and increased for ND at only 14 wk (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the Ab response to IBD (14 wk) and IB (14 wk) vaccines was increased when pullets were fed diet containing a ratio of 6 (P < 0.05). The pullets fed diet with the n-6:n-3 ratio of 2 showed lower egg production and late sexual maturity (P > 0.05) whereas ovary weight (P = 0.01) and number of large yellow follicles (P = 0.049) were significantly decreased at first oviposition. Our results revealed that the supplementation of Optomega-50 as a source of n-3 to decrease the n-6:n-3 ratio in diet significantly increased Ab production for ND, IB, and IBD in pullet chicks with slight reduction in reproductive organs weight at early production. PMID:21753213

  8. ASAS J083241+2332.4: A New Extreme Low Mass Ratio Overcontact Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, K.; Malu, S.; Choi, C. S.; Vivekananda Rao, P.

    2016-03-01

    We present the R- and V-band CCD photometry and Hα line studies of an overcontact binary ASAS J083241+2332.4. The light curves exhibit totality along with a trace of the O’Connell effect. The photometric solution indicates that this system falls into the category of extreme low-mass ratio overcontact binaries with a mass ratio, q ˜ 0.06. Although a trace of the O’ Connell effect is observed, constancy of the Hα line along various phases suggest that a relatively higher magnetic activity is needed for it to show a prominent fill-in effect. The study of O-C variations reveals that the period of the binary shows a secular increase at the rate of dP/dt ˜ 0.0765 s years-1, which is superimposed by a low, but significant, sinusoidal modulation with a period of ˜8.25 years. Assuming that the sinusoidal variation is due to the presence of a third body, orbital elements have been derived. There exist three other similar systems, SX Crv, V857 Her, and E53, which have extremely low mass ratios and we conclude that ASAS J083241+2332.4 resembles SX Crv in many respects. Theoretical studies indicate that at a critical mass ratio range, qcritical = 0.07-0.09, overcontact binaries should merge and form a fast rotating star, but it has been suggested that qcritical can continue to fall up to 0.05 depending on the primary's mass and structure. Moreover, the obtained fill-out factors (50%-70%) indicate that mass loss is considerable and hydrodynamical simulations advocate that mass loss from L2 is mandatory for a successful merging process. Comprehensively, the results indicate that ASAS J083241+2332.4 is at a stage of merger. The pivotal role played by the subtle nature of the derived mass ratio in forming a rapidly rotating star has been discussed.

  9. Carrier - Interference ratios for frequency sharing between satellite systems transmitting frequency modulated and digital television signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    As the data rates required for digitally encoded television are reduced, satellite systems employing the transmission of digitally encoded television will become attractive. It is likely that television transmitted in this format will be adjacent to or in the same frequency band as television transmissions in other modulation formats, so a knowledge of carrier to interference power ratios as a function of assessed picture quality will be required for frequency sharing between these different modulation formats. This paper presents the results of subjective and quantitative tests describing the results of interference to a particular digital television system from a frequency modulated (FM) television system, and for interference to an FM television system from a digital television system.

  10. Simulation of signal-to-noise ratio for the laser range-gated imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weiwei; Chen, Qianrong; Hao, Yongwang; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Wenpan

    2015-10-01

    The laser active imaging system is widely used in night vision, underwater imaging, three-dimension scene imaging and other civilian applications, and the system's detected range increase greatly comparing with the passive imaging system. In recent years, with rapid development of sensor and laser source technique, the laser range-gated imaging system is achieved based on high peak power pulsed laser and gated intensified CCD(ICCD), and it is well known for its properties such as high suppression of backscatter noise from fog and other obscurants, high resolution, long detection range and direct visualization. However, the performance of the laser range-gated imaging system is seriously affected by many factors, and the relationships between system's Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and influence factors are not further elaborated. In this paper, the simulation of SNR for the laser range-gated imaging system is studied. The principle of the laser range-gated imaging system is shown firstly, and the range equation is derived by means of deducing laser illuminating model according to the principle of laser radar and the characters of objects and the detectors. And then, the sources of noise are analyzed by accurately modeling all noise sources in the detection system, the model of SNR for laser range-gated imaging system is established. Finally, the relationships between SNR of system and influence factors such as gating time, laser pulse width and repetition frequency are discussed, and correspondingly the solutions are proposed.

  11. The Minimum Mass Ratio for Contact Close Binary Systems of W Ursae Majoris-Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbutina, B.

    2012-12-01

    The main research topic of this dissertation are extreme mass ratio contact close binary systems, q ≲ 0.1, of W Ursae Majoris (W UMa) type. These close binaries (CBs) represent an interesting class of objects in which "normal", approximately one solar mass main-sequence star is in contact with a significantly less massive companion, M_2 ˜ 0.1 M_⊙. Earlier theoretical investigations of these systems found that there is a minimum mass ratio q_{min} = M_2/M_1 = 0.085 - 0.095 (obtained for n = 3 polytrope - fully radiative primary) above which these CBs are stable and could be observed. If the mass ratio is lower than q_{min}, or, equivalently, if orbital angular momentum is only about three times larger than the spin angular momentum of a massive primary, a tidal instability develops (Darwin's instability) forcing eventually the stars to merge into a single, rapidly rotating object (such as FK Com-type stars or blue stragglers). However, there appear to be some W UMa-type CBs with empirically obtained values for the mass ratio below the theoretical limit for stability. The aim of this dissertation is to try to resolve the discrepancy between theory and observations by considering rotating polytropes. By including in theory the effects of higher central condensation due to rotation we were able to reduce qmin to the new theoretical value q_{min} = 0.070-0.074, for the overcontact degree f = 0 - 1, which is more consistent with the observed population. Other candidate systems for stellar mergers such as AM CVn-type stars have also been discussed in the dissertation.

  12. The mass ratio and formation mechanisms of Herbig Ae/Be star binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelwright, H. E.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Goodwin, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present B- and R-band spectroastrometry of a sample of 45 Herbig Ae/Be (HAe/Be) stars in order to study their binary properties. All but one of the targets known to be binary systems with a separation of ~0.1-2.0 arcsec are detected by a distinctive spectroastrometric signature. Some objects in the sample exhibit spectroastrometric features that do not appear attributable to a binary system. We find that these may be due to light reflected from dusty haloes or material entrained in winds. We present eight new binary detections and four detections of an unknown component in previously discovered binary systems. The data confirm previous reports that HAe/Be stars have a high binary fraction, 74 +/- 6 per cent in the sample presented here. We use a spectroastrometric deconvolution technique to separate the spatially unresolved binary spectra into the individual constituent spectra. The separated spectra allow us to ascertain the spectral type of the individual binary components, which in turn allows the mass ratio of these systems to be determined. In addition, we appraise the method used and the effects of contaminant sources of flux. We find that the distribution of system mass ratios is inconsistent with random pairing from the initial mass function, and that this appears robust despite a detection bias. Instead, the mass ratio distribution is broadly consistent with the scenario of binary formation via disc fragmentation. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. E-mail: pyhew@leeds.ac.uk

  13. Binary star statistics - The mass ratio distribution for very wide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, V.

    Published observational data on a common-proper-motion sample (CPMS) of 326 pairs of AGK 3 stars (Halbwachs, 1986) with proper motion greater than 50 marcsec/yr and separation/proper-motion ratios less than 1000 yr are analyzed statistically to determine the frequency distribution of mass ratios (q = M2/M1). The results are presented in tables and graphs and compared with those for a sample of 798 visual binaries (VBs) studied by Worley and Heintz (1983). Both samples are found to have distributions with a peak at q = about 1, but this tendency is more pronounced in the VBs than in the CPMS. The q distribution of the VB sample, unlike that of the CPMS, cannot be explained by assuming that it is a random sample of normal initial mass functions; from this it is inferred that a binary formation mechanism which favors systems with q = about 1 may be involved.

  14. Estimation of Theaflavins (TF) and Thearubigins (TR) Ratio in Black Tea Liquor Using Electronic Vision System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuli, Amitava; Pal, Abhra; Ghosh, Arunangshu; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Bandhopadhyya, Rajib; Tamuly, Pradip; Gogoi, Nagen

    2011-09-01

    Quality of black tea is generally assessed using organoleptic tests by professional tea tasters. They determine the quality of black tea based on its appearance (in dry condition and during liquor formation), aroma and taste. Variation in the above parameters is actually contributed by a number of chemical compounds like, Theaflavins (TF), Thearubigins (TR), Caffeine, Linalool, Geraniol etc. Among the above, TF and TR are the most important chemical compounds, which actually contribute to the formation of taste, colour and brightness in tea liquor. Estimation of TF and TR in black tea is generally done using a spectrophotometer instrument. But, the analysis technique undergoes a rigorous and time consuming effort for sample preparation; also the operation of costly spectrophotometer requires expert manpower. To overcome above problems an Electronic Vision System based on digital image processing technique has been developed. The system is faster, low cost, repeatable and can estimate the amount of TF and TR ratio for black tea liquor with accuracy. The data analysis is done using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Multiple Discriminate Analysis (MDA). A correlation has been established between colour of tea liquor images and TF, TR ratio. This paper describes the newly developed E-Vision system, experimental methods, data analysis algorithms and finally, the performance of the E-Vision System as compared to the results of traditional spectrophotometer.

  15. Decentralized PID controller for TITO systems using characteristic ratio assignment with an experimental application.

    PubMed

    Hajare, V D; Patre, B M

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a decentralized PID controller design method for two input two output (TITO) systems with time delay using characteristic ratio assignment (CRA) method. The ability of CRA method to design controller for desired transient response has been explored for TITO systems. The design methodology uses an ideal decoupler to reduce the interaction. Each decoupled subsystem is reduced to first order plus dead time (FOPDT) model to design independent diagonal controllers. Based on specified overshoot and settling time, the controller parameters are computed using CRA method. To verify performance of the proposed controller, two benchmark simulation examples are presented. To demonstrate applicability of the proposed controller, experimentation is performed on real life interacting coupled tank level system. PMID:26521724

  16. Component video signal-to-noise ratio analysis of FM and AM television systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvan, B.; Green, R. J.

    1994-02-01

    The objective signal-to-noise performance of component color video signals is analyzed in this paper for FM and AM-VSB video transmission systems. In the analysis, the effect of splitting the composite video signal into its components, by subcarrier demodulation and color decoding, is taken into consideration. The effect of non linearity of the display is also included in the analysis. An expression for objective component signal-to-noise ratio is derived for both the transmission system. A relationship between the conventional composite video SNR and the component video SNR is established. Effective noise transfer, between the input and various stages of video signal processing, is discussed in detail. Noise spectral density analysis, for fully saturated primary colors, is evaluated quantitatively for a PAL-I video system. Finally, SNR performance of various hues at constant luminance is evaluated, and the results obtained are compared with the subjective noise visibility tests first carried out in 1957.

  17. Spatio-temporal patterns of C : N : P ratios in the northern Benguela upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flohr, A.; van der Plas, A. K.; Emeis, K.-C.; Mohrholz, V.; Rixen, T.

    2014-02-01

    On a global scale the ratio of fixed nitrogen (N) and phosphate (P) is characterized by a deficit of N with regard to the classical Redfield ratio of N : P = 16 : 1 reflecting the impact of N loss occurring in the oceanic oxygen minimum zones. The northern Benguela upwelling system (NBUS) is known for losses of N and the accumulation of P in sub- and anoxic bottom waters and sediments of the Namibian shelf resulting in low N : P ratios in the water column. To study the impact of the N : P anomalies on the regional carbon cycle and their consequences for the export of nutrients from the NBUS into the oligotrophic subtropical gyre of the South Atlantic, we measured dissolved inorganic carbon (CT), total alkalinity (AT), oxygen (O2) and nutrient concentrations in February 2011. The results indicate increased P concentrations over the Namibian shelf due to P efflux from sediments resulting in a C : N : P : -O2 ratio of 106 : 16 : 1.6 : 138. N reduction further increase C : N and reduce N : P ratios in those regions where O2 concentrations in bottom waters are < 20 μmol kg-1. However, off the shelf along the continental margin, the mean C : N : P : -O2 ratio is again close to the Redfield stoichiometry. Additional nutrient data measured during two cruises in 2008 and 2009 imply that the amount of excess P, which is created in the bottom waters on the shelf, and its export into the subtropical gyre after upwelling varies through time. The results further reveal an inter-annual variability of excess N within the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) that flows from the north into the NBUS, with highest N values observed in 2008. It is postulated that the N excess in SACW occurred due to the impact of remineralized organic matter produced by N2 fixation and that the magnitude of excess P formation and its export is governed by inputs of excess N along with SACW flowing into the NBUS. Factors controlling N2 fixation north of the BUS need to be addressed in future studies to better understand the role of the NBUS as a P source and N sink in the coupled C : N : P cycles.

  18. Performance enhancement for long distance BOTDR sensing system based on high extinction ratio probe pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixin; Xia, Lan; Wu, Xuelin; Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Guanghui

    2014-10-01

    The leakage light of an electro-optic modulator (EOM) induced by its finite extinction ratio (ER) may degrade the performance of Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer sensing system, especially for long distance measurement. In this letter, the configuration of a high ER probe pulse generator assisted by synchronous optical switch has been presented. A dual pulses interferometric method was also proposed to determine the dynamic ER value (DER) of the generated probe pulse. Contrast experiments have been performed to verify the effect of the proposed method in a BOTDR system and the results have shown that the performance of a long distance BOTDR sensing system can be improved observably with the proposed high ER probe pulse generator. At the end of a 48.5km sensing fiber, the maximum uncertainty of temperature measurement has been reduced from 5.2° to 0.8° with 25m spatial resolution after we improved the extinction ratio of probe pulse from 35dB to 65dB.

  19. Molecular branching ratio method for intensity calibration of optical systems in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review is given of the molecular branching ratio method for intensity calibration in the vacuum ultraviolet. Ways are described for determining both relative and quantitative responses in the wavelength range 1000 A to 3000 A. The molecular band systems which are discussed are the following: H2(B 1 Sigma u +)-(X 1 Sigma g +), H2(C 1 Pi u)-(X 1 Sigma g +), N2(A 1 Pi g)-(X 1 Sigma g +), CO(A 1 Pi)-(X 1 Sigma +), NO(A 2 Sigma +)-(X 2 Pi r), and NO(+) (A 1 Pi)-(X 1 Sigma +).

  20. System-specific spare rail vehicle ratios: A synthesis of transit practice. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    This synthesis addresses the system-specific variables that directly impact fleet size, and the spare ratios that are maintained by individual transit agencies. From the information obtained, it appears that most rail transit agencies closely monitor the spare vehicles they maintain to maximize efficiency and thereby reduce operating costs. This report of the Transportation Research Board describes operating environments at 21 selected rail transit agencies of various sizes in key geographical locations in North America. It contains survey information about operating practices, impediments, and strategies used to appropriately size fleets within each agency`s operating context.

  1. Radiation detection method and system using the sequential probability ratio test

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Karl E.; Valentine, John D.; Beauchamp, Brock R.

    2007-07-17

    A method and system using the Sequential Probability Ratio Test to enhance the detection of an elevated level of radiation, by determining whether a set of observations are consistent with a specified model within a given bounds of statistical significance. In particular, the SPRT is used in the present invention to maximize the range of detection, by providing processing mechanisms for estimating the dynamic background radiation, adjusting the models to reflect the amount of background knowledge at the current point in time, analyzing the current sample using the models to determine statistical significance, and determining when the sample has returned to the expected background conditions.

  2. The geochemical coherence of Pu and Nd and the Pu-244/U-238 ratio of the early solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Two very different sets of Pu-244/U-238 ratios have been reported for early solar system materials, one high and the other low, and this paper examines how one of these groups may yield an incorrect ratio. Recently measured partition coefficients for Pu and Sm (Jones, 1981) are used to evaluate Pu-Nd fractionation during achondrite genesis, and Pu-244/U-238 ratios of chondrites, achondrites, and Ca-Al-rich inclusions are compared and discussed. A low Pu-244/U-238 ratio is favored, and some implications of this low ratio for galactic nucleosynthesis and meteorite age dating are briefly discussed.

  3. Earliest rooting system and root : shoot ratio from a new Zosterophyllum plant.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shougang; Xue, Jinzhuang; Guo, Dali; Wang, Deming

    2010-01-01

    The enhanced chemical weathering by rooted vascular plants during the Silurian-Devonian period played a crucial role in altering global biogeochemical cycles and atmospheric environments; however, the documentation of early root morphology and physiology is scarce because the existing fossils are mostly incomplete. Here, we report an entire, uprooted specimen of a new Zosterophyllum Penhallow, named as Z. shengfengense, from the Early Devonian Xitun Formation (Lochkovian, c. 413 Myr old) of Yunnan, south China. This plant has the most ancient known record of a rooting system. The plant consists of aerial axes of 98 mm in height, showing a tufted habit, and a rhizome bearing a fibrous-like rooting system, c. 20 mm in length. The rhizome shows masses of branchings, which produce upwardly directed aerial axes and downwardly directed root-like axes. The completeness of Z. shengfengense made it possible to estimate the biomass allocation and root : shoot ratio. The root : shoot ratio of this early plant is estimated at a mean value of 0.028, and the root-like axes constitute only c. 3% of the total biomass. Zosterophyllum shengfengense was probably a semi-aquatic plant with efficient water use or a strong uptake capacity of the root-like axes. PMID:19825018

  4. The genetic sex-determination system predicts adult sex ratios in tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Pipoly, Ivett; Bókony, Veronika; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Donald, Paul F; Székely, Tamás; Liker, András

    2015-11-01

    The adult sex ratio (ASR) has critical effects on behaviour, ecology and population dynamics, but the causes of variation in ASRs are unclear. Here we assess whether the type of genetic sex determination influences the ASR using data from 344 species in 117 families of tetrapods. We show that taxa with female heterogamety have a significantly more male-biased ASR (proportion of males: 0.55 ± 0.01 (mean ± s.e.m.)) than taxa with male heterogamety (0.43 ± 0.01). The genetic sex-determination system explains 24% of interspecific variation in ASRs in amphibians and 36% in reptiles. We consider several genetic factors that could contribute to this pattern, including meiotic drive and sex-linked deleterious mutations, but further work is needed to quantify their effects. Regardless of the mechanism, the effects of the genetic sex-determination system on the adult sex ratio are likely to have profound effects on the demography and social behaviour of tetrapods. PMID:26444239

  5. Molecular beam sampling system with very high beam-to-background ratio: The rotating skimmer concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, J.; Ellerweg, D.; von Keudell, A.

    2009-05-01

    A novel method of reducing the background pressure in a vacuum system used for sampling a molecular beam from a high pressure region is presented. A triple differential pumping stage is constructed with a chopper with rotating skimmer within the first pumping stage, which serves effectively as a valve separating periodically the vacuum system from the ambient environment. The mass spectrometry measurement of the species in the molecular beam show an excellent beam-to-background ratio of 14 and a detection limit below 1 ppm. The potential of this method for detection of low density reactive species in atmospheric pressure plasmas is demonstrated for the detection of oxygen atoms generated in an atmospheric pressure microplasma source.

  6. Copy number ratios determined by two digital polymerase chain reaction systems in genetically modified grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Urquiza, M.; Acatzi Silva, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    Three certified reference materials produced from powdered seeds to measure the copy number ratio sequences of p35S/hmgA in maize containing MON 810 event, p35S/Le1 in soybeans containing GTS 40-3-2 event and DREB1A/acc1 in wheat were produced according to the ISO Guides 34 and 35. In this paper, we report digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) protocols, performance parameters and results of copy number ratio content of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in these materials using two new dPCR systems to detect and quantify molecular deoxyribonucleic acid: the BioMark® (Fluidigm) and the OpenArray® (Life Technologies) systems. These technologies were implemented at the National Institute of Metrology in Mexico (CENAM) and in the Reference Center for GMO Detection from the Ministry of Agriculture (CNRDOGM), respectively. The main advantage of this technique against the more-used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is that it generates an absolute number of target molecules in the sample, without reference to standards or an endogenous control, which is very useful when not much information is available for new developments or there are no standard reference materials in the market as in the wheat case presented, or when it was not possible to test the purity of seeds as in the maize case presented here. Both systems reported enhanced productivity, increased reliability and reduced instrument footprint. In this paper, the performance parameters and uncertainty of measurement obtained with both systems are presented and compared.

  7. WZ And, a probable contact system with mass ratio very close to unity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, R. X.

    2006-03-01

    We present B and V time-series CCD photometry of the short-period eclipsing binary WZ And. Eight new epochs of minimum light were determined from the observations covering five primary and three secondary eclipses. Refined period and new ephemeris are given for the system based on the photoelectric and CCD photometric times of minima obtained in the recent 20 years. A period study covering 100 years or nearly 59,000 orbital cycles reveals a cyclic but not periodic behavior of long-term period variations. Two major period jumps can be indicated. That could be evidence for the existence of a very eccentric third body of the eclipsing system. The light curve shows continuous light changes outside eclipses in both V and B band, indicating that it could be of EW rather EB type. A simultaneous solution of the two light curves was computed using the Wilson-Devinney code. The solution indicates that WZ And is in shallow contact with a fill-out factor of ˜6%. A photometric mass ratio of q = 1.00 ± 0.01 was derived for the system. Discussions on the period behavior and the probable evolutionary status of the system suggest that WZ And could very probably be a newly formed equal-mass contact system.

  8. Performance and limits of liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for halogenated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilevska, Tetyana; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) has been an important step for the assessment of the origin and fate of compounds in environmental science.[1] Biologically or pharmaceutically important compounds often are not amenable for gas chromatographic separation because of high polarity and lacking volatility, thermostability. In 2004 liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) became commercially available. LC-IRMS system intent a quantitative conversion of analytes separation into CO2 via wet oxidation with sodium persulfate in the presence of phosphoric acid while analytes are still dissolved in the aqueous liquid phase.[2] The aim of this study is to analyze the oxidation capacity of the interface of the LC-IRMS system and determine which parameters could improve oxidation of compounds which are resistant to persulfate oxidation. Oxidation capacity of the liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry system was tested with halogenated acetic acid and a set of aromatic compounds with different substitutes. Acetic acid (AA) was taken as a model compound for complete oxidation and compared to the oxidation of other analytes on a molar basis. Correct values were obtained for di- and mono chlorinated and fluorinated and also for tribrominated acetic acid and for all studied aromatic compounds. Incomplete oxidation for trichloroacetic (TCAA) and trifluoroacetic (TFAA) acid was revealed with lower recovery compared to acetic acid and isotope fractionation leading to depleted carbon isotope composition compared to values obtained with an elementary analyzer connected to an isotope mass spectrometer Several optimization steps were tried in order to improve the oxidation of TCAA and TFAA: (i) increasing the concentration of the oxidizing agent, (ii) variation of flow rate of the oxidizing and acid solution, (iii) variation of flow rate of liquid chromatography pump (iv) addition of a catalyzer. These modifications lead to longer reaction time in the coil and increase in the concentration of radical but complete combustion of highly chlorinated or fluorinated compounds was not achieved. Due to these findings the limit for a LC-IRMS system for similar structure compounds can be predicted. 1. Elsner, M., et al., Current challenges in compound-specific stable isotope analysis of environmental organic contaminants. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2012. 403(9): p. 2471-2491. 2. Krummen, M., et al., A new concept for isotope ratio monitoring liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 2004. 18(19): p. 2260-2266.

  9. DEEP, LOW MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XI. V1191 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L. Y.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Liu, L.

    2011-10-15

    Complete CCD photometric light curves in BV(RI){sub c} bands obtained on one night in 2009 for the short-period close-binary system V1191 Cygni are presented. A new photometric analysis with the 2003 version of the Wilson-Van Hamme code shows that V1191 Cyg is a W-type overcontact binary system and suggests that it has a high degree of overcontact (f = 68.6%) with very low mass ratio, implying that it is at the late stage of overcontact evolution. The absolute parameters of V1191 Cyg are derived using spectroscopic and photometric solutions. Combining new determined times of light minimum with others published in the literature, the period change of the binary star is investigated. A periodic variation, with a period of 26.7 years and an amplitude of 0.023 days, was discovered to be superimposed on a long-term period increase (dP/dt = +4.5({+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}). The cyclic period oscillation may be caused by the magnetic activity cycles of either of the components or the light-time effect due to the presence of a third body with a mass of m{sub 3} = 0.77 M{sub sun} and an orbital radius of a{sub 3} = 7.6 AU, when this body is coplanar to the orbit of the eclipsing pair. The secular orbital period increase can be interpreted as a mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With the period increases, V1191 Cyg will evolve from its present low mass ratio, high filled overcontact state to a rapidly rotating single star when its orbital angular momentum is less than three times the total spin angular momentum. V1191 Cyg is too blue for its orbital period and it is an unusual W-type overcontact system with such a low mass ratio and high fill-out overcontact configuration, which is worth monitoring continuously in the future.

  10. A study on the optimal hydraulic loading rate and plant ratios in recirculation aquaponic system.

    PubMed

    Endut, Azizah; Jusoh, A; Ali, N; Wan Nik, W B; Hassan, A

    2010-03-01

    The growths of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were evaluated in recirculation aquaponic system (RAS). Fish production performance, plant growth and nutrient removal were measured and their dependence on hydraulic loading rate (HLR) was assessed. Fish production did not differ significantly between hydraulic loading rates. In contrast to the fish production, the water spinach yield was significantly higher in the lower hydraulic loading rate. Fish production, plant growth and percentage nutrient removal were highest at hydraulic loading rate of 1.28 m/day. The ratio of fish to plant production has been calculated to balance nutrient generation from fish with nutrient removal by plants and the optimum ratio was 15-42 gram of fish feed/m(2) of plant growing area. Each unit in RAS was evaluated in terms of oxygen demand. Using specified feeding regime, mass balance equations were applied to quantify the waste discharges from rearing tanks and treatment units. The waste discharged was found to be strongly dependent on hydraulic loading rate. PMID:19819130

  11. Deep, Low Mass Ratio Overcontact Binary Systems. XIV. A Statistical Analysis of 46 Sample Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Gui; Qian, Sheng-Bang

    2015-09-01

    A sample of 46 deep, low mass ratio (DLMR) overcontact binaries (i.e., q≤slant 0.25 and f≥slant 50%) is statistically analyzed in this paper. It is found that five relations possibly exist among some physical parameters. The primary components are little-evolved main sequence stars that lie between the zero-age main sequence line and the terminal-age main sequence (TAMS) line. Meanwhile, the secondary components may be evolved stars above the TAMS line. The super-luminosities and large radii may result from energy transfer, which causes their volumes to expand. The equations of M-L and M-R for the components are also determined. The relation of P-Mtotal implies that mass may escape from the central system when the orbital period decreases. The minimum mass ratio may preliminarily be {q}{min}=0.044(+/- 0.007) from the relations of q-f and q-Jspin/Jorb. With mass and angular momentum loss, the orbital period decreases, which finally causes this kind of DLMR overcontact binary to merge into a rapid-rotating single star.

  12. Amplitude ratios for critical systems in the c=-2 universality class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2013-01-01

    We study the finite-size corrections of the critical dense polymer (CDP) and the dimer models on ∞×N rectangular lattice. We find that the finite-size corrections in the CDP and dimer models depend in a crucial way on the parity of N, and a change of the parity of N is equivalent to the change of boundary conditions. We present a set of universal amplitude ratios for amplitudes in finite-size correction terms of critical systems in the universality class with central charge c=-2. The results are in perfect agreement with a perturbated conformal field theory under the assumption that all analytical corrections coming from the operators which belongs to the tower of the identity. Our results inspire many interesting problems for further studies.

  13. Phase transitions in systems of hard rectangles with non-integer aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Joyjit; Rajesh, R.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate, using Monte Carlo simulations, the phase diagram of a system of hard rectangles of size m mk on a square lattice when the aspect ratio k is a non-integer. The existence of a disordered isotropic phase, a nematic with only orientational order, a columnar phase with orientational and partial translational order, and a high density phase with no orientational order is shown. The high density phase is a solid-like sublattice phase only if the length and width of the rectangles are not mutually prime, else, it is an isotropic phase. The minimum value of k beyond which the nematic and columnar phases exist are determined for m = 2 and 3. The nature of the transitions between different phases is determined, and the critical exponents are numerically obtained for the continuous transitions.

  14. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now? 141.536 Section 141.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now? Each log inactivation serves as a data...

  15. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now? 141.536 Section 141.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now? Each log inactivation serves as a data...

  16. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now? 141.536 Section 141.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now? Each log inactivation serves as a data...

  17. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now? 141.536 Section 141.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now? Each log inactivation serves as a data...

  18. Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder as an Indicator of Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs to Estuarine Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (?15N) were measured in muscle tissue of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems (lagoons, river, bay) along the coast of Rhode Island, USA over a three-year period. Significant differences i...

  19. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2014-05-01

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system. PMID:24880419

  20. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jinzhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-05-15

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  1. Viewing angle dependence of speckle contrast ratio in laser projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qianli; Xu, ChangQing; Ming, Hai

    2015-03-01

    The speckle, which is due to the interference of coherent light scattered by a random surface, can severely degrades the image quality. The speckle properties are usually measured by a camera, which takes images of the center of a projection screen. As a result, the effects of different viewing angles are not considered. In this paper, the dependence of speckle contrast ratio on the viewing angles in a laser projection system is studied. Two major effects have been considered in the studies. First, different viewing angles result different projection distances. Secondly, for a rough screen, there exists an angular intensity distribution for the reflected/scattered light, which is determined by the structure of the screen surface. By combining these two effects, the experiment results show that the speckle contrast can vary significantly for different viewing angels. It is found that speckle contrast decreases with increase of viewing angle. As a result, when evaluating the speckle contrast in a laser projection system, the dependence of viewing angle should be considered.

  2. Associations between Optic Cup-to-disc Ratio and Systemic Factors in the Healthy Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yang Jae; Shim, Seong Hee; Bae, Jeong Hun; Park, Ki Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the relationships between optic cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) and age, sex, and other demographic and health characteristics in the healthy Korean population. Methods The study design was retrospective and population-based. A total of 28,377 subjects who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2008 and 2011 were enrolled in this study. Participants underwent structured interviews as well as systemic and ophthalmic examinations. Patients with glaucoma who were diagnosed using the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology classification were excluded. Changes in vertical CDR were examined by age in relation to systemic variables on multiple regression analysis. Results The mean vertical CDR was 0.34 ± 0.12. The vertical CDR increased with age from subjects in their 20s to those in their 80s (p < 0.001). The mean CDR in males was significantly higher than that of females (p < 0.001). On multiple regression analysis, the vertical CDR was positively associated with age (p < 0.001), male sex (p < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.009), and intraocular pressure (p < 0.001) but was negatively associated with body mass index (p < 0.001). Conclusions Greater vertical CDR was related to age, male sex, higher diastolic blood pressure, higher intraocular pressure, and lower body mass index in healthy Koreans. PMID:26457040

  3. Enhancing Multiple-Transiting Planet System Validation with Transit Duration Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, E. B.; Prša, A.; Ragozzine, D.

    2011-09-01

    The recent discoveries of three planets transiting Kepler-9 (Holman et al. 2010; Torres et al. 2011), six densely packed planets transiting Kepler-11 (Lissauer et al. 2011), and a total of 170 stars with multiple transiting planet candidates (Borucki et al. 2011; Steffen et al. 2010) bode well for the future of multiple-transiting planet systems (MTPSs). For many faint (Kp>14) Kepler targets, traditional confirmation by radial velocities is not practical. Fortunately, detailed light curve analysis can eliminate the vast majority of false-positive scenarios and statistically validate such systems (Torres et al. 2011; Fressin et al. 2011). We explore the utility of the ratio of the observed transit durations in MTPSs for validating candidate MTPSs. After normalizing by a function of orbital periods, we obtain a parameter with a distribution centered on unity for multiple planets around the same star, but markedly different for certain blend scenarios. Using the Kepler Input Catalog and galactic stellar population models, we investigate these distributions through Monte Carlo simulations of four scenarios: 1) one star with two planets, 2) one star with one planet blended with an eclipsing binary, 3) two eclipsing binaries, and 4) two stars each with one planet. We discuss the utility of this statistics for in planet validation and estimating the false alarm probabilities for candidate systems identified by Kepler. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate. R.C.M. is supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-0802270.

  4. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does my system use this data to... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.534 How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio? Use the tables in § 141.74(b)(3)(v)...

  5. The influence of external source intensity in accelerator/target/blanket system on conversion ratio and fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kochurov, Boris P.

    1995-09-15

    The analysis of neutron balance relation for a subcritical system with external source shows that a high ratio of neutron utilization (conversion ratio, breeding ratio) much exceeding similar values for nuclear reactors (both thermal or fast spectrum) is reachable in accelerator/target/blanket system with high external neutron source intensity. An accelerator/target/blanket systems with thermal power in blanket about 1850 Mwt and operating during 30 years have been investigated. Continual feed up by plutonium (fissile material) and Tc-99 (transmuted material) was assumed. Accelerator beam intensity differed 6.3 times (16 mA-Case 1, and 100 mA-Case 2). Conversion ratio (CR) was defined as the ratio of Tc-99 nuclei transmuted to the number of Pu nuclei consumed. The results for two cases are as follows: Case 1Case 2CR 0.77 1.66N(LWR) 8.6 19.1Power MWt(el) 512 225 where N(LWR)-number of LWRs(3000 MWt(th)) from which yearly discharge of Tc-99 is transmuted during 30 years. High value of conversion ratio considerably exceeding 1 (CR=1.66) was obtained in the system with high source intensity as compared with low source system (CR=0.77). Net output of electric power of high source intensity system is about twice lower due to consumption of electric power for accelerator feed up. The loss of energy for Tc-99 transmutation is estimated as 40 Mev(el)/nuclei. Yet high conversion ratio (or breeding ratio) achievable in electronuclear installations with high intensity of external source can effectively be used to close fuel cycle (including incineration of wastes) or to develop growing nuclear power production system.

  6. The influence of external source intensity in accelerator/target/blanket system on conversion ratio and fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochurov, Boris P.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of neutron balance relation for a subcritical system with external source shows that a high ratio of neutron utilization (conversion ratio, breeding ratio) much exceeding similar values for nuclear reactors (both thermal or fast spectrum) is reachable in accelerator/target/blanket system with high external neutron source intensity. An accelerator/target/blanket systems with thermal power in blanket about 1850 Mwt and operating during 30 years have been investigated. Continual feed up by plutonium (fissile material) and Tc-99 (transmuted material) was assumed. Accelerator beam intensity differed 6.3 times (16 mA-Case 1, and 100 mA-Case 2). Conversion ratio (CR) was defined as the ratio of Tc-99 nuclei transmuted to the number of Pu nuclei consumed. The results for two cases are as follows: Case 1Case 2CR 0.77 1.66N(LWR) 8.6 19.1Power MWt(el) 512 225 where N(LWR)-number of LWRs(3000 MWt(th)) from which yearly discharge of Tc-99 is transmuted during 30 years. High value of conversion ratio considerably exceeding 1 (CR=1.66) was obtained in the system with high source intensity as compared with low source system (CR=0.77). Net output of electric power of high source intensity system is about twice lower due to consumption of electric power for accelerator feed up. The loss of energy for Tc-99 transmutation is estimated as 40 Mev(el)/nuclei. Yet high conversion ratio (or breeding ratio) achievable in electronuclear installations with high intensity of external source can effectively be used to close fuel cycle (including incineration of wastes) or to develop growing nuclear power production system.

  7. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  8. A synthetic sex ratio distortion system for the control of the human malaria mosquito.

    PubMed

    Galizi, Roberto; Doyle, Lindsey A; Menichelli, Miriam; Bernardini, Federica; Deredec, Anne; Burt, Austin; Stoddard, Barry L; Windbichler, Nikolai; Crisanti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    It has been theorized that inducing extreme reproductive sex ratios could be a method to suppress or eliminate pest populations. Limited knowledge about the genetic makeup and mode of action of naturally occurring sex distorters and the prevalence of co-evolving suppressors has hampered their use for control. Here we generate a synthetic sex distortion system by exploiting the specificity of the homing endonuclease I-PpoI, which is able to selectively cleave ribosomal gene sequences of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae that are located exclusively on the mosquito's X chromosome. We combine structure-based protein engineering and molecular genetics to restrict the activity of the potentially toxic endonuclease to spermatogenesis. Shredding of the paternal X chromosome prevents it from being transmitted to the next generation, resulting in fully fertile mosquito strains that produce >95% male offspring. We demonstrate that distorter male mosquitoes can efficiently suppress caged wild-type mosquito populations, providing the foundation for a new class of genetic vector control strategies. PMID:24915045

  9. Systemic acid load from the diet affects maximal exercise respiratory exchange ratio

    PubMed Central

    Niekamp, Katherine; Zavorsky, Gerald S.; Fontana, Luigi; McDaniel, Jennifer L; Villareal, Dennis T; Weiss, Edward P

    2013-01-01

    Background A maximal exercise respiratory exchange ratio (RERmax) ≥1.10 is commonly used as a criterion to determine if a “true” maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) has been attained during maximal-effort exercise testing. Because RERmax is heavily influenced by CO2 production from acid buffering during maximal exercise, we postulated that dietary acid load, which affects acid-base regulation, might contribute to variability in RERmax. Purpose To determine if a habitual dietary intake that promotes systemic alkalinity results in higher RERmax during VO2max testing. Methods Sedentary men and women (47-63y, n=57) with no evidence of cardiovascular disease underwent maximal graded treadmill exercise tests. VO2max and RERmax were measured with indirect calorimetry. Habitual diet was assessed for its long-term effect on systemic acid-base status by performing nutrient analysis of food diaries and using this information to calculate the potential renal acid load (PRAL). Participants were grouped into tertiles based on PRAL. Results The lowest PRAL tertile (alkaline PRAL) had higher RERmax values (1.21±0.01, p≤0.05) than the middle tertile (1.17±0.01) and highest PRAL tertile (1.15±0.01). There were no significant differences (all p≥0.30) among PRAL tertiles for RER at submaximal exercise intensities of 70%, 80%, or 90% VO2max. After controlling for age, sex, VO2max, and maximal heart rate (HRmax), regression analysis demonstrated that 19% of the variability in RERmax was attributed to PRAL (r=−0.43, p=0.001). Unexpectedly, HRmax was lower (p≤0.05) in the low PRAL tertile (164±3 beats/min) versus the highest PRAL tertile (173±3 beats/min). Conclusion These results suggest that individuals on a diet that promotes systemic alkalinity may more easily achieve the RERmax criterion of ≥1.10 which might lead to false-positive conclusions about achieving maximal effort and VO2max during graded exercise testing. PMID:21912302

  10. Effects of Different Eddy Covariance Correction Schemes on Energy Balance Closure and Comparisons with the Modified Bowen Ratio System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eddy covariance (EC) and modified Bowen ratio (MBR) systems typically yield subtly different estimates of H, LE, and Fc. Our study analyzed the discrepancies between EC and MBR systems by first considering the role of the data processing algorithm used to estimate fluxes using EC and later examinin...

  11. Carrier: Interference ratios for frequency sharing between satellite systems transmitting frequency modulated and digital television signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of subjective and quantitative tests describing the results of interference to a particular digital television system from a frequency modulated (FM) television system, and for interference to an FM television system from a digital television system.

  12. Semi-empirical estimation of organic compound fugacity ratios at environmentally relevant system temperatures.

    PubMed

    van Noort, Paul C M

    2009-06-01

    Fugacity ratios of organic compounds are used to calculate (subcooled) liquid properties, such as solubility or vapour pressure, from solid properties and vice versa. They can be calculated from the entropy of fusion, the melting temperature, and heat capacity data for the solid and the liquid. For many organic compounds, values for the fusion entropy are lacking. Heat capacity data are even scarcer. In the present study, semi-empirical compound class specific equations were derived to estimate fugacity ratios from molecular weight and melting temperature for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated benzenes, biphenyls, dibenzo[p]dioxins and dibenzofurans. These equations estimate fugacity ratios with an average standard error of about 0.05 log units. In addition, for compounds with known fusion entropy values, a general semi-empirical correction equation based on molecular weight and melting temperature was derived for estimation of the contribution of heat capacity differences to the fugacity ratio. This equation estimates the heat capacity contribution correction factor with an average standard error of 0.02 log units for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated benzenes, biphenyls, dibenzo[p]dioxins and dibenzofurans. PMID:19304312

  13. Influence of COD/sulfate ratios on the integrated reactor system for simultaneous removal of carbon, sulfur and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Chen, Chuan; Zhao, Youkang; Wang, Aijie; Sun, Dezhi; Huang, Cong; Liang, Bin; Tan, Wenbo; Xu, Xijun; Zhou, Xu; Lee, Duu-Jung; Ren, Nanqi

    2015-01-01

    An integrated reactor system was developed for the simultaneous removal of carbon, sulfur and nitrogen from sulfate-laden wastewater and for elemental sulfur (S°) reclamation. The system mainly consisted of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) for sulfate reduction and organic carbon removal (SR-CR), an EGSB for denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR), a biological aerated filter for nitrification and a sedimentation tank for sulfur reclamation. This work investigated the influence of chemical oxygen demand (COD)/sulfate ratios on the performance of the system. Influent sulfate and ammonium were fixed to the level of 600 mg SO(4)(2-) L⁻¹ and 120 mg NH(4)(+) L⁻¹, respectively. Lactate was introduced to generate COD/SO(4)(2-) = 0.5:1, 1:1, 1.5:1, 2:1, 3:1, 3.5:1 and 4:1. The experimental results indicated that sulfate could be efficiently reduced in the SR-CR unit when the COD/SO(4)(2-) ratio was between 1:1 and 3:1, and sulfate reduction was inhibited by the growth of methanogenic bacteria when the COD/SO(4)(2-) ratio was between 3.5:1 and 4:1. Meanwhile, the Org-C/S²⁻/NO(3)(-) ratios affected the S(0) reclamation efficiency in the DSR unit. When the influent COD/SO(4)(2-) ratio was between 1:1 and 3:1, appropriate Org-C/S²⁻/NO(3)(-) ratios could be achieved to obtain a maximum S° recovery in the DSR unit. For the microbial community of the SR-CR unit at different COD/SO(4)(2-) ratios, 16S rRNA gene-based high throughput Illumina MiSeq sequencing was used to analyze the diversity and potential function of the dominant species. PMID:25768217

  14. Lipoxin A4 and Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio: A Possible Indicator in Achieved Systemic Risk Factors for Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Do?an, Burak; Fento?lu, zlem; K?rz?o?lu, Fatma Ye?im; Kemer, Esra Sinem; Kro?lu, Banu Kale; Aksu, O?uzhan; arsancakl?, Sleyman Akif; Orhan, Hikmet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and neutrophil/lymphocyte (Ne/Ly) ratio in individuals with achieved systemic risk factors for periodontitis. Material/Methods One hundred and eighty volunteers (69 male, 111 female) who were categorized as systemically healthy control, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obese and menopause were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic characteristics and oral health behaviors were recorded via questionnaire. Clinical periodontal parameters, including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), sulcus bleeding index (SBI) and decayed, missing, and filled teeth index (DMFT), were assessed. Systemic parameters and LXA4 levels were evaluated in serum samples. Results Clinical periodontal parameters and DMFT were higher in subjects with achieved systemic risk factors than in healthy subjects. The systemically healthy with periodontitis group had higher serum LXA4 levels than the systemically healthy with non-periodontitis group (P<0.05). The Ne/Ly ratio was higher in the hyperlipidemic group with periodontitis than in the hyperlipidemic group with non-periodontitis (P<0.05). In the control group, serum LXA4 levels were positively correlated with the PD, CAL and SBI. Conclusions In the presence of periodontitis, an increase in LXA4 levels and the Ne/Ly ratio in hyperlipidemic patients could contribute to the hypothesis that these parameters could be an indicator in periodontitis and its systemic risk factors. PMID:26298769

  15. Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder as an Indicator of Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs to Estuarine Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (15N) were measured in muscle tissue of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems (lagoons, river, bay) along the coast of Rhode Island, USA over a three-year period. Significant differences i...

  16. New theoretical models and ratio imaging techniques associated with the NASA earth resources spectral information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Four independent investigations are reported; in general these are concerned with improving and utilizing the correlation between the physical properties of natural materials as evidenced in laboratory spectra and spectral data collected by multispectral scanners. In one investigation, two theoretical models were devised that permit the calculation of spectral emittance spectra for rock and mineral surfaces of various particle sizes. The simpler of the two models can be used to qualitatively predict the effect of texture on the spectral emittance of rocks and minerals; it is also potentially useful as an aid in predicting the identification of natural atmospheric aerosol constituents. The second investigation determined, via an infrared ratio imaging technique, the best pair of infrared filters for silicate rock-type discrimination. In a third investigation, laboratory spectra of natural materials were compressed into 11-digit ratio codes for use in feature selection, in searches for false alarm candidates, and eventually for use as training sets in completely automatic data processors. In the fourth investigation, general outlines of a ratio preprocessor and an automatic recognition map processor are developed for on-board data processing in the space shuttle era.

  17. A minimally invasive blood-extraction system: elastic self-recovery actuator integrated with an ultrahigh- aspect-ratio microneedle.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng Guo; Lee, Kwang; Lee, Chang Yeol; Dangol, Manita; Jung, Hyungil

    2012-08-28

    A minimally invasive blood-extraction system is fabricated by the integration of an elastic self-recovery actuator and an ultrahigh-aspect-ratio microneedle. The simple elastic self-recovery actuator converts finger force to elastic energy to provide power for blood extraction and transport without requiring an external source of power. This device has potential utility in the biomedical field within the framework of complete micro-electromechanical systems. PMID:22807158

  18. Aripiprazole-Cyclodextrin Binary Systems for Dissolution Enhancement: Effect of Preparation Technique, Cyclodextrin Type and Molar Ratio

    PubMed Central

    M. Badr-Eldin, Shaimaa; A. Ahmed, Tarek; R Ismail, Hatem

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the natural and the chemically modified form of cyclodextrins namely; β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) respectively on the solubility and dissolution rate of aripiprazole; an antipsychotic medication showing poor aqueous solubility. Materials and Methods: Phase solubility of aripiprazole with the studied CDs and the complexation efficiency values (CE) which reflect the solubilizing power of the CDs towards the drug was performed. Solid binary systems of aripiprazole with CDs were prepared by kneading, microwave irradiation and freeze-drying techniques at 1:1 and 1:2 (drug to CD) molar ratios. Drug-CD physical mixtures were also prepared in the same molar ratios for comparison. The dissolution of aripiprazole-binary systems was carried out to select the most appropriate CD type, molar ratio and preparation technique. Results: Phase solubility study indicated formation of higher order complexes and the complexation efficiency values was higher for HP-β-CD compared to β-CD. Drug dissolution study revealed that aripiprazole dissolution was increased upon increasing the CD molar ratio and, the freeze-drying technique was superior to the other studied methods especially when combined with the HP-β-CD. The cyclodextrin type, preparation technique and molar ratio exhibited statistically significant effect on the drug dissolution at P≤ 0.05. Conclusion: The freeze-dried system prepared at molar ratio 1:2 (drug: CD) can be considered as efficient tool for enhancing aripiprazole dissolution with the possibility of improving its bioavailability. PMID:24570827

  19. Spectral Ratio Estimates for Site Effects on the Horst-Graben System in West Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyol, Nİhal; Kurtulmuş, Tevfİk Özgür; Çamyildiz, Murat; Güngör, Talİp

    2013-12-01

    Recordings of micro- and moderate-size local earthquakes have been used to quantify site effects in the central-west Turkey which contains one of the world's best examples of a rapid intra-continental extension with its high population and industrial potential. We analyzed 436 earthquakes with local magnitudes ranging between 2.0 and 5.6 using three component digital recordings from 32 stations. Site functions were obtained using two different spectral ratio approaches (horizontal to vertical spectral ratio, HVSR, and standard spectral ratio, SSR). HVSR estimates of transverse and radial S-waves were compared with one another. Epicentral distance, magnitude and back-azimuth dependencies of site functions were also evaluated. In general, HVSR values from transverse and radial S-waves are similar within a factor of 2. The back-azimuth dependencies of transverse S-wave HVSR results are more significant than distance and magnitude dependencies. On the other hand, averaging of transverse and radial S-wave HVSR results eliminates systematic back-azimuth dependencies caused by source radiation effects. Distributions of HVSR estimates along ~N-S linear array, which traversed main grabens in the region with a station spacing of 3-4 km, reflect subsurface geological complexities in the region. The sites located near the basin edges are characterized by broader HVSR curves. Broad HVSR peaks could be attributed to the complexity of wave propagation related to significant 2D/3D velocity variations at the sediment-bedrock interface near the basin edges. The results also show that, even if the site is located on a horst, the presence of weathered zones along the surface could cause moderate frequency dependent site effects. Comparison of HVSR and SSR estimates for the stations on the graben sites showed that SSR estimates give larger values at lower frequencies which could be attributed to lateral variations in regional velocity and attenuation values caused by basin geometry and edge effects.

  20. Real-Time Measurement of Oil Circulation Ratio in CO2 Heat Pump System Using Optical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigawa, Ryusuke; Shimizu, Takao; Matsusaka, Yukio; Gao, Lei; Honda, Tomohiro

    The lubricating oil in the refrigerant flow in a CO2 heat pump system has a great influence on cycle performance. In order to measure the OCR (Oil circulation ratio), a mixing chamber and a visual vessel were installed at the outlet of the gas-cooler. By mixing the oil and refrigerant, the liquid mixture of oil and refrigerant becomes cloudy at the outlet of the gas-cooler. By measuring the infrared ray transmittance of the oil-refrigerant liquid mixture, it was found that the transmittance decreases with an increase in the oil circulation ratio. For this reason, it is found that, in spite of immiscible refrigerant and oil, the measurement of the oil circulation ratio is possible by measuring the transmittance of infrared ray at the outlet of the gas-cooler.

  1. Oxygen concentration sensing device for an air-fuel ratio control system of an automotive internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Asakura, M.; Kawanabe, T.; Kushida, N.; Hasebe, H.

    1987-11-17

    An oxygen concentration sensing device for use in an air/fuel ratio control system for an internal combustion engine in which a target air/fuel ratio is determined in accordance with at least one of the operational parameters of the internal combustion engine and in which an air/fuel ratio of a supplied mixture is controlled toward the target air/fuel ratio in response to an oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas is described comprising: an oxygen concentration sensor unit disposed in an exhaust passage of the internal combustion engine. The oxygen concentration sensor unit includes an oxygen pump element and a sensor cell element which define a restricted region therebetween and each of which comprises a solid electrolyte member having oxygen ion permeability and has a pair of electrodes provided on both sides thereof; current supply means for supplying a pump current, which has a magnitude defined in accordance with the target air/fuel ratio, across the electrodes of the oxygen pump element thereby causing the sensor unit to generate a sensor voltage across the electrodes of the sensor cell element which is substantially in proportion to the oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas; and comparing means for comparing the sensor voltage with a predetermined reference voltage, and producing an output signal representing the result of the comparison as an oxygen concentration detection signal.

  2. A multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer for warm-dense matter experiments at NDCX-I and NDCX-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, P. A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer (SOP) developed the for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments at the existing NDCX-I facility and the NDCX-II facility currently being commissioned at LBNL. The SOP served as the primary temperature diagnostic in the recent NDCX-I experiments, in which an intense K+ beam was used to heat different metal samples into WDM states. The SOP consists of a spectral grating (visible and near-infrared spectral range) and a fast, high-dynamic-range optical streak camera. The instrument is calibrated absolutely with a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp and can itself be considered as an absolutely calibrated, time-resolving spectrometer. The sample temperature is determined from fitting the recorded thermal spectrum into the Planck formula multiplied by a model of emissivity.

  3. The molecular branching ratio method for calibration of optical systems in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The intensity distribution of bands belonging to six molecular band systems is discussed with special emphasis on their usefulness for intensity calibration of optical systems in the vacuum ultraviolet (1000A Lambda 3000A). The theory of molecular band intensities is outlined and the technique of measuring the spectral response curve is described. Several methods for establishing an absolute intensity calibration are discussed.

  4. Micro-Bowen ratio system for measuring evapotranspiration in a vineyard interrow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sparse canopy systems such as vineyards are comprised of multiple components (e.g., vines, interrow soil and/or groundcover) that each contribute to system water and energy balance. Understanding component water and energy fluxes is critical for informing management decisions aimed at improving prod...

  5. Solar load ratio method applied to commercial building active solar system sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Schnurr, N.M.; Hunn, B.D.; Williamson, K.D. III

    1981-01-01

    The hourly simulation procedure is the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program. It is capable of calculating the loads and of simulating various control strategies in detail for both residential and commercial buildings and yet is computationally efficient enough to be used for extensive parametric studies. In addition, to a Building Service Hot Water (BSHW) System and a combined space heating and hot water system using liquid collectors for a commercial building analyzed previously, a space heating system using an air collector is analyzed. A series of runs is made for systems using evacuated tube collectors for comparison to flat-plate collectors, and the effects of additional system design parameters are investigated. Also, the generic collector types are characterized by standard efficiency curves, rather than by detailed collector specifications. (MHR)

  6. Martian Post-Impact Hydrothermal Systems: Effects of Permeability and Freezing on Surface Discharge and Water:Rock Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, C. J.; Nimmo, F.; Travis, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A km-scale bolide delivers enough energy to heat subsurface water, and drive hydrothermal circulation (Abramov and Kring, 2005). This post-impact hydrothermal (PIH) circulation can lead to surface discharge of water, and chemical alteration - both are potentially detectable. We present the effects that permeability and freezing have on discharge and water:rock (W/R) ratios. We simulate the evolution of PIH systems using MAGHNUM (detailed in Travis et al., 2003). MAGHNUM solves the time-dependent transport of water and heat through a porous medium, incorporating phase transitions between ice (applicable to Mars), vapor and water. PIH evolution depends on heat sources and permeability (k); these, in turn, control discharge and chemical alteration which depends on both the peak temperatures and the W/R ratio (Schwenzer and Kring, 2008). Recently, CRISM detected phyllosilicate-rich material within ~45 km craters (Mustard et al., 2008) and the HiRISE camera imaged gullies, some emanating from central peaks, within many high latitude craters. We model a 45 km crater created by a 3.9 km dia., 7 km/s impactor. Simulations run for 100,000 yrs in a 2D axisymmetric domain with a heat flux of 32.5 mW m-2. Thus far we have tested systems with a range of surface k's (10-4 to 1 darcys) that decay exponentially with depth and are exposed to two surface temperatures (5°C and -53°C). In general W/R ratios increase with increased k. Focusing in on the upper 200 m at the center of the crater, fluid temperatures remain > 100°C for 9000 yrs and flow yields W/R ratios of 10 when exposed to a surface temperature of 5°C. Dropping the surface temperature below freezing to a Mars-like - 53°C maintains upper 200 m temperatures > 100°C for only 600 yrs and W/R ratios are reduced to 1. Higher permeabilities yield higher W/R ratios but reduced time exposure to high temperatures. When surface temperatures are below freezing total system discharge is roughly independent of k for modest permeabilities but the time until the surface freezes increases with lower k. Freezing reduces both W/R ratios and discharge because ice closes pores and restricts flow.

  7. Tuning the current ratio of a CPV system to maximize the energy harvesting in a particular location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victoria, M.; Askins, S.; Nuñez, R.; Domínguez, C.; Herrero, R.; Antón, I.; Sala, G.; Ruíz, J. M.

    2013-09-01

    A method based on experimental data is proposed to optimize the energy harvesting of a silicone-on-glass Fresnel-lens based CPV system. It takes into account the spectral variations along the year in a particular location as well as the thermal and spectral sensitivities of the optics and solar cell. In addition, different alternatives to tune the top/middle subcells current ratio in a CPV module are analyzed and their capacity to maximize the annually produced energy is quantified.

  8. Sensitivity of children's behavior to probabilistic reward: effects of a decreasing-ratio lottery system on math performance.

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Brian K; Ardoin, Scott P; Hilt, Alexandra M; Lannie, Amanda L; Panahon, Carlos J; Wolfe, Laurie A

    2002-01-01

    Probabilistic reward has been shown to affect children's choice behavior in game-like activities. We examined the effects of a lottery system containing progressively lower exchange ratios on children's completion of math problems. Two of the 3 children completed problems above baseline levels until the chance of exchange dropped to 25%. This study describes a potentially useful method for examining reinforcement schedules in applied settings and extends previous research on probabilities of reinforcement. PMID:12555911

  9. Improving signal-to-noise ratio by use of a cross-shaped aperture in the holographic data storage system.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huarong; Yin, Songfeng; Tan, Qiaofeng; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2009-11-10

    A cross-shaped aperture is proposed to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the holographic data storage system (HDSS). Both simulated and experimental results show that higher SNR can be achieved by the cross-shaped aperture than traditional square or circular apertures with the same area. A maximum gain of 20% in SNR is obtained for the optimized cross-shaped aperture. The sensitivities to pixel misalignment and magnification error are also numerically compared. PMID:19904322

  10. DEEP, LOW MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XIII. DZ PISCIUM WITH INTRINSIC LIGHT VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    New multi-color photometry for the eclipsing binary DZ Psc was performed in 2011 and 2012 using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code, we deduced two sets of photometric solutions. The overcontact degree is f = 89.7({+-} 1.0)%, identifying DZ Psc as a deep, low mass ratio overcontact binary. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., LC{sub 2} in 2012) were modeled by a hot spot on the primary star. Based on all of the available light minimum times, we discovered that the orbital period of DZ Psc may be undergoing a secular period increase with a cyclic variation. The modulated period and semi-amplitude of this oscillation are P{sub mod} = 11.89({+-} 0.19) yr and A = 0.0064({+-} 0.0006) days, which may be possibly attributed to either cyclic magnetic activity or light-time effect due to the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt=+7.43({+-}0.17) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transferring, DZ Psc will finally merge into a rapid-rotation single star when J{sub spin}/J{sub orb} > 1/3.

  11. Local dynamics of a fast-evolving sex-ratio system in Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Bastide, Héloïse; Gérard, Pierre R; Ogereau, David; Cazemajor, Michel; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    By distorting Mendelian transmission to their own advantage, X-linked meiotic drive elements can rapidly spread in natural populations, generating a sex-ratio bias. One expected consequence is the triggering of a co-evolutionary arms race between the sex chromosome that carries the distorter and suppressors counteracting its effect. Such an arms race has been theoretically and experimentally established and can have many evolutionary consequences. However, its dynamics in contemporary populations is still poorly documented. Here, we investigate the fate of the young X-linked Paris driver in Drosophila simulans from sub-Saharan Africa to the Middle East. We provide the first example of the early dynamics of distorters and suppressors: we find consistent evidence that the driving chromosomes have been rising in the Middle East during the last decade. In addition, identical haplotypes are at high frequencies around the two co-evolving drive loci in remote populations, implying that the driving X chromosomes share a recent common ancestor and suggesting that East Africa could be the cradle of the Paris driver. The segmental duplication associated with drive presents an unusual structure in West Africa, which could reflect a secondary state of the driver. Together with our previous demonstration of driver decline in the Indian Ocean where suppression is complete, these data provide a unique picture of the complex dynamics of a co-evolutionary arms race currently taking place in natural populations of D. simulans. PMID:24118375

  12. California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S.

    2005-11-01

    Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

  13. Deep, Low Mass Ratio Overcontact Binary Systems. XIII. DZ Piscium with Intrinsic Light Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhang, L.-Y.; Dai, H.-F.; Soonthornthum, B.

    2013-08-01

    New multi-color photometry for the eclipsing binary DZ Psc was performed in 2011 and 2012 using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code, we deduced two sets of photometric solutions. The overcontact degree is f = 89.7(± 1.0)%, identifying DZ Psc as a deep, low mass ratio overcontact binary. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., LC2 in 2012) were modeled by a hot spot on the primary star. Based on all of the available light minimum times, we discovered that the orbital period of DZ Psc may be undergoing a secular period increase with a cyclic variation. The modulated period and semi-amplitude of this oscillation are P mod = 11.89(± 0.19) yr and A = 0.0064(± 0.0006) days, which may be possibly attributed to either cyclic magnetic activity or light-time effect due to the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt=+7.43(+/- 0.17)\\times 10^{-7}{\\,days\\, yr^{-1}}, which may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transferring, DZ Psc will finally merge into a rapid-rotation single star when J spin/J orb > 1/3.

  14. Review of the design and performance features of hvdc systems connected to low short circuit ratio ac systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thallam, R.S. )

    1992-10-01

    The design and performance of an HVdc system is significantly impacted by the relative strength of the ac system to which it is connected. In this paper, design and performance features of ten HVdc systems are discussed. All of these systems are connected to ac systems that are relatively weak compared to the rating of the dc system. Six of these systems are back-to-back, two are overhead lines, and two are undersea cable connections. AC and dc system interaction problems and how they are addressed in the design and specification of each of these systems, are described.

  15. Closed system respirometry may underestimate tissue gas exchange and bias the respiratory exchange ratio (RER).

    PubMed

    Malte, Christian Lind; Nørgaard, Simon; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Closed respirometry is a commonly used method to measure gas exchange in animals due to its apparent simplicity. Typically, the rates of O2 uptake and CO2 excretion (VO2 and VCO2, respectively) are assumed to be in steady state, such that the measured rates of gas exchange equal those at tissue level. In other words, the respiratory gas exchange ratio (RER) is assumed to equal the respiratory quotient (RQ). However, because the gas concentrations change progressively during closure, the animal inspires air with a progressively increasing CO2 concentration and decreasing O2 concentration. These changes will eventually affect gas exchange causing the O2 and CO2 stores within the animal to change. Because of the higher solubility/capacitance of CO2 in the tissues of the body, VCO2 will be more affected than VO2, and we hypothesize therefore that RER will become progressively underestimated as closure time is prolonged. This hypothesis was addressed by a combination of experimental studies involving closed respirometry on ball pythons (Python regius) as well as mathematical models of gas exchange. We show that increased closed duration of the respirometer reduces RER by up to 13%, and these findings may explain previous reports of RER values being below 0.7. Our model reveals that the maximally possible reduction in RER is determined by the storage capacity of the body for CO2 (product of size and specific capacitance) relative to the respirometer storage capacity. Furthermore, modeling also shows that pronounced ventilatory and circulatory response to hypercapnia can alleviate the reduction in RER. PMID:26523499

  16. Selenium stable isotope ratios in California agricultural drainage water management systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbel, M.J.; Johnson, T.M.; Tanji, K.K.; Gao, S.; Bullen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratios are known to shift in predictable ways during various microbial, chemical, and biological processes, and can be used to better understand Se cycling in contaminated environments. In this study we used Se stable isotopes to discern the mechanisms controlling the transformation of oxidized, aqueous forms of Se to reduced, insoluble forms in sediments of Se-affected environments. We measured 80Se/76Se in surface waters, shallow ground waters, evaporites, digested plants and sediments, and sequential extracts from several sites where agricultural drainage water is processed in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Selenium isotope analyses of samples obtained from the Tulare Lake Drainage District flow-through wetland reveal small isotopic contrasts (mean difference 0.7%o) between surface water and reduced Se species in the underlying sediments. Selenium in aquatic macrophytes was very similar isotopically to the NaOH and Na2SO3 sediment extracts designed to recover soluble organic Se and Se(O), respectively. For the integrated on-farm drainage management sites, evaporite salts were slightly (approximately 0.6%o) enriched in the heavier isotope relative to the inferred parent waters, whereas surface soils were slightly (approximately 1.4%o) depleted. Bacterial or chemical reduction of Se(VI) or Se(IV) may be occurring at these sites, but the small isotopic contrasts suggest that other, less isotopically fractionating mechanisms are responsible for accumulation of reduced forms in the sediments. These findings provide evidence that Se assimilation by plants and algae followed by deposition and mineralization is the dominant transformation pathway responsible for accumulation of reduced forms of Se in the wetland sediments.

  17. Evaluation of the water-effect ratio procedure for metals in a riverine system

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, J.M.; Koplish, D.E.; McMahon, J. III; Rost, R.

    1997-03-01

    Site-specific metal standards were determined for a part of the lower Lehigh River using the US Environmental Protection Agency`s water-effect ratio (WER) procedure. The WERs were based on laboratory and site water testing of the species Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) and five metals (copper, cadmium, lead, silver, and zinc) during four different months. Both species generally exhibited similar patterns in WERs. The greatest variability between the two species was observed for copper, silver, and lead. Ceriodaphnia yielded a lower mean WER than the fathead minnow for lead and zinc and WERs similar to those of the fathead minnow for copper, cadmium, and silver. The species more sensitive to a given metal did not always exhibit a higher WER, as had been previously assumed. A comparison of final WER calculations indicated that the geometric mean WER was typically higher than the final WER obtained using the 1994 guidance. For most metals, site water toxicity was reduced due to nonacutely toxic dissolved metal. Copper yielded the highest final WER regardless of the calculation method used. Regression analyses indicated that the copper WER was directly related, and the cadmium WER inversely related, to effluent concentration. Copper, lead, and silver WERs were related to site water pH. Cadmium and lead WERs were related to pH and dissolved solids. Zinc WERs were unrelated to any of the water quality variables measured and were similar among site water samples. The results suggest it is prudent to use two species in WER testing and different site water samples to derive a final WER, particularly at sites that are not effluent dominated.

  18. Sedimentary Sulphur:Iron Ratio Indicates Vivianite Occurrence: A Study from Two Contrasting Freshwater Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Matthias; Kleeberg, Andreas; Grüneberg, Björn; Friese, Kurt; Pérez-Mayo, Manuel; Hupfer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies constrain the importance of iron for the long-term retention of phosphorus (P) under anoxic conditions, i.e. the formation of reduced iron phosphate minerals such as vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2⋅8H2O). Much remains unknown about vivianite formation, the factors controlling its occurrence, and its relevance for P burial during early sediment diagenesis. To study the occurrence of vivianite and to assess its relevance for P binding, surface sediments of two hydrologically contrasting waters were analysed by heavy-liquid separation and subsequent powder X-ray diffraction. In Lake Arendsee, vivianite was present in deeper sediment horizons and not in the uppermost layers with a sharp transition between vivianite and non-vivianite bearing layers. In contrast, in lowland river Lower Havel vivianite was present in the upper sediment layers and not in deeper horizons with a gradual transition between non-vivianite and vivianite bearing layers. In both waters, vivianite occurrence was accompanied by the presence of pyrite (FeS2). Vivianite formation was favoured by an elevated iron availability through a lower degree of sulphidisation and was present at a molar ratio of total sulphur to reactive iron smaller than 1.1, only. A longer lasting burden of sediments by organic matter, i.e. due to eutrophication, favours the release of sulphides, and the formation of insoluble iron sulphides leading to a lack of available iron and to less or no vivianite formation. This weakening in sedimentary P retention, representing a negative feedback mechanism (P release) in terms of water quality, could be partly compensated by harmless Fe amendments. PMID:26599406

  19. Selenium stable isotope ratios in California agricultural drainage water management systems.

    PubMed

    Herbel, Mitchell J; Johnson, Thomas M; Tanji, Kenneth K; Gao, Suduan; Bullen, Thomas D

    2002-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratios are known to shift in predictable ways during various microbial, chemical, and biological processes, and can be used to better understand Se cycling in contaminated environments. In this study we used Se stable isotopes to discern the mechanisms controlling the transformation of oxidized, aqueous forms of Se to reduced, insoluble forms in sediments of Se-affected environments. We measured 80Se/76Se in surface waters, shallow ground waters, evaporites, digested plants and sediments, and sequential extracts from several sites where agricultural drainage water is processed in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Selenium isotope analyses of samples obtained from the Tulare Lake Drainage District flow-through wetland reveal small isotopic contrasts (mean difference 0.7%) between surface water and reduced Se species in the underlying sediments. Selenium in aquatic macrophytes was very similar isotopically to the NaOH and Na2SO3 sediment extracts designed to recover soluble organic Se and Se(0), respectively. For the integrated on-farm drainage management sites, evaporite salts were slightly (approximately 0.6%) enriched in the heavier isotope relative to the inferred parent waters, whereas surface soils were slightly (approximately 1.4%) depleted. Bacterial or chemical reduction of Se(VI) or Se(IV) may be occurring at these sites, but the small isotopic contrasts suggest that other, less isotopically fractionating mechanisms are responsible for accumulation of reduced forms in the sediments. These findings provide evidence that Se assimilation by plants and algae followed by deposition and mineralization is the dominant transformation pathway responsible for accumulation of reduced forms of Se in the wetland sediments. PMID:12175032

  20. Row Ratios of Intercropping Maize and Soybean Can Affect Agronomic Efficiency of the System and Subsequent Wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yitao; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Jizong; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Shen; Zhai, Limei; Wang, Hongyuan; Lei, Qiuliang; Ren, Tianzhi; Yin, Changbin

    2015-01-01

    Intercropping is regarded as an important agricultural practice to improve crop production and environmental quality in the regions with intensive agricultural production, e.g., northern China. To optimize agronomic advantage of maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) intercropping system compared to monoculture of maize, two sequential experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 was to screening the optimal cropping system in summer that had the highest yields and economic benefits, and Experiment 2 was to identify the optimum row ratio of the intercrops selected from Experiment 1. Results of Experiment 1 showed that maize intercropping with soybean (maize || soybean) was the optimal cropping system in summer. Compared to conventional monoculture of maize, maize || soybean had significant advantage in yield, economy, land utilization ratio and reducing soil nitrate nitrogen (N) accumulation, as well as better residual effect on the subsequent wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crop. Experiment 2 showed that intercropping systems reduced use of N fertilizer per unit land area and increased relative biomass of intercropped maize, due to promoted photosynthetic efficiency of border rows and N utilization during symbiotic period. Intercropping advantage began to emerge at tasseling stage after N topdressing for maize. Among all treatments with different row ratios, alternating four maize rows with six soybean rows (4M:6S) had the largest land equivalent ratio (1.30), total N accumulation in crops (258 kg ha(-1)), and economic benefit (3,408 USD ha(-1)). Compared to maize monoculture, 4M:6S had significantly lower nitrate-N accumulation in soil both after harvest of maize and after harvest of the subsequent wheat, but it did not decrease yield of wheat. The most important advantage of 4M:6S was to increase biomass of intercropped maize and soybean, which further led to the increase of total N accumulation by crops as well as economic benefit. In conclusion, alternating four maize rows with six soybean rows was the optimum row ratio in maize || soybean system, though this needs to be further confirmed by pluri-annual trials. PMID:26061566

  1. Row Ratios of Intercropping Maize and Soybean Can Affect Agronomic Efficiency of the System and Subsequent Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yitao; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Jizong; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Shen; Zhai, Limei; Wang, Hongyuan; Lei, Qiuliang; Ren, Tianzhi; Yin, Changbin

    2015-01-01

    Intercropping is regarded as an important agricultural practice to improve crop production and environmental quality in the regions with intensive agricultural production, e.g., northern China. To optimize agronomic advantage of maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) intercropping system compared to monoculture of maize, two sequential experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 was to screening the optimal cropping system in summer that had the highest yields and economic benefits, and Experiment 2 was to identify the optimum row ratio of the intercrops selected from Experiment 1. Results of Experiment 1 showed that maize intercropping with soybean (maize || soybean) was the optimal cropping system in summer. Compared to conventional monoculture of maize, maize || soybean had significant advantage in yield, economy, land utilization ratio and reducing soil nitrate nitrogen (N) accumulation, as well as better residual effect on the subsequent wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crop. Experiment 2 showed that intercropping systems reduced use of N fertilizer per unit land area and increased relative biomass of intercropped maize, due to promoted photosynthetic efficiency of border rows and N utilization during symbiotic period. Intercropping advantage began to emerge at tasseling stage after N topdressing for maize. Among all treatments with different row ratios, alternating four maize rows with six soybean rows (4M:6S) had the largest land equivalent ratio (1.30), total N accumulation in crops (258 kg ha-1), and economic benefit (3,408 USD ha-1). Compared to maize monoculture, 4M:6S had significantly lower nitrate-N accumulation in soil both after harvest of maize and after harvest of the subsequent wheat, but it did not decrease yield of wheat. The most important advantage of 4M:6S was to increase biomass of intercropped maize and soybean, which further led to the increase of total N accumulation by crops as well as economic benefit. In conclusion, alternating four maize rows with six soybean rows was the optimum row ratio in maize || soybean system, though this needs to be further confirmed by pluri-annual trials. PMID:26061566

  2. 36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1997-07-01

    The {sub 36}Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The {sub 36}Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field.

  3. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HVAC SYSTEM OPERATION, AIR EXCHANGE RATE, AND INDOOR-OUTDOOR PARTICULATE MATTER RATIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of duty cycle , the fraction of time the heating and cooling (HVAC) system was operating, were made in each participant's home during the spring season of the RTP Particulate Matter Panel Study. A miniature temperature sensor/data logger combination placed on the ...

  4. Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing system using rotated constellation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmood, Jassim K.; Noordin, Kamarul A.; Arof, Hamzah; Harun, Sulaiman W.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a new approach for reducing peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) based on modulated half subcarriers in all-optical OFDM systems with rotated QAM constellation is presented. To reduce the PAPR, the odd subcarriers are modulated with rotated QAM constellation, while the even subcarriers are modulated with standard QAM constellation. The impact of the rotation angle on the PAPR is mathematically modeled. The effect of PAPR reduction on the system performance is investigated by simulating the all-optical OFDM system, which uses optical coupler-based inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT)/fast Fourier transform (FFT). The all-optical system is numerically demonstrated with 29 subcarriers. Each subcarrier is modulated by a QAM modulator at a symbol rate of 25 Gsymbol/s. The results reveal that PAPR is reduced with increasing the angle of rotation. The PAPR reduction can reach about 0.8 dB when the complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF) is 1 × 10-3. Furthermore, both the nonlinear phase noise and the optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) of the system are improved in comparison with the original all-optical OFDM without PAPR reduction.

  5. Structure of Rapidly Quenched Fe-Co-Sn-B Systems with Varying Fe/Co Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janotová, Irena; Švec, Peter; Mat'ko, Igor; Švec, Peter; Janičkovič, Dušan; Zigo, Juraj

    2015-09-01

    We present a study of ferromagnetic systems based on Fe-Co-Sn-B in nanocrystalline state. Interesting magnetic properties potentially are given by the homogeneous and ultrafine structure of bcc Fe grains in amorphous structure. The effect of alloying by Sn improves the properties of resulting structure constituted be crystalline grains in amorphous matrix. The structure transformation from amorphous state was investigated by selected techniques of thermal analysis and the resulting phase and morphology of crystalline products were analyzed.

  6. CONSTRAINING MASS RATIO AND EXTINCTION IN THE FU ORIONIS BINARY SYSTEM WITH INFRARED INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, Laurent; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Hinkley, Sasha; Dekany, Richard; Roberts, Jenny; Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick; Cady, Eric; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Brenner, Douglas; Zimmerman, Neil; Monnier, John D.; Crepp, Justin; Parry, Ian; Beichman, Charles; Soummer, Remi

    2012-09-20

    We report low-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the eruptive star FU Orionis using the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) Project 1640 installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. This work focuses on elucidating the nature of the faint source, located 0.''5 south of FU Ori, and identified in 2003 as FU Ori S. We first use our observations in conjunction with published data to demonstrate that the two stars are indeed physically associated and form a true binary pair. We then proceed to extract J- and H-band spectro-photometry using the damped LOCI algorithm, a reduction method tailored for high contrast science with IFS. This is the first communication reporting the high accuracy of this technique, pioneered by the Project 1640 team, on a faint astronomical source. We use our low-resolution near-infrared spectrum in conjunction with 10.2 {mu}m interferometric data to constrain the infrared excess of FU Ori S. We then focus on estimating the bulk physical properties of FU Ori S. Our models lead to estimates of an object heavily reddened, A{sub V} = 8-12, with an effective temperature of {approx}4000-6500 K. Finally, we put these results in the context of the FU Ori N-S system and argue that our analysis provides evidence that FU Ori S might be the more massive component of this binary system.

  7. Constraining Mass Ratio and Extinction in the FU Orionis Binary System with Infrared Integral Field Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Vasisht, Gautam; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Monnier, John D.; Hinkley, Sasha; Crepp, Justin; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Brenner, Douglas; Zimmerman, Neil; Parry, Ian; Beichman, Charles; Dekany, Richard; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick; Cady, Eric; Roberts, Jenny; Soummer, Rémi

    2012-09-01

    We report low-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the eruptive star FU Orionis using the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) Project 1640 installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. This work focuses on elucidating the nature of the faint source, located 0farcs5 south of FU Ori, and identified in 2003 as FU Ori S. We first use our observations in conjunction with published data to demonstrate that the two stars are indeed physically associated and form a true binary pair. We then proceed to extract J- and H-band spectro-photometry using the damped LOCI algorithm, a reduction method tailored for high contrast science with IFS. This is the first communication reporting the high accuracy of this technique, pioneered by the Project 1640 team, on a faint astronomical source. We use our low-resolution near-infrared spectrum in conjunction with 10.2 μm interferometric data to constrain the infrared excess of FU Ori S. We then focus on estimating the bulk physical properties of FU Ori S. Our models lead to estimates of an object heavily reddened, AV = 8-12, with an effective temperature of ~4000-6500 K. Finally, we put these results in the context of the FU Ori N-S system and argue that our analysis provides evidence that FU Ori S might be the more massive component of this binary system.

  8. Vasopressin decreases pulmonary-to-systemic vascular resistance ratio in a porcine model of severe hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Joy; Golden, Patrick J; Kajiura, Lauren N; Murata, Lee-Ann M; Uyehara, Catherine F T

    2015-05-01

    Vasopressors are gaining renewed interest as treatment adjuncts in hemorrhagic shock. The ideal vasoconstrictor will increase systemic blood pressure without increasing pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), which hinders pulmonary perfusion and exacerbates hypoxemia. However, the selectivity of pressors for pulmonary versus systemic vasoconstriction during hemorrhage has not been characterized. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that vasopressin (VP) has distinct effects on pulmonary versus systemic hemodynamics, unlike the catecholamine vasopressors norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine (PE). Anesthetized and ventilated pigs were assigned to resuscitation with saline only (n = 7) or saline with VP (n = 6), NE (n = 6), or PE (n = 6). Animals were hemorrhaged to a target volume of 30 mL/kg and a mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg. One hour after the start of hemorrhage, animals were resuscitated with saline up to one shed blood volume, followed by either additional saline or a vasopressor. Hemodynamics and oxygenation were measured hourly for 4 h after the start of hemorrhage. Vasopressin increased systemic vascular resistance (SVR) while sparing the pulmonary vasculature, leading to a 45% decrease in the PVR/SVR ratio compared with treatment with PE. Conversely, NE induced pulmonary hypertension and led to an increased PVR/SVR ratio associated with decreased oxygen saturation. Phenylephrine and crystalloid had no significant effect on the PVR/SVR ratio. Sparing of pulmonary vasoconstriction occurs only with VP, not with administration of crystalloid or catecholamine pressors. The ability of VP to maintain blood oxygenation indicates that VP may prevent hypoxemia in the management of hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25565637

  9. Direct-drive high-convergence-ratio implosion studies on the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.

    2000-05-01

    A series of direct-drive implosion experiments, using room-temperature, gas-filled CH targets, are performed on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The target performance at stagnation and its dependence on beam smoothing and pulse shaping is investigated. Compressed core conditions are diagnosed using x-ray and neutron spectroscopy, and x-ray imaging. The individual beams of OMEGA are smoothed by spectral dispersion in two dimensions (2D SSD) with laser bandwidths up to {approx}0.3 THz, with 1 ns square to 2.5 ns shaped pulses. A clear dependence of target performance on pulse shape and beam smoothing is seen, with the target performance (yield, areal density, and shell integrity) improving as SSD bandwidth is applied. (c)

  10. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-04-03

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the third year of a 42 month research program that is aimed at an understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work focused on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A mathematical model that describes uptake and crosslinking reactions as a function of time was derived. The model was probability based and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. A liquid chromatography apparatus to experimentally measure the size and molecular weight distributions of polymer samples was developed. The method worked well for polymer samples without the chromium crosslinker. Sample retention observed during measurements of gelant samples during the gelation process compromised the results. Other methods will be tested to measure size distributions of the pre-gel aggregates. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results.

  11. Mechanical Design of High Lift Systems for High Aspect Ratio Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Peter K. C.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center is working to develop a methodology for the optimization and design of the high lift system for future subsonic airliners with the involvement of two partners. Aerodynamic analysis methods for two dimensional and three dimensional wing performance with flaps and slats deployed are being developed through a grant with the aeronautical department of the University of California Davis, and a flap and slat mechanism design procedure is being developed through a contract with PKCR, Inc., of Seattle, WA. This report documents the work that has been completed in the contract with PKCR on mechanism design. Flap mechanism designs have been completed for seven (7) different mechanisms with a total of twelve (12) different layouts all for a common single slotted flap configuration. The seven mechanisms are as follows: Simple Hinge, Upside Down/Upright Four Bar Linkage (two layouts), Upside Down Four Bar Linkages (three versions), Airbus A330/340 Link/Track Mechanism, Airbus A320 Link/Track Mechanism (two layouts), Boeing Link/Track Mechanism (two layouts), and Boeing 767 Hinged Beam Four Bar Linkage. In addition, a single layout has been made to investigate the growth potential from a single slotted flap to a vane/main double slotted flap using the Boeing Link/Track Mechanism. All layouts show Fowler motion and gap progression of the flap from stowed to a fully deployed position, and evaluations based on spanwise continuity, fairing size and number, complexity, reliability and maintainability and weight as well as Fowler motion and gap progression are presented. For slat design, the options have been limited to mechanisms for a shallow leading edge slat. Three (3) different layouts are presented for maximum slat angles of 20 deg, 15 deg and 1O deg all mechanized with a rack and pinion drive similar to that on the Boeing 757 airplane. Based on the work of Ljungstroem in Sweden, this type of slat design appears to shift the lift curve so that higher lift is achieved with the deployed slat with no increase in angle of attack. The layouts demonstrate that these slat systems can be designed with no need for slave links, and an experimental test program is outlined to experimentally validate the lift characteristics of the shallow slat.

  12. A five-collector system for the simultaneous measurement of argon isotope ratios in a static mass spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Sherrill, N.D.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Lanphere, M.A.; Carpenter, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that utilizes five separate Faraday-cup collector assemblies, aligned along the focal plane of a mass spectrometer, to collect simultaneous argon ion beams at masses 36-40. Each collector has its own electrometer amplifier and analog-to-digital measuring channel, the outputs of which are processed by a minicomputer that also controls the mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer utilizes a 90?? sector magnetic analyzer with a radius of 23 cm, in which some degree of z-direction focussing is provided for all the ion beams by the fringe field of the magnet. Simultaneous measurement of the ion beams helps to eliminate mass-spectrometer memory as a significant source of measurement error during an analysis. Isotope ratios stabilize between 7 and 9 s after sample admission into the spectrometer, and thereafter changes in the measured ratios are linear, typically to within ??0.02%. Thus the multi-collector arrangement permits very short extrapolation times for computation of initial ratios, and also provides the advantages of simultaneous measurement of the ion currents in that errors due to variations in ion beam intensity are minimized. A complete analysis takes less than 10 min, so that sample throughput can be greatly enhanced. In this instrument, the factor limiting analytical precision now lies in short-term apparent variations in the interchannel calibration factors. ?? 1981.

  13. Strontium concentrations and isotope ratios in a forest-river system in the South Qinling Mts., China.

    PubMed

    Bu, Hongmei; Song, Xianfang; Zhang, Quanfa; Burford, Michele A

    2016-04-15

    The concentrations of dissolved strontium (Sr) and isotope ratios ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) in rainwater, river water, and water from forest soil are measured to investigate the contributions of these sources to a river during base flow conditions in the relatively pristine South Qinling Mountains, China. Dissolved Sr concentrations and (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios vary significantly between different water types (p < 0.01) suggesting that it is suitable for differentiating sources. Dissolved Sr is also positively correlated with most ions and a range of physicochemical parameters (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively) in water samples including Ca(2+), Mg(2+), EC, and TDS (p < 0.001) indicating their similarities in the drivers of biogeochemical processes and common origins. The correlations between Sr isotopes and Ca/Na, Ca/K, and 1000/Sr ratios suggest that three end-members of atmospheric inputs, carbonate and silicate weathering control the Sr water chemistry in the river water. Using the three-source mixing model, atmospheric inputs, carbonate, and silicate weathering contribute 74%, 20%, and 6% respectively to the dissolved Sr in the river water. This research has provided new insights into the contribution of sources of Sr to a river system in a mountainous catchment. PMID:26900970

  14. Extragalactic O-18/O-17 ratios and star formation - High-mass stars preferred in starburst systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, L. J.; Henkel, C.; Mauersberger, R.

    1991-09-01

    Emission is detected from the two lowest rotational transitions of CO-17 from NGC 253, M 82, and, tentatively, IC 342. Observations of the corresponding transitions of C(O-18) were used to determine O-18/O-17 isotope ratios, which are 8.3 (+/- 1.3) toward M 82, 10 (+/- 3) toward NGC 253 and greater than about 5.5 toward IC 342. These values are much higher than the about 3.6 found in Galactic sources (e.g., Wannier 1980; Penzias 1981), and two are definitely larger than the solar system ratio, 5.5. The results can be understood if, during a previous epoch of star formation, high-mass stars were preferentially formed near the centers of NGC 253 and M 82, if it is assumed that O-18 is mainly produced in high mass stars. This leads to an underabundance of O-17 relative to O-18. This interpretation is also consistent with the high ratios of (C-12)O/(C-13)O observed in NGC 253 and M 82, which suggest an underabundance of C-13.

  15. Compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system for quantifying intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio in brain cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan; Grant, Gerald; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Fangyao; Li, Shuqin; Wilson, Christy; Chen, Kui; Bigner, Darell; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2011-03-01

    We report the development of a compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system and two data analysis methods to quantify the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio and diagnose brain cancer in an orthotopic brain tumor rat model. Our system employs one compact cw diode laser (407 nm) to excite two primary endogenous fluorophores, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. The spectra were first analyzed using a spectral filtering modulation method developed previously to derive the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio, which has the advantages of insensitivty to optical coupling and rapid data acquisition and analysis. This method represents a convenient and rapid alternative for achieving intrinsic fluorescence-based redox measurements as compared to those complicated model-based methods. It is worth noting that the method can also extract total hemoglobin concentration at the same time but only if the emission path length of fluorescence light, which depends on the illumination and collection geometry of the optical probe, is long enough so that the effect of absorption on fluorescence intensity due to hemoglobin is significant. Then a multivariate method was used to statistically classify normal tissues and tumors. Although the first method offers quantitative tissue metabolism information, the second method provides high overall classification accuracy. The two methods provide complementary capabilities for understanding cancer development and noninvasively diagnosing brain cancer. The results of our study suggest that this portable system can be potentially used to demarcate the elusive boundary between a brain tumor and the surrounding normal tissue during surgical resection.

  16. Identifying non-normal and lognormal characteristics of temperature, mixing ratio, surface pressure, and wind for data assimilation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliewer, A. J.; Fletcher, S. J.; Jones, A. S.; Forsythe, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Data assimilation systems and retrieval systems that are based upon a maximum likelihood estimation, many of which are in operational use, rely on the assumption that all of the errors and variables involved follow a normal distribution. This work develops a series of statistical tests to show that mixing ratio, temperature, wind and surface pressure follow non-normal, or in fact, lognormal distributions thus impacting the design-basis of many operational data assimilation and retrieval systems. For this study one year of Global Forecast System 00:00 UTC 6 h forecast were analyzed using statistical hypothesis tests. The motivation of this work is to identify the need to resolve whether or not the assumption of normality is valid and to give guidance for where and when a data assimilation system or a retrieval system needs to adapt its cost function to the mixed normal-lognormal distribution-based Bayesian model. The statistical methods of detection are based upon Shapiro-Wilk, Jarque-Bera and a χ2 test, and a new composite indicator using all three measures. Another method of detection fits distributions to the temporal-based histograms of temperature, mixing ratio, and wind. The conclusion of this work is that there are persistent areas, times, and vertical levels where the normal assumption is not valid, and that the lognormal distribution-based Bayesian model is observationally justified to minimize the error for these conditions. The results herein suggest that comprehensive statistical climatologies may need to be developed to capture the non-normal traits of the 6 h forecast.

  17. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-12-31

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a 42-month research program that focused on the understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work was conducted on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A rate equation that describes the reaction between chromium acetate and polymer molecules was regressed from experimental data. A mathematical model that describes the crosslinking reaction between two polymer molecules as a function of time was derived. The model was based on probability concepts and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. Average molecular weights of pre-gel aggregates were measured as a function of time and were comparable to model simulations. Experimental methods to determine molecular weight distributions of pre-gel aggregates were unsuccessful. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results and data from literature. Gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted in sandpacks to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration and displacement of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels. A similar study of DPR was conducted in Berea sandstone cores. Both oil and water permeabilities were reduced by much smaller factors in Berea sandstone cores than in similar treatments in sandpacks. Poor maturation of the gelant in the Berea rock was thought to be caused by fluid-rock interactions that interfered with the gelation process.

  18. A Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Combining Wavelet Denoising, Principal Component Analysis, and Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Sensor Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Man Gyun; Oh, Seungrohk

    2002-11-15

    A neuro-fuzzy inference system combined with the wavelet denoising, principal component analysis (PCA), and sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) methods has been developed to monitor the relevant sensor using the information of other sensors. The parameters of the neuro-fuzzy inference system that estimates the relevant sensor signal are optimized by a genetic algorithm and a least-squares algorithm. The wavelet denoising technique was applied to remove noise components in input signals into the neuro-fuzzy system. By reducing the dimension of an input space into the neuro-fuzzy system without losing a significant amount of information, the PCA was used to reduce the time necessary to train the neuro-fuzzy system, simplify the structure of the neuro-fuzzy inference system, and also, make easy the selection of the input signals into the neuro-fuzzy system. By using the residual signals between the estimated signals and the measured signals, the SPRT is applied to detect whether the sensors are degraded or not. The proposed sensor-monitoring algorithm was verified through applications to the pressurizer water level, the pressurizer pressure, and the hot-leg temperature sensors in pressurized water reactors.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF POLYMER GEL SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE VOLUMETRIC SWEEP AND REDUCE PRODUCING WATER/OIL RATIOS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Rajeev Jain; Tuan Nguyen

    2003-11-01

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the first year of a three-year research program that is aimed at the understanding of the chemistry of gelation and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work has focused on a widely-applied system in field applications, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. The initial reaction between chromium acetate and one polymer is referred to as the uptake reaction. The uptake reaction was studied as functions of chromium and polymer concentrations and pH values. Experimental data were regressed to determine a rate equation that describes the uptake reaction of chromium by polyacrylamide. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as the reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A statistical model that describes the growth of pre-gel aggregates was developed using the theory of branching processes. The model gives molecular weight averages that are expressed as functions of the conversion of the reactive sites on chromium acetate or on the polymer molecule. Results of the application of the model correlate well with experimental data of viscosity and weight-average molecular weight and gives insights into the gelation process. A third study addresses the flow of water and oil in rock material after a gel treatment. Previous works have shown that gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. Increased pressure gradients during oil flow decreased the oil permeability and the water permeability that was measured afterward. Lower pressure gradients that were applied subsequently moderately affected water permeabilities but did not affect oil permeabilities. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels.

  20. Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio as a predictor of systemic inflammation - A cross-sectional study in a pre-admission setting.

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Tan, Tze Ping; Mehta, Jigesh; Arekapudi, Anil; Govindarajulu, Arun; Siu, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio (NLR)  is an emerging biomarker that is used to predict postoperative mortality and morbidity in cardiac and cancer surgeries. The association of this biomarker with systemic illness and its usefulness in risk assessment of preoperative patients has not been fully elucidated. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of elevated NLR in preoperative patients and to examine the relationship between elevated NLR and the presence of systemic illnesses as well as anaesthesia risk indices such as American Society of Anesthesia (ASA) and the revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) scores.   Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: Anaesthesia pre-admission clinic, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Canada Patients: We evaluated 1117 pre-operative patients seen at an anesthesia preadmission clinic. Results: NLR was elevated (>3.3) in 26.6% of target population. In multivariate analysis, congestive cardiac failure, diabetes mellitus and malignancy were independent risk factors predicting raised NLR. After regression analysis, a relationship between NLR and ASA score (Odds Ratio 1.78; 95% CI: 1.42-2.24) and revised cardiac risk index (RCRI, odds ratio 1.33; 95% CI: 1.09-1.64, p-value: 0.0063) was observed. Conclusions:  NLR was elevated (> 3.3) in 26.6% of patients. Congestive cardiac failure and malignancy were two constant predictors of elevated NLR at >3.3 and > 4.5. There was a strong association between NLR and anesthesia risk scoring tools of ASA and RCRI. PMID:26213612

  1. Production ecology of agroforestry systems: a minimal mechanistic model and analytical derivation of the land equivalent ratio.

    PubMed

    Keesman, K J; van der Werf, W; van Keulen, H

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the yield and the land equivalent ratio (LER) of a silvo-arable agroforestry (SAF) system, containing one tree and one crop species, is analyzed analytically using a minimal mechanistic model describing the system dynamics. Light competition between tree and crop is considered using light extinction functions. The tree leaf area is driven by annual increase in the number of leaf-bearing shoots with a seasonal cycle of bud burst, leaf expansion and senescence. The crop leaf area dynamics is driven by the solar radiation, heat sum and the dry matter allocation to the leaves. As a consequence of this, the model consists of six state equations expressing the temporal dynamics of: (1) tree biomass; (2) tree leaf area; (3) number of shoots per tree; (4) crop biomass; (5) crop leaf area index, and (6) heat sum. The main outputs of the model are the growth dynamics and final yields of trees and crops. Daily inputs are temperature and radiation. Planting densities, initial biomass of tree and crop species and growth parameters must be specified. The main parameters are those describing light interception, conversion to dry matter and leaf area. Given the crop cover and the tree parameters, it is shown that under potential growing conditions the land equivalent ratio can be explicitly expressed in terms of these parameters. PMID:17531272

  2. A post-coding scheme for peak-to-average power ratio reduction in intensity modulated optical OFDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang-ni; Wang, Zhong-peng

    2014-07-01

    An efficient post-coding strategy is proposed in this letter to reduce the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signals for optical intensity modulated direct detection (IM/DD) systems. The post-coding scheme based on discrete cosine transform (DCT) is employed after the inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) in the transmitter to reduce the PAPR of OFDM signals. This method is different from the conventional pre-coding scheme which is employed before IFFT operation. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the new DCT post-coding strategy can significantly reduce the PAPR than the conventional pre-coding scheme. Meantime, the bit error rate (BER) performance of the proposed post-coding system can be improved compared with the conventional pre-coding scheme.

  3. Study of 236U/238U ratio at CIRCE using a 16-strip silicon detector with a TOF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, M.; De Cesare, N.; D'Onofrio, A.; Gialanella, L.; Terrasi, F.

    2015-04-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is presently the most sensitive technique for the measurement of long-lived actinides, e.g. 236U and xPu isotopes. A new actinide AMS system, based on a 3-MV pelletron tandem accelerator, is operated at the Center for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage (CIRCE) in Caserta, Italy. In this paper we report on the procedure adopted to increase the 236U abundance sensitivity as low as possible. The energy and position determinations of the 236U ions, using a 16-strip silicon detector have been obtained. A 236U/238U isotopic ratio background level of about 2.9×10-11 was obtained, summing over all the strips, using a Time of Flight-Energy (TOF-E) system with a 16-strip silicon detector (4.9×10-12 just with one strip).

  4. Predicting prey population dynamics from kill rate, predation rate and predator-prey ratios in three wolf-ungulate systems.

    PubMed

    Vucetich, John A; Hebblewhite, Mark; Smith, Douglas W; Peterson, Rolf O

    2011-11-01

    1. Predation rate (PR) and kill rate are both fundamental statistics for understanding predation. However, relatively little is known about how these statistics relate to one another and how they relate to prey population dynamics. We assess these relationships across three systems where wolf-prey dynamics have been observed for 41 years (Isle Royale), 19 years (Banff) and 12 years (Yellowstone). 2. To provide context for this empirical assessment, we developed theoretical predictions of the relationship between kill rate and PR under a broad range of predator-prey models including predator-dependent, ratio-dependent and Lotka-Volterra dynamics. 3. The theoretical predictions indicate that kill rate can be related to PR in a variety of diverse ways (e.g. positive, negative, unrelated) that depend on the nature of predator-prey dynamics (e.g. structure of the functional response). These simulations also suggested that the ratio of predator-to-prey is a good predictor of prey growth rate. That result motivated us to assess the empirical relationship between the ratio and prey growth rate for each of the three study sites. 4. The empirical relationships indicate that PR is not well predicted by kill rate, but is better predicted by the ratio of predator-to-prey. Kill rate is also a poor predictor of prey growth rate. However, PR and ratio of predator-to-prey each explained significant portions of variation in prey growth rate for two of the three study sites. 5. Our analyses offer two general insights. First, Isle Royale, Banff and Yellowstone are similar insomuch as they all include wolves preying on large ungulates. However, they also differ in species diversity of predator and prey communities, exploitation by humans and the role of dispersal. Even with the benefit of our analysis, it remains difficult to judge whether to be more impressed by the similarities or differences. This difficulty nicely illustrates a fundamental property of ecological communities. Second, kill rate is the primary statistic for many traditional models of predation. However, our work suggests that kill rate and PR are similarly important for understanding why predation is such a complex process. PMID:21569029

  5. The Development of a Computerized System for the Estimation of Reliability for Measurement Systems Employing Interval or Ratio Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, D. Thomas

    Critical to precise quantitative research is reliability estimation. Researchers have limited tools, however, to assess the reliability of evolving instruments. Consequently, cursory assessment is typical and in-depth evaluation is rare. This paper presents a rationale for and description of PIAS, a computerized instrument analysis system. PIAS…

  6. Digit ratio 2D:4D in relation to autism spectrum disorders, empathizing, and systemizing: a quantitative review.

    PubMed

    Hönekopp, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Prenatal testosterone (PT) effects have been proposed to increase systemizing (the drive to understand lawful input-output relationships), to decrease empathizing (the drive to understand others), and to cause autism via hypermasculinization of the brain. Digit ratio 2D:4D is a putative marker of PT effects in humans. An online study (n = 1896) into the relationship between the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (a widely used measure of empathizing) and self-measured 2D:4D in a nonclinical sample is reported. No evidence for a link between empathizing and 2D:4D in either females or males emerged. Further, three meta-analyses are presented that look into the relationships of 2D:4D with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), systemizing, and empathizing. 2D:4D was substantially lower (more masculine) in ASD-affected individuals than in normal controls (d = -0.58, P < 0.001). However, 2D:4D was found to be virtually unrelated to systemizing and empathizing in normal adults. The results support the idea that high PT is a risk factor for autism, but they challenge the view that PT substantially contributes to sex differences in systemizing and empathizing. Possibly, this pattern reflects an interaction effect, whereby PT drives ASD characteristic changes only in brains with a specific damage. PMID:22674640

  7. Plant lighting system with five wavelength-band light-emitting diodes providing photon flux density and mixing ratio control

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant growth and development depend on the availability of light. Lighting systems therefore play crucial roles in plant studies. Recent advancements of light-emitting diode (LED) technologies provide abundant opportunities to study various plant light responses. The LED merits include solidity, longevity, small element volume, radiant flux controllability, and monochromaticity. To apply these merits in plant light response studies, a lighting system must provide precisely controlled light spectra that are useful for inducing various plant responses. Results We have developed a plant lighting system that irradiated a 0.18 m2 area with a highly uniform distribution of photon flux density (PFD). The average photosynthetic PFD (PPFD) in the irradiated area was 438 micro-mol m–2 s–1 (coefficient of variation 9.6%), which is appropriate for growing leafy vegetables. The irradiated light includes violet, blue, orange-red, red, and far-red wavelength bands created by LEDs of five types. The PFD and mixing ratio of the five wavelength-band lights are controllable using a computer and drive circuits. The phototropic response of oat coleoptiles was investigated to evaluate plant sensitivity to the light control quality of the lighting system. Oat coleoptiles irradiated for 23 h with a uniformly distributed spectral PFD (SPFD) of 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 at every peak wavelength (405, 460, 630, 660, and 735 nm) grew almost straight upwards. When they were irradiated with an SPFD gradient of blue light (460 nm peak wavelength), the coleoptiles showed a phototropic curvature in the direction of the greater SPFD of blue light. The greater SPFD gradient induced the greater curvature of coleoptiles. The relation between the phototropic curvature (deg) and the blue-light SPFD gradient (micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1) was 2 deg per 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1. Conclusions The plant lighting system, with a computer with a graphical user interface program, can control the PFD and mixing ratios of five wavelength-band lights. A highly uniform PFD distribution was achieved, although an intentionally distorted PFD gradient was also created. Phototropic responses of oat coleoptiles to the blue light gradient demonstrated the merit of fine controllability of this plant lighting system. PMID:23173915

  8. HIGH FILL-OUT, EXTREME MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. X. THE NEWLY DISCOVERED BINARY XY LEONIS MINORIS

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Liu, L.; Zhu, L.-Y.; He, J.-J.; Bernasconi, L. E-mail: yygcn@163.com

    2011-05-15

    The newly discovered short-period close binary star, XY LMi, has been monitored photometrically since 2006. Its light curves are typical EW-type light curves and show complete eclipses with durations of about 80 minutes. Photometric solutions were determined through an analysis of the complete B, V, R, and I light curves using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. XY LMi is a high fill-out, extreme mass ratio overcontact binary system with a mass ratio of q = 0.148 and a fill-out factor of f = 74.1%, suggesting that it is in the late evolutionary stage of late-type tidal-locked binary stars. As observed in other overcontact binary stars, evidence for the presence of two dark spots on both components is given. Based on our 19 epochs of eclipse times, we found that the orbital period of the overcontact binary is decreasing continuously at a rate of dP/dt = -1.67 x 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be caused by mass transfer from the primary to the secondary and/or angular momentum loss via magnetic stellar wind. The decrease of the orbital period may result in the increase of the fill-out, and finally, it will evolve into a single rapid-rotation star when the fluid surface reaches the outer critical Roche lobe.

  9. Disentangling community functional components in a litter-macrodetritivore model system reveals the predominance of the mass ratio hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bílá, Karolína; Moretti, Marco; Bello, Francesco; Dias, André TC; Pezzatti, Gianni B; Van Oosten, Arend Raoul; Berg, Matty P

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations have shown that two components of community trait composition are important for key ecosystem processes: (i) the community-weighted mean trait value (CWM), related to the mass ratio hypothesis and dominant trait values in the community, and (ii) functional diversity (FD), related to the complementarity hypothesis and the divergence of trait values. However, no experiments controlling for the inherent dependence between CWM and FD have been conducted so far. We used a novel experimental framework to disentangle the unique and shared effects of CWM and FD in a leaf litter-macrodetritivore model system. We manipulated isopod assemblages varying in species number, CWM and FD of litter consumption rate to test the relative contribution of these community parameters in the decomposition process. We showed that CWM, but also the combination of CWM and FD, is a main factor controlling litter decomposition. When we tested individual biodiversity components separately, CWM of litter consumption rate showed a significant effect on decomposition, while FD and species richness alone did not. Our study demonstrated that (i) trait composition rather than species diversity drives litter decomposition, (ii) dominant trait values in the community (CWM) play a chief role in driving ecosystem processes, corroborating the mass ratio hypothesis, and (iii) trait dissimilarity can contribute in modulating the overall biodiversity effects. Future challenge is to assess whether the generality of our finding, that is, that dominant trait values (CWM) predominate over trait dissimilarity (FD), holds for other ecosystem processes, environmental conditions and different spatial and temporal scales. PMID:24634725

  10. Disentangling community functional components in a litter-macrodetritivore model system reveals the predominance of the mass ratio hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bílá, Karolína; Moretti, Marco; Bello, Francesco; Dias, André Tc; Pezzatti, Gianni B; Van Oosten, Arend Raoul; Berg, Matty P

    2014-02-01

    RECENT INVESTIGATIONS HAVE SHOWN THAT TWO COMPONENTS OF COMMUNITY TRAIT COMPOSITION ARE IMPORTANT FOR KEY ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES: (i) the community-weighted mean trait value (CWM), related to the mass ratio hypothesis and dominant trait values in the community, and (ii) functional diversity (FD), related to the complementarity hypothesis and the divergence of trait values. However, no experiments controlling for the inherent dependence between CWM and FD have been conducted so far. We used a novel experimental framework to disentangle the unique and shared effects of CWM and FD in a leaf litter-macrodetritivore model system. We manipulated isopod assemblages varying in species number, CWM and FD of litter consumption rate to test the relative contribution of these community parameters in the decomposition process. We showed that CWM, but also the combination of CWM and FD, is a main factor controlling litter decomposition. When we tested individual biodiversity components separately, CWM of litter consumption rate showed a significant effect on decomposition, while FD and species richness alone did not. Our study demonstrated that (i) trait composition rather than species diversity drives litter decomposition, (ii) dominant trait values in the community (CWM) play a chief role in driving ecosystem processes, corroborating the mass ratio hypothesis, and (iii) trait dissimilarity can contribute in modulating the overall biodiversity effects. Future challenge is to assess whether the generality of our finding, that is, that dominant trait values (CWM) predominate over trait dissimilarity (FD), holds for other ecosystem processes, environmental conditions and different spatial and temporal scales. PMID:24634725

  11. Characterization Of High-Stroke High-Aspect Ratio Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Deformable Mirrors For Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchti, Mohamed Amine

    Adaptive optics MEMS deformable mirror, in conjunction with Shack Hartman wave front sensor and real-time controller, is capable of correcting time-varying aberrations in imaging applications through manipulating its mirror surface. Adaptive optics systems in astronomy for next generation large telescopes (30 meter primary mirrors) require a high stroke of 10microm of mechanical displacement. This required stroke would be achieved by MEMS deformable mirrors fabricated with high aspect ratio techniques. This thesis will review the designs of various types of high aspect actuators consisting of folded springs with rectangular and circular membranes as well as X-beam actuators. Finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of these designs have shown the ability of each design to achieve a stroke of approximately 9.4 microm. Also, FEA simulations proved that the X-beam actuators provide the best spring support while preventing tilting. In addition, this thesis will discuss device characterization and voltage vs. displacement test results for the high aspect ratio gold MEMS 16 x 16 X-beam actuators deformable mirror that has been bonded and packaged. The results have shown that the device is capable of achieving approximately 5.5 microm in individual actuator testing and 7microm in dual actuator testing.

  12. Design of a high voltage input - output ratio dc-dc converter dedicated to small power fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, O.; Cathelin, J.

    2010-12-01

    Consuming chemical energy, fuel cells produce simultaneously heat, water and useful electrical power [J.M. Andújar, F. Segura, Renew. Sust. Energy Rev. 13, 2309 (2009)], [J. Larminie, A. Dicks, Fuel Cell Systems Explained, 2nd edn. (John Wiley & Sons, 2003)]. As a matter of fact, the voltage generated by a fuel cell strongly depends on both the load power demand and the operating conditions. Besides, as a result of many design aspects, fuel cells are low voltage and high current electric generators. On the contrary, electric loads are commonly designed for small voltage swing and a high V/I ratio in order to minimize Joule losses. Therefore, electric loads supplied by fuel cells are typically fed by means of an intermediate power voltage regulator. The specifications of such a power converter are to be able to step up the input voltage with a high ratio (a ratio of 10 is a classic situation) and also to work with an excellent efficiency (in order to minimize its size, its weight and its losses) [A. Shahin, B. Huang, J.P. Martin, S. Pierfederici, B. Davat, Energy Conv. Manag. 51, 56 (2010)]. This paper deals with the design of this essential ancillary device. It intends to bring out the best structure for fulfilling this function. Several dc-dc converters with large voltage step-up ratios are introduced. A topology based on a coupled inductor or tapped inductor is closely studied. A detailed modelling is performed with the purpose of providing designing rules. This model is validated with both simulation and implementation. The experimental prototype is based on the following specifications: the fuel cell output voltage ranges from a 50 V open-voltage to a 25 V rated voltage while the load requires a constant 250 V voltage. The studied coupled inductor converter is compared with a classic boost converter commonly used in this voltage elevating application. Even though the voltage regulator faces severe FC specifications, the measured efficiency reaches 96% at the rated power whereas conventional boost efficiency barely achieves 91.5% in the same operating conditions.

  13. Carrier-interference ratios for frequency sharing between frequency-modulated amplitude-modulated-vestigial-sideband television systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, S. P.; Miller, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    For just perceptible interference, an FM television signal interfering with another FM television signal must have an average signal power that is 26 to 37 db less than the wanted signal power. For an AM-VSB television signal interfering with an FM television signal, the AM-VSB television's sync peak average power must be 18 to 31 db below the FM television signal's average power. Also, when an FM television signal interferes with an AM-VSB signal, the average signal power of the FM signal should be 56 to 59 db below the sync peak average power of the AM-VSB television signal. The range of power ratios occur as a result of different TV scenes used in the tests and different FM-signal frequency deviations used. All tests were performed using 525 line, system M, color-television signals.

  14. A heuristic approach to worst-case carrier-to-interference ratio maximization in satellite system synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, Charles H.; Walton, Eric K.; Mata, Fernando; Mount-Campbell, Clark A.; Olen, Carl A.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of allotting GEO locations to communication satellites so as to maximize the smallest aggregate carrier-to-interference (C/I) ratio calculated at any test point (assumed earth station). The location allotted to each satellite must be within the satellite's service arc, and angular separation constraints are enforced for each pair of satellites to control single-entry EMI. Solutions to this satellite system synthesis problem (SSSP) are found by embedding two heuristic procedures for the satellite location problem (SLP), in a binary search routine to find an estimate of the largest increment to the angular separation values that permits a feasible solution to SLP and SSSP. Numerical results for a 183-satellite, 208-beam example problem are presented.

  15. Systemic Inflammatory Response Based on Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio as a Prognostic Marker in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Suk; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that systemic inflammatory response (SIR) in the tumor microenvironment is closely related to poor oncologic outcomes in cancer patients. Over the past decade, several SIR-related hematological factors have been extensively investigated in an effort to risk-stratify cancer patients to improve treatment selection and to predict posttreatment survival outcomes in various types of cancers. In particular, one readily available marker of SIR is neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), which can easily be measured on the basis of absolute neutrophils and absolute lymphocytes in a differential white blood cell count performed in the clinical setting. Many investigators have vigorously assessed NLR as a potential prognostic biomarker predicting pathological and survival outcomes in patients with urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder. In this paper, we aim to present the prognostic role of NLR in patients with UC of the bladder through a thorough review of the literature. PMID:26880857

  16. Systemic Inflammatory Response Based on Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio as a Prognostic Marker in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Suk; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that systemic inflammatory response (SIR) in the tumor microenvironment is closely related to poor oncologic outcomes in cancer patients. Over the past decade, several SIR-related hematological factors have been extensively investigated in an effort to risk-stratify cancer patients to improve treatment selection and to predict posttreatment survival outcomes in various types of cancers. In particular, one readily available marker of SIR is neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), which can easily be measured on the basis of absolute neutrophils and absolute lymphocytes in a differential white blood cell count performed in the clinical setting. Many investigators have vigorously assessed NLR as a potential prognostic biomarker predicting pathological and survival outcomes in patients with urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder. In this paper, we aim to present the prognostic role of NLR in patients with UC of the bladder through a thorough review of the literature. PMID:26880857

  17. Scaling of volume to surface ratio and doubling time in growing unicellular organisms: Do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2014-10-01

    The scaling of physical and biological characteristics of the living organisms is a basic method for searching of new biophysical laws. In series of previous studies the author showed that in Poikilotherms, Mammals and Aves, the volume to surface ratio V×S-1 (m) of organisms is proportional to their generation time Tgt(s) via growth rate v (m s-1): V×S-1 = vgr×Tr. The power and the correlation coefficients are near to 1.0. Aim of this study is: i) to prove with experimental data the validity of the above equation for Unicellular organisms and ii) to show that perhaps, the cells are quantum-mechanical systems. The data for body mass M (kg), density ρ (kg/m3), minimum and maximum doubling time Tdt (s) for 50 unicellular organisms are assembled from scientific sources, and the computer program `Statistics' is used for calculations. In result i) the analytical relationship from type: V×S-1 = 4.46ṡ10-11×Tdt was found, where vgr = 4.46×10-11 m/s and ii) it is shown that the products between cell mass M, cell length expressed by V/S ratio and growth rate vgr satisfied the Heisenberg uncertainty principle i.e. the inequalities V/S×M×vgr>h/2π and Tdt×M×vgr2>h/2π are valid, where h= 6.626×10-34 Jṡs is the Planck constant. This rise the question: do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

  18. Scaling of volume to surface ratio and doubling time in growing unicellular organisms: Do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2014-10-06

    The scaling of physical and biological characteristics of the living organisms is a basic method for searching of new biophysical laws. In series of previous studies the author showed that in Poikilotherms, Mammals and Aves, the volume to surface ratio V×S{sup −1} (m) of organisms is proportional to their generation time T{sub gt}(s) via growth rate v (m s{sup −1}): V×S{sup −1} = v{sub gr}×T{sup r}. The power and the correlation coefficients are near to 1.0. Aim of this study is: i) to prove with experimental data the validity of the above equation for Unicellular organisms and ii) to show that perhaps, the cells are quantum-mechanical systems. The data for body mass M (kg), density ρ (kg/m{sup 3}), minimum and maximum doubling time T{sub dt} (s) for 50 unicellular organisms are assembled from scientific sources, and the computer program ‘Statistics’ is used for calculations. In result i) the analytical relationship from type: V×S{sup −1} = 4.46⋅10{sup −11}×T{sub dt} was found, where v{sub gr} = 4.46×10{sup −11} m/s and ii) it is shown that the products between cell mass M, cell length expressed by V/S ratio and growth rate v{sub gr} satisfied the Heisenberg uncertainty principle i.e. the inequalities V/S×M×v{sub gr}>h/2π and T{sub dt}×M×v{sub gr}{sup 2}>h/2π are valid, where h= 6.626×10{sup −34} J⋅s is the Planck constant. This rise the question: do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?.

  19. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation in digital computer simulation of lowpass and bandpass systems with applications to analog and digital communications, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tranter, W. H.; Turner, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are developed to estimate power gain, delay, signal-to-noise ratio, and mean square error in digital computer simulations of lowpass and bandpass systems. The techniques are applied to analog and digital communications. The signal-to-noise ratio estimates are shown to be maximum likelihood estimates in additive white Gaussian noise. The methods are seen to be especially useful for digital communication systems where the mapping from the signal-to-noise ratio to the error probability can be obtained. Simulation results show the techniques developed to be accurate and quite versatile in evaluating the performance of many systems through digital computer simulation.

  20. Evaluating adaptation options of microcirculatory-tissue systems based on the physiological link of nutritive blood flow and redox ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Sidorov, Victor V.; Dremin, Victor V.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Novikova, Irina N.; Zhu, Simian; Nabi, Ghulam; Litvinova, Karina S.; Baklanova, Anastasia P.; Bakshaliev, Ruslan M.; Ravcheev, Sergey A.

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescent spectroscopy (FS) is becoming more widely used in chemistry, biology, in various fields of medical technology and medicine in general. Many purulent wounds, burns and other destructive inflammatory processes are accompanied by changes in the fluorescent activity of the tissues, which occurs due to a misbalance in accumulation of natural fluorophores: FAD, NADH, lipofuscin, porphyrins, structural proteins, etc. The study of redox ratio (RR), characterizing the metabolic processes, is important in the assessment of the metabolic activity ofmicrocirculatory-tissue systems (MTS). However, one of the big problems of the FS method is still the correct interpretation of the data and the development of practical methods for its application in clinical medicine. To solve this problem and create new diagnostic criteria, we propose to evaluate the adaptive capacity of MTS using indicators of links between nutritive blood flow and redox ratio during a physiological rest and functional load (occlusion test). As is known, these parameters (RR and nutritive blood flow) characterize the metabolic activity of tissues.We have performedan experimental study of the relationship between the RR, defined by FS, and nutritive blood flow, defined by the methods of laser Doppler flowmetry. Preliminary results in the study of a complex approach to diagnosis of the state of biological tissue were obtained. A positive relationship between the nutritive blood flow in the microcirculatory channel and RR of skin tissue is observed.The speed of change of metabolism in the phase of occlusion and reperfusion and duration of phase of recovery may be the criteria for adaptive capabilities of MTS, which has practical significance for physiology and medicine.

  1. Effects of doping concentration ratio on electrical characterization in pseudomorphic HEMT-based MMIC switches for ICT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Jae-Kyoung; Oh, Jung-Hun; Sung, Ho-Kun; Wang, Cong

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the doping concentration ratios between upper and lower silicon planar-doping layers on the DC and RF characteristics of the double planar doped pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs) are investigated. From the device simulation, an increase of maximum extrinsic transconductance and a decrease of total on- and off-state capacitances are observed, as well as an increase of the upper to lower planar-doping concentration ratios (UTLPDR), which give rise to an enhancement of the switching speed and isolation characteristics. On the basis of simulation results, two types of pHEMTs are fabricated with two different UTLPDRs of 4:1 and 1:2. After applying these two types' pHEMTs, single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) transmitter/receiver monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) switches are also designed and fabricated. The SPDT MMIC switch with a 4:1 UTLPDR shows an insertion loss of 0.58 dB, isolation of 40.2 dB, and switching speed of 100 ns, respectively, which correspondingly indicate a 0.23 dB lower insertion loss, 2.90 dB higher isolation and 2.5 times faster switching speed than those of 1:2 UTLPDR at frequency range of 2-6 GHz. From the simulation results and comparative studies, we propose that the UTLPDR must be greater than 4:1 for the best switching performance. With the abovementioned excellent performances, the proposed switch would be quite promising in the application of information and communications technology system.

  2. Impact of α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin ratio on the heat stability of model infant milk formula protein systems.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Shane V; Dowling, Aisling P; Caldeo, Veronica; Kelly, Alan L; O'Mahony, James A

    2016-03-01

    Model infant milk formula systems (5.5% protein) were formulated to contain α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin ratios of 0.1, 0.5, 1.3, 2.1 or 4.6 and assessed for heat stability and heat-induced changes. 'Humanising' the model formulas by increasing α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin enhanced heat stability at 140°C in the pH range 6.6-6.9. The model formulas were analysed after lab-scale high-temperature short-time heating at pH 6.8. Gel electrophoresis indicated that increased heat stability in high α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin samples was due to decreased covalent interactions between proteins. In low α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin formulas, protein-protein interactions caused marked increases in protein particle size and viscosity of the heated systems; conversely, covalent interactions between proteins were minimal in high α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin formulas. Reduced protein-protein interactions with increasing α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin has important implications for subsequent processing; for example, lower viscosity post-heating may affect bulk density in spray-dried products or physical stability in ready-to-feed products. PMID:26471542

  3. An analytical system for stable isotope analysis on carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, S. L.; van der Veen, C.; Popa, M. E.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-12-01

    A fully automated system for the determination of δ13C and δ18O in atmospheric CO has been developed. CO is extracted from an air sample and converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent. The isotopic composition is determined with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) technique. The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He), the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is ~ 4 nmol mol-1, or 1-3 % of the typical sample size. The repeatability is 0.1 ‰ for δ13C and 0.2 ‰ for δ18O. The peak area allows for simultaneous determination of the mole fraction with an analytical repeatability of ~ 0.7 nmol mol-1 for 100 mL of ambient air (185.4 nmol mol-1 of CO). An automated single measurement is performed in only 18 min, and the achieved time efficiency (and small volume of sample air) allows for repetitive measurements practically.

  4. Influence of Cooling to Heating Load Ratio on Optimal Supply Water and Air Temperatures in an Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karino, Naoki; Shiba, Takashi; Yokoyama, Ryohei; Ito, Koichi

    In planning an air conditioning system, supply water and air temperatures are important factors from the viewpoint of energy saving and cost reduction. For example, lower temperature supply water and air for space cooling reduce the coefficient of performance of a refrigeration machine, and increase the thickness of heat insulation material. However, they enable larger temperature differences, and reduce equipment sizes and power demand. It is also an important subject to evaluate the effect of the supply water and air temperatures on energy saving and cost reduction on the annual basis by considering not only cooling but also heating loads. The purposes of this paper are to propose an optimal planning method for an air conditioning system with large temperature difference, and to analyze the effect of supply water and air temperatures on the long-term economics through a numerical study for an office building. As a result, it is shown that the proposed method effectively determines supply water and air temperatures, and the influence of the cooling to heating load ratio on the long-term economics is clarified.

  5. The alfalfa “almost darks” campaign: Pilot VLA HI observations of five high mass-to-light ratio systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; Martinkus, Charlotte P.; Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Jones, Michael E-mail: cmartink@macalester.edu E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: hallenbg@union.edu; and others

    2015-02-01

    We present new Very Large Array (VLA) H i spectral line imaging of five sources discovered by the ALFALFA extragalactic survey. These targets are drawn from a larger sample of systems that were not uniquely identified with optical counterparts during ALFALFA processing, and as such have unusually high H i mass to light ratios. The candidate “Almost Dark” objects fall into four broad categories: (1) objects with nearby H i neighbors that are likely of tidal origin; (2) objects that appear to be part of a system of multiple H i sources, but which may not be tidal in origin; (3) objects isolated from nearby ALFALFA H i detections, but located near a gas-poor early type galaxy; (4) apparently isolated sources, with no object of coincident redshift within ∼400 kpc. Roughly 75% of the 200 objects without identified counterparts in the α.40 database (Haynes et al. 2011) fall into category 1 (likely tidal), and were not considered for synthesis follow-up observations. The pilot sample presented here (AGC193953, AGC208602, AGC208399, AGC226178, and AGC233638) contains the first five sources observed as part of a larger effort to characterize H i sources with no readily identifiable optical counterpart at single dish resolution (3.′5). These objects span a range of H i mass [7.41 < log(M{sub Hi}) < 9.51] and H i mass to B-band luminosity ratios (3 < M{sub Hi}/L{sub B} < 9). We compare the H i total intensity and velocity fields to optical imaging drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to ultraviolet imaging drawn from archival GALEX observations. Four of the sources with uncertain or no optical counterpart in the ALFALFA data are identified with low surface brightness optical counterparts in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging when compared with VLA H i intensity maps, and appear to be galaxies with clear signs of ordered rotation in the H i velocity fields. Three of these are detected in far-ultraviolet GALEX images, a likely indication of star formation within the last few hundred Myrs. One source (AGC208602) is likely tidal in nature, associated with the NGC 3370 group. Consistent with previous efforts, we find no “dark galaxies” in this limited sample. However, the present observations do reveal complex sources with suppressed star formation, highlighting both the observational difficulties and the necessity of synthesis follow-up observations to understand these extreme objects.

  6. Spatial changes in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of sludge and associated organisms in a biological sewage treatment system.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Takashi; Kanaya, Gen; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Miyaoka, Yuma; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N) have been utilized as powerful tools for tracing energy or material flows within food webs in a range of environmental studies. However, the techniques have rarely been applied to the study of biological wastewater treatment technologies. We report on the spatial changes in δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N in sludge and its associated biotic community in a wastewater treatment system. This system consisted of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) which is a novel type of trickling filter. The results showed clear spatial changes in the δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N of suspended solids (SS), retained sludge, and macrofauna (oligochaetes and fly larvae) in the system. The δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N was used as a natural tracer to determine the SS dynamic throughout the system. The results imply that SS in the DHS effluent was mainly eluted from the retained sludge in the lower section of the DHS reactor. The δ¹⁵N of the retained sludge in the DHS reactor increased drastically from the inlet towards to the outlet, from -0.7‰ to 10.3‰. This phenomenon may be attributed to nitrogen conversion processes (i.e. nitrification and denitrification). The δ¹⁵N of oligochaetes also increased from the inlet to the outlet, which corresponded well to that of the retained sludge. Thus, the δ¹⁵N of the oligochaetes might simply mirror the δ¹⁵N of the retained sludge. On the other hand, the δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N of sympatric fly larvae differed from those of the oligochaetes sampled, indicating dietary differences between the taxa. Therefore δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N reflected both treatment and dietary characteristics. We concluded that δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values are potentially useful as alternative indicators for investigating microbial ecosystems and treatment characteristics of biological wastewater treatment systems. PMID:25462745

  7. Supplementation with bypass fat in silvopastoral systems diminishes the ratio of milk saturated/unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mahecha, L; Angulo, J; Salazar, B; Cerón, M; Gallo, J; Molina, C H; Molina, E J; Suárez, J F; Lopera, J J; Olivera, M

    2008-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate if supplementing bypass fat to cows under silvopastoral systems, increases the concentration of unsaturated fatty acids in milk, thus improving the saturated/ unsaturated ratio without a negative effect on total milk yield in fat or protein. Two concentrations of two different sources of bypass fat were evaluated for 40 days, each in a group of 24 multiparous Lucerna (Colombian breed) cows. A cross-over design of 8 Latin squares 3 x 3 was used. The variables submitted to analysis were body condition, daily milk production and milk composition. Body condition, milk yield and milk quality were not different but there was a significant decrease in the amount of saturated fatty acid in both experiments while the unsaturated fat increased significantly in experiment 1 and remained stable in experiment 2. Results, such as these have as far as we know, not been reported previously and they provide an approach for the improvement of milk as a "functional food". PMID:18484123

  8. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... determine * * * (a) Uses only one point of disinfectant application (1) One inactivation ratio (CTcalc/CT99..., representing sequential inactivation ratios, between the point of disinfectant application and a point before... disinfectant application before the first customer The (CTcalc/CT99.9) value of each disinfection...

  9. Allometric scaling of indirect effects: body size ratios predict non-consumptive effects in multi-predator systems.

    PubMed

    Krenek, Lauren; Rudolf, Volker H W

    2014-11-01

    Non-consumptive effects (NCES) frequently lead to non-independent effects of multiple predators. While such emergent predator effects are ubiquitous in natural communities, the strength of these effects varies among studies and systems, making it difficult to predict a priory how changes in predator diversity influence prey suppression. Thus, identifying general scaling rules which can explain this variation of non-independent effects is vital for modelling natural communities and how they respond to biodiversity loss. Body size is a key trait determining the nature and strength of ecological interactions. While great progress has been made using allometric relationships to predict the interaction strength of predator-prey pairs, it is unknown whether similar relationships explain variation in the strength of NCEs, and how they are related to consumptive effects. Here, we experimentally manipulate the relative size difference of multiple predators to determine whether NCEs follow general allometric scaling relationships in an aquatic multi-predator system. Results demonstrate that the presence and strength of NCEs can vary dramatically across predator combinations. However, this variation scaled predictably with the size ratio of predators, increasing the size difference among predators increased NCEs. This pattern was driven by a size-mediated shift in 'food web motif' from competition to intraguild predation and a positive correlation of NCEs and intraguild predation rate. Results indicate that models which assume that consumers have independent effects are particularly likely to make erroneous predictions when predators differ substantially in size, but simple allometric relationships of NCEs could be used to correct this bias. PMID:24910170

  10. Nurse staff allocation by nurse patient ratio vs. a computerized nurse dependency management system: a comparative cost analysis of Australian and New Zealand hospitals.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Liza; Plummer, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Coding, costing, and accounting for nursing care requirements in Australian public and private hospitals lacks systematic research. Nurse costing for two nurse staffing allocation methods--nurse patient ratios and a computerized nurse dependency management system--were compared. Retrospective nursing workload management data were obtained from hospital information systems in 21 acute care public and private hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Descriptive statistics, cost analysis, and cost modeling were conducted for 103,269 shifts of nursing care. The comparison of costs for nursing staff by nurse-patient ratios and by a computerized nurse dependency management system demonstrated differences. The provision of nursing care using the computerized nurse dependency management system was, overall, lower in cost than for nurse-patient ratios. PMID:23346733

  11. DEEP, LOW-MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XII. CK BOOTIS WITH POSSIBLE CYCLIC MAGNETIC ACTIVITY AND ADDITIONAL COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2012-05-15

    We present precision CCD photometry, a period study, and a two-color simultaneous Wilson code solution of the short-period contact binary CK Bootis. The asymmetric light curves were modeled by a dark spot on the primary component. The result identifies that CK Boo is an A-type W UMa binary with a high fillout of f = 71.7({+-} 4.4)%. From the O - C curve, it is found that the orbital period changes in a complicated mode, i.e., a long-term increase with two sinusoidal variations. One cyclic oscillation with a period of 10.67({+-} 0.20) yr may result from magnetic activity cycles, which are identified by the variability of Max. I - Max. II. Another sinusoidal variation (i.e., A = 0.0131 days({+-} 0.0009 days) and P{sub 3} = 24.16({+-} 0.64) yr) may be attributed to the light-time effect due to a third body. This kind of additional companion can extract angular momentum from the central binary system. The orbital period secularly increases at a rate of dP/dt = +9.79 ({+-}0.80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted by conservative mass transfer from the secondary to the primary. This kind of deep, low-mass ratio overcontact binaries may evolve into a rapid-rotating single star, only if the contact configuration do not break down at J{sub spin} > (1/3)J{sub orb}.

  12. Effect of combustion-chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio on theoretical performance of several rocket propellant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Virginia E

    1956-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of specific impulse to determine the separate effects of increasing the combustion-chamber pressure and the nozzle expansion ratio on the performance of the propellants, hydrogen-fluorine, hydrogen-oxygen, ammonia-fluorine and AN-F-58 fuel - white fuming nitric acid (95 percent). The results indicate that an increase in specific impulse obtainable with an increase in combustion-chamber pressure is almost entirely caused by the increased expansion ratio through the nozzle.

  13. Examining the effect of length/width ratio on the hydro-dynamic behaviour in a DAF system using CFD and ADV techniques.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S B; Park, N S; Lee, S J; Ahn, H W; Wang, C K

    2006-01-01

    Dissolved air flotation (DAF) is a solid-liquid separation system that uses fine bubbles rising from the bottom to remove particles in water. In this study, we investigated the effect of L/W(L; length, W; width) on the hydrodynamic behavior in a DAF system using CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and ADV (acoustic Doppler velocimetry) technique. The factual full-scale DAF system, L/W ratio of 1:1, was selected and various UW ratio conditions (2:1, 3:1,4:1 and 5:1) were simulated with CFD. For modelling, 2-phase (gas-liquid) flow equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and turbulence quantities were solved using a Eulerian-Eulerian approach based on the assumption that a very small particle is applied in the DAF system. Also, for verification of CFD simulation results, we measured the actual velocity at some points in the full-scale DAF system with the ADV technique. Both the simulation and the measurement results were in good accordance with each other. We concluded that the L/W ratio and outlet geometry play an important role for flow pattern and fine bubble distribution in the flotation zone. In the ratio of 1:1, the dead zone is less than those in other cases. On the other hand, in the ratio of 5:1, the fine bubbles were more evenly distributed. PMID:16752775

  14. Evaluating the utility of B/Ca ratios in planktic foraminifera as a proxy for the carbonate system: A case study of Globigerinoides ruber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henehan, Michael J.; Foster, Gavin L.; Rae, James W. B.; Prentice, Katy C.; Erez, Jonathan; Bostock, Helen C.; Marshall, Brittney J.; Wilson, Paul A.

    2015-04-01

    B/Ca ratios in foraminifera have attracted considerable scientific attention as a proxy for past ocean carbonate system. However, the carbonate system controls on B/Ca ratios are not straightforward, with Δ[CO32-] ([CO32-]in situ - [CO32-]at saturation) correlating best with B/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera, rather than pH, B>(OH>)/4-HCO3-, or B>(OH>)/4-DIC (as a simple model of boron speciation in seawater and incorporation into CaCO3 would predict). Furthermore, culture experiments have shown that in planktic foraminifera properties such as salinity and [B]sw can have profound effects on B/Ca ratios beyond those predicted by simple partition coefficients. Here, we investigate the controls on B/Ca ratios in G. ruber via a combination of culture experiments and core-top measurements, and add to a growing body of evidence that suggests B/Ca ratios in symbiont-bearing foraminiferal carbonate are not a straightforward proxy for past seawater carbonate system conditions. We find that while B/Ca ratios in culture experiments covary with pH, in open ocean sediments this relationship is not seen. In fact, our B/Ca data correlate best with [PO43-] (a previously undocumented association) and in most regions, salinity. These findings might suggest a precipitation rate or crystallographic control on boron incorporation into foraminiferal calcite. Regardless, our results underscore the need for caution when attempting to interpret B/Ca records in terms of the ocean carbonate system, at the very least in the case of mixed-layer planktic foraminifera.

  15. Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

    2013-03-01

    If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time-dependent measures of performance including uranium usage, TRU inventory, and radiotoxicity to evaluate the complex impacts of transition from the current uranium-fueled LWR system, and other more realistic impacts that may not be intuited from the time-independent steady-state conditions of the end-state fuel cycle. These analyses were performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model VISION. Compared with static calculations, dynamic results paint a different picture of option space and the urgency of starting a FR fleet. For example, in a static analysis, there is a sharp increase in uranium utilization as CR exceeds 1.0 (burner versus breeder). However, in dynamic analyses that examine uranium use over the next 1 to 2 centuries, behavior as CR crosses the 1.0 threshold is smooth, and other parameters such as the time required outside of reactors to recycle fuel become important. Overall, we find that there is no unambiguously superior value of TRU CR; preferences depend on the relative importance of different fuel cycle system objectives.

  16. Qualitative tissue differentiation by analysing the intensity ratios of atomic emission lines using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): prospects for a feedback mechanism for surgical laser systems.

    PubMed

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mahari, Fanuel; Klämpfl, Florian; Rohde, Maximilian; Knipfer, Christian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper focuses on qualitative tissue differentiation by monitoring the intensity ratios of atomic emissions using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) on the plasma plume created during laser tissue ablation. The background of this study is to establish a real time feedback control mechanism for clinical laser surgery systems during the laser ablation process. Ex-vivo domestic pig tissue samples (muscle, fat, nerve and skin) were used in this experiment. Atomic emission intensity ratios were analyzed to find a characteristic spectral line for each tissue. The results showed characteristic elemental emission intensity ratios for the respective tissues. The spectral lines and intensity ratios of these specific elements varied among the different tissue types. The main goal of this study is to qualitatively and precisely identify different tissue types for tissue specific laser surgery. PMID:24376030

  17. Your fate is in your hands? Handedness, digit ratio (2D:4D), and selection to a national talent development system.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph; Kungl, Ann-Marie; Pabst, Jan; Strauß, Bernd; Büsch, Dirk; Schorer, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade a small evidence base has highlighted the potential importance of seemingly innocuous variables related to one's hands, such as hand dominance and the relative length of the second and fourth digits (2D:4D ratio), to success in sport. This study compared 2D:4D digit ratio and handedness among handball players selected to advance in a national talent development system with those not selected. Participants included 480 youth handball players (240 females and 240 males) being considered as part of the talent selection programme for the German Youth National team. Hand dominance and digit ratio were compared to age-matched control data using standard t-tests. There was a greater proportion of left-handers compared to the normal population in males but not in females. There was also a lower digit ratio in both females and males. However, there were no differences between those selected for the next stage of talent development and those not selected on either handedness or digit ratio. These results add support for general effects for both digit ratio and handedness in elite handball; however, these factors seem inadequate to explain talent selection decisions at this level. PMID:23444944

  18. Importance of mixing ratio for a long-term CO2 flux measurement with a closed-path system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Taro; Iwata, Hiroki; Harazono, Yoshinobu

    2011-07-01

    The new type closed-path CO2/H2O infrared gas analyser enables us to calculate CO2 fluxes from both the mixing ratio (?) and mass density of CO2 (?). After the WPL correction was applied, ? and ? were almost in accord with each other. However, ? tended to be slightly larger than ?, which resulted in a significant difference in cumulative CO2 fluxes. We found that this difference was explained by the pressure covariance term, which is normally omitted in the WPL correction. Therefore, ignoring the pressure covariance term in the WPL correction can cause a serious error in estimation of annual net ecosystem exchange. To reduce uncertainties in calculations, we recommend using the mixing ratio for calculation of CO2 fluxes when using the new type closed-path infrared gas analyser.

  19. Regulation of gonadal sex ratios and pubertal development by the thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Prakash; Patino, Reynaldo

    2013-01-01

    We examined associations between thyroid condition, gonadal sex and pubertal development in zebrafish. Seventy-two-hour postfertilization larvae were reared in untreated medium or in the presence of goitrogens (sodium perchlorate, 0.82 mM; methimazole, 0.15 and 0.3 mM) or thyroxine (1 and 10 nM) for 30 days. Thyrocyte height, gonadal sex and gonadal development were histologically determined at 45 and 60 days postfertilization (dpf). Thyrocyte hypertrophy, an index of hypothyroidism, was observed at 45 and 60 dpf in perchlorate-treated but only at 45 dpf in methimazole-treated fish. Similarly, gonadal sex ratios were biased toward ovaries relative to control animals at 45 and 60 dpf in perchlorate-treated fish but only at 45 dpf in methimazole-treated fish. Gonadal sex ratios were biased toward testes at 45 and 60 dpf in thyroxine-treated fish. Spermatogenesis was delayed in testes from goitrogen-treated fish at 60 dpf relative to control values, but was unaffected in testes from thyroxine-treated individuals. Oogenesis seemed to be nonspecifically delayed in all treatments relative to control at 60 dpf. This study confirmed the previously reported association between hypothyroid condition and ovarian-skewed ratios, and hyperthyroid condition and testicular-skewed ratios, and also showed that male pubertal development is specifically delayed by experimental hypothyroidism. The simultaneous recovery from the hypothyroid and ovary-inducing effects of methimazole by 60 dpf (27 days post-treatment) suggests that the ovary-skewing effect of goitrogens is reversible when thyroid conditions return to basal levels before developmental commitment of gonadal sex. Conversely, the masculinizing effect of hyperthyroidism seems to be stable and perhaps permanent.

  20. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.536 My system... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false My system has developed an... in your disinfection profile. Your system will have obtained 52 measurements (one for every week...

  1. Automated measurement of the bit-error rate as a function of signal-to-noise ratio for microwave communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Daugherty, Elaine S.; Kramarchuk, Ihor

    1987-01-01

    The performance of microwave systems and components for digital data transmission can be characterized by a plot of the bit-error rate as a function of the signal to noise ratio (or E sub b/E sub o). Methods for the efficient automated measurement of bit-error rates and signal-to-noise ratios, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, are described. Noise measurement considerations and time requirements for measurement accuracy, as well as computer control and data processing methods, are discussed.

  2. Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs) carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itoh, T.; Kubo, H.; Honda, H.; Tominaga, T.; Makide, Y.; Yakohata, A.; Sakai, H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs), carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems are reported. The balloon-borne grab-sampling system has been launched from Sanriku Balloon Center three times since 1981. It consists of: (1) six sampling cylinders, (2) eight motor driven values, (3) control and monitor circuits, and (4) pressurized housing. Particular consideration is paid to the problem of contamination. Strict requirements are placed on the choice of materials and components, construction methods, cleaning techniques, vacuum integrity, and sampling procedures. An aluminum pressurized housing and a 4-m long inlet line are employed to prevent the sampling air from contamination by outgassing of sampling and control devices. The sampling is performed during the descent of the system. Vertical profiles of mixing ratios of CF2Cl2, CFCl3 and CH4 are given. Mixing ratios of CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 in the stratosphere do not show the discernible effect of the increase of those in the ground level background, and decrease with altitude. Decreasing rate of CFCl3 is larger than that of CF2Cl2. CH4 mixing ratio, on the other hand, shows diffusive equilibrium, as the photodissociation cross section of CH4 is small and concentrations of OH radical and 0(sup I D) are low.

  3. A dual-mode generalized likelihood ratio approach to self-reorganizing digital flight control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bueno, R.; Chow, E.; Gershwin, S. B.; Willsky, A. S.

    1975-01-01

    The research is reported on the problems of failure detection and reliable system design for digital aircraft control systems. Failure modes, cross detection probability, wrong time detection, application of performance tools, and the GLR computer package are discussed.

  4. What radiologists need to know about the pulmonary-systemic flow ratio (Qp/Qs): what it is, how to calculate it, and what it is for.

    PubMed

    Marín Rodríguez, C; Sánchez Alegre, M L; Lancharro Zapata, Á; Alarcón Rodríguez, J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) provides abundant morphological and functional information in the study of congenital heart disease. The functional information includes pulmonary output and systemic output; the ratio between these two (Qp/Qs) is the shunt fraction. After birth, in normal conditions the pulmonary output is practically identical to the systemic output, so Qp/Qs = 1. In patients with « shunts » between the systemic and pulmonary circulations, the ratio changes, and the interpretation of these findings varies in function of the location of the shunt (intracardiac or extracardiac) and of the associated structural or postsurgical changes. We review the concept of Qp/Qs; the methods to calculate it, with special emphasis on cMRI; and the meaning of the results obtained. We place special emphasis on the relevance of these findings depending on the underlying disease and the treatment the patient has undergone. PMID:26070521

  5. [Process Optimization of Aerobic Granular Sludge Continuous-Flow System for the Treatment of Low COD/N Ratio Sewage].

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Xin, Xin; Lu, Hang; Zhu, Liao-dong; Xie, Si-jian; Wu, Yong

    2015-10-01

    The mature aerobic granular sludge (AGS) was inoculated in a continuous-flow joint constructor reactor to treat low chemical oxygen demand/nitrogen (COD/N) ratio sewage. The effects of aeration intensity and hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the denitrification and phosphorus removal efficiencies and the granular sludge stabilization were investigated. When the aeration intensity was 300 mL x min(-1) (superficial air upflow velocity of 1.2 cm x s(-1)) and the HRT was 7.5 h, the average removal efficiencies of COD, TN and TP were 76.34%, 51.23% and 53.70%, respectively. The mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) was only about 2 000 mg x L(-1), the sludge volume index ( SVI) was below 50 mL x g(-1), and the AGS exhibited complete forms and good settling performances. Additionally, the low COD/N ratios sewage could promote the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of AGS, and the PN proteins in EPS played a pivotal role in the maintenance of AGS stabilization. PMID:26841612

  6. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  7. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing. Part 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Part 2-Appendices of a study conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities, and load reductions were achieved.

  8. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities and load reductions are achieved.

  9. A dual-mode generalized likelihood ratio approach to self-reorganizing digital flight control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Analytic techniques have been developed for detecting and identifying abrupt changes in dynamic systems. The GLR technique monitors the output of the Kalman filter and searches for the time that the failure occured, thus allowing it to be sensitive to new data and consequently increasing the chances for fast system recovery following detection of a failure. All failure detections are based on functional redundancy. Performance tests of the F-8 aircraft flight control system and computerized modelling of the technique are presented.

  10. Alkali injection system with controlled CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 ratios for combustion of coal

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.

    1988-01-01

    A high temperature combustion process for an organic fuel containing sulfur n which the nitrogen of air is replaced by carbon dioxide for combination with oxygen with the ratio of CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 being controlled to generate combustion temperatures above 2000 K. for a gas-gas reaction with SO.sub.2 and an alkali metal compound to produce a sulfate and in which a portion of the carbon-dioxide rich gas is recycled for mixing with oxygen and/or for injection as a cooling gas upstream from heating exchangers to limit fouling of the exchangers, with the remaining carbon-dioxide rich gas being available as a source of CO.sub.2 for oil recovery and other purposes.

  11. Quantum dot-based multidonor concentric FRET system and its application to biosensing using an excitation ratio.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungki; Ng, Cheryl Y W; Algar, W Russ

    2014-05-20

    A plethora of semiconductor quantum dot (QD)-based probes that rely on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed for the optical detection of a wide array of biological targets. To date, the vast majority of these probes have utilized one-step energy transfer between individual donor-acceptor pairs. Here, we report a new multidonor concentric FRET configuration that comprised two fluorescent dyes assembled around a central CdSeS/ZnS QD through peptide linkers. One of these dyes, either Alexa Fluor 555 (A555) or Alexa Fluor 647 (A647), served as an acceptor for both the central QD and the other coassembled dye, Alexa Fluor 488 (A488). The unresolved emission between the A488 and the QD precluded a standard analysis of FRET efficiency from quenching of donor emission intensity or decay time, instead necessitating an analysis of the two energy transfer pathways from deconvolved excitation spectra. When A647 was the terminal acceptor, both the QD-to-A647 and A488-to-A647 energy transfer pathways could be interrogated with blue light, but only the former could be interrogated with violet light. The different degrees of A647 sensitization between these two excitation wavelengths was a predictable function of the above energy transfer efficiencies and dye stoichiometry, and was exploited for quantitative bioanalysis through an excitation ratio, which is in contrast to the conventional use of an emission ratio with FRET-based probes. Detection of the activity of nanomolar concentrations of trypsin, a model protease that hydrolyzed the A488-labeled peptide linker, was demonstrated using both a fluorescence plate reader and a low-cost, compact device that used two low-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as excitation sources and a silicon photodiode to detect A647 emission. This multidonor concentric FRET configuration represents a new modality for ratiometric biosensing with QDs and is potentially useful for portable in vitro diagnostics. PMID:24810095

  12. The effect of partial coherence in receiving system noise temperature on array gain for telemetry and radio frequency carrier reception for receiving systems with unequal predetection signal-to-noise ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockman, M. H.

    1983-01-01

    Signal to noise ratio improvement realized by arraying receiving systems or stations for coherent reception is reduced when some portion of the predetection noise is coherent in the array. This effect for arrayed receiving systems with unequal apertures including expected performance for selected planets of the solar system within the array beamwidth is examined.

  13. Tests of variable-band multilayers designed for investigating optimal signal-to-noise vs artifact signal ratios in Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography (DDSA) imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boyers, D.; Ho, A.; Li, Q.; Piestrup, M.; Rice, M.; Tatchyn, R.

    1993-08-01

    In recent work, various design techniques were applied to investigate the feasibility of controlling the bandwidth and bandshape profiles of tungsten/boron-carbon (W/B{sub 4}C) and tungsten/silicon (W/Si) multilayers for optimizing their performance in synchrotron radiation based angiographical imaging systems at 33 keV. Varied parameters included alternative spacing geometries, material thickness ratios, and numbers of layer pairs. Planar optics with nominal design reflectivities of 30%--94% and bandwidths ranging from 0.6%--10% were designed at the Stanford Radiation Laboratory, fabricated by the Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company, and characterized on Beam Line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, in this paper we report selected results of these tests and review the possible use of the multilayers for determining optimal signal to noise vs. artifact signal ratios in practical Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography systems.

  14. Direct emissions of N2O, CO 2, and CH 4 from A/A/O bioreactor systems: impact of influent C/N ratio.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yangang; Wang, Jinhe; Xu, Li; Liu, Cui; Zong, Ruiqiang; Yu, Jianlin; Liang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    Direct emissions of N2O, CO2, and CH4, three important greenhouse gases (GHGs), from biological sewage treatment process have attracted increasing attention worldwide, due to the increasing concern about climate change. Despite the tremendous efforts devoted to understanding GHG emission from biological sewage treatment process, the impact of influent C/N ratios, in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD)/total nitrogen (TN), on an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A/A/O) bioreactor system has not been investigated. In this work, the direct GHG emission from A/A/O bioreactor systems fed with actual sewage was analyzed under different influent C/N ratios over a 6-month period. The results showed that the variation in influent carbon (160 to 500 mg/L) and nitrogen load (35 to 95 mg/L) dramatically influenced pollutant removal efficiency and GHG production from this process. In the A/A/O bioreactor systems, the GHG production increased from 26-39 to 112-173 g CO2-equivalent as influent C/N ratios decreased from 10.3/10.7 to 3.5/3.8. Taking consideration of pollutant removal efficiency and direct biogenic GHG (N2O, CO2, and CH4) production, the optimum influent C/N ratio was determined to be 7.1/7.5, at which a relatively high pollutant removal efficiency and meanwhile a low level of GHG production (30.4 g CO2-equivalent) can be achieved. Besides, mechanical aeration turned out to be the most significant factor influencing GHG emission from the A/A/O bioreactor systems. PMID:25850740

  15. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.534 How...

  16. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.534 How...

  17. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.534 How...

  18. Polaradiometric pyrometer in which the parallel and perpendicular components of radiation reflected from an unpolarized light source are equalized with the thermal radiation emitted from a measured object to determine its true temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abtahi, Ali A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A radiation pyrometer for measuring the true temperature of a body is provided by detecting and measuring thermal radiation from the body based on the principle that the effects of angular emission I(sub 1) and reflection I(sub 2) on the polarization states p and s of radiation are complementary such that upon detecting the combined partial polarization state components I(sub p) =I(sub 1p) + I(sub 2p) and I(sub s)=I(sub 1s) + I(sub 2s) and adjusting the intensity of the variable radiation source of the reflected radiation I(sub 2) until the combined partial radiation components I(sub p) and I(sub s) are equal, the effects of emissivity as well as diffusivity of the surface of the body are eliminated, thus obviating the need for any post processing of brightness temperature data.

  19. High Resolution Imaging of the Anomalous Flux-Ratio Gravitational Lens System CLASS B2045+265: Dark Or Luminous Satellites?

    SciTech Connect

    McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Flack, C.E.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Thompson, D.; Matthews, K.; Blandford, R.D.; Readhead, A.C.S.; Soifer, B.T.; /UC, Davis /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron. /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /Bemidji State U. /Caltech /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Cornell U., Astron. Dept.

    2006-11-10

    The existence of flux-ratio anomalies between fold and cusp images in galaxy-scale strong-lens systems has led to an interpretation based on the presence of a high mass-fraction of cold-dark-matter (CDM) substructures around galaxies, as predicted by numerical N-body simulations. These substructures can cause large perturbations of the image magnifications, leading to changes in the image flux ratios. The flux-ratio anomaly is particularly evident in the radio-loud quadruple gravitational lens system CLASS B2045+265. In this paper, new high-resolution radio, optical, and infrared imaging of B2045+265 is presented which sheds more light on this anomaly and its possible causes. First, deep Very Long Baseline Array observations show very compact images, possibly with a hint of a jet, but with no evidence for differential scattering or scatter broadening. Hence, the flux-ratio anomaly is unlikely to be caused by refractive scattering in either the Milky Way or the lens galaxy. Second, optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and through Adaptive-Optics imaging with the W. M. Keck Telescope, show a previously undiscovered object--interpreted as a (tidally disrupted) dwarf satellite based on its colors and slight extension--between the main lens galaxy and the three anomalous flux-ratio images. Third, color variations in the early-type lens galaxy indicate recent star-formation, possibly the result of secondary infall of gas-rich satellites. A population of young galaxies around the lens system could explain the previously discovered strong [O II] emission. However, spiral structure and/or normal star formation in the lens galaxy cannot be excluded. In light of these new data, we propose a lens model for the system, including the observed dwarf satellite, which reproduces all positional and flux-ratio constraints, without the need for additional CDM substructure. Although the model is peculiar in that the dwarf galaxy must be highly flattened, the model is very similar to recently proposed mass models based on high-order multipole expansions.

  20. Evolutionary outcomes for pairs of planets undergoing orbital migration and circularization: second-order resonances and observed period ratios in Kepler's planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Gruess, M.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the origin of the architectures of low-mass planetary systems, we perform numerical surveys of the evolution of pairs of coplanar planets in the mass range (1-4) M⊕. These evolve for up to 2 × 107 yr under a range of orbital migration torques and circularization rates assumed to arise through interaction with a protoplanetary disc. Near the inner disc boundary, significant variations of viscosity, interaction with density waves or with the stellar magnetic field could occur and halt migration, but allow circularization to continue. This was modelled by modifying the migration and circularization rates. Runs terminated without an extended period of circularization in the absence of migration torques gave rise to either a collision, or a system close to a resonance. These were mostly first order with a few per cent terminating in second-order resonances. Both planetary eccentricities were small <0.1 and all resonant angles liberated. This type of survey produced only a limited range of period ratios and cannot reproduce Kepler observations. When circularization alone operates in the final stages, divergent migration occurs causing period ratios to increase. Depending on its strength the whole period ratio range between 1 and 2 can be obtained. A few systems close to second-order commensurabilities also occur. In contrast to when arising through convergent migration, resonant trapping does not occur and resonant angles circulate. Thus, the behaviour of the resonant angles may indicate the form of migration that led to near resonance.

  1. Asymmetric thymocyte death underlies the CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio in the adaptive immune system

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Charles; Bains, Iren; Yates, Andrew J.; Seddon, Benedict

    2013-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the T-cell compartment has more CD4 helper than CD8 cytotoxic T cells, and this is most evident looking at T-cell development in the thymus. However, it remains unknown how thymocyte development so favors CD4 lineage development. To identify the basis of this asymmetry, we analyzed development of synchronized cohorts of thymocytes in vivo and estimated rates of thymocyte death and differentiation throughout development, inferring lineage-specific efficiencies of selection. Our analysis suggested that roughly equal numbers of cells of each lineage enter selection and found that, overall, a remarkable ∼75% of cells that start selection fail to complete the process. Importantly it revealed that class I-restricted thymocytes are specifically susceptible to apoptosis at the earliest stage of selection. The importance of differential apoptosis was confirmed by placing thymocytes under apoptotic stress, resulting in preferential death of class I-restricted thymocytes. Thus, asymmetric death during selection is the key determinant of the CD4:CD8 ratio in which T cells are generated by thymopoiesis. PMID:23858460

  2. ARGALI: an automatic cup-to-disc ratio measurement system for glaucoma detection and AnaLysIs framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Wong, D. W. K.; Lim, J. H.; Li, H.; Tan, N. M.; Wong, T. Y.

    2009-02-01

    Glaucoma is an irreversible ocular disease leading to permanent blindness. However, early detection can be effective in slowing or halting the progression of the disease. Physiologically, glaucoma progression is quantified by increased excavation of the optic cup. This progression can be quantified in retinal fundus images via the optic cup to disc ratio (CDR), since in increased glaucomatous neuropathy, the relative size of the optic cup to the optic disc is increased. The ARGALI framework constitutes of various segmentation approaches employing level set, color intensity thresholds and ellipse fitting for the extraction of the optic cup and disc from retinal images as preliminary steps. Following this, different combinations of the obtained results are then utilized to calculate the corresponding CDR values. The individual results are subsequently fused using a neural network. The learning function of the neural network is trained with a set of 100 retinal images For testing, a separate set 40 images is then used to compare the obtained CDR against a clinically graded CDR, and it is shown that the neural network-based result performs better than the individual components, with 96% of the results within intra-observer variability. The results indicate good promise for the further development of ARGALI as a tool for the early detection of glaucoma.

  3. Characterizing the zone of influence of dark matter clumps on image positions and flux ratios in gravitational lensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jyothisraj; Keeton, Charles R.; Brennan, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model of the universe predicts that there should be hundreds to thousands of clumps surrounding a massive galaxy. However, observations have shown that we only see dozens of dwarf galaxies and not the hundreds to thousands that are predicted. This means that either the CDM model prediction is wrong, or most of the substructure consists of dark matter that cannot be observed directly. Massive galaxies serve as natural gravitational lenses throughout the universe that allow us to indirectly observe these dark matter perturbations. Strong gravitational lensing occurs when these massive elliptical galaxies have the critical density required to bend light from a source located behind it and produce multiple images of that same source. Dark matter clumps located near these multiple images affect their positions and flux ratios. We used lensing simulations to quantify how dark matter clumps affect image properties and to characterize this zone of influence through color maps of chi-squared values. Our results showed regions around each of the image positions that display significant perturbations for low mass clumps. For higher mass clumps, however, these distinct regions bleed together. We found that there is a correlation between the mass of the dark matter clump and the area it perturbs.This research has been supported by NSF grant PHY-1263280.

  4. Critical phenomena at the threshold of immediate merger in binary black hole systems: The extreme mass ratio case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Carsten; Akcay, Sarp; Barack, Leor; Nagar, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    In numerical simulations of black hole binaries, Pretorius and Khurana [Classical Quantum Gravity 24, S83 (2007)CQGRDG0264-938110.1088/0264-9381/24/12/S07] have observed critical behavior at the threshold between scattering and immediate merger. The number of orbits scales as n≃-γln⁡|p-p*| along any one-parameter family of initial data such that the threshold is at p=p*. Hence, they conjecture that in ultrarelativistic collisions almost all the kinetic energy can be converted into gravitational waves if the impact parameter is fine-tuned to the threshold. As a toy model for the binary, they consider the geodesic motion of a test particle in a Kerr black hole spacetime, where the unstable circular geodesics play the role of critical solutions, and calculate the critical exponent γ. Here, we incorporate radiation reaction into this model using the self-force approximation. The critical solution now evolves adiabatically along a sequence of unstable circular geodesic orbits under the effect of the self-force. We confirm that almost all the initial energy and angular momentum are radiated on the critical solution. Our calculation suggests that, even for infinite initial energy, this happens over a finite number of orbits given by n∞≃0.41/η, where η is the (small) mass ratio. We derive expressions for the time spent on the critical solution, number of orbits and radiated energy as functions of the initial energy and impact parameter.

  5. Dynamic Response and Signal to Noise Ratio Investigation of NIR-FBG Dynamic Sensing System for Monitoring Thin- walled Composite Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizi, Z. M.; Epaarachchi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Optical fiber systems for dynamic response measurement become an attractive study nowadays especially in the field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). This work presents the investigation of an optical fiber sensor system utilizing Near Infra-Red Fiber Bragg Grating (NIR-FBG) sensor for SHM of a thin-walled composite structure. In this study, a comparison between the experimental result and simulation study using finite element analysis has been presented. By comparing both results, the FBG dynamic sensing system was shown to have an excellent capability in acquiring dynamic response due to flexural wave propagations. In the meantime, a signal to noise ratio (SNR) study was also performed to several FBG dynamic sensor systems; particularly to see the comparison between NIR-FBG sensor and 1550 nm FBG sensor. Furthermore, with a proper configuration, an NIR-FBG system was proved to have better performance than the 1550 nm based FBG sensor.

  6. Increase of signal-to-noise ratio of a collinear holographic storage system with reference modulated by a ring lens array.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yeh-Wei; Chen, Chih-Yuan; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2010-04-15

    We propose an approach of a reference modulation in a collinear holographic storage system to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We derive a solution that shows that the point-spread function is related to the autocorrelation function of the reference pattern times a defocusing phase term. Accordingly, the lens-array phase modulation is proposed and demonstrated theoretically. The SNR of the system can be dramatically enhanced to 63.2, rather than 2.3 in the traditional approach. PMID:20410942

  7. Preliminary engineering report for design of a subscale ejector/diffuser system for high expansion ratio space engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Kurzius, S. C.; Doktor, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The design of a subscale jet engine driven ejector/diffuser system is examined. Analytical results and preliminary design drawings and plans are included. Previously developed performance prediction techniques are verified. A safety analysis is performed to determine the mechanism for detonation suppression.

  8. Analysis of the depth of field in hexagonal array integral imaging systems based on modulation transfer function and Strehl ratio.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Ayatollah

    2016-04-10

    Integral imaging is a technique for displaying three-dimensional images using microlens arrays. In this paper, a method for calculating root mean squared wavefront error and modulation transfer function (MTF) of a defocused integral imaging capture system with hexagonal aperture microlens arrays is introduced. Also, maximum allowable depth of field with Century MTF analyzing and Strehl criterion are obtained. PMID:27139873

  9. Impact of the New Jersey all-payer rate-setting system: an analysis of financial ratios.

    PubMed

    Rosko, M D

    1989-01-01

    Although prospective payment may contain costs, many analysts are concerned about the unintended consequences of rate regulation. This article presents the results of a case-study analysis of the New Jersey rate-setting programs during the period 1977-1985. Using measures of profitability, liquidity, and leverage, data for New Jersey, the Northeast, and the United States as a whole are used to contrast the impact of two forms of prospective payment. After attempting alternative cost-containment methods, the New Jersey Department of Health implemented an all-payer system in which prospective rates of compensation were established for DRGs. The new rate-setting system was designed to control costs, improve access to care, maintain quality of services, ensure financial viability of efficient providers, and limit the payment differentials associated with cost shifting. The results of this study have a number of implications for the evaluation of all-payer rate regulation. First, although the New Jersey all-payer system was more successful than the partial-payer program in restraining the rate of increase in cost per case, savings were achieved without adversely affecting the viability of regulated hospitals. Second, the large differentials among payers that were associated with the partial-payer program were reduced dramatically by the all-payer program. Third, using the financial position of inner-city hospitals relative to suburban hospitals as a measure of equity, the all-payer system appeared to be a fairer method of regulating rates. PMID:10291809

  10. Interstellar CNO Isotope Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, C.; Wilson, T. L.; Langer, N.; Chin, Y.-N.; Mauersberger, R.

    In an interpretation of interstellar, circumstellar, and solar system CNO isotope ratios, we find two scenarios which are free of internal inconsistencies. The first requires that the early solar system was enriched by material from massive stars, leading to enhanced 12C/13C and 18O/17O ratios and to a reduced 14N/15N ratio. The second involves infall of gas onto the galactic disk after the formation of the solar system. Both scenarios require that the bulk of the interstellar 16O, 18O and 15N originates from massive stars (>8M⊙), with 18O and perhaps 15N being destroyed in lower mass stars. 17O is mainly synthesized in stars of intermediate mass while 12C, 13C, and 14N are produced in stars of high and intermediate masses. With respect to nucleosynthesis, evolutionary models of massive stars applying the Ledoux criterion for convection and semiconvective mixing should be preferred. These yield high 18O abundances above the convective He-burning core. For 17O, theoretical yields and observational data are not consistent, since models predict too much 17O from massive stars. The absence of an 18O/17O gradient in the galactic plane remains unexplained. Since 18O and 17O are products of quite different processes, this absence strongly constrains numerical models of the "chemical" evolution of the Galaxy.

  11. "Perfect Zoom System" which enables both a zoom ratio of 25:1 and a high-resolution in stereo microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Norio; Mizuta, Masahiro; Shinada, Nobuhiro; Nakayama, Hiroaki; Ohuchi, Yumiko

    2015-09-01

    A stereomicroscope can stereoscopically observe an object with protrusions and recesses as if the object were viewed by both eyes. Such stereomicroscopes use an optical system to create two slightly different viewing angles of an object. The different images are both enlarged and viewed through two eyepieces. Each of the observation optical systems includes a variable magnification mechanism which is called a zoom lens system. In recent years, a demand for stereomicroscopes that can observe a wide variable magnification range has been increasing along with the diversification of applications. However, there are no stereomicroscope zoom lenses with both a high resolution and a large zoom ratio. We developed the "Perfect Zoom System" which can reduce the light flux diameter going through the objective lens in the low-power state. In the "Perfect Zoom System", the zoom lens groups move along not only the optical axes but also perpendicular to the axes. Therefore, the objective lens could be made smaller by decentering the G2 and G3 group lenses in zoom lens group. We achieved a high resolution and a zoom ratio of 25:1.

  12. Hydrogen isotope abundances in the solar system. Part II: Meteorites with terrestrial-like D / H ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Franois; Javoy, Marc; Halbout, Jrme; Dimon, Bernard; Merlivat, Liliane

    1987-07-01

    Hydrogen isotopic compositions were determined by progressive pyrolysis in type 6 to type 3 ordinary chondrites. A marked decrease in the isotopic composition patterns was observed at intermediate temperatures (250-300C) and results from the pyrolysis of a D-depleted component. A ?D value of-400 for this component can be inferred from a mathematical treatment of the H concentration release pattern. At higher temperatures (600 to 900C) the bimodal ?D pattern was observed in Hedjaz (L3-L6) with negative ?D values, suggesting the presence of a carbonaceous chondrite-like organic polymer in this meteorite. A peak in the ?D pattern was observed at high temperature in all the analyzed samples, suggesting that D-rich H is widespread among meteorites. A minimum of 50% of the total H is concentrated in the fine-grained particles (the "holy smoke") of equilibrated chondrites, reinforcing the idea that H is associated with the C. An internal correlation between the bulk isotopic composition of HT H 2 and the maximum measured D/H ratio is interpreted as the result of either the mixing of two components (Model 1), namely a D-depleted H at -400 and a D-rich H at +5000, or a progressive isotopic fractionation of a D-depleted reservoir (Model 2). The first model (the favored one) implies that the two components were present in different proportions at the time of the formation of each meteorite, and that metamorphism has homogeneized the two phases. The uniqueness of the two isotopic end-members for all meteorites is not demonstrated. The second model relates the isotopic fractionation of the D-rich phase to the degree of equilibration of chondrites. All the isotopic variations reported in this work for ordinary chondrites can be explained quantitatively by either one of these two models. The upper and lower limits for the D/Hratios of the D-rich and of the D-depleted H in meteorites are calculated to be 1.1 10 -3 and 9 10 -5, respectively.

  13. Engineered high aspect ratio vertical nanotubes as a model system for the investigation of catalytic methanol synthesis over Cu/ZnO.

    PubMed

    Gder, Firat; Frei, Elias; Kckbayrak, Umut M; Menzel, Andreas; Thomann, Ralf; Luptak, Roman; Hollaender, Bernd; Krossing, Ingo; Zacharias, Margit

    2014-02-12

    Catalytically synthesized methanol from H2 and CO2 using porous Cu/ZnO aggregates is a promising, carbon neutral, and renewable alternative to replace fossil fuel based transport fuels. However, the absence of surface-engineered model systems to understand and improve the industrial Cu/ZnO catalyst poses a big technological gap in efforts to increase industrial methanol conversion efficiency. In this work, we report a novel process for the fabrication of patterned, vertically aligned high aspect ratio 1D nanostructures on Si that can be used as an engineered model catalyst. The proposed strategy employs near-field phase shift lithography (NF-PSL), deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) to pattern, etch, and coat Si wafers to produce high aspect ratio 1D nanostructures. Using this method, we produced a model system consisting of high aspect ratio Cu-decorated ZnO nanotubes (NTs) to investigate the morphological effects of ZnO catalyst support in comparison to the planar Cu/ZnO catalyst in terms of the catalytic reactions. The engineered catalysts performed 70 times better in activating CO2 than the industrial catalyst. In light of the obtained results, several important points are highlighted, and recommendations are made to achieve higher catalytic performance. PMID:24392784

  14. Biodegradable in situ gelling delivery systems containing pilocarpine as new antiglaucoma formulations: effect of a mercaptoacetic acid/N-isopropylacrylamide molar ratio

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jui-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Ocular drug delivery is one of the most commonly used treatment modalities in the management of glaucoma. We have recently proposed the use of gelatin and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) graft copolymers as biodegradable in situ forming delivery systems for the intracameral administration of antiglaucoma medications. In this study, we further investigated the influence of carrier characteristics on drug delivery performance. The carboxyl-terminated PNIPAAm samples with different molecular weights were synthesized by varying the molar ratio of mercaptoacetic acid (MAA)/N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) from 0.05 to 1.25, and were determined by end-group titration. The preparation of gelatin-g-PNIPAAm (GN) copolymers from these thermoresponsive polymers was achieved using carbodiimide chemistry. Our results showed that the carboxylic end-capped PNIPAAm of high molecular weight may lead to the lower thermal phase transition temperature and slower degradation rate of GN vehicles than its low molecular weight counterparts. With a decreasing MAA/NIPAAm molar ratio, the drug encapsulation efficiency of copolymers was increased due to fast temperature-triggered capture of pilocarpine nitrate. The degradation of the gelatin network could greatly affect the drug release profiles. All of the GN copolymeric carriers demonstrated good corneal endothelial cell and tissue compatibility. It is concluded that different types of GN-based delivery systems exhibit noticeably distinct intraocular pressure-lowering effect and miosis action, thereby reflecting the potential value of a MAA/NIPAAm molar ratio in the development of new antiglaucoma formulations. PMID:24187486

  15. Calcium Supplementation Improves Na+/K+ Ratio, Antioxidant Defense and Glyoxalase Systems in Salt-Stressed Rice Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Anisur; Nahar, Kamrun; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the regulatory role of exogenous calcium (Ca) in developing salt stress tolerance in rice seedlings. Hydroponically grown 13-day-old rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. BRRI dhan47) seedlings were exposed to 200 mM NaCl alone and combined with 2 mM CaCl2 and 2 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA, a Ca scavenger) for 3 days. The salt stress caused growth inhibition, chlorosis and water shortage in the rice seedlings. The salt-induced stress disrupted ion homeostasis through Na+ influx and K+ efflux, and decreased other mineral nutrient uptake. Salt stress caused oxidative stress in seedlings through lipid peroxidation, loss of plasma membrane integrity, higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and methylglyoxal (MG) formation. The salt-stressed seedlings supplemented with exogenous Ca recovered from water loss, chlorosis and growth inhibition. Calcium supplementation in the salt-stressed rice seedlings improved ion homeostasis by inhibition of Na+ influx and K+ leakage. Exogenous Ca also improved ROS and MG detoxification by improving the antioxidant defense and glyoxalase systems, respectively. On the other hand, applying EGTA along with salt and Ca again negatively affected the seedlings as EGTA negated Ca activity. It confirms that, the positive responses in salt-stressed rice seedlings to exogenous Ca were for Ca mediated improvement of ion homeostasis, antioxidant defense and glyoxalase system.

  16. Neutral beam interlock system on TFTR using infrared pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Kugel, H.W.; Kozub, T.A.; Lowrance, J.L.; Mastrocola, V.; Renda, G.; Young, K.M.

    1986-06-01

    Although the region of the TFTR vacuum vessel wall which is susceptible to damage by neutral beam strike is armored with a mosaic of TiC-clad POCO graphite titles, at power deposition levels above 2.5 kW/cm/sup 2/ the armor surface temperature exceeds 1200/sup 0/C within 250 ms and itself becomes susceptible to damage. In order to protect the wall armor, a neutral beam interlock system based on infrared pyrometry measurement of the armor surface temperature was installed on TFTR. For each beamline, a three-fiber-optic telescope views three areas of approx.30 cm diameter centered on the armor hot spots for the three ion sources. Each signal is fiber-optic coupled to a remote 900 nm pyrometer which feeds analog signals to the neutral beam interrupt circuits. The pyrometer interlock system is designed to interrupt each of the twelve ion sources independently within 10 ms of the temperature exceeding a threshold settable in the range of 500 to 2300/sup 0/C. A description of the pyrometer interlock system and its performance will be presented.

  17. Neutral beam interlock system on TFTR using infrared pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Kugel, H.W.; Kozub, T.A.; Lowrance, J.L.; Mastrocola, V.; Renda, G.; Young, K.M.

    1986-08-01

    Although the region of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel wall which is susceptible to damage by neutral beam strike is armored with a mosaic of TiC-clad POCO graphite tiles, at power deposition levels above 2.5 kW/cm/sup 2/ the armor surface temperature exceeds 1200 /sup 0/C within 250 ms, and itself becomes susceptible to damage. In order to protect the wall armor, a neutral beam interlock system based on infrared pyrometry measurement of the armor surface temperature was installed on TFTR. For each beamline, a three-fiber-optic telescope views three areas of --30 cm diameter centered on the armor hot spots for the three ion sources. Each signal is fiber-optic coupled to a remote 900-nm pyrometer which feeds analog signals to the neutral beam interrupt circuits. The pyrometer interlock system is designed to interrupt each of the 12 ion sources independently within 10 ms of the temperature exceeding a threshold which can be set in the range of 500--2300 /sup 0/C. A description of the pyrometer interlock system and its performance will be presented.

  18. Neutral beam interlock system on TFTR using infrared pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, S. S.; Kugel, H. W.; Kozub, T. A.; Lowrance, J. L.; Mastrocola, V.; Renda, G.; Young, K. M.

    1986-08-01

    Although the region of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel wall which is susceptible to damage by neutral beam strike is armored with a mosaic of TiC-clad POCO graphite tiles, at power deposition levels above 2.5 kW/cm2 the armor surface temperature exceeds 1200 °C within 250 ms, and itself becomes susceptible to damage. In order to protect the wall armor, a neutral beam interlock system based on infrared pyrometry measurement of the armor surface temperature was installed on TFTR. For each beamline, a three-fiber-optic telescope views three areas of ˜30 cm diameter centered on the armor hot spots for the three ion sources. Each signal is fiber-optic coupled to a remote 900-nm pyrometer which feeds analog signals to the neutral beam interrupt circuits. The pyrometer interlock system is designed to interrupt each of the 12 ion sources independently within 10 ms of the temperature exceeding a threshold which can be set in the range of 500-2300 °C. A description of the pyrometer interlock system and its performance will be presented.

  19. Determination of pumper truck intervention ratios in zones with high fire potential by using geographical information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricak, Burak; Kucuk, Omer; Enez, Korhan

    2014-01-01

    Fighting forest fires not only depends on the forest type, topography, and weather conditions, but is also closely related to the technical properties of fire-fighting equipment. Firefighting is an important part of fire management planning. However, because of the complex nature of forests, creating thematic layers to generate potential fire risk maps is difficult. The use of remote sensing data has become an efficient method for the discrete classification of potential fire risks. The study was located in the Central District of the Kastamonu Regional Forest Directorate, covering an area of 24,320 ha, 15,685 ha of which is forested. On the basis of stand age, crown closure, and tree species, the sizes and distributions of potential fire risk zones within the study area were determined using high-resolution GeoEye satellite imagery and geographical information system data. The status of pumper truck intervention in zones with high fire risk and the sufficiency of existing forest roads within an existing forest network were discussed based on combustible matter characteristics. Pumper truck intervention was 83% for high-risk zones, 79% for medium-risk zones, and 78% for low-risk zones. A pumper truck intervention area map along existing roads was also created.

  20. Energy dependence of localization with interactions and disorder: The generalized inverse participation ratio of an ensemble of two-site Anderson-Hubbard systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortis, Rachel; Perera, Jayanayana

    2015-03-01

    We explore the effect of interactions on novel features found in non-interacting disordered systems. Johri and Bhatt [PRL 109 076402 (2012), PRB 86 125140 (2012)] showed that for non-interacting particles moving in a disordered potential Lifshitz states lead to a decrease in localization at the band edges. This is reflected in an abrupt decline in the inverse participation ratio following a sharp peak. We consider an ensemble of two-site Anderson-Hubbard systems and study a generalization of the inverse participation ratio applicable to interacting systems. With on-site Coulomb repulsion U, two types of resonances can occur: As in the non-interacting case, the potentials at the two sites may be similar. In addition, the potential at one site may differ from its neighbor by U. We demonstrate that these two types of resonance and the diversity of transitions in the interacting case result in much more varied dependence of localization on energy, with multiple local minima, including a strong suppression and more structure near the Fermi level. Opportunities for experimental observation are considered. NSERC of Canada.

  1. Performance of single and dual-polarized optically preamplified M-ary PPM systems with finite extinction ratios over FSO fading channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolsi, Taha; Elrefaie, Aly F.

    2016-05-01

    M-ary pulse position modulation (PPM) systems have been considered in free-space optical (FSO) communications, optical fiber links, and passive optical networks. In this paper, we study the error performance of direct-detection optically preamplified M-ary PPM systems over slowly fading FSO channels. The study considers the combined effects on the probability of bit error, Pb, of channel fading with a given scintillation index, σp2, the transmitter finite extinction ratio, r, and the preamplifier spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. We provide results for both single and dual-polarized systems with symbol sizes M ∈ { 2 , 4 , … , 1024 } at Pb =10-4 and Pb =10-9. The fading models considered in this study are the exponential, log-normal, and gamma-gamma channels. For single-polarized systems with infinite extinction ratios, we provide closed-form expressions for the bit error probabilities for the three channel models. For the dual-polarized systems we compute them numerically. The results indicate that gamma-gamma fading imposes a more severe penalty than the log-normal case. In this study, the power penalty at Pb =10-9 ranges between 1.8 and 14 dB for the log-normal channel, whereas it ranges between 2.2 and 30.7 dB for the gamma-gamma channel. The study also demonstrates that the power penalty due to the combined effects of transmitter finite r and channel fading is the sum of the penalty due to fading alone and the penalty due to a finite r alone, and that the power penalty for dual-polarized systems is about 0.4 dB larger than single-polarized ones.

  2. On the optimal sex ratio.

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, S; Lessard, S

    1983-01-01

    The equilibrium structures for various multiallele sex-determining genetic models of panmictic populations with sex expression depending on the genotypes of either the zygote or a parent are described. Even-sex-ratio equilibrium surfaces can exist apart from equilibrium points having coincident male and female allelic frequency sets. The latter (symmetric) equilibrium states entail biased sex ratios. A stable symmetric equilibrium and an even-sex-ratio equilibrium segregating the same alleles cannot coexist. The tendency to evolve toward an even-sex ratio is embodied by the following optimality property: starting from an equilibrium having a biased sex ratio, mutant sex-determining alleles can accumulate only in the case in which in the augmented system all attainable equilibrium states have a sex ratio closer to one to one. PMID:6577461

  3. Application of European protocol in the evaluation of contrast-to-noise ratio and mean glandular dose for two digital mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Muhogora, W E; Devetti, A; Padovani, R; Msaki, P; Bonutti, F

    2008-01-01

    The performance of two digital mammography systems, Agfa CR75 and CRMM3 computed radiography (CR) and IMS Giotto MD direct digital radiography (DR), was assessed by applying a method recommended in the European protocol for quality control in mammography screening. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD) values were measured and contrast detail (CD) analysis was performed. The CNRs for system CR were 21.9, 12.9, 9.5, 8.8, 7.4, 5.5 and 4.4 for 2, 3, 4, 4.5, 5, 6 and 7-cm polymenthylmethacrylate (PMMA) thickness, respectively. The respective CNRs for system DR were 10.4, 8.8, 6.3, 7.3, 7.2, 6.4 and 6.54. For the same phantom thickness sequence, the MGDs were 0.7, 1.1, 1.3, 1.6, 1.9, 2.5 and 3.4 mGy for system CR, whereas they were 0.7, 1.2, 1.1, 1.3, 1.8, 3.5 and 3.9 mGy for system DR. The CNR and MGD results satisfactorily correlate with CD analysis results. The MGD values compare well with the values recommended in the European protocol. Despite being simple, CNR and MGD can provide an effective system for performance assessment and constancy checks for related optimisations. PMID:18283065

  4. Air/fuel ratio control system for an internal combustion engine with a function for preventing the blackening phenomenon of oxygen concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanabe, T.; Asakura, M.; Kimura, K.; Muroya, M.

    1988-03-22

    An air/fuel ratio control system for an internal combustion engine is described comprising: an air supply passage connected to an air intake system of the internal combustion engine, for varying the air/fuel ratio of the mixture to be supplied to the engine; an open/close valve disposed in the air supply passage for controlling the air flow in the air supply passage; an oxygen concentration sensing unit disposed in an exhaust gas of the internal combustion engine; current supply means for supplying a pump current across the electrodes of the oxygen pump element so as to keep constant voltage generated across the electrodes of the sensor cell element thereby causing the sensing unit to monitor a magnitude of the pump current which is substantially in proportion to the oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas; valve open time period control circuit means connected to the oxygen concentration detection device; valve drive means connected to the valve open time period control circuit means for opening the open/close valve for the calculated valve open time period in each of the cycles; and control means responsive to output signals of the current supply means and the valve open time period control circuit means for stopping the supply of the pump current across the electrodes of the oxygen pump element when the valve open time period calculated by the valve open time period control circuit means exceeds a predetermined upper limit of valve open time period.

  5. Characteristics and cytotoxicity of folate-modified curcumin-loaded PLA-PEG micellar nano systems with various PLA:PEG ratios.

    PubMed

    Phan, Quoc Thong; Le, Mai Huong; Le, Thi Thu Huong; Tran, Thi Hong Ha; Xuan, Phuc Nguyen; Ha, Phuong Thu

    2016-06-30

    Targeting delivery system use natural drugs for tumor cells is an appealing platform help to reduce the side effects and enhance the therapeutic effects of the drug. In this study, we synthesized curcumin (Cur) loaded (D, L Poly lactic - Poly ethylenglycol) micelle (Cur/PLA-PEG) with the ratio of PLA/PEG of 3:1 2:1 1:1 1:2 and 1:3 (w/w) and another micelle modified by folate (Cur/PLA-PEG-Fol) for targeting cancer therapy. The PLA-PEG copolymer was synthesized by ring opening polymerization method. After loading onto the micelle, solubility of Cur increased from 0.38 to 0.73mgml(-1). The average size of prepared Cur/PLA-PEG micelles was from 60 to 69nm (corresponding to the ratio difference of PLA/PEG) and the drug encapsulating efficiency was from 48.8 to 91.3%. Compared with the Cur/PLA-PEG micelles, the size of Cur/PLA-PEG-Fol micelles were from 80 to 86nm and showed better in vitro cellular uptake and cytotoxicity towards HepG2 cells. The cytotoxicity of the NPs however depends much on the PEG component. The results demonstrated that Folate-modified micelles could serve as a potential nano carrier to improve solubility, anti-cancer activity of Cur and targeting ability of the system. PMID:27150945

  6. Sixteen Years of Ulysses Interstellar Dust Measurements in the Solar System. I. Mass Distribution and Gas-to-dust Mass Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Strub, Peter; Grün, Eberhard; Sterken, Veerle J.

    2015-10-01

    In the early 1990s, contemporary interstellar dust penetrating deep into the heliosphere was identified with the in situ dust detector on board the Ulysses spacecraft. Between 1992 and the end of 2007 Ulysses monitored the interstellar dust stream. The interstellar grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar medium (ISM) surrounding our solar system. Earlier analyses of the Ulysses interstellar dust data measured between 1992 and 1998 implied the existence of a population of “big” interstellar grains (up to 10-13 kg). The derived gas-to-dust-mass ratio was smaller than the one derived from astronomical observations, implying a concentration of interstellar dust in the very local ISM. In this paper we analyze the entire data set from 16 yr of Ulysses interstellar dust measurements in interplanetary space. This paper concentrates on the overall mass distribution of interstellar dust. An accompanying paper investigates time-variable phenomena in the Ulysses interstellar dust data, and in a third paper we present the results from dynamical modeling of the interstellar dust flow applied to Ulysses. We use the latest values for the interstellar hydrogen and helium densities, the interstellar helium flow speed of {v}{ISM∞ }=23.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and the ratio of radiation pressure to gravity, β, calculated for astronomical silicates. We find a gas-to-dust mass ratio in the local interstellar cloud of {R}{{g}/{{d}}}={193}-57+85, and a dust density of (2.1 ± 0.6) × 10-24 kg m-3. For a higher inflow speed of 26 {km} {{{s}}}-1, the gas-to-dust mass ratio is 20% higher, and, accordingly, the dust density is lower by the same amount. The gas-to-dust mass ratio derived from our new analysis is compatible with the value most recently determined from astronomical observations. We confirm earlier results that the very local ISM contains “big” (i.e., ≈1 μm sized) interstellar grains. We find a dust density in the local ISM that is a factor of three lower than values implied by earlier analyses.

  7. Elucidating microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems using sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios: The example of oil reservoir souring control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit; Mayer, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are ubiquitous in anoxic environments where they couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the production of hydrogen sulfide. This can be problematic for various industries including oil production where reservoir "souring" (the generation of H 2S) requires corrective actions. Nitrate or nitrite injection into sour oil fields can promote SRB control by stimulating organotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (O-NRB) that out-compete SRB for electron donors (biocompetitive exclusion), and/or by lithotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) that remove H 2S directly. Sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfide and sulfate were monitored in batch cultures and sulfidic bioreactors to evaluate mitigation of SRB activities by nitrate or nitrite injection. Sulfate reduction in batch cultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac15 indicated typical Rayleigh-type fractionation of sulfur isotopes during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) with lactate, whereas oxygen isotope ratios in unreacted sulfate remained constant. Sulfur isotope fractionation in batch cultures of the NR-SOB Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO was minimal during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, which had δ18O SO4 values similar to that of the water-oxygen. Treating an up-flow bioreactor with increasing doses of nitrate to eliminate sulfide resulted in changes in sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide but very little variation in oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate. These observations were similar to results obtained from SRB-only, but different from those of NR-SOB-only pure culture control experiments. This suggests that biocompetitive exclusion of SRB took place in the nitrate-injected bioreactor. In two replicate bioreactors treated with nitrite, less pronounced sulfur isotope fractionation and a slight decrease in δ18O SO4 were observed. This indicated that NR-SOB played a minor role during dosing with low nitrite and that biocompetitive exclusion was the major process. The results demonstrate that stable isotope data can contribute unique information for understanding complex microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems, and offer important information for the management of H 2S problems in oil reservoirs and elsewhere.

  8. Automated temperature measuring system for coke-oven battery heating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bukreev, A.V.; Khromov, N.A.; Volokita, G.I.

    1992-12-31

    Work is in progress at the Avdeevka C&CW on the introduction of computer technology in the control of coal preparation and carbonization processes. One urgent problem at present is the automated input of information into the computers. Carbonization process control requires temperature measurements to be made by the gas plant attendants every shift, with the aid of {open_quotes}Promin{close_quotes} pyrometers. The readings take a considerable time to record and process, and distract the operator`s attention from his main duties, and the possibility of errors can never be excluded. Since the accuracy of the readings has a significant influence on process control, while the readings are subsequently used in a mathematical model of the carbonization process, it has become necessary to develop an automated system for recording temperature readings, on the basis of the {open_quotes}Promin{close_quotes} pyrometer. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  9. The effect of the size of the system, aspect ratio and impurities concentration on the dynamic of emergent magnetic monopoles in artificial spin ice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Alejandro

    2013-08-01

    In this work we study the dynamical properties of a finite array of nanomagnets in artificial kagome spin ice at room temperature. The dynamic response of the array of nanomagnets is studied by implementing a "frustrated celular autómata" (FCA), based in the charge model and dipolar model. The FCA simulations allow us to study in real-time and deterministic way, the dynamic of the system, with minimal computational resource. The update function is defined according to the coordination number of vertices in the system. Our results show that for a set geometric parameters of the array of nanomagnets, the system exhibits high density of Dirac strings and high density emergent magnetic monopoles. A study of the effect of disorder in the arrangement of nanomagnets is incorporated in this work.

  10. Time-resolved stereo PIV measurements of the horseshoe vortex system at multiple locations in a low-aspect-ratio pin-fin array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Corey D.; Lynch, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Pin-fin arrays are a type of cooling feature found in heat exchangers, with elements (generally cylindrical or square) that span between two endwalls. Flow around the pin-fins generates highly turbulent mixing that increases convective heat transfer from the pins to the cooling flow. At the junction of a pin-fin and the endwall, a complex flow known as the horseshoe vortex (HSV) system is present. Although the HSV is a well-studied phenomenon, its behavior is not understood in the highly turbulent flow of a pin-fin array. Furthermore, the presence of close confining endwalls for low-aspect-ratio (short) pin-fins may have an impact on HSV dynamics. The present study utilized time-resolved stereo particle image velocimetry to examine the fluid dynamics of the HSV system in rows 1, 3, and 5 of a low-aspect-ratio pin-fin array, for a range of Reynolds numbers. In the first row, instantaneous flowfields indicated a clearly defined HSV at the leading edge, with dynamics similar to previous studies of bluff-body junction flows. The time-averaged HSV system moved closer to the pin with increasing Reynolds number, with more concentrated vorticity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). For downstream rows, there was a significant increase in the amount of mid-channel vorticity, with levels on the same order as the value in the core of the HSV. The time-averaged HSV system in downstream rows showed minimal variation with respect to either Reynolds number or row location. Regions of maximum streamwise and wall-normal turbulent fluctuations around the HSV were a result of its quasiperiodic oscillation between so-called backflow and zero-flow modes, which were present even in downstream rows despite the extremely high mid-channel turbulence. In the downstream rows, normalized TKE across the entire field of view decreased with increased Reynolds number, likely due to dissipation rates proportionally outpacing increases in mean channel velocity and Reynolds number. The flowfield results from this study corroborate prior findings from heat transfer measurements that indicate a fully developed condition is established at around the fifth row in an array.

  11. 230Th/232Th activity ratios as a chronological marker complementing 210Pb dating in an estuarine system affected by industrial releases.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, E G; Bolvar, J P; Garca-Tenorio, R; Martn, J E

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to show the usefulness of the 230Th/232Th activity ratios as a chronological marker that can be helpful in the dating of sediment cores collected from an estuarine system located in the south west of Spain highly polluted by wastes from fertilizer plants. These wastes, being released for 30 years, and enriched in radionuclides from the uranium series including 210Pb, invalidate the application of the 210Pb dating technique in full extent to the sediment cores collected in this estuary. However, the evaluation and the interpretation of both 210Pb and 230Th/232Th profiles allows the determination of average sedimentation rates in different parts of the cores, contaminated and noncontaminated zone, that agree in the case analysed in this research. Through this approach, a confident chronology covering the last century, which is essential to analyse and reconstruct the historical evolution of other pollutants in this heavily contaminated system can be established. PMID:11291442

  12. Influence of Ni/Mo ratio on structural and electrical properties of double perovskite system Sr2Ni1+ x Mo1- x O6- δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pravin; Singh, Nitish Kumar; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Prabhakar

    2015-11-01

    Technologically important double perovskite system Sr2Ni1+ x Mo1- x O6- δ with x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 was prepared by solution combustion method. The structural and the Rietveld analysis of compositions revealed the formation of double perovskite tetragonal phase Sr2NiMoO6 with space group I4/m as a major phase. SrMoO4 and NiO were also observed as minor phases. Microstructural studies depicted the formation of uniform grains for all the samples. The average grain size was found to lie between the ranges of 1-4 μm. XPS analysis of the synthesized compositions showed the decreasing ratio of Mo5+ to Mo6+ ions in the system with increasing Ni content, which played an important role in the conduction mechanism. The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of all compositions indicated that it is more compatible to the TEC of standard electrolytes. The electrical conductivity for all the compositions was studied using impedance spectroscopy in the temperature range 200-600 °C. Composition with x = 0.05 showed better electrical conductivity with good catalytic activity.

  13. An analytical system for studying the stable isotopes of carbon monoxide using continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, S. L.; van der Veen, C.; Popa, M. E.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-02-01

    In the atmosphere, carbon monoxide (CO) is the major sink for the hydroxyl radical (OH •), has multiple anthropogenic and natural sources and considerable spatial and seasonal variability. Measurements of CO isotopic composition are useful in constraining the strengths of its individual source and sink processes and thus its global cycle. A fully automated system for δ13C and δ18O analysis has been developed to extract CO from an air sample, convert CO into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent, and then determine the isotopic composition in an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He), the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is only 1-3% of the typical sample size. The repeatability is 0.1‰ for δ13C and 0.2‰ for δ18O. The peak area allows simultaneous determination of the mole fraction with an analytical repeatability of ~0.7 nmol mol-1 for 100 mL of typical ambient air (185.4 nmol mol-1 of CO). A single, automated, measurement is performed in 18 min, so multiple measurements can be combined conveniently to improve precision.

  14. Design, fabrication and characterization of high-stroke high-aspect ratio micro electro mechanical systems deformable mirrors for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Rocha, Bautista

    Adaptive optic (AO) systems for next generation of extremely large telescopes (30--50 meter diameter primary mirrors) require high-stroke (10 microns), high-order (100x100) deformable mirrors at lower-cost than current technology. The required specifications are achievable with Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices fabricated with high-aspect ratio processing techniques. This dissertation will review simulation results compared with displacement measurements of actuators utilizing a white-light interferometer. It will also review different actuator designs, materials and post-processing procedures fabricated in three different high-aspect ratio processes, Microfabrica's Electrochemical Fabrication (EFAB(TM)), HT-Micro's Precision Fabrication Technology (HTPF(TM)), and Innovative Micro Technologies (IMT) fabrication process. These manufacturing processes allow high-precision multilayer fabrication and their sacrificial layer thicknesses can be specified by the designer, rather than by constraints of the fabrication process. Various types of high-stroke gold actuators for AO consisting of folded springs with rectangular and circular membranes as well as X-beam actuators supported diagonally by beams were designed, simulated, fabricated, and tested individually and as part of a continuous facesheet DM system. The design, modeling and simulation of these actuators are compared to experimental measurements of their pull-in voltages, which characterizes their stiffness and maximum stroke. Vertical parallel plate ganged actuators fabricated with the EFAB(TM) process have a calculated pull-in voltage of 95V for a 600mum size device. In contrast, the pull-in voltages for the comb-drive actuators ranged from 55V for the large actuator, to 203V for the smallest actuator. Simulations and interferometer scans of actuator designs fabricated with HT-Micro's Precision Fabrication (HTPF(TM)) two wafer bonded process with different spring supports have shown the ability of the actuators to achieve displacements of 1/3 of the initial gap between the spring layer and the counter electrode. Actuators and DM displacement vs. voltage have been measured with an interferometer and the corresponding results were compared to Finite Element Analysis (FEA) simulations. Simulations and interferometer scans have shown the ability of the actuators to achieve displacements of greater than 1/3 of the initial gap. A stroke of ˜9.4mum has been achieved by a DM, thus showing that this fabrication process holds promise in the manufacturing of future MEMS DMs for the next generation of extremely large telescopes. A monolithic fabrication approach for integrating a faceplate on top of an actuator array from Innovative Micro Technologies has been investigated. This monolithic approach has the ability to deposit thicker layers (tens of micrometers) of structural and sacrificial materials than that of a surface micro machining processes. This fabrication process will allow the DMs to provide both high-stoke and high-order corrections, thus eliminating the need for a woofer-tweeter DM configuration. Both the actuator and the facesheet were fabricated monolithically in gold plated onto a thermally matched ceramic-glass substrate (WMS-15) using IMT's high-aspect ratio fabrication process.

  15. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PMID:23855895

  16. Backscatter-to-Extinction Ratios in the Top Layers of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems and in Isolated Cirrus from LITE Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, C. M. R.; Winker, D. M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Miller, S. D.

    1999-01-01

    Cloud-integrated attenuated backscatter from observations with the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) was studied over a range of cirrus clouds capping some extensive mesoscale convective systems (MCSS) in the Tropical West Pacific. The integrated backscatter when the cloud is completely attenuating, and when corrected for multiple scattering, is a measure of the cloud particle backscatter phase function. Four different cases of MCS were studied. The first was very large, very intense, and fully attenuating, with cloud tops extending to 17 km and a maximum lidar pulse penetration of about 3 km. It also exhibited the highest integrated attenuated isotropic backscatter, with values in the 532-nm channel of up to 2.5 near the center of the system, falling to 0.6 near the edges. The second MCS had cloud tops that extended to 14.8 km. Although MCS2 was almost fully attenuating, the pulse penetration into the cloud was up to 7 km and the MCS2 had a more diffuse appearance than MCS1. The integrated backscatter values were much lower in this system but with some systematic variations between 0.44 and 0.75. The third MCS was Typhoon Melissa. Values of integrated backscatter in tt-ds case varied from 1.64 near the eye of the typhoon to between 0.44 and 1.0 in the areas of typhoon outflow and in the 532-nm channel. Mean pulse penetration through the cloud top was 2-3 km, the lowest penetration of any of the systems. The fourth MCS consisted of a region of outflow from Typhoon Melissa. The cloud was semitransparent for more than half of the image time. During that time, maximum cloud depth was about 7 km. The integrated backscatter varied from about 0.38 to 0.63 in the 532-nm channel when the cloud was fully attenuating. In some isolated cirrus between the main systems, a plot of integrated backscatter against one minus the two-way transmittance gave a linear dependence with a maximum value of 0.35 when the clouds were fully attenuating. The effective backscatter-to-extinction ratios, when allowing for different multiple-scattering factors from space, were often within the range of those observed with ground-based lidar. Exceptions occurred near the centers of the most intense convection, where values were measured that were considerably higher than those in cirrus observed from the surface. In this case, the values were more compatible with theoretical values for perfectly formed hexagonal columns or plates. The large range in theoretically calculated back- scatter-to-extinction ratio and integrated multiple-scattering factor precluded a closer interpretation in terms of cloud microphysics.

  17. Aspartate aminotransferase-lymphocyte ratio index and systemic immune-inflammation index predict overall survival in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma patients after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zongguo; Zhang, Jianliang; Lu, Yunfei; Xu, Qingnian; Tang, Bozong; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Wensi; Chen, Shishi; Lu, Lingqing; Chen, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that lymphocytes play central roles in host antitumor immune responses and control cancer outcome. We reviewed the clinical parameters of 189 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and investigated the prognostic significance of lymphocyte-related scores in HCC patients following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Survival analysis revealed that an elevated aspartate aminotransferase-lymphocyte ratio index (ALRI) > 57 and a systemic immune-inflammation index (SII) > 300 were negatively associated with overall survival in HBV-related HCC (HR = 2.181, P = 0.003 and HR = 2.453, P = 0.003; respectively). Spearman chi-square analysis showed that ALRI had a specificity of 82.4% and that SII index had a sensitivity of 71.9% for HCC overall survival. ALRI and SII had negative predictive values of 74.6% and 80%, respectively for HCC overall survival. Additionally, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage C patients had significantly higher ALRI and SII scores (both P < 0.0001) and poorer overall survival (HR = 3.618, P < 0.001). Additionally, HCC patients with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) had higher ALRI and SII scores (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0059, respectively). In conclusion, as noninvasive, low cost, easily assessable and reproducible parameters, elevated ALRI and SII should be used as negative predictive factors for overall survival in HBV-related HCC in clinical practice. PMID:26506519

  18. Comparison of entrance exposure and signal-to-noise ratio between an SBDX prototype and a wide-beam cardiac angiographic system

    SciTech Connect

    Speidel, Michael A.; Wilfley, Brian P.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Heanue, Joseph A.; Betts, Timothy D.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2006-08-15

    The scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system uses an inverse geometry, narrow x-ray beam, and a 2-mm thick CdTe detector to improve the dose efficiency of the coronary angiographic procedure. Entrance exposure and large-area iodine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured with the SBDX prototype and compared to that of a clinical cardiac interventional system with image intensifier (II) and charge coupled device (CCD) camera (Philips H5000, MRC-200 x-ray tube, 72 kWp max). Phantoms were 18.6-35.0 cm acrylic with an iohexol-equivalent disk placed at midthickness (35 mg/cm{sup 2} iodine radiographic density). Imaging was performed at 15 frame/s, with the disk at mechanical isocenter and an 11-cm object-plane field width. The II/CCD system was operated in cine mode with automatic exposure control. With the SBDX prototype at maximum x-ray output (120 kVp, 24.3 kWp), the SBDX SNR was 107%-69% of the II/CCD SNR, depending on phantom thickness, and the SBDX entrance exposure rate was 10.7-9.3 R/min (9.4-8.2 cGy/min air kerma). For phantoms where an equal-kVp imaging comparison was possible ({>=}23.3 cm), the SBDX SNR ranged from 47% to 69% of the II/CCD SNR while delivering 6% to 9% of the II/CCD entrance exposure rate. From these measurements it was determined that the relative SBDX entrance exposure at equal SNR would be 31%-16%. Results were consistent with a model for relative entrance exposure at equal SNR, which predicted a 3-7 times reduction in entrance exposure due to SBDX's comparatively low scatter fraction (5.5%-8.1% measured, including off-focus radiation), high detector detective quantum efficiency (66%-73%, measured from 70 to 120 kVp), and large entrance field area (1.7x-2.3x, for the same object-plane field width). With improvements to the system geometry, detector, and x-ray source, SBDX technology is projected to achieve conventional cine-quality SNR over a full range of patient thicknesses, with 5-10 times lower skin dose.

  19. MicroRNA-29a induces apoptosis via increasing the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio in dermal fibroblasts of patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Karimizadeh, Elham; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Faridani, Habibeh; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The most prominent feature of systemic sclerosis (SSc) and other diseases associated with fibrosis is the prolonged activation of fibroblasts not eliminated by apoptosis, hence characterized by accumulation of more extra cellular matrix (ECM). We tend to verify if microRNA-29a (miR-29a) as an anti-fibrotic factor could induce apoptosis in SSc fibroblasts. We did not detect apoptosis in SSc fibroblasts. We found that Bcl-2 expression was upregulated in SSc fibroblasts and the ratio of Bax:Bcl-2 in these cells was significantly lower (p = 0.02) compared to normal fibroblasts. Transfection of both SSc and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) stimulated fibroblasts by miR-29a mimic, significantly decreased the expression of two anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, Bcl-2 (p = 0.0005, p = 0.01) and Bcl-XL (p = 0.0001, p = 0.006), resulted in enhanced Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and induced a high rate of apoptosis. Recently, miR-29 has been introduced as an anti-fibrotic factor with potential therapeutic effect on SSc. Until now, it has not been proposed whether there is a relationship between miR-29a and apoptosis in SSc. According to our results, it seems that miR-29a is a potent inducer of apoptosis in SSc fibroblasts and an attenuator of ECM production in these cells. MiR-29a disrupted the expression profiling of Bcl-2 family proteins (Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL) which is the central point of dynamic life-death rheostat in many apoptotic pathways. Furthermore, dermal fibroblasts from patients with SSc showed elevation in TNF-α mRNA levels, while restoration of miR-29a decreases TNF-α production in these cells. Although further molecular studies are necessary to investigate the underlying apoptotic pathways, the present findings suggest that anti-fibrotic and pro-apoptotic properties of miR-29a could provide novel benefits toward the development of fibroblast-specific anti-fibrotic therapies. PMID:25857445

  20. Birthweight ratio revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Brownlee, K G; Ng, P C; Roussounis, S H; Dear, P R

    1991-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis suggested in a recent report that the birthweight ratio might be a useful predictor of several important clinical outcome measures in babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation, we examined the association between the birthweight ratio and aspects of both short and long term outcome in 436 Leeds babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation. Unlike the report, and contrary to what we had expected, we were unable to find any significant association between birthweight ratio and length of time on the ventilator, mortality, neurological outcome, or intellectual outcome. PMID:2025035

  1. Deterrence and arrest ratios.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Stephanie E; Piquero, Alex R

    2006-02-01

    In the limited research on the origins of sanction threat perceptions, researchers have focused on either the effects of actively engaging in crime or the effects of formal sanctioning but rarely on both (i.e., the arrest ratio or the number of arrests relative to the number of crimes committed). This article extends this line of research by using a sample of Colorado inmates and measures arrest ratios and sanction perceptions for eight different crime types. Analyses reveal that the offenders report both significant experiential and arrest ratio effects. Theoretical and policy implications, limitations, and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:16397123

  2. Ratio and Proportion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipton, Sheila

    1980-01-01

    Examples of ratio and proportion problems from engineering, science, business, and catering are presented and solved. The goal is to illustrate how certain basic processes are used across a wide spectrum of occupations. (MK)

  3. Further stratification of patients with multiple myeloma by International Staging System in combination with ratio of serum free ? to ? light chains.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Sui, Weiwei; Deng, Shuhui; An, Gang; Wang, Yafei; Xie, Zhenqing; Yao, Hongjing; Zhu, Guoqing; Zou, Dehui; Qi, Junyuan; Hao, Mu; Zhao, Yaozhong; Wang, Jianxiang; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Lugui

    2013-01-01

    The serum free light chain (sFlc) levels were measured for 122 Chinese patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma (NDSMM), and ?/? ratios (rFlc) were calculated. The data were analyzed for the roles of sFlc and rFlc in the diagnosis and prognosis of MM. Abnormal sFlc and/or rFlc were detected in 99.2% of patients, demonstrating that the FLC assay is much more sensitive than the commonly used methods. Baseline sFlc and rFlc successfully predicted the overall survival (OS). The median OS was not reached (NR) versus 23 months for the low sFLC group (sFLC-? < 180 mg/L or sFLC-? < 592.5 mg/L) and high sFLC group (sFLC-? ? 180 mg/L or sFLC-? ? 592.5 mg/L) (p = 0.001), and NR versus 21 months for the low rFLC group (0.04 ? rFLC ? 25) and high rFLC group (p < 0.001), respectively. Interestingly, the significant differences in OS between the low and high rFLC groups were not changed by bortezomib chemotherapy. In addition, patients were further stratified by three novel poor-prognosis factors (?(2)-microglobulin [?2-MG] > 3.5 mg/L, albumin [ALB] < 35 g/L, rFLC > 25 or rFLC < 0.04) that were developed from combination of the rFlc with the International Staging System (ISS): the low risk group (no factor), the low-intermediate risk group (one factor), the high-intermediate risk group (two factors) and the high risk group (three factors). The median OS for those groups was NR, NR, 24 months and 13 months, respectively (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the sFLC assay was highly sensitive in the diagnosis of MM in Chinese patients. The prognostic potential of the ISS may be improved with the addition of rFLC. PMID:22712834

  4. Characterizing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions over a Wheat-based Cropping System in the Northwest United States Using the Modified Bowen Ratio Technique and Static Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldo, Sarah; Kostyanovsky, Kirill; O'Keeffe, Patrick; Pressley, Shelley; Huggins, Dave; Stockle, Claudio; Lamb, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance. Agricultural soils are the primary source of N2O, which is created as a by-product of soil microbial processes. The production and emission of N2O is characterized by high spatial and temporal variability, or "hot spots" and "hot moments". These behaviors, along with limitations in instrument sensitivity to N2O, are challenges in characterizing emissions. Many studies have monitored N2O emissions using either static chambers or micrometeorological measurements or the two methods together. The two techniques are complementary: chamber methods have a lower detection limit and are more reliable as their operation does not depend on atmospheric conditions, but may not capture spatial variability even with multiple chambers. Tower-based methods are subject to relatively high data loss due to non-ideal conditions and to less sensitive detection limits, but have a larger measurement footprint and can characterize field-scale emissions. This study aims to characterize a long-term, field-scale N2O budget over two winter wheat fields located in the Inland Pacific Northwest of the United States, both in terms of an annual emission budget and in terms of understanding what causes hot moments. We combined continuous measurements of N2O emissions from a system of sixteen automated, static chambers with tower-based measurements of N2O fluxes. We used the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) technique with temperature as a tracer. Preliminary results indicate that freeze-thaw cycles in the winter make up a higher percentage of annual emissions than previously thought. Furthermore, comparison of the chamber results to the tower-based measurements imply that the chambers may be underestimating field-scale N2O fluxes because they are not adequately capturing hot spots of emissions. We are conducting ongoing work on how to integrate the two measurement techniques, as well as how the empirical measurements compare with other measures of N2O emissions for the region.

  5. Evaluation of a modified early warning system for acute medical admissions and comparison with C-reactive protein/albumin ratio as a predictor of patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Emily; Cairns, Eleanor; Hamilton, Jennifer; Kelly, Clive

    2009-02-01

    The modified early warning score (MEWS) was developed as a track and trigger tool for the prompt identification of seriously ill patients on an acute medical ward. This paper examines its value in the setting of an acute medical admissions unit (MAU) and compares it to biochemical markers of acute and chronic disease. Three hundred unselected acute admissions to the MAU of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, were assessed. Correlations between MEWS score and C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin separately were assessed, and then the relationship between MEWS and the CRP/albumin ratio across the age spectrum was examined. The findings demonstrated a strong correlation between the MEWS score and CRP/albumin ratio (r=0.88, p<0.001) across the whole age spectrum. Length of stay correlated poorly with MEWS (r=0.08) and CRP/albumin ratio (r=0.15). Overall mortality was 5% and was predicted by both tools, with a MEWS score of >4 (relative risk (RR)=7.8) outperforming a CRP/albumin of >2 (RR=2.6). MEWS remains the gold standard for assessing outcome in acute medical admissions, but does have limitations in the elderly (those aged over 70 years). A raised CRP/albumin ratio was less sensitive for overall mortality than MEWS. It did, however, appear to be of greater value in the elderly, especially in those with acute exacerbations of chronic disease. Neither test accurately predicted length of stay. PMID:19271597

  6. Discrimination Level of Students' Ratio, Number of Students per Faculty Member and Article Scores Indicators According to Place of Turkish Universities in International Ranking Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özkan, Metin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine classification in which the level of accuracy in Turkish universities rankings is detected by the international assessments according to the independent variables PhD students ratio, the number of students per faculty member and the article scores. The data of research were obtained from University Ranking…

  7. High temperature measurement system devised for Claus reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wadi, I. )

    1989-11-01

    High temperatures encountered in Claus sulfur recovery unit reaction furnaces can be measured accurately and reliably by using a special arrangement of two thermocouples and two optical pyrometers at two locations in the Claus reaction furnace. The measurement system was developed as a result of investigations and trials done on the Claus sulfur recovery unit at a Ruwais refinery. From those investigations, some general recommendations on thermo-couple types and installations for Claus reactor applications were determined. The author presents those recommendations, and the details on the special temperature measurement system considered to provide the best accuracy and reliability.

  8. Determining maintenance cost ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Donald S.; Sherif, Josef S.; Buchanan, Harry R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the wide range of costs involved in maintaining equipment and discusses methods that different industries use to measure and report their maintenance cost. Results are presented of the study of maintenance costs in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) and of a comparison of DSN maintenance cost with the maintenance costs of a number of other reports. A comparison of the maintenance costs in terms of the maintenance cost ratio (annual maintenance cost/capital replacement cost) shows that DSN has the lowest maintenance cost ratio of the industries and organizations surveyed.

  9. Pyrolaser Operating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Floyd E., III

    1994-01-01

    Software provides for control and acquisition of data from optical pyrometer. There are six individual programs in PYROLASER package. Provides quick and easy way to set up, control, and program standard Pyrolaser. Temperature and emisivity measurements either collected as if Pyrolaser in manual operating mode or displayed on real-time strip charts and stored in standard spreadsheet format for posttest analysis. Shell supplied to allow macros, which are test-specific, added to system easily. Written using Labview software for use on Macintosh-series computers running System 6.0.3 or later, Sun Sparc-series computers running Open-Windows 3.0 or MIT's X Window System (X11R4 or X11R5), and IBM PC or compatible computers running Microsoft Windows 3.1 or later.

  10. Air/fuel ratio regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, A.

    1980-07-22

    A description is given of an air/fuel ratio regulator for use with the fuel injection control system of an internal combustion engine of the spark ignition type having an air and exhaust gas (gas) induction passage open at one end to air at ambient pressure level and connected at its other end to the engine combustion chamber to be subject to manifold vacuum changes therein, a throttle valve rotatably mounted for movement across the passage to control the gas flow therethrough, exhaust gas recirculation (egr) passage means connecting engine exhaust gases to the induction passage above the closed position of the throttle valve, an egr flow control valve mounted in the egr passage means for movement between open and closed postions to control the volume of egr gas flow, an engine speed responsive positive displacement type fuel injection pump having a fuel flow output to the engine that varies in direct proportion to changes in engines speed to match fuel flow and mass airflow through the induction system of the engine over the entire speed and load range of the engine to maintain the intake mixture ratio of air to fuel constant, the pump having a fuel flow control lever movable to vary the fuel rate of flow, the regulator being characterized by engine manifold vacuum responsive first servo means operably connected to the fuel control lever for maintaining a constant air/fuel (A/F) ratio by changing fuel output as a function of changing manifold vacuum and air flow upon opening of the throttle valve, a fuel enrichment control lever operably connected to the pump control lever and movable to modify the position of the pump lever dictated by the first servo means to change the A/F ratio, and further means responsive to engine operating conditions for moving the fuel enrichment control lever to provide the changed A/F ratio.

  11. Formation and Evolution of the Disk System of the Milky Way: [alpha/Fe] Ratios and Kinematics of the SEGUE G-Dwarf Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; An, Deokkeun; Ivezic, Zeljko; Just, Andreas; Rockosi, Constance M.; Morrison, Heather L.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Schonrich, Ralph; Bird, Jonathan; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Case Western Reserve U.

    2011-04-01

    We employ measurements of the [{alpha}/Fe] ratio fromlow-resolution (R {approx} 2000) spectra of 17,500 G-type dwarfs included in SDSS Data Release 8, selected using simple and well-understood selection criteria, to separate them into likely thin- and thick-disk subsamples. This classification, based on chemistry, is strongly motivated by the bi-modal distribution of stars in the [{alpha}/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagram. The resulting subsamples allow, for the first time, investigations of the kinematic behavior of thin- and thick-disk stars as a function of metallicity and position up to distances of 3 kpc from the Galactic plane. Both subsamples exhibit strong gradients of orbital rotational velocity with metallicity, but with opposite signs (-20 to -30 km s{sup -1} dex{sup -1} for the thin-disk population, and +40 to +50 km s{sup -1} dex{sup -1} for the thick-disk population). We find that the rotational velocity decreases with the distance from the plane for both disk components, with similar slopes (10 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1}), and a nearly constant difference in the mean rotational velocity of about 30 km s{sup -1}. The mean rotational velocity is uncorrelated with Galactocentric distance for the thin-disk subsample, and exhibits only a marginally significant correlation for the thick-disk subsample. Thick-disk stars exhibit a very strong trend of orbital eccentricity with metallicity (-0.2 dex{sup -1}), while the eccentricity does not change with metallicity for the thin-disk subsample. The eccentricity is almost independent of Galactocentric radius for the thin-disk stars, while a marginal gradient of the eccentricity with distance exists for the thick-disk population. Both subsamples possess similar trends of increasing eccentricity with distance from the Galactic plane, with a constant difference of about 0.1. The shapes of the overall distributions of orbital eccentricity for the thin- and thick-disk populations are quite different from one another, independent of distance from the plane; neither subsample has significant numbers of stars with eccentricity above 0.6. These observational results provide strong new constraints on models for the formation and evolution of the Milky Way's disk system. For example, the observed dependence of the mean rotational velocity on metallicity for thin-disk stars is inconsistent with predictions from classical local chemical evolution models. We also consider the predictions of several contemporary models of disk evolution, such as radial migration, gas-rich mergers, disk heating, and pure accretion models. We find that radial migration appears to have played an important role in the evolution of the thin-disk population, but possibly less so, relative to the gas-rich merger or disk heating scenarios, for the thick disk. Pure accretion models appear to be ruled out by the observed distribution of eccentricities for thick-disk stars. We emphasize that more physically realistic models, and simulations that probe a greater range of disk formation scenarios, need to be constructed in order to carry out the detailed quantitative comparisons that our new data enable.

  12. Cruise performance of an isolated 1.15 pressure ratio turbofan propulsion system simulator at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    An isolated 1.15 pressure ratio turbofan engine simulator was tested at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.85. At Mach 0.75 the net propulsive force of the fan and nacelle (excluding core thrust) was 73 percent of the ideal fan net thrust. Internal losses amounted to 7 percent, and external drag amounted to 20 percent of the ideal fan net thrust. External pressure and friction drag were about equal. The propulsive efficiency with a 90 percent efficient fan would have been 63 percent. For the aerodynamic characteristics of the nacelle that was tested, increasing the fan pressure ratio to approximately 1.35 would have resulted in a maximum propulsive efficiency of 67 percent.

  13. Automated airway evaluation system for multi-slice computed tomography using airway lumen diameter, airway wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2006-03-01

    Pulmonary diseases such as bronchiectasis, asthma, and emphysema are characterized by abnormalities in airway dimensions. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has become one of the primary means to depict these abnormalities, as the availability of high-resolution near-isotropic data makes it possible to evaluate airways at oblique angles to the scanner plane. However, currently, clinical evaluation of airways is typically limited to subjective visual inspection only: systematic evaluation of the airways to take advantage of high-resolution data has not proved practical without automation. We present an automated method to quantitatively evaluate airway lumen diameter, wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratios. In addition, our method provides 3D visualization of these values, graphically illustrating the location and extent of disease. Our algorithm begins by automatic airway segmentation to extract paths to the distal airways, and to create a map of airway diameters. Normally, airway diameters decrease as paths progress distally; failure to taper indicates abnormal dilatation. Our approach monitors airway lumen diameters along each airway path in order to detect abnormal profiles, allowing even subtle degrees of pathologic dilatation to be identified. Our method also systematically computes the broncho-arterial ratio at every terminal branch of the tree model, as a ratio above 1 indicates potentially abnormal bronchial dilatation. Finally, the airway wall thickness is computed at corresponding locations. These measurements are used to highlight abnormal branches for closer inspection, and can be summed to compute a quantitative global score for the entire airway tree, allowing reproducible longitudinal assessment of disease severity. Preliminary tests on patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis demonstrated rapid identification of lack of tapering, which also was confirmed by corresponding demonstration of elevated broncho-arterial ratios.

  14. Spectral ratio method for measuring emissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral ratio method is based on the concept that although the spectral radiances are very sensitive to small changes in temperature the ratios are not. Only an approximate estimate of temperature is required thus, for example, we can determine the emissivity ratio to an accuracy of 1% with a temperature estimate that is only accurate to 12.5 K. Selecting the maximum value of the channel brightness temperatures is an unbiased estimate. Laboratory and field spectral data are easily converted into spectral ratio plots. The ratio method is limited by system signal:noise and spectral band-width. The images can appear quite noisy because ratios enhance high frequencies and may require spatial filtering. Atmospheric effects tend to rescale the ratios and require using an atmospheric model or a calibration site. ?? 1992.

  15. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  16. Bromine isotope ratio measurements in seawater by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with a conventional sample introduction system.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Vallelonga, Paul; Spolaor, Andrea; Devulder, Veerle; Borges, Daniel L G; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A simple and accurate methodology for Br isotope ratio measurements in seawater by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) with pneumatic nebulization for sample introduction was developed. The Br(+) signals could be measured interference-free at high mass resolution. Memory effects for Br were counteracted using 5 mmol L(-1) of NH4OH in sample, standard, and wash solutions. The major cation load of seawater was removed via cation exchange chromatography using Dowex 50WX8 resin. Subsequent Br preconcentration was accomplished via evaporation of the sample solution at 90 °C, which did not induce Br losses or isotope fractionation. Mass discrimination was corrected for by external correction using a Cl-matched standard measured in a sample-standard bracketing approach, although Sr, Ge, and Se were also tested as potential internal standards for internal correction for mass discrimination. The δ(81)Br (versus standard mean ocean bromide (SMOB)) values thus obtained for the NaBr isotopic reference material NIST SRM 977 and for IRMM BCR-403 seawater certified reference material are in agreement with literature values. For NIST SRM 977, the (81)Br/(79)Br ratio (0.97291) was determined with a precision ≤0.08‰ relative standard deviation (RSD). PMID:26123436

  17. High-response on-line gas analysis system for hydrogen-reaction combustion products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, A. J.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The results of testing an on-line quadrupole gas analyzer system are reported. Gas samples were drawn from the exhaust of a hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen rocket which simulated the flow composition and dynamics at the combustor exit of a supersonic combustion ramjet engine. System response time of less than 50 milliseconds was demonstrated, with analytical accuracy estimated to be + or - 5 percent. For more complex chemical systems with interfering atom patterns, analysis would be more difficult. A cooled-gas pyrometer probe was evaluated as a total temperature indicator and as the primary mass flow measuring element for the total sample flow rate.

  18. Stereoscopic pyrometer for char combustion characterization.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, M; Vorobiev, N; Scherer, V

    2015-02-10

    For many pulverized fuels, especially coal and biomass, char combustion is the time determining step. Based on intensified ICCD cameras, a novel setup has been developed to study pulverized fuel combustion, mainly in a laminar flow reactor. For char burning characterization, the typical measurement parameters are particle temperature, size, and velocity. The working principle of the camera setup is introduced and its capabilities are discussed by examination of coal particle combustion under CO(2)-enriched, so-called oxy-fuel atmospheres with varying O(2) content. PMID:25968027

  19. Prognostic significance of the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bin; Wang, Yi-Han; Liu, Yong-Mei; Ma, Lei-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) was recently demonstrated as a useful index in predicting the prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Thus, a meta-analysis was performed to demonstrate the relationship between NLR and overall survival (OS), progress-free survival (PFS) or disease free survival (DFS) in patients with NSCLC. We searched for relevant literatures in PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane library and pooled the eligible studies and synthesized hazard ratios (HRs) using Stata 12.0. Final analysis of NSCLC patients from 12 eligible studies was performed. Combined HR suggested that high NLR had an unfavorable effect on patients’ OS (n=1700 in 11 studies; HR= 1.43, 95% CI: 1.25-1.64; I^2=80.2%, P<0.01) and PFS (n=664 in 5 studies, HR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.07-1.74; I^2=70.8%, P=0.004). Subgroup analysis based on cutoff shown that, compared with other subgroups, the subgroup with a cutoff of 5 had a significantly poorer survival (HR=1.87, 95% CI 1.49-2.34) with less heterogeneity (I^2=21.3%, P=0.28). However, subgroup analysis based on treatment method indicated that the “surgery” subgroup seemed to have not a significant impact on survival (HR=1.32, 95% CI 0.99-1.77; I^2=80.0%, P=0.063) compared with the chemotherapy subgroup (HR=1.61, 95% CI 1.24-2.10; I^2=82.6%, P<0.01). Additionally, combined odds ratio (OR) suggested high NLR was associated inversely with response to treatment (n = 276 in 2 studies; OR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.04-2.88; I^2=0%, P=0.40). This study suggests high NLR (especially with a cutoff of 5) seems to be associated with a worse prognosis in patients with NSCLC as well as a worse response to treatments. PMID:26064198

  20. Effect of particle aspect ratio in magnetorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Jose R.; Carreón-González, Elizabeth; de Vicente, Juan

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles in magnetorheology. Two systems are studied: conventional magnetorheological fluids prepared by dispersion of nickel nanowires, and inverse ferrofluids prepared by dispersion of glass fibers in a ferrofluid. In both cases the apparent yield stress is found to increase with aspect ratio in contradiction to available models in the literature. Experimental observations demonstrate that the particle volume fraction within the aggregates initially increases with increasing the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles. When the aspect ratio is further raised, a gel-like percolating structure forms inhibiting the formation of elongated clusters in the field direction.

  1. Central Nervous System Effects of the Second-Generation Antihistamines Marketed in Japan -Review of Inter-Drug Differences Using the Proportional Impairment Ratio (PIR)-

    PubMed Central

    Isomura, Tatsuya; Kono, Takeshi; Hindmarch, Ian; Kikuchi, Norimasa; Murakami, Aya; Inuzuka, Kyoko; Kawana, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Background Second-generation antihistamines (AHs) have, in general, fewer sedative effects than the first-generation. However, important inter-drug differences remain in the degree of cognitive and/or psychomotor impairment. The extent to which a particular compound causes disruption can be conveniently compared, to all other AHs, using the Proportional Impairment Ratio (PIR). Although the PIR can differentiate the relative impairment caused by individual drugs, there is no indication of the reliability of the ratios obtained. Objective To calculate the PIRs –together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), as an index of reliability– and compare AHs currently, or soon to be, available in Japan, with respect to their intrinsic capacity to cause impairment. Methods Results from studies of cetirizine, desloratadine, ebastine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine, loratadine, mequitazine, and olopatadine were included in the PIR calculations. All data utilised came from crossover studies in healthy volunteers which were randomised and placebo and positive-internal controlled. Existing databases from studies reporting the sedative effects of AHs on objective (speed, accuracy, memory) and subjective (feeling) psychometrics were augmented, via results from suitable studies published after the previous reviews. The null value for a PIR was one. Results A total of 45 studies were finally included for this review. Of the AHs assessed, fexofenadine, ebastine, and levocetirizine showed a PIR for objective tests of 0. However, only fexofenadine (PIR = 0.49) had an upper limit of the 95% CI of less than 1. Fexofenadine, levocetirizine, desloratadine, olopatadine, loratadine, and mequitazine all had a PIR for subjective ratings of 0, but the upper limits of the 95% CIs were all in excess of 1, although fexofenadine (PIR = 2.57) was the lowest. Conclusions The results show that there are differences between second-generation AHs in the extent of sedation produced. However, subjective ratings indicate that patients may not necessarily be aware of this. PMID:25501360

  2. Infinitely variable ratio transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Geppert, E.F.

    1989-02-21

    A variable ratio vehicle transmission is described whose gear ratio is determined essentially only by torque on the output shaft of the transmission, comprising: a housing fixed in the vehicle; a power input shaft entering one end of the housing; a power output shaft entering the other end of the housing; a planet carrier mounted concentrically on the input shaft; a planet shaft mounted rotatably to the planet carrier; planet gears fixed coaxially to the planet shaft, one planet gear being a power transferring gear, a second planet gear being a reaction planet gear; a brake means rotatable about the input shaft sleeve for controlling the rate of rotation of the reaction planet gear about the planet shaft axis when the reaction planet gear orbits about the input shaft axis, the brake means having an inhibitor means for providing a substantially constant drag against rotation of the brake means about the input shaft; the brake means having a disk-like wall encircling the input shaft and a brake gear meshed with the reaction planet gear; the inhibitor means having two sets of annular friction disks disposed between the disk-like wall and the one end of the housing; the transmission further comprising means for operatively connecting the transferring planet gear to the output shaft.

  3. Directional gear ratio transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafever, A. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Epicyclic gear transmissions which transmit output at a gear ratio dependent only upon the input's direction are considered. A transmission housing envelops two epicyclic gear assemblies, and has shafts extending from it. One shaft is attached to a sun gear within the first epicyclic gear assembly. Planet gears are held symmetrically about the sun gear by a planet gear carrier and are in mesh with both the sun gear and a ring gear. Two unidirectional clutches restrict rotation of the first planet gear carrier and ring gear to one direction. A connecting shaft drives a second sun gear at the same speed and direction as the first planet gear carrier while a connecting portion drives a second planet gear carrier at the same speed and direction as the first ring gear. The transmission's output is then transmitted by the second ring gear to the second shaft. Input is transmitted at a higher gear ratio and lower speed for all inputs in the first direction than in the opposite direction.

  4. Airborne ultraviolet imaging system for oil slick surveillance: oil-seawater contrast, imaging concept, signal-to-noise ratio, optical design, and optomechanical model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Lei; Cao, Diansheng; Wu, Qingwen; Yu, Xiangyang; Lin, Guanyu

    2015-09-01

    The airborne ultraviolet imaging system, which assesses oil slick areas better than visible and infrared optical systems, was designed to monitor and track oil slicks in coastal regions. A model was built to achieve the upwelling radiance distribution of oil-covered sea and clean seawater, based on the radiance transfer software. With this model, the oil-seawater contrast, which affects the detection of oil-covered coastal areas, was obtained. The oil-seawater contrast, fundamental imaging concept, analog calculation of SNR, optical design, and optomechanical configuration of the airborne ultraviolet imaging system are illustrated in this paper. The study of an airborne ultraviolet imaging system with F-number 3.4 and a 40° field of view (FOV) in near ultraviolet channel (0.32-0.38 μm) was illustrated and better imaging quality was achieved. The ground sample distance (GSD) is from 0.35 to 0.7 m with flight height ranges from 0.5 to 1 km. Comparisons of detailed characteristics of the airborne ultraviolet imaging system with the corresponding characteristics of previous ultraviolet systems were tabulated, and these comparisons showed that this system can achieve a wide FOV and a relative high SNR. A virtual mechanical prototype and tolerances analysis are illustrated in this paper to verify the performance of fabrication and assembly of the ultraviolet system. PMID:26368888

  5. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  6. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  7. The ratio of dietary (n-6) to (n-3) fatty acids influences immune system function, eicosanoid metabolism, lipid peroxidation and vitamin E status in aged dogs.

    PubMed

    Wander, R C; Hall, J A; Gradin, J L; Du, S H; Jewell, D E

    1997-06-01

    We studied the effects of feeding experimental diets containing (n-6) to (n-3) fatty acid ratios of 31:1, 5.4:1, and 1.4:1 to 20 healthy female geriatric Beagles (9.5-11.5 y) for 8-12 wk on various indices of the immune response. Compared with the 31:1 diet, consumption of the 5.4:1 and 1.4:1 diets significantly increased (n-3) fatty acids in plasma (2.17 +/- 0.64, 9.05 +/- 0.64, 17.46 +/- 0.64 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively, P < 0.0001). Although supplementation with (n-3) fatty acids did not significantly alter the humoral immune response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), it significantly suppressed the cell-mediated immune response based on results of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response after intradermal injection of KLH at 24 h was significantly lower in the group consuming the 1.4:1 diet compared with the group consuming the 5.4:1 (P = 0.02) or the 31:1 diets (P = 0.04), and remained significantly suppressed at 48 h in the group fed 1.4:1 relative to the group fed 31:1. After consumption of the 1.4:1 diet, stimulated mononuclear cells produced 52% less prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than those from dogs fed the 31:1 diet (224 +/- 74 and 451 +/- 71 pmol/L, respectively, P = 0.04). Plasma concentration of alpha-tocopherol was 20% lower in dogs fed the 1.4:1 diet compared with those fed the 31:1 diet (P = 0.04), and lipid peroxidation was greater in both plasma (P = 0.03) and urine (P = 0.002). These data suggest that although a ratio of dietary (n-6) to (n-3) fatty acids of 1.4:1 depresses the cell-mediated immune response and PGE2 production, it increases lipid peroxidation and lowers vitamin E concentration. PMID:9187636

  8. Paleosalinities in ancient brackish water systems determined by 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios in carbonate fossils: A case study from the Western Canada sedimentary basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, C.; Creaser, R. A.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1997-05-01

    Two strategies for determining paleosalinities in ancient brackish water deposits are presented based on the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios in well preserved carbonate fossil shells. The relative contributions of seawater and freshwater can be determined for shells of unknown or presumed ecological affinity by comparing their 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios to contemporaneous marine and fluviatile sources. The nearly one hundredfold difference in Sr concentration between seawater (7.7 ppm) and freshwater (median = 0.071 ppm) dictates that mixing relations define hyperbolae. Paleosalinities are most precisely determined along the freshwater asymptote (<15‰) because these waters have the lower Sr concentration, and, therefore, display the greatest rate of change of 87Sr/ 86Sr with salinity. Paleosalinities greater than 15‰ are resolvable if the 87Sr/ 86Sr or Sr concentration in the freshwater mixing endmember is greater than the 50th percentile for present-day Sr concentrations in world rivers and lakes. A second technique utilizes both 87Sr/ 86Sr and Sr/Ca from a single fossil species and allows the brackish water hypothesis to be tested graphically on a plot of 87Sr/ 86Sr - Ca/Sr. Linear correlations on this plot are evidence for two-component mixing. Measured Sr/Ca in mollusc shells are related to the original Sr/Ca in the habitat waters by a species specific Sr distribution coefficient ( DSr). For the case of seawater-freshwater mixing, DSr is fixed in that seawater must plot on the water mixing line. If the transformation between shell and water mixing lines yields a DSr within the range of modern values (0.2-0.3), a brackish water habitat is implied. Examples from purported brackish water deposits of the early Cretaceous Mannville Group, Canada, illustrate the potential uses of 87Sr/ 86Sr, Sr, and Sr/Ca for determining paleosalinities in ancient estuarine and estuarine-like deposits, and the importance of the paleohydrological perspective as a factor influencing the interpretation of ancient depositional environments.

  9. Low speed test of a high-bypass-ratio propulsion system with an asymmetric inlet designed for a tilt-nacelle V/STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syberg, J.

    1978-01-01

    A large scale model of a lift/cruise fan inlet designed for a tilt nacelle V/STOL airplane was tested with a high bypass ratio turbofan. Testing was conducted at low freestream velocities with inlet angles of attack ranging from 0 deg to 120 deg. The operating limits for the nacelle were found to be related to inlet boundary layer separation. Small separations originating in the inlet diffuser cause little or no performance degradation. However, at sufficiently severe freestream conditions the separation changes abruptly to a lip separation. This change is associated with a significant reduction in nacelle net thrust as well as a sharp increase in fan blade vibratory stresses. Consequently, the onset of lip separation is regarded as the nacelle operating limit. The test verified that the asymmetric inlet design will provide high performance and stable operation at the design forward speed and angle of attack conditions. At some of these, however, operation near the lower end of the design inlet airflow range is not feasible due to the occurrence of lip separation.

  10. Numerical simulations of the evolution of Taylor cells from a growing boundary layer on the inner cylinder of a high radius ratio Taylor-Couette system.

    PubMed

    Batten, W M J; Bressloff, N W; Turnock, S R

    2002-12-01

    The Taylor-Couette flow in the gap between two concentric cylinders has been studied numerically to show the evolution of Taylor vortices from pairs of ring-shaped vortices, at Reynolds numbers of 5 x 10(3) and 8 x 10(3) based upon the gap width. The cylinders have a high radius ratio of 0.985 and the inner cylinder rotates within a stationary outer cylinder. Initially, ring-shaped vortices are generated at the surface of the inner cylinder and spread into the gap. This is distinctly different from the formation of laminar Taylor vortices that grow from the end walls. Mixing of these ring-shaped vortices with the developing Couette flow then occurs and further ring-shaped vortices are generated. Some of these dominate the flow and begin to form Taylor vortices. Finally the Taylor vortices are stabilized and further vortex formation ceases. An analysis is also presented of the variation of shear stress with time. PMID:12513397

  11. From the Companion Mass Ratio Distribution to the Planetary Mass Function: Using Multiple Systems to Constrain Models of Star and Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, Maddalena; Meyer, Michael R.

    We present new results regarding the companion mass ratio distribution (CMRD) of stars, and sub-stellar objects. Considering the new survey of multiples for solar type field stars (Raghavan et al. ApJS 190:1, 2010) and M dwarfs (Janson et al. ApJ 754(1):26, 2012), we test the universality of the CMRD derived in Reggiani and Meyer (ApJ 738:60, 2011). Whereas we do not find significant differences in the CMRD for M dwarfs compared to previous results, the solar type CMRD appears to inconsistent with the previously derived CMRD from Reggiani and Meyer (ApJ 738:60, 2011). Despite the fact that this survey spans a wider range of angular separations than the previously studied samples, there is no evidence for variations in the CMRD as a function of orbital separation. Assuming that we can extrapolate both the stellar CMRD into the BD regime and the radial velocity planetary Companion Mass Function (Cumming et al. PASP 120:531, 2008) to larger separations, we can run MC simulations to test in which mass range we expect the planet population to become more important than BDs as companions to stars. This tool can be useful to predict the outcome of future surveys for very low mass companions or to analyze already existing datasets.

  12. A Mission-Adaptive Variable Camber Flap Control System to Optimize High Lift and Cruise Lift-to-Drag Ratios of Future N+3 Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urnes, James, Sr.; Nguyen, Nhan; Ippolito, Corey; Totah, Joseph; Trinh, Khanh; Ting, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Boeing and NASA are conducting a joint study program to design a wing flap system that will provide mission-adaptive lift and drag performance for future transport aircraft having light-weight, flexible wings. This Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system offers a lighter-weight lift control system having two performance objectives: (1) an efficient high lift capability for take-off and landing, and (2) reduction in cruise drag through control of the twist shape of the flexible wing. This control system during cruise will command varying flap settings along the span of the wing in order to establish an optimum wing twist for the current gross weight and cruise flight condition, and continue to change the wing twist as the aircraft changes gross weight and cruise conditions for each mission segment. Design weight of the flap control system is being minimized through use of light-weight shape memory alloy (SMA) actuation augmented with electric actuators. The VCCTEF program is developing better lift and drag performance of flexible wing transports with the further benefits of lighter-weight actuation and less drag using the variable camber shape of the flap.

  13. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  14. Lorentz ratio of quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khalfaoui, A.; Bennaceur, D. )

    1994-06-01

    A quantum collective approach is developed to investigate linear transport properties of a system of highly degenerate weakly coupled electrons and strongly coupled semiclassical ions. The basic formalism rests upon suitable extention of the Boltzmann--Bloch quantum transport equation. The model considers electron--ion (e--i) and electron--electron (e--e) collisions in a unified scheme of both long- and short-range Coulomb interactions. The e--e collisions contribute to the thermal conductivity calculation in the low coupling regime. Even though they can be insignificant for strongly coupled systems, the extensively used Lorentz gas approximation cannot be justified for plasmas of astrophysical interests. It is shown that the Lorentz ratio of high-density plasma may exhibit substantial negative deviation from the ideal Sommerfeld value, due to some nonidealities, such as e--e interaction and quantum effects. Results are presented under analytical and compact forms allowing numerical applications, as well as comparisons with existing theories.

  15. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients??=??80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of??-0.93 (p??=??0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of??-0.95 (p??=??0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of??-0.85 (p??=??0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely. PMID:26540441

  16. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients  =  80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of  -0.93 (p  =  0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of  -0.95 (p  =  0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of  -0.85 (p  =  0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  17. Volume ratios between the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion system affect their performance and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wen; Zhang, Wenfei; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-25

    An experimental temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) system, with the thermophilic digester operated at neutral pH and with a balanced acidogenesis and methanogenesis (referred to as NT-TPAD), was evaluated with respect to the microbial communities and population dynamics of methanogens when digesting dairy cattle manure at 15-day overall system hydraulic retention time (HRT). When fed a manure slurry of 10% total solid (TS), similar system performance, 36-38% volatile solid (VS) removal and 0.21-0.22 L methane g(-1) VS fed, was achieved between a 5-day and 7.5-day HRT for the thermophilic digester. However, the thermophilic digester achieved a greater volumetric biogas yield when operated at a 5-day RT than at a 7.5-day HRT (6.3 vs. 4.7 L/L/d), while the mesophilic digester had a stable volumetric biogas yield (about 1.0 L/L/d). Each of the digesters harbored distinct yet dynamic microbial populations, and some of the methanogens were significantly correlated with methane productions. Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta were the most important methanogenic genera in the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters, respectively. The microbiological findings may help understand the metabolism that underpins the anaerobic processes within each of the two digesters of TPAD systems when fed dairy manure. PMID:26232524

  18. Tuning the Formations of Metal-Organic Frameworks by Modification of Ratio of Reactant, Acidity of Reaction System, and Use of a Secondary Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Q; Xie, YB; Li, JR; Yuan, DQ; Yakovenko, AA; Sun, JH; Zhou, HC

    2012-01-01

    Four porous coordination networks (PCNs), {[Zn3O(H2O)(3)(adc)(3)]center dot 2(C2H6NH2)center dot 2(DMF)center dot 3(H2O)}(n) (PCN-131), Zn-2(DMA)(2)(adc)(2)]center dot 2(DMA)}(n) (PCN-132), {[Zn3O(DMF)(adc)(3)(4,4'-bpy)]center dot 2(C2H6NH2)center dot S}(n) (PCN-131'), and {[Zn(adc)(4,4'-bpy)(0.5)]center dot S}(n) (PCN-132'), have been synthesized by the assembly of anthrancene-9,10-dicarboxylic acid (H(2)adc) with Zn(II) under different reaction conditions, including modifications of reactant ratio, acidity variations, and the use of a secondary ligand. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that PCN-131, obtained from the dimethylformamide (DMF) solution under acid condition, has a three-dimentional (3D) framework structure with one-dimensional (1D) honeycomb channels. PCN-132 isolated from dimethylacetamide (DMA) solution without adding acid in synthesis is a two-dimensional (2D) layer compound. By employing 4,4'-bipyridyl (4,4'-bpy) as a secondary ligand, PCN-131' and PCN-132' were synchronously synthesized as a mixture outcome with more PCN-131' than PCN-132'. In PCN-131', 4,4'-bpy acting as a secondary ligand is arranged inside the honeycomb channel of the 3D PCN-131, resulting in an effective improvement of thermal stability of the network, while in PCN-132', 4,4'-bpy ligands link 2D layers of PCN-132 to form a pillared-layer 3D framework Gas adsorption has been performed for selected materials. The results show that the framework of PCN-131 is thermally unstable after removing the solvent molecules coordinated to their metal sites. While PCN-131' is stable for gas uptake, with an evaluated Langmuir surface area of 199.04 m(2) g(-1), it shows a selective adsorption of CO2 over CH4.

  19. Boolean network model for GPR142 against Type 2 diabetes and relative dynamic change ratio analysis using systems and biological circuits approach.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Aman Chandra; Sahi, Shakti

    2015-06-01

    Systems biology addresses challenges in the analysis of genomics data, especially for complex genes and protein interactions using Meta data approach on various signaling pathways. In this paper, we report systems biology and biological circuits approach to construct pathway and identify early gene and protein interactions for predicting GPR142 responses in Type 2 diabetes. The information regarding genes, proteins and other molecules involved in Type 2 diabetes were retrieved from literature and kinetic simulation of GPR142 was carried out in order to determine the dynamic interactions. The major objective of this work was to design a GPR142 biochemical pathway using both systems biology as well as biological circuits synthetically. The term 'synthetically' refers to building biological circuits for cell signaling pathway especially for hormonal pathway disease. The focus of the paper is on logical components and logical circuits whereby using these applications users can create complex virtual circuits. Logic gates process represents only true or false and investigates whether biological regulatory circuits are active or inactive. The basic gates used are AND, NAND, OR, XOR and NOT gates and Integrated circuit composition of many such basic gates and some derived gates. Biological circuits may have a futuristic application in biomedical sciences which may involve placing a micro chip in human cells to modulate the down or up regulation of hormonal disease. PMID:25972988

  20. Energy Profit Ratio Compared

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Osamu

    2007-07-01

    We need more oil energy to take out oil under the ground. Limit resources make us consider other candidates of energy source instead of oil. Electricity shall be the main role more and more like electric vehicles and air conditioners so we should consider electricity generation ways. When we consider what kind of electric power generation is the best or suitable, we should not only power generation plant but whole process from mining to power generation. It is good way to use EPR, Energy Profit Ratio, to analysis which type is more efficient and which part is to do research and development when you see the input breakdown analysis. Electricity by the light water nuclear power plant, the hydrogen power plant and the geothermal power plant are better candidates from EPR analysis. Forecasting the world primly energy supply in 2050, it is said that the demand will be double of the demand in 2000 and the supply will not be able to satisfy the demand in 2050. We should save 30% of the demand and increase nuclear power plants 3.5 times more and recyclable energy like hydropower plants 3 times more. When the nuclear power plants are 3.5 times more then uranium peak will come and we will need breed uranium. I will analysis the EPR of FBR. Conclusion: A) the EPR of NPS in Japan is 17.4 and it is the best of all. B) Many countries will introduce new nuclear power plants rapidly may be 3.5 times in 2050. C) Uranium peak will happen around 2050. (author)

  1. Correlation of infrared reflectance ratios at 2.3 microns/1.6 micron and 1.1 micron/1.6 micron with delta O-18 values delineating fossil hydrothermal systems in the Idaho batholith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.; Criss, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Reflectance ratios from laboratory spectra and airborne multispectral images are found to be strongly correlated with delta O-18 values of granite rocks in the Idaho batholith. The correlation is largely a result of interactions between hot water and rock, which lowered the delta O-18 values of the rocks and produced secondary hydrous material. Maps of the ratio of reflectivities at 2.3 and 1.6 microns should delineate fossil hydrothermal systems and provide estimates of alteration intensity. However, hydrous minerals produced during deuteric alteration or weathering cannot be unambiguously distinguished in remotely sensed images from the products of propylitic alteration without the use of narrow-band scanners. The reflectivity at 1.6 micron is strongly correlated with rock density and may be useful in distinguishing rock types in granitic terranes.

  2. Using Cl/Br ratios and other indicators to assess potential impacts on groundwater quality from septic systems: A review and examples from principal aquifers in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Brian G.; Eberts, Sandra M.; Kauffman, Leon J.

    2011-02-01

    SummaryA detailed review was made of chemical indicators used to identify impacts from septic tanks on groundwater quality. Potential impacts from septic tank leachate on groundwater quality were assessed using the mass ratio of chloride-bromide (Cl/Br), concentrations of selected chemical constituents, and ancillary information (land use, census data, well depth, soil characteristics) for wells in principal aquifers of the United States. Chemical data were evaluated from 1848 domestic wells in 19 aquifers, 121 public-supply wells in 6 aquifers, and associated monitoring wells in four aquifers and their overlying hydrogeologic units. Based on previously reported Cl/Br ratios, statistical comparisons between targeted wells (where Cl/Br ratios range from 400 to 1100 and Cl concentrations range from 20 to 100 mg/L) and non-targeted wells indicated that shallow targeted monitoring and domestic wells (<20 m depth below land surface) had a significantly ( p < 0.05) higher median percentage of houses with septic tanks (1990 census data) than non-targeted wells. Higher ( p = 0.08) median nitrate-N concentration (3.1 mg/L) in oxic (dissolved oxygen concentrations >0.5 mg/L) shallow groundwater from target domestic wells, relative to non-target wells (1.5 mg/L), corresponded to significantly higher potassium, boron, chloride, dissolved organic carbon, and sulfate concentrations, which may also indicate the influence of septic-tank effluent. Impacts on groundwater quality from septic systems were most evident for the Eastern Glacial Deposits aquifer and the Northern High Plains aquifer that were associated with the number of housing units using septic tanks, high permeability of overlying sediments, mostly oxic conditions, and shallow wells. Overall, little or no influence from septic systems were found for water samples from the deeper public-supply wells. The Cl/Br ratio is a useful first-level screening tool for assessing possible septic tank influence in water from shallow wells (<20 m) with the range of 400-1100. The use of this ratio would be enhanced with information on other chloride sources, temporal variability of chloride and bromide concentrations in shallow groundwater, knowledge of septic-system age and maintenance, and the use of multiple tracers (combination of additional chemical and microbiological indicators).

  3. How learn the branching ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, N. N.; Rogozina, E. V.

    2014-10-01

    Enfant terrible of charmonium spectroscopy, the resonance X(3872), generated a stream of interpretations and ushered in a new exotic XYZ spectroscopy. In the meantime, many (if not all) characteristics of X(3872) are rather ambiguous. We construct spectra of decays of the resonance X(3872) with good analytical and unitary properties which allows to define the branching ratio of the decay studying only one more decay, for example, the X(3872) → π+π- J/ψ(1 S) decay. We next define the range of values of the coupling constant of the X(3872) resonance with the system. Finally, we show that our spectra are effective means of selection of models for the resonance X(3872).

  4. Controlling Gas-Flow Mass Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed system automatically controls proportions of gases flowing in supply lines. Conceived for control of oxidizer-to-fuel ratio in new gaseous-propellant rocket engines. Gas-flow control system measures temperatures and pressures at various points. From data, calculates control voltages for electronic pressure regulators for oxygen and hydrogen. System includes commercially available components. Applicable to control of mass ratios in such gaseous industrial processes as chemical-vapor depostion of semiconductor materials and in automotive engines operating on compressed natural gas.

  5. Competing antiferromagnetism and local magnetic order in the bulk ceramic PZT-PFW multiferroic system: searching for the most promising ratio between PZT and PFW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajić, D.; Jagodič, M.; Jagličić, Z.; Holc, J.; Kosec, M.; Trontelj, Z.

    2013-11-01

    Bulk ceramic compounds of formula xPZT + (1 - x)PFW, where PZT = Pb(Zr0.575Ti0.425)O3 and PFW = Pb(Fe2/3W1/3)O3, for x = 0.15 0.20; 0.25; 0.37; 0.50; 0.60; 0.65; 0.70 and 0.80, were synthesized. In these single phase perovskites a change from rhombohedral to cubic structure is observed as the proportion of PFW increases. Magnetic investigations including zero-field cooled and field-cooled magnetization versus temperature measurements, magnetic hysteresis loops measurement and ac susceptibility measurements were performed. At high temperatures a clear antiferromagnetic (AFM)-like transition was observed for high PFW concentrations. The low temperature behaviour indicated spin freezing and thermal activation of magnetic moments and measurements confirmed the existence of a barrier maximum for x = 0.37. Competition between the long-range AFM order and short-range magnetic ordering of small nano-sized regions with finite magnetic moments was observed in the studied system.

  6. Ratio estimation in SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.

    2011-09-01

    The determination of an isotope ratio by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) traditionally involves averaging a number of ratios collected over the course of a measurement. We show that this method leads to an additive positive bias in the expectation value of the estimated ratio that is approximately equal to the true ratio divided by the counts of the denominator isotope of an individual ratio. This bias does not decrease as the number of ratios used in the average increases. By summing all counts in the numerator isotope, then dividing by the sum of counts in the denominator isotope, the estimated ratio is less biased: the bias is approximately equal to the ratio divided by the summed counts of the denominator isotope over the entire measurement. We propose a third ratio estimator (Beale's estimator) that can be used when the bias from the summed counts is unacceptably large for the hypothesis being tested. We derive expressions for the variance of these ratio estimators as well as the conditions under which they are normally distributed. Finally, we investigate a SIMS dataset showing the effects of ratio bias, and discuss proper ratio estimation for SIMS analysis.

  7. Displacement damage in bit error ratio performance of on-off keying, pulse position modulation, differential phase shift keying, and homodyne binary phase-shift keying-based optical intersatellite communication system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Zhao, Jing; Dong, Chen; Li, Xuan

    2016-04-10

    Displacement damage (DD) effect induced bit error ratio (BER) performance degradations in on-off keying (OOK), pulse position modulation (PPM), differential phase-shift keying (DPSK), and homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) based systems were simulated and discussed under 1 MeV neutron irradiation to a total fluence of 1×1012  n/cm2 in this paper. Degradation of main optoelectronic devices included in communication systems were analyzed on the basis of existing experimental data. The system BER degradation was subsequently simulated and the variations of BER with different neutron irradiation location were also achieved. The result shows that DD on an Er-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is the dominant cause of system degradation, and a BPSK-based system performs better than the other three systems against DD. In order to improve radiation hardness of communication systems against DD, protection and enhancement of EDFA are required, and the use of a homodyne BPSK modulation scheme is a considered choice. PMID:27139876

  8. Spatial and temporal infaunal dynamics of the Blanes submarine canyon-slope system (NW Mediterranean); changes in nematode standing stocks, feeding types and gender-life stage ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingels, Jeroen; Vanreusel, Ann; Romano, Chiara; Coenjaerts, Johan; Mar Flexas, M.; Zúñiga, Diana; Martin, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of submarine canyons ecosystems, our understanding of the faunal patterns and processes in these environments is still marginal. In this study, meiobenthic nematode communities (from 300 m to 1600 m depth) obtained in November 2003 and May 2004 at eight stations inside and outside Blanes submarine canyon were analysed for nematode standing stocks (SSs), feeding types and gender-life stage distributions. Environmental data were obtained by sediment traps and current meters, attached to moorings (April 2003-May 2004), and sediments samples analysed for biogeochemistry and grain size (May 2004). In November 2003, nematode SSs decreased with increasing depth (367.2 individuals and 7.31 μg C per 10 cm2 at 388 m water depth to 7.7 individuals and 0.18 μg C per 10 cm2 at 1677 m water depth), showing a significant negative relation (abundance: R2 = 0.620, p = 0.020; biomass: R2 = 0.512, p = 0.046). This was not the case in May 2004 (283.5 individuals and 3.53 μg C per 10 cm2 at 388 m water depth to 490.8 individuals and 4.93 μg C per 10 cm2 at 1677 m water depth; abundance: R2 = 0.003, p = 0.902; biomass: R2 = 0.052, p = 0.587), suggesting a temporal effect that overrides the traditional decrease of SSs with increasing water depth. Both water depth and sampling time played a significant role in explaining nematode SSs, but with differences between stations. No overall differences were observed between canyon and open slope stations. Nematode standing stock (SS) patterns can be explained by taking into account the interplay of phytodetrital input and disturbance events, with station differences such as topography playing an important role. Individual nematode size decreased from November 2003 to May 2004 and was explained by a food-induced genera shift and/or a food-induced transition from a ‘latent’ to a ‘reproductive’ nematode community. Our results suggest that size patterns in nematode communities are not solely governed by trophic conditions over longer periods of time in relatively food-rich environments such as canyons. We hypothesize that food pulses in a dynamic and topographical heterogeneous environment such as canyons regulate nematode size distributions, rather than long-term food availability. Feeding type distributions in the Blanes Canyon did not clearly resemble those from other canyon systems, apart from the spring assemblage at one station in the head of the canyon.

  9. HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUAL NATIONAL LABORATORY2nd QUARTER 2010 MILESTONE REPORTDevelop the theory connecting pyrometer and streak camera spectrometer data to the material properties of beam heatedtargets and compare to the data

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.; Barnard, J. J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.

    2010-04-01

    This milestone has been accomplished. We have extended the theory that connects pyrometer and streak spectrometer data to material temperature on several fronts and have compared theory to NDCX-I experiments. For the case of NDCX-I, the data suggests that as the metallic foils are heated they break into droplets (cf. HIFS VNL Milestone Report FY 2009 Q4). Evaporation of the metallic surface will occur, but optical emission should be directly observable from the solid or liquid surface of the foil or from droplets. However, the emissivity of hot material may be changed from the cold material and interference effects will alter the spectrum emitted from small droplets. These effects have been incorporated into a theory of emission from droplets. We have measured emission using streaked spectrometry and together with theory of emission from heated droplets have inferred the temperature of a gold foil heated by the NDCX-I experiment. The intensity measured by the spectrometer is proportional to the emissivity times the blackbody intensity at the temperature of the foil or droplets. Traditionally, a functional form for the emissivity as a function of wavelength (such as a quadratic) is assumed and the three unknown emissivity parameters (for the case of a quadratic) and the temperature are obtained by minimizing the deviations from the fit. In the case of the NDCX-I experiment, two minima were obtained: at 7200 K and 2400 K. The best fit was at 7200 K. However, when the actual measured emissivity of gold was used and when the theoretical corrections for droplet interference effects were made for emission from droplets having radii in the range 0.2 to 2.0 microns, the corrected emissivity was consistent with the 2400 K value, whereas the fit emissivity at 7200 K shows no similarity to the corrected emissivity curves. Further, an estimate of the temperature obtained from beam heating is consistent with the lower value. This exercise proved to be a warning to be skeptical of assuming functional forms when they are unknown, and also represents a first success of the droplet emission theory. The thermal optical emission from a hot metal surface is polarized (for observation angles that are not normal to the surface). By observing the intensity of both polarizations at two or more observation angles the emissivity can be inferred directly, and the temperature at the surface unambiguously determined. Emission from the spolarization (where the E-field is parallel to the surface and normal to the wave vector) is generally less intense than emission from the p-polarization (E-field that is normal to the s-polarization E-field and the wave vector.) The emissivity and temperature may be inferred directly without assuming any specific functional form for the emissivity or resorting to published data tables (which usually do not apply when temperatures reach the WDM regime). We have derived the theory of polarized emission from hot metals, and consider an improved method of temperature determination that takes advantage of polarization measurements, which we call polarization pyrometry. Thus far we have successfully applied the theory to electrically heated metallic filaments, and will apply the theory to beam heated targets when chamber space constraints are removed that will make it feasible to observe the targets at multiple angles. For the case of experiments on NDCX-II, hydrodynamic expansion on a nanosecond timescale that is comparable to the heating time will result in an expanding fluid, with a strong (but finite) density and temperature gradient. Emission will be observed from positions in the foil near the critical density (where the observation photon frequency is equal to the local plasma frequency). By assuming a brightness temperature equal to the local fluid temperature at the critical frequency, a time history of the emission spectrum from an expanding foil can be synthesized from a hydrodynamic simulation of the target. We find that observations from the ultraviolet to the infrared will allow a probing of the target at different depths, and will allow a test of specific equations of state. Improved versions of this theory that integrate the electric field along a ray from the interior of the metal to observation point are being constructed to give a more accurate description of the emitted spectrum.

  10. High pressure ratio turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Woollenweber, W.E.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes a turbocharger system for an internal combustion engine. It comprises means forming a turbine adapted to be driven by exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine comprising: a turbine wheel having a central core and outwardly extending vanes, the turbine wheel being rotatable about a central axis; a meridionally divided volute for exhaust gas surrounding the turbine wheel, the meridionally divided volute including a divider wall defining first and second volute passageways with openings at the turbine wheel; means forming a high-pressure compressor driven by the turbine means, the high-pressure compressor comprising: rotating compressor blades, the compressor blades adapted to be driven in rotation about the central axis by the turbine means to deliver a flow of air at high pressures for an internal combustion engine, and blades being moveable about longitudinal axes generally transverse to the central axis to impart positive or negative pre-whirl motion to the air leaving the stator blades prior to entering the rotating blades of the compressor stage; closure means for providing a flow of engine exhaust gas from one of the first and second volute passageways into the turbine wheel; and a control means for operating the closure means and the stator blades in synchronization.

  11. Versatile inlet system for on-line compound-specific deltaD and delta13C gas chromatography-oxidation/reduction-isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis of gaseous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Henning, Mark; Strapoć, Dariusz; Lis, Grzegorz P; Sauer, Peter; Fong, Jon; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Pratt, Lisa M

    2007-01-01

    Compound-specific deltaD and delta13C analyses of gas mixtures are useful indicators of geochemical and environmental factors. However, the relative concentrations of individual components in gas mixtures (e.g., H2, CO2, methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, n-butane) may vary over several orders of magnitude. The determination of hydrogen and carbon compound-specific stable isotope ratios requires that the hydrogen and carbon dioxide produced from each separated component has a concentration adjusted to match the dynamic range of the stable isotope mass spectrometer. We present a custom-built gas sampling and injection system (GASIS) linked with a Delta Plus XP mass spectrometer that provides flexibility, ease of operation, and economical use of small gas samples with wide ranges of analyte concentrations. The overall on-line GC-ox/red-IRMS (Gas Chromatography - oxidation/reduction - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) system consists of (i) a customized GASIS inlet system and (ii) two alternative reactors, namely an oxidative Cu-Ni-Pt reactor at 950 degrees C for production of CO2 and a reductive graphitized Al2O3 reactor at 1420 degrees C for production of H2. In addition, the system is equipped with (iii) a liquid nitrogen spray-cooling unit for cryo-GC-focusing at -20 degrees C, and (iv) a Nafion dryer for removal of water vapor from product CO2. The three injection loops of the GASIS inlet allow flexibility in the volume of injected analyte gas (e.g., from 0.06 to 500 microL) in order to measure reproducible deltaD and delta13C values for gases at concentrations ranging from 100% down to 10 ppm. We calibrate our GC-ox/red-IRMS system with two isotopically distinct methane references gases that are combusted off-line and characterized using dual-inlet IRMS. PMID:17577874

  12. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  13. Mobile, outdoor continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer system for automated high-frequency 13C- and 18O-CO2 analysis for Keeling plot applications.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Hans; Schäufele, Rudi; Wenzel, Richard

    2004-01-01

    A continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS, custom-made GasBenchII and Delta(plus)Advantage, ThermoFinnigan) was installed on a grassland site and interfaced with a closed-path infrared gas analyser (IRGA). The CF-IRMS and IRGA were housed in an air-conditioned travel van. Air was sampled at 1.5 m above the 0.07-m tall grassland canopy, drawn through a 17-m long PTFE tube at a rate of 0.25 L s(-1), and fed to the IRGA and CF-IRMS in series. The IRMS was interfaced with the IRGA via a stainless steel capillary inserted 0.5 m into the sample air outlet tube of the IRGA (forming an open split), a gas-tight pump, and a sample loop attached to the eight-port Valco valve of the continuous-flow interface. Air was pumped through the 0.25-mL sample loop at 10 mL s(-1) (a flushing frequency of 40 Hz). Air samples were analysed at intervals of approx. 2.8 min. Whole system precision was tested in the field using air mixed from pure CO2 and CO2-free air by means of mass flow controllers. The standard deviation of repeated single measurements was 0.21-0.07 per thousand for delta13C and 0.34-0.14 per thousand for delta18O of CO2 in air with mixing ratios ranging between 200-800 micromol mol(-1). The CO2 peak area measured by the IRMS was proportional to the CO2 mixing ratio (r2 = 1.00), allowing estimation of sample air CO2 mixing ratio from IRMS data. A 1-day long measurement cycle of CO2, delta13C and delta18O of air sampled above the grassland canopy was used to test the system for Keeling plot applications. Delta18O exhibited a clear diurnal cycle (4 per thousand range), but short-term (1-h interval) variability was small (average SD 0.38 per thousand). Yet, the correlation between delta18O and CO2 mixing ratio was relatively weak, and this was true for both the whole data set and 1-h subsets. Conversely, the delta13C of all 541 samples measured during the 25.2-h interval fitted well the Keeling regression (r2 = 0.99), yielding an intercept of -27.40 per thousand (+/-0.07 per thousand SE). Useful Keeling regressions (r2 > 0.9, average r2 = 0.96) also resulted from data collected over 1-h intervals of the 12-h long twilight and dark period. These indicated that 13C content of ecosystem respiration was approx. constant near -27.6 per thousand. The precision of the present system is similar to that of current techniques used in ecosystem studies which employ flask sampling and a laboratory-based CF-IRMS. Sampling (and measurement) frequency is greatly increased relative to systems based on flask sampling, and sampling time (0.025 s per sample) is decreased. These features increase the probability for sampling the entire CO2 range which occurs in a given time window. The system obviates sample storage problems, greatly minimises handling needs, and allows extended campaigns of high frequency sampling and analysis with minimal attendance. PMID:15543546

  14. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals. PMID:12396200

  15. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  16. The diversity of the N2O reducers matters for the N2O:N2 denitrification end-product ratio across an annual and a perennial cropping system

    PubMed Central

    Domeignoz-Horta, Luiz A.; Spor, Aymé; Bru, David; Breuil, Marie-Christine; Bizouard, Florian; Léonard, Joël; Philippot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is the main source of terrestrial emissions of N2O, a potent greenhouse gas and the main cause of ozone layer depletion. The reduction of N2O into N2 by microorganisms carrying the nitrous oxide reductase gene (nosZ) is the only biological process known to eliminate this greenhouse gas. Recent studies showed that a previously unknown clade of N2O-reducers was related to the capacity of the soil to act as an N2O sink, opening the way for new strategies to mitigate emissions. Here, we investigated whether the agricultural practices could differently influence the two N2O reducer clades with consequences for denitrification end-products. The abundance of N2O-reducers and producers was quantified by real-time PCR, and the diversity of both nosZ clades was determined by 454 pyrosequencing. Potential N2O production and potential denitrification activity were used to calculate the denitrification gaseous end-product ratio. Overall, the results showed limited differences between management practices but there were significant differences between cropping systems in both the abundance and structure of the nosZII community, as well as in the [rN2O/r(N2O+N2)] ratio. More limited differences were observed in the nosZI community, suggesting that the newly identified nosZII clade is more sensitive than nosZI to environmental changes. Potential denitrification activity and potential N2O production were explained mainly by the soil properties while the diversity of the nosZII clade on its own explained 26% of the denitrification end-product ratio, which highlights the importance of understanding the ecology of this newly identified clade of N2O reducers for mitigation strategies. PMID:26441904

  17. Sialyltransferase and Neuraminidase Levels/Ratios and Sialic Acid Levels in Peripheral Blood B Cells Correlate with Measures of Disease Activity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Lieh-bang; Huang, Che-ching

    2016-01-01

    Objective We attempted to determine whether the level of enzymes sialyltransferase (ST) and neuraminidase (Neu) and sialic acid (SIA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlates with the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) correlates with the Disease Activity Score28 (DAS28). Methods We examined cell-surface levels of ST6Gal-1, Neu1, ST3Gal-1, Neu3, α-2,6-SIA, and α-2,3-SIA by using fluorescent anti-enzyme antibodies, fluorescent-conjugated Sambucus nigra lectin, and fluorescent-conjugated Maackia amurensis lectin on blood cells in SLE and RA patients and assessed correlations of these levels with SLEDAI and with DAS28. Areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for different variables against SLEDAI. Results The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio positively correlated with SLEDAI scores (ρ = 0.409 and P = 0.002, statistically significant after Bonferroni’ correction for multiple analyses.). It was supported by the inverse correlation of B-cell Neu3 levels with SLEDAI scores (ρ = −0.264, P = 0.048). The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio against SLEDAI yielded an AUC of 0.689, which was comparable to that of anti-dsDNA levels at 0.635. In contrast, both ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels of RA B cells (r = 0.376, P = 0.013; r = 0.425, P = 0.005, respectively) correlated positively with high disease-activity DAS28 scores. Conclusion B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratios in SLE and B-cell ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels in RA with high disease-activity DAS28 scores correlated with disease activity measures and may be useful in monitoring disease activities. PMID:26981635

  18. The diversity of the N2O reducers matters for the N2O:N2 denitrification end-product ratio across an annual and a perennial cropping system.

    PubMed

    Domeignoz-Horta, Luiz A; Spor, Aymé; Bru, David; Breuil, Marie-Christine; Bizouard, Florian; Léonard, Joël; Philippot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is the main source of terrestrial emissions of N2O, a potent greenhouse gas and the main cause of ozone layer depletion. The reduction of N2O into N2 by microorganisms carrying the nitrous oxide reductase gene (nosZ) is the only biological process known to eliminate this greenhouse gas. Recent studies showed that a previously unknown clade of N2O-reducers was related to the capacity of the soil to act as an N2O sink, opening the way for new strategies to mitigate emissions. Here, we investigated whether the agricultural practices could differently influence the two N2O reducer clades with consequences for denitrification end-products. The abundance of N2O-reducers and producers was quantified by real-time PCR, and the diversity of both nosZ clades was determined by 454 pyrosequencing. Potential N2O production and potential denitrification activity were used to calculate the denitrification gaseous end-product ratio. Overall, the results showed limited differences between management practices but there were significant differences between cropping systems in both the abundance and structure of the nosZII community, as well as in the [rN2O/r(N2O+N2)] ratio. More limited differences were observed in the nosZI community, suggesting that the newly identified nosZII clade is more sensitive than nosZI to environmental changes. Potential denitrification activity and potential N2O production were explained mainly by the soil properties while the diversity of the nosZII clade on its own explained 26% of the denitrification end-product ratio, which highlights the importance of understanding the ecology of this newly identified clade of N2O reducers for mitigation strategies. PMID:26441904

  19. Effects of Al2O3 and CaO/SiO2 Ratio on Phase Equilbria in the ZnO-"FeO"-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2 System in Equilibrium with Metallic Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baojun; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2011-02-01

    The phase equilibria and liquidus temperatures in the ZnO-"FeO"-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2 system in equilibrium with metallic iron have been determined experimentally in the temperature range 1383 K to 1573 K (1150 °C to 1300 °C). The experimental conditions were selected to characterize lead blast furnace and imperial smelting furnace slags. The results are presented in a form of pseudoternary sections ZnO-"FeO"-(Al2O3 + CaO + SiO2) with fixed CaO/SiO2 and (CaO + SiO2)/Al2O3 ratios. It was found that wustite and spinel are the major primary phases in the composition range investigated. Effects of Al2O3 concentration as well as the CaO/SiO2 ratio on the primary phase field, the liquidus temperature, and the partitioning of ZnO between liquid and solid phases have been discussed for zinc-containing slags.

  20. The Th17/Treg ratio, IL-1RA and sCD14 levels in primary HIV infection predict the T-cell activation set point in the absence of systemic microbial translocation.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Petitjean, Gaël; Dunyach-Rémy, Catherine; Didier, Céline; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Manea, Maria Elena; Campa, Pauline; Meyer, Laurence; Rouzioux, Christine; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Weiss, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of the intestinal barrier and subsequent microbial translocation (MT) may be involved in chronic immune activation, which plays a central role in HIV pathogenesis. Th17 cells are critical to prevent MT. The aim of the study was to investigate, in patients with primary HIV infection (PHI), the early relationship between the Th17/Treg ratio, monocyte activation and MT and their impact on the T-cell activation set point, which is known to predict disease progression. 27 patients with early PHI were included in a prospective longitudinal study and followed-up for 6 months. At baseline, the Th17/Treg ratio strongly negatively correlated with the proportion of activated CD8 T cells expressing CD38/HLA-DR or Ki-67. Also, the Th17/Treg ratio was negatively related to viral load and plasma levels of sCD14 and IL-1RA, two markers of monocyte activation. In untreated patients, the Th17/Treg ratio at baseline negatively correlated with CD8 T-cell activation at month 6 defining the T-cell activation set point (% HLA-DR(+)CD38(+) and %Ki-67(+)). Soluble CD14 and IL-1RA plasma levels also predicted the T-cell activation set point. Levels of I-FABP, a marker of mucosal damages, were similar to healthy controls at baseline but increased at month 6. No decrease in anti-endotoxin core antibody (EndoCAb) and no peptidoglycan were detected during PHI. In addition, 16S rDNA was only detected at low levels in 2 out 27 patients at baseline and in one additional patient at M6. Altogether, data support the hypothesis that T-cell and monocyte activation in PHI are not primarily driven by systemic MT but rather by viral replication. Moreover, the "innate immune set point" defined by the early levels of sCD14 and IL-1RA might be powerful early surrogate markers for disease progression and should be considered for use in clinical practice. PMID:23818854

  1. The Th17/Treg Ratio, IL-1RA and sCD14 Levels in Primary HIV Infection Predict the T-cell Activation Set Point in the Absence of Systemic Microbial Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Mathieu F.; Petitjean, Gaël; Dunyach-Rémy, Catherine; Didier, Céline; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Manea, Maria Elena; Campa, Pauline; Meyer, Laurence; Rouzioux, Christine; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Weiss, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of the intestinal barrier and subsequent microbial translocation (MT) may be involved in chronic immune activation, which plays a central role in HIV pathogenesis. Th17 cells are critical to prevent MT. The aim of the study was to investigate, in patients with primary HIV infection (PHI), the early relationship between the Th17/Treg ratio, monocyte activation and MT and their impact on the T-cell activation set point, which is known to predict disease progression. 27 patients with early PHI were included in a prospective longitudinal study and followed-up for 6 months. At baseline, the Th17/Treg ratio strongly negatively correlated with the proportion of activated CD8 T cells expressing CD38/HLA-DR or Ki-67. Also, the Th17/Treg ratio was negatively related to viral load and plasma levels of sCD14 and IL-1RA, two markers of monocyte activation. In untreated patients, the Th17/Treg ratio at baseline negatively correlated with CD8 T-cell activation at month 6 defining the T-cell activation set point (% HLA-DR+CD38+ and %Ki-67+). Soluble CD14 and IL-1RA plasma levels also predicted the T-cell activation set point. Levels of I-FABP, a marker of mucosal damages, were similar to healthy controls at baseline but increased at month 6. No decrease in anti-endotoxin core antibody (EndoCAb) and no peptidoglycan were detected during PHI. In addition, 16S rDNA was only detected at low levels in 2 out 27 patients at baseline and in one additional patient at M6. Altogether, data support the hypothesis that T-cell and monocyte activation in PHI are not primarily driven by systemic MT but rather by viral replication. Moreover, the “innate immune set point” defined by the early levels of sCD14 and IL-1RA might be powerful early surrogate markers for disease progression and should be considered for use in clinical practice. PMID:23818854

  2. 12 CFR 615.5206 - Permanent capital ratio computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permanent capital ratio computation. 615.5206 Section 615.5206 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL... capital ratio computation. (a) The institution's permanent capital ratio is determined on the basis of...

  3. Progressive Ratio Schedules of Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, Peter R.; Posadas-Sanchez, Diana; Johansen, Espen Borgå; Thrailkill, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Pigeons’ pecks produced grain under progressive ratio (PR) schedules, whose response requirements increased systematically within sessions. Experiment 1 compared arithmetic (AP) and geometric (GP) progressions. Response rates increased as a function of the component ratio requirement, then decreased linearly (AP) or asymptotically (GP). Experiment 2 found the linear decrease in AP rates to be relatively independent of step size. Experiment 3 showed pausing to be controlled by the prior component length, which predicted the differences between PR and regressive ratio schedules found in Experiment 4. When the longest component ratios were signaled by different key colors, rates at moderate ratios increased, demonstrating control by forthcoming context. Models for response rate and pause duration described performance on AP schedules; GP schedules required an additional parameter representing the contextual reinforcement. PMID:19159161

  4. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  5. Sex ratios in the most-selective elite US undergraduate colleges and universities are consistent with the hypothesis that modern educational systems increasingly select for conscientious personality compared with intelligence.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2009-08-01

    The main predictors of examination results and educational achievement in modern societies are intelligence (IQ - or general factor 'g' intelligence) and the personality trait termed 'Conscientiousness' (C). I have previously argued that increased use of continuous assessment (e.g. course work rather than timed and supervised examinations) and increased duration of the educational process implies that modern educational systems have become increasingly selective for the personality trait of Conscientiousness and consequently less selective for IQ. I have tested this prediction (in a preliminary fashion) by looking at the sex ratios in the most selective elite US universities. My two main assumptions are: (1) that a greater proportion of individuals with very high intelligence are men than women, and (2) that women are more conscientious than men. To estimate the proportion of men and women expected at highly-selective schools, I performed demonstration calculations based on three plausible estimates of male and female IQ averages and standard deviations. The expected percentage of men at elite undergraduate colleges (selecting students with IQ above 130 - i.e. in the top 2% of the population) were 66%, 61% and 74%. When these estimates were compared with the sex ratios at 33 elite colleges and universities, only two technical institutes had more than 60% men. Elite US colleges and universities therefore seem to be selecting primarily on the basis of something other than IQ - probably conscientiousness. There is a 'missing population' of very high IQ men who are not being admitted to the most selective and prestigious undergraduate schools, probably because their high school educational qualifications and evaluations are too low. This analysis is therefore consistent with the hypothesis that modern educational systems tend to select more strongly for Conscientiousness than for IQ. The implication is that modern undergraduates at the most-selective US schools are not primarily an intelligence elite, as commonly assumed, but instead an elite for Conscientious personality. PMID:19369009

  6. RATIO_TOOL - SOFTWARE FOR COMPUTING IMAGE RATIOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    Geological studies analyze spectral data in order to gain information on surface materials. RATIO_TOOL is an interactive program for viewing and analyzing large multispectral image data sets that have been created by an imaging spectrometer. While the standard approach to classification of multispectral data is to match the spectrum for each input pixel against a library of known mineral spectra, RATIO_TOOL uses ratios of spectral bands in order to spot significant areas of interest within a multispectral image. Each image band can be viewed iteratively, or a selected image band of the data set can be requested and displayed. When the image ratios are computed, the result is displayed as a gray scale image. At this point a histogram option helps in viewing the distribution of values. A thresholding option can then be used to segment the ratio image result into two to four classes. The segmented image is then color coded to indicate threshold classes and displayed alongside the gray scale image. RATIO_TOOL is written in C language for Sun series computers running SunOS 4.0 and later. It requires the XView toolkit and the OpenWindows window manager (version 2.0 or 3.0). The XView toolkit is distributed with Open Windows. A color monitor is also required. The standard distribution medium for RATIO_TOOL is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. An electronic copy of the documentation is included on the program media. RATIO_TOOL was developed in 1992 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Sun, SunOS, and OpenWindows are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories.

  7. Intensity ratios: a cautionary tale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Claire-Elise; Cunningham, Maria; Green, Jimi; Dawson, Joanne; Jones, Paul; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Henkel, Christian; Baan, Willem; Martin, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Molecular line intensity ratios can be used as diagnostic tools to examine the effect of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) or central black hole on circum-nuclear gas. These intensity ratios allow the identification of X-ray dominated regions (XDRs) and photon-dominated regions (PDRs), which facilitates determination of whether the star formation or AGN has the dominant effect on the gas . The chemistry of these regions is dependent upon the type of radiation, thus they are differentiated by the relative intensity of their rotational molecular lines, HCO+/HCN and HNC/HCN (1-0). The ratio of the intensity of these molecular lines can be calculated in an unexpectedly large variety of ways. I present a cautionary tale regarding the calculation and interpretation of these ratios and a recommendation on how this calculation should be performed in the identification of XDRs and PDRs.

  8. Pressure Ratio to Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Wang, Winston

    2012-01-01

    A pressure ratio to thermal environments (PRatTlE.pl) program is a Perl language code that estimates heating at requested body point locations by scaling the heating at a reference location times a pressure ratio factor. The pressure ratio factor is the ratio of the local pressure at the reference point and the requested point from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) solutions. This innovation provides pressure ratio-based thermal environments in an automated and traceable method. Previously, the pressure ratio methodology was implemented via a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and macro scripts. PRatTlE is able to calculate heating environments for 150 body points in less than two minutes. PRatTlE is coded in Perl programming language, is command-line-driven, and has been successfully executed on both the HP and Linux platforms. It supports multiple concurrent runs. PRatTlE contains error trapping and input file format verification, which allows clear visibility into the input data structure and intermediate calculations.

  9. Arcjet nozzle area ratio effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  10. Continually variable transmission having fixed ratio and variable ratio mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Moan, R.D

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a transmission for producing a stepless, continually variable range of ratios of the speed of its output to its input comprising: a fluid coupling having an impeller adapted for connection to a power source and a turbine hydrodynamically connected to the impeller; as planetary gearset having a ring gear, a sun gear, a first set of planet pinions meshing with the sun gear, a second set of planet pinions meshing with the first set of pinions and with the ring gear, and a pinion carrier on which the first and second sets of pinions are rotatably supported; first drive means drivable connecting the turbine and the sun gear for producing a variable speed ratio therebetween having a range between an underdrive ratio and an overdrive ratio; second drive means drivably connecting the impeller and the ring gear for producing a fixed speed ratio therebetween; a first clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the ring gear and the second drive means; and a second clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the first drive means and the pinion carrier.

  11. A novel measurement scheme of the polarization extinction ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Huihui; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Yangan; Hong, Yan; Wang, Limeng; Zhang, Yue

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we mainly introduce a novel measurement system of the polarization extinction ratio(PBSBC system). Here, because the main optical components of the system is PBS and PBC, so we call this system PBSBC system. First of all, we introduce the principle of method of measuring the polarization extinction ratio by drawing a circle on the Poincare. Secondly, we present the system block diagram of PBSBC system, and design an experimental system to theoretically and experimentally investigate the performance of this system though the multiple groups of experimental data collected under the same condition. Finally, we could show that it is compatible with the analysis in PBSBC system.

  12. CO isotopologue ratios in the solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, James; Gharib-Nezhad, Ehsan; Ayres, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Determination of the oxygen isotope ratios in the solar photosphere is essential to constraining the formation environment of the solar system. The solar CO fundamental and first-overtone bands were previously measured by the shuttle-borne ATMOS Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), and with the National Solar Observatory FTS on the McMath-Pierce telescope at Kitt Peak. Analyzing the rovibrational bands from these photospheric spectra, a 3D convection model was employed to calculate ratios with improved uncertainties (16O/17O=2738±118 and 16O/18O =511±10 Ayres et al. 2013), which fall between the terrestrial values and those inferred from solar wind measurements by the Genesis spacecraft. However, differences in published CO dipole moment functions yielded a range of isotopic ratios spanning ~ 3 % in δ18O. Here we re-evaluate the CO dipole moment function in order to obtain more accurate isotope ratios for the photosphere. We used a new set of dipole moments from HITEMP which were accurately determined by both semi-empirical and ab initio methods. Preliminary values of isotope ratios using the new dipole moments are in better agreement with the inferred photosphere values from Genesis, showing that the solar photosphere is isotopically similar to primitive inclusions in meteorites, but different from the terrestrial planets by ~ 6 %. New spectral observations are needed to reduce uncertainties in photospheric C17O abundances.

  13. Low-speed tests of a high-aspect-ratio, supercritical-wing transport model equipped with a high-lift flap system in the Langley 4- by 7-meter and Ames 12-foot pressure tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.; Kjelgaard, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    The Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel was used to determine the effects of Reynolds number on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced, high-aspect-ratio, supercritical wing transport model equipped with a full span, leading edge slat and part span, double slotted, trailing edge flaps. The model had a wing span of 7.5 ft and was tested through a free stream Reynolds number range from 1.3 to 6.0 x 10 to 6th power per foot at a Mach number of 0.20. Prior to the Ames tests, an investigation was also conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.3 x 10 to 6th power per foot with the model mounted on an Ames strut support system and on the Langley sting support system to determine strut interference corrections. The data obtained from the Langley tests were also used to compare the aerodynamic charactertistics of the rather stiff, 7.5-ft-span steel wing model tested during this investigation and the larger, and rather flexible, 12-ft-span aluminum-wing model tested during a previous investigation. During the tests in both the Langley and Ames tunnels, the model was tested with six basic wing configurations: (1) cruise; (2) climb (slats only extended); (3) 15 deg take-off flaps; (4) 30 deg take-off flaps; (5) 45 deg landing flaps; and (6) 60 deg landing flaps.

  14. [Effect of long-term shallow tillage and straw returning on soil potassium content and stratification ratio in winter wheat/summer maize rotation system in Guanzhong Plain, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiang-lan; Li, Xiu-shuang; Wang, Shu-juan; Li, Shuo; Li, You-bing; Tian, Xiao-hong

    2015-11-01

    Soil stratified sampling method and potassium chemical fractionation analysis were used to investigate effects of long-term shallow tillage and straw returning on soil K contents and stratification ratios in winter wheat/summer maize rotation system in Guanzhong Plain of Northwest China. The results showed that after 13-year continuous shallow tillage and straw returning, surface accumulation and stratification effect obviously occurred for soil available K (SAK) and non-exchangeable K (NEK), which was particularly remarkable for SAK and its fractions. Serious depletion of SAK occurred in 15-30 cm soil layer, and the SAK value was lower than the critical value of soil potassium deficiency. Meanwhile, significant differences were found between SR1 and SR2 values of SAK and its fractions, SR was obtained by values of topsoil layer (0-5 cm) divided by corresponding values of lower soil layers (5-15 cm layer, SR1, or 15-30 cm layer, SR2). However, no significant difference was observed between SR values of NEK and mineral K. In conclusion, returning of all straw over 10 years in the winter wheat/summer maize rotation system contributed greatly to maintaining soil K pool balance, while special attention should be paid to the negative effects of surface accumulation and stratification of SAK on soil K fertility. PMID:26915186

  15. Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing visible light communications system using a combination of a genetic algorithm and a hill-climbing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wei; Deng, Honggui; Jiang, Fangqing; Zhu, Kaicheng; Yin, Linzi

    2015-03-01

    The orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) modulation technique has been used widely in visible light communications (VLC) systems to combat intersymbol interference. At the same time, the inherent drawback of OFDM with a high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) is brought into OFDM visible light communications (VLC-OFDM). Furthermore, considering the limited dynamic range characteristics of light-emitting diodes, the performance degradation caused by a high PAPR is more serious in VLC-OFDM. In this paper, we propose a partial transmit sequence (PTS) technique based on the combination of a genetic algorithm (GA) and a hill-climbing algorithm (GH-PTS) to solve the problem of high PAPR. GH-PTS is a modified PTS technique based on GA-PTS. Essentially, GH-PTS is a local optimization of GA-PTS. Simulation results show that the optimized technique is able to reduce PAPR more effectively without any loss of bit error rate performance than the GA-PTS technique in VLC-OFDM system.

  16. Quantifying asymmetry: ratios and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Franks, Erin M; Cabo, Luis L

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, the study of metric skeletal asymmetry has relied largely on univariate analyses, utilizing ratio transformations when the goal is comparing asymmetries in skeletal elements or populations of dissimilar dimensions. Under this approach, raw asymmetries are divided by a size marker, such as a bilateral average, in an attempt to produce size-free asymmetry indices. Henceforth, this will be referred to as "controlling for size" (see Smith: Curr Anthropol 46 (2005) 249-273). Ratios obtained in this manner often require further transformations to interpret the meaning and sources of asymmetry. This model frequently ignores the fundamental assumption of ratios: the relationship between the variables entered in the ratio must be isometric. Violations of this assumption can obscure existing asymmetries and render spurious results. In this study, we examined the performance of the classic indices in detecting and portraying the asymmetry patterns in four human appendicular bones and explored potential methodological alternatives. Examination of the ratio model revealed that it does not fulfill its intended goals in the bones examined, as the numerator and denominator are independent in all cases. The ratios also introduced strong biases in the comparisons between different elements and variables, generating spurious asymmetry patterns. Multivariate analyses strongly suggest that any transformation to control for overall size or variable range must be conducted before, rather than after, calculating the asymmetries. A combination of exploratory multivariate techniques, such as Principal Components Analysis, and confirmatory linear methods, such as regression and analysis of covariance, appear as a promising and powerful alternative to the use of ratios. PMID:24842694

  17. On logarithmic ratio quantities and their units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Ian; Morfey, Christopher

    2005-08-01

    The use of special units for logarithmic ratio quantities is reviewed. The neper is used with a natural logarithm (logarithm to the base e) to express the logarithm of the amplitude ratio of two pure sinusoidal signals, particularly in the context of linear systems where it is desired to represent the gain or loss in amplitude of a single-frequency signal between the input and output. The bel, and its more commonly used submultiple, the decibel, are used with a decadic logarithm (logarithm to the base 10) to measure the ratio of two power-like quantities, such as a mean square signal or a mean square sound pressure in acoustics. Thus two distinctly different quantities are involved. In this review we define the quantities first, without reference to the units, as is standard practice in any system of quantities and units. We show that two different definitions of the quantity power level, or logarithmic power ratio, are possible. We show that this leads to two different interpretations for the meaning and numerical values of the units bel and decibel. We review the question of which of these alternative definitions is actually used, or is used by implication, by workers in the field. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages of the alternative definitions.

  18. Isotopic ratios in planetary atmospheres.

    PubMed

    de Bergh, C

    1995-03-01

    Recent progress on measurements of isotopic ratios in planetary or satellite atmospheres include measurements of the D/H ratio in the methane of Uranus, Neptune and Titan and in the water of Mars and Venus. Implications of these measurements on our understanding of the formation and evolution of the planets and satellite are discussed. Our current knowledge of the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios in the atmospheres of these planets, as well as on Jupiter and Saturn, is also reviewed. We finally show what progress can be expected in the very near future due to some new ground-based instrumentation particularly well suited to such studies, and to forthcoming space missions. PMID:11539257

  19. Overconfidence, Incentives and Digit Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Neyse, Levent; Bosworth, Steven; Ring, Patrick; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to a better understanding of the biological underpinnings of overconfidence by analyzing performance predictions in the Cognitive Reflection Test with and without monetary incentives. In line with the existing literature we find that the participants are too optimistic about their performance on average; incentives lead to higher performance; and males score higher than females on this particular task. The novelty of this paper is an analysis of the relation between participants’ performance prediction accuracy and their second to fourth digit ratio. It has been reported that the digit ratio is a negatively correlated bio-marker of prenatal testosterone exposure. In the un-incentivized treatment, we find that males with low digit ratios, on average, are significantly more overconfident about their performance. In the incentivized treatment, however, we observe that males with low digit ratios, on average, are less overconfident about their performance. These effects are not observed in females. We discuss how these findings fit into the literature on testosterone and decision making and how they might help to explain seemingly opposing evidence. PMID:27039893

  20. A Ratio Explanation for Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riss, Pam Helfers

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on physical anthropology activities for teaching students about evolution. Using evidence found in hominid skulls, students conduct investigations that involve calculating ratios. Eight full-page photographs of skulls from the program Stones and Bones are included. (PR)

  1. Overconfidence, Incentives and Digit Ratio.

    PubMed

    Neyse, Levent; Bosworth, Steven; Ring, Patrick; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to a better understanding of the biological underpinnings of overconfidence by analyzing performance predictions in the Cognitive Reflection Test with and without monetary incentives. In line with the existing literature we find that the participants are too optimistic about their performance on average; incentives lead to higher performance; and males score higher than females on this particular task. The novelty of this paper is an analysis of the relation between participants' performance prediction accuracy and their second to fourth digit ratio. It has been reported that the digit ratio is a negatively correlated bio-marker of prenatal testosterone exposure. In the un-incentivized treatment, we find that males with low digit ratios, on average, are significantly more overconfident about their performance. In the incentivized treatment, however, we observe that males with low digit ratios, on average, are less overconfident about their performance. These effects are not observed in females. We discuss how these findings fit into the literature on testosterone and decision making and how they might help to explain seemingly opposing evidence. PMID:27039893

  2. Gender Ratios for Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawke, Jesse L.; Olson, Richard K.; Willcut, Erik G.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; DeFries, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of reading difficulties is typically higher in males than females in both referred and research-identified samples, and the ratio of males to females is greater in more affected samples. To explore possible gender differences in reading performance, we analysed data from 1133 twin pairs in which at least one member of each pair had…

  3. Follistatin-like Protein 1 and the Ferritin/Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Ratio Are Potential Biomarkers for Dysregulated Gene Expression and Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Mark; Fall, Ndate; Altaye, Mekibib; Barnes, Michael G.; Thompson, Susan D.; Grom, Alexei A.; Hirsch, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Objective Follistatin-like protein 1 (FSTL-1) is a secreted glycoprotein overexpressed in certain inflammatory diseases. Our objective was to correlate FSTL-1 levels with gene expression, known biomarkers, and measures of disease activity in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), including macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). Methods FSTL-1 serum levels were measured by ELISA in 28 patients with sJIA, including 7 patients who developed MAS, and 30 healthy controls. Levels were correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), ferritin, and soluble interleukin-2 receptor-α (sIL-2Rα). Gene expression based on FSTL-1 levels was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Results Serum levels of FSTL-1 were elevated at time of presentation of sJIA (mean 200.7 ng/ml) and decreased to normal (mean 133.7 ng/ml) over 24 months (p < 0.01). FSTL-1 levels were markedly elevated during acute MAS (mean 279.8 ng/ml) and decreased to normal following treatment (p < 0.001). FSTL-1 levels correlated with serum markers of inflammation, including sIL-2Rα and ferritin. Ferritin/ESR ratio was superior to ferritin, sIL-2Rα, and FSTL-1 in discriminating MAS from new-onset sJIA. PBMC from patients with FSTL-1 levels > 200 ng/ml showed altered expression of genes related to innate immunity, erythropoiesis, and natural killer cell dysfunction. Two patients with the highest FSTL-1 levels at disease onset (> 300 ng/ml) ultimately developed MAS. Conclusion Elevated pretreatment serum FSTL-1 levels in sJIA are associated with dysregulated gene expression suggestive of occult MAS, and may have utility in predicting progression to overt MAS. Ferritin/ESR ratio may be superior to ferritin alone in discriminating overt MAS from new-onset sJIA. (First Release May 15 2013; J Rheumatol 2013;40:1191–9; doi:10.3899/jrheum.121131) PMID:23678162

  4. The Prigogine-Defay ratio revisited.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Jrn W P; Gutzow, Ivan

    2006-11-14

    One of the basic characteristics of the glass transition, the Prigogine-Defay ratio, connecting jumps of the thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal compressibility, and isobaric specific heat capacity in vitrification is rederived in the framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes employing the order-parameter concept introduced by de Donder and van Rysselberghe [Thermodynamic Theory of Affinity (Stanford University Press, Stanford, 1936)]. In our analysis, glass-forming liquids and glasses are described by only one structural order parameter. However, in contrast to previous approaches to the derivation of this ratio, the process of vitrification is treated not in terms of Simon's simplified model [Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. 203, 219 (1931)] as a freezing-in process proceeding at some sharp temperature, the glass transition temperature T(g), but in some finite temperature interval accounting appropriately for the nonequilibrium character of vitrifying systems in this temperature range. As the result of the theoretical analysis, we find, in particular, that the Prigogine-Defay ratio generally has to have values larger than 1 for vitrification in cooling processes. Quantitative estimates of the Prigogine-Defay ratio are given utilizing a mean-field lattice-hole model of glass-forming melts. Some further consequences are derived concerning the behavior of thermodynamic coefficients, in particular, of Young's modulus in vitrification. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data. PMID:17115769

  5. Thermal evolution and Urey ratio of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, A.-C.; Tosi, N.; Grott, M.; Breuer, D.

    2015-05-01

    The upcoming InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) mission, to be launched in 2016, will carry out the first in situ Martian heat flux measurement, thereby providing an important baseline to constrain the present-day heat budget of the planet and, in turn, the thermal and chemical evolution of its interior. The surface heat flux can be used to constrain the amount of heat-producing elements present in the interior if the Urey ratio (Ur)—the planet's heat production rate divided by heat loss—is known. We used numerical simulations of mantle convection to model the thermal evolution of Mars and determine the present-day Urey ratio for a variety of models and parameters. We found that Ur is mainly sensitive to the efficiency of mantle cooling, which is associated with the temperature dependence of the viscosity (thermostat effect), and to the abundance of long-lived radiogenic isotopes. If the thermostat effect is efficient, as expected for the Martian mantle, assuming typical solar system values for the thorium-uranium ratio and a bulk thorium concentration, simulations show that the present-day Urey ratio is approximately constant, independent of model parameters. Together with an estimate of the average surface heat flux as determined by InSight, models of the amount of heat-producing elements present in the primitive mantle can be constrained.

  6. Fission Product Ratios as Treaty Monitoring Discriminants

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Arthur, Richard J.

    2008-05-15

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is currently under construction. The IMS is intended for monitoring of nuclear explosions. The radionuclide branch of the IMS monitors the atmosphere for short-lived radioisotopes indicative of a nuclear weapon test, and includes field collection and measurement stations, as well as laboratories to provide reanalysis of the most important samples and a quality control function. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington hosts the United States IMS laboratory, with the designation “RL16.” Since acute reactor containment failures and chronic reactor leakage may also produce similar isotopes, it is tempting to compute ratios of detected isotopes to determine the relevance of an event to the treaty or agreement in question. In this paper we will note several shortcomings of simple isotopic ratios: (1) fractionation of different chemical species, (2) difficulty in comparing isotopes within a single element, (3) the effect of unknown decay times. While these shortcomings will be shown in the light of an aerosol sample, several of the problems extend to xenon isotopic ratios. The result of the difficulties listed above is that considerable human expertise will be required to convert a simple mathematical ratio into a criterion which will reliably categorize an event as ‘reactor’ or ‘weapon’.

  7. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  8. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station (EBBR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-02-23

    The energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  9. Estimating diversity via frequency ratios.

    PubMed

    Willis, Amy; Bunge, John

    2015-12-01

    We wish to estimate the total number of classes in a population based on sample counts, especially in the presence of high latent diversity. Drawing on probability theory that characterizes distributions on the integers by ratios of consecutive probabilities, we construct a nonlinear regression model for the ratios of consecutive frequency counts. This allows us to predict the unobserved count and hence estimate the total diversity. We believe that this is the first approach to depart from the classical mixed Poisson model in this problem. Our method is geometrically intuitive and yields good fits to data with reasonable standard errors. It is especially well-suited to analyzing high diversity datasets derived from next-generation sequencing in microbial ecology. We demonstrate the method's performance in this context and via simulation, and we present a dataset for which our method outperforms all competitors. PMID:26038228

  10. Optomechanical Raman-ratio thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, T. P.; Yu, P.-L.; Kampel, N. S.; Peterson, R. W.; Cicak, K.; Simmonds, R. W.; Regal, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the asymmetry between Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering can be exploited for self-calibrating, optically based thermometry. In the context of cavity optomechanics, we observe the cavity-enhanced scattering of light interacting with the standing-wave drumhead modes of a Si3N4 membrane mechanical resonator. The ratio of the amplitude of Stokes to anti-Stokes scattered light is used to measure temperatures of optically cooled mechanical modes, down to the level of a few vibrational quanta. We demonstrate that the Raman-ratio technique allows the measurement of the physical temperature of our device over a range extending from cryogenic temperatures to within an order of magnitude of room temperature.

  11. GUT Scale Fermion Mass Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrath, Martin

    2014-10-01

    We present a series of recent works related to group theoretical factors from GUT symmetry breaking which lead to predictions for the ratios of quark and lepton Yukawa couplings at the unification scale. New predictions for the GUT scale ratios yμ/ys, yτ/yb and yt/yb in particular are shown and compared to experimental data. For this comparison it is important to include possibly large supersymmetric threshold corrections. Due to this reason the structure of the fermion masses at the GUT scale depends on TeV scale physics and makes GUT scale physics testable at the LHC. We also discuss how this new predictions might lead to predictions for mixing angles by discussing the example of the recently measured last missing leptonic mixing angle θ13 making this new class of GUT models also testable in neutrino experiments.

  12. Gender ratios for reading difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Richard K.; Willcutt, Erik G.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; DeFries, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of reading difficulties is typically higher in males than females in both referred and research-identified samples, and the ratio of males to females is greater in more affected samples. To explore possible gender differences in reading performance, we analyzed data from 1,133 twin pairs in which at least one member of each pair had a school-history of reading problems and from 684 twin pairs from a comparison sample with no reading difficulties. Although the difference between the average scores of males and females in these two samples was very small, the variance of reading performance was significantly greater for males in both groups. We suggest that a greater variance of reading performance measures in males may account at least in part for their higher prevalence of reading difficulties as well as for the higher gender ratios that are observed in more severely impaired samples. PMID:19367616

  13. Segregation Ratios in Alport's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, Elizabeth; Shaw, Richard F.

    1973-01-01

    Pooled data of 35 pedigrees for Alport's syndrome were analysed. Affected to normal ratios among the offspring of heterozgyous fathers and mothers were tabulated. Offspring of heterozygous mothers were tabulated separately where the mother showed symptoms of the disease and where she was asymptomatic. Three current theories on the inheritance of Alport's syndrome are considered and discussed. Each theory fails to account fully for the known facts. A non-chromosomal agent has not yet been excluded for this intriguing disease. PMID:4697851

  14. Prolactin/cortisol ratio in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Angelo; Ferlisi, Ester Maria; Lizzio, Marco; Altomonte, Lorenzo; Mirone, Luisa; Barini, Angela; Scuderi, Flavia; Bartolozzi, F; Magaro, Mario

    2002-06-01

    Prolactin (PRL) and glucocorticoids are hormones involved in the regulation of the immune system. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory condition that presents a diurnal rhythm of disease activity. PRL/cortisol ratio, and IL-1beta and TNF-alpha levels were determined in patients with RA and in control subjects at 0600, 1000, 1400, 1800, 2200, and 0200 hours. In patients with RA we observed higher PRL/cortisol ratio at 0200 hours, whereas IL-1beta and TNF-alpha reached their highest serum levels at 0200 and 0600 hours. In patients with RA we observed an imbalance in favor of proinflammatory hormones as opposed to levels of antiinflammatory hormones during nocturnal hours together with increased levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha of the diurnal rhythm of disease activity. PMID:12114312

  15. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low the compression ratio can be raised (to as much as 18:1) providing high engine efficiency. It is important to recognize that for a well designed VCR engine cylinder pressure does not need to be higher than found in current production turbocharged engines. As such, there is no need for a stronger crankcase, bearings and other load bearing parts within the VCR engine. The Envera VCR mechanism uses an eccentric carrier approach to adjust engine compression ratio. The crankshaft main bearings are mounted in this eccentric carrier or 'crankshaft cradle' and pivoting the eccentric carrier 30 degrees adjusts compression ratio from 9:1 to 18:1. The eccentric carrier is made up of a casting that provides rigid support for the main bearings, and removable upper bearing caps. Oil feed to the main bearings transits through the bearing cap fastener sockets. The eccentric carrier design was chosen for its low cost and rigid support of the main bearings. A control shaft and connecting links are used to pivot the eccentric carrier. The control shaft mechanism features compression ratio lock-up at minimum and maximum compression ratio settings. The control shaft method of pivoting the eccentric carrier was selected due to its lock-up capability. The control shaft can be rotated by a hydraulic actuator or an electric motor. The engine shown in Figures 3 and 4 has a hydraulic actuator that was developed under the current program. In-line 4-cylinder engines are significantly less expensive than V engines because an entire cylinder head can be eliminated. The cost savings from eliminating cylinders and an entire cylinder head will notably offset the added cost of the VCR and supercharging. Replacing V6 and V8 engines with in-line VCR 4-cylinder engines will provide high fuel economy at low cost. Numerous enabling technologies exist which have the potential to increase engine efficiency. The greatest efficiency gains are realized when the right combination of advanced and new technologies are packaged together to provide the greatest gains at the least cost. Aggressive engine downsizing with variable compression ratio and use of the extended Atkinson cycle can provide large fuel economy gains that are exceptionally cost effective. Analysis indicates that a 2.2L supercharged Envera VCR engine can match the torque of a larger V8 engine at 2000 rpm. The VCR engine's high torque value at low engine speed is beneficial for maintaining the driving feel and responsiveness of the larger V8 engine. The Envera VCR engine will attain high efficiency at {approx}100 Nm primarily due to the combination of engine down-sizing and use of the Atkinson cycle. Qualitatively the fuel economy gain realized from down-sizing from a V8 to an Atkinson-cycle I-4 is about twice as large as the benefits from down-sizing from a V8 to a Turbo V6 when evaluated at 100 Nm 2000 rpm.

  16. Low conversion ratio fuel studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.

    2006-02-28

    Recent studies on TRU disposition in fast reactors indicated viable reactor performance for a sodium cooled low conversion ratio reactor design. Additional studies have been initiated to refine the earlier work and consider the feasibility of alternate fuel forms such as nitride and oxide fuel (rather than metal fuel). These alternate fuel forms may have significant impacts upon the burner design and the safety behavior. The work performed thus far has focused on compiling the necessary fuel form property information and refinement of the physics models. For this limited project, the burner design and performance using nitride fuel will be assessed.

  17. Is increasing MB ratio a positive indicator of declining leprosy?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Girdhar, B K

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing MB ratio-trend has been seen in most state reported leprosy data in India and elsewhere. The programme of leprosy all over the world has been integrated with general health system (GHS). This has given rise to gross under reporting of leprosy cases and increasing MB ratio. This paper examines this critical issue and attempt to find out the causes of this trend. The findings suggest clearly that increasing MB ratio is the result of early cases of leprosy being missed out. This can be to the extent of 73% when MB ratio is reached to 47.5%. PMID:17370687

  18. High-aspect-ratio wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    High-aspect-ratio aircraft include most transport aircraft such as commercial and military transports, business aircraft, and cargo aircraft. Generally, these types of aircraft are designed to cruise over a narrow range of lift coefficients and Mach numbers in the performance of their mission. Emphasis is therefore placed on the cruise performance of transport aircraft and every effort is made to obtain accurate wind-tunnel data to use as a basis for prediction of full-scale cruise performance. However, off-cruise performance is also important and methods were developed for extrapolating wind-tunnel data on buffet and flutter at transonic speed. Transport-type aircraft were tested extensively in various wind tunnels around the world and many different test techniques were developed to simulate higher Reynolds numbers. Methods developed for one tunnel may not be applicable to another tunnel because of differences in size, Reynolds number capability, running time, and test objectives. Many of the methods of boundary-layer control developed in two-dimensional airfoil testing can be applied in tests of transport configurations, but sometimes the three-dimensional flow fields that develop on tranpsort aircraft can make application of the two-dimensional methods difficult or impossible. The discussion is intended to be a representative, but not exhaustive, survey of the various methods of high Reynolds number simulation in the testing of high-aspect-ratio aircraft.

  19. In-line process control for laser welding of titanium by high dynamic range ratio pyrometry and plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Baselt, T.; Rudek, F.; Maschke, R.; Basan, F.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    The production of complex titanium components for various industries using laser welding processes has received growing attention in recent years. It is important to know whether the result of the cohesive joint meets the quality requirements of standardization and ultimately the customer requirements. Erroneous weld seams can have fatal consequences especially in the field of car manufacturing and medicine technology. To meet these requirements, a real-time process control system has been developed which determines the welding quality through a locally resolved temperature profile. By analyzing the resulting weld plasma received data is used to verify the stability of the laser welding process. The determination of the temperature profile is done by the detection of the emitted electromagnetic radiation from the material in a range of 500 nm to 1100 nm. As detectors, special high dynamic range CMOS cameras are used. As the emissivity of titanium depends on the wavelength, the surface and the angle of radiation, measuring the temperature is a problem. To solve these a special pyrometer setting with two cameras is used. That enables the compensation of these effects by calculating the difference between the respective pixels on simultaneously recorded images. Two spectral regions with the same emissivity are detected. Therefore the degree of emission and surface effects are compensated and canceled out of the calculation. Using the spatially resolved temperature distribution the weld geometry can be determined and the laser process can be controlled. The active readjustment of parameters such as laser power, feed rate and inert gas injection increases the quality of the welding process and decreases the number of defective goods.

  20. Activity ratios of thorium daughters in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, R.E.; Rundo, J.; Sha, J.Y.; Essling, M.A.; Pedersen, J.C.; Slane, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized method of least squares has been used to analyze the /sup 228/Ac and /sup 212/Pb-/sup 212/Bi and daughter ..gamma..-ray spectra obtained in vivo from 133 former workers at a thorium refinery. In addition, the exhalation rate of /sup 220/Rn was determined for each subject and expressed as pCi of emanating /sup 224/Ra. This value was added to the /sup 212/Pb value determined from the ..gamma..-ray measurements to obtain the total /sup 224/Ra present, and the ratio of /sup 224/Ra to /sup 228/Ac was calculated. Values of the ratio ranged from 0.52 +- 0.32 to 2.1 +- 1.7, with a weighted mean of 0.92 +- 0.17. However, it appears that the ratio observed in a given case is characteristic for that case alone; the computed mean value may not be meaningful. The least squares fitting procedure and the overall calibration of the counting system were validated by measurements of /sup 224/Ra in the lungs of one subject postmortem, compared with results obtained from the same subject in vivo. 6 references, 5 figures.

  1. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry in nutrition research

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, A.H.

    1994-12-31

    Many of the biochemical pathways and processes that form the foundation of modern nutrition research was elucidated using stable isotopes as physiological tracers. Since the discovery of stable isotopes, improvements and innovations in mass spectrometry and chromatography have led to greatly expanded applications. This research project was designed to evaluate gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) as a tool for isotopic tracer studies and to delineate the operational parameters for the analysis of {sup 13}C-labeled cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate. The same isotope ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the development of two additional inlet systems: a continuous-flow inlet for the analyses of {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} and a filament inlet for on-line combustion and isotopic analysis of non-volatile organic compounds. Each of these three inlets was evaluated and their utility in nutrition research illustrated. GC/C/IRMS was used to analyze cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate with good accuracy, precision and little isotopic memory. For all three compounds the detection limits achieved well surpassed currently used technologies. For compounds that can be well separated by GC, GC/C/IRMS is a valuable analytical tool. The continuous-flow inlet provided good accuracy and precision for measurements of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} from breath tests and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} from total energy expenditure tests. Most importantly, the continuous-flow inlet increased sample throughput by at least a factor of three over conventional analytical techniques. The filament inlet provided accurate and precise {sup 13}C ratio measurements of both natural abundance and enriched standards of non-volatile organic compounds of physiological interest.

  2. Coupled Ge/Si and Ge isotope ratios as geochemical tracers of seafloor hydrothermal systems: Case studies at Loihi Seamount and East Pacific Rise 9°50‧N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoube, Raphaelle; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Edwards, Katrina; Glazer, Brian; Donard, Olivier F. X.

    2015-10-01

    Germanium (Ge) and Silicon (Si) exhibit similar geochemical behavior in marine environments but are variably enriched in seafloor hydrothermal fluids relative to seawater. In this study, Ge isotope and Ge/Si ratio systematics were investigated in low temperature hydrothermal vents from Loihi Seamount (Pacific Ocean, 18°54‧N, 155°15‧W) and results were compared to high-temperature vents from the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°50‧N. Loihi offers the opportunity to understand contrasting Ge and Si behavior in low temperature seafloor hydrothermal systems characterized by abundant Fe oxyhydroxide deposition at the seafloor. The results show that both Ge/Si and δ74/70Ge in hydrothermal fluids are fractionated relative to the basaltic host rocks. The enrichment in Ge vs. Si relative to fresh basalts, together with Ge isotope fractionation (Δ74/70Gefluid-basalt up to 1.15‰ at EPR 9°50‧N and 1.64‰ at Loihi) are best explained by the precipitation of minerals (e.g. quartz and Fe-sulfides) during higher temperature seawater-rock reactions in the subsurface. The study of Fe-rich hydrothermal deposits at Loihi, largely composed of Fe-oxyhydroxides, shows that Ge isotopes are also fractionated upon mineral precipitation at the seafloor. We obtained an average Ge isotope fractionation factor between Fe-oxyhydroxide (ferrihydrite) and dissolved Ge in the fluid of -2.0 ± 0.6‰ (2sd), and a maximum value of -3.6 ± 0.6‰ (2sd), which is consistent with recent theoretical and experimental studies. The study of a hydrothermal chimney at Bio 9 vent at EPR 9°50‧N also demonstrates that Ge isotopes are fractionated by approximately -5.6 ± 0.6‰ (2sd) during precipitation of metal sulfides under hydrothermal conditions. Using combined Ge/Si and estimated Ge isotope signatures of Ge sinks and sources in seawater, we propose a preliminary oceanic budget of Ge which reveals that an important sink, referred as the "missing Ge sink", may correspond to Ge sequestration into authigenic Fe-oxyhydroxides in marine sediments. This study shows that combining Ge/Si and δ74/70Ge systematics provides a useful tool to trace hydrothermal Ge and Si sources in marine environments and to understand formation processes of seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  3. Selection of Ka-Band Transponder Turnaround Frequency Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koukos, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems has issued recommendations specifying Transponder Turn-around Frequency Ratios for S-band and X-band coherent earth-to-space and space-to earth links.

  4. Likelihood ratios for DNA identification.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A; Morton, N E

    1994-01-01

    Likelihood ratio (LR) tests are provided for the three alternatives to DNA identity: exclusion, coincidence, and kinship. The coincidence test uses the radius of coalescence to conserve the observed frequency of single band phenotypes. Genotype probabilities under kinship are derived for mating groups, specified relatives, and structured populations; and unbiased estimates of the genetic parameters are provided. The LR is made robust to gene frequency errors by specifying the mean matching probability, and the tolerable loss of information this entails is determined by LR theory. This straightforward application of the seminal work of Jerzy Neyman and Sewall Wright strongly supports the use of LRs and kinship for presentation of DNA evidence by expert witnesses and committees. PMID:8016106

  5. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1981-12-15

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  6. Optical thermography for a fusion tokamak neutral-beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Levine, F.; Colleraine, T.

    1980-11-01

    A brief description is given of the protective armor plate as it pertains to both pyrometer and infrared camera requirements. The operating principles and test results for a number of these instruments are considered separately in two subsequent sections. We conclude with a discussion of which camera and pyrometer proved to be most suitable for protective surveillance of the armor plate.

  7. Variable expansion ratio reaction engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, W.R.

    1987-11-24

    A variable expansion ratio reaction rocket engine for producing a mainstream of hot combustion gases is described comprising: a reaction chamber including a thrust nozzle portion formed by converging and diverging wall portions in which the diverging portion terminates in a gas discharge and through which the combustion gases pass; a nozzle throat section at the juncture of the convergent-divergent wall portions; rows of circumferentially and axially spaced injection ports formed within the wall portions and communicating therethrough and into the reaction chamber; fluid conduit means in communication with the injection ports; at least one high pressure pump in communication with the fluid conduit means; a fluid containing storage tank including a conduit in communication with the high pressure pump; and means for selectively controlling a flow of fluid out of the tank, through the pump and to the fluid conduit means and the injection ports for controlling a cross-sectional area of the mainstream combustion gases passing through the thrust nozzle.

  8. Carbon to oxygen ratios in extrasolar planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David J.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Farihi, Jay; Koester, Detlev

    2016-04-01

    Observations of small extrasolar planets with a wide range of densities imply a variety of planetary compositions and structures. Currently, the only technique to measure the bulk composition of extrasolar planetary systems is the analysis of planetary debris accreting onto white dwarfs, analogous to abundance studies of meteorites. We present measurements of the carbon and oxygen abundances in the debris of planetesimals at ten white dwarfs observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, along with C/O ratios of debris in six systems with previously reported abundances. We find no evidence for carbon-rich planetesimals, with C/O <0.8 by number in all 16 systems. Our results place an upper limit on the occurrence of carbon-rich systems at <17 percent with a 2 σ confidence level. The range of C/O of the planetesimals is consistent with that found in the Solar System, and appears to follow a bimodal distribution: a group similar to the CI chondrites, with log ( < C/O > ) = -0.92, and oxygen-rich objects with C/O less than or equal to that of the bulk Earth. The latter group may have a higher mass fraction of water than the Earth, increasing their relative oxygen abundance.

  9. People Patterns: Ratio. Environmental Module for Use in a Mathematics Laboratory Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trojan, Arthur; Zastrocky, Mike

    The objectives of this module include students being able to: measure using the metric system, determine ratios of different types, and analyze a problem using ratios. Some of the worksheets require the development of ratios from physical activity; others require the development and analysis of ratios using parts of the student's own body.…

  10. Noise of Embedded High Aspect Ratio Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2011-01-01

    A family of high aspect ratio nozzles were designed to provide a parametric database of canonical embedded propulsion concepts. Nozzle throat geometries with aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were chosen, all with convergent nozzle areas. The transition from the typical round duct to the rectangular nozzle was designed very carefully to produce a flow at the nozzle exit that was uniform and free from swirl. Once the basic rectangular nozzles were designed, external features common to embedded propulsion systems were added: extended lower lip (a.k.a. bevel, aft deck), differing sidewalls, and chevrons. For the latter detailed Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were made to predict the thrust performance and to optimize parameters such as bevel length, and chevron penetration and azimuthal curvature. Seventeen of these nozzles were fabricated at a scale providing a 2.13 inch diameter equivalent area throat." ! The seventeen nozzles were tested for far-field noise and a few data were presented here on the effect of aspect ratio, bevel length, and chevron count and penetration. The sound field of the 2:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet was very nearly axisymmetric, but the 4:1 and 8:1 were not, the noise on their minor axes being louder than the major axes. Adding bevel length increased the noise of these nozzles, especially on their minor axes, both toward the long and short sides of the beveled nozzle. Chevrons were only added to the 2:1 rectangular jet. Adding 4 chevrons per wide side produced some decrease at aft angles, but increased the high frequency noise at right angles to the jet flow. This trend increased with increasing chevron penetration. Doubling the number of chevrons while maintaining their penetration decreased these effects. Empirical models of the parametric effect of these nozzles were constructed and quantify the trends stated above." Because it is the objective of the Supersonics Project that future design work be done more by physics-based computations and less by experiments, several codes under development were evaluated against these test cases. Preliminary results show that the RANS-based code JeNo predicts the spectral directivity of the low aspect ratio jets well, but has no capability to predict the non-axisymmetry. An effort to address this limitations, used in the RANS-based code of Leib and Goldstein, overpredicted the impact of aspect ratio. The broadband shock noise code RISN, also limited to axisymmetric assumptions, did a good job of predicting the spectral directivity of underexpanded 2:1 cold jet case but was not as successful on high aspect ratio jets, particularly when they are hot. All results are preliminary because the underlying CFD has not been validated yet. An effort using a Large Eddy Simulation code by Stanford University predicted noise that agreed with experiments to within a few dB.

  11. The C-12/C-13 Ratio as a Chemistry Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstroem, Eva; Geppert, Wolf; Persson, Carina; Charnley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Isotopic ratios of elements are considered powerful tools, e.g. in tracing the origin of solar system body materials, or the degree of nucleosynthesis processing throughout the Galaxy. In interstellar molecules, some isotopic ratios like H/D and C-12/C-13 can also be used as indicators of their chemical origin. Isotope fractionation in gas-phase chemical reactions and gas-dust interaction makes observations of the ratio between C-12 and C-13 isotopologues suitable to distinguish between different formation scenarios. We will present observations of the C-12/C-13 ratio in methanol and formaldehyde towards a sample of embedded, massive young stellar objects. In relation to this we also present results from theoretical modeling showing the usefulness of the C-12/C-13 ratio as a chemistry indicator.

  12. ESTADIUS: A High Motion "One Arcsec" Daytime Attitude Estimation System for Stratospheric Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, J.; Andre, Y.; Mirc, F.; Etcheto, P.; Evrard, J.; Bray, N.; Saccoccio, M.; Tomasini, L.; Perot, E.

    2015-09-01

    ESTADIUS is an autonomous, accurate and daytime attitude estimation system, for stratospheric balloons that require a high level of attitude measurement and stability. The system has been developed by CNES. ESTADIUS is based on star sensor an pyrometer data fusion within an extended Kalman filter. The star sensor is composed of a 16 MPixels visible-CCD camera and a large aperture camera lens (focal length of 135mm, aperture f/1.8, 10ºx15º field of view or FOV) which provides very accurate stars measurements due to very low pixel angular size. This also allows detecting stars against a bright sky background. The pyrometer is a 0.01º/h performance class Fiber Optic Gyroscope (FOG). The system is adapted to work down to an altitude of ~25km, even under high cinematic conditions. Key elements of ESTADIUS are: daytime conditions use (as well as night time), autonomy (automatic recognition of constellations), high angular rate robustness (a few deg/s thanks to the high performance of attitude propagation), stray-light robustness (thanks to a high performance baffle), high accuracy (<1", 1σ). Four stratospheric qualification flights were very successfully performed in 2010/2011 and 2013/2014 in Kiruna (Sweden) and Timmins (Canada). ESTADIUS will allow long stratospheric flights with a unique attitude estimation system avoiding the restriction of night/day conditions at launch. The first operational flight of ESTADIUS will be in 2015 for the PILOT scientific missions (led by IRAP and CNES in France). Further balloon missions such as CIDRE will use the system ESTADIUS is probably the first autonomous, large FOV, daytime stellar attitude measurement system. This paper details the technical features and in-flight results.

  13. C/O ratios in extrasolar planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David John; Gaensicke, Boris; Farihi, Jay; Koester, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    The wide range of densities found in small exoplanets imply a variety of possible compositions and interior structures. In particular, some models predict that protoplanetary discs with C/O>0.8 may form carbon-dominated planets. The only way to directly test such predictions are studies of evolved planetary systems at white dwarfs. Analysis of planetesimal debris in white dwarf atmospheres provides a unique insight into the chemical compositions of extrasolar planets, which cannot be observed at main-sequence systems. Thus far, such studies have predominantly focused on individual objects. However, the growing sample of abundance studies now allows conclusions to be derived regarding the overall chemical abundances of (solid) exoplanet precursors in a statistically significant sample of systems. Here, we present measurements of the C/O ratio in the debris of planetesimals at 16 white dwarfs observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. These data allow us to constrain the occurrence frequency of carbon-dominated planets. We find no evidence for such carbon planets, with C/O<0.8 by number in all 16 systems.

  14. The basic reproductive ratio of life

    PubMed Central

    Manapat, Michael L.; Chen, Irene A.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    Template-directed polymerization of nucleotides is believed to be a pathway for the replication of genetic material in the earliest cells. We assume that activated monomers are produced by prebiotic chemistry. These monomers can undergo spontaneous polymerization, a system that we call “prelife.” Adding template-directed polymerization changes the equilibrium structure of prelife if the rate constants meet certain criteria. In particular, if the basic reproductive ratio of sequences of a certain length exceeds one, then those sequences can attain high abundance. Furthermore, if many sequences replicate, then the longest sequences can reach high abundance even if the basic reproductive ratios of all sequences are less than one. We call this phenomenon “subcritical life.” Subcritical life suggests that sequences long enough to be ribozymes can become abundant even if replication is relatively inefficient. Our work on the evolution of replication has interesting parallels to infection dynamics. Life (replication) can be seen as an infection of prelife. PMID:20034501

  15. Implications of the Nitrogen Isotope Ratio in Titan's Atmosphere for the Nitrogen Ratio in Ammonia in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K.; Mousis, O.

    2013-12-01

    The D/H ratio of water measured in solar system bodies has been established as a tool for determining the conditions under which bodies such as comets or icy moons formed. This ratio varies significantly and indicates complex thermal and chemical evolution of the solar nebula during solar system and planetary formation. Nitrogen isotope ratios also vary significantly, and in some but not all cases correlate to D/H ratios, but are poorly understood. Nitrogen in the solar nebula was primarily in the form of atomic and molecular nitrogen. The isotope ratio (14N/15N) of this reservoir is expected to be ~435 based on the ratio measured in Jupiter's atmosphere, because the atmosphere of Jupiter is made up of gas captured from the solar nebula (Owen et al., 2001). The terrestrial atmospheric ratio is 272, which is close to the ratio measured in the Earth's mantle. This may be the primordial ratio for nitrogen delivered to Earth depending on the amount of exchange between the atmosphere and the mantle and any atmospheric fractionation processes that may have influenced the ratio over time. Comets are a possible source of nitrogen in the Earth's atmosphere (Hutsmekers et al., 2009), although chondrites have also been suggested as a source (Marty, 2012). In the case of comets, nitrogen would have been essentially retained in the form of ammonia (Mousis et al., 2012), which is the most abundant form of nitrogen in comets. The nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere is expected to have originated as ammonia hydrates and converted to N2 early in Titan's history (Atreya et al., 1978). The nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere is ~170, which is significantly enriched in the heavy isotope compared to the terrestrial value. We will discuss the evolution of the nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere (Mandt et al., 2009), the limits of the primordial ratio in ammonia, and the implications for this ratio for the isotope ratio in ammonia in comets that should be measured by the ROSINA instrument on Rosetta in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (Balsiger et al., 2007). Atreya, S., et al., 1978, Science, 201, 611-613. Balsiger, H., et al., 2007, Space Science Reviews, 128, 745-801. Hutsmekers et al., 2009, Icarus, 204, 346-348. Marty, B., 2012, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 313-314, 56-66. Mandt, K. E., et al., 2009, Planetary and Space Science, 57, 1917-1930. Mousis, O., et al., 2012, The Astrophysical Journal, 757, 146. Owen, T. et al., 2001, The Astrophysical Journal, 553, L77-L79.

  16. Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

    2010-11-01

    Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

  17. High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, A.; Parsley, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Vehicle/engine analysis studies have identified the High/Dual Mixture Ratio O2/H2 Engine cycle as a leading candidate for an advanced Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) propulsion system. This cycle is designed to allow operation at a higher than normal O/F ratio of 12 during liftoff and then transition to a more optimum O/F ratio of 6 at altitude. While operation at high mixture ratios lowers specific impulse, the resultant high propellant bulk density and high power density combine to minimize the influence of atmospheric drag and low altitude gravitational forces. Transition to a lower mixture ratio at altitude then provides improved specific impulse relative to a single mixture ratio engine that must select a mixture ratio that is balanced for both low and high altitude operation. This combination of increased altitude specific impulse and high propellant bulk density more than offsets the compromised low altitude performance and results in an overall mission benefit. Two areas of technical concern relative to the execution of this dual mixture ratio cycle concept are addressed. First, actions required to transition from high to low mixture ratio are examined, including an assessment of the main chamber environment as the main chamber mixture ratio passes through stoichiometric. Secondly, two approaches to meet a requirement for high turbine power at high mixture ratio condition are examined. One approach uses high turbine temperature to produce the power and requires cooled turbines. The other approach incorporates an oxidizer-rich preburner to increase turbine work capability via increased turbine mass flow.

  18. A theoretically based determination of bowen-ratio fetch requirements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stannard, D.I.

    1997-01-01

    Determination of fetch requirements for accurate Bowen-ratio measurements of latent- and sensible-heat fluxes is more involved than for eddy-correlation measurements because Bowen-ratio sensors are located at two heights, rather than just one. A simple solution to the diffusion equation is used to derive an expression for Bowen-ratio fetch requirements, downwind of a step change in surface fluxes. These requirements are then compared to eddy-correlation fetch requirements based on the same diffusion equation solution. When the eddy-correlation and upper Bowen-ratio sensor heights are equal, and the available energy upwind and downwind of the step change is constant, the Bowen-ratio method requires less fetch than does eddy correlation. Differences in fetch requirements between the two methods are greatest over relatively smooth surfaces. Bowen-ratio fetch can be reduced significantly by lowering the lower sensor, as well as the upper sensor. The Bowen-ratio fetch model was tested using data from a field experiment where multiple Bowen-ratio systems were deployed simultaneously at various fetches and heights above a field of bermudagrass. Initial comparisons were poor, but improved greatly when the model was modified (and operated numerically) to account for the large roughness of the upwind cotton field.

  19. Toward a Unique Nitrogen Isotopic Ratio in Cometary Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselot, Philippe; Pirali, Olivier; Jehin, Emmanul; Vervloet, Michel; Hutsemkers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Cordier, Daniel; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Gruet, Sbastien; Arpigny, Claude; Decock, Alice; Mousis, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the nitrogen isotopic ratios in different bodies of the solar system provides important information regarding the solar system's origin. We unambiguously identified emission lines in comets due to the 15NH2 radical produced by the photodissociation of 15NH3. Analysis of our data has permitted us to measure the 14N/15N isotopic ratio in comets for a molecule carrying the amine (-NH) functional group. This ratio, within the error, appears similar to that measured in comets in the HCN molecule and the CN radical, and lower than the protosolar value, suggesting that N2 and NH3 result from the separation of nitrogen into two distinct reservoirs in the solar nebula. This ratio also appears similar to that measured in Titan's atmospheric N2, supporting the hypothesis that, if the latter is representative of its primordial value in NH3, these bodies were assembled from building blocks sharing a common formation location.

  20. How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-11-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  1. Urine Albumin and Albumin/ Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Albumin and Albumin/Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page ... known as: Microalbumin; ACR; UACR Formal name: Urine Albumin; Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio Related tests: Albumin ; Creatinine ; ...

  2. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  3. Poisson`s ratio and crustal seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, N.I.

    1996-02-10

    This report discusses the use of Poisson`s ratio to place constraints on continental crustal composition. A summary of Poisson`s ratios for many common rock formations is also included with emphasis on igneous and metamorphic rock properties.

  4. Effect of fuel-air-ratio nonuniformity on emissions of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1981-01-01

    The inlet fuel-air ratio nonuniformity is studied to deterine how nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions are affected. An increase in NOx emissions with increased fuel-air ratio nonuniformity for average equivalence ratios less than 0.7 and a decrease in NOx emissions for average equivalence ratios near stoichiometric is predicted. The degree of uniformityy of fuel-air ratio profiles that is necessary to achieve NOx emissions goals for actual engines that use lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion systems is determined.

  5. Management Ratios 1. For Colleges & Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, John, Ed.

    Ratios that enable colleges and universities to select other institutions for comparison are presented. The ratios and underlying data also enable colleges to rank order institutions and to calculate means, quartiles, and ranges for these groups. The data are based on FY 1983 U.S. Department of Education Statistics. The ratios summarize the…

  6. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  7. Distribution of Grades, Credits Earned Ratios, Course Completion Ratios and Current Grade Point Ratios, University of Hawaii Community Colleges, Fall 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of the Chancellor for Community Colleges.

    This document summarizes fall 1998 data on student achievement at the University of Hawaii's seven community colleges along two dimensions: the current grade point ratios earned by students, by program; and the distribution of grades in the courses offered by the colleges. Data are presented for the system and for each individual college. The data…

  8. Transformer ratio improvement for beam based plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, Brendan; Rosenzweig, James; Barber, Samuel; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Williams, Oliver; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl

    2012-12-21

    Increasing the transformer ratio of wakefield accelerating systems improves the viability of present novel accelerating schemes. The use of asymmetric bunches to improve the transformer ratio of beam based plasma systems has been proposed for some time[1, 2] but suffered from lack appropriate beam creation systems. Recently these impediments have been overcome [3, 4] and the ability now exists to create bunches with current profiles shaped to overcome the symmetric beam limit of R {<=} 2. We present here work towards experiments designed to measure the transformer ratio of such beams, including theoretical models and simulations using VORPAL (a 3D capable PIC code) [5]. Specifically we discuss projects to be carried out in the quasi-nonlinear regime [6] at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory and the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab.

  9. Poisson's ratio in layered two-dimensional crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sungjong; Park, Hee Chul; Son, Young-Woo

    2016-02-01

    We present first-principles calculations of elastic properties of multilayered two-dimensional crystals, such as graphene, h -BN, and 2 H -MoS2 , which show that their Poisson's ratios along the out-of-plane direction are negative, near zero, and positive, respectively, spanning all possibilities for the sign of the ratios. While the in-plane Poisson's ratios are all positive regardless of their disparate electronic and structural properties, the characteristic interlayer interactions as well as layer stacking structures are shown to determine the sign of their out-of-plane ratios. A thorough investigation of elastic properties as a function of the number of layers for each system is also provided, highlighting their intertwined nature between elastic and electronic properties.

  10. Quantifying Void Ratio in Granular Materials Using Voronoi Tessellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; El-Saidany, Hany A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Voronoi technique was used to calculate the local void ratio distribution of granular materials. It was implemented in an application-oriented image processing and analysis algorithm capable of extracting object edges, separating adjacent particles, obtaining the centroid of each particle, generating Voronoi polygons, and calculating the local void ratio. Details of the algorithm capabilities and features are presented. Verification calculations included performing manual digitization of synthetic images using Oda's method and Voronoi polygon system. The developed algorithm yielded very accurate measurements of the local void ratio distribution. Voronoi tessellation has the advantage, compared to Oda's method, of offering a well-defined polygon generation criterion that can be implemented in an algorithm to automatically calculate local void ratio of particulate materials.

  11. Statistics of Spatial Cone-Excitation Ratios in Natural Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Sérgio M. C.; Ferreira, Flávio P.; Foster, David H.

    2007-01-01

    For some sets of surfaces, the spatial ratios of cone-photoreceptor excitations produced by light reflected from pairs of surfaces are almost invariant under illuminant changes. These sets include large populations of spectral reflectances, some of which represent individual natural surfaces but not their relative abundances in nature. The aim of this study was to determine whether spatial cone-excitation ratios are preserved under illuminant changes within the natural visual environment. A fast hyperspectral imaging system was used to obtain populations of 640,000 reflectance spectra from each of 30 natural scenes. The statistics of spatial cone-excitation ratios for randomly selected pairs of points in these scenes were determined for two extreme daylights. Almost-invariant ratios were common, suggesting that they represent a reliable property of the natural visual environment and a suitable foundation for visual color constancy. PMID:12152688

  12. Liquidus Temperatures of Cryolite Melts With Low Cryolite Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apisarov, Alexei; Dedyukhin, Alexander; Nikolaeva, Elena; Tinghaev, Pavel; Tkacheva, Olga; Redkin, Alexander; Zaikov, Yurii

    2011-02-01

    The effect of calcium fluoride on liquidus temperatures of the cryolite melts with a low cryolite ratio (CR) was studied. The systems KF-NaF-AlF3 and KF-LiF-AlF3 with CRs of 1.3, 1.5, and 1.7 have been investigated. The liquidus curves of systems containing CaF2 are different and depend on the K/(K + Na) and K/(K + Li) ratios. In potassium cryolite with CRs of 1.3 and 1.5, the calcium fluoride solubility is low and increases with NaF (LiF) concentration.

  13. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith Edward; Moser, William Elliott; Roozenboom, Stephan Donald; Knox, Kevin Jay

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  14. Conceptualizing Ratios with Look-Alike Polygons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Nancy K.; Causey-Lee, Betty J.; Irby, Nekeya M.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity using similar rectangles to help children conceptualize ratio relationships in several different ways. Develops proportional reasoning without introducing the process of cross- multiplication. (YDS)

  15. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Reinsurance Agreement-Standards for Approval; Regulations for the 1997 and Subsequent Reinsurance Years § 400.162 Qualification ratios. The...

  16. Force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; McBee, Lindsey N

    2014-03-01

    Fixed-ratio schedules are widely used in behavioral research. Although fixed-ratio schedules often conjure up relationships to work and effort, little is known about effort-related measures in these schedules. Early research had shown that force and effort of operant behavior vary systematically during the execution of ratio schedules, and the goal of the present study was to revisit early research on force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules. Four rats earned sucrose by pressing an isometric force transducer. Presses produced sucrose after ten or twenty responses. In general, the force of responses increased then decreased systematically across the ratio. The possibility that decreases in force during ratio execution was due to a trade-off with the differential reinforcement of short inter-response times (IRT) was investigated in an additional condition where sucrose was made available according to a tandem fixed-ratio 19 inter-response (IRT)> t schedule. The tandem IRT requirement did not eliminate decreasing trends in force across the ratio; unexpectedly, the tandem requirement did eliminate increases in force early in the ratio, which may reflect sequence-level organization operating in the control of force dynamics. PMID:24315798

  17. Sex ratio at birth in Croatia: update.

    PubMed

    Pavić, Dario

    2014-06-01

    There is strong evidence that the sex ratio at birth is partially determined by environmental and social factors. The modern change in those factors serves as an explanation for the secular decline in sex ratio at birth in most of the industrialized countries. This article is the reexamination of the results from my previous communication in which no trend in sex ratio at birth was established for the Croatian data from 1946 to 2007. The data for the years 2008 to 2011 were added, which didn't result with the detection of a significant change in sex ratio at birth by the regression analysis or by the Box-Jenkins time series analysis. Although the numerous factors associated with the decline in sex ratio at birth did occur during the studied period (e.g. increased exposure to the environmental pollution through food, air and water, the rise of the obesity and diabetes incidence, the economic crisis etc.), it appears that none of them made the measurable impact on sex ratio at birth. Also, the possible marginally significant decline in sex ratio at birth could be the result of a high sex ratio at birth immediately after the World War II. The results of this study caution against rapid generalization of the factors found to influence the sex ratio at birth in the epidemiological and clinical studies on the population level data. PMID:25144988

  18. Correlation between Atomic Size Ratio and Poisson's Ratio in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ai-Kun; Wang, Shi-Guang; Xue, Rong-Jie; Liu, Guo-Cai; Zhao, Kun

    2014-06-01

    We report the correlation between atomic size ratio and Poisson's ratio in various metallic glasses. It is found that atomic size ratio has an influence on the atomic packing density of metallic glasses, which would significantly impact the shear modulus rather than bulk modulus. The findings may be helpful for understanding the structural origin of Poisson's ratio in metallic glasses, and are instructive for designing tough metallic glasses with large Poisson's ratio.

  19. Temperature-controlled electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry using a pyrometric feedback system in conjunction with a background monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deijck, W.; Roelofsen, A. M.; Pieters, H. J.; Herber, R. F. M.

    The construction of a temperature-controlled feedback system for electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) using an optical pyrometer applied to the atomization stage is described. The system was used in conjunction with a fast-response background monitoring device. The heating rate of the furnace amounted to 1400° s -1 with a reproducibility better than 1%. The precision of the temperature control at a steady state temperature of 2000°C was 0.1%. The analytical improvements offered by the present system have been demonstrated by the determination of cadmium and lead in blood and finally by the determination of lead in serum. Both the sensitivity and the precision of the method have been improved. The accuracy of the method was checked by determining the lead content for a number of scrum samples both by ETA-AAS and differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry (DPASV) and proved to be satisfactory.

  20. Low concentration ratio solar array structural configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalbandian, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    The design and structural properties of a low concentration ratio solar array are discussed. The assembled module consists of six interconnected containers which are compactly stowed in a volume of 3.24 m(3) for delivery to orbit by the shuttle. The containers deploy in accordian fashion into a rectangular area of 19.4 x 68 meters and can be attached to the user spacecraft along the longitudinal centerline of the end container housing. Five rotary incremental actuators requiring about 8 watts each will execute the 180-degree rotation at each joint. Deployable masts (three per side) are used to extend endcaps from the housing in both directions. Each direction is extended by three masts requiring about 780 watts for about 27 minutes. Concentrator elements are extended by the endcaps and are supported by cable systems that are connected between the housings and endcaps. These power generating elements contain reflector panels which concentrate light onto the solar panels consisting of an aluminum radiator with solar cells positioned within the element base formed by the reflectors. A flat wire harness collects the power output of individual elements for transfer to the module container housing harnesses.

  1. High-aspect-ratio integrated force arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbio, Stephen M.; Smith, Stephen W.; Zara, Jason M.; Goodwin-Johansson, Scott H.; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Hudak, John A.; Kerns, Matthew; Elliott, Paul C.; Rouse, Buchanan J.; Borno, R. T.

    2001-08-01

    The Integrated Force Array (IFA) is a metallized polyimide actuator made up of a large array of capacitive cells that deform when voltage is applied. The deformations of the individual cells add to produce an overall muscle-like compression of the array. In previously reported work deformations of up to 30% have been realized and the IFAs have been used as mechanical scanners in ultrasound imaging systems. The gaps of the capacitive cells are etched directly into the polyimide and oriented perpendicular to the plane of the array. Metal is deposited on the sidewalls of the etched features in order to form the plates of each capacitor. The force associated with the IFA motion is directly proportional to the height of the sidewall metal and thus to the thickness of the membrane. Until now, the thickness has been 2μm with gap widths of 1μm. In recent work, much higher aspect ratio IFAs (thicker but with the same gap width) have been fabricated in order to produce devices that operate with greater force and are much more robust devices.

  2. Ecological genetics of sex ratios in plant populations

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Spencer C. H.; Yakimowski, Sarah B.; Field, David L.; Pickup, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    In many angiosperm species, populations are reproductively subdivided into distinct sexual morphs including females, males and hermaphrodites. Sexual polymorphism is maintained by frequency-dependent selection, leading to predictable sex ratios at equilibrium. Charles Darwin devoted much of his book ‘The Different Forms of Flowers on Plants of the Same Species’ (1877) to investigating plant sexual polymorphisms and laid the foundation for many problems addressed today by integrating theory with empirical studies of the demography and genetics of populations. Here, we summarize our recent work on the ecological and genetic mechanisms influencing variation in sex ratios and their implications for evolutionary transitions among sexual systems. We present the results of a survey of sex ratios from 126 species from 47 angiosperm families and then address two general problems using examples from diverse angiosperm taxa: (i) the mechanisms governing biased sex ratios in dioecious species; (ii) the origins and maintenance of populations composed of females, males and hermaphrodites. Several themes are emphasized, including the importance of non-equilibrium conditions, the role of life history and demography in affecting sex ratios, the value of theory for modelling the dynamics of sex ratio variation, and the utility of genetic markers for investigating evolutionary processes in sexually polymorphic plant populations. PMID:20643745

  3. Sustainable sex ratio in lattice populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tainaka, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yoshimura, J.

    2006-05-01

    We present a lattice model of mating populations. Simulation is performed by two different methods: local and global interactions. Simulation results account for the reason why the observed sex ratio is nearly one half in many animals. The male-biased sex ratio, such as in human populations, is also explained.

  4. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668.172 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Financial Responsibility § 668.172 Financial... for private non-profit institutions. (1) The ratios for proprietary institutions are: For...

  5. ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CORRELOGRAM RATIOS AND THEIR STABILITY.

    PubMed

    DANIEL, R S

    1964-08-14

    Autocorrelations of electroencephalograms can be reduced to ratios of estimated power among distinguishable parameters of typical tracings: the dominant rhythm, background activity, abundance, and total power. These data reduction methods permit statistical evaluation of differences among experimental conditions, thus extending the usefulness of graphic correlograms in research. Ratios discriminate between two experimental conditions and two subjects, while showing stability over days. PMID:14163806

  6. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide. PMID:17778807

  7. CCSSM Challenge: Graphing Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Mintos, Alexia; Krawczyk, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A renewed emphasis was placed on ratio and proportional reasoning in the middle grades in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The expectation for students includes the ability to not only compute and then compare and interpret the results of computations in context but also interpret ratios and proportions as they are…

  8. CCSSM Challenge: Graphing Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Mintos, Alexia; Krawczyk, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A renewed emphasis was placed on ratio and proportional reasoning in the middle grades in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The expectation for students includes the ability to not only compute and then compare and interpret the results of computations in context but also interpret ratios and proportions as they are

  9. Osmosis and Surface Area to Volume Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, D. R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help students understand the concepts of osmosis and surface area to volume ratio (SA:VOL). The task for students is to compare water uptake in different sizes of potato cubes and relate differences to their SA:VOL ratios. (JN)

  10. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  11. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Financial Responsibility § 668.172 Financial... Primary Reserve, Equity, and Net Income ratios, as described under paragraph (b) of this section; (2...) Rounding the composite score to one digit after the decimal point. (b) Ratios. The Primary Reserve,...

  12. Sex ratios in pheasant research and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, F.H.

    1952-01-01

    Sex ratios are of primary importance in interpretation of extensive studies of pheasant populations. They are necessary for converting crowing-cock indices to population estimates even where annual trends are to be studied in the same area. Reliability of population estimates from hunting season kill of pheasants suffers primarily from inability to estimate sex ratios accurately. Fall sex ratio is an index to production and where adult sex ratios are divergent can serve as a good check on production per hen. Age ratios of cocks cannot be interpreted directly as an index of productivity, even within the boundaries of one state, unless adult sex ratios are known. The relationship between observed and actual sex ratio varies significantly from season to season and according to the method of observation. In view of their importance in population studies and the lack of reliability of present methods, it is believed that intensive studies on techniques for obtaining sex ratios are a major need in pheasant research.

  13. The Golden Ratio--A Contrary Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falbo, Clement

    2005-01-01

    Many assertions about the occurrence of the golden ratio phi in art, architecture, and nature have been shown to be false, unsupported, or misleading. For instance, we show that the spirals found in sea shells, in particular the "Nautilus pompilius," are not in the shape of the golden ratio, as is often claimed. Some of the most interesting…

  14. Administrator-Teacher Ratio Study: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Services of California, Inc., Sacramento.

    Since the early 1970s, financial penalties have been levied in California school districts if their administrator-to-teacher ratio is in excess of a standard set by law. A study was conducted to determine whether the provisions of administrator-teacher maximum ratio are effective for calculating, monitoring, and reporting administrative costs.…

  15. Directional spectral emissivity measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim (Inventor); Pandey, Dhirendra K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus and process for determining the emissivity of a test specimen including an integrated sphere having two concentric walls with a coolant circulating therebetween, and disposed within a chamber which may be under ambient, vacuum or inert gas conditions. A reference sample is disposed within the sphere with a monochromatic light source in optical alignment therewith. A pyrometer is in optical alignment with the test sample for obtaining continuous test sample temperature measurements during a test. An arcuate slit port is provided through the spaced concentric walls of the integrating sphere with a movable monochromatic light source extending through and movable along the arcuate slit port. A detector system extends through the integrating sphere for continuously detecting an integrated signal indicative of all radiation within its field of view, as a function of the emissivity of the test specimen at various temperatures and various angle position of the monochromatic light source. A furnace for heating the test sample to approximately 3000 K. and control mechanism for transferring the heated sample from the furnace to the test sample port in the integrating sphere is also contained within the chamber.

  16. Schroeter's ratios for Martian craters - Radar results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Schroeter's ratios (ratios of the rim volume to the apparent volume) are determined for a sample of 29 large, degraded Martian craters selected from the Goldstone Mars radar altimetry data. On the average, the values of the calculated Schroeter's ratios are about two orders of magnitude smaller than the same ratios for fresh lunar craters. This indicates a severe rim volume deficit in degraded Martian craters and it provides an additional support to the notion of a widespread resurfacing of intercrater plains on Mars. Schroeter's ratios for degraded craters could provide a semi-quantitative measure of the effects of the modification processes that had been active on Mars and on the other planetary bodies.

  17. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  18. 12 CFR 615.5335 - Bank net collateral ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bank net collateral ratio. 615.5335 Section 615.5335 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5335 Bank...

  19. 12 CFR 615.5335 - Bank net collateral ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bank net collateral ratio. 615.5335 Section 615.5335 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5335 Bank...

  20. 12 CFR 615.5335 - Bank net collateral ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bank net collateral ratio. 615.5335 Section 615.5335 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5335 Bank...

  1. 12 CFR 615.5335 - Bank net collateral ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bank net collateral ratio. 615.5335 Section 615.5335 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5335 Bank...

  2. 12 CFR 615.5335 - Bank net collateral ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bank net collateral ratio. 615.5335 Section 615.5335 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5335 Bank...

  3. Why ratio dependence is (still) a bad model of predation.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Peter A

    2014-08-01

    The history of the idea that predation rates are functions of the ratio of prey density to predator density, known as ratio dependence, is reviewed and updated. When the term was introduced in 1989, it was already known that higher predator abundance often reduced an individual predator's average intake rate of prey. However, the idea that this effect was a universally applicable inverse proportionality was new. That idea was widely criticized in many articles in the early 1990s, and many of these criticisms have never been addressed. Nevertheless, ratio dependence seems to be gaining in popularity and is the subject of a recent monograph by the originators. This article revisits the most important objections to this theory, and assesses to what extent they have been answered by the theory's proponents. In this process, several new objections are raised. The counterarguments begin with the lack of a plausible, generally applicable mechanism that could produce ratio dependence. They include the fact that ratio dependence is a special case of predator-density effects, which, in turn, are only one of many non-prey species effects that influence the consumption rate of a particular prey. The proclaimed simplicity advantage of ratio dependence is at best small and is outweighed by its disadvantages; it predicts biologically implausible phenomena, and cannot easily be extended to describe multi-species systems, trait-mediated interactions, coevolution, and a number of other important ecological phenomena. Any potential small simplicity advantage disappears with corrections to remove unrealistic low-density dynamics caused by ratio dependence. The frequent occurrence of strong predator dependence does not make ratio dependence a better 'default' model of predation than prey dependence, and empirical studies of the full range of non-prey species effects on the consumption rates of predators are needed. PMID:25099654

  4. Atmospheric helium isotope ratio: Possible temporal and spatial variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuji; Furukawa, Yukiko; Takahata, Naoto

    2010-09-01

    The atmospheric 3He/ 4He ratio has been considered to be constant on a global scale, because the residence time of helium is significantly longer than the mixing time in the atmosphere. However, this ratio may be decreasing with time owing to the anthropogenic release of crustal helium from oil and natural gas wells, although this observation has been disputed. Here, we present the 3He/ 4He ratios of old air trapped in historical slags in Japan and of modern surface air samples collected at various sites around the world, measured with a newly developed analytical system. In air helium extracted from metallurgical slag found at refineries in operation between AD 1603 and 1907 in Japan, we determined a mean 3He/ 4He ratio of (5106 ± 108) × 10 -5 R HESJ (where R HESJ is the 3He/ 4He ratio of the Helium Standard of Japan), which is consistent with the previously reported value of (5077 ± 59) × 10 -5 R HESJ for historical slags in France and United Arab Emirates and about 4% higher than that of average modern air, (4901 ± 4) × 10 -5 R HESJ. This result implies that the air 3He/ 4He ratio has decreased with time as expected by anthropogenic causes. Our modern surface air samples revealed that the 3He/ 4He ratio increases from north to south at a rate of (0.16 ± 0.08) × 10 -5 R HESJ/degree of latitude, suggesting that the low 3He/ 4He ratio originates in high-latitude regions of the northern hemisphere, which is consistent with the fact that most fossil fuel is extracted and consumed in the northern hemisphere.

  5. C/O Ratios in Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhusudhan, N.

    2012-04-01

    Recent observations are allowing unprecedented constraints on the carbon-to-oxygen (C/O) ratios of giant exoplanetary atmospheres. Elemental abundance ratios, such as the C/O ratio, of planetary atmospheres provide important constraints on planetary interior compositions and formation conditions, and on the chemical and dynamical processes in the atmospheres. In addition, for super-Earths, the potential availability of water and oxygen, and hence the notion of `habitability', is contingent on the C/O ratio. Typically, an oxygen-rich composition, motivated by the solar nebula C/O of 0.5, is assumed in models of exoplanetary formation, interiors, and atmospheres. However, recent observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are suggesting the possibility of C/O ratios of 1.0 or higher, motivating the new class of Carbon-rich Planets (CRPs). In this talk, we will present observational constraints on atmospheric C/O ratios for an ensemble of transiting exoplanets and discuss their implications on the various aspects of exoplanetary characterization described above. Motivated by these results, we propose a two-dimensional classification scheme for irradiated giant exoplanets in which the incident irradiation and the atmospheric C/O ratio are the two dimensions. We demonstrate that some of the extreme anomalies reported in the literature for hot Jupiter atmospheres can be explained based on this 2-D scheme. An overview of new theoretical avenues and observational efforts underway for chemical characterization of extrasolar planets, from hot Jupiters to super-Earths, will be presented.

  6. Hybrid LTA vehicle controllability as affected by buoyancy ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, D. N.; Kubicki, P.; Tarczynski, T.; Fairbanks, A.; Piasecki, F. N.

    1979-01-01

    The zero and low speed controllability of heavy lift airships under various wind conditions as affected by the buoyancy ratio are investigated. A series of three hybrid LTA vehicls were examined, each having a dynamic thrust system comprised of four H-34 helicopters, but with buoyant envelopes of different volumes (and hence buoyancies), and with varying percentage of helium inflation and varying useful loads (hence gross weights). Buoyancy ratio, B, was thus examined varying from approximately 0.44 to 1.39. For values of B greater than 1.0, the dynamic thrusters must supply negative thrust (i.e. downward).

  7. The golden ratio in facial symmetry.

    PubMed

    Prokopakis, E P; Vlastos, I M; Picavet, V A; Nolst Trenite, G; Thomas, R; Cingi, C; Hellings, P W

    2013-03-01

    Symmetry is believed to be a hallmark of appealing faces. However, this does not imply that the most aesthetically pleasing proportions are necessary those that arise from the simple division of the face into thirds or fifths. Based on the etymology of the word symmetry, as well as on specific examples and theories of beauty, we conclude that ?-value, a ratio also known as the golden ratio or the divine proportion, can also characterize symmetrical forms. Therefore, we propose the utilization of this ratio in facial aesthetics. PMID:23441307

  8. Optimal sampling ratios in comparative diagnostic trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ting; Tang, Liansheng Larry; Rosenberger, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A subjective sampling ratio between the case and the control groups is not always an efficient choice to maximize the power or to minimize the total required sample size in comparative diagnostic trials.We derive explicit expressions for an optimal sampling ratio based on a common variance structure shared by several existing summary statistics of the receiver operating characteristic curve. We propose a two-stage procedure to estimate adaptively the optimal ratio without pilot data. We investigate the properties of the proposed method through theoretical proofs, extensive simulation studies and a real example in cancer diagnostic studies. PMID:24948841

  9. Development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements are discussed. Efforts were directed towards the following task areas: design and development of a High Temperature Acoustic Levitator (HAL) for containerless processing and property measurements at high temperatures; testing of the HAL module to establish this technology for use as a positioning device for microgravity uses; construction and evaluation of a brassboard hot wall Acoustic Levitation Furnace; construction and evaluation of a noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) system based on AGEMA thermal imaging camera; construction of a prototype Division of Amplitude Polarimetric Pyrometer for NCTM of levitated specimens; evaluation of and recommendations for techniques to control contamination in containerless materials processing chambers; and evaluation of techniques for heating specimens to high temperatures for containerless materials experimentation.

  10. Development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Charles A.

    1991-03-01

    The development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements are discussed. Efforts were directed towards the following task areas: design and development of a High Temperature Acoustic Levitator (HAL) for containerless processing and property measurements at high temperatures; testing of the HAL module to establish this technology for use as a positioning device for microgravity uses; construction and evaluation of a brassboard hot wall Acoustic Levitation Furnace; construction and evaluation of a noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) system based on AGEMA thermal imaging camera; construction of a prototype Division of Amplitude Polarimetric Pyrometer for NCTM of levitated specimens; evaluation of and recommendations for techniques to control contamination in containerless materials processing chambers; and evaluation of techniques for heating specimens to high temperatures for containerless materials experimentation.

  11. A leading edge heating array and a flat surface heating array: Final design. [for testing the thermal protection system of the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A heating array is described for testing full-scale sections of the leading edge and lower fuselage surfaces of the shuttle. The heating array was designed to provide a tool for development and acceptance testing of leading edge segments and large flat sections of the main body thermal protection system. The array was designed using a variable length module concept to meet test requirements using interchangeable components from one test configuration in another configuration. Heat generating modules and heat absorbing modules were employed to achieve the thermal gradient around the leading edge. A support was developed to hold the modules to form an envelope around a variety of leading edges; to supply coolant to each module; the support structure and to hold the modules in the flat surface heater configuration. An optical pyrometer system mounted within the array was designed to monitor specimen surface temperatures without altering the test article's surface.

  12. Experimental evaluation of blockage ratio and plenum evacuation system flow effects on pressure distribution for bodies of revolution in 0.1 scale model test section of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard R.; Harrington, Douglas E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the slotted test section of the 0.1-scale model of the proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel to evaluate wall interference effects at tunnel Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.95 on bodies of revolution with blockage rates of 0.43, 3, 6, and 12 percent. The amount of flow that had to be removed from the plenum chamber (which surrounded the slotted test section) by the plenum evacuation system (PES) to eliminate wall interference effects was determined. The effectiveness of tunnel reentry flaps in removing flow from the plenum chamber was examined. The 0.43-percent blockage model was the only one free of wall interference effects with no PES flow. Surface pressures on the forward part of the other models were greater than interference-free results and were not influenced by PES flow. Interference-free results were achieved on the aft part of the 3- and 6-percent blockage models with the proper amount of PES flow. The required PES flow was substantially reduced by opening the reentry flaps.

  13. Intralocus sexual conflict and offspring sex ratio.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Masako; Harano, Tomohiro; Miyatake, Takahisa; Okada, Kensuke; Hosken, David J

    2012-03-01

    Males and females frequently have different fitness optima for shared traits, and as a result, genotypes that are high fitness as males are low fitness as females, and vice versa. When this occurs, biasing of offspring sex-ratio to reduce the production of the lower-fitness sex would be advantageous, so that for example, broods produced by high-fitness females should contain fewer sons. We tested for offspring sex-ratio biasing consistent with these predictions in broad-horned flour beetles. We found that in both wild-type beetles and populations subject to artificial selection for high- and low-fitness males, offspring sex ratios were biased in the predicted direction: low-fitness females produced an excess of sons, whereas high-fitness females produced an excess of daughters. Thus, these beetles are able to adaptively bias sex ratio and recoup indirect fitness benefits of mate choice. PMID:22225600

  14. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    We have measured vibration-rotation first and second overtone 12C16O, 13C16O, 12C17O, 12C18O lines in 1.5 to 2.5 micron spectra of 41 Mira and SRa stars. These measurements have been used to derive 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O isotopic ratios. The ratios are compared to available literature values for the individual stars and the ratios are compared to isotopic ratios for various samples of evolved stars. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are compared to the results. We find that the majority of the M stars had main sequence masses <1.5 solar mass and have not experienced the third dredge up. The progenitors of the S and C Miras in the sample were more massive but no stars in the sample show evidence of hot bottom burning.

  15. Doing Mathematics with Bicycle Gear Ratios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sheryl L.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students examine bicycle chain-rings, cogs, and gear ratios as a means of exploring algebraic relationships, data collection, scatter plots, and lines of best fit. (KHR)

  16. Ratio Analysis: Where Investments Meet Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Susan D.; Woodbury, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Discusses ratio analysis by which investments may be evaluated. Requires the use of fundamental mathematics, problem solving, and a comparison of the mathematical results within the framework of industry. (Author/NB)

  17. The effect of SiO2/Al2O3 ratio on the structure and microstructure of the glazes from SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partyka, Janusz; Sitarz, Maciej; Leśniak, Magdalena; Gasek, Katarzyna; Jeleń, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic glazes are commonly used to covering of the facing surface of ceramics ware. A well-chosen oxide composition and firing conditions of glazes causes significant improvement of technical parameters of ceramic products. Modern glazes are classified as glass-ceramic composites with different crystalline phases arising during firing. The presence of crystals in the glass matrix is influenced by many factors, especially by oxides molar composition. A crucial role is played by the molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3. In this work the six composition of glazes from SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O system were examined. The only variable is the ratio of the silicon oxideto alumina at a constant content of other components: MgO, CaO, K2O, Na2O, ZnO. In order to determine the real phase composition of the obtained glazes research on fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) were done. For structural studies X-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectroscopic in the middle infrared (MIR) were performed. In order to determine the state of the surface (microstructure) research on the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with EDX. The research allowed to determine the influence of SiO2/Al2O3 ratio on the structure and phase composition of glazes and the nature, and type of formed crystalline phases.

  18. Numerical Estimation of the Spent Fuel Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Durbin, Samuel; Wilke, Jason; Margraf, J.; Dunn, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO 2 ), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. However, the validity of these large- scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible spent fuel ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR in the 1980's have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Because of the large uncertainty surrounding the SFR, estimates of releases from security-related events may be unnecessarily conservative. Credible arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask systems. In the present work, the shock physics codes CTH and ALE3D were used to simulate spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and DUO 2 targets impacted by a high-velocity jet at an ambient temperature condition. These preliminary results are used to illustrate an approach to estimate the respirable release fraction for each type of material and ultimately, an estimate of the SFR. This page intentionally blank

  19. Oxidative ratio (OR) of UK peats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, G. D.; Worrall, F.; Masiello, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) is the amount of CO2 sequestered in the terrestrial biosphere for each mol of O2 produced. The OR governs the effectiveness of a terrestrial biome to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and it has been used to calculate the balance of terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks across the globe. However, few studies have investigated the controls of the variability in OR. What factors affect OR - climate? Soil type? Vegetation type? N deposition? Land use? Land use change? Small shifts in OR could have important implications in the global partitioning of CO2 between the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans. This study looks at peat soils (Histosols) from a series of sites representing a climatic transect across the UK. Duplicate peat cores were taken, along with samples of above-ground vegetation and litter, from sites in northern Scotland (Forsinard), southern Scotland (Auchencorth), northern England (Moor House; Thorne Moor) through the Welsh borders (Whixhall Moss) and Somerset levels (Westhay Moor) to Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor in the south west of England. Sub-samples of the cores were analysed for their CHNO concentrations using a Costech ECS 4010 Elemental combustion system. Using the method of Masiello et al. (2008), OR values could be calculated from these elemental concentrations. Initial results show that OR values of UK peats varied between 0.94 and 1.1 with a median value of 1.05 which similar to the median value of World soils but the range is at the more reduced end. There was significant variation between peat cores, even between peat cores on the same site and the peat showed significant reduction in OR with depth in the core.

  20. The Charon-Pluto mass ratio from MKO astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Elliot, J. L.; Tholen, D. J.; Buie, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    Using the University of Hawaii (UH) 2.2-m telescope, we obtained charge coupled device (CCD) images of Pluto as it passed through a single field of 10 stars during 6 nights of Charon's 6.4-day orbital period. From these data, Charon's orbital semimajor axis is found to be 19,460 +/- 58 km, which is consistent with the recent measurement by Null et al. (1993), of 19,405 +/- 86 km. Our semimajor axis implies a system mass of (14.32 +/- 0.13) x 10(exp 24) g. From the motions of Pluto and Charon around their barycenter, we find that the ratio of Charon's mass to Pluto's is 0.1566 +/- 0.0035, indicating that the bodies both have densities near 2 g/cc. Our ratio is nearly twice that of Null et al., who find a ratio of 0.0837 +/- 0.0147. Possible reasons for the large discrepancy are discussed.