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Sample records for ratio pyrometer system

  1. Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quince, Asia N. (Inventor); Stein, Alexander (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A non-contact pyrometer and method for calibrating the same are provided. The pyrometer includes a radiation sensor configured to measure at least a portion of a radiance signal emitted from a target medium and output a voltage that is a function of an average of the absorbed radiance signal, and an optical window disposed proximate the radiation sensor and configured to control a wavelength range of the radiance signal that reaches the radiation sensor. The pyrometer may further include a reflective enclosure configured to receive the target medium therein, wherein the radiation sensor and the optical window are disposed within the reflective enclosure, an amplifier in communication with an output of the radiation sensor, and a data acquisition system in communication with an output of the amplifier.

  2. High resolution color band pyrometer ratioing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); Henry, Paul K. (Inventor); LoGiurato, D. Daniel (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The sensing head of a two-color band ratioing pyrometer of a known type using a fiber optic cable to couple radiation to dual detector photodiodes is improved to have high spatial resolution by focusing the radiation received through an objective lens (i.e., by focusing the image of a target area) onto an opaque sheet spaced in front of the input end of the fiber optic cable. A two-mil hole in that sheet then passes radiation to the input end of the cable. The detector has two channels, one for each color band, with an electronic-chopper stabilized current amplifier as the input stage followed by an electronic-chopper stabilized voltage amplifier.

  3. Measurement performance of an optical CCD-based pyrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Yang, Zangjian; Wang, Luping; Cheng, Xiaofang; Zhong, Maohua; Shi, Congling

    2010-06-01

    The measurement performance of a CCD-based pyrometer system using a three-color method was evaluated for scientific and engineering metrology. The relationships between the system parameters (exposure time and sensor gain) and the intensity measurements in an integrating sphere experiment were determined for a specific CCD sensor. The pyrometer system uses the three-color method based on the intensity ratio without geometry calibrations. The field measurement characteristics and the effectiveness of coupling the three-color channels were investigated in terms of the temperature measurement uniformity, temperature sensitivity and temperature range of the pyrometer system in standard blackbody tests. The results showed that the temperature non-uniformity is not proportional to the intensity non-uniformity and is in the range of 0.13-2.14%. The relative temperature sensitivities of intensity ratios for different channel combinations are different, which may provide a way to improve the measurement results. The temperature range bandwidth for object with a non-uniform temperature distribution varies from 190 to 270 K for this specific CCD-based pyrometer. The performance evaluation conclusions for the system with this specific CCD sensor are general and applicable for pyrometer systems using other CCD sensors.

  4. CN violet system spectrum used as a molecular pyrometer and the influence noise to signal ratio on the temperature values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, H.

    2012-06-01

    The CN violet system (B2?+ - X2?+) molecular emission spectrum is frequently observed in plasma sources containing hydrocarbons and nitrogen mixture. We have simulated the spectrum of (0,0) and (1,1) bands of this system for different rotational and vibrational temperatures. The influence of the noise to signal ratio has been studied, if the noise to signal ratio is about 10% we found an error of 6% at temperature 3000K and 10% at 6000K.

  5. PYROLASER - PYROLASER OPTICAL PYROMETER OPERATING SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E.

    1994-01-01

    The PYROLASER package is an operating system for the Pyrometer Instrument Company's Pyrolaser. There are 6 individual programs in the PYROLASER package: two main programs, two lower level subprograms, and two programs which, although independent, function predominantly as macros. The package provides a quick and easy way to setup, control, and program a standard Pyrolaser. Temperature and emissivity measurements may be either collected as if the Pyrolaser were in the manual operations mode, or displayed on real time strip charts and stored in standard spreadsheet format for post-test analysis. A shell is supplied to allow macros, which are test-specific, to be easily added to the system. The Pyrolaser Simple Operation program provides full on-screen remote operation capabilities, thus allowing the user to operate the Pyrolaser from the computer just as it would be operated manually. The Pyrolaser Simple Operation program also allows the use of "quick starts". Quick starts provide an easy way to permit routines to be used as setup macros for specific applications or tests. The specific procedures required for a test may be ordered in a sequence structure and then the sequence structure can be started with a simple button in the cluster structure provided. One quick start macro is provided for continuous Pyrolaser operation. A subprogram, Display Continuous Pyr Data, is used to display and store the resulting data output. Using this macro, the system is set up for continuous operation and the subprogram is called to display the data in real time on strip charts. The data is simultaneously stored in a spreadsheet format. The resulting spreadsheet file can be opened in any one of a number of commercially available spreadsheet programs. The Read Continuous Pyrometer program is provided as a continuously run subprogram for incorporation of the Pyrolaser software into a process control or feedback control scheme in a multi-component system. The program requires the Pyrolaser to be set up using the Pyrometer String Transfer macro. It requires no inputs and provides temperature and emissivity as outputs. The Read Continuous Pyrometer program can be run continuously and the data can be sampled as often or as seldom as updates of temperature and emissivity are required. PYROLASER is written using the Labview software for use on Macintosh series computers running System 6.0.3 or later, Sun Sparc series computers running OpenWindows 3.0 or MIT's X Window System (X11R4 or X11R5), and IBM PC or compatibles running Microsoft Windows 3.1 or later. Labview requires a minimum of 5Mb of RAM on a Macintosh, 24Mb of RAM on a Sun, and 8Mb of RAM on an IBM PC or compatible. The Labview software is a product of National Instruments (Austin,TX; 800-433-3488), and is not included with this program. The standard distribution medium for PYROLASER is a 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. It is also available on a 3.5 inch 720K MS-DOS format diskette, a 3.5 inch diskette in UNIX tar format, and a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. An electronic copy of the documentation in Macintosh WordPerfect version 2.0.4 format is included on the distribution medium. Printed documentation is included in the price of the program. PYROLASER was developed in 1992.

  6. Optical pyrometer system for collisionless shock experiments in high-power laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Sakawa, Y; Kuramitsu, Y; Dono, S; Ide, T; Shibata, S; Aoki, H; Tanji, H; Sano, T; Shiroshita, A; Waugh, J N; Gregory, C D; Woolsey, N C; Takabe, H

    2012-10-01

    A temporally and spatially resolved optical pyrometer system has been fielded on Gekko XII experiments. The system is based on the self-emission measurements with a gated optical imager (GOI) and a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). Both detectors measure the intensity of the self-emission from laser-produced plasmas at the wavelength of 450 nm with a bandpass filter with a width of ~10 nm in FWHM. The measurements were calibrated with different methods, and both results agreed with each other within 30% as previously reported [T. Morita et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 336, 283 (2011)]. As a tool for measuring the properties of low-density plasmas, the system is applicable for the measurements of the electron temperature and density in collisionless shock experiments [Y. Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)]. PMID:23126856

  7. Optical pyrometer system for collisionless shock experiments in high-power laser-produced plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Dono, S.; Ide, T.; Shibata, S.; Aoki, H.; Tanji, H.; Sano, T.; Shiroshita, A.; Waugh, J. N.; Gregory, C. D.; Woolsey, N. C.; Takabe, H.

    2012-10-01

    A temporally and spatially resolved optical pyrometer system has been fielded on Gekko XII experiments. The system is based on the self-emission measurements with a gated optical imager (GOI) and a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). Both detectors measure the intensity of the self-emission from laser-produced plasmas at the wavelength of 450 nm with a bandpass filter with a width of ˜10 nm in FWHM. The measurements were calibrated with different methods, and both results agreed with each other within 30% as previously reported [T. Morita et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 336, 283 (2011)], 10.1007/s10509-010-0525-5. As a tool for measuring the properties of low-density plasmas, the system is applicable for the measurements of the electron temperature and density in collisionless shock experiments [Y. Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.175002.

  8. Study of the Performance of a Streaked Optical Pyrometer System for Temperature Measurement of Shocked Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Huige; Liu, Yonggang; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Dong; Ding, Yongkun; Zhao, Bin; Hu, Guangyue; Zheng, Jian

    2014-06-01

    A streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) is developed and calibrated for the measurement of the temperature of shocked materials. In order to achieve a higher relative sensitivity, a one-channel scheme is adopted for the system. The system is calibrated with a shocked step-shaped aluminum sample in the SG-III prototype laser facility. The relation between the count number in the detection system and the sample temperature is thus obtained, which can be adopted to infer the temperature of any shocked materials in future experiments.

  9. Streaked optical pyrometer system for laser-driven shock-wave experiments on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Miller, J E; Boehly, T R; Melchior, A; Meyerhofer, D D; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Sorce, C M; Oertel, J A; Emmel, P M

    2007-03-01

    The temperature of laser-driven shock waves is of interest to inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics. We report on a streaked optical pyrometer that measures the self-emission of laser-driven shocks simultaneously with a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Together these diagnostics are used to obtain the temporally and spatially resolved temperatures of approximately megabar shocks driven by the OMEGA laser. We provide a brief description of the diagnostic and how it is used with VISAR. Key spectral calibration results are discussed and important characteristics of the recording system are presented. PMID:17411209

  10. Rotating turbine blade pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.; Lesco, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Non-contacting pyrometer system optically measures surface temperature distribution on rotating turbine blade, comprising line-by-line scan via fiber optic probe. Each scan line output is converted to digital signals, temporarily stored in buffer memory, and then processed in minicomputer for display as temperature.

  11. Polaradiometric Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abtahi, Ali A.

    1995-01-01

    Polaradiometric pyrometer provides measurements from which one calculates temperature of specimen, without having to measure or account explicitly for polarization-dependent emissivities and reflectivities of specimen. Provides measurements of spectral intensities in two perpendicular polarizations. When brightness of lamp set so two measured intensities equal, measurements used to compute temperature.

  12. Closed loop control for laser micro spot welding using fast pyrometer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, T.; Hermsdorf, J.; Henning, T.; Kling, R.

    Laser micro spot welding offers temperature resistant high strength contacts without filler material. However, due to varying surface absorption properties of copper, the welding quality shows poor reproducibility. To stabilize the process we set up a power control for laser micro spot welding of copper. It consists of a high speed pyrometer and an external micro controller. The subject of the investigations is to apply a constant energy amount using conduction welding to increase the process stability. Using the closed loop control, the standard deviation of pull force for overlap welds is reduced from 3.3N to 1.3N.

  13. Reference wavelength method for a two-color pyrometer.

    PubMed

    Hahn, J W; Rhee, C

    1987-12-15

    The reference wavelength method is used for a two-color pyrometer and, with the reference wavelength method, an analytical formula of the ratio temperature for the two-color pyrometer is derived. For one channel of the two-color pyrometer, with a triangular spectral response of 0.1-micro m FWHM and 2.0-micro m peak wavelength, the effective wavelength and the correction factors with several reference wavelengths are determined. By fitting the curves of the effective wavelength and the correction factor to simple functional forms of temperature, the radiance errors for both cases are calculated. Also, it is found that the correction factor determined in a single-color pyrometer can be used directly in one channel of the two-color pyrometer without additional calculation. PMID:20523516

  14. A radiometer-pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Radiometer-pyrometer measures the spectral absorption, emission, and temperature of gases. The major problems involved in spectroradiometric measurements are nonuniform spectral sensitivity, nonlinearity, poor absolute accuracy, wide range of intensities, and wide range of wavelengths.

  15. The use of optical pyrometers in axial flow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, R.R.; Przirembel, H.R.; Clevenger, D.H.; Lang, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    An optical pyrometer system that can be used to measure metal temperatures over an extended range of temperature has been developed. Real-time flame discrimination permits accurate operation in the gas turbine environment with high flame content. This versatile capability has been used in a number of ways. In experimental engines, a fixed angle pyrometer has been used for turbine health monitoring for the automatic test stand abort system. Turbine blade creep capability has been improved by tailoring the burner profile based on measured blade temperatures. Fixed and traversing pyrometers were used extensively during engine development to map blade surface temperatures in order to assess cooling effectiveness and identify optimum configurations. Portable units have been used in turbine field inspections. A new low temperature pyrometer is being used as a diagnostic tool in the alternate turbopump design for the Space Shuttle main engine. Advanced engine designs will incorporate pyrometers in the engine control system to limit operation to safe temperatures.

  16. Fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Tan, Peng; Pang, Chuanhe; Zhao, Huan; Shen, Yi

    2011-06-01

    A fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was developed for the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra from 200 nm to 1700 nm using a CCD detector and an InGaAs detector. The pyrometer system conveniently and quickly provides the sufficient choices of multiple measurement wavelengths using optical diffraction, which avoids the use of narrow-band filters. Flexible optical fibers are used to transmit the radiation so the pyrometer can be used for temperature measurements in harsh environments. The setup and calibrations (wavelength calibration, nonlinearity calibration, and radiation response calibration) of this pyrometer system were described. Development of the multi-wavelength pyrometer involved optimization of the bandwidth and temperature discrimination of the multiple spectra data. The analysis results showed that the wavelength intervals, ??CCD = 30 nm and ??InGaAs = 50 nm, are the suitable choices as a tradeoff between the simple emissivity model assumption and the multiple signal discrimination. The temperature discrimination was also quantificationally evaluated for various wavelengths and temperatures. The measurement performance of the fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was partially verified through measurements with a high-temperature blackbody and actual hot metals. This multi-wavelength pyrometer can be used for remote high-temperature measurements.

  17. Fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tairan; Tan, Peng; Pang, Chuanhe; Zhao, Huan; Shen, Yi

    2011-06-01

    A fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was developed for the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra from 200 nm to 1700 nm using a CCD detector and an InGaAs detector. The pyrometer system conveniently and quickly provides the sufficient choices of multiple measurement wavelengths using optical diffraction, which avoids the use of narrow-band filters. Flexible optical fibers are used to transmit the radiation so the pyrometer can be used for temperature measurements in harsh environments. The setup and calibrations (wavelength calibration, nonlinearity calibration, and radiation response calibration) of this pyrometer system were described. Development of the multi-wavelength pyrometer involved optimization of the bandwidth and temperature discrimination of the multiple spectra data. The analysis results showed that the wavelength intervals, ??(CCD) = 30 nm and ??(InGaAs) = 50 nm, are the suitable choices as a tradeoff between the simple emissivity model assumption and the multiple signal discrimination. The temperature discrimination was also quantificationally evaluated for various wavelengths and temperatures. The measurement performance of the fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was partially verified through measurements with a high-temperature blackbody and actual hot metals. This multi-wavelength pyrometer can be used for remote high-temperature measurements. PMID:21721719

  18. A multicolor imaging pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    A multicolor imaging pyrometer was designed for accurately and precisely measuring the temperature distribution histories of small moving samples. The device projects six different color images of the sample onto a single charge coupled device array that provides an RS-170 video signal to a computerized frame grabber. The computer automatically selects which one of the six images provides useful data, and converts that information to a temperature map. By measuring the temperature of molten aluminum heated in a kiln, a breadboard version of the device was shown to provide high accuracy in difficult measurement situations. It is expected that this pyrometer will ultimately find application in measuring the temperature of materials undergoing radiant heating in a microgravity acoustic levitation furnace.

  19. Beam Director For Optical Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.; Randall, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    Optical-fiber pyrometer under development observes fields of view as much as 31 degree off axis. Prismlike end fitting bends viewing angle so pyrometer can "look" at object off axis. Angled face directs thermal radiation from object into optical-fiber cable along axis.

  20. Multicolor pyrometer for materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, Michael; Frank, Jonathan; Beerman, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The program goals are to design, construct, and program a prototype imaging pyrometer capable of measuring the temperature distribution across the surface of a moving object suspended in space. The approach is to utilize an optical system which operates at short wavelengths compared to the peak of the blackbody spectrum for the temperature range of interest, thus minimizing errors associated with a lack of knowledge about heated sample emissivity. An analysis of the system's temperature measurement capability based on the camera's responsivity was performed and bound to be satisfactory. Details for the evolving optical design and the progress towards construction of a working model are discussed. Details of the algorithm developed for selecting the optimum colors to be used by the pyrometer are reported. Though final selection of the colors will have to await a final design of the optical system, results using a preliminary optical design are presented.

  1. C2 Swan spectrum used as a molecular pyrometer in transferred arc and the influence noise to signal ratio on the temperature values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, H.

    2014-05-01

    The C2 Swan system molecular emission spectrum is frequently observed in arc plasmas containing hydrocarbons. The spectra emitted from 5 kw in the transferred arc reactor at atmospheric pressure by CH4/CO2/Ar mixture are recorded with the help of an optical system consisting of a linear CCD array coupled with 2m spectrometer. The rotational temperature of 4300±300K is found from the experimental Abel inverted spectra in the arc center after a point-to-point comparison of the spectrum with a computer simulated one. The influence of the noise to signal ratio has been studied, if the noise to signal ratio is about 10% we found an error of 7% at temperature 3000K and 10% at 6000K.

  2. Testing a solar-blind pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrín, J.; Marzo, A.; Cañadas, I.; Rodríguez, J.

    2010-12-01

    Surface temperatures are key parameters in many concentrated solar radiation applications. Pyrometric temperature measurement of solar irradiated material surfaces is the alternative to contact measurement techniques, which are inadequate for measuring the temperatures of such surfaces. However, reflected solar radiation is an important uncertainty variable in this non-contact methodology. A promising method for eliminating this solar perturbation is by using centred passband filters on the atmospheric solar absorption bands, creating solar-blind pyrometric systems. A commercial pyrometer has been tested in the wavelength band at around 1.4 µm in the solar furnace at Plataforma Solar de Almería, showing its advantages and limitations. An estimation of temperature measurement uncertainty for a real case is presented with theory and experiment in agreement: the higher the temperature, the lower the uncertainty. Another experiment has shown that the pyrometer measures temperature properly even through quartz windows in this spectral range.

  3. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes.

    PubMed

    Polk, J E; Marrese-Reading, C M; Thornber, B; Dang, L; Johnson, L K; Katz, I

    2007-09-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed. PMID:17902941

  4. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, J. E.; Marrese-Reading, C. M.; Thornber, B.; Dang, L.; Johnson, L. K.; Katz, I.

    2007-09-15

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed.

  5. Two-color optical charge-coupled-device-based pyrometer using a two-peak filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Zhao, Huan; Zeng, Jun; Zhong, Maohua; Shi, Congling

    2010-12-01

    A two-color optical charge-coupled-device (CCD)-based pyrometer was developed using a multipeak interference filter with a color CCD sensor to measure multicolor signals with specified wavelengths. The effective and simple method adjusts the fixed spectrum response characteristics of a color CCD to allow improved temperature measurements. This pyrometer system not only has the advantage of traditional two-color (two-wavelength) pyrometry, but also overcomes the restrictions of color CCDs that can only be applied in waveband measurements. The measurement performance of the system using a two-peak filter (? _1 = 643 nm,? _2 = 564 nm) was evaluated by blackbody experiments. The results show that the low temperature detection limit is increased about 200 K with an increase in the sensitivity of the measured signals compared with the original system without two-peak filter [Fu, et al., Opt. Laser Technol. 42, 586 (2010)]. And the effective temperature range is also increased when T > 1233 K. The measured ratio C_R /C_G is monotonically relative to the temperature, which simplifies the measurements. The temperature sensitivity of 2.49 is larger and more uniform than the temperature sensitivity of 1.36 in the previous original system. Thus, the measurement performance of the new system is greatly improved. Finally, as an application, the surface temperature distribution of stainless steel sample in hot environments was determined by this new CCD-based pyrometer. The results agree well with the spectrometer-based results and further verify the applicability of the new system.

  6. Two-color optical charge-coupled-device-based pyrometer using a two-peak filter.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tairan; Zhao, Huan; Zeng, Jun; Zhong, Maohua; Shi, Congling

    2010-12-01

    A two-color optical charge-coupled-device (CCD)-based pyrometer was developed using a multipeak interference filter with a color CCD sensor to measure multicolor signals with specified wavelengths. The effective and simple method adjusts the fixed spectrum response characteristics of a color CCD to allow improved temperature measurements. This pyrometer system not only has the advantage of traditional two-color (two-wavelength) pyrometry, but also overcomes the restrictions of color CCDs that can only be applied in waveband measurements. The measurement performance of the system using a two-peak filter (?(1)=643?nm,??(2)=564?nm) was evaluated by blackbody experiments. The results show that the low temperature detection limit is increased about 200 K with an increase in the sensitivity of the measured signals compared with the original system without two-peak filter [Fu, et al., Opt. Laser Technol. 42, 586 (2010)]. And the effective temperature range is also increased when T > 1233 K. The measured ratio C(R)/C(G) is monotonically relative to the temperature, which simplifies the measurements. The temperature sensitivity of 2.49 is larger and more uniform than the temperature sensitivity of 1.36 in the previous original system. Thus, the measurement performance of the new system is greatly improved. Finally, as an application, the surface temperature distribution of stainless steel sample in hot environments was determined by this new CCD-based pyrometer. The results agree well with the spectrometer-based results and further verify the applicability of the new system. PMID:21198043

  7. IR optical fiber-based noncontact pyrometer for drop tube instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. G.; Moneyhun, S.; Saleh, W.; Sudeora, S.; Claus, R. O.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a two color pyrometer with infrared optical fiber bundles for collection of the infrared radiation is described. The pyrometer design is engineered to facilitate its use for measurement of the temperature of small, falling samples in a microgravity materials processing experiment using a 100 meter long drop tube. Because the samples are small and move rapidly through the field of view of the pyrometer, the optical power budget of the detection system is severly limited. Strategies for overcoming this limitation are discussed.

  8. Multicolor pyrometer for materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, M. B.; Frank, J.; Baker, J. E.; Foutter, R. R.; Beerman, H.; Allen, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), under contract to NASA JPL, during a 2.5-year SBIR Phase 2 Program. The program goals were to design, construct, and program a prototype passive imaging pyrometer capable of measuring, as accurately as possible, and controlling the temperature distribution across the surface of a moving object suspended in space. These goals were achieved and the instrument was delivered to JPL in November 1989. The pyrometer utilizes an optical system which operates at short wavelengths compared to the peak of the black-body spectrum for the temperature range of interest, thus minimizing errors associated with a lack of knowledge about the heated sample's emissivity. To cover temperatures from 900 to 2500 K, six wavelengths are available. The preferred wavelength for measurement of a particular temperature decreases as the temperature increases. Images at all six wavelengths are projected onto a single CCD camera concurrently. The camera and optical system have been calibrated to relate the measured intensity at each pixel to the temperature of the heated object. The output of the camera is digitized by a frame grabber installed in a personal computer and analyzed automatically to yield temperature information. The data can be used in a feedback loop to alter the status of computer-activated switches and thereby control a heating system.

  9. Laser Pyrometer For Spot Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Allen, J. L.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Laser pyrometer makes temperature map by scanning measuring spot across target. Scanning laser pyrometer passively measures radiation emitted by scanned spot on target and calibrated by similar passive measurement on blackbody of known temperature. Laser beam turned on for active measurements of reflectances of target spot and reflectance standard. From measurements, temperature of target spot inferred. Pyrometer useful for non-contact measurement of temperature distributions in processing of materials.

  10. A Self Calibrating Emissivity and/or Transmissivity Independent Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Pyrometer is a favorite method to do remote temperature measurement in research and development. One-color, two-color and the disappearing filament pyrometers are most common, multicolor and multiwavelength pyrometers are being introduced recently. All these pyrometers invariably require, in one form or another, information concerning emissivity, the medium transmissivity, their ratio at some two spectral regions, the instrument's calibration constant, etc. for their operation. This information can come from hand books, from the manufacturer or in some instances, from results of dedicated separate experiments. Often this information is sample or instrument specific. Sometimes this information, though obtained from a special experiment, is obtained using a separate sample rather than the one pursued for temperature measurement. Then, there would be the question of variability from sample to sample and variability from batch to batch in the sample used. Also, previously determined calibrations can change with time, and the only way to reduce uncertainty is to perform the calibration more frequently or even immediately before the experiment. We have developed a multiwavelength pyrometer, which eliminates the need to supply the necessary emissivity and/or transmissivity information and the instrument calibration constants ahead of time. The pyrometer calibrates itself from its first cycle data.

  11. Self Calibration of a 2-wavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometers require calibrations to determine their instrument constants before they can be used in remote temperature measurements. These constants reflect the combined effects of detector response, the transmissivities of intervening optical media (windows and gases) and the emissivity of the measured surface. We describe here the principal and the demonstration of self calibrating 2-wavelength pyrometer.

  12. Multi-band pyrometer uncertainty analysis and improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongjun; Zhang, Xuecong; Cai, Jing; Wang, Zhongyu

    2011-05-01

    According to the energy ratio value of multi-band radiating from the measured surface, the 'true' temperature can be calculated by multi-band pyrometer. Multi-band pyrometer has many advantages: it can hardly be affected by the emission of measured surface and the environment radiation, and it has higher Signal-to-Noise Ratio and higher temperature measurement accuracy. This paper introduces the principle of a multi-band pyrometer and the uncertainty of measurement result is evaluated by using Monte-Carlo Method (MCM). The result shows that the accuracy of effective wavelength is the largest source of uncertainty and the other main source is reference temperature. When using ordinary blackbody furnace with continuous temperature, which can provide reference temperature and calibrate effective wavelength, the uncertainty component is 2.17K and 2.48K respectively. The combined standard uncertainty is 3.30K. A new calibration method is introduced. The effective wavelength is calibrated by monochromator, and the reference temperature is provided by fixed point black body furnace. The uncertainty component is decreased to 0.73K and 0.12K respectively. The measurement uncertainty is decreased to 0.74K. The temperature measurement accuracy is enhanced.

  13. Multi-band pyrometer uncertainty analysis and improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongjun; Zhang, Xuecong; Cai, Jing; Wang, Zhongyu

    2010-12-01

    According to the energy ratio value of multi-band radiating from the measured surface, the 'true' temperature can be calculated by multi-band pyrometer. Multi-band pyrometer has many advantages: it can hardly be affected by the emission of measured surface and the environment radiation, and it has higher Signal-to-Noise Ratio and higher temperature measurement accuracy. This paper introduces the principle of a multi-band pyrometer and the uncertainty of measurement result is evaluated by using Monte-Carlo Method (MCM). The result shows that the accuracy of effective wavelength is the largest source of uncertainty and the other main source is reference temperature. When using ordinary blackbody furnace with continuous temperature, which can provide reference temperature and calibrate effective wavelength, the uncertainty component is 2.17K and 2.48K respectively. The combined standard uncertainty is 3.30K. A new calibration method is introduced. The effective wavelength is calibrated by monochromator, and the reference temperature is provided by fixed point black body furnace. The uncertainty component is decreased to 0.73K and 0.12K respectively. The measurement uncertainty is decreased to 0.74K. The temperature measurement accuracy is enhanced.

  14. Self-calibrated active pyrometer for furnace temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The pyrometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave receiver including a millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. In an alternative embodiment, a translatable base plate and a visible laser beam allow slow mapping out of interference patterns and obtaining peak values therefor. The invention also includes a waveguide having a replaceable end portion, an insulating refractory sleeve and/or a source of inert gas flow. The pyrometer may be used in conjunction with a waveguide to form a system for temperature measurements in a furnace. The system may employ a chopper or alternatively, be constructed without a chopper. The system may also include an auxiliary reflector for surface emissivity measurements.

  15. [Research on the non-source temperature calibration of Multispectral pyrometer].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-gang; Sun, Kun; Dai, Jing-min

    2012-01-01

    At present, Multispectral pyrometer used in high-temperature measurement has already had high resolution and high signal to noise ratio. However, the non-source temperature (higher than 3 000 degrees C) calibration falls far behind the development of multispectral pyrometer and has already seriously hindered the precision and application range of the pyrometer. In order to break through the limitation of calibration of non-source temperature, a new calibration method was put forward in the present paper. The temperature-voltage (T-U) model was formed based on power function where output voltage U of the multispectral pyrometer was derived from its corresponding known temperature point. Based on the model, derivative least square method was used to obtain the parameters of the model to realize the non-source temperature calibration. Both theoretical and experimental data proved the efficiency and precision of the calibration method. In addition, within the spectral range of high-temperature measurement pyrometer (0.4-1.1 microm), the range of non-source temperature calibration with precision better than 3 per thousand, 1% and 3% respectively have been divided theoretically. PMID:22497175

  16. DESIGN, FABRICATION AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF GASIFIER REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas F. Leininger; Hua-Min Huang

    2003-07-01

    Polk Power has decided that the Texaco gasification unit will not be sold to a third party. Therefore, including the ownership transfer of the Texaco gasification unit in the agreement is not an issue any more. The cooperative agreement between Texaco and Polk Power has been revised several times in this quarter. Polk power is making comments on the last draft that Texaco sent to them. The modification fieldwork and testing will start once the cooperative agreement is signed with Polk Power.

  17. High-speed spatial scanning pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezairliyan, A.; Chang, R. F.; Foley, G. M.; Miller, A. P.

    1993-01-01

    A high-speed spatial scanning pyrometer has been designed and developed to measure spectral radiance temperatures at multiple target points along the length of a rapidly heating/cooling specimen in dynamic thermophysical experiments at high temperatures (above about 1800 K). The design, which is based on a self-scanning linear silicon array containing 1024 elements, enables the pyrometer to measure spectral radiance temperatures (nominally at 650 nm) at 1024 equally spaced points along a 25-mm target length. The elements of the array are sampled consecutively every 1 microsec, thereby permitting one cycle of measurements to be completed in approximately 1 msec. Procedures for calibration and temperature measurement as well as the characteristics and performance of the pyrometer are described. The details of sources and estimated magnitudes of possible errors are given. An example of measurements of radiance temperatures along the length of a tungsten rod, during its cooling following rapid resistive pulse heating, is presented.

  18. A sensitive optical pyrometer for shock-temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    A new optical system was used to determine temperatures above 2400 K in shocked materials by measuring the spectral radiance of sub-microsecond pulses of light emitted from initially transparent solid samples in the visible and near infrared (450 to 900 nm). The high sensitivity of this optical pyrometer is attributed to the small number of channels, large aperture (0.03 steradian), the large bandwidth per channel (40 nm), and large photodiode detection area (0.2 sq cm). Improved calibration techniques reduce systematic errors encountered in previous shock-temperature experiments.

  19. Infrared shield facilitates optical pyrometer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Illg, W.

    1965-01-01

    Water-cooled shield facilitates optical pyrometer high temperature measurements of small sheet metal specimens subjected to tensile stress in fatigue tests. The shield excludes direct or reflected radiation from one face of the specimen and permits viewing of the infrared radiation only.

  20. Temperature Measurement of a Glass Material Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Temperature measurement of a substance that is transparent using the traditional 1-color, 2-color and other pyrometers has been difficult. The radiation detected by pyrometers do not come from a well defined location in the transparent body. The multiwavelength pyrometer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center can measure the surface temperature of many materials. We show in this paper that it also measures the surface and a bulk subsurface temperature of transparent materials like glass.

  1. Development of three-wavelength CCD image pyrometer used for the temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi; Bai, Haicheng

    2014-02-01

    This paper develops an imaging based three-color pyrometer for the monitoring of temperature distribution in a continuous casting billet. A novel optical device, together with an embedded electronic system, is designed to sequentially collect a dark image and three thermal images with specified wavelengths on a same monochromatic charge-coupled-device (CCD). The three thermal images provide the basis for the determination of target temperature, while the dark image is used to online eliminate the dark noise of CCD with a differential method. This image pyrometer is not only independent of target emissivity but also overcomes the dissimilarity of measuring accuracy between the micro-sensors of CCD resulted from the non-uniformity of pixels' intensity response and the vignetting of optical system. Furthermore, a precise two-color temperature field measuring model on the CCD pyrometer is established, based on which a self-adaptive light-integration mechanism is presented. Compared with the traditional fixed light-integration method, the measuring range of the pyrometer is greatly extended and its sensitivity in low temperature segment is improved. The test results in a steel factory demonstrate that the pyrometer is capable of meeting the requirement of surface temperature measurements about casting billets. Reliability and accuracy of measurement results are also discussed herein. PMID:24593387

  2. Development of three-wavelength CCD image pyrometer used for the temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhi; Bai, Haicheng

    2014-02-01

    This paper develops an imaging based three-color pyrometer for the monitoring of temperature distribution in a continuous casting billet. A novel optical device, together with an embedded electronic system, is designed to sequentially collect a dark image and three thermal images with specified wavelengths on a same monochromatic charge-coupled-device (CCD). The three thermal images provide the basis for the determination of target temperature, while the dark image is used to online eliminate the dark noise of CCD with a differential method. This image pyrometer is not only independent of target emissivity but also overcomes the dissimilarity of measuring accuracy between the micro-sensors of CCD resulted from the non-uniformity of pixels' intensity response and the vignetting of optical system. Furthermore, a precise two-color temperature field measuring model on the CCD pyrometer is established, based on which a self-adaptive light-integration mechanism is presented. Compared with the traditional fixed light-integration method, the measuring range of the pyrometer is greatly extended and its sensitivity in low temperature segment is improved. The test results in a steel factory demonstrate that the pyrometer is capable of meeting the requirement of surface temperature measurements about casting billets. Reliability and accuracy of measurement results are also discussed herein.

  3. Development of three-wavelength CCD image pyrometer used for the temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhi; Bai, Haicheng

    2014-02-15

    This paper develops an imaging based three-color pyrometer for the monitoring of temperature distribution in a continuous casting billet. A novel optical device, together with an embedded electronic system, is designed to sequentially collect a dark image and three thermal images with specified wavelengths on a same monochromatic charge-coupled-device (CCD). The three thermal images provide the basis for the determination of target temperature, while the dark image is used to online eliminate the dark noise of CCD with a differential method. This image pyrometer is not only independent of target emissivity but also overcomes the dissimilarity of measuring accuracy between the micro-sensors of CCD resulted from the non-uniformity of pixels’ intensity response and the vignetting of optical system. Furthermore, a precise two-color temperature field measuring model on the CCD pyrometer is established, based on which a self-adaptive light-integration mechanism is presented. Compared with the traditional fixed light-integration method, the measuring range of the pyrometer is greatly extended and its sensitivity in low temperature segment is improved. The test results in a steel factory demonstrate that the pyrometer is capable of meeting the requirement of surface temperature measurements about casting billets. Reliability and accuracy of measurement results are also discussed herein.

  4. Absolute Calibration of the OMEGA Streaked Optical Pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, M.; Boni, R.; Sorce, A.; McCoy, C.; Henchen, R. J.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.

    2013-10-01

    High-energy-density-physics (HEDP) experiments often rely on temperature measurements using optical pyrometry. Laser-driven experiments have time scales of picoseconds, requiring the use of a streak camera as a detector. This complicates the already formidable task of absolute calibration. We report on multiple calibration runs that used a NIST-traceable tungsten-filament lamp to calibrate the optical response of the streaked optical pyrometer on OMEGA. This entailed constructing a spectral-response function from measurements and estimates of the transmissions and responses of all components in the system as well as measurements using narrowband (30-nm) optical filters. The latter is used to normalize the estimated response. The resulting response function predicts the wideband (~300-nm) response of the system to high precision. The performance of a spectral calibration device is also presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. Noncontact true temperature measurement. [of levitated sample using laser pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark C.; Allen, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A laser pyrometer has been developed for acquiring the true temperature of a levitated sample. The laser beam is first expanded to cover the entire cross-sectional surface of the target. For calibration of such a system, the reflectivity signal of an ideal 0.95 cm diameter gold-coated sphere (reflectivity = 0.99) is used as the reference for any other real targets. The emissivity of the real target can then be calculated. The overall system constant is obtained by passively measuring the radiance of a blackbody furnace (emissivity = 1.0) at a known, arbitrary temperature. Since the photo sensor used is highly linear over the entire operating temperature range, the true temperature of the target can then be computed. Preliminary results indicate that true temperatures thus obtained are in excellent correlation with thermocouple measured temperatures.

  6. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes that can identify origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, environmental habitability and biology [1]. For the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite, for example, the (sup 1)(sup 3)C/(sup 1)(sup 2)C ratio identifies it as a Mars (SNC) meteorite; the ??K/??Ar ratio tells us the last time the rock cooled to solid, namely 4 Gya; isotope ratios in (sup 3)He, (sup 2)(sup 1)Ne and (sup 3)?Ar show it was in space (cosmic ray exposure) for 10-20 million years; (sup 1)?C dating that it sat in Antarctica for 13,000 years before discovery; and clumped isotope analysis of (sup 1)?O(sup 1)(sup 3)C(sup 1)?O in its carbonate that it was formed at 18+/-4 ?C in a near-surface aqueous environment [2]. Solar System Formation

  7. CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2011-02-23

    The main function of the CO instrument is to provide continuous accurate measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratio at the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) 60-meter tower (36.607 °N, 97.489 °W, 314 meters above sea level). The essential feature of the control and data acquisition system is to record signals from a Thermo Electron 48C and periodically calibrate out zero and span drifts in the instrument using the combination of a CO scrubber and two concentrations of span gas (100 and 300 ppb CO in air). The system was deployed on May 25, 2005.

  8. Dual purpose pyrometer for temperature and solidification velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.; Robinson, M. B.

    1990-01-01

    A dual purpose pyrometer is described that allows both accurate radiance temperature measurement and fast temporal response. The system uses two silicon photodiodes with separate optical paths derived from a common spot on the sample. The optical bandwidths and response times of each detection circuit are tailored to the function of each radiometer. The radiance temperature of electromagnetically levitated metallic samples is measured over a narrow optical bandwidth with a high-gain silicon detector. The velocity of solidification of undercooled melts can be deduced from the rise time of the second silicon detector which samples a broad optical bandwidth and has a fast response time. Results from experiments on the undercooling and solidification behavior of electromagnetically levitated pure nickel show that the solidification velocity approaches 17 m/s at high undercooling.

  9. The non-source temperature calibration method of multi-spectral pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kun; Sun, Xiaogang; Dai, Jingmin; Wang, Li

    2011-11-01

    At present, Multi-spectral pyrometer (MSP) used in high-temperature measurement has already had high resolution and high signal to noise ratio. However, the non-source temperature (higher than 3000°C) calibration falls far behind the development of MSP and has already seriously hindered the precision and application range of the pyrometer. In order to break through the limitation of calibration of non-source temperature, a new calibration method has been put forward in this paper. The temperature-voltage (T-U) model is formed based on power function where output voltage U of the MSP is derived from its corresponding known temperature point. Based on the model, Derivative least square method is used to obtain the parameters of the model to realize the non-source temperature calibration. Both theoretical and experimental data have proved the efficiency and precision of the calibration method. In addition, within the spectral range of high-temperature measurement pyrometer (0.4um~1.1um), the theoretical aberration within 1800°C extrapolation range is less than 13.54°C.

  10. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  11. Hydraulic system for a ratio change transmission

    DOEpatents

    Kalns, Ilmars (Northville, MI)

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  12. High-Resolution, Two-Wavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.; Henry, Paul K.; Logiurato, D. Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Modified two-color pyrometer measures temperatures of objects with high spatial resolution. Image focused on hole 0.002 in. (0.05 mm) in diameter in brass sheet near end of bundle, causing image to be distributed so fibers covered by defocused radiation from target. Pinhole ensures radiation from only small part of target scene reaches detector, thus providing required spatial resolution. By spreading radiation over bundle, pinhole ensures entire active area of detectors utilized. Produces signal as quiet as conventional instruments but with only 1/64 input radiation.

  13. Multicolor pyrometer for materials processing in space, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, Michael; Frank, Jonathan; Beerman, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The program goals were to design, construct, and program a prototype passive imaging pyrometer capable of measuring, as accurately as possible, the temperature distribution across the surface of a moving object suspended in space.

  14. Ultraviolet photographic pyrometer used in rocket exhaust analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, B. P.

    1966-01-01

    Ultraviolet photographic pyrometer investigates the role of carbon as a thermal radiator and determines the geometry, location, and progress of afterburning phenomena in the exhaust plume of rocket engines using liquid oxygen/RP-1 as propellant.

  15. Method and Apparatus for Polaradiometric Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abtahi, Ali A. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A radiation pyrometer for measuring the true temperature of a body is provided by detecting and measuring thermal radiation from the body based on the principle that the effects of angular emission I(sub 1) and reflection I(sub 2) on the polarization states p and s of radiation are complementary such that upon detecting the combined partial polarization state components I(sub p) = I(sub 1p) + I(sub 2p) and I(sub s) = I(sub 1s) + I(sub 2s) and adjusting the intensity of the variable radiation source of the reflected radiation I(sub 2) until the combined partial radiation components I(sub p) and I(sub s) are equal, the effects of emissivity as well as diffusivity of the surface of the body are eliminated, thus obviating the need for any post processing of brightness temperature data.

  16. 75 FR 42330 - Elemental Mercury Used in Flow Meters, Natural Gas Manometers, and Pyrometers; Significant New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ...United States (Ref. 1). iii. Pyrometers containing elemental mercury. A pyrometer is an instrument that is similar to a thermometer but is typically used to measure extremely high temperatures in industrial processes such as in foundries, for pottery...

  17. The period-ratio and mass-ratio correlation in extra-solar multiple planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ing-Guey; Yeh, Li-Chin; Hung, Wen-Liang

    2015-04-01

    Employing the data from orbital periods and masses of extra-solar planets in 166 multiple planetary systems, the period ratio and mass ratio of adjacent planet pairs are studied. The correlation between the period ratio and mass ratio is confirmed, with a correlation coefficient of 0.5303 with a 99 per cent confidence interval (0.3807, 0.6528). A comparison with the distribution of synthetic samples from a Monte Carlo simulation reveals the imprint of planet-planet interactions on the formation of adjacent planet pairs in multiple planetary systems.

  18. Application of the Self Calibrating Emissivity and/or Transmissivity Independent Multiwavelength Pyrometer in an Intense Ambient Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    The NASA self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer is a recent addition to the list of pyrometers used in remote temperature measurement in research and development. The older one-color, two-color, and the disappearing filament pyrometers, as well as the multicolor and early multiwavelength pyrometers, all do not operate successfully in situations in which strong ambient radiation coexists with radiation originating from the measured surface. In such situations radiation departing from the target surface arrives at the pyrometer together with radiation coming from another source either directly or through reflection. Unlike the other pyrometers, the self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer can still calibrate itself and measure the temperatures in this adverse environment.

  19. Direct emissivity measurements on liquids and corrections to multi-color pyrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Optical pyrometry provides a means for non-contact temperature measurements whose accuracy depends on the accuracy with which specimen emittance is known. Two methods for obtaining the required emittance data are discussed in which the emittance is determined from measurements of the wavelength or polarization dependence of light emitted by the specimen. The spectral technique, multi-color pyrometry, yields apparent values for specimen emittance and temperature from emitted intensity measurements at two or more wavelengths. Emittance corrections cannot be eliminated by increasing the number of spectral intensity measurements required by an n-color pyrometer. Even if this were possible, the accuracy of temperature measurements by n-color pyrometry decreases with n such that pyrometers that require four intensity measurements would be impractical. In contrast, emittance values and corrections for one-color pyrometers can be accurately measured by the polarized light technique. The polarized light technique involves measurement of the degree of polarization for light emitted at an angle of 45 deg to the specimen normal. The reflectivities (r) for light polarized parallel (p) and normal (n) to the plane of emission are related by r(p) = r(n) squared. This leads to a simple relation between the intensity ratio for light emitted in the two polarized states and the emittance, i.e., e(n) = 2 - I(p)/I(n). The true specimen temperature is also obtained if absolute intensities are measured. Delvelopment of the polarized light technique in combination with one-color optical pyrometry is recommended to achieve accurate non-contact temperature measurements on liquids.

  20. Temperature Measurement of Ceramic Materials Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    1999-01-01

    The surface temperatures of several pure ceramic materials (alumina, beryllia, magnesia, yittria and spinel) in the shape of pellets were measured using a multiwavelength pyrometer. In one of the measurements, radiation signal collection is provided simply by an optical fiber. In the other experiments, a 4.75 inch (12 cm) parabolic mirror collects the signal for the spectrometer. Temperature measurement using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer for these ceramic materials is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which varies with both temperature and wavelength. In at least one of the materials, yittria, the detected optical emission increased as the temperature was decreased due to such emissivity variation. The reasons for such changes are not known. The multiwavelength pyrometer has demonstrated its ability to measure surface temperatures under such conditions. Platinum electrodes were embedded in the ceramic pellets for resistance measurements as the temperature changed.

  1. REMS GTS: a pyrometer for Mars ground temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    2009-07-01

    This paper proposes a set of mathematical equations for modelling the REMS GTS, a pyrometer dedicated to measure the brightness temperature of the Martian surface. The equations complete a new simplified analytical thermal model based on an energy balance theory, which considers the internal thermopile structure and operation, and the exchanged heat fluxes between detector transducer and the rest of the elements. The main advantage of this model, versus previous ones, is that it includes a direct relation between the sensor physical properties and the parameters of the model. Therefore, it is simple to establish a methodology to calibrate the system after a change or degradation in any part of the sensor. In remote or hostile applications this property is very important and necessary. The model permits to establish a practical method to identify the model constants, and a differential in-flight calibration algorithm to determine and compensate the degradation of the sensor due to the deposition of dust over the thermopile window. The main objective of this paper is to show, by using experimental data, the performance of the proposed model, analyzing its capability to measure the temperature of a target surface. It is also included a practical demonstration of the correct behaviour of the in-flight calibration algorithm.

  2. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-08-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus.

  3. Radiation temperature measurement method for semitransparent materials using one-channel infrared pyrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tairan; Liu, Jiangfan; Zong, Anzhou

    2014-10-10

    Semitransparent zinc sulfide (ZnS) crystal materials are widely used as the infrared-transmitting windows for optical instruments operating in long wavelengths. This paper describes a temperature measurement method for high-temperature ZnS materials using the one-channel optical pyrometer based on a theoretical model of radiation transfer in semitransparent plates. Numerical analyses of the radiation properties of ZnS plate are used to optimize the spectral band for the optical pyrometry. The optimized measurement spectral band is based on a trade-off between the measurement radiation intensity and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the ZnS material. The effective waveband emittance of one-dimensional (1D) ZnS plates is analyzed for various experimental conditions (temperatures, thicknesses, and direction angles) for the one-channel infrared pyrometer with the optimized measurement spectral response. The analysis can be used to improve radiation temperature measurements of semitransparent ZnS materials in applications. PMID:25322390

  4. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  5. Three-wavelength pyrometer for measuring flame temperatures.

    PubMed

    Cashdollar, K L

    1979-08-01

    This paper describes a pyrometer that measures the continuum radiation from particles in a flame or explosion at three wavelengths (0.8 microm, 0.9 microm, and 1.0 microm). The particle temperature is calculated from the radiation data using the Planck equation. Temperatures measured for coal dust explosions in a closed vessel are presented. PMID:20212715

  6. Temperature Measurement in WTE Boilers Using Suction Pyrometers

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Najafi, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE) plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR) pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty. PMID:24248279

  7. Concept of planetary gear system to control fluid mixture ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgroarty, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanical device senses and corrects for fluid flow departures from the selected flow ratio of two fluids. This system has been considered for control of rocket engine propellant mixture control but could find use wherever control of the flow ratio of any two fluids is desired.

  8. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  9. Multi-color pyrometer for materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Spencer, Mark N.; Wolk, Nancy E.; Werner, Jennifer S.; Miranda, Henry A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The design, construction and calibration of a computer-linked multicolor pyrometer is described. The device was constructed for ready adaptation to a spacecraft and for use in the control of thermal processes for manufacturing materials in space. The pyrometer actually uses only one color at a time, and is relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the heated object's emissivity because the product of the color and the temperature has been selected to be within a regime where the radiant energy emitted from the body increases very rapidly with temperature. The instrument was calibrated and shown to exceed its design goal of temperature measurements between 300 and 2000 C, and its accuracy in the face of imprecise knowledge of the hot object's emissivity was demonstrated.

  10. Use of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer in Several Elevated Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    2001-01-01

    A multiwavelength pyrometer was developed for applications unique to aerospace environments. It was shown to be a useful and versatile technique for measuring temperature, even when the emissivity is unknown. It has also been used to measure the surface temperatures of ceramic zircomia thermal barrier coatings and alumina. The close agreement between pyrometer and thin film thermocouple temperatures provided an independent check. Other applications of the multiwavelength pyrometer are simultaneous surface and bulk temperature measurements of a transparent material, and combustion gas temperature measurement using a special probe interfaced to the multiwavelength pyrometer via an optical fiber. The multiwavelength pyrometer determined temperature by transforming the radiation spectrum in a broad wavelength region to produce a straight line (in a certain spectral region), whose intercept in the vertical axis gives the temperature. Implicit in a two-color pyrometer is the assumption of wavelength independent emissivity. Though the two data points of a two-color pyrometer similarly processed would result immediately in a similar straight line to give the unknown temperature, the two-color pyrometer lacks the greater data redundancy of the multiwavelength pyrometer, which enables it to do so with improved accuracy. It also confirms that emissivity is indeed wavelength independent, as evidenced by a multitude of the data lying on a simple straight line. The multiwavelength pyrometer was also used to study the optical transmission properties of a nanostructured material from which a quadratic exponential functional frequency dependence of its spectral transmission was determined. Finally, by operating the multiwavelength pyrometer in a very wide field of view mode, the surface temperature distribution of a large hot surface was obtained through measurement of just a single radiation spectrum.

  11. Rapid exchange effects on isotope ratios in groundwater systems: 2. Flow investigation using Sr isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas M.; Depaolo, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    Sr isotope ratios were measured in groundwater, whole rock digestions, and cation exchange extracts from a clay-rich groundwater system at Ernest O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and were used to constrain flow velocities and search for preferential flow paths. In the Orinda formation siltstone, 87Sr/86Sr increases strongly over tens of meters along presumed flow paths, indicating slow groundwater flow. Dissolved Sr is close to isotopic equilibrium with the exchangeable Sr in the clays, and the observed 87Sr/86Sr increase is interpreted as a cation exchange front moving slowly through the unit combined with dissolution of minerals with relatively high 87Sr/86Sr ratios. The data are inverted using a one-dimensional transport-dissolution-exchange model; the results indicate long-term average flow velocities of less than 0.2 m/yr which are consistent with 14C measurements. The data suggest a lack of strong preferential flow paths through this unit.

  12. Video imaging system and thermal mapping of the molten hearth in an electron beam melting furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Miszkiel, M.E.; Davis, R.A.; Van Den Avyle, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    This project was initiated to develop an enhanced video imaging system for the Liquid Metal Processing Laboratory Electron Beam Melting (EB) Furnace at Sandia and to use color video images to map the temperature distribution of the surface of the molten hearth. In a series of test melts, the color output of the video image was calibrated against temperatures measured by an optical pyrometer and CCD camera viewing port above the molten pool. To prevent potential metal vapor deposition onto line-of-sight optical surfaces above the pool, argon backfill was used along with a pinhole aperture to obtain the vide image. The geometry of the optical port to the hearth set the limits for the focus lens and CCD camera`s field of view. Initial melts were completed with the pyrometer and pinhole aperture port in a fixed position. Using commercially available vacuum components, a second flange assembly was constructed to provide flexibility in choosing pyrometer target sights on the hearth and to adjust the field of view for the focus lens/CCD combination. RGB video images processed from the melts verified that red wavelength light captured with the video camera could be calibrated with the optical pyrometer target temperatures and used to generate temperature maps of the hearth surface. Two color ratio thermal mapping using red and green video images, which has theoretical advantages, was less successful due to probable camera non-linearities in the red and green image intensities.

  13. DETECTION OF LOW-MASS-RATIO STELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gullikson, Kevin; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    O- and B-type stars are often found in binary systems, but the low binary mass-ratio regime is relatively unexplored due to observational difficulties. Binary systems with low mass ratios may have formed through fragmentation of the circumstellar disk rather than molecular cloud core fragmentation. We describe a new technique sensitive to G- and K-type companions to early B stars, a mass ratio of roughly 0.1, using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra. We apply this technique to a sample of archived VLT/CRIRES observations of nearby B stars in the CO bandhead near 2300 nm. While there are no unambiguous binary detections in our sample, we identify HIP 92855 and HIP 26713 as binary candidates warranting follow-up observations. We use our non-detections to determine upper limits to the frequency of FGK stars orbiting early B-type primaries.

  14. A Time-Measurement System Based on Isotopic Ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, Duc T.; Karpius, P. J.; MacArthur, D. W.; Thron, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    A time-measurement system can be built based on the ratio of gamma-ray peak intensities from two radioactive isotopes. The ideal system would use a parent isotope with a short half-life decaying to a long half-life daughter. The activities of the parent-daughter isotopes would be measured using a gamma-ray detector system. The time can then be determined from the ratio of the activities. The best-known candidate for such a system is the {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am parent-daughter pair. However, this {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am system would require a high-purity germanium detector system and sophisticated software to separate and distinguish between the many gamma-ray peaks produced by the decays of the two isotopes. An alternate system would use two different isotopes, again one with a short half-life and one with a half-life that is long relative to the other. The pair of isotopes {sup 210}Pb and {sup 241}Am (with half-lives of 22 and 432 years, respectively) appears suitable for such a system. This time-measurement system operates by measuring the change in the ratio of the 47-keV peak of {sup 210}Pb to the 60-keV peak of {sup 241}Am. For the system to work reasonably well, the resolution of the detector would need to be such that the two gamma-ray peaks are well separated so that their peak areas can be accurately determined using a simple region-of-interest (ROI) method. A variety of detectors were tested to find a suitable system for this application. The results of these tests are presented here.

  15. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: a pyrometer for measuring ground temperature on Mars.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Zorzano, María P; Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Esteban, Blanca; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS), an instrument aboard NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor's main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment. PMID:22163405

  16. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Zorzano, María P.; Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Esteban, Blanca; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS), an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment. PMID:22163405

  17. Time Resolved Radiation Pyrometer For Transient Temperature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rav, Amit S.; Saxena, A. K.; Joshi, K. D.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2011-07-01

    The four channel radiation pyrometer has been developed and used for the measurement of transient temperature profile of copper wire of cross-section diameter 77 ?m and length 10 mm heated rapidly to plasma state by deposition of electrical energy within short duration of ˜100 ns. The heating is achieved by rapid deposition of electrical energy using 8 ?F capacitor bank charged up-to 3.8 kV. The temperature profile was determined from time resolved radiated intensities recorded for four wavelengths with a time resolution of 0.4 ns and total time duration of 4 ?s.

  18. Evaluation of Raytek infrared pyrometer for continuous propellant temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dykstra, Mark D.

    1990-01-01

    The primary purpose of this evaluation was to determine if the Raytek IR pyrometer that was installed in the 600 gallon propellant mixers could be used to provide a continuous, accurate, reliable measurement of the propellant temperature during mixing. The Raytek infrared sensor is not recommended to be used for controlling propellant temperature nor for inspection buy-off. The first part of the evaluation was to determine the accuracy of the sensor in measuring the propellant temperature. The second part was to determine the reliability of the air purge design in preventing contamination of the IR window.

  19. Evaluation and comparison of three IR detectors and three amplifier designs for a new high-speed IR pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. A.; Borror, S.; Obst, A. W.; Payton, J. R.; Seifter, A.

    2005-08-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a high-speed, four-wavelength, infrared (IR) pyrometer has been used for surface temperature measurements in shock-physics experiments for several years. The pyrometer uses solid-state detectors and a single fiber-optic cable for transmission of light from the target surface to the detectors. This instrument has recently been redesigned for an upcoming experiment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Three different IR detectors (two HgCdTe variants as well as the existing InSb chip) were compared for sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio, and bandwidth. Of major concern was detector amplifier recovery time from overload saturation. In shock-physics experiments, a short but very bright precursor frequently accompanies shock breakout (often from trapped air). This precursor can saturate the amplifier and may "swamp-out" the signal of interest before the amplifier recovers. With this in mind, we evaluated two new amplifier designs by the Perry Amplifier Company for linearity, signal-to-noise characteristics, gain, and saturation recovery time. This paper describes experimental setup for detector comparison and results obtained. Furthermore, we discuss new amplifier design and suitability for high-speed infrared pyrometry in shock physics experiments.

  20. Evaluation and comparison of three IR detectors and three amplifier designs for a new, high-speed IR pyrometer

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Young, S. Borrora, A.W. Obst, J.R. Payton, A. Seifter

    2005-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a high-speed, four-wavelength, infrared (IR) pyrometer has been used for surface temperature measurements in shock-physics experiments for several years. The pyrometer uses solid state detectors and a single fiber-optic cable for transmission of light from the target surface to the detectors. This instrument has recently been redesigned for an upcoming experiment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Three different IR detectors (two HgCdTe variants as well as the existing InSb chip) were compared for sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio, and bandwidth. Of major concern was detector amplifier recovery time from overload saturation. In shock physics experiments, a short but very bright precursor frequently accompanies shock breakout (often from trapped air). This precursor can saturate the amplifier and may ''swamp-out'' the signal of interest before the amplifier recovers. With this in mind, we evaluated two new amplifier designs by the Perry Amplifier Company for linearity, signal-to-noise characteristics, gain, and saturation recovery time. This paper describes experimental setup for detector comparison and results obtained. Furthermore, we discuss new amplifier design and suitability for highspeed infrared pyrometry in shock physics experiments.

  1. Empathizing, systemizing and finger length ratio in a Swedish sample.

    PubMed

    Von Horn, Agneta; Bäckman, Lisa; Davidsson, Thomas; Hansen, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    The Empathy- and Systemizing Quotients (EQ and SQ, respectively; Baron-Cohen, 2003) were determined in a Swedish sample consisting mainly of university undergraduates. Females had significantly higher EQ than males, who in turn scored higher on the SQ inventory. Gender explained 12-14% of the variation. Males were strikingly overrepresented in the group defined by a high SQ/low EQ profile or by a large SQ - EQ difference; females dominated among people with a low SQ/high EQ profile or by a large EQ - SQ difference. Students majoring in the natural sciences had higher SQs than psychology majors, but in both groups the gender difference in SQ and EQ was strong. For each participant a weighted composite score was generated by multivariate processing of the EQ and SQ data (Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis). These scores were associated in a sex-linked fashion to a biometric measure reflecting prenatal testosterone exposure, i.e. the ratio between index (2D)- and ring (4D) finger lengths. In males a high (female-typical) 2D:4D ratio predicted an enhanced tendency to empathize and a reduced tendency to systemize; in women, by contrast, the 2D:4D ratio was unrelated to these traits. The present research confirms earlier work of a gender difference in EQ and SQ. The difference appears robust as it appears as large in Sweden (a country with high cultural gender-equality) as in countries with considerably lower gender-equality. PMID:19392945

  2. A sensitive time-resolved radiation pyrometer for shock-temperature measurements above 1500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, Mark B.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The general design, calibration, and performance of a new high-sensitivity radiation pyrometer are described. The pyrometer can determine time-resolved temperatures (as low as 1500 K) in shocked materials by measuring the spectral radiance of light emitted from shocked solid samples in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range (0.5-1.0 micron). The high sensitivity of the radiation pyrometer is attributed to the large angular aperture (0.06 sr), the large bandwidth per channel (up to 0.1 micron), the large photodiode detection areas (1.0 sq cm), and the small number of calibrated channels (4) among which light is divided.

  3. High-resolution surface temperature measurements on rotating turbine blades with an infrared pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uguccini, O. W.; Pollack, F. G.

    1976-01-01

    A high-resolution pyrometer was developed and tested on a modified turbine engine. The pyrometer was used to obtain temperature profiles of the viewed surface of turbine blades in the engine at tip speeds up to 366 meters per second. The combination of coherent fiber optics, a silicon avalanche detector, and high-speed electronics enabled surface resolution of a spot diameter of 0.05 centimeter. The data, in the form of temperature profiles, was obtained in near real time as a hard copy output from a computer display terminal. Temperatures measured with the pyrometer and with thermocouples agreed within 2 percent at temperatures between 977 to 1144 K.

  4. Decreased serum apolipoprotein AII/AI ratio in systemic amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T.; Ozawa, T.; Gejyo, F.; Okuda, Y.; Takasugi, K.; Hotta, O.; Itoh, Y.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate if serum apolipoprotein A-I and A-II (apoAI and apoAII) concentrations change in subjects with systemic amyloidosis secondary to underlying disorders.?METHODS—Serum concentrations of apoAI and apoAII were measured in 21 multiple myeloma patients, including eight with amyloidosis; 95 rheumatoid arthritis patients, including 45 with amyloidosis; and 73 haemodialysis patients, including 32 with amyloidosis.?RESULTS—ApoAII values tended to be reduced in subjects with amyloidosis in each group, but could not effectively distinguish amyloidosis. However, apoAII/AI ratios were significantly lower in subjects with amyloidosis in all groups. The ratio of 0.2 had diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for amyloidosis; 50% and 100%, respectively, in multiple myeloma; 80% and 78%, respectively, in rheumatoid arthritis; and 46% and 90%, respectively, in patients requiring long term haemodialysis.?CONCLUSION—The apoAII/AI ratio can be a useful biochemical marker of suspect amyloidosis in patients with underlying diseases, especially those with rheumatoid arthritis.?? Keywords: amyloidosis; apolipoprotein; rheumatoid arthritis; haemodialysis PMID:9709183

  5. Characterizing the Period Ratio Distribution of Kepler Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, James L.; Ragozzine, Darin

    2016-01-01

    Many of the exoplanetary systems discovered by the Kepler space telescope demonstrate unusual properties which need to be explored in order to better understand planetary system formation and evolution. Among these interesting properties is an excess in the number of planets orbiting in resonance or near-resonance with their neighbors. The prevailing assumption in the planetary sciences community is that these are real features of the exoplanet population, but many theories developed on this assumption produce a resonance structure quite different from what we see. In our work we explore the possibility that the actual resonances may not be as we observe them, and may instead be explained by a combination of real resonance features and/or observational bias resulting from geometric effects. In particular, if the near-resonant systems have a different inclination distribution than other systems, then it is possible for them to be over or under-represented.We analyze the existing Kepler data and generate models which approximately represent the empirical period ratio distribution. The 2:1 and 3:2 just-wide-of-resonance excesses are included in the model, along with the deficit of period ratios just short of the 2:1 resonance. We test the Kepler data set against these models using the Python emcee package in order to determine the best-fit parameters for each model. We then address the inclination distribution question by generating two-planet systems with different inclination distributions for the near-resonant systems. We use the CORBITS package (https://github.com/jbrakensiek/CORBITS, Brakensiek & Ragozzine, submitted) to determine the probability of detecting both planets in transit. These tests adjust the relative sizes of the resonance excesses as well as orbital parameters (primarily inclination and nodal alignments) in order to determine which combinations of parameters would create in an observational bias resulting in the resonance excesses seen in the Kepler data.Initial results using first-approximation synthetic data show that some of the observed resonance excesses can be created in the observed data purely from geometric effects resulting from inclination varying as a function of period ratio.

  6. Multiwavelength Pyrometer Developed for Use at Elevated Temperatures in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel L.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a unique multiwavelength pyrometer for aerospace applications. It has been shown to be a useful and versatile instrument for measuring the surface temperatures of ceramic zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and alumina, even when their emissivity is unknown. The introduction of fiber optics into the pyrometer has greatly increased the ease of using this instrument. Direct comparison of measurements obtained using the pyrometer and thin film thermocouples on a sample provided independent verification of pyrometry temperature measurement. Application of the pyrometer has also included simultaneous surface and bulk temperature measurement in a transparent material, the measurement of combustion gas temperatures in the flames of an atmospheric burner, the measurement of the temperature distribution appearing on a large surface from the recording of just a single radiation spectrum emitted from this nonuniform temperature surface, and the measurement of some optical properties for special aeronautical materials-such as nanostructured layers. The multiwavelength pyrometer temperature is obtained from a radiation spectrum recorded over a broad wavelength region by transforming it into a straight line segment(s) in part or all of the spectral region. The intercept of the line segment(s) with the vertical axis at zero wavelength gives the inverse of the temperature. In a two-color pyrometer, the two data points are also amenable to this analysis to determine the unknown temperature. Implicit in a two-color pyrometer is the assumption of wavelength-independent emissivity. Its two (and minimum) pieces of data are sufficient to determine this straight line. However, a multiwavelength pyrometer not only has improved accuracy but also confirms that the wavelength-independent emissivity assumption is valid when a multitude of data points are shown to lie on a simple straight line.

  7. Spectral stray light effect on high-temperature measurements using a near-infrared multi-wavelength pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Duan, Minghao; Liu, Jiangfan; Li, Teng

    2014-11-01

    The spectral stray light is a major, non-negligible error source affecting spectral intensity measurements for optical instruments. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of spectral stray light on high-temperature measurements using a near-infrared (1.0-1.65 ?m) multi-wavelength pyrometer. The spectral stray light corrections were measured for the multi-wavelength pyrometer using a pulsed tunable laser for wavelengths from 0.41 ?m to 2.63 ?m. A matrix correction method was then used for the spectral stray light for the multi-wavelength pyrometer. The spectral response characteristics of the pyrometer were calibrated using a standard high-temperature blackbody source. The experimental results show that the spectral response characteristics are approximately identical for different calibration temperatures when the spectral stray light correction is used. The corrections for the spectral stray light significantly improve the accuracy of the multi-wavelength pyrometer at a blackbody calibration temperature which gives a simplified accurate calibration procedure, unlike the temperature calibrations for general optical pyrometers. Temperature measurement tests using a multi-wavelength pyrometer for standard high-temperature source further verified the measurement accuracy of the calibrated pyrometer which also illustrates the necessity of the spectral stray light corrections for the complex optical pyrometer and the applicability of the multi-wavelength algorithm.

  8. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly proposed for embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side ('bevel') did produce up to 3dB more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side ('slant') produced up to 2dB more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron ('notch') produced up to 2dB increase in the noise. Having internal walls ('septae') within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  9. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly found in embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side (bevel) did produce up to 3 decibels more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side (slant) produced up to 2 decibels more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron (notch) produced up to 2decibels increase in the noise. Having internal walls (septae) within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed electric propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  10. Multi-spectral pyrometer for gas turbine blade temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi

    2014-09-01

    To achieve the highest possible turbine inlet temperature requires to accurately measuring the turbine blade temperature. If the temperature of blade frequent beyond the design limits, it will seriously reduce the service life. The problem for the accuracy of the temperature measurement includes the value of the target surface emissivity is unknown and the emissivity model is variability and the thermal radiation of the high temperature environment. In this paper, the multi-spectral pyrometer is designed provided mainly for range 500-1000°, and present a model corrected in terms of the error due to the reflected radiation only base on the turbine geometry and the physical properties of the material. Under different working conditions, the method can reduce the measurement error from the reflect radiation of vanes, make measurement closer to the actual temperature of the blade and calculating the corresponding model through genetic algorithm. The experiment shows that this method has higher accuracy measurements.

  11. Extreme oxygen isotope ratios in the early Solar System.

    PubMed

    Aléon, Jérôme; Robert, François; Duprat, Jean; Derenne, Sylvie

    2005-09-15

    The origins of the building blocks of the Solar System can be studied using the isotopic composition of early planetary and meteoritic material. Oxygen isotopes in planetary materials show variations at the per cent level that are not related to the mass of the isotopes; rather, they result from the mixture of components having different nucleosynthetic or chemical origins. Isotopic variations reaching orders of magnitude in minute meteoritic grains are usually attributed to stellar nucleosynthesis before the birth of the Solar System, whereby different grains were contributed by different stars. Here we report the discovery of abundant silica-rich grains embedded in meteoritic organic matter, having the most extreme 18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios observed (both approximately 10(-1)) together with a solar silicon isotopic composition. Both O and Si isotopes indicate a single nucleosynthetic process. These compositions can be accounted for by one of two processes: a single exotic evolved star seeding the young Solar System, or irradiation of the circumsolar gas by high energy particles accelerated during an active phase of the young Sun. We favour the latter interpretation, because the observed compositions are usually not expected from nucleosynthetic processes in evolved stars, whereas they are predicted by the selective trapping of irradiation products. PMID:16163350

  12. Multiwavelength optical pyrometer for shock compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Lyzenga, G A; Ahrens, T J

    1979-11-01

    A system for measurement of the spectral radiance of materials shocked to high pressures ( approximately 100 GPa) by impact using a light gas gun is described. Thermal radiation from the sample is sampled at six wavelength bands in the visible spectrum, and each signal is separately detected by solid-state photodiodes, and recorded with a time resolution of approximately 10 ns. Interpretation of the records in terms of temperature of transparent sample materials is discussed. Results of a series of exploratory experiments with metals are also given. Shock temperatures in the range 4000-8000 K have been reliably measured. Spectral radiance and temperatures have been determined with uncertainties of 2%. PMID:18699402

  13. Use of a variable exposure photographic pyrometer to measure surface temperatures on a hemispherical-face model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.; Henley, W. C., Jr.; Snow, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a photographic pyrometer for nonintrusive measurement of high temperature surfaces in a wind tunnel test is described. The advantages of the pyrometer for measuring surfaces whose unique shape makes use of thermocouples difficult are pointed out. The use of computer operated densitometers or optical processors for the data reduction is recommended.

  14. Study on Reducing the Size-of-Source Effect of Pyrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Yuan, Z.; Hao, X.

    2011-12-01

    The size-of-source effect (SSE) is an important uncertainty source in radiation thermometry when radiation targets with different sizes are measured. In this article, a test pyrometer was established to study the way to reduce the SSE. The most dominant factors that influence the SSE, include the quality and surface condition of the objective lens, the placement and diameter of the aperture stop, and the inner baffles. Through an optimized lens and redesign of the aperture stop and baffles, the SSE of the test pyrometer is reduced to 2 × 10-4 when a 50 mm diameter radiance source with a 4 mm diameter central obscuration is used. The improvement method is applied to the primary standard pyrometer for which the SSE is reduced to less than 1 × 10-4.

  15. A preliminary industrial evaluation of the fluidic capillary pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillippi, R. M.; Negas, T.

    This paper presents results from a preliminary field evaluation of the fluidic capillary pyrometer (FCP). The device uses a viscosity and, hence, temperature-sensitive fluid resistor, or capillary tube as the sensing element in a simple fluid resistor bridge. Resultant pressure changes due to temperature (typically quite small for a gas) are then amplified to a useful level with fluidic laminar pressure amplifiers. Evaluation has shown over 2000 hours of operation, accumulated by two FCP units in a U.S. Army rotary hearth forging furnace (1200 C) with sensing probes of alumina operating on air. In addition, FCP transient response to flame light-off in a Naval steam generator is discussed. Laboratory calibrations (P-temperature) are shown to 1500 C. Finally, experimental data are given for operation in molten gray iron. Four separate immersions of a single probe for up to 6 hours of total operation have been demonstrated by using a refractory metal (molybdenum) sensing probe coated with a graded cermet-oxide ceramic coating. Nitrogen was used as the working fluid to prevent internal oxidation of the probe. Design considerations for high temperature probes are outlined and corresponding fluidic circuitry is shown.

  16. Multi-channel optical pyrometer for sub-nanosecond temperature measurements at NDCX-I/II

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Waldron, W.L.

    2011-04-13

    We present a detailed technical description of a fast multi-channel pyrometer designed for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments with intense heavy ion beams at the neutralized-drift-compression-experiment linear accelerator (NDCX-I/II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The unique features of the described instrument are its sub-nanosecond temporal resolution (100 ps rise-time) and a broad range, 1,500 K - 12,000 K of measurable brightness temperatures in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. The working scheme, calibration procedure, experimental data obtained with the pyrometer and future applications are presented.

  17. Multi-spectral pyrometer for narrow space with high ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Xiao, Yihan; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-08-01

    A fiber-optic multi-spectral pyrometer with high spatial and temporal resolution has been applied to measure temperatures of the range from 700 to 1200 K. In a narrow space, the important problems in temperature measurement include the unknown emissivity on target surface and the thermal radiation from the high ambient temperature. This paper analyzed several critical issues affecting the multi-spectral pyrometer and calculated the corresponding model through genetic algorithm. The experiment result showed that this method has high accuracy and the measurement error is 0.44 %.

  18. Infrared pyrometer for high resolution surface temperature measurements on rotating turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uguccini, O. W.

    1976-01-01

    A high resolution pyrometer was developed and used to obtain temperature profiles of rotating turbine blades at tip speeds up to 366 meters per second (1200 fps). Surface temperature variations from 920 to 1250 K (1200 to 1800 F) can be measured and variations over distances of 0.05 cm (0.020 in.) can be resolved. Temperature profiles were obtained in near real time as hard copies from a computer display terminal. Temperatures measured with the prototype pyrometer and with thermocouples agreed to within 2 percent over the temperature range from 977 to 1144 K (1300 to 1600 F).

  19. Optimization of the width of the working spectral region of a video pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    We have obtained expressions allowing us to estimate the uncertainty in measurement of the temperature by a broadband video pyrometer in the case when the known value of the spectral emissivity of the object applies to the central wavelength of the working spectral region. We show that for monitoring industrial production processes, the working spectral region of the video pyrometer in a number of cases can be broadened up to 100-400 nm, which enables a many-fold increase in its sensitivity and a faster response time.

  20. Infrared pyrometer for high resolution surface temperature measurement on rotating turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uguccini, O. W.

    1976-01-01

    A high resolution pyrometer was developed and used to obtain temperature profiles of rotating turbine blades at tip speeds up to 366 meters per second. Surface temperature variations from 920 to 1250 K can be measured and variations over distances of 0.05 cm can be resolved. Temperature profiles were obtained in near real time as hard copies from a computer display terminal. Temperatures measured with the prototype pyrometer and with thermocouples agreed to within 2 percent over the temperature range from 977 to 1144.

  1. Control system and method for a power delivery system having a continuously variable ratio transmission

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Andrew A. (1034 Hillside Ave., Madison, WI 53705)

    1984-01-01

    A control system and method for a power delivery system, such as in an automotive vehicle, having an engine coupled to a continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT). Totally independent control of engine and transmission enable the engine to precisely follow a desired operating characteristic, such as the ideal operating line for minimum fuel consumption. CVT ratio is controlled as a function of commanded power or torque and measured load, while engine fuel requirements (e.g., throttle position) are strictly a function of measured engine speed. Fuel requirements are therefore precisely adjusted in accordance with the ideal characteristic for any load placed on the engine.

  2. Control system and method for a power delivery system having a continuously variable ratio transmission

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.A.

    1984-07-10

    A control system and method for a power delivery system, such as in an automotive vehicle, having an engine coupled to a continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT). Totally independent control of engine and transmission enable the engine to precisely follow a desired operating characteristic, such as the ideal operating line for minimum fuel consumption. CVT ratio is controlled as a function of commanded power or torque and measured load, while engine fuel requirements (e.g., throttle position) are strictly a function of measured engine speed. Fuel requirements are therefore precisely adjusted in accordance with the ideal characteristic for any load placed on the engine. 4 figs.

  3. Surface heat flux data from energy balance Bowen ratio systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Coulter, R.L.

    1995-06-01

    The 350 {times} 400 km domain of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program`s Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in the southern Great Plains is equipped with 10 energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) stations at grassland sites; they measure the net radiation, ground heat flux, and temperature/humidity differences between 1.0 and 2.0 m heights. The latter differences provide estimates of the geometric Bowen ratio ({beta}), which are used to estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes. This paper addresses the problem that occurs when the value of {beta} is near {minus}1 and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the EBBR stations in collecting energy flux data at the CART site.

  4. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  5. Seven-wavelength pyrometer for determining surface temperature of ablation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, H.

    1985-01-01

    Results which were achieved by a seven-wavelength pyrometer last year are reported in this paper. These studies are directed toward the development of a method for determining the real surface temperature of thermal protection materials and for evaluating its emittance under varieties of reentry environment. A description of the data processing method and apparatus is also included.

  6. A cooled-gas pyrometer for use in hypersonic engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A cooled-gas pyrometer designed for application in a hypersonic research engine program was fabricated and tested. Design and operational considerations and calibration data are presented. The probe was tested in a rocket-engine exhaust stream operating at Mach 2 and 2300 K. Test temperature measurements agreed to within 2 percent with a radiation shielded thermocouple probe.

  7. Self-balancing line-reversal pyrometer automatically measures gas temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D.

    1967-01-01

    Automatic line-reversal pyrometer measures gas temperatures from 2900 degrees to 4500 degrees R. The self-balancing device uses the sodium D-line but replaces the two conventional manual operations of the line-reversal method and can be used by semiskilled personnel.

  8. A pyrometer for calibration traceable to a future thermodynamic temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, D.

    2013-01-01

    A radiation thermometer (pyrometer) has been built that is relatively low cost but is shown will be capable of providing calibration and industrial laboratories with National Measurement Institute primary standard levels of uncertainty traceable to the kelvin at temperatures above 1300 K following proposed changes to the mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin.

  9. Short wavelengths active bichromatic pulsed pyrometer for solids and liquids designed for measurements in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navello, L.; Lebedinsky, J.; Offret, J. P.; Serio, B.; Davin, T.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Optical passive methods for temperature measurements such as thermography or optical pyrometry are very interesting because they allow a non-intrusive measurement when the emissivity is known. The knowledge of this coefficient is critical for determining the actual temperature of a surface from the thermal radiation emitted in a wavelength band. The bichromatic pulsed pyrometer allows to overcome the knowledge of this parameter provided that precautions are taken in the choice of the values of wavelengths. When the object to be measured is placed in harsh environments, such passive optical methods are greatly disturbed by the presence of an optically absorbing medium. They are also distorted when the measured objects are located in very hot environments emitting intense disturbing radiation. In this study, we present an active bichromatic radiometric method for measuring the temperature of a surface in harsh environments. The method is based on a localized excitation by a modulated laser source in the infrared range. Detecting the temperature modulation, which is correlated with the excitation, is performed using a lock-in amplifier able to extract the signal embedded in a noise up to a million times superior. Working at short wavelengths (visible range and near infrared range) offers a large dynamic range and minimizes the error due to variations in emissivity with the wavelength. This system collects the radiation emitted by the object at a distance from a few meters up to dozens of meters depending on the configuration of the optical system. Both the principle and the design of the active bichromatic optical surface thermometer are presented and discussed. To demonstrate the method, results obtained on a molten ceramic stream are presented.

  10. A high-speed spatial (linear) scanning pyrometer: A tool for diagnostics, temperature mapping, and property determinations at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezairliyan, A.; Chang, R. F.; Foley, G. M.

    1990-01-01

    Development of a fast spatial scanning pyrometer for temperature measurements above 1500 K is described. The salient features of the pyrometer are: (1) it measures spectral radiance temperature (at 0.65 micron) at 1024 points along a straight line (25 mm long) on the target; (2) it has no moving parts and uses a self-scanning linear array of silicon photodiodes as the detector; (3) its output is recorded digitally every 1 microsec with a full-scale resolution of about 1 part in 4000, permitting performance of a complete cycle of measurements (1024 points) in about 1 ms. Operational characteristics of the pyrometer are given. Examples of measurements of the temperature along rapidly heated (resistive self-heating) specimens (rod, tube, strip) are presented. Potential use of the pyrometer in the experiments, both ground-based and in microgravity, requiring temperature mapping and property distribution of the specimen at high temperatures is discussed.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  12. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  13. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  14. Evaluation and improvement in the accuracy of a charge-coupled-device-based pyrometer for temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haicheng; Xie, Zhi; Zhang, Yuzhong; Hu, Zhenwei

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a radiometric high-temperature field measurement model based on a charge-coupled-device (CCD). According to the model, an intelligent CCD pyrometer with a digital signal processor as the core is developed and its non-uniformity correction algorithm for reducing the differences in accuracy between individual pixel sensors is established. By means of self-adaptive adjustment for the light-integration time, the dynamic range of the CCD is extended and its accuracy in low-temperature range is improved. The non-uniformity correction algorithm effectively reduces the accuracy differences between different pixel sensors. The performance of the system is evaluated through a blackbody furnace and an integrating sphere, the results of which show that the dynamic range of 400 K is obtained and the accuracy in low temperature range is increased by 7 times compared with the traditional method based on the fixed light-integration time. In addition, the differences of accuracy between the on-axis pixel and the most peripheral pixels are decreased from 19.1 K to 2.8 K. Therefore, this CCD pyrometer ensures that the measuring results of all pixels tend to be equal-accuracy distribution across the entire measuring ranges. This pyrometric system has been successfully applied to the temperature field measurements in continuous casting billets. PMID:23822369

  15. Evaluation and improvement in the accuracy of a charge-coupled-device-based pyrometer for temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Haicheng; Xie, Zhi; Zhang, Yuzhong; Hu, Zhenwei

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a radiometric high-temperature field measurement model based on a charge-coupled-device (CCD). According to the model, an intelligent CCD pyrometer with a digital signal processor as the core is developed and its non-uniformity correction algorithm for reducing the differences in accuracy between individual pixel sensors is established. By means of self-adaptive adjustment for the light-integration time, the dynamic range of the CCD is extended and its accuracy in low-temperature range is improved. The non-uniformity correction algorithm effectively reduces the accuracy differences between different pixel sensors. The performance of the system is evaluated through a blackbody furnace and an integrating sphere, the results of which show that the dynamic range of 400 K is obtained and the accuracy in low temperature range is increased by 7 times compared with the traditional method based on the fixed light-integration time. In addition, the differences of accuracy between the on-axis pixel and the most peripheral pixels are decreased from 19.1 K to 2.8 K. Therefore, this CCD pyrometer ensures that the measuring results of all pixels tend to be equal-accuracy distribution across the entire measuring ranges. This pyrometric system has been successfully applied to the temperature field measurements in continuous casting billets.

  16. Mortality, fertility, and the OY ratio in a model hunter-gatherer system.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew A

    2014-06-01

    An agent-based model (ABM) is used to explore how the ratio of old to young adults (the OY ratio) in a sample of dead individuals is related to aspects of mortality, fertility, and longevity experienced by the living population from which the sample was drawn. The ABM features representations of rules, behaviors, and constraints that affect person- and household-level decisions about marriage, reproduction, and infant mortality in hunter-gatherer systems. The demographic characteristics of the larger model system emerge through human-level interactions playing out in the context of "global" parameters that can be adjusted to produce a range of mortality and fertility conditions. Model data show a relationship between the OY ratios of living populations (the living OY ratio) and assemblages of dead individuals drawn from those populations (the dead OY ratio) that is consistent with that from empirically known ethnographic hunter-gatherer cases. The dead OY ratio is clearly related to the mean ages, mean adult mortality rates, and mean total fertility rates experienced by living populations in the model. Sample size exerts a strong effect on the accuracy with which the calculated dead OY ratio reflects the actual dead OY ratio of the complete assemblage. These results demonstrate that the dead OY ratio is a potentially useful metric for paleodemographic analysis of changes in mortality and mean age, and suggest that, in general, hunter-gatherer populations with higher mortality, higher fertility, and lower mean ages are characterized by lower dead OY ratios. PMID:24523247

  17. High-speed two-camera imaging pyrometer for mapping fireball temperatures.

    PubMed

    Densmore, John M; Homan, Barrie E; Biss, Matthew M; McNesby, Kevin L

    2011-11-20

    A high-speed imaging pyrometer was developed to investigate the behavior of flames and explosive events. The instrument consists of two monochrome high-speed Phantom v7.3 m cameras made by Vision Research Inc. arranged so that one lens assembly collects light for both cameras. The cameras are filtered at 700 or 900 nm with a 10 nm bandpass. The high irradiance produced by blackbody emission combined with variable shutter time and f-stop produces properly exposed images. The wavelengths were chosen with the expected temperatures in mind, and also to avoid any molecular or atomic gas phase emission. Temperatures measured using this pyrometer of exploded TNT charges are presented. PMID:22108886

  18. Pyrometer mount for a closed-circuit thermal medium cooled gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Raymond Joseph (Duanesburg, NY); Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence (late of Galway, NY); Burns, James Lee (Schenectady, NY); Fulton, John Robert (Clifton Park, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A steam-cooled second-stage nozzle segment has an outer band and an outer cover defining a plenum therebetween for receiving cooling steam for flow through the nozzles to the inner band and cover therefor and return flow through the nozzles. To measure the temperature of the buckets of the stage forwardly of the nozzle stage, a pyrometer boss is electron beam-welded in an opening through the outer band and TIG-welded to the outer cover plate. By machining a hole through the boss and seating a linearly extending tube in the boss, a line of sight between a pyrometer mounted on the turbine frame and the buckets is provided whereby the temperature of the buckets can be ascertained. The welding of the boss to the outer band and outer cover enables steam flow through the plenum without leakage, while providing a line of sight through the outer cover and outer band to measure bucket temperature.

  19. Direct-drive high-convergence-ratio implosion studies on the OMEGA laser system*

    E-print Network

    Direct-drive high-convergence-ratio implosion studies on the OMEGA laser system* F. J. Marshall, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 175 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 Received 18 November 1999

  20. High contrast ratio and compact-sized prism for DLP projection system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yung-Chih; Pan, Jui-Wen

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, a novel light separator with contrast ratio enhancement but maintaining the optical efficiency of the DLP projection system is proposed. The main capability of the novel light separator is to direct the uncontrolled light away from the image system. The working theorem for the novel light separator is derived as well. Uncontrolled light is kept away from the image system by a total internal reflection surface, thereby effectively improving the image quality. Compared with the conventional contrast ratio enhancement method, the FO:FO contrast ratio can be improved from 839:1 to 48250:1, the ANSI contrast ratio can be improved from 180:1 to 306:1, while the image system efficiency remains at 76.2%. PMID:25090516

  1. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test...

  2. Temporal trends in nitrogen isotope ratios of winter flounder collected from Rhode Island coastal systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (15N) were measured in muscle tissue of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA, including Narragansett Bay, Narrow River and three coastal lagoons. Fish collect...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test...

  4. Near-infrared two-color pyrometer for determining ignition temperatures of metals and metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K.; Branch, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    A two-color pyrometer has been designed, constructed, and used to measure the ignition temperatures of metals and metal alloys. Cylindrical metal and metal alloy specimens were ignited by a focused cw CO2 laser beam in a cool, static, pure oxygen environment. The pyrometer operates in the near-infrared at two narrow spectral regions, with a nominal bandwidth of 10 nm centered at 0.9051 and 1.06 micron, and has a temperature range from 1000 to 4000 K. In the present design the temperature of a spot, about 0.5 mm in diameter, can be recorded with a maximum time resolution of 25 microseconds and with an accuracy of a few percent. Results of CO2 laser ignition of cylindrical specimens of 6061 aluminum alloy and 302 SS in a pure oxygen environment were obtained from the two-color pyrometer and were compared with those obtained from a thermocouple placed inside the specimen near the laser-irradiated surface.

  5. Temperature measurement involving nanostructured thermal barrier coating using a multiwavelength pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    It has been reported that erroneous results were obtained when a conventional pyrometer was used to measure the surface temperature of turbine engine components. Temperatures discrepancies were observed in components which were identical, except that one had its measured surface covered by a nanostructured thermal barrier coating (TBC) whereas the other component's surface was not so coated. These components were placed in an identical environment, receiving identical heat fluxes. A pyrometer measured the TBC covered surface hundreds degrees lower. These coatings were about 25 (mu)m thick, consisting of hundreds of layers of finer structures. The TBC's had very low thermal conductivity, heat flux calculations indicated that the temperatures of the coated surface should exhibit much higher temperature than the uncoated surface. Because these coatings were transparent to radiation from the visible to the infrared region, the temperatures measured by the pyrometer should be the temperature of the covered surface. Turbo components' performance and service life depend critically on the temperatures that it would experience; it is therefore important to know accurately and confidently the real surface temperature. Out of these concerns, an investigation into the measurement of nanostructured material surface temperature was carried out.

  6. Two-Step Calibration of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer for High Temperature Measurement Using a Quartz Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    There is no theoretical upper temperature limit for pyrometer application in temperature measurements. NASA Glenn's multiwavelength pyrometer can make measurements over wide temperature ranges. However, the radiation spectral response of the pyrometer's detector must be calibrated before any temperature measurement is attempted, and it is recommended that calibration be done at temperatures close to those for which measurements will be made. Calibration is a determination of the constants of proportionality at all wavelengths between the detector's output (voltage) and its input signals (usually from a blackbody radiation source) in order to convert detector output into radiation intensity. To measure high temperatures, the detectors are chosen to be sensitive in the spectral range from 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers. A blackbody furnace equilibrated at around 1000 C is often used for this calibration. Though the detector may respond sensitively to short wavelengths radiation, a blackbody furnace at 1000 C emits only feebly at very short wavelengths. As a consequence, the calibration constants that result may not be the most accurate. For pyrometry calibration, a radiation source emitting strongly at the short wavelengths is preferred. We have chosen a quartz halogen lamp for this purpose.

  7. Analysis of Average Signal-to-Interference-Noise Ratio for Indoor UWB Rake Receiving System

    E-print Network

    Kim, Dong In

    Analysis of Average Signal-to-Interference-Noise Ratio for Indoor UWB Rake Receiving System Tao Jia the multiple- access performance of a time-hopping (TH) pulse position modulation (PPM) UWB system based on this framework, we can compare the performance of UWB Rake receiving system in different types of indoor wireless

  8. The Determination of Heat Capacity Ratios in a Simple Open System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Glen L.

    2007-01-01

    A virtually closed system is treated as open and compared to known results. The classic experiment of Clement and Desormes provides the conceptual framework for this open system approach in determining the molar heat capacity ratios, lambda. This alternate view, extends the theoretical treatment beyond the first law of thermodynamics for closed…

  9. A system for estimating bowen ratio And evaporation from waste lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low cost system was deployed above a swine waste lagoon to obtain estimates of Bowen ratios and characterize lagoon temperatures. The system consisted of humidity and temperature sensors and anemometers deployed above the lagoon, water temperature sensors, and a meteorological station located by t...

  10. Impedance and Scattering Variance Ratios of Complicated Wave Scattering Systems in the Low Loss Regime

    E-print Network

    Jen-Hao Yeh; Zachary Drikas; Jesus Gil Gil; Sun Hong; Biniyam T. Taddese; Edward Ott; Thomas M. Antonsen; Tim Andreadis; Steven M. Anlage

    2013-11-13

    Random matrix theory (RMT) successfully predicts universal statistical properties of complicated wave scattering systems in the semiclassical limit, while the random coupling model offers a complete statistical model with a simple additive formula in terms of impedance to combine the predictions of RMT and nonuniversal system-specific features. The statistics of measured wave properties generally have nonuniversal features. However, ratios of the variances of elements of the impedance matrix are predicted to be independent of such nonuniversal features and thus should be universal functions of the overall system loss. In contrast with impedance variance ratios, scattering variance ratios depends on nonuniversal features unless the system is in the high loss regime. In this paper, we present numerical tests of the predicted universal impedance variance ratios and show that an insufficient sample size can lead to apparent deviation from the theory, particularly in the low loss regime. Experimental tests are carried out in three two-port microwave cavities with varied loss parameters, including a novel experimental system with a superconducting microwave billiard, to test the variance-ratio predictions in the low loss time-reversal-invariant regime. It is found that the experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions to the extent permitted by the finite sample size.

  11. Application of Taguchi methods to dual mixture ratio propulsion system optimization for SSTO vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Douglas O.; Unal, Resit; Joyner, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The application of advanced technologies to future launch vehicle designs would allow the introduction of a rocket-powered, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch system early in the next century. For a selected SSTO concept, a dual mixture ratio, staged combustion cycle engine that employs a number of innovative technologies was selected as the baseline propulsion system. A series of parametric trade studies are presented to optimize both a dual mixture ratio engine and a single mixture ratio engine of similar design and technology level. The effect of varying lift-off thrust-to-weight ratio, engine mode transition Mach number, mixture ratios, area ratios, and chamber pressure values on overall vehicle weight is examined. The sensitivity of the advanced SSTO vehicle to variations in each of these parameters is presented, taking into account the interaction of each of the parameters with each other. This parametric optimization and sensitivity study employs a Taguchi design method. The Taguchi method is an efficient approach for determining near-optimum design parameters using orthogonal matrices from design of experiments (DOE) theory. Using orthogonal matrices significantly reduces the number of experimental configurations to be studied. The effectiveness and limitations of the Taguchi method for propulsion/vehicle optimization studies as compared to traditional single-variable parametric trade studies is also discussed.

  12. Development of a System to Measure Recrystallization Ratio of Plate Steel Using Laser-Based Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Y.; Yamada, H.; Hamada, N.; Lim, C. S.; Yi, J. K.; Hong, S. T.; Choi, S. G.; Oh, K. J.

    2007-03-21

    In this study, a material property measurement system of plate steel using laser-based ultrasonics has been developed. The system consists of pulsed Nd:YAG laser for ultrasonic generation, CW single frequency laser and Fabry-Perot interferometer for ultrasonic detection. The system generates and detects shear waves and precisely calculates anisotropy parameter values of shear wave velocities of test samples. At first, the relationship between anisotropy parameter and recrystallization ratio was investigated in the laboratory experiments. Quenching the test samples just after the ultrasonic measurement, recrystallization ratio values were measured by the conventional microscopic method. According to the experimental results, the anisotropy parameter values showed a good correlation with actual recrystallization ratio values. To evaluate the applicability of the system to real steel production line, the system was installed in hot rolling pilot plant of plate steel. As the results, it was demonstrated that the system could measure the recrystallization ratio using the anisotropy parameter values of shear wave velocities, even in the environment of hot rolling pilot plant.

  13. Disturbance rejection performance analyses of closed loop control systems by reference to disturbance ratio.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Baris Baykant; Deniz, Furkan Nur; Keles, Cemal; Tan, Nusret

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems by means of reference to disturbance ratio (RDR). The RDR analysis calculates the ratio of reference signal energy to disturbance signal energy at the system output and provides a quantitative evaluation of disturbance rejection performance of control systems on the bases of communication channel limitations. Essentially, RDR provides a straightforward analytical method for the comparison and improvement of implicit disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems. Theoretical analyses demonstrate us that RDR of the negative feedback closed loop control systems are determined by energy spectral density of controller transfer function. In this manner, authors derived design criteria for specifications of disturbance rejection performances of PID and fractional order PID (FOPID) controller structures. RDR spectra are calculated for investigation of frequency dependence of disturbance rejection capacity and spectral RDR analyses are carried out for PID and FOPID controllers. For the validation of theoretical results, simulation examples are presented. PMID:25311160

  14. An experimental system for spectral line ratio measurements in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Jimenez-Rey, D.; Pelaez, R.

    2008-10-15

    The chord-integrated emissions of spectral lines have been monitored in the TJ-II stellarator by using a spectral system with time and space scanning capabilities and relative calibration over the entire UV-visible spectral range. This system has been used to study the line ratio of lines of different ionization stages of carbon (C{sup 5+} 5290 A and C{sup 4+} 2271 A) for plasma diagnostic purposes. The local emissivity of these ions has been reconstructed, for quasistationary profiles, by means of the inversion Fisher method described previously. The experimental line ratio is being empirically studied and in parallel a simple spectroscopic model has been developed to account for that ratio. We are investigating whether the role played by charge exchange processes with neutrals and the existence of non-Maxwellian electrons, intrinsic to Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) heating, leave any distinguishable mark on this diagnostic method.

  15. DISK-PLANETS INTERACTIONS AND THE DIVERSITY OF PERIOD RATIOS IN KEPLER'S MULTI-PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Baruteau, Clement; Papaloizou, John C. B. E-mail: J.C.B.Papaloizou@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2013-11-20

    The Kepler mission is dramatically increasing the number of planets known in multi-planetary systems. Many adjacent planets have orbital period ratios near resonant values, with a tendency to be larger than required for exact first-order mean-motion resonances. This feature has been shown to be a natural outcome of orbital circularization of resonant planetary pairs due to star-planet tidal interactions. However, this feature holds in multi-planetary systems with periods longer than 10 days, in which tidal circularization is unlikely to provide efficient divergent evolution of the planets' orbits to explain these orbital period ratios. Gravitational interactions between planets and their parent protoplanetary disk may instead provide efficient divergent evolution. For a planet pair embedded in a disk, we show that interactions between a planet and the wake of its companion can reverse convergent migration and significantly increase the period ratio from a near-resonant value. Divergent evolution due to wake-planet interactions is particularly efficient when at least one of the planets opens a partial gap around its orbit. This mechanism could help account for the diversity of period ratios in Kepler's multiple systems from super-Earth to sub-Jovian planets with periods greater than about 10 days. Diversity is also expected for pairs of planets massive enough to merge their gap. The efficiency of wake-planet interactions is then much reduced, but convergent migration may stall with a variety of period ratios depending on the density structure in the common gap. This is illustrated for the Kepler-46 system, for which we reproduce the period ratio of Kepler-46b and c.

  16. Design and fabrication of an infrared optical pyrometer ASIC as a diagnostic for shock physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jared

    Optical pyrometry is the sensing of thermal radiation emitted from an object using a photoconductive device to convert photons into electrons, and is an important diagnostic tool in shock physics experiments. Data obtained from an optical pyrometer can be used to generate a blackbody curve of the material prior to and after being shocked by a high speed projectile. The sensing element consists of an InGaAs photodiode array, biasing circuitry, and multiple transimpedance amplifiers to boost the weak photocurrent from the noisy dark current into a signal that can eventually be digitized. Once the circuit elements have been defined, more often than not commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components are inadequate to satisfy every requirement for the diagnostic, and therefore a custom application specific design has to be considered. This thesis outlines the initial challenges with integrating the photodiode array block with multiple COTS transimpedance amplifiers onto a single chip, and offers a solution to a comparable optical pyrometer that uses the same type of photodiodes in conjunction with a re-designed transimpedance amplifier integrated onto a single chip. The final design includes a thorough analysis of the transimpedance amplifier along with modeling the circuit behavior which entails schematics, simulations, and layout. An alternative circuit is also investigated that incorporates an approach to multiplex the signals from each photodiode onto one data line and not only increases the viable real estate on the chip, but also improves the behavior of the photodiodes as they are subjected to less thermal load. The optical pyrometer application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for shock physic experiments includes a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) with a 100 k? gain operating at bandwidth of 30 MHz, and an input-referred noise RMS current of 50 nA that is capable of driving a 50 ? load.

  17. Peak-to-Average Power-Ratio Reduction Algorithms for OFDM Systems via Constellation Extension

    E-print Network

    Lu, Wu-Sheng

    Peak-to-Average Power-Ratio Reduction Algorithms for OFDM Systems via Constellation Extension Y. J in computational complexity. In [5], a constellation extension technique for PAPR reduction was proposed where in a probabilistic framework [5]-[7]. New de-randomization algorithms are proposed based on a constellation extension

  18. New Peak-to-Average Power-Ratio Reduction Algorithms for OFDM Systems Using Constellation Extension

    E-print Network

    Lu, Wu-Sheng

    New Peak-to-Average Power-Ratio Reduction Algorithms for OFDM Systems Using Constellation Extension is investigated in a probabilistic framework [5]-[7]. A new constellation extension technique for PAPR reduction constellation or by an extended point. In order to find the optimal representation of the OFDM signal, two de

  19. Bionomic Exploitation of a Ratio-Dependent Predator-Prey System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiti, Alakes; Patra, Bibek; Samanta, G. P.

    2008-01-01

    The present article deals with the problem of combined harvesting of a Michaelis-Menten-type ratio-dependent predator-prey system. The problem of determining the optimal harvest policy is solved by invoking Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. Dynamic optimization of the harvest policy is studied by taking the combined harvest effort as a dynamic…

  20. Inhibition to excitation ratio regulates visual system responses and behavior in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wanhua; McKeown, Caroline R.; Demas, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The balance of inhibitory to excitatory (I/E) synaptic inputs is thought to control information processing and behavioral output of the central nervous system. We sought to test the effects of the decreased or increased I/E ratio on visual circuit function and visually guided behavior in Xenopus tadpoles. We selectively decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission in optic tectal neurons by knocking down the ?2 subunit of the GABAA receptors (GABAAR) using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides or by expressing a peptide corresponding to an intracellular loop of the ?2 subunit, called ICL, which interferes with anchoring GABAAR at synapses. Recordings of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) and miniature excitatory PSCs (mEPSCs) showed that these treatments decreased the frequency of mIPSCs compared with control tectal neurons without affecting mEPSC frequency, resulting in an ?50% decrease in the ratio of I/E synaptic input. ICL expression and ?2-subunit knockdown also decreased the ratio of optic nerve-evoked synaptic I/E responses. We recorded visually evoked responses from optic tectal neurons, in which the synaptic I/E ratio was decreased. Decreasing the synaptic I/E ratio in tectal neurons increased the variance of first spike latency in response to full-field visual stimulation, increased recurrent activity in the tectal circuit, enlarged spatial receptive fields, and lengthened the temporal integration window. We used the benzodiazepine, diazepam (DZ), to increase inhibitory synaptic activity. DZ increased optic nerve-evoked inhibitory transmission but did not affect evoked excitatory currents, resulting in an increase in the I/E ratio of ?30%. Increasing the I/E ratio with DZ decreased the variance of first spike latency, decreased spatial receptive field size, and lengthened temporal receptive fields. Sequential recordings of spikes and excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to the same visual stimuli demonstrated that decreasing or increasing the I/E ratio disrupted input/output relations. We assessed the effect of an altered I/E ratio on a visually guided behavior that requires the optic tectum. Increasing and decreasing I/E in tectal neurons blocked the tectally mediated visual avoidance behavior. Because ICL expression, ?2-subunit knockdown, and DZ did not directly affect excitatory synaptic transmission, we interpret the results of our study as evidence that partially decreasing or increasing the ratio of I/E disrupts several measures of visual system information processing and visually guided behavior in an intact vertebrate. PMID:21795628

  1. Measurements on flame temperature and its 3D distribution in a 660 MWe arch-fired coal combustion furnace by visible image processing and verification by using an infrared pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huajian, Wang; Zhifeng, Huang; Dundun, Wang; Zixue, Luo; Yipeng, Sun; Qingyan, Fang; Chun, Lou; Huaichun, Zhou

    2009-11-01

    In order to verify the 3D temperature distribution of combustion in large-scale, coal-fired boiler furnaces visualized through a visible flame image processing system, a carefully calibrated portable flame temperature measuring system adopting the same flame image processing technique was developed, which is more convenient for industrial flame measurements. Furthermore, the temperatures and emissivities measured by the portable system were compared with the results by an infrared pyrometer which was used to measure the equivalent blackbody temperatures of the flames. The relative differences of the predicted temperatures and emissivity for a blackbody furnace by the portable system are less than 1% and 3%, respectively, showing a good accuracy for its application in the combustion industry. The equivalent blackbody temperatures deduced from the flame temperatures and emissivities measured by the portable system from 12 flame-observing ports in a 660 MWe arch-fired boiler in three horizontal sections at different elevations were compared with those measured by the infrared pyrometer. The relative differences are less than 7%, an acceptable agreement for measurements in the case of a coal-fired furnace. The cross-section-averaged temperatures deduced from the 3D temperature distribution acquired by the visualizing system were verified by those measured by the portable flame measuring system, and the two sets of results matched each other reasonably. This revealed that the coal combustion in the furnace was suffering from seriously delayed ignition of coal, leading to a lower efficiency of fuel utilization.

  2. Effects of feedstock, airflow rate, and recirculation ratio on performance of composting systems with air recirculation.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, K; Keener, H M; Akbolat, D

    2006-05-01

    The thermodynamics, kinetics, and energy use of composting systems with air recirculation were determined for feedstocks comprising paper mill sludge and biosolids. Results were developed by simulating the composting system using a two-dimensional finite difference numerical model. Incorporated into the simulation model was independent regulation of temperature and oxygen using a closed loop feedback control system with a two-stage fan setting. Results showed that at low airflows and high recirculation ratios, heat removal by the exhaust gas was insufficient to maintain set point temperatures with the result that process temperatures increased and eventually limited the reaction rate. Types of feedstock, magnitude of airflow and recirculation ratio all affected the energy use of the system. Although recirculation leads to high energy use, it can produce high quality compost by having a temperature gradient of less than 2 degrees C across the bed. PMID:15963715

  3. Remote Heat Flux Using a Self Calibration Multiwavelength Pyrometer and a Transparent Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    A self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer was used to conduct remote heat flux measurements using a transparent sapphire disk by determining the sapphire disk's front and back surface temperatures. Front surface temperature (Tfs) was obtained from detection of surface emitted radiation at long wavelengths (k = 6 gm). Back surface temperature (Tbs) was obtained from short wavelength (1 to 5 gm) radiation transmitted through the sapphire disk. The thermal conductivity of the sapphire disk and the heat transfer coefficients h, and h2 of its surfaces are determined experimentally. An analysis of the heat flux measurement is presented.

  4. Remote Heat Flux Measurement Using a Self Calibration Multiwavelength Pyrometer and a Transparent Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    A self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer was used to conduct remote heat flux measurements using a transparent sapphire disk by determining the sapphire disk's front and back surface temperatures. Front surface temperature (Tfs) was obtained from detection of surface emitted radiation at long wavelengths (lambda > 6 micrometers). Back surface temperature (Tbs) was obtained from short wavelength (1 to 5 micrometers) radiation transmitted through the sapphire disk. The thermal conductivity k of the sapphire disk and the heat transfer coefficients h(sub 1) and h(sub 2) of its surfaces are determined experimentally. An analysis of the heat flux measurement is presented.

  5. Evaluation of denitrification-nitrification biofilter systems in treating wastewater with low carbon: nitrogen ratios.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjin; Bae, Wookeun; Kim, Moonil; Kim, Jong-Oh; Chung, Jinwook

    2015-01-01

    A two-stage biological aerated/anoxic filter (BAF) system for denitrification-nitrification was developed to increase nitrogen removal in the treatment of municipal wastewater with low carbon:nitrogen (C/N) ratio [Formula: see text]. This system exhibited a high denitrification efficiency (67%), despite the low C/N ratio, and the ratio of reduced nitrate to consumed organic compounds was greater than the theoretical value due to the minimization of the conversion of organic carbon to biomass growth, the maintenance of low levels of dissolved oxygen in recycled water, and the maximization of use of organic carbon biosorbed inside biomass in the denitrification BAF. The maximum rate of nitrogen removal was achieved at a recycle ratio of 170%, and the headloss in two BAFs was maintained after a 24-h backwash. Biological nitrogen removal in a two-stage BAF system was possible in a short hydraulic retention time (1.2?h) because the maximum reaction rates of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in each column were achieved. PMID:25287910

  6. Influence of tire dynamics on slip ratio estimation of independent driving wheel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianqiu; Song, Ziyou; Wei, Yintao; Ouyang, Minggao

    2014-11-01

    The independent driving wheel system, which is composed of in-wheel permanent magnet synchronous motor(I-PMSM) and tire, is more convenient to estimate the slip ratio because the rotary speed of the rotor can be accurately measured. However, the ring speed of the tire ring doesn't equal to the rotor speed considering the tire deformation. For this reason, a deformable tire and a detailed I-PMSM are modeled by using Matlab/Simulink. Moreover, the tire/road contact interface(a slippery road) is accurately described by the non-linear relaxation length-based model and the Magic Formula pragmatic model. Based on the relatively accurate model, the error of slip ratio estimated by the rotor rotary speed is analyzed in both time and frequency domains when a quarter car is started by the I-PMSM with a definite target torque input curve. In addition, the natural frequencies(NFs) of the driving wheel system with variable parameters are illustrated to present the relationship between the slip ratio estimation error and the NF. According to this relationship, a low-pass filter, whose cut-off frequency corresponds to the NF, is proposed to eliminate the error in the estimated slip ratio. The analysis, concerning the effect of the driving wheel parameters and road conditions on slip ratio estimation, shows that the peak estimation error can be reduced up to 75% when the LPF is adopted. The robustness and effectiveness of the LPF are therefore validated. This paper builds up the deformable tire model and the detailed I-PMSM models, and analyzes the effect of the driving wheel parameters and road conditions on slip ratio estimation.

  7. Calibration of fiber-optic shock pyrometer using high-power coiled tungsten lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-06-01

    Comparison of all known calibration sources indicates that coiled standards of spectral irradiance, despite their very non-uniform brightness, are currently the best practical choice for accurate shock temperature measurements above 3000 K by optical pyrometry. We review all three documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to a coiled lamp and show that only one technique, with no fiber-optics employed, is free of major radiometric errors. We report the development of a new, accurate to 5% and precise to 1-1.5% calibration procedure for the modified Caltech 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution combined open beam and fiber-coupled instrument. A designated central area of an 0.7x demagnified image of 900 W coiled-coil lamp filament is used, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. The results of two slightly different cross-calibrations are reported and the procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of NewFocus 1801 amplified photodetectors. The most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic pyrometer using a coiled irradiance standard lamp are discussed. All these conditions are validated in actual radiometric tests and shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO.

  8. Radiation pyrometer for gas turbine blades. [in LOX turbopump engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohy, D. A.; Compton, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    A turbine blade temperature measuring system for liquid oxygen turbopumps is reported. The system includes a three mode, two-input optical signal processor, interconnecting cable, and four sensor heads. Two of the heads are aperture type, while the other two are lens type. This system is applicable to a temperature range of 1400 to 2200 F.

  9. 2000 Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, Princeton University, March 15-17, 2000 The Competitive Complexity Ratio

    E-print Network

    Stine, Robert A.

    2000 Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, Princeton University, March 15-17, 2000 The Competitive Complexity Ratio R. A. Stine and D. P. Foster1 Department of Statistics The Wharton School -- The competitive complexity ratio is the worst case ratio of the regret of a data-driven model to that obtained

  10. Between-Year Variation in Population Sex Ratio Increases with Complexity of the Breeding System in Hymenoptera.

    E-print Network

    Keller, Laurent

    between-year variation in population sex ratio, we conducted a comparative anal- ysis across 47Between-Year Variation in Population Sex Ratio Increases with Complexity of the Breeding System naturalist june 2011 Between-Year Variation in Population Sex Ratio Increases with Complexity of the Breeding

  11. Simulation of signal-to-noise ratio for the laser range-gated imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weiwei; Chen, Qianrong; Hao, Yongwang; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Wenpan

    2015-10-01

    The laser active imaging system is widely used in night vision, underwater imaging, three-dimension scene imaging and other civilian applications, and the system's detected range increase greatly comparing with the passive imaging system. In recent years, with rapid development of sensor and laser source technique, the laser range-gated imaging system is achieved based on high peak power pulsed laser and gated intensified CCD(ICCD), and it is well known for its properties such as high suppression of backscatter noise from fog and other obscurants, high resolution, long detection range and direct visualization. However, the performance of the laser range-gated imaging system is seriously affected by many factors, and the relationships between system's Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and influence factors are not further elaborated. In this paper, the simulation of SNR for the laser range-gated imaging system is studied. The principle of the laser range-gated imaging system is shown firstly, and the range equation is derived by means of deducing laser illuminating model according to the principle of laser radar and the characters of objects and the detectors. And then, the sources of noise are analyzed by accurately modeling all noise sources in the detection system, the model of SNR for laser range-gated imaging system is established. Finally, the relationships between SNR of system and influence factors such as gating time, laser pulse width and repetition frequency are discussed, and correspondingly the solutions are proposed.

  12. Estimation of Theaflavins (TF) and Thearubigins (TR) Ratio in Black Tea Liquor Using Electronic Vision System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuli, Amitava; Pal, Abhra; Ghosh, Arunangshu; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Bandhopadhyya, Rajib; Tamuly, Pradip; Gogoi, Nagen

    2011-09-01

    Quality of black tea is generally assessed using organoleptic tests by professional tea tasters. They determine the quality of black tea based on its appearance (in dry condition and during liquor formation), aroma and taste. Variation in the above parameters is actually contributed by a number of chemical compounds like, Theaflavins (TF), Thearubigins (TR), Caffeine, Linalool, Geraniol etc. Among the above, TF and TR are the most important chemical compounds, which actually contribute to the formation of taste, colour and brightness in tea liquor. Estimation of TF and TR in black tea is generally done using a spectrophotometer instrument. But, the analysis technique undergoes a rigorous and time consuming effort for sample preparation; also the operation of costly spectrophotometer requires expert manpower. To overcome above problems an Electronic Vision System based on digital image processing technique has been developed. The system is faster, low cost, repeatable and can estimate the amount of TF and TR ratio for black tea liquor with accuracy. The data analysis is done using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Multiple Discriminate Analysis (MDA). A correlation has been established between colour of tea liquor images and TF, TR ratio. This paper describes the newly developed E-Vision system, experimental methods, data analysis algorithms and finally, the performance of the E-Vision System as compared to the results of traditional spectrophotometer.

  13. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder as indicators of inputs to estuarine systems.

    PubMed

    Pruell, Richard J; Taplin, Bryan K

    2015-12-30

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several Rhode Island, USA estuarine systems. These included three coastal lagoons, an estuarine river and Narragansett Bay. The ?(13)C trends observed along transects in several systems showed isotopically depleted terrestrial signals in the upper reaches of the estuaries. Significant differences (P<0.05) in ?(15)N were observed among all estuarine systems and these differences correlated (P<0.01) with human population densities in the watersheds. Although Narragansett Bay has a strong north-south gradient in nutrient concentrations this trend was not reflected in flounder ?(15)N. The northernmost station with the highest nutrient concentrations unexpectedly had significantly lower ?(15)N values. Depleted ?(15)N values at this nutrient-rich station may indicate that concentration-dependent fractionation needs to be considered when using nitrogen isotope ratios in biota to monitor anthropogenic nitrogen inputs in systems with high nitrogen loadings. PMID:26541984

  14. The geochemical coherence of Pu and Nd and the Pu-244/U-238 ratio of the early solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Two very different sets of Pu-244/U-238 ratios have been reported for early solar system materials, one high and the other low, and this paper examines how one of these groups may yield an incorrect ratio. Recently measured partition coefficients for Pu and Sm (Jones, 1981) are used to evaluate Pu-Nd fractionation during achondrite genesis, and Pu-244/U-238 ratios of chondrites, achondrites, and Ca-Al-rich inclusions are compared and discussed. A low Pu-244/U-238 ratio is favored, and some implications of this low ratio for galactic nucleosynthesis and meteorite age dating are briefly discussed.

  15. The geochemical coherence of PU and Nd and the Pu-244/U-238 ratio of the early solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1982-10-01

    Two very different sets of Pu-244/U-238 ratios have been reported for early solar system materials, one high and the other low, and this paper examines how one of these groups may yield an incorrect ratio. Recently measured partition coefficients for Pu and Sm (Jones, 1981) are used to evaluate Pu-Nd fractionation during achondrite genesis, and Pu-244/U-238 ratios of chondrites, achondrites, and Ca-Al-rich inclusions are compared and discussed. A low Pu-244/U-238 ratio is favored, and some implications of this low ratio for galactic nucleosynthesis and meteorite age dating are briefly discussed.

  16. Decentralized PID controller for TITO systems using characteristic ratio assignment with an experimental application.

    PubMed

    Hajare, V D; Patre, B M

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a decentralized PID controller design method for two input two output (TITO) systems with time delay using characteristic ratio assignment (CRA) method. The ability of CRA method to design controller for desired transient response has been explored for TITO systems. The design methodology uses an ideal decoupler to reduce the interaction. Each decoupled subsystem is reduced to first order plus dead time (FOPDT) model to design independent diagonal controllers. Based on specified overshoot and settling time, the controller parameters are computed using CRA method. To verify performance of the proposed controller, two benchmark simulation examples are presented. To demonstrate applicability of the proposed controller, experimentation is performed on real life interacting coupled tank level system. PMID:26521724

  17. Lymph node ratio-based staging system for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Bin; Weng, Hong-Rui; Wang, Geng; Zou, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Di-Tian; Chen, Yu-Ping; Zhang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze a modified staging system utilizing lymph node ratio (LNR) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: Clinical data of 2011 patients with ESCC who underwent surgical resection alone between January 1995 and June 2010 at the Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College were reviewed. The LNR, or node ratio (Nr) was defined as the ratio of metastatic LNs ompared to the total number of resected LNs. Overall survival between groups was compared with the log-rank test. The cutoff point of LNR was established by grouping patients with 10% increment in Nr, and then combining the neighborhood survival curves using the log-rank test. A new TNrM staging system, was constructed by replacing the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) N categories with the Nr categories in the new TNM staging system. The time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the predictive performance of the seventh edition AJCC staging system and the TNrM staging system. RESULTS: The median number of resected LNs was 12 (range: 4-44), and 25% and 75% interquartile rangeswere8 and 16. Patients were classified into four Nr categories with distinctive survival differences (Nr0: LNR = 0; Nr1: 0% < LNR ? 10%; Nr2: 10% < LNR ? 20%; and Nr3: LNR > 20%). From N categories to Nr categories, 557 patients changed their LN stage. The median survival time (MST) for the four Nr categories (Nr0-Nr3) was 155.0 mo, 39.0 mo, 28.0 mo, and 19.0 mo, respectively, and the 5-year overall survival was 61.1%, 41.1%, 33.0%, and 22.9%, respectively (P < 0.001). Overall survival was significantly different for the AJCC N categories when patients were subgrouped into 15 or more vs fewer than 15 examined nodes, except for the N3 category (P = 0.292). However, overall survival was similar when the patients in all four Nr categories were subgrouped into 15 or more vs fewer than 15 nodes. Using the time-dependent receiver operating characteristic, we found that the Nr category and TNrM stage had higher accuracy in predicting survival than the AJCC N category and TNM stage. CONCLUSION: A staging system based on LNR may have better prognostic stratification of patients with ESCC than the current TNM system, especially for those undergoing limited lymphadenectomy. PMID:26139998

  18. Radiation detection method and system using the sequential probability ratio test

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Karl E. (Livermore, CA); Valentine, John D. (Redwood City, CA); Beauchamp, Brock R. (San Ramon, CA)

    2007-07-17

    A method and system using the Sequential Probability Ratio Test to enhance the detection of an elevated level of radiation, by determining whether a set of observations are consistent with a specified model within a given bounds of statistical significance. In particular, the SPRT is used in the present invention to maximize the range of detection, by providing processing mechanisms for estimating the dynamic background radiation, adjusting the models to reflect the amount of background knowledge at the current point in time, analyzing the current sample using the models to determine statistical significance, and determining when the sample has returned to the expected background conditions.

  19. A high-speed four-wavelength infrared pyrometer for low-temperature shock physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifter, A.; Boboridis, K.; Payton, J. R.; Obst, A. W.

    2005-03-01

    In addition to the standard problems associated with contactless temperature measurements, pyrometry in shock physics experiments has many additional concerns. These include background temperatures which are often higher than the substrate temperature, non-uniform sample temperature due to hotspots and ejecta, fast sample motion up to several km.s-1, fast-changing sample emissivity at shock breakout, and very short measurement times. We have designed a four channel, high speed near-infrared (NIR) pyrometer for measurements in the 400 to 1000K blackbody temperature range. The front end optics are specific to each experiment, utilizing preferably reflective optics in order to mitigate spectral dispersion. Next-generation instruments under development are also discussed.

  20. A high-speed, four-wavelength infrared pyrometer for low temperature shock physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, A.; Boboridis, K.; Payton, J. R.; Obst, A. W.

    2004-01-01

    In addition to the standard problems associated with contactless temperature measurements, pyrometry in shock physics experiments has many additional concerns. These include background temperatures which are often higher than the substrate temperature, non-uniform sample temperature due to hotspots and ejecta, fast sample motion up to several km s{sup -1}, fast-changing sample emissivity at shock breakout, and very short measurement times. We have designed a four channel, high speed near-infrared (NIR) pyrometer for measurements in the 400 to 1000K blackbody temperature regime. The front end optics are specific to each experiment, utilizing preferably reflective optics in order to mitigate spectral dispersion. Next-generation instruments under development are also discussed.

  1. [Development of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Dai, Jing-Min; Wang, Qing-Wei

    2008-11-01

    The plume temperature of a solid propellant rocket engine (SPRE) is a fundamental parameter in denoting combustion status. It is necessary to measure the temperature along both the axis and the radius of the engine. In order to measure the plume temperature distribution of a solid propellant rocket engine, the multi-spectral thermometry has been approved. Previously the pyrometer was developed in the Harbin Institute of Technology of China in 1999, which completed the measurement of SPRE plume temperature and its distribution with multi-spectral technique in aerospace model development for the first time. Following this experience, a new type of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer used in the ground experiments of SPRE plume temperature measurement was developed. The main features of the instrument include the use of a dispersing prism and a photo-diode array to cover the entire spectral band of 0.4 to 1.1 microm. The optic fibers are used in order to collect and transmit the thermal radiation fluxes. The instrument can measure simultaneously the temperature and emissivity of eight spectra for six uniformly distributed points on the target surface, which are well defined by the hole on the field stop lens. A specially designed S/H (Sample/Hold) circuit, with 48 sample and hold units that were triggered with a signal, measures the multi-spectral and multi-target outputs. It can sample 48 signals with a less than 10ns time difference which is most important for the temperature calculation. PMID:19271529

  2. Computer-controlled flow injection analysis system for on-line determination of distribution ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Nekimken, H.L.; Smith, B.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Peterson, E.J.; Jones, M.M.

    1988-07-15

    An automated flow injection analysis (FIA) system has been developed for the rapid acquisition of liquid/liquid, metal ion distribution ratios (D). The system features automatic switching between aqueous metal sample and wash solutions, on-line solvent extraction, phase separation, and the simultaneous detection of the separated phases by diode-array spectrophotometry. A comparative study of manual, single-stage liquid/liquid extractions with the flow injection system was completed by using a new extraction system UO/sub 2//sup 2 +//benzene/TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide)/HBMPPT (4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione). The batch and FIA methods yielded results generally within 5% of each other. The major differences between the two systems are that the FIA system is at least twice as fast, is less labor intensive, is more reproducible, and yields better statistics (a result of the FIA's speed and automation features). Slope analysis of the plotted data from the uranyl extraction studies indicates that the extraction complex is UO/sub 2/(BMPPT)/sub 2/(TOPO).

  3. The genetic sex-determination system predicts adult sex ratios in tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Pipoly, Ivett; Bókony, Veronika; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Donald, Paul F; Székely, Tamás; Liker, András

    2015-11-01

    The adult sex ratio (ASR) has critical effects on behaviour, ecology and population dynamics, but the causes of variation in ASRs are unclear. Here we assess whether the type of genetic sex determination influences the ASR using data from 344 species in 117 families of tetrapods. We show that taxa with female heterogamety have a significantly more male-biased ASR (proportion of males: 0.55 ± 0.01 (mean ± s.e.m.)) than taxa with male heterogamety (0.43 ± 0.01). The genetic sex-determination system explains 24% of interspecific variation in ASRs in amphibians and 36% in reptiles. We consider several genetic factors that could contribute to this pattern, including meiotic drive and sex-linked deleterious mutations, but further work is needed to quantify their effects. Regardless of the mechanism, the effects of the genetic sex-determination system on the adult sex ratio are likely to have profound effects on the demography and social behaviour of tetrapods. PMID:26444239

  4. Earliest rooting system and root : shoot ratio from a new Zosterophyllum plant.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shougang; Xue, Jinzhuang; Guo, Dali; Wang, Deming

    2010-01-01

    The enhanced chemical weathering by rooted vascular plants during the Silurian-Devonian period played a crucial role in altering global biogeochemical cycles and atmospheric environments; however, the documentation of early root morphology and physiology is scarce because the existing fossils are mostly incomplete. Here, we report an entire, uprooted specimen of a new Zosterophyllum Penhallow, named as Z. shengfengense, from the Early Devonian Xitun Formation (Lochkovian, c. 413 Myr old) of Yunnan, south China. This plant has the most ancient known record of a rooting system. The plant consists of aerial axes of 98 mm in height, showing a tufted habit, and a rhizome bearing a fibrous-like rooting system, c. 20 mm in length. The rhizome shows masses of branchings, which produce upwardly directed aerial axes and downwardly directed root-like axes. The completeness of Z. shengfengense made it possible to estimate the biomass allocation and root : shoot ratio. The root : shoot ratio of this early plant is estimated at a mean value of 0.028, and the root-like axes constitute only c. 3% of the total biomass. Zosterophyllum shengfengense was probably a semi-aquatic plant with efficient water use or a strong uptake capacity of the root-like axes. PMID:19825018

  5. Copy number ratios determined by two digital polymerase chain reaction systems in genetically modified grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Urquiza, M.; Acatzi Silva, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    Three certified reference materials produced from powdered seeds to measure the copy number ratio sequences of p35S/hmgA in maize containing MON 810 event, p35S/Le1 in soybeans containing GTS 40-3-2 event and DREB1A/acc1 in wheat were produced according to the ISO Guides 34 and 35. In this paper, we report digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) protocols, performance parameters and results of copy number ratio content of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in these materials using two new dPCR systems to detect and quantify molecular deoxyribonucleic acid: the BioMark® (Fluidigm) and the OpenArray® (Life Technologies) systems. These technologies were implemented at the National Institute of Metrology in Mexico (CENAM) and in the Reference Center for GMO Detection from the Ministry of Agriculture (CNRDOGM), respectively. The main advantage of this technique against the more-used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is that it generates an absolute number of target molecules in the sample, without reference to standards or an endogenous control, which is very useful when not much information is available for new developments or there are no standard reference materials in the market as in the wheat case presented, or when it was not possible to test the purity of seeds as in the maize case presented here. Both systems reported enhanced productivity, increased reliability and reduced instrument footprint. In this paper, the performance parameters and uncertainty of measurement obtained with both systems are presented and compared.

  6. Performance and limits of liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for halogenated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilevska, Tetyana; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) has been an important step for the assessment of the origin and fate of compounds in environmental science.[1] Biologically or pharmaceutically important compounds often are not amenable for gas chromatographic separation because of high polarity and lacking volatility, thermostability. In 2004 liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) became commercially available. LC-IRMS system intent a quantitative conversion of analytes separation into CO2 via wet oxidation with sodium persulfate in the presence of phosphoric acid while analytes are still dissolved in the aqueous liquid phase.[2] The aim of this study is to analyze the oxidation capacity of the interface of the LC-IRMS system and determine which parameters could improve oxidation of compounds which are resistant to persulfate oxidation. Oxidation capacity of the liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry system was tested with halogenated acetic acid and a set of aromatic compounds with different substitutes. Acetic acid (AA) was taken as a model compound for complete oxidation and compared to the oxidation of other analytes on a molar basis. Correct values were obtained for di- and mono chlorinated and fluorinated and also for tribrominated acetic acid and for all studied aromatic compounds. Incomplete oxidation for trichloroacetic (TCAA) and trifluoroacetic (TFAA) acid was revealed with lower recovery compared to acetic acid and isotope fractionation leading to depleted carbon isotope composition compared to values obtained with an elementary analyzer connected to an isotope mass spectrometer Several optimization steps were tried in order to improve the oxidation of TCAA and TFAA: (i) increasing the concentration of the oxidizing agent, (ii) variation of flow rate of the oxidizing and acid solution, (iii) variation of flow rate of liquid chromatography pump (iv) addition of a catalyzer. These modifications lead to longer reaction time in the coil and increase in the concentration of radical but complete combustion of highly chlorinated or fluorinated compounds was not achieved. Due to these findings the limit for a LC-IRMS system for similar structure compounds can be predicted. 1. Elsner, M., et al., Current challenges in compound-specific stable isotope analysis of environmental organic contaminants. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2012. 403(9): p. 2471-2491. 2. Krummen, M., et al., A new concept for isotope ratio monitoring liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 2004. 18(19): p. 2260-2266.

  7. Measurement of the radial temperature distribution of the heated spot produced by a focused laser beam using an optical pyrometer.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, L J; Zobrist, S P

    1981-05-15

    A method is described for the evaluation of the Gaussian curve parameters needed for the description of the temperature distribution of the heated spot produced on a target substrate by a well-focused laser beam, using an optical pyrometer to read the weighted average temperatures from two distinct distances. The parameter so found gave a calculated distribution curve in excellent agreement with experimental determinations of that distribution. PMID:20332849

  8. A gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for high-precision dD measurements

    E-print Network

    Fischer, Hubertus

    A gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for high-precision d we present a highly automated, high-precision online gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio from ice, preconcentration, gas chromatographic separation and pyrolysis of CH4 from roughly 500 g

  9. DEEP, LOW MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XI. V1191 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L. Y.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Liu, L.

    2011-10-15

    Complete CCD photometric light curves in BV(RI){sub c} bands obtained on one night in 2009 for the short-period close-binary system V1191 Cygni are presented. A new photometric analysis with the 2003 version of the Wilson-Van Hamme code shows that V1191 Cyg is a W-type overcontact binary system and suggests that it has a high degree of overcontact (f = 68.6%) with very low mass ratio, implying that it is at the late stage of overcontact evolution. The absolute parameters of V1191 Cyg are derived using spectroscopic and photometric solutions. Combining new determined times of light minimum with others published in the literature, the period change of the binary star is investigated. A periodic variation, with a period of 26.7 years and an amplitude of 0.023 days, was discovered to be superimposed on a long-term period increase (dP/dt = +4.5({+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}). The cyclic period oscillation may be caused by the magnetic activity cycles of either of the components or the light-time effect due to the presence of a third body with a mass of m{sub 3} = 0.77 M{sub sun} and an orbital radius of a{sub 3} = 7.6 AU, when this body is coplanar to the orbit of the eclipsing pair. The secular orbital period increase can be interpreted as a mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With the period increases, V1191 Cyg will evolve from its present low mass ratio, high filled overcontact state to a rapidly rotating single star when its orbital angular momentum is less than three times the total spin angular momentum. V1191 Cyg is too blue for its orbital period and it is an unusual W-type overcontact system with such a low mass ratio and high fill-out overcontact configuration, which is worth monitoring continuously in the future.

  10. Deep, Low Mass Ratio Overcontact Binary Systems. XIV. A Statistical Analysis of 46 Sample Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Gui; Qian, Sheng-Bang

    2015-09-01

    A sample of 46 deep, low mass ratio (DLMR) overcontact binaries (i.e., q?slant 0.25 and f?slant 50%) is statistically analyzed in this paper. It is found that five relations possibly exist among some physical parameters. The primary components are little-evolved main sequence stars that lie between the zero-age main sequence line and the terminal-age main sequence (TAMS) line. Meanwhile, the secondary components may be evolved stars above the TAMS line. The super-luminosities and large radii may result from energy transfer, which causes their volumes to expand. The equations of M–L and M–R for the components are also determined. The relation of P–Mtotal implies that mass may escape from the central system when the orbital period decreases. The minimum mass ratio may preliminarily be {q}{min}=0.044(+/- 0.007) from the relations of q–f and q–Jspin/Jorb. With mass and angular momentum loss, the orbital period decreases, which finally causes this kind of DLMR overcontact binary to merge into a rapid-rotating single star.

  11. A study on the optimal hydraulic loading rate and plant ratios in recirculation aquaponic system.

    PubMed

    Endut, Azizah; Jusoh, A; Ali, N; Wan Nik, W B; Hassan, A

    2010-03-01

    The growths of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were evaluated in recirculation aquaponic system (RAS). Fish production performance, plant growth and nutrient removal were measured and their dependence on hydraulic loading rate (HLR) was assessed. Fish production did not differ significantly between hydraulic loading rates. In contrast to the fish production, the water spinach yield was significantly higher in the lower hydraulic loading rate. Fish production, plant growth and percentage nutrient removal were highest at hydraulic loading rate of 1.28 m/day. The ratio of fish to plant production has been calculated to balance nutrient generation from fish with nutrient removal by plants and the optimum ratio was 15-42 gram of fish feed/m(2) of plant growing area. Each unit in RAS was evaluated in terms of oxygen demand. Using specified feeding regime, mass balance equations were applied to quantify the waste discharges from rearing tanks and treatment units. The waste discharged was found to be strongly dependent on hydraulic loading rate. PMID:19819130

  12. Reliability analysis of a passive cooling system using a response surface with an application to the Flexible Conversion Ratio Reactor

    E-print Network

    Fong, Christopher J. (Christopher Joseph)

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive risk-informed methodology for passive safety system design and performance assessment is presented and demonstrated on the Flexible Conversion Ratio Reactor (FCRR). First, the methodology provides a framework ...

  13. Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder as an Indicator of Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs to Estuarine Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (?15N) were measured in muscle tissue of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems (lagoons, river, bay) along the coast of Rhode Island, USA over a three-year period. Significant differences i...

  14. Signal to noise ratio of energy selective x-ray photon counting systems with pileup

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To derive fundamental limits on the effect of pulse pileup and quantum noise in photon counting detectors on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and noise variance of energy selective x-ray imaging systems. Methods: An idealized model of the response of counting detectors to pulse pileup is used. The model assumes a nonparalyzable response and delta function pulse shape. The model is used to derive analytical formulas for the noise and energy spectrum of the recorded photons with pulse pileup. These formulas are first verified with a Monte Carlo simulation. They are then used with a method introduced in a previous paper [R. E. Alvarez, “Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors,” Med. Phys. 37, 822–841 (2010)] to compare the signal to noise ratio with pileup to the ideal SNR with perfect energy resolution. Detectors studied include photon counting detectors with pulse height analysis (PHA), detectors that simultaneously measure the number of photons and the integrated energy (NQ detector), and conventional energy integrating and photon counting detectors. The increase in the A-vector variance with dead time is also computed and compared to the Monte Carlo results. A formula for the covariance of the NQ detector is developed. The validity of the constant covariance approximation to the Cramèr–Rao lower bound (CRLB) for larger counts is tested. Results: The SNR becomes smaller than the conventional energy integrating detector (Q) SNR for 0.52, 0.65, and 0.78 expected number photons per dead time for counting (N), two, and four bin PHA detectors, respectively. The NQ detector SNR is always larger than the N and Q SNR but only marginally so for larger dead times. Its noise variance increases by a factor of approximately 3 and 5 for the A1 and A2 components as the dead time parameter increases from 0 to 0.8 photons per dead time. With four bin PHA data, the increase in variance is approximately 2 and 4 times. The constant covariance approximation to the CRLB is valid for larger counts such as those used in medical imaging. Conclusions: The SNR decreases rapidly as dead time increases. This decrease places stringent limits on allowable dead times with the high count rates required for medical imaging systems. The probability distribution of the idealized data with pileup is shown to be accurately described as a multivariate normal for expected counts greater than those typically utilized in medical imaging systems. The constant covariance approximation to the CRLB is also shown to be valid in this case. A new formula for the covariance of the NQ detector with pileup is derived and validated. PMID:25370642

  15. Signal-to-noise ratio performance for detection systems of quantum dot multiplexed optical encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, K. C.; Potter, M. E.; Messier, G. G.

    2010-06-01

    The wavelength and intensity of the spectral emission of a group of quantum dots can be altered by varying the size of the quantum dots (wavelength) and the number of the quantum dots (intensity). In this way, information and be encoded into the spectral characteristics of the group of quantum dots emission. This approach has been proposed for the application of tagging thousands of biomolecules as well as replacing barcodes as a means to identify objects. The potential in this system rests in the ability to achieve a high information density. In this paper we model and measure the noise in the readout system that will contribute to the decrease of the information density. We also propose an alternate optical detector as a possibly simpler and cheaper design. Our results demonstrate that the signal-to-noise ratio for both the CCD and photodiode detectors has a linear relationship with time. To achieve comparable SNR, approximately 30dB, in both detectors we note that the CCD-based spectrometer requires integration times on the order of hundreds of milliseconds while the photodiode only requires tens of microseconds.

  16. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jinzhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-05-15

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 M?, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 K?. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  17. Associations between Optic Cup-to-disc Ratio and Systemic Factors in the Healthy Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yang Jae; Shim, Seong Hee; Bae, Jeong Hun; Park, Ki Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the relationships between optic cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) and age, sex, and other demographic and health characteristics in the healthy Korean population. Methods The study design was retrospective and population-based. A total of 28,377 subjects who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2008 and 2011 were enrolled in this study. Participants underwent structured interviews as well as systemic and ophthalmic examinations. Patients with glaucoma who were diagnosed using the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology classification were excluded. Changes in vertical CDR were examined by age in relation to systemic variables on multiple regression analysis. Results The mean vertical CDR was 0.34 ± 0.12. The vertical CDR increased with age from subjects in their 20s to those in their 80s (p < 0.001). The mean CDR in males was significantly higher than that of females (p < 0.001). On multiple regression analysis, the vertical CDR was positively associated with age (p < 0.001), male sex (p < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.009), and intraocular pressure (p < 0.001) but was negatively associated with body mass index (p < 0.001). Conclusions Greater vertical CDR was related to age, male sex, higher diastolic blood pressure, higher intraocular pressure, and lower body mass index in healthy Koreans. PMID:26457040

  18. A Toy Model for Testing Finite Element Methods to Simulate Extreme-Mass-Ratio Binary Systems

    E-print Network

    Carlos F. Sopuerta; Pengtao Sun; Pablo Laguna; Jinchao Xu

    2006-01-19

    Extreme mass ratio binary systems, binaries involving stellar mass objects orbiting massive black holes, are considered to be a primary source of gravitational radiation to be detected by the space-based interferometer LISA. The numerical modelling of these binary systems is extremely challenging because the scales involved expand over several orders of magnitude. One needs to handle large wavelength scales comparable to the size of the massive black hole and, at the same time, to resolve the scales in the vicinity of the small companion where radiation reaction effects play a crucial role. Adaptive finite element methods, in which quantitative control of errors is achieved automatically by finite element mesh adaptivity based on posteriori error estimation, are a natural choice that has great potential for achieving the high level of adaptivity required in these simulations. To demonstrate this, we present the results of simulations of a toy model, consisting of a point-like source orbiting a black hole under the action of a scalar gravitational field.

  19. Neutrophil lymphocyte ratio as a measure of systemic inflammation in prevalent chronic diseases in Asian population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Preliminary evidence has suggested the role of inflammation in development and prognosis of cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Most of the prognostic studies failed to account for the effects of co-morbid conditions as these might have raised the systemic inflammation. We used neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as a measure of systemic inflammation and investigated its association with prevalent chronic conditions. Methods Present study is a cross sectional study conducted on population of Karachi, Pakistan. A detailed questionnaire about the demographic details of all subjects was filled and an informed consent obtained for blood sampling. Multinomial regression analyses were carried out to investigate the relationship between NLR and prevalent chronic conditions. Results 1070 apparently healthy individuals participated in the study. Proportion of individuals with hypertension was higher in middle and highest tertile of NLR as compared to the lowest tertile (18.2% & 16.1% compared to 11.8%). Individuals with hypertension were 43% (RRR = 1.43, 95% CI 0.94-2.20) and 66% (RRR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.09-2.54) more likely to be in the middle and highest tertile of NLR respectively compared to the baseline group. Similarly, individuals with diabetes mellitus were 53% (RRR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.93-2.51) and 65% (RRR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.01-2.71) more likely to be in the middle or highest tertile of NLR as compared to the baseline NLR group. Conclusions Systemic inflammation measured by NLR has a significant association with prevalent chronic conditions. Future research is needed to investigate this relationship with longitudinal data to establish the temporal association between these variables. PMID:22281066

  20. Performance evaluation of optically-preamplified hybrid QPSK M-ary PPM systems with finite extinction ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolsi, Taha; Hassan, Mohamed S.; Elrefaie, Aly F.; Hamid, Sanaa

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of finite extinction ratios on the error performance of optically-preamplified homodyne hybrid PDM-QPSK M-ary PPM (PQ-mPPM) systems. The study is carried for symbol sizes M ? { 2, 4, …, 1024 } and extinction ratios r ? { 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 }dB for probabilities of bit error down to Pb =3-9 , which covers systems with or without forward error correction (FEC). We demonstrate that the probability of slot correct location within a symbol in a PQ-mPPM homodyne system with finite extinction ratios is equal to the probability of symbol correct detection in a direct-detection system with dual polarized noise, with the same extinction ratio and symbol size M. This result is leveraged to compute the probabilities of bit error for the homodyne system using an accurate numerical approach. We show that when the extinction ratio is finite, the probability of slot correct location is decreased which not only increases the probability of bit error in the PPM demodulator subsystem but also leads to an increased probability of bit error in the QPSK demodulator. This results in a situation where systems with higher values of M lose their advantage. For example, at Pb =10-4 , M = 128 and M = 16 require the least signal to noise ratio for the case of r = 30 dB and 20 dB, respectively. The power penalty due to a finite extinction ratio depends on the symbol size M. For instance, at Pb =10-9 , M = 1024, and r = 20 dB, the penalty is ? = 10.6dB . It increases drastically to 22.1 dB for r = 10 dB. For M = 16, it is 0.6 dB and 5 dB for r = 20 dB and r = 10 dB, respectively.

  1. A synthetic sex ratio distortion system for the control of the human malaria mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Galizi, Roberto; Doyle, Lindsey A.; Menichelli, Miriam; Bernardini, Federica; Deredec, Anne; Burt, Austin; Stoddard, Barry L.; Windbichler, Nikolai; Crisanti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    It has been theorized that inducing extreme reproductive sex ratios could be a method to suppress or eliminate pest populations. Limited knowledge about the genetic makeup and mode of action of naturally occurring sex distorters and the prevalence of co-evolving suppressors has hampered their use for control. Here we generate a synthetic sex distortion system by exploiting the specificity of the homing endonuclease I-PpoI, which is able to selectively cleave ribosomal gene sequences of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae that are located exclusively on the mosquito’s X chromosome. We combine structure-based protein engineering and molecular genetics to restrict the activity of the potentially toxic endonuclease to spermatogenesis. Shredding of the paternal X chromosome prevents it from being transmitted to the next generation, resulting in fully fertile mosquito strains that produce >95% male offspring. We demonstrate that distorter male mosquitoes can efficiently suppress caged wild-type mosquito populations, providing the foundation for a new class of genetic vector control strategies. PMID:24915045

  2. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  3. Automatic Calibration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, A. T.; Edwards, S. F.; Stewart, W. F.; Mason, D. R. J.; Finley, T. D.; Williams, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    A continuous requirement exists for calibration and environmental testing of instruments in use at multitude of test facilities at Langley Research Center. Brief summarizes several automated systems available for calibration of research instruments to include: six-component balance, multimeter, amplifier, pyrometer, voltage-controlled oscillator, pressure transducer and accelerometer.

  4. An application of the emissive layer technique to temperature measurements by infrared optical pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, Camille; Petit, Jacques; Sinatti, Frédéric; CEA Gramat Team

    2011-06-01

    A reliable measurement of the temperature of a material under dynamic loading is fundamental to differentiate its EOS. This aim is difficult to reach for temperatures lower than 1000 K due to the low amplitude of the radiated energy. A pyrometer has been developed at CEA Gramat to detect temperature from 373 K with a response time of 70 ns. An important parameter governing the material temperature estimation from the radiance measurements between the material and a LiF window is the evaluation of the dynamic emissivity. A way to overcome the lack of knowledge of emissivity consists in artificially increasing the emissivity of the material up to an apparent value of approximately 0.8 by the use of an emissive layer. The detected radiance is amplified and the range of dynamic emissivity is restricted. Promising results at material and LiF interface with an emissive layer of ReSi2 indicate that the mechanical, thermal and optical properties of this layer can be estimated and the sample temperature can be deduced. This paper investigates different parameters (roughness) potentially influencing the measured radiances at this complex interface.

  5. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen irradiance standard lamp.

  6. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp.

    PubMed

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30?000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen irradiance standard lamp. PMID:26520933

  7. DEEP, LOW MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. IX. V345 GEMINORUM WITH A BRIGHT VISUAL PAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhu, L.-Y.; He, J.-J.

    2009-08-15

    CCD photometric observations of the visual binary, V345 Geminorum, obtained from 2007 January 24 to 2009 March 22, are presented. When comparing the light curves in 2007 and 2008, it is found that there appears to be an O'Connell effect in the light curves of 2008. From those observations, two sets of photometric solutions were deduced using the 2003 version of the W-D program. The results indicated that V345 Gem is a low mass ratio overcontact binary with f = 72.9%({+-}3.1%). The asymmetric light curves in 2008 may be attributed to the activity of starspot, whose area is up to 1.55% of the area of the more massive component. The contributions of the third light to the total light are approximately 20% in the BVR bands. The absolute physical parameters for V345 Gem were obtained first. From the log L-log M diagram of the binary-star evolution, the primary component is an evolved star. From the O-C curve for V345 Gem, it is discovered that there exists a long-term period increase with a cyclic variation. The period and amplitude of the cyclic variation are P {sub 3} = 646.7({+-}0.7) day and A = 0fd0019({+-}0fd0002), which may be caused by the light-time effect via the assumed third body. If it is true, the visual binary V345 Gem may be a quadruple star. The kind of additional component may remove angular momentum from the central system, which may play an important role for the formation and evolution of the binary. The secular period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +5.88 x 10{sup -8} d yr{sup -1}, indicating that the mass transfers from the less massive component to the more massive component. With mass transferring, the orbital angular momentum decreases while the spin angular momentum increases. When J {sub spin}/J {sub orb} > 1/3, this kind of deep, low mass ratio overcontact binary with secular period increase may evolve into a rapid-rotating single star.

  8. Temperature Measurement of a Miniature Ceramic Heater in the Presence of an Extended Interfering Background Radiation Source Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Temperature measurement of small (millimeter size) objects is generally difficult and demanding. Measurement involving ceramic materials using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which may vary with both temperature and wavelength. Pyrometry applications in an environment with an interfering radiation source of extended dimension adds extra complexity to the process. We show that the multiwavelength pyrometer successfully measured the temperatures of a millimeter (mm) size ceramic heater under these demanding conditions.

  9. Distribution of local void ratio in porous media systems from 3D X-ray microtomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Raoush, R.; Alshibli, K.A.

    2008-09-04

    We present in this paper a methodology to calculate the distribution of local void ratio in porous media systems from high-resolution three-dimensional images. We introduce an algorithm to calculate the distribution of local void ratio from 3D images based on distance and watershed transforms. The watershed transform is used to segment touched or overlapped particles in an efficient way and the distance transform is used to calculate the boundaries of local void regions. The algorithm is validated using computer simulated 3D images of regular packing, irregular (non-spherical particles) packing, and random uniform spherical packing. Results show that the algorithm is robust, accurate and can be used to calculate local void ratio distribution of 3D systems regardless of irregularity in shapes, sizes, or arrangement of particles. X-ray microtomography images of different glass bead systems are used to calculate distributions of local void ratio. Parameters of distributions are function of porosity and particle-size distribution. The maximum local void ratio in each system is less than 3.0 and the minimum is greater than 0.2.

  10. Design of passive decay heat removal system for the lead cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor

    E-print Network

    Whitman, Joshua (Joshua J.)

    2007-01-01

    The lead-cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor shows many benefits over other fast-reactor designs; however, the higher power rating and denser primary coolant present difficulties for the design of a passive decay ...

  11. Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in systemic lupus erythematosus disease: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lixiu; Xia, Yuncheng; Chen, Chunmei; Cheng, Ping; Peng, Canhui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease. Lupus nephritis (LN) is an important cause of morbidity and even mortality in patients with SLE. Some evidences suggest that neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) associated with different inflammatory malignancies, ischemic injury and cardiovascular disease. Few scholars have investigated the relationship between NLR and SLE. This study aims to evaluate the role of NLR in SLE without nephritis and LN patients. Methods: A total of 228 subjects were participated in this study. 79 diagnosed with SLE in patients group and 149 healthy age-and sex-matched in control group. In patient team, 20 of them were diagnosed with LN. Results: The SLE without nephritis group showed significantly higher NLR than control group (control=2.00±0.76, SLE=4.26±3.38, P<0.001), and the NLR values of the patients with LN were higher than those of the patients without LN (SLE=4.26±3.38, LN=7.21±6.01, P<0.001). Receiver-operating characteristics analysis (ROC) of NLR to predict SLE showed that the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.757. The cutoff value using the ROC curve was 3.13 (sensitivity, 0.574; specificity, 0.926; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.668-0.845; P<0.001). While ROC analysis of NLR to predict LN showed that the AUC was 0.828). Logistic regression analysis showed that SLE without nephritis and LN were independently related to NLR. Conclusion: NLR is independently associated with SLE, and it may be a promising marker that reflects renal involvement in patients with SLE. PMID:26379900

  12. Chondrites - Initial strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios and the early history of the solar system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.; Mark, R.; Lee-Hu, C.

    1973-01-01

    A sodium-poor, calcium-rich inclusion in the carbonaceous chondrite Allende had a Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio at the time of its formation of 0.69880, as low a value as that found in any other meteorite. The higher Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios found in ordinary chondrites indicate that their formation or isotopic equilibration occurred tens of millions of years later.

  13. Primary Radiometry for the mise-en-pratique: The Laser-Based Radiance Method Applied to a Pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.; Bourson, F.; Rougi, B.; Rihan, A.; Zondy, J.-J.

    2011-12-01

    A new setup has been implemented at LCM-LNE-CNAM for the determination "of the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers for the determination" of the thermodynamic temperature of high-temperature blackbodies at the temperature of a metal-carbon eutectic phase transition. In this new setup, an innovative acoustic-optic modulator feedback loop is used to stabilize the radiance of a wavelength tunable laser. The effect of residual optical interferences on the calibration of a test pyrometer is analyzed. The full uncertainty budget is presented.

  14. An electrically tunable optical zoom system using two composite liquid crystal lenses with a large zoom ratio.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Ming-Syuan; Lin, Hung-Chun

    2011-02-28

    An electrically tunable-focusing optical zoom system using two composite LC lenses with a large zoom ratio is demonstrated. The optical principle is investigated. To enhance the electrically tunable focusing range of the negative lens power of the LC lens for a large zoom ratio, we adopted two composite LC lenses. Each composite LC lens consists of a sub-LC lens and a planar polymeric lens. The zoom ratio of the optical zooming system reaches ~7.9:1 and the object can be zoomed in or zoomed out continuously at the objective distance of infinity to 10 cm. The potential applications are cell phones, cameras, telescope and pico projectors. PMID:21369302

  15. Flux ratio anomalies in gravitationally lensed quasars with four images: Chandra observations of 4 new systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechter, Paul

    2006-09-01

    We propose to observe four quasars lensed by intervening galaxies for a total of 55 ksec. Each quasar has four images. Comparison of the X-ray flux ratios with the corresponding optical ratios constrains the relative sizes of the two emitting regions. Comparison with predictions from smooth lens models constrains the lenses' dark matter content. There is growing evidence that the flux ratio ``anomalies'' -- the differences between the observed fluxes and those predicted by smooth models -- are yet larger in X-rays than in the optical. The implications are first, that the optical comes from a substantially larger region than predicted by Shakura-Sunyaev disks models, and second, that X-ray observations give a better handle on the dark matter content than optical observations.

  16. Fibrinogen and the albumin-globulin ratio in essential hypertension: relations to plasma renin system activity.

    PubMed

    Allikmets, K; Parik, T; Teesalu, R

    1996-02-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the blood albumin-globulin ratio and fibrinogen levels in untreated patients with essential hypertension according to their renin profile, and to investigate the relationship between these hemorheologic variables and metabolic cardiovascular risk factors. Patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension (n = 36, DBP = 95-115 mm Hg) were studied. Normotensive, age and sex matched volunteers (n = 19) served as controls. Assessment of plasma renin activity (PRA) related to concurrent 24 h sodium excretion was used to define patients with high (n = 12), medium (n = 16) and low renin profile (n = 8). Plasma fibrinogen levels and the albumin-globulin ratio (A-G ratio) were determined. The A-G ratio was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the high PRA group compared to the low renin group or the controls. The A-G ratio was significantly negatively related to PRA (r = -0.348; P = 0.043) and serum C-peptide (r = -0.395; P = 0.017). Fibrinogen levels were lower (P < 0.05) in the controls when compared to high and medium PRA group. Fibrinogen was associated with total cholesterol (r = 0.479; P = 0.037), HDL cholesterol (r = -0.467; P = 0.028), plasma triglycerides (r = 0.414; P = 0.012) and fasting plasma glucose level (r = 0.358; P = 0.032). In conclusion, essential hypertensive patients with high PRA display more pronounced alterations in blood proteins, particularly in the decrease of the A-G ratio than patients with low PRA. This may be one additional factor accounting for the higher incidence of cardiovascular disease previously reported in high PRA group. PMID:8867564

  17. Lipoxin A4 and Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio: A Possible Indicator in Achieved Systemic Risk Factors for Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Do?an, Burak; Fento?lu, Özlem; K?rz?o?lu, Fatma Ye?im; Kemer, Esra Sinem; Köro?lu, Banu Kale; Aksu, O?uzhan; Çarsancakl?, Süleyman Akif; Orhan, Hikmet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and neutrophil/lymphocyte (Ne/Ly) ratio in individuals with achieved systemic risk factors for periodontitis. Material/Methods One hundred and eighty volunteers (69 male, 111 female) who were categorized as systemically healthy control, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obese and menopause were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic characteristics and oral health behaviors were recorded via questionnaire. Clinical periodontal parameters, including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), sulcus bleeding index (SBI) and decayed, missing, and filled teeth index (DMFT), were assessed. Systemic parameters and LXA4 levels were evaluated in serum samples. Results Clinical periodontal parameters and DMFT were higher in subjects with achieved systemic risk factors than in healthy subjects. The systemically healthy with periodontitis group had higher serum LXA4 levels than the systemically healthy with non-periodontitis group (P<0.05). The Ne/Ly ratio was higher in the hyperlipidemic group with periodontitis than in the hyperlipidemic group with non-periodontitis (P<0.05). In the control group, serum LXA4 levels were positively correlated with the PD, CAL and SBI. Conclusions In the presence of periodontitis, an increase in LXA4 levels and the Ne/Ly ratio in hyperlipidemic patients could contribute to the hypothesis that these parameters could be an indicator in periodontitis and its systemic risk factors. PMID:26298769

  18. Evaluation of carbonate pore system under texture control for prediction of microporosity aspect ratio and shear wave velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima Neto, Irineu A.; Misságia, Roseane M.; Ceia, Marco A.; Archilha, Nathaly L.; Hollis, Cathy

    2015-06-01

    This work evaluates a suite of carbonate rocks from Albian age in the Campos Basin - Brazil, complemented by data from the literature, totaling 472 samples with detailed description of diagenetic features, quantitative mineralogy analyses, and P- and S-wave velocities (Vp and Vs) measured at three ranges of effective pressure loading: low (5-7.5 MPa), moderate (20 MPa) and high (40-50 MPa) values. Digital image analysis (DIA) was applied on microtomography (?CT) images to quantitatively describe the macro-mesopore system of the Albian carbonates, and was extended to characterize different textures from literature data to estimate reference values for carbonates. The methodology utilized to predict the aspect ratio of microporosity assumes three pore-space scales in two representative scenarios: 1) measured macro-mesopore aspect ratio from DIA, and 2) predicted microporosity aspect ratio, using Vp measurement as the main input parameter. The differential effective medium model (DEMM) is combined with analytical theories of data analysis to characterize microporosity. Shear modulus and microporosity aspect ratio calibrated by this methodology were used to predict Vs, which was compared to experimental data, resulting in a good match for all samples. Polynomial curves are fitted with a variety of carbonate textures by velocities at effective pressure and bulk porosity crossplots, establishing important relationships for velocity prediction. The effects of effective pressure on the pore system within dry plugs of Albian samples were evaluated by combining triaxial measurements at 0-10 MPa, relative pore volume reduction (RPVR) and microporosity aspect ratio prediction. According to the results, micropores that exhibit low aspect ratio tend to close with stress and cause an increase on Vp and Vs. A wide textural heterogeneity of data base and different digital image analysis and resolutions were employed successfully, combining rock physics methodologies and concepts to characterize carbonate pore system as microporosity and pressure effects.

  19. Aripiprazole-Cyclodextrin Binary Systems for Dissolution Enhancement: Effect of Preparation Technique, Cyclodextrin Type and Molar Ratio

    PubMed Central

    M. Badr-Eldin, Shaimaa; A. Ahmed, Tarek; R Ismail, Hatem

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the natural and the chemically modified form of cyclodextrins namely; ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) and hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin (HP-?-CD) respectively on the solubility and dissolution rate of aripiprazole; an antipsychotic medication showing poor aqueous solubility. Materials and Methods: Phase solubility of aripiprazole with the studied CDs and the complexation efficiency values (CE) which reflect the solubilizing power of the CDs towards the drug was performed. Solid binary systems of aripiprazole with CDs were prepared by kneading, microwave irradiation and freeze-drying techniques at 1:1 and 1:2 (drug to CD) molar ratios. Drug-CD physical mixtures were also prepared in the same molar ratios for comparison. The dissolution of aripiprazole-binary systems was carried out to select the most appropriate CD type, molar ratio and preparation technique. Results: Phase solubility study indicated formation of higher order complexes and the complexation efficiency values was higher for HP-?-CD compared to ?-CD. Drug dissolution study revealed that aripiprazole dissolution was increased upon increasing the CD molar ratio and, the freeze-drying technique was superior to the other studied methods especially when combined with the HP-?-CD. The cyclodextrin type, preparation technique and molar ratio exhibited statistically significant effect on the drug dissolution at P? 0.05. Conclusion: The freeze-dried system prepared at molar ratio 1:2 (drug: CD) can be considered as efficient tool for enhancing aripiprazole dissolution with the possibility of improving its bioavailability. PMID:24570827

  20. New theoretical models and ratio imaging techniques associated with the NASA earth resources spectral information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Four independent investigations are reported; in general these are concerned with improving and utilizing the correlation between the physical properties of natural materials as evidenced in laboratory spectra and spectral data collected by multispectral scanners. In one investigation, two theoretical models were devised that permit the calculation of spectral emittance spectra for rock and mineral surfaces of various particle sizes. The simpler of the two models can be used to qualitatively predict the effect of texture on the spectral emittance of rocks and minerals; it is also potentially useful as an aid in predicting the identification of natural atmospheric aerosol constituents. The second investigation determined, via an infrared ratio imaging technique, the best pair of infrared filters for silicate rock-type discrimination. In a third investigation, laboratory spectra of natural materials were compressed into 11-digit ratio codes for use in feature selection, in searches for false alarm candidates, and eventually for use as training sets in completely automatic data processors. In the fourth investigation, general outlines of a ratio preprocessor and an automatic recognition map processor are developed for on-board data processing in the space shuttle era.

  1. Sex ratios 

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart A; Reece, S E; Sheldon, Ben C

    2002-01-01

    Sex ratio theory attempts to explain variation at all levels (species, population, individual, brood) in the proportion of offspring that are male (the sex ratio). In many cases this work has been extremely successful, ...

  2. The effect of expansion-ratio limitations on positive-displacement, total-flow geothermal power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiPippo, R.

    1982-02-01

    Combined steam-turbine/positive-displacement engine (PDE) geothermal power systems are analyzed thermodynamically and compared with optimized reference flash-steam plants. Three different configurations of combined systems are considered. Treated separately are the cases of self-flowing and pumped wells. Two strategies are investigated that help overcome the inherent expansion-ratio limitation of PDE's: pre-flashing and pre-mixing. Parametrically-obtained results show the required minimum PDE efficiency for the combined system to match the reference plant for various sets of design conditions.

  3. Efficiency and concentration ratio measurements of fluorescent solar concentrators using a xenon measurement system.

    PubMed

    Heidler, K

    1981-03-01

    An indoor test stand for fluorescent planar concentrator-collectors (FPC) with a 1.6-kW xenon light source, irradiating a rectangular triangle (active area 400 cm(2)) with 82 mW cm(-2), and a typical homogeneity of +/-10% is described in detail. Conditions and definitions for the efficiency measurements are discussed, taking intensity and reflection effects into account. As an illustration FPC efficiency and concentration ratios are reported (best optical efficiency was 7.5% for a single-plate one-dye FPC), the influence of thickness variation is discussed, and an enhancement in solar cell efficiency is demonstrated. PMID:20309202

  4. Martian Post-Impact Hydrothermal Systems: Effects of Permeability and Freezing on Surface Discharge and Water:Rock Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, C. J.; Nimmo, F.; Travis, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A km-scale bolide delivers enough energy to heat subsurface water, and drive hydrothermal circulation (Abramov and Kring, 2005). This post-impact hydrothermal (PIH) circulation can lead to surface discharge of water, and chemical alteration - both are potentially detectable. We present the effects that permeability and freezing have on discharge and water:rock (W/R) ratios. We simulate the evolution of PIH systems using MAGHNUM (detailed in Travis et al., 2003). MAGHNUM solves the time-dependent transport of water and heat through a porous medium, incorporating phase transitions between ice (applicable to Mars), vapor and water. PIH evolution depends on heat sources and permeability (k); these, in turn, control discharge and chemical alteration which depends on both the peak temperatures and the W/R ratio (Schwenzer and Kring, 2008). Recently, CRISM detected phyllosilicate-rich material within ~45 km craters (Mustard et al., 2008) and the HiRISE camera imaged gullies, some emanating from central peaks, within many high latitude craters. We model a 45 km crater created by a 3.9 km dia., 7 km/s impactor. Simulations run for 100,000 yrs in a 2D axisymmetric domain with a heat flux of 32.5 mW m-2. Thus far we have tested systems with a range of surface k's (10-4 to 1 darcys) that decay exponentially with depth and are exposed to two surface temperatures (5°C and -53°C). In general W/R ratios increase with increased k. Focusing in on the upper 200 m at the center of the crater, fluid temperatures remain > 100°C for 9000 yrs and flow yields W/R ratios of 10 when exposed to a surface temperature of 5°C. Dropping the surface temperature below freezing to a Mars-like - 53°C maintains upper 200 m temperatures > 100°C for only 600 yrs and W/R ratios are reduced to 1. Higher permeabilities yield higher W/R ratios but reduced time exposure to high temperatures. When surface temperatures are below freezing total system discharge is roughly independent of k for modest permeabilities but the time until the surface freezes increases with lower k. Freezing reduces both W/R ratios and discharge because ice closes pores and restricts flow.

  5. Wind tunnel tests of high-lift systems for advanced transports using high-aspect-ratio supercritical wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. B.; Oliver, W. R.; Spacht, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The wind tunnel testing of an advanced technology high lift system for a wide body and a narrow body transport incorporating high aspect ratio supercritical wings is described. This testing has added to the very limited low speed high Reynolds number data base for this class or aircraft. The experimental results include the effects on low speed aerodynamic characteristics of various leading and trailing edge devices, nacelles and pylons, ailerons, and spoilers, and the effects of Mach and Reynolds numbers.

  6. Row Ratios of Intercropping Maize and Soybean Can Affect Agronomic Efficiency of the System and Subsequent Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yitao; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Jizong; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Shen; Zhai, Limei; Wang, Hongyuan; Lei, Qiuliang; Ren, Tianzhi; Yin, Changbin

    2015-01-01

    Intercropping is regarded as an important agricultural practice to improve crop production and environmental quality in the regions with intensive agricultural production, e.g., northern China. To optimize agronomic advantage of maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) intercropping system compared to monoculture of maize, two sequential experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 was to screening the optimal cropping system in summer that had the highest yields and economic benefits, and Experiment 2 was to identify the optimum row ratio of the intercrops selected from Experiment 1. Results of Experiment 1 showed that maize intercropping with soybean (maize || soybean) was the optimal cropping system in summer. Compared to conventional monoculture of maize, maize || soybean had significant advantage in yield, economy, land utilization ratio and reducing soil nitrate nitrogen (N) accumulation, as well as better residual effect on the subsequent wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crop. Experiment 2 showed that intercropping systems reduced use of N fertilizer per unit land area and increased relative biomass of intercropped maize, due to promoted photosynthetic efficiency of border rows and N utilization during symbiotic period. Intercropping advantage began to emerge at tasseling stage after N topdressing for maize. Among all treatments with different row ratios, alternating four maize rows with six soybean rows (4M:6S) had the largest land equivalent ratio (1.30), total N accumulation in crops (258 kg ha-1), and economic benefit (3,408 USD ha-1). Compared to maize monoculture, 4M:6S had significantly lower nitrate-N accumulation in soil both after harvest of maize and after harvest of the subsequent wheat, but it did not decrease yield of wheat. The most important advantage of 4M:6S was to increase biomass of intercropped maize and soybean, which further led to the increase of total N accumulation by crops as well as economic benefit. In conclusion, alternating four maize rows with six soybean rows was the optimum row ratio in maize || soybean system, though this needs to be further confirmed by pluri-annual trials. PMID:26061566

  7. Row Ratios of Intercropping Maize and Soybean Can Affect Agronomic Efficiency of the System and Subsequent Wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yitao; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Jizong; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Shen; Zhai, Limei; Wang, Hongyuan; Lei, Qiuliang; Ren, Tianzhi; Yin, Changbin

    2015-01-01

    Intercropping is regarded as an important agricultural practice to improve crop production and environmental quality in the regions with intensive agricultural production, e.g., northern China. To optimize agronomic advantage of maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) intercropping system compared to monoculture of maize, two sequential experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 was to screening the optimal cropping system in summer that had the highest yields and economic benefits, and Experiment 2 was to identify the optimum row ratio of the intercrops selected from Experiment 1. Results of Experiment 1 showed that maize intercropping with soybean (maize || soybean) was the optimal cropping system in summer. Compared to conventional monoculture of maize, maize || soybean had significant advantage in yield, economy, land utilization ratio and reducing soil nitrate nitrogen (N) accumulation, as well as better residual effect on the subsequent wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crop. Experiment 2 showed that intercropping systems reduced use of N fertilizer per unit land area and increased relative biomass of intercropped maize, due to promoted photosynthetic efficiency of border rows and N utilization during symbiotic period. Intercropping advantage began to emerge at tasseling stage after N topdressing for maize. Among all treatments with different row ratios, alternating four maize rows with six soybean rows (4M:6S) had the largest land equivalent ratio (1.30), total N accumulation in crops (258 kg ha(-1)), and economic benefit (3,408 USD ha(-1)). Compared to maize monoculture, 4M:6S had significantly lower nitrate-N accumulation in soil both after harvest of maize and after harvest of the subsequent wheat, but it did not decrease yield of wheat. The most important advantage of 4M:6S was to increase biomass of intercropped maize and soybean, which further led to the increase of total N accumulation by crops as well as economic benefit. In conclusion, alternating four maize rows with six soybean rows was the optimum row ratio in maize || soybean system, though this needs to be further confirmed by pluri-annual trials. PMID:26061566

  8. Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing system using rotated constellation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmood, Jassim K.; Noordin, Kamarul A.; Arof, Hamzah; Harun, Sulaiman W.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a new approach for reducing peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) based on modulated half subcarriers in all-optical OFDM systems with rotated QAM constellation is presented. To reduce the PAPR, the odd subcarriers are modulated with rotated QAM constellation, while the even subcarriers are modulated with standard QAM constellation. The impact of the rotation angle on the PAPR is mathematically modeled. The effect of PAPR reduction on the system performance is investigated by simulating the all-optical OFDM system, which uses optical coupler-based inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT)/fast Fourier transform (FFT). The all-optical system is numerically demonstrated with 29 subcarriers. Each subcarrier is modulated by a QAM modulator at a symbol rate of 25 Gsymbol/s. The results reveal that PAPR is reduced with increasing the angle of rotation. The PAPR reduction can reach about 0.8 dB when the complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF) is 1 × 10-3. Furthermore, both the nonlinear phase noise and the optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) of the system are improved in comparison with the original all-optical OFDM without PAPR reduction.

  9. The Role of Boron-Chloride and Noble Gas Isotope Ratios in TVZ Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hulston, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The model of the geothermal system in which deep circulating groundwater containing noble gases, at air saturated water concentrations, mixes with hot fluids of mantle origin at depth, is extended to include the effect of interaction of the ascending fluid with both solid and gaseous phases of basement (or other) rocks en route to the surface. It is demonstrated that this interaction is responsible for most of the CO{sub 2} in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) geothermal systems. It is proposed that the modeling of this interaction might be accomplished by techniques similar to those used for the understanding of the oxygen isotope shift found in geothermal systems. The water rock interaction experiments of Ellis and Mahon (1964, 1967) provides some data on the kinetic rates for B and Cl dissolution from rocks likely to be encountered in the geothermal system, but further information on the behavior of B may be needed. If these problems can be overcome this modeling technique has promise for the estimation of the recharge of geothermal systems and hence the sustainability of these systems.

  10. Calibration of a monochromator/spectrometer system for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions and branching ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, Stephen H.; Parr, Albert C.; Hardis, J. E.; Dehmer, Joseph L.; Holland, David M.P.

    1985-01-01

    We describe the techniques used in calibrating a monochromator/spectrometer system for gas-phase photoelectron angular distribution and branching ratio measurements. We report a self-consistent set of values for the Ne 2p, Ar 3p, Kr 4p3/2 and 4p1/2, and Xe 5p3/2 and 5p1/2 photoelectron asymmetry parameters and for the Kr 4p3/2:4p1/2 and Xe 5p3/2:5p1/2 branching ratios for the energy regions from threshold to approximately 15 eV. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  11. California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S.

    2005-11-01

    Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

  12. Local dynamics of a fast-evolving sex-ratio system in Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Bastide, Héloïse; Gérard, Pierre R; Ogereau, David; Cazemajor, Michel; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    By distorting Mendelian transmission to their own advantage, X-linked meiotic drive elements can rapidly spread in natural populations, generating a sex-ratio bias. One expected consequence is the triggering of a co-evolutionary arms race between the sex chromosome that carries the distorter and suppressors counteracting its effect. Such an arms race has been theoretically and experimentally established and can have many evolutionary consequences. However, its dynamics in contemporary populations is still poorly documented. Here, we investigate the fate of the young X-linked Paris driver in Drosophila simulans from sub-Saharan Africa to the Middle East. We provide the first example of the early dynamics of distorters and suppressors: we find consistent evidence that the driving chromosomes have been rising in the Middle East during the last decade. In addition, identical haplotypes are at high frequencies around the two co-evolving drive loci in remote populations, implying that the driving X chromosomes share a recent common ancestor and suggesting that East Africa could be the cradle of the Paris driver. The segmental duplication associated with drive presents an unusual structure in West Africa, which could reflect a secondary state of the driver. Together with our previous demonstration of driver decline in the Indian Ocean where suppression is complete, these data provide a unique picture of the complex dynamics of a co-evolutionary arms race currently taking place in natural populations of D. simulans. PMID:24118375

  13. DEEP, LOW MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XIII. DZ PISCIUM WITH INTRINSIC LIGHT VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    New multi-color photometry for the eclipsing binary DZ Psc was performed in 2011 and 2012 using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code, we deduced two sets of photometric solutions. The overcontact degree is f = 89.7({+-} 1.0)%, identifying DZ Psc as a deep, low mass ratio overcontact binary. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., LC{sub 2} in 2012) were modeled by a hot spot on the primary star. Based on all of the available light minimum times, we discovered that the orbital period of DZ Psc may be undergoing a secular period increase with a cyclic variation. The modulated period and semi-amplitude of this oscillation are P{sub mod} = 11.89({+-} 0.19) yr and A = 0.0064({+-} 0.0006) days, which may be possibly attributed to either cyclic magnetic activity or light-time effect due to the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt=+7.43({+-}0.17) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transferring, DZ Psc will finally merge into a rapid-rotation single star when J{sub spin}/J{sub orb} > 1/3.

  14. Evaluation of the Association of Sleep Apnea-Related Systemic Inflammation with CRP, ESR, and Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Mukadder; Korkmaz, Hakan; Küçüker, Fatma; Ayy?ld?z, Sema Nur; Çankaya, Soner

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by cyclic episodes of hypoxemia and reoxygenation. It has been suggested that OSAS is associated with chronic inflammation within the microvasculature. This low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathophysiology of OSAS-related comorbidities. Evaluation of the inflammatory markers may predict the degree of the systemic inflammation and this may be a prognostic factor for future adverse events such as cardiovascular risks. Proinflammatory cytokines have been extensively studied in sleep-disordered breathing. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is a recently described indicator of systemic inflammation, but it has not been studied in OSAS patients. In this study we aimed to evaluate the easily measurable parameters of systemic inflammation in these patients. We conducted this study to examine the association among OSAS and C- reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio. Material/Methods OSAS patients who underwent overnight polysomnography were studied retrospectively. They were divided into 4 groups: control, mild, moderate, and severe OSAS patients. Blood test results and inflammatory markers were compared between the groups. One-way ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis H test were used for statistical analysis. Results A total of 147 patients were included in the study. No differences in evaluated inflammatory markers were observed among the 4 groups. Conclusions Evaluation of the OSAS-related systemic inflammation is not likely to be possible by CRP, ESR, or neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio measurements. These markers do not seem to be associated with the degree of the upper airway obstruction. PMID:25686632

  15. Review of the design and performance features of hvdc systems connected to low short circuit ratio ac systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thallam, R.S. )

    1992-10-01

    The design and performance of an HVdc system is significantly impacted by the relative strength of the ac system to which it is connected. In this paper, design and performance features of ten HVdc systems are discussed. All of these systems are connected to ac systems that are relatively weak compared to the rating of the dc system. Six of these systems are back-to-back, two are overhead lines, and two are undersea cable connections. AC and dc system interaction problems and how they are addressed in the design and specification of each of these systems, are described.

  16. Selenium stable isotope ratios in California agricultural drainage water management systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbel, M.J.; Johnson, T.M.; Tanji, K.K.; Gao, S.; Bullen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratios are known to shift in predictable ways during various microbial, chemical, and biological processes, and can be used to better understand Se cycling in contaminated environments. In this study we used Se stable isotopes to discern the mechanisms controlling the transformation of oxidized, aqueous forms of Se to reduced, insoluble forms in sediments of Se-affected environments. We measured 80Se/76Se in surface waters, shallow ground waters, evaporites, digested plants and sediments, and sequential extracts from several sites where agricultural drainage water is processed in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Selenium isotope analyses of samples obtained from the Tulare Lake Drainage District flow-through wetland reveal small isotopic contrasts (mean difference 0.7%o) between surface water and reduced Se species in the underlying sediments. Selenium in aquatic macrophytes was very similar isotopically to the NaOH and Na2SO3 sediment extracts designed to recover soluble organic Se and Se(O), respectively. For the integrated on-farm drainage management sites, evaporite salts were slightly (approximately 0.6%o) enriched in the heavier isotope relative to the inferred parent waters, whereas surface soils were slightly (approximately 1.4%o) depleted. Bacterial or chemical reduction of Se(VI) or Se(IV) may be occurring at these sites, but the small isotopic contrasts suggest that other, less isotopically fractionating mechanisms are responsible for accumulation of reduced forms in the sediments. These findings provide evidence that Se assimilation by plants and algae followed by deposition and mineralization is the dominant transformation pathway responsible for accumulation of reduced forms of Se in the wetland sediments.

  17. Selenium stable isotope ratios in California agricultural drainage water management systems.

    PubMed

    Herbel, Mitchell J; Johnson, Thomas M; Tanji, Kenneth K; Gao, Suduan; Bullen, Thomas D

    2002-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratios are known to shift in predictable ways during various microbial, chemical, and biological processes, and can be used to better understand Se cycling in contaminated environments. In this study we used Se stable isotopes to discern the mechanisms controlling the transformation of oxidized, aqueous forms of Se to reduced, insoluble forms in sediments of Se-affected environments. We measured 80Se/76Se in surface waters, shallow ground waters, evaporites, digested plants and sediments, and sequential extracts from several sites where agricultural drainage water is processed in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Selenium isotope analyses of samples obtained from the Tulare Lake Drainage District flow-through wetland reveal small isotopic contrasts (mean difference 0.7%) between surface water and reduced Se species in the underlying sediments. Selenium in aquatic macrophytes was very similar isotopically to the NaOH and Na2SO3 sediment extracts designed to recover soluble organic Se and Se(0), respectively. For the integrated on-farm drainage management sites, evaporite salts were slightly (approximately 0.6%) enriched in the heavier isotope relative to the inferred parent waters, whereas surface soils were slightly (approximately 1.4%) depleted. Bacterial or chemical reduction of Se(VI) or Se(IV) may be occurring at these sites, but the small isotopic contrasts suggest that other, less isotopically fractionating mechanisms are responsible for accumulation of reduced forms in the sediments. These findings provide evidence that Se assimilation by plants and algae followed by deposition and mineralization is the dominant transformation pathway responsible for accumulation of reduced forms of Se in the wetland sediments. PMID:12175032

  18. Closed system respirometry may underestimate tissue gas exchange and bias the respiratory exchange ratio (RER).

    PubMed

    Malte, Christian Lind; Nørgaard, Simon; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Closed respirometry is a commonly used method to measure gas exchange in animals due to its apparent simplicity. Typically, the rates of O2 uptake and CO2 excretion (V?O2 and V?CO2, respectively) are assumed to be in steady state, such that the measured rates of gas exchange equal those at tissue level. In other words, the respiratory gas exchange ratio (RER) is assumed to equal the respiratory quotient (RQ). However, because the gas concentrations change progressively during closure, the animal inspires air with a progressively increasing CO2 concentration and decreasing O2 concentration. These changes will eventually affect gas exchange causing the O2 and CO2 stores within the animal to change. Because of the higher solubility/capacitance of CO2 in the tissues of the body, V?CO2 will be more affected than V?O2, and we hypothesize therefore that RER will become progressively underestimated as closure time is prolonged. This hypothesis was addressed by a combination of experimental studies involving closed respirometry on ball pythons (Python regius) as well as mathematical models of gas exchange. We show that increased closed duration of the respirometer reduces RER by up to 13%, and these findings may explain previous reports of RER values being below 0.7. Our model reveals that the maximally possible reduction in RER is determined by the storage capacity of the body for CO2 (product of size and specific capacitance) relative to the respirometer storage capacity. Furthermore, modeling also shows that pronounced ventilatory and circulatory response to hypercapnia can alleviate the reduction in RER. PMID:26523499

  19. Sedimentary Sulphur:Iron Ratio Indicates Vivianite Occurrence: A Study from Two Contrasting Freshwater Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Matthias; Kleeberg, Andreas; Grüneberg, Björn; Friese, Kurt; Pérez-Mayo, Manuel; Hupfer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies constrain the importance of iron for the long-term retention of phosphorus (P) under anoxic conditions, i.e. the formation of reduced iron phosphate minerals such as vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2?8H2O). Much remains unknown about vivianite formation, the factors controlling its occurrence, and its relevance for P burial during early sediment diagenesis. To study the occurrence of vivianite and to assess its relevance for P binding, surface sediments of two hydrologically contrasting waters were analysed by heavy-liquid separation and subsequent powder X-ray diffraction. In Lake Arendsee, vivianite was present in deeper sediment horizons and not in the uppermost layers with a sharp transition between vivianite and non-vivianite bearing layers. In contrast, in lowland river Lower Havel vivianite was present in the upper sediment layers and not in deeper horizons with a gradual transition between non-vivianite and vivianite bearing layers. In both waters, vivianite occurrence was accompanied by the presence of pyrite (FeS2). Vivianite formation was favoured by an elevated iron availability through a lower degree of sulphidisation and was present at a molar ratio of total sulphur to reactive iron smaller than 1.1, only. A longer lasting burden of sediments by organic matter, i.e. due to eutrophication, favours the release of sulphides, and the formation of insoluble iron sulphides leading to a lack of available iron and to less or no vivianite formation. This weakening in sedimentary P retention, representing a negative feedback mechanism (P release) in terms of water quality, could be partly compensated by harmless Fe amendments. PMID:26599406

  20. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HVAC SYSTEM OPERATION, AIR EXCHANGE RATE, AND INDOOR-OUTDOOR PARTICULATE MATTER RATIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of duty cycle , the fraction of time the heating and cooling (HVAC) system was operating, were made in each participant's home during the spring season of the RTP Particulate Matter Panel Study. A miniature temperature sensor/data logger combination placed on the ...

  1. 36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1997-07-01

    The {sub 36}Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The {sub 36}Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field.

  2. A five-collector system for the simultaneous measurement of argon isotope ratios in a static mass spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Sherrill, N.D.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Lanphere, M.A.; Carpenter, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that utilizes five separate Faraday-cup collector assemblies, aligned along the focal plane of a mass spectrometer, to collect simultaneous argon ion beams at masses 36-40. Each collector has its own electrometer amplifier and analog-to-digital measuring channel, the outputs of which are processed by a minicomputer that also controls the mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer utilizes a 90?? sector magnetic analyzer with a radius of 23 cm, in which some degree of z-direction focussing is provided for all the ion beams by the fringe field of the magnet. Simultaneous measurement of the ion beams helps to eliminate mass-spectrometer memory as a significant source of measurement error during an analysis. Isotope ratios stabilize between 7 and 9 s after sample admission into the spectrometer, and thereafter changes in the measured ratios are linear, typically to within ??0.02%. Thus the multi-collector arrangement permits very short extrapolation times for computation of initial ratios, and also provides the advantages of simultaneous measurement of the ion currents in that errors due to variations in ion beam intensity are minimized. A complete analysis takes less than 10 min, so that sample throughput can be greatly enhanced. In this instrument, the factor limiting analytical precision now lies in short-term apparent variations in the interchannel calibration factors. ?? 1981.

  3. Pyrometer for measurement of surface temperature distribution on a rotating turbine blade.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.; Lesco, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual optical method and some test results are presented for measuring the surface temperature distribution on one of the rotating turbine blades with a surface resolution of 0.05 cm spot diameter at a tip speed of 400 m/sec. The blade is scanned line-by-line by a fixed optical system. During each line-scan, the detector analog output signal is converted to 200 consecutive digital values that are temporarily stored in a high-speed buffer memory and then transferred at a slower rate to a computer for processing. The signal-to-noise ratio of the silicon avalanche detector is large enough to obtain an accuracy of 1% at 1050 K blade temperature. By averaging 25 scans of the same line the same accuracy can be obtained at 900 K.

  4. Pyrometer for measurement of surface temperature distribution on a rotating turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.; Lesco, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual optical method and some test results are presented for measuring the surface temperature distribution on one of the rotating turbine blades with a surface resolution of 0.05 cm spot diameter at a tip speed of 400 m/sec. The blade is scanned line-by-line by a fixed optical system. During each line-scan, the detector analog output signal is converted to two hundred consecutive digital values that are temporarily stored in a high speed buffer memory, and then transferred at a slower rate to a computer for processing. The signal-to-noise ratio of the silicon avalanche detector is large enough to obtain an accuracy of one percent at 1050 K blade temperature. By averaging 25 scans of the same line the same accuracy can be obtained at 900 K.

  5. Compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system for quantifying intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio in brain cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan; Grant, Gerald; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Fangyao; Li, Shuqin; Wilson, Christy; Chen, Kui; Bigner, Darell; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2011-03-01

    We report the development of a compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system and two data analysis methods to quantify the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio and diagnose brain cancer in an orthotopic brain tumor rat model. Our system employs one compact cw diode laser (407 nm) to excite two primary endogenous fluorophores, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. The spectra were first analyzed using a spectral filtering modulation method developed previously to derive the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio, which has the advantages of insensitivty to optical coupling and rapid data acquisition and analysis. This method represents a convenient and rapid alternative for achieving intrinsic fluorescence-based redox measurements as compared to those complicated model-based methods. It is worth noting that the method can also extract total hemoglobin concentration at the same time but only if the emission path length of fluorescence light, which depends on the illumination and collection geometry of the optical probe, is long enough so that the effect of absorption on fluorescence intensity due to hemoglobin is significant. Then a multivariate method was used to statistically classify normal tissues and tumors. Although the first method offers quantitative tissue metabolism information, the second method provides high overall classification accuracy. The two methods provide complementary capabilities for understanding cancer development and noninvasively diagnosing brain cancer. The results of our study suggest that this portable system can be potentially used to demarcate the elusive boundary between a brain tumor and the surrounding normal tissue during surgical resection.

  6. Identifying non-normal and lognormal characteristics of temperature, mixing ratio, surface pressure, and wind for data assimilation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliewer, A. J.; Fletcher, S. J.; Jones, A. S.; Forsythe, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Data assimilation systems and retrieval systems that are based upon a maximum likelihood estimation, many of which are in operational use, rely on the assumption that all of the errors and variables involved follow a normal distribution. This work develops a series of statistical tests to show that mixing ratio, temperature, wind and surface pressure follow non-normal, or in fact, lognormal distributions thus impacting the design-basis of many operational data assimilation and retrieval systems. For this study one year of Global Forecast System 00:00 UTC 6 h forecast were analyzed using statistical hypothesis tests. The motivation of this work is to identify the need to resolve whether or not the assumption of normality is valid and to give guidance for where and when a data assimilation system or a retrieval system needs to adapt its cost function to the mixed normal-lognormal distribution-based Bayesian model. The statistical methods of detection are based upon Shapiro-Wilk, Jarque-Bera and a ?2 test, and a new composite indicator using all three measures. Another method of detection fits distributions to the temporal-based histograms of temperature, mixing ratio, and wind. The conclusion of this work is that there are persistent areas, times, and vertical levels where the normal assumption is not valid, and that the lognormal distribution-based Bayesian model is observationally justified to minimize the error for these conditions. The results herein suggest that comprehensive statistical climatologies may need to be developed to capture the non-normal traits of the 6 h forecast.

  7. A Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Combining Wavelet Denoising, Principal Component Analysis, and Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Sensor Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Man Gyun; Oh, Seungrohk

    2002-11-15

    A neuro-fuzzy inference system combined with the wavelet denoising, principal component analysis (PCA), and sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) methods has been developed to monitor the relevant sensor using the information of other sensors. The parameters of the neuro-fuzzy inference system that estimates the relevant sensor signal are optimized by a genetic algorithm and a least-squares algorithm. The wavelet denoising technique was applied to remove noise components in input signals into the neuro-fuzzy system. By reducing the dimension of an input space into the neuro-fuzzy system without losing a significant amount of information, the PCA was used to reduce the time necessary to train the neuro-fuzzy system, simplify the structure of the neuro-fuzzy inference system, and also, make easy the selection of the input signals into the neuro-fuzzy system. By using the residual signals between the estimated signals and the measured signals, the SPRT is applied to detect whether the sensors are degraded or not. The proposed sensor-monitoring algorithm was verified through applications to the pressurizer water level, the pressurizer pressure, and the hot-leg temperature sensors in pressurized water reactors.

  8. The influence of product and service ratio on the stakeholder interaction in software system development

    E-print Network

    Yip, Man Hang; Phaal, Rob; Probert, David

    2014-01-01

    experts Ex X X Patients' family & other care-giving organizations P-O X Supplier or partner to the company to develop the PSS V X - Customer's management Cu-M X X X X Company's management Co-M (X) (X) X X Company's commercial Co-Co (X) (X) X X... -M), company’s management (Co-M) and company’s commercial groups (Co-Co) have an overall interest in the operations of the PSS, and so they are associated with the system level. Authority and domain experts (Ex) are associated with the business environment...

  9. CONSTRAINING MASS RATIO AND EXTINCTION IN THE FU ORIONIS BINARY SYSTEM WITH INFRARED INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, Laurent; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Hinkley, Sasha; Dekany, Richard; Roberts, Jenny; Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick; Cady, Eric; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Brenner, Douglas; Zimmerman, Neil; Monnier, John D.; Crepp, Justin; Parry, Ian; Beichman, Charles; Soummer, Remi

    2012-09-20

    We report low-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the eruptive star FU Orionis using the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) Project 1640 installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. This work focuses on elucidating the nature of the faint source, located 0.''5 south of FU Ori, and identified in 2003 as FU Ori S. We first use our observations in conjunction with published data to demonstrate that the two stars are indeed physically associated and form a true binary pair. We then proceed to extract J- and H-band spectro-photometry using the damped LOCI algorithm, a reduction method tailored for high contrast science with IFS. This is the first communication reporting the high accuracy of this technique, pioneered by the Project 1640 team, on a faint astronomical source. We use our low-resolution near-infrared spectrum in conjunction with 10.2 {mu}m interferometric data to constrain the infrared excess of FU Ori S. We then focus on estimating the bulk physical properties of FU Ori S. Our models lead to estimates of an object heavily reddened, A{sub V} = 8-12, with an effective temperature of {approx}4000-6500 K. Finally, we put these results in the context of the FU Ori N-S system and argue that our analysis provides evidence that FU Ori S might be the more massive component of this binary system.

  10. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-04-03

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the third year of a 42 month research program that is aimed at an understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work focused on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A mathematical model that describes uptake and crosslinking reactions as a function of time was derived. The model was probability based and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. A liquid chromatography apparatus to experimentally measure the size and molecular weight distributions of polymer samples was developed. The method worked well for polymer samples without the chromium crosslinker. Sample retention observed during measurements of gelant samples during the gelation process compromised the results. Other methods will be tested to measure size distributions of the pre-gel aggregates. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results.

  11. Mechanical Design of High Lift Systems for High Aspect Ratio Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Peter K. C.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center is working to develop a methodology for the optimization and design of the high lift system for future subsonic airliners with the involvement of two partners. Aerodynamic analysis methods for two dimensional and three dimensional wing performance with flaps and slats deployed are being developed through a grant with the aeronautical department of the University of California Davis, and a flap and slat mechanism design procedure is being developed through a contract with PKCR, Inc., of Seattle, WA. This report documents the work that has been completed in the contract with PKCR on mechanism design. Flap mechanism designs have been completed for seven (7) different mechanisms with a total of twelve (12) different layouts all for a common single slotted flap configuration. The seven mechanisms are as follows: Simple Hinge, Upside Down/Upright Four Bar Linkage (two layouts), Upside Down Four Bar Linkages (three versions), Airbus A330/340 Link/Track Mechanism, Airbus A320 Link/Track Mechanism (two layouts), Boeing Link/Track Mechanism (two layouts), and Boeing 767 Hinged Beam Four Bar Linkage. In addition, a single layout has been made to investigate the growth potential from a single slotted flap to a vane/main double slotted flap using the Boeing Link/Track Mechanism. All layouts show Fowler motion and gap progression of the flap from stowed to a fully deployed position, and evaluations based on spanwise continuity, fairing size and number, complexity, reliability and maintainability and weight as well as Fowler motion and gap progression are presented. For slat design, the options have been limited to mechanisms for a shallow leading edge slat. Three (3) different layouts are presented for maximum slat angles of 20 deg, 15 deg and 1O deg all mechanized with a rack and pinion drive similar to that on the Boeing 757 airplane. Based on the work of Ljungstroem in Sweden, this type of slat design appears to shift the lift curve so that higher lift is achieved with the deployed slat with no increase in angle of attack. The layouts demonstrate that these slat systems can be designed with no need for slave links, and an experimental test program is outlined to experimentally validate the lift characteristics of the shallow slat.

  12. A post-coding scheme for peak-to-average power ratio reduction in intensity modulated optical OFDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang-ni; Wang, Zhong-peng

    2014-07-01

    An efficient post-coding strategy is proposed in this letter to reduce the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signals for optical intensity modulated direct detection (IM/DD) systems. The post-coding scheme based on discrete cosine transform (DCT) is employed after the inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) in the transmitter to reduce the PAPR of OFDM signals. This method is different from the conventional pre-coding scheme which is employed before IFFT operation. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the new DCT post-coding strategy can significantly reduce the PAPR than the conventional pre-coding scheme. Meantime, the bit error rate (BER) performance of the proposed post-coding system can be improved compared with the conventional pre-coding scheme.

  13. Full-duplex radio over fiber system with optimum optical carrier to sideband ratio and wavelength reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jintian; Wang, Rong; Pu, Tao; Fang, Tao; Zheng, Jilin; Lu, Lin; Xiang, Peng

    2014-06-01

    A full-duplex radio over fiber system with optimum optical carrier to sideband ratio (OCSR) of 0 dB and wavelength reuse for uplink are proposed. At the central office, single-sideband modulation with OCSR larger than 0 dB is realized based on optical injection. At the base station, a notch filter with the notch depth corresponding to the OCSR of the transmitted signal is used to achieve the optimum OCSR of 0 dB. The reflected weakly modulated carrier is reused as the carrier for upload signals. A simulation is carried out to verify the proposed system. Results show that the download 60-GHz-RF signal is almost not affected by the fiber chromatic dispersion, and the power penalty after transmission over a 50-km single-mode fiber is negligible in uplink and is only 1.27 dB in downlink.

  14. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-12-31

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a 42-month research program that focused on the understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work was conducted on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A rate equation that describes the reaction between chromium acetate and polymer molecules was regressed from experimental data. A mathematical model that describes the crosslinking reaction between two polymer molecules as a function of time was derived. The model was based on probability concepts and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. Average molecular weights of pre-gel aggregates were measured as a function of time and were comparable to model simulations. Experimental methods to determine molecular weight distributions of pre-gel aggregates were unsuccessful. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results and data from literature. Gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted in sandpacks to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration and displacement of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels. A similar study of DPR was conducted in Berea sandstone cores. Both oil and water permeabilities were reduced by much smaller factors in Berea sandstone cores than in similar treatments in sandpacks. Poor maturation of the gelant in the Berea rock was thought to be caused by fluid-rock interactions that interfered with the gelation process.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF POLYMER GEL SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE VOLUMETRIC SWEEP AND REDUCE PRODUCING WATER/OIL RATIOS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Rajeev Jain; Tuan Nguyen

    2003-11-01

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the first year of a three-year research program that is aimed at the understanding of the chemistry of gelation and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work has focused on a widely-applied system in field applications, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. The initial reaction between chromium acetate and one polymer is referred to as the uptake reaction. The uptake reaction was studied as functions of chromium and polymer concentrations and pH values. Experimental data were regressed to determine a rate equation that describes the uptake reaction of chromium by polyacrylamide. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as the reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A statistical model that describes the growth of pre-gel aggregates was developed using the theory of branching processes. The model gives molecular weight averages that are expressed as functions of the conversion of the reactive sites on chromium acetate or on the polymer molecule. Results of the application of the model correlate well with experimental data of viscosity and weight-average molecular weight and gives insights into the gelation process. A third study addresses the flow of water and oil in rock material after a gel treatment. Previous works have shown that gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. Increased pressure gradients during oil flow decreased the oil permeability and the water permeability that was measured afterward. Lower pressure gradients that were applied subsequently moderately affected water permeabilities but did not affect oil permeabilities. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels.

  16. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation in digital computer simulation of lowpass and bandpass systems with applications to analog and digital communications, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tranter, W. H.; Turner, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are developed to estimate power gain, delay, signal-to-noise ratio, and mean square error in digital computer simulations of lowpass and bandpass systems. The techniques are applied to analog and digital communications. The signal-to-noise ratio estimates are shown to be maximum likelihood estimates in additive white Gaussian noise. The methods are seen to be especially useful for digital communication systems where the mapping from the signal-to-noise ratio to the error probability can be obtained. Simulation results show the techniques developed to be accurate and quite versatile in evaluating the performance of many systems through digital computer simulation.

  17. A short-standoff bistatic lidar system for aerosol cloud backscatter and fluorescence cross section, and depolarization ratio measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, C.; Schmitt, R. L.; Sickafoose, S.; Johnson, M. S.; Shagam, R.; Reichardt, T.; Sanchez, A.; Servantes, B.

    2012-12-01

    We have designed a short-standoff bistatic lidar system, used for the direct measurement of the optical backscatter at 355-nm and 1064-nm and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) cross sections as well as depolarization ratio of aerosols inside a vacuum sealed, aerosol flow chamber. The 355- and 1064-nm beams are sent through the aerosol chamber at an angle of ~2° with respect to the field of view of the receiver optics to ensure that measurements reflect true backscatter. This bistatic lidar configuration naturally defines a limited region in space where the laser beams and the receiver field of view overlap, a region that can be easily quantified using a standard calibration procedure. Our technique also takes advantage of a specially designed vacuum sealed, aerosol flow chamber that provides a well-mixed, uniform aerosol distribution over the region of sensitivity. Both modeling results and experimental measurements confirm that little particle loss is observed inside the aerosol flow chamber. A TSI aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) is used to measure the aerosol concentration in the chamber, and the N2 concentration can be calculated using the measured temperature and pressure of the air inside the chamber. Optical backscatter and LIF cross sections are determined by comparing the measured elastic and LIF signals with the N2 Raman scattering signal from the same sample volume, a technique which eliminates the need for absolute radiometric calibration of the system. Instead, all detectors in the system are calibrated relative to the N2 Raman channel and the unknown aerosol cross sections are determined by taking the ratio of the backscatter (or LIF) signals to the Raman signal and multiplying by the well-known Raman cross section of N2. Particulate population depolarization parameters are determined by measuring the rejected polarized light from a Glan Laser prism polarizer and comparing those intensity measurements with that of the direct backscatter intensity. This work will focus on particle specific optical backscatter cross-sections and depolarization ratios for atmospherically relevant particle populations including Arizona road dust, black carbon, ammonium sulfate, and sodium chloride. Preliminary results of the absolute scattering cross-section and polarization parameters will be presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Digit ratio 2D:4D in relation to autism spectrum disorders, empathizing, and systemizing: a quantitative review.

    PubMed

    Hönekopp, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Prenatal testosterone (PT) effects have been proposed to increase systemizing (the drive to understand lawful input-output relationships), to decrease empathizing (the drive to understand others), and to cause autism via hypermasculinization of the brain. Digit ratio 2D:4D is a putative marker of PT effects in humans. An online study (n = 1896) into the relationship between the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (a widely used measure of empathizing) and self-measured 2D:4D in a nonclinical sample is reported. No evidence for a link between empathizing and 2D:4D in either females or males emerged. Further, three meta-analyses are presented that look into the relationships of 2D:4D with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), systemizing, and empathizing. 2D:4D was substantially lower (more masculine) in ASD-affected individuals than in normal controls (d = -0.58, P < 0.001). However, 2D:4D was found to be virtually unrelated to systemizing and empathizing in normal adults. The results support the idea that high PT is a risk factor for autism, but they challenge the view that PT substantially contributes to sex differences in systemizing and empathizing. Possibly, this pattern reflects an interaction effect, whereby PT drives ASD characteristic changes only in brains with a specific damage. PMID:22674640

  19. On the assessment of adverse drug reactions from spontaneous reporting systems: the influence of under-reporting on odds ratios.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Peter G M; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; van Buuren, Stef; van der Hofstede, Jacques W

    2002-07-30

    A well-known problem in spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is under-reporting, that is, the problem that not all occurrences of ADRs are reported to the SRS. We look at the question of how to draw statistical conclusions from analyses of SRS data using reporting odds ratios. We will show that certain under-reporting problems play no role in assessing ADRs from SRSs: the results from the analyses turn out to be biased by some specific under-reporting problems, but not by others. SRS data can be particularly useful for the assessment of drug-drug interactions. If the assumption holds that there is an under-reporting problem for a first drug, and an under-reporting problem for a second drug, but that these two under-reporting problems do not influence each other, then reporting odds ratios estimated from SRSs are useful for signalling drug-drug interactions in the ADR-experiencing population. Similar results hold for covariate-drug interactions. We illustrate our results using two examples. PMID:12111885

  20. HIGH FILL-OUT, EXTREME MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. X. THE NEWLY DISCOVERED BINARY XY LEONIS MINORIS

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Liu, L.; Zhu, L.-Y.; He, J.-J.; Bernasconi, L. E-mail: yygcn@163.com

    2011-05-15

    The newly discovered short-period close binary star, XY LMi, has been monitored photometrically since 2006. Its light curves are typical EW-type light curves and show complete eclipses with durations of about 80 minutes. Photometric solutions were determined through an analysis of the complete B, V, R, and I light curves using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. XY LMi is a high fill-out, extreme mass ratio overcontact binary system with a mass ratio of q = 0.148 and a fill-out factor of f = 74.1%, suggesting that it is in the late evolutionary stage of late-type tidal-locked binary stars. As observed in other overcontact binary stars, evidence for the presence of two dark spots on both components is given. Based on our 19 epochs of eclipse times, we found that the orbital period of the overcontact binary is decreasing continuously at a rate of dP/dt = -1.67 x 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be caused by mass transfer from the primary to the secondary and/or angular momentum loss via magnetic stellar wind. The decrease of the orbital period may result in the increase of the fill-out, and finally, it will evolve into a single rapid-rotation star when the fluid surface reaches the outer critical Roche lobe.

  1. Plant lighting system with five wavelength-band light-emitting diodes providing photon flux density and mixing ratio control

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant growth and development depend on the availability of light. Lighting systems therefore play crucial roles in plant studies. Recent advancements of light-emitting diode (LED) technologies provide abundant opportunities to study various plant light responses. The LED merits include solidity, longevity, small element volume, radiant flux controllability, and monochromaticity. To apply these merits in plant light response studies, a lighting system must provide precisely controlled light spectra that are useful for inducing various plant responses. Results We have developed a plant lighting system that irradiated a 0.18 m2 area with a highly uniform distribution of photon flux density (PFD). The average photosynthetic PFD (PPFD) in the irradiated area was 438 micro-mol m–2 s–1 (coefficient of variation 9.6%), which is appropriate for growing leafy vegetables. The irradiated light includes violet, blue, orange-red, red, and far-red wavelength bands created by LEDs of five types. The PFD and mixing ratio of the five wavelength-band lights are controllable using a computer and drive circuits. The phototropic response of oat coleoptiles was investigated to evaluate plant sensitivity to the light control quality of the lighting system. Oat coleoptiles irradiated for 23 h with a uniformly distributed spectral PFD (SPFD) of 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 at every peak wavelength (405, 460, 630, 660, and 735 nm) grew almost straight upwards. When they were irradiated with an SPFD gradient of blue light (460 nm peak wavelength), the coleoptiles showed a phototropic curvature in the direction of the greater SPFD of blue light. The greater SPFD gradient induced the greater curvature of coleoptiles. The relation between the phototropic curvature (deg) and the blue-light SPFD gradient (micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1) was 2 deg per 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1. Conclusions The plant lighting system, with a computer with a graphical user interface program, can control the PFD and mixing ratios of five wavelength-band lights. A highly uniform PFD distribution was achieved, although an intentionally distorted PFD gradient was also created. Phototropic responses of oat coleoptiles to the blue light gradient demonstrated the merit of fine controllability of this plant lighting system. PMID:23173915

  2. Carrier-interference ratios for frequency sharing between frequency-modulated amplitude-modulated-vestigial-sideband television systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, S. P.; Miller, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    For just perceptible interference, an FM television signal interfering with another FM television signal must have an average signal power that is 26 to 37 db less than the wanted signal power. For an AM-VSB television signal interfering with an FM television signal, the AM-VSB television's sync peak average power must be 18 to 31 db below the FM television signal's average power. Also, when an FM television signal interferes with an AM-VSB signal, the average signal power of the FM signal should be 56 to 59 db below the sync peak average power of the AM-VSB television signal. The range of power ratios occur as a result of different TV scenes used in the tests and different FM-signal frequency deviations used. All tests were performed using 525 line, system M, color-television signals.

  3. A heuristic approach to worst-case carrier-to-interference ratio maximization in satellite system synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, Charles H.; Walton, Eric K.; Mata, Fernando; Mount-Campbell, Clark A.; Olen, Carl A.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of allotting GEO locations to communication satellites so as to maximize the smallest aggregate carrier-to-interference (C/I) ratio calculated at any test point (assumed earth station). The location allotted to each satellite must be within the satellite's service arc, and angular separation constraints are enforced for each pair of satellites to control single-entry EMI. Solutions to this satellite system synthesis problem (SSSP) are found by embedding two heuristic procedures for the satellite location problem (SLP), in a binary search routine to find an estimate of the largest increment to the angular separation values that permits a feasible solution to SLP and SSSP. Numerical results for a 183-satellite, 208-beam example problem are presented.

  4. Scaling of volume to surface ratio and doubling time in growing unicellular organisms: Do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2014-10-06

    The scaling of physical and biological characteristics of the living organisms is a basic method for searching of new biophysical laws. In series of previous studies the author showed that in Poikilotherms, Mammals and Aves, the volume to surface ratio V×S{sup ?1} (m) of organisms is proportional to their generation time T{sub gt}(s) via growth rate v (m s{sup ?1}): V×S{sup ?1}?=?v{sub gr}×T{sup r}. The power and the correlation coefficients are near to 1.0. Aim of this study is: i) to prove with experimental data the validity of the above equation for Unicellular organisms and ii) to show that perhaps, the cells are quantum-mechanical systems. The data for body mass M (kg), density ? (kg/m{sup 3}), minimum and maximum doubling time T{sub dt} (s) for 50 unicellular organisms are assembled from scientific sources, and the computer program ‘Statistics’ is used for calculations. In result i) the analytical relationship from type: V×S{sup ?1}?=?4.46?10{sup ?11}×T{sub dt} was found, where v{sub gr}?=?4.46×10{sup ?11} m/s and ii) it is shown that the products between cell mass M, cell length expressed by V/S ratio and growth rate v{sub gr} satisfied the Heisenberg uncertainty principle i.e. the inequalities V/S×M×v{sub gr}>h/2? and T{sub dt}×M×v{sub gr}{sup 2}>h/2? are valid, where h= 6.626×10{sup ?34} J?s is the Planck constant. This rise the question: do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?.

  5. The Development of a Computerized System for the Estimation of Reliability for Measurement Systems Employing Interval or Ratio Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, D. Thomas

    Critical to precise quantitative research is reliability estimation. Researchers have limited tools, however, to assess the reliability of evolving instruments. Consequently, cursory assessment is typical and in-depth evaluation is rare. This paper presents a rationale for and description of PIAS, a computerized instrument analysis system. PIAS…

  6. Spatial changes in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of sludge and associated organisms in a biological sewage treatment system.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Takashi; Kanaya, Gen; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Miyaoka, Yuma; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (?¹³C and ?¹?N) have been utilized as powerful tools for tracing energy or material flows within food webs in a range of environmental studies. However, the techniques have rarely been applied to the study of biological wastewater treatment technologies. We report on the spatial changes in ?¹³C and ?¹?N in sludge and its associated biotic community in a wastewater treatment system. This system consisted of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) which is a novel type of trickling filter. The results showed clear spatial changes in the ?¹³C and ?¹?N of suspended solids (SS), retained sludge, and macrofauna (oligochaetes and fly larvae) in the system. The ?¹³C and ?¹?N was used as a natural tracer to determine the SS dynamic throughout the system. The results imply that SS in the DHS effluent was mainly eluted from the retained sludge in the lower section of the DHS reactor. The ?¹?N of the retained sludge in the DHS reactor increased drastically from the inlet towards to the outlet, from -0.7‰ to 10.3‰. This phenomenon may be attributed to nitrogen conversion processes (i.e. nitrification and denitrification). The ?¹?N of oligochaetes also increased from the inlet to the outlet, which corresponded well to that of the retained sludge. Thus, the ?¹?N of the oligochaetes might simply mirror the ?¹?N of the retained sludge. On the other hand, the ?¹³C and ?¹?N of sympatric fly larvae differed from those of the oligochaetes sampled, indicating dietary differences between the taxa. Therefore ?¹³C and ?¹?N reflected both treatment and dietary characteristics. We concluded that ?¹³C and ?¹?N values are potentially useful as alternative indicators for investigating microbial ecosystems and treatment characteristics of biological wastewater treatment systems. PMID:25462745

  7. Behavior of aircraft antiskid breaking systems on dry and wet runway surfaces: A slip-ratio-controlled system with ground speed reference from unbraked nose wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, J. A.; Stubbs, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility to study the braking and cornering response of a slip ratio controlled aircraft antiskid braking system with ground speed reference derived from an unbraked nose wheel. The investigation, conducted on dry and wet runway surfaces, utilized one main gear wheel, brake, and tire assembly of a DC-9 series 10 airplane. During maximum braking, the average ratio of the drag force friction coefficient developed by the antiskid system to the maximum drag force friction coefficient available was higher on the dry surface than on damp and flooded surfaces, and was reduced with lighter vertical loads, higher yaw angles, and when new tire treads were replaced by worn treads. Similarly, the average ratio of side force friction coefficient developed by the tire under antiskid control to the maximum side force friction coefficient available to a freely rolling yawed tire decreased with increasing yaw angle, generally increased with ground speed, and decreased when tires with new treads were replaced by those with worn treads.

  8. Impact of heel effect and ROI size on the determination of contrast-to-noise ratio for digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsager, Abdulaziz; Young, Kenneth C.; Oduko, Jennifer M.

    2008-03-01

    The European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify a procedure for measuring contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) using a 0.2mm thickness of aluminium with different thicknesses of Plexiglas. The relationship between ROI size and heel effect and how this affects CNR measurement is investigated in this work for DR and CR systems. The measured relative noise for the CR images was found to be strongly dependant on the ROI size due to the heel effect. After applying heel effect correction there was very little dependence on ROI size. The relative noise in the images from the DR system showed very little dependence on ROI size. The heel effect also distorted the CNR measurement on CR images when larger ROI is used. However the use of multiple small ROIs led to a result that was essentially the same as if a heel effect correction had been applied. The appropriate ROI size which should be used for CNR measurement was found to be 0.25 × 0.25 cm. Using this size the heel effect had an insignificant impact on the measurement of relative noise and CNR. This approach has the advantage that only a single image is required for each measurement. The application of heel effect correction with CR systems requires two images and complex image processing. The current suggestion in the European guidelines to use a 2 × 2cm ROI is inappropriate for CR systems and leads to an error of 8% to 18% in CNR determination due to the heel effect.

  9. Effects of doping concentration ratio on electrical characterization in pseudomorphic HEMT-based MMIC switches for ICT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Jae-Kyoung; Oh, Jung-Hun; Sung, Ho-Kun; Wang, Cong

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the doping concentration ratios between upper and lower silicon planar-doping layers on the DC and RF characteristics of the double planar doped pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs) are investigated. From the device simulation, an increase of maximum extrinsic transconductance and a decrease of total on- and off-state capacitances are observed, as well as an increase of the upper to lower planar-doping concentration ratios (UTLPDR), which give rise to an enhancement of the switching speed and isolation characteristics. On the basis of simulation results, two types of pHEMTs are fabricated with two different UTLPDRs of 4:1 and 1:2. After applying these two types' pHEMTs, single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) transmitter/receiver monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) switches are also designed and fabricated. The SPDT MMIC switch with a 4:1 UTLPDR shows an insertion loss of 0.58 dB, isolation of 40.2 dB, and switching speed of 100 ns, respectively, which correspondingly indicate a 0.23 dB lower insertion loss, 2.90 dB higher isolation and 2.5 times faster switching speed than those of 1:2 UTLPDR at frequency range of 2-6 GHz. From the simulation results and comparative studies, we propose that the UTLPDR must be greater than 4:1 for the best switching performance. With the abovementioned excellent performances, the proposed switch would be quite promising in the application of information and communications technology system.

  10. Evaluating adaptation options of microcirculatory-tissue systems based on the physiological link of nutritive blood flow and redox ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Sidorov, Victor V.; Dremin, Victor V.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Novikova, Irina N.; Zhu, Simian; Nabi, Ghulam; Litvinova, Karina S.; Baklanova, Anastasia P.; Bakshaliev, Ruslan M.; Ravcheev, Sergey A.

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescent spectroscopy (FS) is becoming more widely used in chemistry, biology, in various fields of medical technology and medicine in general. Many purulent wounds, burns and other destructive inflammatory processes are accompanied by changes in the fluorescent activity of the tissues, which occurs due to a misbalance in accumulation of natural fluorophores: FAD, NADH, lipofuscin, porphyrins, structural proteins, etc. The study of redox ratio (RR), characterizing the metabolic processes, is important in the assessment of the metabolic activity ofmicrocirculatory-tissue systems (MTS). However, one of the big problems of the FS method is still the correct interpretation of the data and the development of practical methods for its application in clinical medicine. To solve this problem and create new diagnostic criteria, we propose to evaluate the adaptive capacity of MTS using indicators of links between nutritive blood flow and redox ratio during a physiological rest and functional load (occlusion test). As is known, these parameters (RR and nutritive blood flow) characterize the metabolic activity of tissues.We have performedan experimental study of the relationship between the RR, defined by FS, and nutritive blood flow, defined by the methods of laser Doppler flowmetry. Preliminary results in the study of a complex approach to diagnosis of the state of biological tissue were obtained. A positive relationship between the nutritive blood flow in the microcirculatory channel and RR of skin tissue is observed.The speed of change of metabolism in the phase of occlusion and reperfusion and duration of phase of recovery may be the criteria for adaptive capabilities of MTS, which has practical significance for physiology and medicine.

  11. Impact of ?-lactalbumin:?-lactoglobulin ratio on the heat stability of model infant milk formula protein systems.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Shane V; Dowling, Aisling P; Caldeo, Veronica; Kelly, Alan L; O'Mahony, James A

    2016-03-01

    Model infant milk formula systems (5.5% protein) were formulated to contain ?-lactalbumin:?-lactoglobulin ratios of 0.1, 0.5, 1.3, 2.1 or 4.6 and assessed for heat stability and heat-induced changes. 'Humanising' the model formulas by increasing ?-lactalbumin:?-lactoglobulin enhanced heat stability at 140°C in the pH range 6.6-6.9. The model formulas were analysed after lab-scale high-temperature short-time heating at pH 6.8. Gel electrophoresis indicated that increased heat stability in high ?-lactalbumin:?-lactoglobulin samples was due to decreased covalent interactions between proteins. In low ?-lactalbumin:?-lactoglobulin formulas, protein-protein interactions caused marked increases in protein particle size and viscosity of the heated systems; conversely, covalent interactions between proteins were minimal in high ?-lactalbumin:?-lactoglobulin formulas. Reduced protein-protein interactions with increasing ?-lactalbumin:?-lactoglobulin has important implications for subsequent processing; for example, lower viscosity post-heating may affect bulk density in spray-dried products or physical stability in ready-to-feed products. PMID:26471542

  12. The Alfalfa “Almost Darks” Campaign: Pilot VLA HI Observations of Five High Mass-To-Light Ratio Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, John M.; Martinkus, Charlotte P.; Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Janowiecki, Steven; Jones, Michael; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Nichols, Nathan; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Troischt, Parker

    2015-02-01

    We present new Very Large Array (VLA) H i spectral line imaging of five sources discovered by the ALFALFA extragalactic survey. These targets are drawn from a larger sample of systems that were not uniquely identified with optical counterparts during ALFALFA processing, and as such have unusually high H i mass to light ratios. The candidate “Almost Dark” objects fall into four broad categories: (1) objects with nearby H i neighbors that are likely of tidal origin; (2) objects that appear to be part of a system of multiple H i sources, but which may not be tidal in origin; (3) objects isolated from nearby ALFALFA H i detections, but located near a gas-poor early type galaxy; (4) apparently isolated sources, with no object of coincident redshift within ˜400 kpc. Roughly 75% of the 200 objects without identified counterparts in the ?.40 database (Haynes et al. 2011) fall into category 1 (likely tidal), and were not considered for synthesis follow-up observations. The pilot sample presented here (AGC193953, AGC208602, AGC208399, AGC226178, and AGC233638) contains the first five sources observed as part of a larger effort to characterize H i sources with no readily identifiable optical counterpart at single dish resolution (3.?5). These objects span a range of H i mass [7.41 < log(MHi ) < 9.51] and H i mass to B-band luminosity ratios (3 < MHi /LB < 9). We compare the H i total intensity and velocity fields to optical imaging drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to ultraviolet imaging drawn from archival GALEX observations. Four of the sources with uncertain or no optical counterpart in the ALFALFA data are identified with low surface brightness optical counterparts in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging when compared with VLA H i intensity maps, and appear to be galaxies with clear signs of ordered rotation in the H i velocity fields. Three of these are detected in far-ultraviolet GALEX images, a likely indication of star formation within the last few hundred Myrs. One source (AGC208602) is likely tidal in nature, associated with the NGC 3370 group. Consistent with previous efforts, we find no “dark galaxies” in this limited sample. However, the present observations do reveal complex sources with suppressed star formation, highlighting both the observational difficulties and the necessity of synthesis follow-up observations to understand these extreme objects.

  13. Assessment of Knee Cartilage Stress Distribution and Deformation Using Motion Capture System and Wearable Sensors for Force Ratio Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mijailovic, N.; Vulovic, R.; Milankovic, I.; Radakovic, R.; Filipovic, N.; Peulic, A.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the knee cartilage deformation ratio as well as the knee cartilage stress distribution is of particular importance in clinical studies due to the fact that these represent some of the basic indicators of cartilage state and that they also provide information about joint cartilage wear so medical doctors can predict when it is necessary to perform surgery on a patient. In this research, we apply various kinds of sensors such as a system of infrared cameras and reflective markers, three-axis accelerometer, and force plate. The fluorescent marker and accelerometers are placed on the patient's hip, knee, and ankle, respectively. During a normal walk we are recording the space position of markers, acceleration, and ground reaction force by force plate. Measured data are included in the biomechanical model of the knee joint. Geometry for this model is defined from CT images. This model includes the impact of ground reaction forces, contact force between femur and tibia, patient body weight, ligaments, and muscle forces. The boundary conditions are created for the finite element method in order to noninvasively determine the cartilage stress distribution. PMID:26417382

  14. JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2007 1025 Ultrathick and High-Aspect-Ratio Nickel

    E-print Network

    Akin, Tayfun

    -Aspect-Ratio Nickel Microgyroscope Using EFAB Multilayer Additive Electroforming Said Emre Alper, Ilker Ender Ocak of a microgyroscope that has a 240-µm-thick multilayer electroformed-nickel structural mass and a lateral aspect ratio, demonstrating reliability of electroformed nickel of EFAB process. In addition, the mechanical quality factor

  15. Examining the effect of length/width ratio on the hydro-dynamic behaviour in a DAF system using CFD and ADV techniques.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S B; Park, N S; Lee, S J; Ahn, H W; Wang, C K

    2006-01-01

    Dissolved air flotation (DAF) is a solid-liquid separation system that uses fine bubbles rising from the bottom to remove particles in water. In this study, we investigated the effect of L/W(L; length, W; width) on the hydrodynamic behavior in a DAF system using CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and ADV (acoustic Doppler velocimetry) technique. The factual full-scale DAF system, L/W ratio of 1:1, was selected and various UW ratio conditions (2:1, 3:1,4:1 and 5:1) were simulated with CFD. For modelling, 2-phase (gas-liquid) flow equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and turbulence quantities were solved using a Eulerian-Eulerian approach based on the assumption that a very small particle is applied in the DAF system. Also, for verification of CFD simulation results, we measured the actual velocity at some points in the full-scale DAF system with the ADV technique. Both the simulation and the measurement results were in good accordance with each other. We concluded that the L/W ratio and outlet geometry play an important role for flow pattern and fine bubble distribution in the flotation zone. In the ratio of 1:1, the dead zone is less than those in other cases. On the other hand, in the ratio of 5:1, the fine bubbles were more evenly distributed. PMID:16752775

  16. Evaluating the utility of B/Ca ratios in planktic foraminifera as a proxy for the carbonate system: A case study of Globigerinoides ruber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henehan, Michael J.; Foster, Gavin L.; Rae, James W. B.; Prentice, Katy C.; Erez, Jonathan; Bostock, Helen C.; Marshall, Brittney J.; Wilson, Paul A.

    2015-04-01

    B/Ca ratios in foraminifera have attracted considerable scientific attention as a proxy for past ocean carbonate system. However, the carbonate system controls on B/Ca ratios are not straightforward, with ?[CO32-] ([CO32-]in situ - [CO32-]at saturation) correlating best with B/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera, rather than pH, B>(OH>)/4-HCO3-, or B>(OH>)/4-DIC (as a simple model of boron speciation in seawater and incorporation into CaCO3 would predict). Furthermore, culture experiments have shown that in planktic foraminifera properties such as salinity and [B]sw can have profound effects on B/Ca ratios beyond those predicted by simple partition coefficients. Here, we investigate the controls on B/Ca ratios in G. ruber via a combination of culture experiments and core-top measurements, and add to a growing body of evidence that suggests B/Ca ratios in symbiont-bearing foraminiferal carbonate are not a straightforward proxy for past seawater carbonate system conditions. We find that while B/Ca ratios in culture experiments covary with pH, in open ocean sediments this relationship is not seen. In fact, our B/Ca data correlate best with [PO43-] (a previously undocumented association) and in most regions, salinity. These findings might suggest a precipitation rate or crystallographic control on boron incorporation into foraminiferal calcite. Regardless, our results underscore the need for caution when attempting to interpret B/Ca records in terms of the ocean carbonate system, at the very least in the case of mixed-layer planktic foraminifera.

  17. DEEP, LOW-MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XII. CK BOOTIS WITH POSSIBLE CYCLIC MAGNETIC ACTIVITY AND ADDITIONAL COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2012-05-15

    We present precision CCD photometry, a period study, and a two-color simultaneous Wilson code solution of the short-period contact binary CK Bootis. The asymmetric light curves were modeled by a dark spot on the primary component. The result identifies that CK Boo is an A-type W UMa binary with a high fillout of f = 71.7({+-} 4.4)%. From the O - C curve, it is found that the orbital period changes in a complicated mode, i.e., a long-term increase with two sinusoidal variations. One cyclic oscillation with a period of 10.67({+-} 0.20) yr may result from magnetic activity cycles, which are identified by the variability of Max. I - Max. II. Another sinusoidal variation (i.e., A = 0.0131 days({+-} 0.0009 days) and P{sub 3} = 24.16({+-} 0.64) yr) may be attributed to the light-time effect due to a third body. This kind of additional companion can extract angular momentum from the central binary system. The orbital period secularly increases at a rate of dP/dt = +9.79 ({+-}0.80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted by conservative mass transfer from the secondary to the primary. This kind of deep, low-mass ratio overcontact binaries may evolve into a rapid-rotating single star, only if the contact configuration do not break down at J{sub spin} > (1/3)J{sub orb}.

  18. Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

    2013-03-01

    If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time-dependent measures of performance including uranium usage, TRU inventory, and radiotoxicity to evaluate the complex impacts of transition from the current uranium-fueled LWR system, and other more realistic impacts that may not be intuited from the time-independent steady-state conditions of the end-state fuel cycle. These analyses were performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model VISION. Compared with static calculations, dynamic results paint a different picture of option space and the urgency of starting a FR fleet. For example, in a static analysis, there is a sharp increase in uranium utilization as CR exceeds 1.0 (burner versus breeder). However, in dynamic analyses that examine uranium use over the next 1 to 2 centuries, behavior as CR crosses the 1.0 threshold is smooth, and other parameters such as the time required outside of reactors to recycle fuel become important. Overall, we find that there is no unambiguously superior value of TRU CR; preferences depend on the relative importance of different fuel cycle system objectives.

  19. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred J.

    2014-03-01

    Wrinkles occur when a compressive strain is imposed on a bilayer system composed of a stiff thin top film and a soft substrate. Wrinkle aspect ratio (wrinkle height divided by wavelength) is perhaps the most critical parameter for many promising wrinkle-based technologies; however, the current accessible range of aspect ratio has been restricted from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or ridges. Here, we demonstrate the ability to delay this transition and ultimately expand the range of aspect ratios. Building upon recently developed models which link this transition to the asymmetric traction forces between the wrinkle crests and valleys for non-linear strain energy functions, we experimentally quantify the critical strain for both ridge and fold localizations as a function of the substrate material properties, initial stretch ratio, as well as film properties and geometry. Collectively, we demonstrate the ability to achieve wrinkle aspect ratios as large as 0.8, demonstrating significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  20. ENRICHMENT OF THE DUST-TO-GAS MASS RATIO IN BONDI/JEANS ACCRETION/CLOUD SYSTEMS DUE TO UNEQUAL CHANGES IN DUST AND GAS INCOMING VELOCITIES

    E-print Network

    Bellan, Paul M.

    ENRICHMENT OF THE DUST-TO-GAS MASS RATIO IN BONDI/JEANS ACCRETION/CLOUD SYSTEMS DUE TO UNEQUAL CHANGES IN DUST AND GAS INCOMING VELOCITIES P. M. Bellan Applied Physics, California Institute. It is shown that high-velocity dust impinging on this cloud will tend to pile up due to having a different

  1. Stable isotopes are a powerful way to describe and quantify trophic relationships in aquatic systems. Evaluating the ratios of carbon and nitrogen isotopes of consumers

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Deborah

    ratios between different species of macroalgae that cannot usually be differentiated using other isotopes. A Bayesian model found that macroalgae was the leading source of organic matter to clam diets food web analysis in coastal and marine systems when used in combination with carbon and nitrogen

  2. Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs) carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itoh, T.; Kubo, H.; Honda, H.; Tominaga, T.; Makide, Y.; Yakohata, A.; Sakai, H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs), carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems are reported. The balloon-borne grab-sampling system has been launched from Sanriku Balloon Center three times since 1981. It consists of: (1) six sampling cylinders, (2) eight motor driven values, (3) control and monitor circuits, and (4) pressurized housing. Particular consideration is paid to the problem of contamination. Strict requirements are placed on the choice of materials and components, construction methods, cleaning techniques, vacuum integrity, and sampling procedures. An aluminum pressurized housing and a 4-m long inlet line are employed to prevent the sampling air from contamination by outgassing of sampling and control devices. The sampling is performed during the descent of the system. Vertical profiles of mixing ratios of CF2Cl2, CFCl3 and CH4 are given. Mixing ratios of CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 in the stratosphere do not show the discernible effect of the increase of those in the ground level background, and decrease with altitude. Decreasing rate of CFCl3 is larger than that of CF2Cl2. CH4 mixing ratio, on the other hand, shows diffusive equilibrium, as the photodissociation cross section of CH4 is small and concentrations of OH radical and 0(sup I D) are low.

  3. Regulation of gonadal sex ratios and pubertal development by the thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Prakash; Patino, Reynaldo

    2013-01-01

    We examined associations between thyroid condition, gonadal sex and pubertal development in zebrafish. Seventy-two-hour postfertilization larvae were reared in untreated medium or in the presence of goitrogens (sodium perchlorate, 0.82 mM; methimazole, 0.15 and 0.3 mM) or thyroxine (1 and 10 nM) for 30 days. Thyrocyte height, gonadal sex and gonadal development were histologically determined at 45 and 60 days postfertilization (dpf). Thyrocyte hypertrophy, an index of hypothyroidism, was observed at 45 and 60 dpf in perchlorate-treated but only at 45 dpf in methimazole-treated fish. Similarly, gonadal sex ratios were biased toward ovaries relative to control animals at 45 and 60 dpf in perchlorate-treated fish but only at 45 dpf in methimazole-treated fish. Gonadal sex ratios were biased toward testes at 45 and 60 dpf in thyroxine-treated fish. Spermatogenesis was delayed in testes from goitrogen-treated fish at 60 dpf relative to control values, but was unaffected in testes from thyroxine-treated individuals. Oogenesis seemed to be nonspecifically delayed in all treatments relative to control at 60 dpf. This study confirmed the previously reported association between hypothyroid condition and ovarian-skewed ratios, and hyperthyroid condition and testicular-skewed ratios, and also showed that male pubertal development is specifically delayed by experimental hypothyroidism. The simultaneous recovery from the hypothyroid and ovary-inducing effects of methimazole by 60 dpf (27 days post-treatment) suggests that the ovary-skewing effect of goitrogens is reversible when thyroid conditions return to basal levels before developmental commitment of gonadal sex. Conversely, the masculinizing effect of hyperthyroidism seems to be stable and perhaps permanent.

  4. A dual-mode generalized likelihood ratio approach to self-reorganizing digital flight control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bueno, R.; Chow, E.; Gershwin, S. B.; Willsky, A. S.

    1975-01-01

    The research is reported on the problems of failure detection and reliable system design for digital aircraft control systems. Failure modes, cross detection probability, wrong time detection, application of performance tools, and the GLR computer package are discussed.

  5. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.536 My system has...

  6. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.534 How does my system...

  7. Tests of variable-band multilayers designed for investigating optimal signal-to-noise vs artifact signal ratios in Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography (DDSA) imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boyers, D.; Ho, A.; Li, Q.; Piestrup, M.; Rice, M.; Tatchyn, R.

    1993-08-01

    In recent work, various design techniques were applied to investigate the feasibility of controlling the bandwidth and bandshape profiles of tungsten/boron-carbon (W/B{sub 4}C) and tungsten/silicon (W/Si) multilayers for optimizing their performance in synchrotron radiation based angiographical imaging systems at 33 keV. Varied parameters included alternative spacing geometries, material thickness ratios, and numbers of layer pairs. Planar optics with nominal design reflectivities of 30%--94% and bandwidths ranging from 0.6%--10% were designed at the Stanford Radiation Laboratory, fabricated by the Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company, and characterized on Beam Line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, in this paper we report selected results of these tests and review the possible use of the multilayers for determining optimal signal to noise vs. artifact signal ratios in practical Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography systems.

  8. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  9. Direct emissions of N2O, CO 2, and CH 4 from A/A/O bioreactor systems: impact of influent C/N ratio.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yangang; Wang, Jinhe; Xu, Li; Liu, Cui; Zong, Ruiqiang; Yu, Jianlin; Liang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    Direct emissions of N2O, CO2, and CH4, three important greenhouse gases (GHGs), from biological sewage treatment process have attracted increasing attention worldwide, due to the increasing concern about climate change. Despite the tremendous efforts devoted to understanding GHG emission from biological sewage treatment process, the impact of influent C/N ratios, in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD)/total nitrogen (TN), on an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A/A/O) bioreactor system has not been investigated. In this work, the direct GHG emission from A/A/O bioreactor systems fed with actual sewage was analyzed under different influent C/N ratios over a 6-month period. The results showed that the variation in influent carbon (160 to 500 mg/L) and nitrogen load (35 to 95 mg/L) dramatically influenced pollutant removal efficiency and GHG production from this process. In the A/A/O bioreactor systems, the GHG production increased from 26-39 to 112-173 g CO2-equivalent as influent C/N ratios decreased from 10.3/10.7 to 3.5/3.8. Taking consideration of pollutant removal efficiency and direct biogenic GHG (N2O, CO2, and CH4) production, the optimum influent C/N ratio was determined to be 7.1/7.5, at which a relatively high pollutant removal efficiency and meanwhile a low level of GHG production (30.4 g CO2-equivalent) can be achieved. Besides, mechanical aeration turned out to be the most significant factor influencing GHG emission from the A/A/O bioreactor systems. PMID:25850740

  10. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing. Part 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Part 2-Appendices of a study conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities, and load reductions were achieved.

  11. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities and load reductions are achieved.

  12. High Resolution Imaging of the Anomalous Flux-Ratio Gravitational Lens System CLASS B2045+265: Dark Or Luminous Satellites?

    SciTech Connect

    McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Flack, C.E.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Thompson, D.; Matthews, K.; Blandford, R.D.; Readhead, A.C.S.; Soifer, B.T.; /UC, Davis /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron. /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /Bemidji State U. /Caltech /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Cornell U., Astron. Dept.

    2006-11-10

    The existence of flux-ratio anomalies between fold and cusp images in galaxy-scale strong-lens systems has led to an interpretation based on the presence of a high mass-fraction of cold-dark-matter (CDM) substructures around galaxies, as predicted by numerical N-body simulations. These substructures can cause large perturbations of the image magnifications, leading to changes in the image flux ratios. The flux-ratio anomaly is particularly evident in the radio-loud quadruple gravitational lens system CLASS B2045+265. In this paper, new high-resolution radio, optical, and infrared imaging of B2045+265 is presented which sheds more light on this anomaly and its possible causes. First, deep Very Long Baseline Array observations show very compact images, possibly with a hint of a jet, but with no evidence for differential scattering or scatter broadening. Hence, the flux-ratio anomaly is unlikely to be caused by refractive scattering in either the Milky Way or the lens galaxy. Second, optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and through Adaptive-Optics imaging with the W. M. Keck Telescope, show a previously undiscovered object--interpreted as a (tidally disrupted) dwarf satellite based on its colors and slight extension--between the main lens galaxy and the three anomalous flux-ratio images. Third, color variations in the early-type lens galaxy indicate recent star-formation, possibly the result of secondary infall of gas-rich satellites. A population of young galaxies around the lens system could explain the previously discovered strong [O II] emission. However, spiral structure and/or normal star formation in the lens galaxy cannot be excluded. In light of these new data, we propose a lens model for the system, including the observed dwarf satellite, which reproduces all positional and flux-ratio constraints, without the need for additional CDM substructure. Although the model is peculiar in that the dwarf galaxy must be highly flattened, the model is very similar to recently proposed mass models based on high-order multipole expansions.

  13. Evolutionary outcomes for pairs of planets undergoing orbital migration and circularization: second-order resonances and observed period ratios in Kepler's planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Gruess, M.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the origin of the architectures of low-mass planetary systems, we perform numerical surveys of the evolution of pairs of coplanar planets in the mass range (1-4) M?. These evolve for up to 2 × 107 yr under a range of orbital migration torques and circularization rates assumed to arise through interaction with a protoplanetary disc. Near the inner disc boundary, significant variations of viscosity, interaction with density waves or with the stellar magnetic field could occur and halt migration, but allow circularization to continue. This was modelled by modifying the migration and circularization rates. Runs terminated without an extended period of circularization in the absence of migration torques gave rise to either a collision, or a system close to a resonance. These were mostly first order with a few per cent terminating in second-order resonances. Both planetary eccentricities were small <0.1 and all resonant angles liberated. This type of survey produced only a limited range of period ratios and cannot reproduce Kepler observations. When circularization alone operates in the final stages, divergent migration occurs causing period ratios to increase. Depending on its strength the whole period ratio range between 1 and 2 can be obtained. A few systems close to second-order commensurabilities also occur. In contrast to when arising through convergent migration, resonant trapping does not occur and resonant angles circulate. Thus, the behaviour of the resonant angles may indicate the form of migration that led to near resonance.

  14. A multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer for warm-dense matter experiments at NDCX-I and NDCX-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, P. A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer (SOP) developed the for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments at the existing NDCX-I facility and the NDCX-II facility currently being commissioned at LBNL. The SOP served as the primary temperature diagnostic in the recent NDCX-I experiments, in which an intense K+ beam was used to heat different metal samples into WDM states. The SOP consists of a spectral grating (visible and near-infrared spectral range) and a fast, high-dynamic-range optical streak camera. The instrument is calibrated absolutely with a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp and can itself be considered as an absolutely calibrated, time-resolving spectrometer. The sample temperature is determined from fitting the recorded thermal spectrum into the Planck formula multiplied by a model of emissivity.

  15. A dual-mode generalized likelihood ratio approach to self-reorganizing digital flight control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Analytic techniques have been developed for detecting and identifying abrupt changes in dynamic systems. The GLR technique monitors the output of the Kalman filter and searches for the time that the failure occured, thus allowing it to be sensitive to new data and consequently increasing the chances for fast system recovery following detection of a failure. All failure detections are based on functional redundancy. Performance tests of the F-8 aircraft flight control system and computerized modelling of the technique are presented.

  16. Alkali injection system with controlled CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 ratios for combustion of coal

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A high temperature combustion process for an organic fuel containing sulfur n which the nitrogen of air is replaced by carbon dioxide for combination with oxygen with the ratio of CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 being controlled to generate combustion temperatures above 2000 K. for a gas-gas reaction with SO.sub.2 and an alkali metal compound to produce a sulfate and in which a portion of the carbon-dioxide rich gas is recycled for mixing with oxygen and/or for injection as a cooling gas upstream from heating exchangers to limit fouling of the exchangers, with the remaining carbon-dioxide rich gas being available as a source of CO.sub.2 for oil recovery and other purposes.

  17. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People...

  18. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People...

  19. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People...

  20. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People...

  1. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People...

  2. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People...

  3. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People...

  4. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People...

  5. Fabrication of High-Resolution and High-Aspect-Ratio Patterns on a Stepped Substrate by Using Scanning Probe Lithography with a Multilayer-Resist System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Masayoshi; Sugita, Nami; Heike, Seiji; Kajiyama, Hiroshi; Hashizume, Tomihiro

    1999-04-01

    The high-resolution and high-aspect-ratio resist-patterning method using a trilayer-resist system with atomic force microscopy (AFM) lithography is described. This system consists of a high-resolution negative-type resist as a top layer, p-Si as an intermediate layer, and an organic resist as a bottom layer. Since the bottom layer planarizes the surface, the patterns can be fabricated on a stepped surface. Using this method, we successfully fabricate 50-nm-wide and 340-nm-thick line-and-space resist patterns on a 200-nm-stepped substrate.

  6. Isotopic Ratio, Isotonic Ratio, Isobaric Ratio and Shannon Information Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The isoscaling and the isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) probes, both of which are constructed by yield ratio of fragment, provide cancelation of parameters. The information entropy theory is introduced to explain the physical meaning of the isoscaling and IBD probes. The similarity between the isoscaling and IBD results is found, i.e., the information uncertainty determined by the IBD method equals to ? - ? determined by the isoscaling (? (?) is the parameter fitted from the isotopic (isotonic) yield ratio).

  7. [Development of transient pyrometer based on multi-spectral radiation technology].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yang; Shen, Hua; Zhu, Ri-hong; Ma, Suo-dong; Li, Jian-xin; Chen, Lei; Gu, Jin-liang

    2010-11-01

    In modern dynamics system, the radiant temperature of the flame, which caused by the transient plasma stimulated by high-energy-level electromagnetism field, takes an important role in the description of the flying object's status as well as cauterization of the trajectory. Due to its extremely high temperature and transient process, the radiant temperature of the flame can hardly be measured through contracted ways, either static ways such as traditional pyrophotometer or CCD arrays. In the present paper, the authors bring forward a novel pyrophotometer based on classical theory of Planck's law (blackbody radiation law) and multi-channel spectrums radiation method. With this new type pyrophotometer, any spectrum can be selected out from the wavelength of 300 to 860 nm within 2 ns. Also, the application of high-definition diffraction grating and fibers can'ensure the accuracy of selected spectrum. The results through a serial of experiments by using this theory as well as high-speed photodetector indicate that this method is valid and accurate for the measurement of the object's surface's radiant temperature. PMID:21284205

  8. "Perfect Zoom System" which enables both a zoom ratio of 25:1 and a high-resolution in stereo microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Norio; Mizuta, Masahiro; Shinada, Nobuhiro; Nakayama, Hiroaki; Ohuchi, Yumiko

    2015-09-01

    A stereomicroscope can stereoscopically observe an object with protrusions and recesses as if the object were viewed by both eyes. Such stereomicroscopes use an optical system to create two slightly different viewing angles of an object. The different images are both enlarged and viewed through two eyepieces. Each of the observation optical systems includes a variable magnification mechanism which is called a zoom lens system. In recent years, a demand for stereomicroscopes that can observe a wide variable magnification range has been increasing along with the diversification of applications. However, there are no stereomicroscope zoom lenses with both a high resolution and a large zoom ratio. We developed the "Perfect Zoom System" which can reduce the light flux diameter going through the objective lens in the low-power state. In the "Perfect Zoom System", the zoom lens groups move along not only the optical axes but also perpendicular to the axes. Therefore, the objective lens could be made smaller by decentering the G2 and G3 group lenses in zoom lens group. We achieved a high resolution and a zoom ratio of 25:1.

  9. 40 CFR 141.534 - How does my system use this data to calculate an inactivation ratio?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.534 How...

  10. 40 CFR 141.536 - My system has developed an inactivation ratio; what must we do now?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.536 My...

  11. Thermodynamic Modeling and Analysis of the Ratio of Heat to Power Based on a Conceptual CHP System 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Z.; Li, X.; Liu, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The CHP system not only produces electrical energy, but also produces thermal energy. An extensive analysis of the CHP market reveals that one of the most important engineering characteristics is flexibility. A variable ...

  12. Characterizing the zone of influence of dark matter clumps on image positions and flux ratios in gravitational lensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jyothisraj; Keeton, Charles R.; Brennan, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model of the universe predicts that there should be hundreds to thousands of clumps surrounding a massive galaxy. However, observations have shown that we only see dozens of dwarf galaxies and not the hundreds to thousands that are predicted. This means that either the CDM model prediction is wrong, or most of the substructure consists of dark matter that cannot be observed directly. Massive galaxies serve as natural gravitational lenses throughout the universe that allow us to indirectly observe these dark matter perturbations. Strong gravitational lensing occurs when these massive elliptical galaxies have the critical density required to bend light from a source located behind it and produce multiple images of that same source. Dark matter clumps located near these multiple images affect their positions and flux ratios. We used lensing simulations to quantify how dark matter clumps affect image properties and to characterize this zone of influence through color maps of chi-squared values. Our results showed regions around each of the image positions that display significant perturbations for low mass clumps. For higher mass clumps, however, these distinct regions bleed together. We found that there is a correlation between the mass of the dark matter clump and the area it perturbs.This research has been supported by NSF grant PHY-1263280.

  13. Evaluation of a tracer release and measurement system for the detection and quantification of air emissions using the tracer ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecobian, A.; Clements, A. L.; Shonkwiler, K. B.; Williams, C. M.; Wells, B. L.; MacDonald, L. P.; Pierce, J. R.; Ham, J. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The number of oil and gas production operations is increasing as is their proximity to residential areas. These facilities have been known to emit methane and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere during the different phases of development and operation. To gain a better understanding of the types and magnitude of these emissions, accurate methods for identifying and measuring the plumes released from these sources are needed. One of the most common methods for characterization of emissions is the tracer ratio. In this method, a known amount of a tracer gas is released near the potential emission source, both the tracer and the compound(s) of interest are then measured at a location downwind of the potential emissions; and the emission rate is estimated based on the ratio of the compound of interest to the tracer at the location of the measurement. This work describes field tests conducted in an air field in Fort Collins, CO to evaluate a tracer release and detection system. Acetylene (tracer gas) and methane (emission from potential source) have been released from a custom made manifold system. A PICARRO G2203 analyzer (using cavity ring down spectroscopy) and a mobile kit A0941 have been deployed on a vehicle for the downwind measurements. The emissions are measured downwind of the source and the tracer ratio method is used to calculate the emissions of methane. The measured and calculated values have been compared. Additionally, silonite-coated canisters have been used for collection and analysis of acetylene to further validate the setup. This system has been evaluated for sensitivity, accuracy and response time through a series of controlled tracer and methane releases under various meteorological conditions. The results from these tests and error analysis for the system are presented and discussed.

  14. Measurement and analysis of perceivable signal-to-noise ratio for infrared imaging system with human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Jing; Chang, Honghua; Ma, Lin

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between correct discrimination probability of the human eye and perceivable signal-to-noise (SNR) threshold is studied for different equilateral triangle sizes with specified luminance through combining theoretical calculation with practical experiment based on triangle orientation discrimination (TOD) performance evaluation method. Specifically, the simulation images of triangle patterns are generated by an infrared imaging system (IRIS) simulation model. And the perceivable SNRs for these images are calculated by establishing the system theoretical model and the human vision system model. Meanwhile, the Four-Alternative Forced-Choice experiment is performed. Experiment results of several observers are averaged statistically and the curves of perceivable SNR threshold which change with the correct discrimination probability are obtained. Finally, the analyses of these results show that these changes are in accordance with the psychometric function and that the fitting curves become steep with the increase of triangle sizes. These data and conclusions are helpful to modify the existing TOD performance model of an IRIS.

  15. Preliminary engineering report for design of a subscale ejector/diffuser system for high expansion ratio space engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Kurzius, S. C.; Doktor, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The design of a subscale jet engine driven ejector/diffuser system is examined. Analytical results and preliminary design drawings and plans are included. Previously developed performance prediction techniques are verified. A safety analysis is performed to determine the mechanism for detonation suppression.

  16. Impact of the New Jersey all-payer rate-setting system: an analysis of financial ratios.

    PubMed

    Rosko, M D

    1989-01-01

    Although prospective payment may contain costs, many analysts are concerned about the unintended consequences of rate regulation. This article presents the results of a case-study analysis of the New Jersey rate-setting programs during the period 1977-1985. Using measures of profitability, liquidity, and leverage, data for New Jersey, the Northeast, and the United States as a whole are used to contrast the impact of two forms of prospective payment. After attempting alternative cost-containment methods, the New Jersey Department of Health implemented an all-payer system in which prospective rates of compensation were established for DRGs. The new rate-setting system was designed to control costs, improve access to care, maintain quality of services, ensure financial viability of efficient providers, and limit the payment differentials associated with cost shifting. The results of this study have a number of implications for the evaluation of all-payer rate regulation. First, although the New Jersey all-payer system was more successful than the partial-payer program in restraining the rate of increase in cost per case, savings were achieved without adversely affecting the viability of regulated hospitals. Second, the large differentials among payers that were associated with the partial-payer program were reduced dramatically by the all-payer program. Third, using the financial position of inner-city hospitals relative to suburban hospitals as a measure of equity, the all-payer system appeared to be a fairer method of regulating rates. PMID:10291809

  17. A complementary method to CD4 counting: measurement of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio in a tandem affinity microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjie; Gao, Yan; Pappas, Dimitri

    2015-12-01

    We describe a tandem affinity microfluidic separation that measures the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes from blood samples. It is performed by injecting 2 ?L of lysed blood samples at 1800-2700 cells ?L(-1) into a microfluidic device containing two serially linked affinity regions, followed with a stop flow incubation that captures CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes on the corresponding affinity regions. Fluorophore conjugated antibodies are then injected at a controlled shear stress of 1.7 dyn cm(-2) to label target cells while eluting non-specific cells; and at last the CD4/CD8 ratio is calculated after the cell enumeration. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes achieved by our tandem affinity microfluidic system was in close agreement with that performed using conventional flow cytometry (R (2) ?=?0.97) over a wide range (0.4-2.5) that covered the reference values from immune deficient patients to healthy people. This approach may represent an inexpensive and powerful tool in diagnosis of immunodeficiency disorders including HIV or mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:26559198

  18. Self-forced evolutions of an implicit rotating source: A natural framework to model comparable and intermediate mass-ratio systems from inspiral through ringdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, E. A.; Kumar, Prayush; Gair, Jonathan R.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2014-07-01

    We develop a waveform model to describe the inspiral, merger and ringdown of binary systems with comparable and intermediate mass ratios. This model incorporates first-order conservative self-force corrections to the energy and angular momentum, which are valid in the strong-field regime [S. Akcay et al., Phys. Rev. D 86, 104041 (2012)]. We model the radiative part of the self-force by deriving second-order radiative corrections to the energy flux. These corrections are obtained by minimizing the phase discrepancy between our self-force model and the effective one body model [Y. Pan et al., Phys. Rev. D 84, 124052 (2011) and T. Damour et al., Phys. Rev. D 87, 084035 (2013)] for a variety of mass ratios. We show that our model performs substantially better than post-Newtonian approximants currently used to model neutron star-black hole mergers from early inspiral to the innermost stable circular orbit. In order to match the late inspiral evolution onto the plunge regime, we extend the "transition phase" developed by Ori and Thorne Phys. Rev. D 62, 124022 (2000) by including finite mass-ratio corrections and modeling the orbital phase evolution using an implicit rotating source [J. G. Baker et al., Phys. Rev. D 78, 044046 (2008)]. We explicitly show that the implicit rotating source approach provides a natural transition from late-time radiation to ringdown that is equivalent to ringdown waveform modeling based on a sum of quasinormal modes.

  19. Application of European protocol in the evaluation of contrast-to-noise ratio and mean glandular dose for two digital mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Muhogora, W E; Devetti, A; Padovani, R; Msaki, P; Bonutti, F

    2008-01-01

    The performance of two digital mammography systems, Agfa CR75 and CRMM3 computed radiography (CR) and IMS Giotto MD direct digital radiography (DR), was assessed by applying a method recommended in the European protocol for quality control in mammography screening. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD) values were measured and contrast detail (CD) analysis was performed. The CNRs for system CR were 21.9, 12.9, 9.5, 8.8, 7.4, 5.5 and 4.4 for 2, 3, 4, 4.5, 5, 6 and 7-cm polymenthylmethacrylate (PMMA) thickness, respectively. The respective CNRs for system DR were 10.4, 8.8, 6.3, 7.3, 7.2, 6.4 and 6.54. For the same phantom thickness sequence, the MGDs were 0.7, 1.1, 1.3, 1.6, 1.9, 2.5 and 3.4 mGy for system CR, whereas they were 0.7, 1.2, 1.1, 1.3, 1.8, 3.5 and 3.9 mGy for system DR. The CNR and MGD results satisfactorily correlate with CD analysis results. The MGD values compare well with the values recommended in the European protocol. Despite being simple, CNR and MGD can provide an effective system for performance assessment and constancy checks for related optimisations. PMID:18283065

  20. Sixteen Years of Ulysses Interstellar Dust Measurements in the Solar System. I. Mass Distribution and Gas-to-dust Mass Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Strub, Peter; Grün, Eberhard; Sterken, Veerle J.

    2015-10-01

    In the early 1990s, contemporary interstellar dust penetrating deep into the heliosphere was identified with the in situ dust detector on board the Ulysses spacecraft. Between 1992 and the end of 2007 Ulysses monitored the interstellar dust stream. The interstellar grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar medium (ISM) surrounding our solar system. Earlier analyses of the Ulysses interstellar dust data measured between 1992 and 1998 implied the existence of a population of “big” interstellar grains (up to 10?13 kg). The derived gas-to-dust-mass ratio was smaller than the one derived from astronomical observations, implying a concentration of interstellar dust in the very local ISM. In this paper we analyze the entire data set from 16 yr of Ulysses interstellar dust measurements in interplanetary space. This paper concentrates on the overall mass distribution of interstellar dust. An accompanying paper investigates time-variable phenomena in the Ulysses interstellar dust data, and in a third paper we present the results from dynamical modeling of the interstellar dust flow applied to Ulysses. We use the latest values for the interstellar hydrogen and helium densities, the interstellar helium flow speed of {v}{ISM? }=23.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and the ratio of radiation pressure to gravity, ?, calculated for astronomical silicates. We find a gas-to-dust mass ratio in the local interstellar cloud of {R}{{g}/{{d}}}={193}-57+85, and a dust density of (2.1 ± 0.6) × 10?24 kg m?3. For a higher inflow speed of 26 {km} {{{s}}}-1, the gas-to-dust mass ratio is 20% higher, and, accordingly, the dust density is lower by the same amount. The gas-to-dust mass ratio derived from our new analysis is compatible with the value most recently determined from astronomical observations. We confirm earlier results that the very local ISM contains “big” (i.e., ?1 ?m sized) interstellar grains. We find a dust density in the local ISM that is a factor of three lower than values implied by earlier analyses.

  1. Determination of pumper truck intervention ratios in zones with high fire potential by using geographical information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricak, Burak; Kucuk, Omer; Enez, Korhan

    2014-01-01

    Fighting forest fires not only depends on the forest type, topography, and weather conditions, but is also closely related to the technical properties of fire-fighting equipment. Firefighting is an important part of fire management planning. However, because of the complex nature of forests, creating thematic layers to generate potential fire risk maps is difficult. The use of remote sensing data has become an efficient method for the discrete classification of potential fire risks. The study was located in the Central District of the Kastamonu Regional Forest Directorate, covering an area of 24,320 ha, 15,685 ha of which is forested. On the basis of stand age, crown closure, and tree species, the sizes and distributions of potential fire risk zones within the study area were determined using high-resolution GeoEye satellite imagery and geographical information system data. The status of pumper truck intervention in zones with high fire risk and the sufficiency of existing forest roads within an existing forest network were discussed based on combustible matter characteristics. Pumper truck intervention was 83% for high-risk zones, 79% for medium-risk zones, and 78% for low-risk zones. A pumper truck intervention area map along existing roads was also created.

  2. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  3. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  4. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PMID:23855895

  5. Altered Th17 cells and Th17/regulatory T-cell ratios indicate the subsequent conversion from undifferentiated connective tissue disease to definitive systemic autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Szodoray, Peter; Nakken, Britt; Barath, Sandor; Csipo, Istvan; Nagy, Gabor; El-Hage, Fadi; Osnes, Liv T; Szegedi, Gyula; Bodolay, Edit

    2013-12-01

    A shift in the balance between Th17-cells and regulatory T-cells (Treg) is an important feature of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID), and may also contribute to their development. Hereby, we assessed the distribution of peripheral Th17 and Treg-cells in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD), the forerunner of SAIDs and followed these parameters during the development towards definitive SAIDs. Fifty-one UCTD patients were investigated and followed-up for 3 years. Flow cytometry was used to identify and follow three cell-populations: Th17-cells (CD4+IL-17+ T-cells), natural regulatory T-cells (CD4(+)CD25(bright)FoxP3(+); nTregs) and IL-10 producing Type-1 regulatory T-cells (CD4+IL-10+ T-cells; Tr1). Altogether 37.3% of these patients progressed into SAIDs. Th17-cells were increased in UCTD vs. controls, which further increased in those, whom developed SAIDs eventually. The Th17/nTreg ratio gradually increased from controls through UCTD patients, reaching the highest values in SAID-progressed patients. Regarding the Th17/Tr1 ratios, a similar tendency was observed moreover Th17/Tr1 could distinguish between UCTD patients with, or without subsequent SAID progression in a very early UCTD stage. Various immunoserological markers showed association with Th17 and Th17/nTreg at baseline, indicating the consecutive development of a distinct SAID. The derailed Th17/Treg balance may contribute to disease progression therefore could function as a prognostic marker. PMID:23974054

  6. Influence of Ni/Mo ratio on structural and electrical properties of double perovskite system Sr2Ni1+ x Mo1- x O6- ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pravin; Singh, Nitish Kumar; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Prabhakar

    2015-11-01

    Technologically important double perovskite system Sr2Ni1+ x Mo1- x O6- ? with x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 was prepared by solution combustion method. The structural and the Rietveld analysis of compositions revealed the formation of double perovskite tetragonal phase Sr2NiMoO6 with space group I4/m as a major phase. SrMoO4 and NiO were also observed as minor phases. Microstructural studies depicted the formation of uniform grains for all the samples. The average grain size was found to lie between the ranges of 1-4 ?m. XPS analysis of the synthesized compositions showed the decreasing ratio of Mo5+ to Mo6+ ions in the system with increasing Ni content, which played an important role in the conduction mechanism. The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of all compositions indicated that it is more compatible to the TEC of standard electrolytes. The electrical conductivity for all the compositions was studied using impedance spectroscopy in the temperature range 200-600 °C. Composition with x = 0.05 showed better electrical conductivity with good catalytic activity.

  7. An analytical system for studying the stable isotopes of carbon monoxide using continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, S. L.; van der Veen, C.; Popa, M. E.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-02-01

    In the atmosphere, carbon monoxide (CO) is the major sink for the hydroxyl radical (OH •), has multiple anthropogenic and natural sources and considerable spatial and seasonal variability. Measurements of CO isotopic composition are useful in constraining the strengths of its individual source and sink processes and thus its global cycle. A fully automated system for ?13C and ?18O analysis has been developed to extract CO from an air sample, convert CO into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent, and then determine the isotopic composition in an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He), the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is only 1-3% of the typical sample size. The repeatability is 0.1‰ for ?13C and 0.2‰ for ?18O. The peak area allows simultaneous determination of the mole fraction with an analytical repeatability of ~0.7 nmol mol-1 for 100 mL of typical ambient air (185.4 nmol mol-1 of CO). A single, automated, measurement is performed in 18 min, so multiple measurements can be combined conveniently to improve precision.

  8. The effect of the size of the system, aspect ratio and impurities concentration on the dynamic of emergent magnetic monopoles in artificial spin ice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Alejandro

    2013-08-01

    In this work we study the dynamical properties of a finite array of nanomagnets in artificial kagome spin ice at room temperature. The dynamic response of the array of nanomagnets is studied by implementing a "frustrated celular autómata" (FCA), based in the charge model and dipolar model. The FCA simulations allow us to study in real-time and deterministic way, the dynamic of the system, with minimal computational resource. The update function is defined according to the coordination number of vertices in the system. Our results show that for a set geometric parameters of the array of nanomagnets, the system exhibits high density of Dirac strings and high density emergent magnetic monopoles. A study of the effect of disorder in the arrangement of nanomagnets is incorporated in this work.

  9. 16 Years of Ulysses Interstellar Dust Measurements in the Solar System: I. Mass Distribution and Gas-to-Dust Mass Ratio

    E-print Network

    Krüger, Harald; Gruen, Eberhard; Sterken, Veerle J

    2015-01-01

    In the early 1990s, contemporary interstellar dust (ISD) penetrating deep into the heliosphere was identified with the in-situ dust detector on board the Ulysses spacecraft. Between 1992 and the end of 2007 Ulysses monitored the ISD stream. The interstellar grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar medium surrounding our solar system. Earlier analyses of the Ulysses ISD data measured between 1992 and 1998 implied the existence of 'big' ISD grains [up to 10^-13kg]. The derived gas-to-dust-mass ratio was smaller than the one derived from astronomical observations, implying a concentration of ISD in the very local interstellar medium. We analyse the entire data set from 16 yr of Ulysses ISD measurements in interplanetary space. This paper concentrates on the overall mass distribution of ISD. An accompanying paper investigates time-variable phenomena in the Ulysses ISD data, and in a third paper we present the results from dynamical modelling of the ISD flow applied to Ulysses. We...

  10. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Effects of melt composition on Fe3+/Fe2+ in silicate melts: a step to model ferric/ferrous ratio in multicomponent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Behrens, Harald; Holtz, Francois

    2015-02-01

    The effect of Al2O3, MgO and total iron on the ferric/ferrous ratio in silicate melts was investigated in model silicate melts in the temperature range 1400-1550 °C at 1 atm total pressure. The experiments were done mostly in air and partially in pure CO2. It is demonstrated that an increase in Al2O3 concentration in a basaltic melt results in a moderate decrease of Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio. In contrast, the increase in Al2O3 in more silicic melts results in a much more pronounced decrease of Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio. The increase of MgO concentration in a basaltic melt results in a moderate increase of Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio but has a negligible effects in more silicic melts. The different behavior of Al2O3 and MgO in basaltic and more silicic melts indicates that at constant T- fO2 conditions, the effects of melt composition on ferric/ferrous ratio cannot be predicted accurately as a function of ? d i X i where d i are fixed empirical coefficients and X i are mole fractions of the main oxide component in silicate melts. We suggest an alternative approach which accounts for the interaction of cations in complex silicate melts. Based on the data obtained in this study, an equation predicting the ferric/ferrous ratio of ultramafic to silicic melts at air conditions with changing SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, total iron, MgO and P2O5 is proposed.

  12. Informal uncertainty analysis (GLUE) of continuous flow simulation in a hybrid sewer system with infiltration inflow - consistency of containment ratios in calibration and validation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinholt, A.; Grum, M.; Madsen, H.; Örn Thordarson, F.; Mikkelsen, P. S.

    2013-10-01

    Monitoring of flows in sewer systems is increasingly applied to calibrate urban drainage models used for long-term simulation. However, most often models are calibrated without considering the uncertainties. The generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) methodology is here applied to assess parameter and flow simulation uncertainty using a simplified lumped sewer model that accounts for three separate flow contributions: wastewater, fast runoff from paved areas, and slow infiltrating water from permeable areas. Recently GLUE methodology has been critisised for generating prediction limits without statistical coherence and consistency and for the subjectivity in the choice of a threshold value to distinguish "behavioural" from "non-behavioural" parameter sets. In this paper we examine how well the GLUE methodology performs when the behavioural parameter sets deduced from a calibration period are applied to generate prediction bounds in validation periods. By retaining an increasing number of parameter sets we aim at obtaining consistency between the GLUE generated 90% prediction limits and the actual containment ratio (CR) in calibration. Due to the large uncertainties related to spatio-temporal rain variability during heavy convective rain events, flow measurement errors, possible model deficiencies as well as epistemic uncertainties, it was not possible to obtain an overall CR of more than 80%. However, the GLUE generated prediction limits still proved rather consistent, since the overall CRs obtained in calibration corresponded well with the overall CRs obtained in validation periods for all proportions of retained parameter sets evaluated. When focusing on wet and dry weather periods separately, some inconsistencies were however found between calibration and validation and we address here some of the reasons why we should not expect the coverage of the prediction limits to be identical in calibration and validation periods in real-world applications. The large uncertainties result in wide posterior parameter limits, that cannot be used for interpretation of, for example, the relative size of paved area vs. the size of infiltrating area. We should therefore try to learn from the significant discrepancies between model and observations from this study, possibly by using some form of non-stationary error correction procedure, but it seems crucial to obtain more representative rain inputs and more accurate flow observations to reduce parameter and model simulation uncertainty.

  13. Informal uncertainty analysis (GLUE) of continuous flow simulation in a hybrid sewer system with infiltration inflow - consistency of containment ratios in calibration and validation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinholt, A.; Grum, M.; Madsen, H.; Thordarson, F. Ö.; Mikkelsen, P. S.

    2012-07-01

    Monitoring of flows in sewer systems is increasingly applied to calibrate urban drainage models used for long term simulation. However, most often models are calibrated without considering the uncertainties. The GLUE methodology is here applied to assess parameter and flow simulation uncertainty using a simplified lumped sewer model that accounts for three separate flow contributions: wastewater, fast runoff from paved areas, and slow infiltrating water from permeable areas. Recently the GLUE methodology has been critised for generating prediction limits without statistical coherence and consistency and for the subjectivity in the choice of a threshold value to distinguish "behavioral" from "non-behavioral" parameter sets. In this paper we examine how well the GLUE methodology performs when the behavioural parameter sets deduced from a calibration period are applied to generate prediction bounds in validation periods. By retaining an increasing number of parameter sets we aim at obtaining consistency between the GLUE generated 90% prediction limits and the actual containment ratio (CR) in calibration. Due to the large uncertainties related to spatio-temporal rain variability during heavy convective rain events, flow measurement errors, as well as model limitations, it was not possible to obtain an overall CR of more than 80%. However, the GLUE generated prediction limits still proved rather consistent, since the overall CRs obtained in calibration corresponded well with the overall CRs obtained in validation periods for all proportions of retained parameter sets evaluated. When focusing on wet and dry weather periods separately, some inconsistencies were however found between calibration and validation and we address here some of the reasons why we should not expect the coverage of the prediction limits to be identical in calibration and validation periods in real-world applications. The large uncertainties propagate to the parameters and result in wide posterior parameter limits, that cannot be used for interpretation of e.g. the relative size of paved area vs. the size of infiltrating area. From this study it seems crucial to obtain more representative rain inputs and more accurate flow observations to reduce parameter and model simulation uncertainty.

  14. Coupled Ge/Si and Ge isotope ratios as geochemical tracers of seafloor hydrothermal systems: Case studies at Loihi Seamount and East Pacific Rise 9°50?N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoube, Raphaelle; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Edwards, Katrina; Glazer, Brian; Donard, Olivier F. X.

    2015-10-01

    Germanium (Ge) and Silicon (Si) exhibit similar geochemical behavior in marine environments but are variably enriched in seafloor hydrothermal fluids relative to seawater. In this study, Ge isotope and Ge/Si ratio systematics were investigated in low temperature hydrothermal vents from Loihi Seamount (Pacific Ocean, 18°54?N, 155°15?W) and results were compared to high-temperature vents from the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°50?N. Loihi offers the opportunity to understand contrasting Ge and Si behavior in low temperature seafloor hydrothermal systems characterized by abundant Fe oxyhydroxide deposition at the seafloor. The results show that both Ge/Si and ?74/70Ge in hydrothermal fluids are fractionated relative to the basaltic host rocks. The enrichment in Ge vs. Si relative to fresh basalts, together with Ge isotope fractionation (?74/70Gefluid-basalt up to 1.15‰ at EPR 9°50?N and 1.64‰ at Loihi) are best explained by the precipitation of minerals (e.g. quartz and Fe-sulfides) during higher temperature seawater-rock reactions in the subsurface. The study of Fe-rich hydrothermal deposits at Loihi, largely composed of Fe-oxyhydroxides, shows that Ge isotopes are also fractionated upon mineral precipitation at the seafloor. We obtained an average Ge isotope fractionation factor between Fe-oxyhydroxide (ferrihydrite) and dissolved Ge in the fluid of -2.0 ± 0.6‰ (2sd), and a maximum value of -3.6 ± 0.6‰ (2sd), which is consistent with recent theoretical and experimental studies. The study of a hydrothermal chimney at Bio 9 vent at EPR 9°50?N also demonstrates that Ge isotopes are fractionated by approximately -5.6 ± 0.6‰ (2sd) during precipitation of metal sulfides under hydrothermal conditions. Using combined Ge/Si and estimated Ge isotope signatures of Ge sinks and sources in seawater, we propose a preliminary oceanic budget of Ge which reveals that an important sink, referred as the "missing Ge sink", may correspond to Ge sequestration into authigenic Fe-oxyhydroxides in marine sediments. This study shows that combining Ge/Si and ?74/70Ge systematics provides a useful tool to trace hydrothermal Ge and Si sources in marine environments and to understand formation processes of seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  15. Effects of NH4:NO3:urea ratio on cut roses yield, leaf nutrients content and proton efflux by roots in closed hydroponic system

    E-print Network

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    that the salinity threshold level above which cut flower yield declined was between 2.4 (de Kreij and van den Berg) was carried out to investigate these relationships. In winter, total and >40 cm cut flower yields were maximalEffects of NH4:NO3:urea ratio on cut roses yield, leaf nutrients content and proton efflux by roots

  16. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  17. Effect of particle aspect ratio in magnetorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Jose R.; Carreón-González, Elizabeth; de Vicente, Juan

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles in magnetorheology. Two systems are studied: conventional magnetorheological fluids prepared by dispersion of nickel nanowires, and inverse ferrofluids prepared by dispersion of glass fibers in a ferrofluid. In both cases the apparent yield stress is found to increase with aspect ratio in contradiction to available models in the literature. Experimental observations demonstrate that the particle volume fraction within the aggregates initially increases with increasing the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles. When the aspect ratio is further raised, a gel-like percolating structure forms inhibiting the formation of elongated clusters in the field direction.

  18. Automated airway evaluation system for multi-slice computed tomography using airway lumen diameter, airway wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2006-03-01

    Pulmonary diseases such as bronchiectasis, asthma, and emphysema are characterized by abnormalities in airway dimensions. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has become one of the primary means to depict these abnormalities, as the availability of high-resolution near-isotropic data makes it possible to evaluate airways at oblique angles to the scanner plane. However, currently, clinical evaluation of airways is typically limited to subjective visual inspection only: systematic evaluation of the airways to take advantage of high-resolution data has not proved practical without automation. We present an automated method to quantitatively evaluate airway lumen diameter, wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratios. In addition, our method provides 3D visualization of these values, graphically illustrating the location and extent of disease. Our algorithm begins by automatic airway segmentation to extract paths to the distal airways, and to create a map of airway diameters. Normally, airway diameters decrease as paths progress distally; failure to taper indicates abnormal dilatation. Our approach monitors airway lumen diameters along each airway path in order to detect abnormal profiles, allowing even subtle degrees of pathologic dilatation to be identified. Our method also systematically computes the broncho-arterial ratio at every terminal branch of the tree model, as a ratio above 1 indicates potentially abnormal bronchial dilatation. Finally, the airway wall thickness is computed at corresponding locations. These measurements are used to highlight abnormal branches for closer inspection, and can be summed to compute a quantitative global score for the entire airway tree, allowing reproducible longitudinal assessment of disease severity. Preliminary tests on patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis demonstrated rapid identification of lack of tapering, which also was confirmed by corresponding demonstration of elevated broncho-arterial ratios.

  19. Polaradiometric pyrometer in which the parallel and perpendicular components of radiation reflected from an unpolarized light source are equalized with the thermal radiation emitted from a measured object to determine its true temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abtahi, Ali A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A radiation pyrometer for measuring the true temperature of a body is provided by detecting and measuring thermal radiation from the body based on the principle that the effects of angular emission I(sub 1) and reflection I(sub 2) on the polarization states p and s of radiation are complementary such that upon detecting the combined partial polarization state components I(sub p) =I(sub 1p) + I(sub 2p) and I(sub s)=I(sub 1s) + I(sub 2s) and adjusting the intensity of the variable radiation source of the reflected radiation I(sub 2) until the combined partial radiation components I(sub p) and I(sub s) are equal, the effects of emissivity as well as diffusivity of the surface of the body are eliminated, thus obviating the need for any post processing of brightness temperature data.

  20. Use of VNIR Camera System to Estimate Lava Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2012-12-01

    We present initial results from using a visible and near infrared (VNIR) camera as an optical pyrometer at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i. The basic concept of pyrometry simply converts the color of incandescent material into a temperature and has been used on Kilauea since the earliest days of regular volcano monitoring. However, these temperatures have always been lower than expected, raising the concern that the emissivity of lava at these wavelengths was not close to a blackbody. We carefully calibrated a system that uses 3 digital cameras with wavelengths similar to the green, red, and near-infrared channels of the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emissions and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) VNIR instruments by imaging a high-temperature blackbody. Following techniques used to estimate lava temperatures on Jupiter's moon, Io, we obtained relationships between band ratios and blackbody temperatures. The green/red ratio provides good temperature estimates for any reasonable temperature above 1000 °C, while the red/NIR is useful from about 700-1200 °C. We also observed the glow from the lava lake in Halema`uma`u as reflected and scattered from the steam plume above it. We found that the temperatures inferred from the glow are much too high (~1400 °C) from the red/NIR ratios and much too low (<700 °C) from the green/red ratios. One possible explanation is that there are variations in the emissivity of molten lava at these wavelengths. However, we also know that there are wavelength dependent scattering properties of the plume cloud that are consistent with errors in these temperature estimates. Future work examining incandescent lava without the interference of a plume will be needed to better evaluate the emissivity of lava in this wavelength range. However, we have sufficient data to demonstrate the great utility of VNIR data acquired at night for determining if a volcano is actively erupting mafic lava. We propose that further refinement of this methodology using ETM+, ASTER, and other instruments could provide a useful complement to other near-real-time thermal alert systems.

  1. A gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for high-precision delta13C measurements of atmospheric methane extracted from ice core samples.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Melanie; Schmitt, Jochen; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Bock, Michael; Richter, Ulrike C; Levin, Ingeborg; Fischer, Hubertus

    2008-10-01

    Past atmospheric composition can be reconstructed by the analysis of air enclosures in polar ice cores which archive ancient air in decadal to centennial resolution. Due to the different carbon isotopic signatures of different methane sources high-precision measurements of delta13CH4 in ice cores provide clues about the global methane cycle in the past. We developed a highly automated (continuous-flow) gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) technique for ice core samples of approximately 200 g. The methane is melt-extracted using a purge-and-trap method, then separated from the main air constituents, combusted and measured as CO2 by a conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometer. One CO2 working standard, one CH4 and two air reference gases are used to identify potential sources of isotope fractionation within the entire sample preparation process and to enhance the stability, reproducibility and accuracy of the measurement. After correction for gravitational fractionation, pre-industrial air samples from Greenland ice (1831 +/- 40 years) show a delta13C(VPDB) of -49.54 +/- 0.13 per thousand and Antarctic samples (1530 +/- 25 years) show a delta13C(VPDB) of -48.00 +/- 0.12 per thousand in good agreement with published data. PMID:18819111

  2. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  3. Central Nervous System Effects of the Second-Generation Antihistamines Marketed in Japan -Review of Inter-Drug Differences Using the Proportional Impairment Ratio (PIR)-

    PubMed Central

    Isomura, Tatsuya; Kono, Takeshi; Hindmarch, Ian; Kikuchi, Norimasa; Murakami, Aya; Inuzuka, Kyoko; Kawana, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Background Second-generation antihistamines (AHs) have, in general, fewer sedative effects than the first-generation. However, important inter-drug differences remain in the degree of cognitive and/or psychomotor impairment. The extent to which a particular compound causes disruption can be conveniently compared, to all other AHs, using the Proportional Impairment Ratio (PIR). Although the PIR can differentiate the relative impairment caused by individual drugs, there is no indication of the reliability of the ratios obtained. Objective To calculate the PIRs –together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), as an index of reliability– and compare AHs currently, or soon to be, available in Japan, with respect to their intrinsic capacity to cause impairment. Methods Results from studies of cetirizine, desloratadine, ebastine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine, loratadine, mequitazine, and olopatadine were included in the PIR calculations. All data utilised came from crossover studies in healthy volunteers which were randomised and placebo and positive-internal controlled. Existing databases from studies reporting the sedative effects of AHs on objective (speed, accuracy, memory) and subjective (feeling) psychometrics were augmented, via results from suitable studies published after the previous reviews. The null value for a PIR was one. Results A total of 45 studies were finally included for this review. Of the AHs assessed, fexofenadine, ebastine, and levocetirizine showed a PIR for objective tests of 0. However, only fexofenadine (PIR?=?0.49) had an upper limit of the 95% CI of less than 1. Fexofenadine, levocetirizine, desloratadine, olopatadine, loratadine, and mequitazine all had a PIR for subjective ratings of 0, but the upper limits of the 95% CIs were all in excess of 1, although fexofenadine (PIR?=?2.57) was the lowest. Conclusions The results show that there are differences between second-generation AHs in the extent of sedation produced. However, subjective ratings indicate that patients may not necessarily be aware of this. PMID:25501360

  4. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  5. Balanced Aspect Ratio Trees

    E-print Network

    Goodrich, Michael T.

    fields, including as- tronomy, geographic information systems (GIS), com- puter graphics, information- mination, shadow generation, ray casting, and visibility. They are also used in information retrieval

  6. Controlling Gas-Flow Mass Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed system automatically controls proportions of gases flowing in supply lines. Conceived for control of oxidizer-to-fuel ratio in new gaseous-propellant rocket engines. Gas-flow control system measures temperatures and pressures at various points. From data, calculates control voltages for electronic pressure regulators for oxygen and hydrogen. System includes commercially available components. Applicable to control of mass ratios in such gaseous industrial processes as chemical-vapor depostion of semiconductor materials and in automotive engines operating on compressed natural gas.

  7. Correlation of infrared reflectance ratios at 2.3 microns/1.6 micron and 1.1 micron/1.6 micron with delta O-18 values delineating fossil hydrothermal systems in the Idaho batholith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.; Criss, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Reflectance ratios from laboratory spectra and airborne multispectral images are found to be strongly correlated with delta O-18 values of granite rocks in the Idaho batholith. The correlation is largely a result of interactions between hot water and rock, which lowered the delta O-18 values of the rocks and produced secondary hydrous material. Maps of the ratio of reflectivities at 2.3 and 1.6 microns should delineate fossil hydrothermal systems and provide estimates of alteration intensity. However, hydrous minerals produced during deuteric alteration or weathering cannot be unambiguously distinguished in remotely sensed images from the products of propylitic alteration without the use of narrow-band scanners. The reflectivity at 1.6 micron is strongly correlated with rock density and may be useful in distinguishing rock types in granitic terranes.

  8. Low speed test of a high-bypass-ratio propulsion system with an asymmetric inlet designed for a tilt-nacelle V/STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syberg, J.

    1978-01-01

    A large scale model of a lift/cruise fan inlet designed for a tilt nacelle V/STOL airplane was tested with a high bypass ratio turbofan. Testing was conducted at low freestream velocities with inlet angles of attack ranging from 0 deg to 120 deg. The operating limits for the nacelle were found to be related to inlet boundary layer separation. Small separations originating in the inlet diffuser cause little or no performance degradation. However, at sufficiently severe freestream conditions the separation changes abruptly to a lip separation. This change is associated with a significant reduction in nacelle net thrust as well as a sharp increase in fan blade vibratory stresses. Consequently, the onset of lip separation is regarded as the nacelle operating limit. The test verified that the asymmetric inlet design will provide high performance and stable operation at the design forward speed and angle of attack conditions. At some of these, however, operation near the lower end of the design inlet airflow range is not feasible due to the occurrence of lip separation.

  9. A Mission-Adaptive Variable Camber Flap Control System to Optimize High Lift and Cruise Lift-to-Drag Ratios of Future N+3 Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urnes, James, Sr.; Nguyen, Nhan; Ippolito, Corey; Totah, Joseph; Trinh, Khanh; Ting, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Boeing and NASA are conducting a joint study program to design a wing flap system that will provide mission-adaptive lift and drag performance for future transport aircraft having light-weight, flexible wings. This Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system offers a lighter-weight lift control system having two performance objectives: (1) an efficient high lift capability for take-off and landing, and (2) reduction in cruise drag through control of the twist shape of the flexible wing. This control system during cruise will command varying flap settings along the span of the wing in order to establish an optimum wing twist for the current gross weight and cruise flight condition, and continue to change the wing twist as the aircraft changes gross weight and cruise conditions for each mission segment. Design weight of the flap control system is being minimized through use of light-weight shape memory alloy (SMA) actuation augmented with electric actuators. The VCCTEF program is developing better lift and drag performance of flexible wing transports with the further benefits of lighter-weight actuation and less drag using the variable camber shape of the flap.

  10. Prognostic Significance of Systemic Inflammation-Based Lymphocyte- Monocyte Ratio in Patients with Lung Cancer: Based on a Large Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pingping; Shen, Hongchang; Wang, Guanghui; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Qi; Du, Jiajun

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates cancer-related inflammatory biomarkers show great promise for predicting the outcome of cancer patients. The lymphocyte- monocyte ratio (LMR) was demonstrated to be independent prognostic factor mainly in hematologic tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of LMR in operable lung cancer. We retrospectively enrolled a large cohort of patients with primary lung cancer who underwent complete resection at our institution from 2006 to 2011. Inflammatory biomarkers including lymphocyte count and monocyte count were collected from routinely performed preoperative blood tests and the LMR was calculated. Survival analyses were calculated for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). A total of 1453 patients were enrolled in the study. The LMR was significantly associated with OS and DFS in multivariate analyses of the whole cohort (HR?=?1.522, 95% CI: 1.275–1.816 for OS, and HR?=?1.338, 95% CI: 1.152–1.556 for DFS). Univariate subgroup analyses disclosed that the prognostic value was limited to patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (HR: 1.824, 95% CI: 1.520–2.190), in contrast to patients with small cell lung cancer (HR: 1.718, 95% CI: 0.946–3.122). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that LMR was still an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC. LMR can be considered as a useful independent prognostic marker in patients with NSCLC after complete resection. This will provide a reliable and convenient biomarker to stratify high risk of death in patients with operable NSCLC. PMID:25275631

  11. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE DISK SYSTEM OF THE MILKY WAY: [{alpha}/Fe] RATIOS AND KINEMATICS OF THE SEGUE G-DWARF SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; An, Deokkeun; Ivezic, Zeljko; Just, Andreas; Rockosi, Constance M.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Bird, Jonathan; Schoenrich, Ralph; Yanny, Brian; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J. E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu

    2011-09-10

    We employ measurements of the [{alpha}/Fe] ratio derived from low-resolution (R {approx} 2000) spectra of 17,277 G-type dwarfs from the SEGUE survey to separate them into likely thin- and thick-disk subsamples. Both subsamples exhibit strong gradients of orbital rotational velocity with metallicity, of opposite signs, -20 to -30 km s{sup -1} dex{sup -1} for the thin-disk and +40 to +50 km s{sup -1} dex{sup -1} for the thick-disk population. The rotational velocity is uncorrelated with Galactocentric distance for the thin-disk subsample and exhibits a small trend for the thick-disk subsample. The rotational velocity decreases with distance from the plane for both disk components, with similar slopes (-9.0 {+-} 1.0 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1}). Thick-disk stars exhibit a strong trend of orbital eccentricity with metallicity (about -0.2 dex{sup -1}), while the eccentricity does not change with metallicity for the thin-disk subsample. The eccentricity is almost independent of Galactocentric radius for the thin-disk population, while a marginal gradient of the eccentricity with radius exists for the thick-disk population. Both subsamples possess similar positive gradients of eccentricity with distance from the Galactic plane. The shapes of the eccentricity distributions for the thin- and thick-disk populations are independent of distance from the plane, and include no significant numbers of stars with eccentricity above 0.6. Among several contemporary models of disk evolution that we consider, radial migration appears to have played an important role in the evolution of the thin-disk population, but possibly less so for the thick disk, relative to the gas-rich merger or disk heating scenarios. We emphasize that more physically realistic models and simulations need to be constructed in order to carry out the detailed quantitative comparisons that our new data enable.

  12. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients??=??80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of???0.93 (p??=??0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of???0.95 (p??=??0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of???0.85 (p??=??0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  13. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients??=??80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of??-0.93 (p??=??0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of??-0.95 (p??=??0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of??-0.85 (p??=??0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely. PMID:26540441

  14. Volume ratios between the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion system affect their performance and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wen; Zhang, Wenfei; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-25

    An experimental temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) system, with the thermophilic digester operated at neutral pH and with a balanced acidogenesis and methanogenesis (referred to as NT-TPAD), was evaluated with respect to the microbial communities and population dynamics of methanogens when digesting dairy cattle manure at 15-day overall system hydraulic retention time (HRT). When fed a manure slurry of 10% total solid (TS), similar system performance, 36-38% volatile solid (VS) removal and 0.21-0.22L methaneg(-1) VS fed, was achieved between a 5-day and 7.5-day HRT for the thermophilic digester. However, the thermophilic digester achieved a greater volumetric biogas yield when operated at a 5-day RT than at a 7.5-day HRT (6.3 vs. 4.7L/L/d), while the mesophilic digester had a stable volumetric biogas yield (about 1.0L/L/d). Each of the digesters harbored distinct yet dynamic microbial populations, and some of the methanogens were significantly correlated with methane productions. Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta were the most important methanogenic genera in the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters, respectively. The microbiological findings may help understand the metabolism that underpins the anaerobic processes within each of the two digesters of TPAD systems when fed dairy manure. PMID:26232524

  15. Temperature-insensitive line ratios

    E-print Network

    Kesich, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    We develop method to extract elemental abundance ratios using temperature-insensitive ratios of x-ray line fluxes for a collisionally ionized plasma. This method is then refined using more realistic plasma models for coronae ...

  16. Tuning the Formations of Metal-Organic Frameworks by Modification of Ratio of Reactant, Acidity of Reaction System, and Use of a Secondary Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Q; Xie, YB; Li, JR; Yuan, DQ; Yakovenko, AA; Sun, JH; Zhou, HC

    2012-01-01

    Four porous coordination networks (PCNs), {[Zn3O(H2O)(3)(adc)(3)]center dot 2(C2H6NH2)center dot 2(DMF)center dot 3(H2O)}(n) (PCN-131), Zn-2(DMA)(2)(adc)(2)]center dot 2(DMA)}(n) (PCN-132), {[Zn3O(DMF)(adc)(3)(4,4'-bpy)]center dot 2(C2H6NH2)center dot S}(n) (PCN-131'), and {[Zn(adc)(4,4'-bpy)(0.5)]center dot S}(n) (PCN-132'), have been synthesized by the assembly of anthrancene-9,10-dicarboxylic acid (H(2)adc) with Zn(II) under different reaction conditions, including modifications of reactant ratio, acidity variations, and the use of a secondary ligand. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that PCN-131, obtained from the dimethylformamide (DMF) solution under acid condition, has a three-dimentional (3D) framework structure with one-dimensional (1D) honeycomb channels. PCN-132 isolated from dimethylacetamide (DMA) solution without adding acid in synthesis is a two-dimensional (2D) layer compound. By employing 4,4'-bipyridyl (4,4'-bpy) as a secondary ligand, PCN-131' and PCN-132' were synchronously synthesized as a mixture outcome with more PCN-131' than PCN-132'. In PCN-131', 4,4'-bpy acting as a secondary ligand is arranged inside the honeycomb channel of the 3D PCN-131, resulting in an effective improvement of thermal stability of the network, while in PCN-132', 4,4'-bpy ligands link 2D layers of PCN-132 to form a pillared-layer 3D framework Gas adsorption has been performed for selected materials. The results show that the framework of PCN-131 is thermally unstable after removing the solvent molecules coordinated to their metal sites. While PCN-131' is stable for gas uptake, with an evaluated Langmuir surface area of 199.04 m(2) g(-1), it shows a selective adsorption of CO2 over CH4.

  17. The effect of SiO?/Al?O? ratio on the structure and microstructure of the glazes from SiO?-Al?O?-CaO-MgO-Na?O-K?O system.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Janusz; Sitarz, Maciej; Le?niak, Magdalena; Gasek, Katarzyna; Jele?, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic glazes are commonly used to covering of the facing surface of ceramics ware. A well-chosen oxide composition and firing conditions of glazes causes significant improvement of technical parameters of ceramic products. Modern glazes are classified as glass-ceramic composites with different crystalline phases arising during firing. The presence of crystals in the glass matrix is influenced by many factors, especially by oxides molar composition. A crucial role is played by the molar ratio of SiO?/Al?O?. In this work the six composition of glazes from SiO?-Al?O?-CaO-MgO-Na?O-K?O system were examined. The only variable is the ratio of the silicon oxideto alumina at a constant content of other components: MgO, CaO, K?O, Na?O, ZnO. In order to determine the real phase composition of the obtained glazes research on fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) were done. For structural studies X-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectroscopic in the middle infrared (MIR) were performed. In order to determine the state of the surface (microstructure) research on the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with EDX. The research allowed to determine the influence of SiO?/Al?O? ratio on the structure and phase composition of glazes and the nature, and type of formed crystalline phases. PMID:25049171

  18. Usefulness of the organ culture system when villous height/crypt depth ratio, intraepithelial lymphocyte count, or serum antibody tests are not diagnostic for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Picarelli, Antonio; Di Tola, Marco; Marino, Mariacatia; Libanori, Valerio; Borghini, Raffaele; Salvi, Elisa; Donato, Giuseppe; Vitolo, Domenico; Tiberti, Antonio; Marcheggiano, Adriana; Bassotti, Gabrio; Corazziari, Enrico

    2013-03-01

    The existence of mild forms of celiac disease (CD) can make the histology-based diagnosis difficult to reach. Since anti-endomysium (EMA) and anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) are detectable in culture supernatants of duodenal biopsies from CD patients, our aim was to assess if this system can support the histology in the diagnostic work-up. A total of 559 suspected CD patients underwent serum EMA/anti-tTG detection, upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsy sampling, histologic analysis, and organ culture to detect EMA/anti-tTG in supernatants. A subgroup of 30 patients with organ culture positive results were put on a gluten-free diet (GFD). Their gluten-dependency was evaluated by the psychological general well-being and beck depression inventory indexes. Statistical analysis was performed by Cohen k inter-test, Friedman test, and Dunn multiple comparison. Two hundred forty-one out of 559 (43.1%) patients showed intestinal villous atrophy, whereas serum and organ culture EMA/anti-tTG were positive in 293/559 (52.4%) and 334/559 (59.7%) patients, respectively. The strength of agreement resulted good for serology vs histology (k = 0.730), good for organ culture vs histology (k = 0.662), and very good for serology vs organ culture (k = 0.852). After 12 months of GFD, psychological general well-being index significantly increased, and beck depression inventory index significantly decreased (P < 0.001 for each one). Data highlight the organ culture system as a useful tool to assist the histology in diagnosing CD, mainly in cases without villous atrophy or in seronegative patients. The marked improvement in quality of life after a GFD further supports the reliability of this system in diagnosing CD. PMID:23177794

  19. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  20. Predicting buffer hit ratios with neural networks Uli Harder

    E-print Network

    Imperial College, London

    Predicting buffer hit ratios with neural networks Uli Harder and Tim MacLeod September 18, 2003 Abstract A neural network is used to predict the buffer hit ratio in an Oracle database, given the access but nevertheless important topic is that of buffer hit ratios in databases. For modern computing systems accessing

  1. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals. PMID:12396200

  2. The sources and evolution of mineralising fluids in iron oxide-copper-gold systems, Norrbotten, Sweden: Constraints from Br/Cl ratios and stable Cl isotopes of fluid inclusion leachates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, S. A.; Smith, M. P.

    2009-10-01

    We have analysed the halogen concentrations and chlorine stable isotope composition of fluid inclusion leachates from three spatially associated Fe-oxide ± Cu ± Au mineralising systems in Norrbotten, Sweden. Fluid inclusions in late-stage veins in Fe-oxide-apatite deposits contain saline brines and have a wide range of Br/Cl molar ratios, from 0.2 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and ? 37Cl values from -3.1‰ to -1.0‰. Leachates from saline fluid inclusions from the Greenstone and Porphyry hosted Cu-Au prospects have Br/Cl ratios that range from 0.2 to 0.5 × 10 -3 and ? 37Cl values from -5.6‰ to -1.3‰. Finally, the Cu-Au deposits hosted by the Nautanen Deformation Zone (NDZ) have Br/Cl molar ratios from 0.4 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and ? 37Cl values that range from -2.4‰ to +0.5‰, although the bulk of the data fall within 0‰ ± 0.5‰. The Br/Cl ratios of leachates are consistent with the derivation of salinity from magmatic sources or from the dissolution of halite. Most of the isotopic data from the Fe-oxide-apatite and Greenstone deposits are consistent with a mantle derived source of the chlorine, with the exception of the four samples with the most negative values. The origin of the low ? 37Cl values in these samples is unknown but we suggest that there may have been some modification of the Cl-isotope signature due to fractionation between the mineralising fluids and Cl-rich silicate assemblages found in the alteration haloes around the deposits. If such a process has occurred then a modified crustal source of the chlorine for all the samples cannot be ruled out although the amount of fractionation necessary to generate the low ? 37Cl values would be significantly larger. The source of Cl in the NDZ deposits has a crustal signature, which suggests the Cl in this system may be derived from (meta-) evaporites or from input from crustal melts such as granitic pegmatites of the Lina Suite.

  3. Spatial and temporal infaunal dynamics of the Blanes submarine canyon-slope system (NW Mediterranean); changes in nematode standing stocks, feeding types and gender-life stage ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingels, Jeroen; Vanreusel, Ann; Romano, Chiara; Coenjaerts, Johan; Mar Flexas, M.; Zúñiga, Diana; Martin, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of submarine canyons ecosystems, our understanding of the faunal patterns and processes in these environments is still marginal. In this study, meiobenthic nematode communities (from 300 m to 1600 m depth) obtained in November 2003 and May 2004 at eight stations inside and outside Blanes submarine canyon were analysed for nematode standing stocks (SSs), feeding types and gender-life stage distributions. Environmental data were obtained by sediment traps and current meters, attached to moorings (April 2003-May 2004), and sediments samples analysed for biogeochemistry and grain size (May 2004). In November 2003, nematode SSs decreased with increasing depth (367.2 individuals and 7.31 ?g C per 10 cm2 at 388 m water depth to 7.7 individuals and 0.18 ?g C per 10 cm2 at 1677 m water depth), showing a significant negative relation (abundance: R2 = 0.620, p = 0.020; biomass: R2 = 0.512, p = 0.046). This was not the case in May 2004 (283.5 individuals and 3.53 ?g C per 10 cm2 at 388 m water depth to 490.8 individuals and 4.93 ?g C per 10 cm2 at 1677 m water depth; abundance: R2 = 0.003, p = 0.902; biomass: R2 = 0.052, p = 0.587), suggesting a temporal effect that overrides the traditional decrease of SSs with increasing water depth. Both water depth and sampling time played a significant role in explaining nematode SSs, but with differences between stations. No overall differences were observed between canyon and open slope stations. Nematode standing stock (SS) patterns can be explained by taking into account the interplay of phytodetrital input and disturbance events, with station differences such as topography playing an important role. Individual nematode size decreased from November 2003 to May 2004 and was explained by a food-induced genera shift and/or a food-induced transition from a ‘latent’ to a ‘reproductive’ nematode community. Our results suggest that size patterns in nematode communities are not solely governed by trophic conditions over longer periods of time in relatively food-rich environments such as canyons. We hypothesize that food pulses in a dynamic and topographical heterogeneous environment such as canyons regulate nematode size distributions, rather than long-term food availability. Feeding type distributions in the Blanes Canyon did not clearly resemble those from other canyon systems, apart from the spring assemblage at one station in the head of the canyon.

  4. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  5. The diversity of the N2O reducers matters for the N2O:N2 denitrification end-product ratio across an annual and a perennial cropping system.

    PubMed

    Domeignoz-Horta, Luiz A; Spor, Aymé; Bru, David; Breuil, Marie-Christine; Bizouard, Florian; Léonard, Joël; Philippot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is the main source of terrestrial emissions of N2O, a potent greenhouse gas and the main cause of ozone layer depletion. The reduction of N2O into N2 by microorganisms carrying the nitrous oxide reductase gene (nosZ) is the only biological process known to eliminate this greenhouse gas. Recent studies showed that a previously unknown clade of N2O-reducers was related to the capacity of the soil to act as an N2O sink, opening the way for new strategies to mitigate emissions. Here, we investigated whether the agricultural practices could differently influence the two N2O reducer clades with consequences for denitrification end-products. The abundance of N2O-reducers and producers was quantified by real-time PCR, and the diversity of both nosZ clades was determined by 454 pyrosequencing. Potential N2O production and potential denitrification activity were used to calculate the denitrification gaseous end-product ratio. Overall, the results showed limited differences between management practices but there were significant differences between cropping systems in both the abundance and structure of the nosZII community, as well as in the [rN2O/r(N2O+N2)] ratio. More limited differences were observed in the nosZI community, suggesting that the newly identified nosZII clade is more sensitive than nosZI to environmental changes. Potential denitrification activity and potential N2O production were explained mainly by the soil properties while the diversity of the nosZII clade on its own explained 26% of the denitrification end-product ratio, which highlights the importance of understanding the ecology of this newly identified clade of N2O reducers for mitigation strategies. PMID:26441904

  6. The diversity of the N2O reducers matters for the N2O:N2 denitrification end-product ratio across an annual and a perennial cropping system

    PubMed Central

    Domeignoz-Horta, Luiz A.; Spor, Aymé; Bru, David; Breuil, Marie-Christine; Bizouard, Florian; Léonard, Joël; Philippot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is the main source of terrestrial emissions of N2O, a potent greenhouse gas and the main cause of ozone layer depletion. The reduction of N2O into N2 by microorganisms carrying the nitrous oxide reductase gene (nosZ) is the only biological process known to eliminate this greenhouse gas. Recent studies showed that a previously unknown clade of N2O-reducers was related to the capacity of the soil to act as an N2O sink, opening the way for new strategies to mitigate emissions. Here, we investigated whether the agricultural practices could differently influence the two N2O reducer clades with consequences for denitrification end-products. The abundance of N2O-reducers and producers was quantified by real-time PCR, and the diversity of both nosZ clades was determined by 454 pyrosequencing. Potential N2O production and potential denitrification activity were used to calculate the denitrification gaseous end-product ratio. Overall, the results showed limited differences between management practices but there were significant differences between cropping systems in both the abundance and structure of the nosZII community, as well as in the [rN2O/r(N2O+N2)] ratio. More limited differences were observed in the nosZI community, suggesting that the newly identified nosZII clade is more sensitive than nosZI to environmental changes. Potential denitrification activity and potential N2O production were explained mainly by the soil properties while the diversity of the nosZII clade on its own explained 26% of the denitrification end-product ratio, which highlights the importance of understanding the ecology of this newly identified clade of N2O reducers for mitigation strategies. PMID:26441904

  7. Nanoscale High Aspect Ratio Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Jonathan; Davis, Robert; Vanfleet, Richard; Conley, Hiram

    2008-10-01

    Nanoscale high aspect ratio structures have possible applications in microfluidic channels, batteries, and fuel cells, among others. We present methods we have been trying to create 3:1 aspect ratio structures in transparent materials that will withstand temperatures needed for CVD or ALD processes; including contact molding, spin and etch back, and replica molding.

  8. The sex ratio at birth.

    PubMed

    Rubin, E

    1967-10-01

    Several aspects of the disparity in birth ratio of males over females are discussed including variations among different races, variations by order of birth, by age of the parent, and in multiple births. Avenues of statistical exploration are suggested in an attempt to indicate certain peculiarities in nature. The Negro population in the United States has a sex ratio of 102 males to 100 females as opposed to 105:100 for whites, a highly significant difference. Inferences from these statistics are suggested for study of the sex ratios of mixed unions. The group classified as Mulatto show a lower sex ratio and further analysis of this was suggested including examination of slave records. For the white population sex ratio declines from 106.2 to 102.9 between 1st order and 7th order births. This is highly significant. However, nonwhite determinations were more irregular. Data limitations on sex ratio by age of parent prevented conclusive results. Multiple births among whites show a decline from 105.3 for single live births to 103.2 for twins and 86.1 for all other plural deliveries. Among nonwhites these ratios are 102.3, 99.7, and 102.6 respectively. Further information should be developed using the multiple facts relating to the sex ratio at birth. PMID:12275623

  9. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  10. CO isotopologue ratios in the solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, James; Gharib-Nezhad, Ehsan; Ayres, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Determination of the oxygen isotope ratios in the solar photosphere is essential to constraining the formation environment of the solar system. The solar CO fundamental and first-overtone bands were previously measured by the shuttle-borne ATMOS Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), and with the National Solar Observatory FTS on the McMath-Pierce telescope at Kitt Peak. Analyzing the rovibrational bands from these photospheric spectra, a 3D convection model was employed to calculate ratios with improved uncertainties (16O/17O=2738±118 and 16O/18O =511±10 Ayres et al. 2013), which fall between the terrestrial values and those inferred from solar wind measurements by the Genesis spacecraft. However, differences in published CO dipole moment functions yielded a range of isotopic ratios spanning ~ 3 % in ?18O. Here we re-evaluate the CO dipole moment function in order to obtain more accurate isotope ratios for the photosphere. We used a new set of dipole moments from HITEMP which were accurately determined by both semi-empirical and ab initio methods. Preliminary values of isotope ratios using the new dipole moments are in better agreement with the inferred photosphere values from Genesis, showing that the solar photosphere is isotopically similar to primitive inclusions in meteorites, but different from the terrestrial planets by ~ 6 %. New spectral observations are needed to reduce uncertainties in photospheric C17O abundances.

  11. Arcjet Nozzle Area Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  12. Arcjet nozzle area ratio effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  13. Pressure Ratio to Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Wang, Winston

    2012-01-01

    A pressure ratio to thermal environments (PRatTlE.pl) program is a Perl language code that estimates heating at requested body point locations by scaling the heating at a reference location times a pressure ratio factor. The pressure ratio factor is the ratio of the local pressure at the reference point and the requested point from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) solutions. This innovation provides pressure ratio-based thermal environments in an automated and traceable method. Previously, the pressure ratio methodology was implemented via a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and macro scripts. PRatTlE is able to calculate heating environments for 150 body points in less than two minutes. PRatTlE is coded in Perl programming language, is command-line-driven, and has been successfully executed on both the HP and Linux platforms. It supports multiple concurrent runs. PRatTlE contains error trapping and input file format verification, which allows clear visibility into the input data structure and intermediate calculations.

  14. Continually variable transmission having fixed ratio and variable ratio mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Moan, R.D

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a transmission for producing a stepless, continually variable range of ratios of the speed of its output to its input comprising: a fluid coupling having an impeller adapted for connection to a power source and a turbine hydrodynamically connected to the impeller; as planetary gearset having a ring gear, a sun gear, a first set of planet pinions meshing with the sun gear, a second set of planet pinions meshing with the first set of pinions and with the ring gear, and a pinion carrier on which the first and second sets of pinions are rotatably supported; first drive means drivable connecting the turbine and the sun gear for producing a variable speed ratio therebetween having a range between an underdrive ratio and an overdrive ratio; second drive means drivably connecting the impeller and the ring gear for producing a fixed speed ratio therebetween; a first clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the ring gear and the second drive means; and a second clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the first drive means and the pinion carrier.

  15. Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing visible light communications system using a combination of a genetic algorithm and a hill-climbing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wei; Deng, Honggui; Jiang, Fangqing; Zhu, Kaicheng; Yin, Linzi

    2015-03-01

    The orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) modulation technique has been used widely in visible light communications (VLC) systems to combat intersymbol interference. At the same time, the inherent drawback of OFDM with a high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) is brought into OFDM visible light communications (VLC-OFDM). Furthermore, considering the limited dynamic range characteristics of light-emitting diodes, the performance degradation caused by a high PAPR is more serious in VLC-OFDM. In this paper, we propose a partial transmit sequence (PTS) technique based on the combination of a genetic algorithm (GA) and a hill-climbing algorithm (GH-PTS) to solve the problem of high PAPR. GH-PTS is a modified PTS technique based on GA-PTS. Essentially, GH-PTS is a local optimization of GA-PTS. Simulation results show that the optimized technique is able to reduce PAPR more effectively without any loss of bit error rate performance than the GA-PTS technique in VLC-OFDM system.

  16. Low-speed tests of a high-aspect-ratio, supercritical-wing transport model equipped with a high-lift flap system in the Langley 4- by 7-meter and Ames 12-foot pressure tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.; Kjelgaard, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    The Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel was used to determine the effects of Reynolds number on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced, high-aspect-ratio, supercritical wing transport model equipped with a full span, leading edge slat and part span, double slotted, trailing edge flaps. The model had a wing span of 7.5 ft and was tested through a free stream Reynolds number range from 1.3 to 6.0 x 10 to 6th power per foot at a Mach number of 0.20. Prior to the Ames tests, an investigation was also conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.3 x 10 to 6th power per foot with the model mounted on an Ames strut support system and on the Langley sting support system to determine strut interference corrections. The data obtained from the Langley tests were also used to compare the aerodynamic charactertistics of the rather stiff, 7.5-ft-span steel wing model tested during this investigation and the larger, and rather flexible, 12-ft-span aluminum-wing model tested during a previous investigation. During the tests in both the Langley and Ames tunnels, the model was tested with six basic wing configurations: (1) cruise; (2) climb (slats only extended); (3) 15 deg take-off flaps; (4) 30 deg take-off flaps; (5) 45 deg landing flaps; and (6) 60 deg landing flaps.

  17. Tracking the Planet-Planet Interactions by Statistics: The Period-Ratio and Mass-Ratio Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ing-Guey; Yeh, Li-Chin

    2015-08-01

    Employing the data from orbital periods and masses of extra-solar planets in 166 multiple planetary systems, the period-ratio and mass-ratio of adjacent planet pairs are studied.The correlation between the period-ratio and mass-ratio is confirmed and found to have a correlation coefficientof 0.5303 with a 99% confidence interval (0.3807, 0.6528).A comparison with the distribution of synthetic samples from a Monte Carlo simulation reveals the imprint of planet-planet interactions on the formation of adjacent planet pairs in multiple planetary systems.

  18. Fission Product Ratios as Treaty Monitoring Discriminants

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Arthur, Richard J.

    2008-05-15

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is currently under construction. The IMS is intended for monitoring of nuclear explosions. The radionuclide branch of the IMS monitors the atmosphere for short-lived radioisotopes indicative of a nuclear weapon test, and includes field collection and measurement stations, as well as laboratories to provide reanalysis of the most important samples and a quality control function. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington hosts the United States IMS laboratory, with the designation “RL16.” Since acute reactor containment failures and chronic reactor leakage may also produce similar isotopes, it is tempting to compute ratios of detected isotopes to determine the relevance of an event to the treaty or agreement in question. In this paper we will note several shortcomings of simple isotopic ratios: (1) fractionation of different chemical species, (2) difficulty in comparing isotopes within a single element, (3) the effect of unknown decay times. While these shortcomings will be shown in the light of an aerosol sample, several of the problems extend to xenon isotopic ratios. The result of the difficulties listed above is that considerable human expertise will be required to convert a simple mathematical ratio into a criterion which will reliably categorize an event as ‘reactor’ or ‘weapon’.

  19. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station (EBBR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-02-23

    The energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  20. SUBSPACE BASED ESTIMATION OF THE SIGNAL TO INTERFERENCE RATIO

    E-print Network

    Mandayam, Narayan

    SUBSPACE BASED ESTIMATION OF THE SIGNAL TO INTERFERENCE RATIO FOR TDMA CELLULAR SYSTEMS Michael)­445­3693 \\Lambda Radio Communication Systems, Department of Signals, Sensors and Systems, Royal Institute of Tech in a practical context. We develop a general SIR estimation technique for narrow­band cellular systems

  1. A Ratio Explanation for Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riss, Pam Helfers

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on physical anthropology activities for teaching students about evolution. Using evidence found in hominid skulls, students conduct investigations that involve calculating ratios. Eight full-page photographs of skulls from the program Stones and Bones are included. (PR)

  2. Sex-ratio distortion driven by migration loads.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-Sheng; Yeh, Francis C; He, Fangliang

    2007-12-01

    The significance of migration load in driving the evolution of recipient populations has long been documented in population genetics, but its effects have not been linked to the formation of biased sex ratios in natural populations. In this study, we develop a single-locus model to demonstrate how the migration load can shape the primary and secondary sex ratios in dioecious plants where sexual dimorphism is determined by the sex chromosomes (the XX-XY or similar systems). Our results show that migration load can generate an array of sex ratios (from the female- to male-biased primary/secondary sex ratios), depending on the selection systems at the gametophyte and sporophyte stages and on the sex ratio in the migrating seeds. Ovule abortion and the purging of maladaptive genes from the immigrating pollen at the gametophyte stage can alter the primary sex ratio and indirectly alter the secondary sex ratio. The presence of maladaptive sex-linked genes from the migrating pollen and seeds of males facilitates the outcome of the female-biased secondary sex ratios, while the presence of maladaptive sex-linked genes from the migrating seeds of females can lead to the male-biased secondary sex ratios. The detrimental effects of the Y-chromosome from the migrating pollen and seeds can enhance the formation of female-biased primary and secondary sex ratios. These theoretical predictions highlight an alternative approach to the existing sex-ratio theories for interpreting the formation of biased sex ratios in the populations that are subject to the impacts of maladaptive genes from immigrants. PMID:17905398

  3. Optomechanical Raman-ratio thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, T. P.; Yu, P.-L.; Kampel, N. S.; Peterson, R. W.; Cicak, K.; Simmonds, R. W.; Regal, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the asymmetry between Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering can be exploited for self-calibrating, optically based thermometry. In the context of cavity optomechanics, we observe the cavity-enhanced scattering of light interacting with the standing-wave drumhead modes of a Si3N4 membrane mechanical resonator. The ratio of the amplitude of Stokes to anti-Stokes scattered light is used to measure temperatures of optically cooled mechanical modes, down to the level of a few vibrational quanta. We demonstrate that the Raman-ratio technique allows the measurement of the physical temperature of our device over a range extending from cryogenic temperatures to within an order of magnitude of room temperature.

  4. Sex ratios in bumble bees

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, A. F. G.

    1997-01-01

    The median proportion of investment in females among 11 populations of seven bumble bee (Bombus) species was 0.32 (range 0.07 to 0.64). By contrast, two species of workerless social parasites in the related genus Psithyrus had female-biased sex allocation, the reasons for which remain unclear. Male-biased sex allocation in Bombus contradicts the predictions of Trivers and Hare's sex ratio model for the social Hymenoptera, which are that the population sex investment ratio should be 0.5 (1:1) under queen control and 0.75 (3:1 females:males) under worker control (assuming single, once-mated, outbred queens and non-reproductive workers). Male bias in Bombus does not appear to be either an artefact, or purely the result of symbiotic sex ratio distorters. According to modifications of the Trivers–Hare model, the level of worker male-production in Bombus is insufficient to account for observed levels of male bias. There is also no evidence that male bias arises from either local resource competition (related females compete for resources) or local mate enhancement (related males cooperate in securing mates). Bulmer presented models predicting sexual selection for protandry (males are produced before females) in annual social Hymenoptera and, as a consequence (given some parameter values), male-biased sex allocation. Bumble bees fit the assumptions of Bulmer's models and are protandrous. These models therefore represent the best current explanation for the bees' male-biased sex investment ratios. This conclusion suggests that the relative timing of the production of the sexes strongly influences sex allocation in the social Hymenoptera.

  5. High contrast ratio prism design in a mini projector.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jui-Wen; Wang, Hsiang-Hua

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel prism with the ability to enhance the contrast ratio and maintain the optical efficiency in a digital light processing projection system. The working theorem for the novel prism is derived as well. In this novel prism design, the ghost ray is directed away from the projection lens by a total internal reflection surface. Since the ghost ray does not even enter the projection lens, the contrast ratio enhancement is more effective than that achieved by an asymmetrical stop. Compared with the conventional method, the full-on/full-off contrast ratio is increased from 921?1 to 46347?1 and the American National Standards Institute contrast ratio is increased from 177?1 to 295?1. The imaging system efficiency can maintain at 79.8% under the contrast ratio enhancement process. Ghost ray analysis for the novel prism explains the contrast enhancement well. PMID:24513837

  6. Skylab S-192 ratio codes of soil, mineral, and rock spectra for ratio image selection and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.; Pillars, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    A limited theoretical systems study is made of the Skylab S-192 12-channel multispectral scanner's capabilities for geological remote sensing. Laboratory spectra of rocks, minerals, soils, and some vegetation were used to rank the twelve channels and the best twelve of the 66 possible nonreciprocal spectral ratios according to their ability to discriminate among 17 classes of geological targets. Environmental and instrumental noise sources were ignored. The S-192 should be most useful for discriminating minerals deposited by hydrothermal alteration, weathering, and evaporation. Discrimination of igneous rocks will be difficult. Ratio images are recommended over automatic discrimination methods for those geological targets that can be enhanced by ratio imaging. Ratio codes were found for the twelve highest ranked ratios, for use in selecting the ratio images which will best enhance a target of interest. They can also be searched for false alarm candidates for a given target.

  7. Meteoritic Ce-138/Ce-142 ratio and its evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, H.; Tanaka, T.; Masuda, A.

    1984-01-01

    Cerium isotope ratios were determined for Juvinas, Pasamonte and ALH-78132 eucrites and the Jilin (H4) chondrite. Neodymium isotope ratios and abundances of lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and samarium were also determined for these meteorites. The La-Ce isotopic system, coupled with the Sm-Nd system, provides a new isotope tracer for geo- and cosmo-chemical samples, especially for samples having a Ce anomaly in the rare-earth element patterns.

  8. People Patterns: Ratio. Environmental Module for Use in a Mathematics Laboratory Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trojan, Arthur; Zastrocky, Mike

    The objectives of this module include students being able to: measure using the metric system, determine ratios of different types, and analyze a problem using ratios. Some of the worksheets require the development of ratios from physical activity; others require the development and analysis of ratios using parts of the student's own body.…

  9. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668... (5) Excludes from the ratio calculations Federal funds...funds are excluded from the ratio calculations. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under...

  10. A quantum framework for likelihood ratios

    E-print Network

    Rachael L. Bond; Yang-Hui He; Thomas C. Ormerod

    2015-08-04

    The ability to calculate precise likelihood ratios is fundamental to many STEM areas, such as decision-making theory, biomedical science, and engineering. However, there is no assumption-free statistical methodology to achieve this. For instance, in the absence of data relating to covariate overlap, the widely used Bayes' theorem either defaults to the marginal probability driven "naive Bayes' classifier", or requires the use of compensatory expectation-maximization techniques. Equally, the use of alternative statistical approaches, such as multivariate logistic regression, may be confounded by other axiomatic conditions, e.g., low levels of co-linearity. This article takes an information-theoretic approach in developing a new statistical formula for the calculation of likelihood ratios based on the principles of quantum entanglement. In doing so, it is argued that this quantum approach demonstrates: that the likelihood ratio is a real quality of statistical systems; that the naive Bayes' classifier is a special case of a more general quantum mechanical expression; and that only a quantum mechanical approach can overcome the axiomatic limitations of classical statistics.

  11. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low the compression ratio can be raised (to as much as 18:1) providing high engine efficiency. It is important to recognize that for a well designed VCR engine cylinder pressure does not need to be higher than found in current production turbocharged engines. As such, there is no need for a stronger crankcase, bearings and other load bearing parts within the VCR engine. The Envera VCR mechanism uses an eccentric carrier approach to adjust engine compression ratio. The crankshaft main bearings are mounted in this eccentric carrier or 'crankshaft cradle' and pivoting the eccentric carrier 30 degrees adjusts compression ratio from 9:1 to 18:1. The eccentric carrier is made up of a casting that provides rigid support for the main bearings, and removable upper bearing caps. Oil feed to the main bearings transits through the bearing cap fastener sockets. The eccentric carrier design was chosen for its low cost and rigid support of the main bearings. A control shaft and connecting links are used to pivot the eccentric carrier. The control shaft mechanism features compression ratio lock-up at minimum and maximum compression ratio settings. The control shaft method of pivoting the eccentric carrier was selected due to its lock-up capability. The control shaft can be rotated by a hydraulic actuator or an electric motor. The engine shown in Figures 3 and 4 has a hydraulic actuator that was developed under the current program. In-line 4-cylinder engines are significantly less expensive than V engines because an entire cylinder head can be eliminated. The cost savings from eliminating cylinders and an entire cylinder head will notably offset the added cost of the VCR and supercharging. Replacing V6 and V8 engines with in-line VCR 4-cylinder engines will provide high fuel economy at low cost. Numerous enabling technologies exist which have the potential to increase engine efficiency. The greatest efficiency gains are realized when the right combination of advanced and new technologies are packaged together to provide the greatest gains at the least cost. Aggressive engine downsiz

  12. Low conversion ratio fuel studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.

    2006-02-28

    Recent studies on TRU disposition in fast reactors indicated viable reactor performance for a sodium cooled low conversion ratio reactor design. Additional studies have been initiated to refine the earlier work and consider the feasibility of alternate fuel forms such as nitride and oxide fuel (rather than metal fuel). These alternate fuel forms may have significant impacts upon the burner design and the safety behavior. The work performed thus far has focused on compiling the necessary fuel form property information and refinement of the physics models. For this limited project, the burner design and performance using nitride fuel will be assessed.

  13. Low aspect ratio wing experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mike; Seegmiller, H. Lee

    1994-01-01

    This test was initiated to provide validation data on low aspect ratio wings at transonic speeds. The test was conducted so that the data obtained would be useful in the validation of codes, and all boundary condition data required would be measured as part of the test. During the conduct of the test, the measured quantities were checked for repeatability, and when the data would not repeat, the cause was tracked down and either eliminated or included in the measurement uncertainty. The accuracy of the data was in the end limited by wall imperfections of the wind tunnel in which the test was run.

  14. GRB brightness ratio distribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laros, J. G.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this analysis is to obtain insight into whether positionally close pairs of GRBs are due to repetitions, clustering, or random chance. We consider the Brightness Ratio Distribution (BRD) of pairs of events. Here, brightness is used as a generic term for any quantity related to the observed intensity of an event. The BRD has the interesting property that if one can select pairs whose components are at the same distance-such as, by considering only close-together pairs-then the distance dependence ``drops out'' of each brightness ratio and the BRD becomes narrower because its width no longer has a component caused by the sources' differing distances. We have begun to apply this analysis to the BATSE events for which location and brightness data are available, comparing the BRD for close-together event pairs to the BRDs for the other (presumedly unrelated) pairs. Preliminary results do not show any clear indication that close-together pairs are related. However, this work is at a very early stage with regard to optimizing the method and understanding its properties.

  15. The C-12/C-13 Ratio as a Chemistry Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstroem, Eva; Geppert, Wolf; Persson, Carina; Charnley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Isotopic ratios of elements are considered powerful tools, e.g. in tracing the origin of solar system body materials, or the degree of nucleosynthesis processing throughout the Galaxy. In interstellar molecules, some isotopic ratios like H/D and C-12/C-13 can also be used as indicators of their chemical origin. Isotope fractionation in gas-phase chemical reactions and gas-dust interaction makes observations of the ratio between C-12 and C-13 isotopologues suitable to distinguish between different formation scenarios. We will present observations of the C-12/C-13 ratio in methanol and formaldehyde towards a sample of embedded, massive young stellar objects. In relation to this we also present results from theoretical modeling showing the usefulness of the C-12/C-13 ratio as a chemistry indicator.

  16. Effect of fuel-air-ratio nonuniformity on emissions of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1981-01-01

    The inlet fuel-air ratio nonuniformity is studied to deterine how nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions are affected. An increase in NOx emissions with increased fuel-air ratio nonuniformity for average equivalence ratios less than 0.7 and a decrease in NOx emissions for average equivalence ratios near stoichiometric is predicted. The degree of uniformityy of fuel-air ratio profiles that is necessary to achieve NOx emissions goals for actual engines that use lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion systems is determined.

  17. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1981-12-15

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  18. Implications of the Nitrogen Isotope Ratio in Titan's Atmosphere for the Nitrogen Ratio in Ammonia in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K.; Mousis, O.

    2013-12-01

    The D/H ratio of water measured in solar system bodies has been established as a tool for determining the conditions under which bodies such as comets or icy moons formed. This ratio varies significantly and indicates complex thermal and chemical evolution of the solar nebula during solar system and planetary formation. Nitrogen isotope ratios also vary significantly, and in some but not all cases correlate to D/H ratios, but are poorly understood. Nitrogen in the solar nebula was primarily in the form of atomic and molecular nitrogen. The isotope ratio (14N/15N) of this reservoir is expected to be ~435 based on the ratio measured in Jupiter's atmosphere, because the atmosphere of Jupiter is made up of gas captured from the solar nebula (Owen et al., 2001). The terrestrial atmospheric ratio is 272, which is close to the ratio measured in the Earth's mantle. This may be the primordial ratio for nitrogen delivered to Earth depending on the amount of exchange between the atmosphere and the mantle and any atmospheric fractionation processes that may have influenced the ratio over time. Comets are a possible source of nitrogen in the Earth's atmosphere (Hutsmekers et al., 2009), although chondrites have also been suggested as a source (Marty, 2012). In the case of comets, nitrogen would have been essentially retained in the form of ammonia (Mousis et al., 2012), which is the most abundant form of nitrogen in comets. The nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere is expected to have originated as ammonia hydrates and converted to N2 early in Titan's history (Atreya et al., 1978). The nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere is ~170, which is significantly enriched in the heavy isotope compared to the terrestrial value. We will discuss the evolution of the nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere (Mandt et al., 2009), the limits of the primordial ratio in ammonia, and the implications for this ratio for the isotope ratio in ammonia in comets that should be measured by the ROSINA instrument on Rosetta in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (Balsiger et al., 2007). Atreya, S., et al., 1978, Science, 201, 611-613. Balsiger, H., et al., 2007, Space Science Reviews, 128, 745-801. Hutsmekers et al., 2009, Icarus, 204, 346-348. Marty, B., 2012, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 313-314, 56-66. Mandt, K. E., et al., 2009, Planetary and Space Science, 57, 1917-1930. Mousis, O., et al., 2012, The Astrophysical Journal, 757, 146. Owen, T. et al., 2001, The Astrophysical Journal, 553, L77-L79.

  19. In-line process control for laser welding of titanium by high dynamic range ratio pyrometry and plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Baselt, T.; Rudek, F.; Maschke, R.; Basan, F.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    The production of complex titanium components for various industries using laser welding processes has received growing attention in recent years. It is important to know whether the result of the cohesive joint meets the quality requirements of standardization and ultimately the customer requirements. Erroneous weld seams can have fatal consequences especially in the field of car manufacturing and medicine technology. To meet these requirements, a real-time process control system has been developed which determines the welding quality through a locally resolved temperature profile. By analyzing the resulting weld plasma received data is used to verify the stability of the laser welding process. The determination of the temperature profile is done by the detection of the emitted electromagnetic radiation from the material in a range of 500 nm to 1100 nm. As detectors, special high dynamic range CMOS cameras are used. As the emissivity of titanium depends on the wavelength, the surface and the angle of radiation, measuring the temperature is a problem. To solve these a special pyrometer setting with two cameras is used. That enables the compensation of these effects by calculating the difference between the respective pixels on simultaneously recorded images. Two spectral regions with the same emissivity are detected. Therefore the degree of emission and surface effects are compensated and canceled out of the calculation. Using the spatially resolved temperature distribution the weld geometry can be determined and the laser process can be controlled. The active readjustment of parameters such as laser power, feed rate and inert gas injection increases the quality of the welding process and decreases the number of defective goods.

  20. A theoretically based determination of bowen-ratio fetch requirements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stannard, D.I.

    1997-01-01

    Determination of fetch requirements for accurate Bowen-ratio measurements of latent- and sensible-heat fluxes is more involved than for eddy-correlation measurements because Bowen-ratio sensors are located at two heights, rather than just one. A simple solution to the diffusion equation is used to derive an expression for Bowen-ratio fetch requirements, downwind of a step change in surface fluxes. These requirements are then compared to eddy-correlation fetch requirements based on the same diffusion equation solution. When the eddy-correlation and upper Bowen-ratio sensor heights are equal, and the available energy upwind and downwind of the step change is constant, the Bowen-ratio method requires less fetch than does eddy correlation. Differences in fetch requirements between the two methods are greatest over relatively smooth surfaces. Bowen-ratio fetch can be reduced significantly by lowering the lower sensor, as well as the upper sensor. The Bowen-ratio fetch model was tested using data from a field experiment where multiple Bowen-ratio systems were deployed simultaneously at various fetches and heights above a field of bermudagrass. Initial comparisons were poor, but improved greatly when the model was modified (and operated numerically) to account for the large roughness of the upwind cotton field.

  1. Noise of Embedded High Aspect Ratio Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2011-01-01

    A family of high aspect ratio nozzles were designed to provide a parametric database of canonical embedded propulsion concepts. Nozzle throat geometries with aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were chosen, all with convergent nozzle areas. The transition from the typical round duct to the rectangular nozzle was designed very carefully to produce a flow at the nozzle exit that was uniform and free from swirl. Once the basic rectangular nozzles were designed, external features common to embedded propulsion systems were added: extended lower lip (a.k.a. bevel, aft deck), differing sidewalls, and chevrons. For the latter detailed Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were made to predict the thrust performance and to optimize parameters such as bevel length, and chevron penetration and azimuthal curvature. Seventeen of these nozzles were fabricated at a scale providing a 2.13 inch diameter equivalent area throat." ! The seventeen nozzles were tested for far-field noise and a few data were presented here on the effect of aspect ratio, bevel length, and chevron count and penetration. The sound field of the 2:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet was very nearly axisymmetric, but the 4:1 and 8:1 were not, the noise on their minor axes being louder than the major axes. Adding bevel length increased the noise of these nozzles, especially on their minor axes, both toward the long and short sides of the beveled nozzle. Chevrons were only added to the 2:1 rectangular jet. Adding 4 chevrons per wide side produced some decrease at aft angles, but increased the high frequency noise at right angles to the jet flow. This trend increased with increasing chevron penetration. Doubling the number of chevrons while maintaining their penetration decreased these effects. Empirical models of the parametric effect of these nozzles were constructed and quantify the trends stated above." Because it is the objective of the Supersonics Project that future design work be done more by physics-based computations and less by experiments, several codes under development were evaluated against these test cases. Preliminary results show that the RANS-based code JeNo predicts the spectral directivity of the low aspect ratio jets well, but has no capability to predict the non-axisymmetry. An effort to address this limitations, used in the RANS-based code of Leib and Goldstein, overpredicted the impact of aspect ratio. The broadband shock noise code RISN, also limited to axisymmetric assumptions, did a good job of predicting the spectral directivity of underexpanded 2:1 cold jet case but was not as successful on high aspect ratio jets, particularly when they are hot. All results are preliminary because the underlying CFD has not been validated yet. An effort using a Large Eddy Simulation code by Stanford University predicted noise that agreed with experiments to within a few dB.

  2. Toward a Unique Nitrogen Isotopic Ratio in Cometary Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselot, Philippe; Pirali, Olivier; Jehin, Emmanuël; Vervloet, Michel; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Cordier, Daniel; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Gruet, Sébastien; Arpigny, Claude; Decock, Alice; Mousis, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the nitrogen isotopic ratios in different bodies of the solar system provides important information regarding the solar system's origin. We unambiguously identified emission lines in comets due to the 15NH2 radical produced by the photodissociation of 15NH3. Analysis of our data has permitted us to measure the 14N/15N isotopic ratio in comets for a molecule carrying the amine (-NH) functional group. This ratio, within the error, appears similar to that measured in comets in the HCN molecule and the CN radical, and lower than the protosolar value, suggesting that N2 and NH3 result from the separation of nitrogen into two distinct reservoirs in the solar nebula. This ratio also appears similar to that measured in Titan's atmospheric N2, supporting the hypothesis that, if the latter is representative of its primordial value in NH3, these bodies were assembled from building blocks sharing a common formation location.

  3. How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-11-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  4. C/O ratios in extrasolar planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David John; Gaensicke, Boris; Farihi, Jay; Koester, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    The wide range of densities found in small exoplanets imply a variety of possible compositions and interior structures. In particular, some models predict that protoplanetary discs with C/O>0.8 may form carbon-dominated planets. The only way to directly test such predictions are studies of evolved planetary systems at white dwarfs. Analysis of planetesimal debris in white dwarf atmospheres provides a unique insight into the chemical compositions of extrasolar planets, which cannot be observed at main-sequence systems. Thus far, such studies have predominantly focused on individual objects. However, the growing sample of abundance studies now allows conclusions to be derived regarding the overall chemical abundances of (solid) exoplanet precursors in a statistically significant sample of systems. Here, we present measurements of the C/O ratio in the debris of planetesimals at 16 white dwarfs observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. These data allow us to constrain the occurrence frequency of carbon-dominated planets. We find no evidence for such carbon planets, with C/O<0.8 by number in all 16 systems.

  5. Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

    2010-11-01

    Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

  6. New VR magnification ratios of QSO 0957+561

    E-print Network

    L. J. Goicoechea; R. Gil-Merino; A. Ullan; M. Serra-Ricart; J. A. Munoz; E. Mediavilla; J. Gonzalez-Cadelo; A. Oscoz

    2004-09-30

    We present VR magnification ratios of QSO 0957+561, which are inferred from the GLITP light curves of Q0957+561A and new frames taken with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope about 14 months after the GLITP monitoring. From two photometric approaches and a reasonable range for the time delay in the system (415-430 days), we do not obtain achromatic optical continuum ratios, but ratios depending on the wavelength. These new measurements are consistent with differential extinction in the lens galaxy, the Lyman limit system, the damped Ly-alpha system, or the host galaxy of the QSO. The possible values for the differential extinction and the ratio of total to selective extinction in the V band are reasonable. Moreover, crude probability arguments suggest that the ray paths of the two components cross a similar dusty environment, including a network of compact dust clouds and compact dust voids. As an alternative (in fact, the usual interpretation of the old ratios), we also try to explain the new ratios as caused by gravitational microlensing in the deflector. From magnification maps for each of the gravitationally lensed images, using different fractions of the surface mass density represented by the microlenses, as well as different sizes and profiles of the V-band and R-band sources, several synthetic distributions of V-band and R-band ratios are derived. In some gravitational scenarios, there is an apparent disagreement between the observed pair of ratios and the simulated distributions. However, several microlensing pictures work well. To decide between either extinction, or microlensing, or a mixed scenario (extinction + microlensing), new observational and interpretation efforts are required.

  7. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  8. Poisson`s ratio and crustal seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, N.I.

    1996-02-10

    This report discusses the use of Poisson`s ratio to place constraints on continental crustal composition. A summary of Poisson`s ratios for many common rock formations is also included with emphasis on igneous and metamorphic rock properties.

  9. Distribution of Grades, Credits Earned Ratios, Course Completion Ratios and Current Grade Point Ratios, University of Hawaii Community Colleges, Fall 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of the Chancellor for Community Colleges.

    This document summarizes fall 1998 data on student achievement at the University of Hawaii's seven community colleges along two dimensions: the current grade point ratios earned by students, by program; and the distribution of grades in the courses offered by the colleges. Data are presented for the system and for each individual college. The data…

  10. Transformer ratio improvement for beam based plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, Brendan; Rosenzweig, James; Barber, Samuel; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Williams, Oliver; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl

    2012-12-21

    Increasing the transformer ratio of wakefield accelerating systems improves the viability of present novel accelerating schemes. The use of asymmetric bunches to improve the transformer ratio of beam based plasma systems has been proposed for some time[1, 2] but suffered from lack appropriate beam creation systems. Recently these impediments have been overcome [3, 4] and the ability now exists to create bunches with current profiles shaped to overcome the symmetric beam limit of R {<=} 2. We present here work towards experiments designed to measure the transformer ratio of such beams, including theoretical models and simulations using VORPAL (a 3D capable PIC code) [5]. Specifically we discuss projects to be carried out in the quasi-nonlinear regime [6] at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory and the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab.

  11. 75 FR 79286 - Designated Reserve Ratio

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...3064-AD69 Designated Reserve Ratio AGENCY: Federal Deposit...comprehensive, long-range management plan for the Deposit...the designated reserve ratio (DRR) at 2 percent...the Designated Reserve Ratio setting out a comprehensive, long-range management plan for the DIF...

  12. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  13. Quantifying Void Ratio in Granular Materials Using Voronoi Tessellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; El-Saidany, Hany A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Voronoi technique was used to calculate the local void ratio distribution of granular materials. It was implemented in an application-oriented image processing and analysis algorithm capable of extracting object edges, separating adjacent particles, obtaining the centroid of each particle, generating Voronoi polygons, and calculating the local void ratio. Details of the algorithm capabilities and features are presented. Verification calculations included performing manual digitization of synthetic images using Oda's method and Voronoi polygon system. The developed algorithm yielded very accurate measurements of the local void ratio distribution. Voronoi tessellation has the advantage, compared to Oda's method, of offering a well-defined polygon generation criterion that can be implemented in an algorithm to automatically calculate local void ratio of particulate materials.

  14. Stereoscopic pyrometer for char combustion characterization.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, M; Vorobiev, N; Scherer, V

    2015-02-10

    For many pulverized fuels, especially coal and biomass, char combustion is the time determining step. Based on intensified ICCD cameras, a novel setup has been developed to study pulverized fuel combustion, mainly in a laminar flow reactor. For char burning characterization, the typical measurement parameters are particle temperature, size, and velocity. The working principle of the camera setup is introduced and its capabilities are discussed by examination of coal particle combustion under CO(2)-enriched, so-called oxy-fuel atmospheres with varying O(2) content. PMID:25968027

  15. Predicting buffer hit ratios with neural networks Uli Harder \\Lambda and Tim MacLeod y

    E-print Network

    Imperial College, London

    Predicting buffer hit ratios with neural networks Uli Harder \\Lambda and Tim MacLeod y July 7, 1999 Abstract A neural network is used to predict the buffer hit ratio in an Oracle database, given the access but nevertheless important topic is that of buffer hit ratios in databases. For modern computing systems accessing

  16. The Interstellar Rubidium Isotope Ratio toward Rho Ophiuchi A

    E-print Network

    S. R. Federman; David C. Knauth; David L. Lambert

    2004-01-28

    The isotope ratio, 85Rb/87Rb, places constraints on models of the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements, but there is no precise determination of the ratio for material beyond the Solar System. We report the first measurement of the interstellar Rb isotope ratio. Our measurement of the Rb I line at 7800 A for the diffuse gas toward rho Oph A yields a value of 1.21 +/- 0.30 (1-sigma) that differs significantly from the meteoritic value of 2.59. The Rb/K elemental abundance ratio for the cloud also is lower than that seen in meteorites. Comparison of the 85Rb/K and 87Rb/K ratios with meteoritic values indicates that the interstellar 85Rb abundance in this direction is lower than the Solar System abundance. We attribute the lower abundance to a reduced contribution from the r-process. Interstellar abundances for Kr, Cd, and Sn are consistent with much less r-process synthesis for the solar neighborhood compared to the amount inferred for the Solar System.

  17. Ecological genetics of sex ratios in plant populations.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Spencer C H; Yakimowski, Sarah B; Field, David L; Pickup, Melinda

    2010-08-27

    In many angiosperm species, populations are reproductively subdivided into distinct sexual morphs including females, males and hermaphrodites. Sexual polymorphism is maintained by frequency-dependent selection, leading to predictable sex ratios at equilibrium. Charles Darwin devoted much of his book 'The Different Forms of Flowers on Plants of the Same Species' (1877) to investigating plant sexual polymorphisms and laid the foundation for many problems addressed today by integrating theory with empirical studies of the demography and genetics of populations. Here, we summarize our recent work on the ecological and genetic mechanisms influencing variation in sex ratios and their implications for evolutionary transitions among sexual systems. We present the results of a survey of sex ratios from 126 species from 47 angiosperm families and then address two general problems using examples from diverse angiosperm taxa: (i) the mechanisms governing biased sex ratios in dioecious species; (ii) the origins and maintenance of populations composed of females, males and hermaphrodites. Several themes are emphasized, including the importance of non-equilibrium conditions, the role of life history and demography in affecting sex ratios, the value of theory for modelling the dynamics of sex ratio variation, and the utility of genetic markers for investigating evolutionary processes in sexually polymorphic plant populations. PMID:20643745

  18. Feed-conversion ratio of finisher pigs in the USA.

    PubMed

    Losinger, W C

    1998-10-01

    Although the feed-conversion ratio is recognized as a prominent indicator of profitability for pork producers, only 212 (50.7%) of 418 producers who were asked the feed-conversion ratio for finisher pigs provided a response during the USA National Animal Health Monitoring System 1995 National Swine Study. Of these, 126 (59.4%) producers furnished a feed-conversion ratio which they characterized as having been calculated from records, while 86 (40.6%) gave a response that they characterized as estimated or guessed. Feed-conversion ratios ranged from 2.18 to 5.91 kg of feed fed for each kg of live-body weight gained during the grower/finisher phase, with a mean of 3.28 and a standard deviation of 0.52. Stepwise regression revealed the following management factors to be associated with improved feed-conversion ratios: > or = 3 different rations fed during the grower/finisher phase (P < 0.01); no rations mixed on the farm (P < 0.05); and not giving chlortetracycline in feed or water as a disease preventive or growth promotant (P < 0.01). In addition, operations where > or = 3000 pigs entered the grower/finisher-production phase during the six-month period prior to interview had a better mean feed-conversion ratio than operations where < 3000 pigs entered the grower/finisher phase (P < 0.01). PMID:9820889

  19. Interpretation of the underground muon charge ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M. C.; Schreinera, P. A.; Reichenbachera, J.; High Energy Physics; Benedictine Univ.; Univ. of Alabama

    2009-08-01

    The MINOS experiment has observed a rise in the underground muon charge ratio r{sub {mu}} = {mu}{sup +}/{mu}{sup -}. This ratio can be related to the atmospheric production ratios of {pi}{sup +}/{pi}{sup -} and K{sup +}/K{sup -}. Our analysis indicates that the relevant variable for studying the charge ratio is E{sub {mu}}{sup surface} cos {theta}, rather than E{sub {mu}}{sup surface}. We compare a simple energy dependent parameterization of the rise in the charge ratio with more detailed previously published Monte Carlo simulations and an analytical calculation. We also estimate the size of two previously neglected effects in this context: the charge sign dependency of the dE/dx in rock, and the energy dependence of heavy primaries on the derived K{sup +}/K{sup -} ratio.

  20. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith Edward (Kobe, JP); Moser, William Elliott (Peoria, IL); Roozenboom, Stephan Donald (Washington, IL); Knox, Kevin Jay (Peoria, IL)

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  1. 12 CFR 615.5335 - Bank net collateral ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bank net collateral ratio. 615.5335 Section 615.5335 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5335 Bank...

  2. 12 CFR 615.5335 - Bank net collateral ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bank net collateral ratio. 615.5335 Section 615.5335 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5335 Bank...

  3. HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUAL NATIONAL LABORATORY2nd QUARTER 2010 MILESTONE REPORTDevelop the theory connecting pyrometer and streak camera spectrometer data to the material properties of beam heatedtargets and compare to the data

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.; Barnard, J. J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.

    2010-04-01

    This milestone has been accomplished. We have extended the theory that connects pyrometer and streak spectrometer data to material temperature on several fronts and have compared theory to NDCX-I experiments. For the case of NDCX-I, the data suggests that as the metallic foils are heated they break into droplets (cf. HIFS VNL Milestone Report FY 2009 Q4). Evaporation of the metallic surface will occur, but optical emission should be directly observable from the solid or liquid surface of the foil or from droplets. However, the emissivity of hot material may be changed from the cold material and interference effects will alter the spectrum emitted from small droplets. These effects have been incorporated into a theory of emission from droplets. We have measured emission using streaked spectrometry and together with theory of emission from heated droplets have inferred the temperature of a gold foil heated by the NDCX-I experiment. The intensity measured by the spectrometer is proportional to the emissivity times the blackbody intensity at the temperature of the foil or droplets. Traditionally, a functional form for the emissivity as a function of wavelength (such as a quadratic) is assumed and the three unknown emissivity parameters (for the case of a quadratic) and the temperature are obtained by minimizing the deviations from the fit. In the case of the NDCX-I experiment, two minima were obtained: at 7200 K and 2400 K. The best fit was at 7200 K. However, when the actual measured emissivity of gold was used and when the theoretical corrections for droplet interference effects were made for emission from droplets having radii in the range 0.2 to 2.0 microns, the corrected emissivity was consistent with the 2400 K value, whereas the fit emissivity at 7200 K shows no similarity to the corrected emissivity curves. Further, an estimate of the temperature obtained from beam heating is consistent with the lower value. This exercise proved to be a warning to be skeptical of assuming functional forms when they are unknown, and also represents a first success of the droplet emission theory. The thermal optical emission from a hot metal surface is polarized (for observation angles that are not normal to the surface). By observing the intensity of both polarizations at two or more observation angles the emissivity can be inferred directly, and the temperature at the surface unambiguously determined. Emission from the spolarization (where the E-field is parallel to the surface and normal to the wave vector) is generally less intense than emission from the p-polarization (E-field that is normal to the s-polarization E-field and the wave vector.) The emissivity and temperature may be inferred directly without assuming any specific functional form for the emissivity or resorting to published data tables (which usually do not apply when temperatures reach the WDM regime). We have derived the theory of polarized emission from hot metals, and consider an improved method of temperature determination that takes advantage of polarization measurements, which we call polarization pyrometry. Thus far we have successfully applied the theory to electrically heated metallic filaments, and will apply the theory to beam heated targets when chamber space constraints are removed that will make it feasible to observe the targets at multiple angles. For the case of experiments on NDCX-II, hydrodynamic expansion on a nanosecond timescale that is comparable to the heating time will result in an expanding fluid, with a strong (but finite) density and temperature gradient. Emission will be observed from positions in the foil near the critical density (where the observation photon frequency is equal to the local plasma frequency). By assuming a brightness temperature equal to the local fluid temperature at the critical frequency, a time history of the emission spectrum from an expanding foil can be synthesized from a hydrodynamic simulation of the target. We find that observations from the ultraviolet to the infrared will allow a probing of the target at dif

  4. The D/H ratio in water from Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, P.; Dolder, U.; Schulte, W.; Krankowsky, D.; Laemmerzahl, P.; Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R.; Berthelier, J. J.; Illiano, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The neutral gas mass spectrometer on Giotto made neutral and ion composition measurements with a high mass resolution. Evaluation of the ion data within the contact surface gives a D/H ratio in water from Halley between 0.00006 and 0.00048. While this ratio is definitely not compatible with the D/H in molecular hydrogen of the protosolar nebula or the Jovian and Saturnian atmospheres, it is in the range observed for hydrogen in solar system objects which acquired their hydrogen as part of volatile molecules, e.g., as ices.

  5. Hybrid LTA vehicle controllability as affected by buoyancy ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, D. N.; Kubicki, P.; Tarczynski, T.; Fairbanks, A.; Piasecki, F. N.

    1979-01-01

    The zero and low speed controllability of heavy lift airships under various wind conditions as affected by the buoyancy ratio are investigated. A series of three hybrid LTA vehicls were examined, each having a dynamic thrust system comprised of four H-34 helicopters, but with buoyant envelopes of different volumes (and hence buoyancies), and with varying percentage of helium inflation and varying useful loads (hence gross weights). Buoyancy ratio, B, was thus examined varying from approximately 0.44 to 1.39. For values of B greater than 1.0, the dynamic thrusters must supply negative thrust (i.e. downward).

  6. Effects of Thermal Conductivity Ratio in

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    negligible Calculate nondimensional heat transfer coefficient and loss coefficient KL from experimental dataEffects of Thermal Conductivity Ratio in Helium-Cooled Divertors B. H. Mills J. D. Rader D. L conductivity ratio Verify previous predictions of thermal performance at prototypical conditions and general

  7. Urine Albumin and Albumin/ Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Albumin; Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio Related tests: Albumin ; Creatinine ; Glucose ; A1c ; Urine Protein ; Beta-2 Microglobulin All content on Lab ... urine ). Most of the time, both albumin and creatinine are measured in a random urine sample and an albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) is ...

  8. Thermal photons to dileptons ratio at LHC

    E-print Network

    Jajati K. Nayak; Jan-e Alam; Sourav Sarkar; Bikash Sinha

    2007-05-24

    It is shown that the ratio of transverse momentum (p_T) distribution of thermal photons to dileptons produced in heavy ion collisions reaches a plateau above p_T=1 GeV. We argue that the value of the ratio in the plateau region can be used to estimate the initial temperature.

  9. Key financial ratios can foretell hospital closures.

    PubMed

    Lynn, M L; Wertheim, P

    1993-11-01

    An analysis of various financial ratios sampled from open and closed hospitals shows that certain leverage, liquidity, capital efficiency, and resource availability ratios can predict hospital closure up to two years in advance of the closure with an accuracy of nearly 75 percent. PMID:10145901

  10. Osmosis and Surface Area to Volume Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, D. R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help students understand the concepts of osmosis and surface area to volume ratio (SA:VOL). The task for students is to compare water uptake in different sizes of potato cubes and relate differences to their SA:VOL ratios. (JN)

  11. Construction of CCC resistance ratio bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.; Jensen, D.H.; Holtoug, J.U.

    1994-12-31

    The paper introduces the cryogenic current comparator (CCC) resistance ratio bridge being built at DFM, which is designed to relate the value of quantized hall resistance R{sub H}(i) to room temperature resistance standards. The CCC is an overlapping tube type with copper wire. A double constant current source is used to supply for the CCC resistance ratio bridge.

  12. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  13. The Divine Ratio and Golden Rectangles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Martin

    1982-01-01

    The material examines aspects of Fibonacci and Lucas sequences, the generation of the Divine Ratio, and the nature of this ratio in golden rectangles, triangles, and figures made up of golden triangles. It is noted Lucas sequence is formed like Fibonacci but has one and three as the first elements. (Author/MP)

  14. Sex ratios in pheasant research and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, F.H.

    1952-01-01

    Sex ratios are of primary importance in interpretation of extensive studies of pheasant populations. They are necessary for converting crowing-cock indices to population estimates even where annual trends are to be studied in the same area. Reliability of population estimates from hunting season kill of pheasants suffers primarily from inability to estimate sex ratios accurately. Fall sex ratio is an index to production and where adult sex ratios are divergent can serve as a good check on production per hen. Age ratios of cocks cannot be interpreted directly as an index of productivity, even within the boundaries of one state, unless adult sex ratios are known. The relationship between observed and actual sex ratio varies significantly from season to season and according to the method of observation. In view of their importance in population studies and the lack of reliability of present methods, it is believed that intensive studies on techniques for obtaining sex ratios are a major need in pheasant research.

  15. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide. PMID:17778807

  16. Sustainable sex ratio in lattice populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tainaka, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yoshimura, J.

    2006-05-01

    We present a lattice model of mating populations. Simulation is performed by two different methods: local and global interactions. Simulation results account for the reason why the observed sex ratio is nearly one half in many animals. The male-biased sex ratio, such as in human populations, is also explained.

  17. The Golden Ratio--A Contrary Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falbo, Clement

    2005-01-01

    Many assertions about the occurrence of the golden ratio phi in art, architecture, and nature have been shown to be false, unsupported, or misleading. For instance, we show that the spirals found in sea shells, in particular the "Nautilus pompilius," are not in the shape of the golden ratio, as is often claimed. Some of the most interesting…

  18. CCSSM Challenge: Graphing Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Mintos, Alexia; Krawczyk, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A renewed emphasis was placed on ratio and proportional reasoning in the middle grades in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The expectation for students includes the ability to not only compute and then compare and interpret the results of computations in context but also interpret ratios and proportions as they are…

  19. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  20. A new continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for the analysis of delta2H, delta17O and delta18O of small (120 microg) water samples in atmospheric applications.

    PubMed

    Franz, Peter; Röckmann, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A new continuous-flow system for the analysis of the complete stable isotopic composition of water vapor has been developed. The sample size is reduced to only 120 microg (identical with 120 nL of liquid substance) of water, yielding precisions of about 0.7, 1.3 and 7 per thousand for delta17O, delta18O and delta2H, respectively. The total time for the analysis of a sample is about 150 min including purging times. Oxidized steel surfaces can be a source of memory effects which can be corrected for. The system is predestined for atmospheric applications in the tropopause region, as the sample can be directly introduced into the system from a cryogenic trap. PMID:15216502

  1. The Charon-Pluto mass ratio from MKO astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Elliot, J. L.; Tholen, D. J.; Buie, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    Using the University of Hawaii (UH) 2.2-m telescope, we obtained charge coupled device (CCD) images of Pluto as it passed through a single field of 10 stars during 6 nights of Charon's 6.4-day orbital period. From these data, Charon's orbital semimajor axis is found to be 19,460 +/- 58 km, which is consistent with the recent measurement by Null et al. (1993), of 19,405 +/- 86 km. Our semimajor axis implies a system mass of (14.32 +/- 0.13) x 10(exp 24) g. From the motions of Pluto and Charon around their barycenter, we find that the ratio of Charon's mass to Pluto's is 0.1566 +/- 0.0035, indicating that the bodies both have densities near 2 g/cc. Our ratio is nearly twice that of Null et al., who find a ratio of 0.0837 +/- 0.0147. Possible reasons for the large discrepancy are discussed.

  2. Tone prominence ratio, error sources, and proposed solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, G. (Randy); Demoss, Jeffrey; Damani, Anil

    2005-09-01

    Tone prominence ratio is finding increasing use as a tool for product sound design. ECMA-74 Annex D offers a procedure for calculating tone prominence ratio and qualifying tone audibility. However, there are significant potential sources of error when utilizing the ECMA-74 procedure. These include possible misidentification of tone frequency, and ambiguities about what constitutes tone audibility. Misidentification of tone frequency can occur when closely spaced tones exist in the spectrum; whereas, other errors may result from individual subjective assessment of tone audibility. The existing ECMA method does not specify how to identify the primary tone frequency when such ambiguities exist. Real-world examples of potential error sources are presented along with proposed solutions. An unambiguous peak prominence ratio value reporting system is presented along with data to support its improved relevance in terms of hearing perception and subjective annoyance.

  3. Temperature Calibration for Optical Pyrometry in Containerless Systems Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry: Application to (-50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendert, J. C.; Pueblo, C. E.; Veligati, S.; Mauro, N. A.; Kelton, K. F.

    2014-10-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of the temperature are important for controlling conditions in any experimental design. In containerless processing, such as in electrostatic levitation and electromagnetic levitation, the temperature is typically measured using optical pyrometers. These are generally calibrated to the sample of interest by measuring the temperatures of phase transitions. The presence of multiple heat signatures, differences in emissivity for different phases, and inconsistencies in published phase diagrams can make this difficult. In this manuscript, a method for using differential scanning calorimetry measurements for calibration is outlined and applied to four Cu-Zr alloys from the eutectic to the line compound. This technique is particularly valuable for systems in which accurate phase diagram information is unavailable or inaccurate.

  4. CALIPSO Lidar Ratio Retrieval Over the Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josset, Damien B.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali H.; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-01-01

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type

  5. The HNC/HCN ratio in star-forming regions

    SciTech Connect

    Graninger, Dawn M.; Öberg, Karin I.; Herbst, Eric; Vasyunin, Anton I.

    2014-05-20

    HNC and HCN, typically used as dense gas tracers in molecular clouds, are a pair of isomers that have great potential as a temperature probe because of temperature dependent, isomer-specific formation and destruction pathways. Previous observations of the HNC/HCN abundance ratio show that the ratio decreases with increasing temperature, something that standard astrochemical models cannot reproduce. We have undertaken a detailed parameter study on which environmental characteristics and chemical reactions affect the HNC/HCN ratio and can thus contribute to the observed dependence. Using existing gas and gas-grain models updated with new reactions and reaction barriers, we find that in static models the H + HNC gas-phase reaction regulates the HNC/HCN ratio under all conditions, except for very early times. We quantitatively constrain the combinations of H abundance and H + HNC reaction barrier that can explain the observed HNC/HCN temperature dependence and discuss the implications in light of new quantum chemical calculations. In warm-up models, gas-grain chemistry contributes significantly to the predicted HNC/HCN ratio and understanding the dynamics of star formation is therefore key to model the HNC/HCN system.

  6. Retrieved waste properties and high-level waste critical component ratios for privatization waste feed delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.B.

    1998-03-04

    The purpose for this document is to provide the basis for the retrieved waste properties and high-level waste critical component ratios specified in the System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System.

  7. The optimal ratio time-frequency mask for speech separation in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shan; Liu, Wenju; Jiang, Wei; Xue, Wei

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, a computational goal for a monaural speech separation system is proposed. Since this goal is derived by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is called the optimal ratio mask (ORM). Under the approximate W-Disjoint Orthogonality assumption which almost always holds due to the sparse nature of speech, theoretical analysis shows that the ORM can improve the SNR about 10log(10)2 dB over the ideal ratio mask. With three kinds of real-world interference, the speech separation results of SNR gain and objective quality evaluation demonstrate the correctness of the theoretical analysis, and imply that the ORM achieves a better separation performance. PMID:24181990

  8. The effect of SiO2/Al2O3 ratio on the structure and microstructure of the glazes from SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partyka, Janusz; Sitarz, Maciej; Le?niak, Magdalena; Gasek, Katarzyna; Jele?, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic glazes are commonly used to covering of the facing surface of ceramics ware. A well-chosen oxide composition and firing conditions of glazes causes significant improvement of technical parameters of ceramic products. Modern glazes are classified as glass-ceramic composites with different crystalline phases arising during firing. The presence of crystals in the glass matrix is influenced by many factors, especially by oxides molar composition. A crucial role is played by the molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3. In this work the six composition of glazes from SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O system were examined. The only variable is the ratio of the silicon oxideto alumina at a constant content of other components: MgO, CaO, K2O, Na2O, ZnO. In order to determine the real phase composition of the obtained glazes research on fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) were done. For structural studies X-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectroscopic in the middle infrared (MIR) were performed. In order to determine the state of the surface (microstructure) research on the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with EDX. The research allowed to determine the influence of SiO2/Al2O3 ratio on the structure and phase composition of glazes and the nature, and type of formed crystalline phases.

  9. TOWARD A UNIQUE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIO IN COMETARY ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Rousselot, Philippe; Cordier, Daniel; Mousis, Olivier; Pirali, Olivier; Vervloet, Michel; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Gruet, Sébastien; Jehin, Emmanuël; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arpigny, Claude; Decock, Alice

    2014-01-10

    Determination of the nitrogen isotopic ratios in different bodies of the solar system provides important information regarding the solar system's origin. We unambiguously identified emission lines in comets due to the {sup 15}NH{sub 2} radical produced by the photodissociation of {sup 15}NH{sub 3}. Analysis of our data has permitted us to measure the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N isotopic ratio in comets for a molecule carrying the amine (-NH) functional group. This ratio, within the error, appears similar to that measured in comets in the HCN molecule and the CN radical, and lower than the protosolar value, suggesting that N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} result from the separation of nitrogen into two distinct reservoirs in the solar nebula. This ratio also appears similar to that measured in Titan's atmospheric N{sub 2}, supporting the hypothesis that, if the latter is representative of its primordial value in NH{sub 3}, these bodies were assembled from building blocks sharing a common formation location.

  10. The Effect of Satellite Galaxies on Gravitational Lensing Flux Ratios

    E-print Network

    E. M. Shin; N. W. Evans

    2008-01-16

    Gravitational lenses with anomalous flux ratios are often cited as possible evidence for dark matter satellites predicted by simulations of hierarchical merging in cold dark matter cosmogonies. We show that the fraction of quads with anomalous flux ratios depends primarily on the total mass and spatial extent of the satellites, and the characteristic lengthscale R of their distribution. If R is 100 kpc, then for a moderately elliptical galaxy with a line-of-sight velocity dispersion of 250 km/s, a mass of 3 x 10^9 solar masses in highly-concentrated (Plummer model) satellites is needed for 20% of quadruplets to show anomalous flux ratios, rising to 1.25 x 10^10 solar masses for 50%. Several times these masses are required if the satellites have more extended Hernquist profiles. Compared to a typical elliptical, the flux ratios of quads formed by typical edge-on disc galaxies with maximum discs are significantly less susceptible to changes through substructure -- three times the mass in satellite galaxies is needed to affect 50% of the systems. In many of the lens systems with anomalous flux ratios, there is evidence for visible satellites (e.g., B2045+265 or MG0414+0534). We show that optically identified substructure should not be preponderant among lens systems with anomalies. There are two possible resolutions of this difficulty. First, in some cases, visible substructure may be projected within or close to the Einstein radius and wrongly ascribed as the culprit, whereas dark matter substructure is causing the flux anomaly. Second, bright satellites, in which baryon cooling and condensation has taken place, may have higher central densities than dark satellites, rendering them more efficient at causing flux anomalies.

  11. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    We have measured vibration-rotation first and second overtone 12C16O, 13C16O, 12C17O, 12C18O lines in 1.5 to 2.5 micron spectra of 41 Mira and SRa stars. These measurements have been used to derive 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O isotopic ratios. The ratios are compared to available literature values for the individual stars and the ratios are compared to isotopic ratios for various samples of evolved stars. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are compared to the results. We find that the majority of the M stars had main sequence masses <1.5 solar mass and have not experienced the third dredge up. The progenitors of the S and C Miras in the sample were more massive but no stars in the sample show evidence of hot bottom burning.

  12. Approaches to high aspect ratio triangulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, M.-A.

    1993-01-01

    In aerospace computational fluid dynamics calculations, high aspect ratio, or stretched, triangulations are necessary to adequately resolve the features of a viscous flow around bodies. In this paper, we explore alternatives to the Delaunay triangulation which can be used to generate high aspect ratio triangulations of point sets. The method is based on a variation of the lifting map concept which derives Delaunay triangulations from convex hull calculations.

  13. D5 Pristine:Degraded Mixture Ratio

    E-print Network

    :20 1:40 Mixture Ratio PeakHeight(rfu) 10 M 11 M 12 M 13 M Disclaimer Points of view are those://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/pub_pres/Promega2008poster.pdf Determining Contributor Profiles from DNA Mixtures of Varying Ratios John M. Butler1, Forest Park, GA 30297 Mixtures exist whenever more than one individual contributes biological material

  14. Noncontact thermal pyrometry for condensed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubas, L. G.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrometry technique is suggested aimed at minimizing the measurement error and increasing the accuracy of contactless temperature measurements. Significantly, the suggested method of pyrometer calibration allows using a two-tiered approach with preliminary or additional recording of the system's state and thermal radiation to refine temperature measurements. To improve the reliability of results and extend the application range of thermal pyrometry, it is necessary to decrease the influence of the relative error of the spectral ratio on measuring data.

  15. A note on trader Sharpe Ratios.

    PubMed

    Coates, John M; Page, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    Traders in the financial world are assessed by the amount of money they make and, increasingly, by the amount of money they make per unit of risk taken, a measure known as the Sharpe Ratio. Little is known about the average Sharpe Ratio among traders, but the Efficient Market Hypothesis suggests that traders, like asset managers, should not outperform the broad market. Here we report the findings of a study conducted in the City of London which shows that a population of experienced traders attain Sharpe Ratios significantly higher than the broad market. To explain this anomaly we examine a surrogate marker of prenatal androgen exposure, the second-to-fourth finger length ratio (2D:4D), which has previously been identified as predicting a trader's long term profitability. We find that it predicts the amount of risk taken by traders but not their Sharpe Ratios. We do, however, find that the traders' Sharpe Ratios increase markedly with the number of years they have traded, a result suggesting that learning plays a role in increasing the returns of traders. Our findings present anomalous data for the Efficient Markets Hypothesis. PMID:19946367

  16. Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; La Mont, Stephen P; Eisele, William F; Fresquez, Philip R; Mc Naughton, Michael; Whicker, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-14

    Historically, approximately 12,000 TBq of plutonium was distributed throughout the global biosphere by thermo nuclear weapons testing. The resultant global plutonium fallout is a complex mixture whose {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio is a function of the design and yield of the devices tested. The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in global fallout is 0.176 + 014. However, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio at any location may differ significantly from 0.176. Plutonium has also been released by discharges and accidents associated with the commercial and weapons related nuclear industries. At many locations contributions from this plutonium significantly alters the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios from those observed in global fallout. We have measured the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in environmental samples collected from many locations in North America. This presentation will summarize the analytical results from these measurements. Special emphasis will be placed on interpretation of the significance of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios measured in environmental samples collected in the Arctic and in the western portions of the United States.

  17. The Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Colchin, R.J.; Carolan, P.G.; Duck, R.; Edlington, T.; Erents, S.K.; Ferreira, J.; Fielding, S.J.; Gibson, K.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Gryaznevich, M.; Hender, T.C.; Hugill, J.; Jenkins, I.; Li, J.; Manhood, S.J.; Parham, B.J.; Robinson, D.C.; Singleton, M.; Sykes, A.; Todd, T.N.; Turner, M.F.; Valovic, M.; Walsh, M.; Wilson, H.R. , Abingdon, Oxon )

    1993-07-01

    Low-aspect-ratio tokamaks offer both the economic advantage of smaller size and a number of physics advantages which are not available at conventional aspect ratio. The Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak (START) [[ital Fusion] [ital Technology] 1990, edited by B. E. Keen, M. Huguet, and R. Hemsworth (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1991), Vol. 1, p. 353] was conceived as a first substantial test of tokamak plasma behavior at low aspect ratio. It has achieved plasma currents up to 200 kA, peak densities of [similar to]2[times]10[sup 20] m[sup [minus]3] and central electron temperatures of [similar to]500 eV at an aspect ratio of 1.3--1.5. Central beta values of [similar to]13% have been measured and the volume-averaged beta [l angle][beta][r angle] can approach the Troyon limit. Plasmas are naturally elongated ([kappa][approx lt]2.0) and are vertically stable without feedback control. Major disruptions have not been observed at low aspect ratios ([ital A][le]2.0).

  18. A Note on Trader Sharpe Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Coates, John M.; Page, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    Traders in the financial world are assessed by the amount of money they make and, increasingly, by the amount of money they make per unit of risk taken, a measure known as the Sharpe Ratio. Little is known about the average Sharpe Ratio among traders, but the Efficient Market Hypothesis suggests that traders, like asset managers, should not outperform the broad market. Here we report the findings of a study conducted in the City of London which shows that a population of experienced traders attain Sharpe Ratios significantly higher than the broad market. To explain this anomaly we examine a surrogate marker of prenatal androgen exposure, the second-to-fourth finger length ratio (2D?4D), which has previously been identified as predicting a trader's long term profitability. We find that it predicts the amount of risk taken by traders but not their Sharpe Ratios. We do, however, find that the traders' Sharpe Ratios increase markedly with the number of years they have traded, a result suggesting that learning plays a role in increasing the returns of traders. Our findings present anomalous data for the Efficient Markets Hypothesis. PMID:19946367

  19. Optimal power split ratio for autobalanced photodetection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2014-01-20

    The noise suppression of the autobalanced photoreceiver devised by Hobbs [Proc. SPIE1376, 216 (1990)] had been determined to depend on the photocurrent ratio of reference beam to signal beam under the condition of constant signal beam photocurrent, and the best noise cancellation was suggested at a ratio close to 2. But in most applications, the available optical power has a limit. Therefore, to optimize the sensitivity of measurements, we should consider how to allocate the beam power in the case of fixed total optical power. In this paper, we measure the air Faraday rotation at different azimuth angles of beam polarization, which correspond to different photocurrent ratios. The signal-to-noise ratio at each photocurrent ratio is determined, and the best sensitivity appears at the photocurrent ratio of 1. This best sensitivity achieved is 3.02×10(-8)??rad?Hz(-1/2), which is about 1.3 times the shot noise limit. Our results are useful for sensitive optical measurements with the autobalanced photoreceiver. PMID:24514118

  20. In vivo dissolution measurement with indium-111 summation peak ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, M.; Woodward, M.A.; Brouwer, K.R.

    1985-10-01

    Dissolution of (/sup 111/In)labeled tablets was measured in vivo in a totally noninvasive manner by using a modification of the perturbed angular correlation technique known as the summation peak ratio method. This method, which requires the incorporation of only 10-12 microCi into the dosage form, provided reliable dissolution data after oral administration of (/sup 111/In)lactose tablets. These results were supported by in vitro experiments which demonstrated that the dissolution rate as measured by the summation peak ratio method was in close agreement with the dissolution rate of salicylic acid in a (/sup 111/In)salicylic acid tablet. The method has the advantages of using only one detector, thereby avoiding the need for complex coincidence counting systems, requiring less radioactivity, and being potentially applicable to a gamma camera imaging system.

  1. 10 CFR 436.21 - Savings-to-investment ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Savings-to-investment ratio. 436.21 Section 436...CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology... Savings-to-investment ratio. The savings-to-investment ratio is the ratio of the...

  2. Thermosolutal convection in high-aspect-ratio enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. W.; Chen, C. T.

    1988-01-01

    Convection in high-aspect-ratio rectangular enclosures with combined horizontal temperature and concentration gradients is studied experimentally. An electrochemical system is employed to impose the concentration gradients. The solutal buoyancy force either opposes or augments the thermal buoyancy force. Due to a large difference between the thermal and solutal diffusion rates the flow possesses double-diffusive characteristics. Various complex flow patterns are observed with different experimental conditions.

  3. Remote identification of soil conditions with ratioed multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, T. W.; Dillman, R.; Thomson, F.

    1973-01-01

    Some of the information concerning soils that a multispectral scanner system may provide is discussed, and a practical approach for realizing this potential is suggested. Some reflectance and emittance characteristics of soil surfaces are reviewed, and the feasibility of selectively enhancing contrasts associated with differing soil conditions is demonstrated. The simplicity of the proposed ratio technique, its relative economy, and the compatibility of the image output with conventional survey methods commends it for consideration as an operational method.

  4. Experimental evaluation of blockage ratio and plenum evacuation system flow effects on pressure distribution for bodies of revolution in 0.1 scale model test section of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard R.; Harrington, Douglas E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the slotted test section of the 0.1-scale model of the proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel to evaluate wall interference effects at tunnel Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.95 on bodies of revolution with blockage rates of 0.43, 3, 6, and 12 percent. The amount of flow that had to be removed from the plenum chamber (which surrounded the slotted test section) by the plenum evacuation system (PES) to eliminate wall interference effects was determined. The effectiveness of tunnel reentry flaps in removing flow from the plenum chamber was examined. The 0.43-percent blockage model was the only one free of wall interference effects with no PES flow. Surface pressures on the forward part of the other models were greater than interference-free results and were not influenced by PES flow. Interference-free results were achieved on the aft part of the 3- and 6-percent blockage models with the proper amount of PES flow. The required PES flow was substantially reduced by opening the reentry flaps.

  5. A new ratio for protocol categorization.

    PubMed

    Squara, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The present review describes and validates a new ratio "S" created for matching predictability and balance between TP and TN. Validity of S was studied in a three-step process as follows: (i) S was applied to the data of a past study predicting cardiac output response to fluid bolus from response to passive leg raise (PLR); (ii) S was comparatively analyzed with traditional ratios by modeling different 2 ? 2 contingency tables in 1000 hypothetical patients; (iii) precision of S was compared with other ratios by computing random fluctuations in the same patients. In comparison to other ratios, S performs better in predicting the cardiac response to fluid bolus and supports more directly the clinical conclusions. When the proportion of false responses is high, S is close to the coefficient correlation (CC). When the proportion of true responses is high, S is the unique ratio that identifies the categorization that balances the proportion of TP and TN. The precision of S is close to that of CC. In conclusion, S should be considered for creating categories from quantitative variables; especially when matching predictability with balance between TP and TN is a concern. PMID:24738007

  6. Optimal aspect ratio of endocytosed spherocylindrical nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Bing; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zeng, Yan; Mao, Wei; Hu, Lin; Mao, Zong-Liang; Xu, Hou-Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Recent simulations have demonstrated that bioparticle size and shape modulate the process of endocytosis, and studies have provided more quantitative information that the endocytosis efficiency of spherocylindrical bioparticles is decided by its aspect ratio. At the same time, the dimensions of the receptor-ligand complex have strong effects on the size-dependent exclusion of proteins within the cellular environment. However, these earlier theoretical works including simulations did not consider the effects of ligand-receptor complex dimension on the endocytosis process. Thus, it is necessary to resolve the effects of ligand-receptor complex dimension and determine the optimal aspect ratio of spherocylindrical bioparticles in the process of endocytosis. Accordingly, we proposed a continuum elastic model, of which the results indicate that the aspect ratio depends on the ligand-receptor complex dimension and the radius of the spherocylindrical bioparticle. This model provides a phase diagram of the aspect ratio of endocytosed spherocylindrical bioparticles, the larger aspect ratio of which appears in the phase diagram with increasing ligand density, and highlights the bioparticle design.

  7. Upper limit of magnetic effect on ?/? ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, G.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being integrated into radiotherapy delivery for MRI-guided radiotherapy. The purpose of this work is to investigate theoretically the upper limit of any potential magnetic effect on the ?/? ratio, an important radiobiological parameter in radiation therapy. Based on the theory of dual radiation action, the ?/? ratio can be expressed by an integral of the product of two microdosimetry quantities ? (x) and t(x) , where ? (x) is the probability that two energy transfers, a distance x apart, results in a lesion, and t(x) is the proximity function, which is the energy-weighted point-pair distribution of distances between energy transfer points in a track. The quantity t(x) depends on the applied magnetic field. An analytical approach has been used to derive a formula that can be used to calculate the ?/? ratio in an extremely strong magnetic field, which gives the upper limit of the potential changes of the ?/? ratio due to the presence of a magnetic field. For V79 Chinese hamster cells the upper limit of the increase of the ?/? ratio with a magnetic field has been found to be 2.90 times for Pd-103, 2.97 times for I-125 and 2.3 times for Co-60 sources.

  8. Duty-ratio of cooperative molecular motors

    E-print Network

    Nadiv Dharan; Oded Farago

    2012-01-22

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body, and have many different and important roles. These micro-machines move along filament tracks, and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty-ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II - a non-processive molecular machine with a low duty ratio - cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of non-processive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track.

  9. Development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements are discussed. Efforts were directed towards the following task areas: design and development of a High Temperature Acoustic Levitator (HAL) for containerless processing and property measurements at high temperatures; testing of the HAL module to establish this technology for use as a positioning device for microgravity uses; construction and evaluation of a brassboard hot wall Acoustic Levitation Furnace; construction and evaluation of a noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) system based on AGEMA thermal imaging camera; construction of a prototype Division of Amplitude Polarimetric Pyrometer for NCTM of levitated specimens; evaluation of and recommendations for techniques to control contamination in containerless materials processing chambers; and evaluation of techniques for heating specimens to high temperatures for containerless materials experimentation.

  10. A leading edge heating array and a flat surface heating array: Final design. [for testing the thermal protection system of the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A heating array is described for testing full-scale sections of the leading edge and lower fuselage surfaces of the shuttle. The heating array was designed to provide a tool for development and acceptance testing of leading edge segments and large flat sections of the main body thermal protection system. The array was designed using a variable length module concept to meet test requirements using interchangeable components from one test configuration in another configuration. Heat generating modules and heat absorbing modules were employed to achieve the thermal gradient around the leading edge. A support was developed to hold the modules to form an envelope around a variety of leading edges; to supply coolant to each module; the support structure and to hold the modules in the flat surface heater configuration. An optical pyrometer system mounted within the array was designed to monitor specimen surface temperatures without altering the test article's surface.

  11. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at NFSS

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.C.; Keil, K.G.; Frederick, W.T.; Papura, T.R.; Leithner, J.S.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Buffalo District is currently evaluating environmental contamination at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The NFSS is located in the Town of Lewiston in western New York and has been used to store uranium-contaminated materials since 1944. Most of the radioactive materials are currently contained in an on-site structure, but past contamination remains in soil and groundwater. As a naturally occurring radionuclide, uranium is present in all groundwater. Because contamination levels at the site are quite low, it can be difficult to distinguish zones that have been impacted by the past releases from those at the high end of the natural background range. The differences in the isotopic ratio of uranium-234 (U-234) to uranium-238 (U-238) between natural groundwater systems and affected areas are being used in an innovative way to better define the nature and extent of groundwater contamination at NFSS. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow, and it can be hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable impact is seen in the isotopic ratio. Thus, as a result of the recoil effect, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 will be higher in natural groundwater than in contaminated groundwater. This means that if site releases were the source of the uranium being measured in groundwater at NFSS, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 would be expected to be very close to 1 (the same ratio that exists in wastes and soil at the site), because not enough time has elapsed for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered that ratio. From an evaluation of site and regional groundwater data, an isotopic ratio of 1.2 has been identified as a site-specific signature to help distinguish natural groundwater (e.g., at the high end of the background range) from zones impacted by past releases. This information is crucial for focusing the ongoing CERCLA evaluation and decision making process. This signature value is not applied as a bright line, e.g., to define samples with ratios of U-234 to U-238 above 1.2 as representing background and those with ratios below 1.2 as being affected by site releases. Rather, this ratio serves as a weight of evidence for use in conjunction with other site information, including historical activities, to form science-based decisions regarding contaminated groundwater. This novel approach for developing a groundwater signature from the isotopic uranium ratio has proven to be a very useful tool for NFSS, and it is now being considered for broader application. (authors)

  12. Spectroscopic Measurement of Neutral Particle Influx Ratio on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Shi, Yuejiang; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yongcai; Wang, Fudi; Lu, Bo; Huang, Juan; Zhang, Ling; Xu, Jingcui; Zhou, Qian

    2013-06-01

    The spectra of HeI (587.6 nm), H? (656.28 nm) and D? (656.1 nm) of the helium discharges as well as the normal deuterium discharges have been measured with two optical spectroscopic multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The influx ratio of the sum of H and D to He spectral lines and the influx ratio of H to D are given. In this way the ratio of hydrogen/deuterium ion (S/XB)H/D to (S/XB)He as well as (S/XB)H/D is not very sensitive to the variation in the edge density and temperature. The low-density helium discharges are operated in order to reduce the recycling hydrogen fluxes; however, the effect is not obvious. The possible reason is that the number of helium discharges is not enough and the content of hydrogen in the wall is still very abundant, which is caused by frequent wall conditionings and the vacuum leakage. The H/(H+D) ratio decreases quickly after one lithium coating and reduces to less than 10% using several accumulated lithium wall conditioning. It is found that the deposited He atoms on the carbon wall will remain at a low level after several D2 discharges.

  13. Poisson ratio map of Brazil: Data compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franca, G.; Bianchi, M.; Pavão, C.; Moreira, L. P.; Farrapo Albuquerque, D.; Peres Rocha, M.; Marotta, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a Poisson ration map of Brazil based on a compilation of data published in the literature as well as new measurements. We only used Poisson ration derived from receiver function analyses deep seismic refraction experiments . Our compilation shows that the crust in the stable continental area onshore has an Poisson ratio of 0.24 +- 0.03. The Poisson ratio highest is found along boundary with three provinces; Sao Francisco craton, Tocantins belt and Parana basin. Prelimary results have not clear difference can be observed between low altitude, intracratonic sedimentary basins, NeoProterozoic foldbelts and cratonic aeas. Although sparse in data coverage, we expect the resulting Poisson ratio map to be useful for future studies of isostasy, constraint, dynamic topography, and crustal evolution of the country.

  14. Kinship Institutions and Sex Ratios in India

    PubMed Central

    CHAKRABORTY, TANIKA; KIM, SUKKOO

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between kinship institutions and sex ratios in India at the turn of the twentieth century. Because kinship rules vary by caste, language, religion, and region, we construct sex ratios by these categories at the district level by using data from the 1901 Census of India for Punjab (North), Bengal (East), and Madras (South). We find that the male-to-female sex ratio varied positively with caste rank, fell as one moved from the North to the East and then to the South, was higher for Hindus than for Muslims, and was higher for northern Indo-Aryan speakers than for the southern Dravidian-speaking people. We argue that these systematic patterns in the data are consistent with variations in the institution of family, kinship, and inheritance. PMID:21308567

  15. Ratio versus difference comparators in choice.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, J; Fairhurst, S

    1994-01-01

    Several theories in the learning literature describe decision rules for performance utilizing ratios and differences. The present paper analyzes rules for choice based on either delays to food, immediacies (the inverse of delays), or rates of food, combined factorially with a ratio or difference comparator. An experiment using the time-left procedure (Gibbon & Church, 1981) is reported with motivational differentials induced by unequal reinforcement durations. The preference results were compatible with a ratio-comparator decision rule, but not with decision rules based on differences. Differential reinforcement amounts were functionally equivalent to changes in delays to food. Under biased reinforcement, overall food rate was increased, but variance in preference was increased or decreased depending on which alternative was favored. This is a Weber law finding that is compatible with multiplicative, scalar sources of variance but incompatible with pacemaker rate changes proportional to food presentation rate. PMID:7983462

  16. Algorithms for high aspect ratio oriented triangulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K.

    1995-01-01

    Grid generation plays an integral part in the solution of computational fluid dynamics problems for aerodynamics applications. A major difficulty with standard structured grid generation, which produces quadrilateral (or hexahedral) elements with implicit connectivity, has been the requirement for a great deal of human intervention in developing grids around complex configurations. This has led to investigations into unstructured grids with explicit connectivities, which are primarily composed of triangular (or tetrahedral) elements, although other subdivisions of convex cells may be used. The existence of large gradients in the solution of aerodynamic problems may be exploited to reduce the computational effort by using high aspect ratio elements in high gradient regions. However, the heuristic approaches currently in use do not adequately address this need for high aspect ratio unstructured grids. High aspect ratio triangulations very often produce the large angles that are to be avoided. Point generation techniques based on contour or front generation are judged to be the most promising in terms of being able to handle complicated multiple body objects, with this technique lending itself well to adaptivity. The eventual goal encompasses several phases: first, a partitioning phase, in which the Voronoi diagram of a set of points and line segments (the input set) will be generated to partition the input domain; second, a contour generation phase in which body-conforming contours are used to subdivide the partition further as well as introduce the foundation for aspect ratio control, and; third, a Steiner triangulation phase in which points are added to the partition to enable triangulation while controlling angle bounds and aspect ratio. This provides a combination of the advancing front/contour techniques and refinement. By using a front, aspect ratio can be better controlled. By using refinement, bounds on angles can be maintained, while attempting to minimize the number of Steiner points.

  17. Enantiomer Ratios of Meteoritic Sugar Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites contain a diverse suite of soluble organic compounds. Studies of these compounds reveal the Solar System's earliest organic chemistry. Among the classes of organic compounds found in meteorites are keto acids (pyruvic acid, etc.), hydroxy tricarboxylic acids (1), amino acids, amides, purines and pyrimidines. The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the most studied for soluble and insoluble organic compounds and organic carbon phases. The majority of (indigenous) meteoritic compounds are racemic, (i.e., their D/L enantiomer ratios are 50:50). However, some of the more unusual (non-protein) amino acids contain slightly more of one enantiomer (usually the L) than the other. This presentation focuses on the enantiomer analyses of three to six-carbon (3C to 6C) meteoritic sugar acids. The molecular and enantiomer analysis of corresponding sugar alcohols will also be discussed. Detailed analytical procedures for sugar-acid enantiomers have been described. Results of several meteorite analyses show that glyceric acid is consistently racemic (or nearly so) as expected of non-biological mechanisms of synthesis. Also racemic are 4-C deoxy sugar acids: 2-methyl glyceric acid; 2,4-dihydroxybutyric acid; 2,3-dihydroxybutyric acid (two diastereomers); and 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid. However, a 4C acid, threonic acid, has never been observed as racemic, i.e., it possesses a large D excess. In several samples of Murchison and one of GRA 95229 (possibly the most pristine carbonaceous meteorite yet analyzed) threonic acid has nearly the same D enrichment. In Murchison, preliminary isotopic measurements of individual threonic acid enantiomers point towards extraterrestrial sources of the D enrichment. Enantiomer analyses of the 5C mono-sugar acids, ribonic, arabinonic, xylonic, and lyxonic also show large D excesses. It is worth noting that all four of these acids (all of the possible straight-chained 5C sugar acids) are present in meteorites, including the rare lyxonic acid, and their relative abundances are in equilibrium proportions. In addition (in contrast to the above D-only excesses), some of the above acids are found in biology as the L enantiomer. Whether rare are common, all of the 6C sugar acids that are present in sufficient amounts to allow enantiomer analysis (Mannonic, gluconic, altronic, talonic, idonic, gulonic, and galactonic) also, apparently, possess significant D excesses.

  18. Radioactive anomaly discrimination from spectral ratios

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements

    2013-08-20

    A method for discriminating a radioactive anomaly from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive anomaly is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.

  19. On the variability of alligator sex ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Chabreck, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Samples of alligators from wild and 'farm' populations exhibited disproportionate sex ratios. Males predominated among young alligators from wild populations, whereas females were much more abundant than males in the farm population, where resources were superabundant. These results and other considerations lead us to hypothesize that environmental factors influence sex determination in alligators. During favorable environmental conditions natural selection is expected to favor a preponderance of the sex whose individuals exhibit the greater environmentally associated variation in relative fitness. We hypothesize that environmentally associated variation in age at sexual maturity of females produces sufficient variation in relative fitness of females to result in selection for low sex ratios during periods of resource abundance.

  20. Effect of grid aspect ratio on convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buelow, P. E. O.; Venkateswaran, S.; Merkle, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of high-aspect-ratio grids on algorithm convergence are considered by means of vector stability theory and computational experiments. The results indicate that approximately factored implicit schemes experience convergence deterioration because of nonoptimum local time-stepping procedures and increased need for viscous preconditioning. Based on this insight, an enhanced algorithm is devised using improved selection of the local time step, appropriate definition of the viscous preconditioning matrix, and proper implementation of the boundary conditions. The new algorithm provides uniformly efficient convergence at all aspect ratios for both Euler and Navier-Stokes computations for a variety of test problems.

  1. These are ``how to do it'' papers. They should be written and illustrated so that the reader may easily follow whatever instruction or advice is being given.

    E-print Network

    Thibado, Paul M.

    Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 Y. Baharav CI Systems Limited, Migdal Haemek radiative heating of the substrate, the pyrometer becomes flooded with the infra- red radiation

  2. Wide acceptance angle, high concentration ratio, optical collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruer, Mark Arthur (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is directed to an optical collector requiring a wide acceptance angle, and a high concentration ratio. The invention is particularly adapted for use in solar collectors of cassegrain design. The optical collector system includes a parabolic circular concave primary mirror and a hyperbolic circular convex secondary mirror. The primary mirror includes a circular hole located at its center wherein a solar collector is located. The mirrored surface of the secondary mirror has three distinct zones: a center circle, an on-axis annulus, and an off-axis section. The parabolic shape of the primary mirror is chosen so that the primary mirror reflects light entering the system on-axis onto the on-axis annulus. A substantial amount of light entering the system off-axis is reflected by the primary mirror onto either the off-axis section or onto the center circle. Subsequently, the off-axis sections reflect the off-axis light toward the solar collector. Thus, off-axis light is captured which would otherwise be lost to the system. The novelty of the system appears to lie in the configuration of the primary mirror which focuses off-axis light onto an annular portion of the secondary mirror to enable capture thereof. This feature results in wide acceptance angle and a high concentration ratio, and also compensates for the effects of non-specular reflection, and enables a cassegrain configuration to be used where such characteristics are required.

  3. Viscosity to entropy ratio at extremality

    E-print Network

    Sayan K. Chakrabarti; Sachin Jain; Sudipta Mukherji

    2010-01-19

    Assuming gauge theory realization at the boundary, we show that the viscosity to entropy ratio is 1/(4 pi) where the bulk is represented by a large class of extremal black holes in anti-de Sitter space. In particular, this class includes multiple R-charged black holes in various dimensions.

  4. Flowmeter determines mix ratio for viscous adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.

    1967-01-01

    Flowmeter determines mix ratio for continuous flow mixing machine used to produce an adhesive from a high viscosity resin and aliphatic amine hardener pumped through separate lines to a rotary blender. The flowmeter uses strain gages in the two flow paths and monitors their outputs with appropriate instrumentation.

  5. Giving More Realistic Definitions of Trigonometric Ratios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Pramode Ranjan

    2012-01-01

    Trigonometry is a well known branch of Mathematics. The study of trigonometry is of great importance in surveying, astronomy, navigation, engineering, and in different branches of science. This paper reports on the discovery of flaws in the traditional definitions of trigonometric ratios of an angle, which (in most cases) make use of the most…

  6. Improved Measurement of the ? ?e ? Branching Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; Vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.; Pienu Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re /?=? (?+?e+? +?+?e+? ? )/? (?+??+? +?+??+? ? ) resulted in Re/? exp=[1.2344 ±0.0023 (stat)±0.0019 (syst)]×10-4 . This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  7. Constrained Ratio Approach to Allocating Instructional Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, William B.

    1975-01-01

    Principal budgetary approaches underlying the allocation of instructional resources to an institution of higher education to maintain its continuing programs are briefly considered from several standpoints, and an alternative approach is developed. The constrained ratio approach is conducive to innovation but maintains resource control. (LBH)

  8. Improved Measurement of the ??e? Branching Ratio.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Aoki, M; Blecher, M; Britton, D I; Bryman, D A; Vom Bruch, D; Chen, S; Comfort, J; Ding, M; Doria, L; Cuen-Rochin, S; Gumplinger, P; Hussein, A; Igarashi, Y; Ito, S; Kettell, S H; Kurchaninov, L; Littenberg, L S; Malbrunot, C; Mischke, R E; Numao, T; Protopopescu, D; Sher, A; Sullivan, T; Vavilov, D; Yamada, K

    2015-08-14

    A new measurement of the branching ratio R_{e/?}=?(?^{+}?e^{+}?+?^{+}?e^{+}??)/?(?^{+}??^{+}?+?^{+}??^{+}??) resulted in R_{e/?}^{exp}=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)]×10^{-4}. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%. PMID:26317713

  9. 75 FR 79286 - Designated Reserve Ratio

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... remains constrained by weak loan demand and banks' reduced tolerance for risk. Industry-wide, loans... a strategy for assessment rates and dividends (the October NPR).\\7\\ \\7\\ 75 FR 66262 (Oct. 27, 2010... reserve ratio reaches 1.35 percent by September 30, 2020, as required by Dodd-Frank. 75 FR 66293 (Oct....

  10. Ratio method of measuring $w$ boson mass

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Feng; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in D0 experiment. Instead of extracting M{sub W} from the fitting of W {yields} e{nu} fast Monte Carlo simulations to W {yields} e{nu} data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W {yields} e{nu} data and Z {yields} ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (M{sub W}/M{sub Z}). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb{sup -1} D0 Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives M{sub W} = 80435 {+-} 43(stat) {+-} 26(sys) MeV.

  11. Weber Ratio for Visual Discrimination of Velocity.

    PubMed

    Brown, R H

    1960-06-17

    As an approximation based on various experiments reported in the literature, the least detectable difference in speed (delta w) varies in direct proportion to the speed (w) over a range from 0.1 to 20 degrees of visual angle per second. The constancy of the Weber ratio (deltaw/w) aids in understanding how men react to velocity in various situations. PMID:17753209

  12. Male pygmy hippopotamus influence offspring sex ratio.

    PubMed

    Saragusty, Joseph; Hermes, Robert; Hofer, Heribert; Bouts, Tim; Göritz, Frank; Hildebrandt, Thomas B

    2012-01-01

    Pre-determining fetal sex is against the random and equal opportunity that both conceptus sexes have by nature. Yet, under a wide variety of circumstances, populations shift their birth sex ratio from the expected unity. Here we show, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, that in a population of pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) with 42.5% male offspring, males bias the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in their ejaculates, resulting in a 0.4337±0.0094 (mean±s.d.) proportion of Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa. Three alternative hypotheses for the shifted population sex ratio were compared: female counteract male, female indifferent, or male and female in agreement. We conclude that there appears little or no antagonistic sexual conflict, unexpected by prevailing theories. Our results indicate that males possess a mechanism to adjust the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in the ejaculate, thereby substantially expanding currently known male options in sexual conflict. PMID:22426218

  13. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668.172 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Financial Responsibility § 668.172 Financial... program authorized by the HEA only if— (i) In the notes to the institution's audited financial...

  14. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668.172 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Financial Responsibility § 668.172 Financial... program authorized by the HEA only if— (i) In the notes to the institution's audited financial...

  15. Catch to Bycatch Ratios: Comparing Hawaii's Longline

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Catch to Bycatch Ratios: Comparing Hawaii's Longline Fisheries with Others Paul K. Bartram and J. John Kaneko PacMar, Inc. 3615 Harding Avenue, Suite 409 Honolulu, Hawaii SOEST 04-05 JIMAR Contribution finfish bycatch per unit effort estimates (BPUE) for Hawaii pelagic longline fisheries without assistance

  16. Ratio model serves suprathreshold color luminance discrimination

    E-print Network

    Mullen, Kathy T.

    Ratio model serves suprathreshold color­ luminance discrimination Marcel J. Sankeralli and Kathy T Trevor J. Hine School of Applied Psychology, Faculty of Health Science, Griffith University, Brisbane quadrants of the red­ green/luminance and blue­yellow/luminance planes of cardinal color space. We showed

  17. IKONOS Signal-to-Noise Ratio Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanoni, Vicki; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation focuses on the differences in Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) between IKONOS imagery with and without Modulation Transfer Function Correction (MTFC). The researchers used a simulated scene to evaluate the effects of MTFC on SNR. They also used four very uniform IKONOS scenes, two of Antarctica, one of Ivanpah, CA, and one of Mali to estimate SNR.

  18. Disproportionate sex ratios of wolf pups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    1975-01-01

    Males comprised 66 percent of wild wolf (Canis lupus) pups from a saturated, high-density wolf range in northeastern Minnesota, possibly reflecting disproportionate conception of males. Packs from areas of lower wolf density in other areas of Minnesota had equal sex ratios of pups or a disproportionate number of female pups. Captive wolves showed a slight preponderance of male pups.

  19. Improved Measurement of the ??e? Branching Ratio

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; et al

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/?=?(?+ ? e+? + ?+ ? e+??)/?(?+ ? ?+? + ?+??+??) resulted in Rexpe/?=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  20. HIGH-ASPECT-RATIO INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ETCHING OF BULK TITANIUM FOR MEMS APPLICATIONS

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Noel C.

    HIGH-ASPECT-RATIO INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ETCHING OF BULK TITANIUM FOR MEMS APPLICATIONS E. R option for certain MEMS applications. #12;Dry etching of high-aspect-ratio structures in bulk titanium system for the bulk micromachining of MEMS devices. Titanium-based MEMS have the potential to be used

  1. Gametocyte sex ratio in single-clone infections of the malaria parasite Plasmodium mexicanum

    E-print Network

    Schall, Joseph J.

    Gametocyte sex ratio in single-clone infections of the malaria parasite Plasmodium mexicanum A 12 July 2010) SUMMARY Sex ratio theory predicts that malaria parasites should bias gametocyte system later in the infection. Recent experimental studies reveal genetic variation for gametocyte sex

  2. Measuring the signal-to-noise ratio of a neuron.

    PubMed

    Czanner, Gabriela; Sarma, Sridevi V; Ba, Demba; Eden, Uri T; Wu, Wei; Eskandar, Emad; Lim, Hubert H; Temereanca, Simona; Suzuki, Wendy A; Brown, Emery N

    2015-06-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a commonly used measure of fidelity in physical systems, is defined as the ratio of the squared amplitude or variance of a signal relative to the variance of the noise. This definition is not appropriate for neural systems in which spiking activity is more accurately represented as point processes. We show that the SNR estimates a ratio of expected prediction errors and extend the standard definition to one appropriate for single neurons by representing neural spiking activity using point process generalized linear models (PP-GLM). We estimate the prediction errors using the residual deviances from the PP-GLM fits. Because the deviance is an approximate ?(2) random variable, we compute a bias-corrected SNR estimate appropriate for single-neuron analysis and use the bootstrap to assess its uncertainty. In the analyses of four systems neuroscience experiments, we show that the SNRs are -10 dB to -3 dB for guinea pig auditory cortex neurons, -18 dB to -7 dB for rat thalamic neurons, -28 dB to -14 dB for monkey hippocampal neurons, and -29 dB to -20 dB for human subthalamic neurons. The new SNR definition makes explicit in the measure commonly used for physical systems the often-quoted observation that single neurons have low SNRs. The neuron's spiking history is frequently a more informative covariate for predicting spiking propensity than the applied stimulus. Our new SNR definition extends to any GLM system in which the factors modulating the response can be expressed as separate components of a likelihood function. PMID:25995363

  3. Measure your septa release ratios: pheromone release ratio variability affected by rubber septa and solvent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The type of solvent and volume of the solvent used to load pheromone/volatile components onto rubber septa had significant effects on release ratios, the variability of those release ratios, and the recoverability of the volatile components during subsequent extraction with hexane. Volatile release ...

  4. OFFSPRING SEX RATIO IN DEER MALE REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY AND OFFSPRING SEX RATIO IN ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary sex ratio of the family Cervidae may vary at conception and/or birth from an expected 50:50 (males:females). Fertilization by X- or Y- chromosome-bearing sperm (referred to simply as X- and Y- sperm) ultimately controls the sex of offspring; however, alteration of the fetal sex ratio co...

  5. Discrepancies between isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the

    E-print Network

    Goldsmith, Greg

    Discrepancies between isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the stable isotope analysis of plant and soil waters Adam G. West1,2*, Gregory R. Goldsmith1 , Paul D. Brooks Center for Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA

  6. Shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in nuclear multifragmentation

    E-print Network

    Subrata Pal

    2010-05-03

    Nuclear multifragmentation in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions has long been associated with liquid-gas phase transition. We calculate the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s for an equilibrated system of nucleons and fragments produced in multifragmentation within an extended statistical multifragmentation model. The temperature dependence of eta/s exhibits surprisingly similar behavior as that for water. In the coexistence phase of fragments and light particles, the ratio eta/s reaches a minimum of comparable depth as that for water in the vicinity of the critical temperature for liquid-gas phase transition. The effects of freeze-out volume and surface symmetry energy on eta/s in multifragmentation are studied.

  7. Shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in nuclear multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Subrata

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear multifragmentation in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions has long been associated with liquid-gas phase transition. We calculate the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s for an equilibrated system of nucleons and fragments produced in multifragmentation within an extended statistical multifragmentation model. The temperature dependence of eta/s exhibits behavior surprisingly similar to that of H{sub 2}O. In the coexistence phase of fragments and light particles, the ratio eta/s reaches a minimum of depth comparable to that for water in the vicinity of the critical temperature for liquid-gas phase transition. The effects of freeze-out volume and surface symmetry energy on eta/s in multifragmentation are studied.

  8. Is the Binary Mass Ratio Distribution Separation-Dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Kraus, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries of planets orbiting retired A-stars on close orbits and young A-stars on very wide orbits have renewed interest in the properties of nearby intermediate-mass stars. Especially interesting are the young stars because directly-imaged planets orbiting them may be bright enough for characterization (e.g. HR 8799, Beta Pictoris, etc). However, intermediate-mass stars and especially young intermediate mass stars are part of multiple systems more often than not. Close stellar companions may affect the formation and orbital evolution of any planets, and the properties of the companions can help constrain the binary formation mechanism. The mass ratio distribution of a population of binary stars, especially if the distribution for close companions is significantly different from that of wide companions, is helpful to distinguish companions that were born in or affected by the circumstellar disk from those which formed through fragmentation of the molecular core. Previous imaging surveys have found that binary systems with A-type primary stars tend to have cool companions with extreme mass ratios. There are hints at a much flatter mass ratio distribution for close companions, but strong completeness effects complicate the picture. We have conducted a spectroscopic survey of ~400 nearby main sequence A- and B-type stars, aimed at detecting stellar companions as late as M4 for all orbital separations <100 AU. We have searched for companions to the stars by cross-correlating the spectra against model templates for F-M type stars; a significant peak in the cross-correlation function indicates a detection. Our cross-correlation technique can detect low-mass companions with orbits that are too wide to detect with radial velocity monitoring and too small to detect with imaging techniques, making it complementary to work already done. We will present results from our survey and compare the mass ratio distribution we measure to the corresponding distribution for wide companions.

  9. CFD assessment of orifice aspect ratio and mass flow ratio on jet mixing in rectangular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, D. B.; Smith, C. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Isothermal CFD analysis was performed on axially opposed rows of jets mixing with cross flow in a rectangular duct. Laterally, the jets' centerlines were aligned with each other on the top and bottom walls. The focus of this study was to characterize the effects of orifice aspect ratio and jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio on jet penetration and mixing. Orifice aspect ratios (L/W) of 4-to-1, 2-to-1, and 1-to-1, along with circular holes, were parametrically analyzed. Likewise, jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratios (MR) of 2.0, 0.5, and 0.25 were systematically investigated. The jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio (J) was maintained at 36 for all cases, and the orifice spacing-to-duct height (S/H) was varied until optimum mixing was attained for each configuration. The numerical results showed that orifice aspect ratio (and likewise orifice blockage) had little effect on jet penetration and mixing. Based on mixing characteristics alone, the 4-to-1 slot was comparable to the circular orifice. The 4-to-1 slot has a smaller jet wake which may be advantageous for reducing emissions. However, the axial length of a 4-to-1 slot may be prohibitively long for practical application, especially for MR of 2.0. The jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio had a more significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. For a 4-to-1 aspect ratio orifice, the design correlating parameter for optimum mixing (C = (S/H)(sq. root J)) varied from 2.25 for a mass flow ratio of 2.0 to 1.5 for a mass flow ratio of 0.25.

  10. 45 CFR 800.203 - Medical loss ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical loss ratio. 800.203 Section 800.203 Public... PROGRAM Premiums, Rating Factors, Medical Loss Ratios, and Risk Adjustment § 800.203 Medical loss ratio. (a) Required medical loss ratio. An MSPP issuer must attain: (1) The medical loss ratio...

  11. 45 CFR 800.203 - Medical loss ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical loss ratio. 800.203 Section 800.203 Public... PROGRAM Premiums, Rating Factors, Medical Loss Ratios, and Risk Adjustment § 800.203 Medical loss ratio. (a) Required medical loss ratio. An MSPP issuer must attain: (1) The medical loss ratio...

  12. Raman and infrared spectroscopy study on structure and microstructure of glass-ceramic materials from SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-K2O-CaO system modified by variable molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Janusz; Le?niak, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the effect of the molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 on the microstructure and structure of the internal aluminium-silicon-oxide lattice of the glass-ceramic materials from the SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-K2O-CaO system. In order to examine the real composition of the obtained samples, a chemical analysis was performed. Following the heat-treatment procedure, pseudowollastonite, anorthite and the vitreous phase were identified. In order to determine the microstructure, research using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with EDS was done. For the inner structural study, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy as well as MIR and FIR spectroscopy were performed. PMID:26196934

  13. Raman and infrared spectroscopy study on structure and microstructure of glass-ceramic materials from SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-K2O-CaO system modified by variable molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partyka, Janusz; Le?niak, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the effect of the molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 on the microstructure and structure of the internal aluminium-silicon-oxide lattice of the glass-ceramic materials from the SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-K2O-CaO system. In order to examine the real composition of the obtained samples, a chemical analysis was performed. Following the heat-treatment procedure, pseudowollastonite, anorthite and the vitreous phase were identified. In order to determine the microstructure, research using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with EDS was done. For the inner structural study, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy as well as MIR and FIR spectroscopy were performed.

  14. Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2011-01-01

    To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Système International d'Unités, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented.

  15. In-vivo concentration ratio estimation of two fluorescent probes for early detection of Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    In-vivo measurement of the concentrations of biological compounds using fluorescence is one of the challenging biophotonic fields. These measurements are useful in diagnostic and treatment monitoring applications that use fluorescent probes which may bond to specific proteins and drugs. In some cases the relative concentration of two compounds is a sufficient biological indicator. For instance, it has been shown that the ratio between Amyloid-Beta and tau protein in the Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may predict the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) several years before current diagnosis. We have previously suggested a system that could measure the concentration ratio of these two proteins in-vivo without the need to collect CSF samples. This system uses a miniature needle with an optical fiber which is coupled to a laser source and a detector. The fiber excites fluorescent probes which were injected and bond to the proteins in the CSF, and collects the fluorescence emission. Using the fluorescence intensity ratio, the concentration ratio between the proteins is estimated, and AD may be diagnosed. In this work we present the results of an in-vivo trial performed on mice. Miniature tubes containing two fluorescent probes in several concentration ratios were inserted into the mice in two locations: subcutaneously, and deeper in the abdomen. The fluorescent probes were excited and the fluorescence intensity was measured. The concentration ratios were extracted from the fluorescence intensities using a simple calibration curve. The extracted ratios are compared to the true ratios and the system's accuracy is estimated.

  16. Method for nanomachining high aspect ratio structures

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Wenbing; Spence, John; Padmore, Howard A.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Howells, Malcolm R.

    2004-11-09

    A nanomachining method for producing high-aspect ratio precise nanostructures. The method begins by irradiating a wafer with an energetic charged-particle beam. Next, a layer of patterning material is deposited on one side of the wafer and a layer of etch stop or metal plating base is coated on the other side of the wafer. A desired pattern is generated in the patterning material on the top surface of the irradiated wafer using conventional electron-beam lithography techniques. Lastly, the wafer is placed in an appropriate chemical solution that produces a directional etch of the wafer only in the area from which the resist has been removed by the patterning process. The high mechanical strength of the wafer materials compared to the organic resists used in conventional lithography techniques with allows the transfer of the precise patterns into structures with aspect ratios much larger than those previously achievable.

  17. True gender ratios and stereotype rating norms.

    PubMed

    Garnham, Alan; Doehren, Sam; Gygax, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    We present a study comparing, in English, perceived distributions of men and women in 422 named occupations with actual real world distributions. The first set of data was obtained from previous a large-scale norming study, whereas the second set was mostly drawn from UK governmental sources. In total, real world ratios for 290 occupations were obtained for our perceive vs. real world comparison, of which 205 were deemed to be unproblematic. The means for the two sources were similar and the correlation between them was high, suggesting that people are generally accurate at judging real gender ratios, though there were some notable exceptions. Beside this correlation, some interesting patterns emerged from the two sources, suggesting some response strategies when people complete norming studies. We discuss these patterns in terms of the way real world data might complement norming studies in determining gender stereotypicality. PMID:26257681

  18. Maternal transmission, sex ratio distortion, and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Steve J; Hodson, Christina N; Hamilton, Phineas T; Opit, George P; Gowen, Brent E

    2015-08-18

    In virtually all multicellular eukaryotes, mitochondria are transmitted exclusively through one parent, usually the mother. In this short review, we discuss some of the major consequences of uniparental transmission of mitochondria, including deleterious effects in males and selection for increased transmission through females. Many of these consequences, particularly sex ratio distortion, have well-studied parallels in other maternally transmitted genetic elements, such as bacterial endosymbionts of arthropods. We also discuss the consequences of linkage between mitochondria and other maternally transmitted genetic elements, including the role of cytonuclear incompatibilities in maintaining polymorphism. Finally, as a case study, we discuss a recently discovered maternally transmitted sex ratio distortion in an insect that is associated with extraordinarily divergent mitochondria. PMID:25870270

  19. Maternal transmission, sex ratio distortion, and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Steve J.; Hodson, Christina N.; Hamilton, Phineas T.; Opit, George P.; Gowen, Brent E.

    2015-01-01

    In virtually all multicellular eukaryotes, mitochondria are transmitted exclusively through one parent, usually the mother. In this short review, we discuss some of the major consequences of uniparental transmission of mitochondria, including deleterious effects in males and selection for increased transmission through females. Many of these consequences, particularly sex ratio distortion, have well-studied parallels in other maternally transmitted genetic elements, such as bacterial endosymbionts of arthropods. We also discuss the consequences of linkage between mitochondria and other maternally transmitted genetic elements, including the role of cytonuclear incompatibilities in maintaining polymorphism. Finally, as a case study, we discuss a recently discovered maternally transmitted sex ratio distortion in an insect that is associated with extraordinarily divergent mitochondria. PMID:25870270

  20. The HNC/HCN ratio in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Dickens, J. E.; Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Senay, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Jewitt, D.; Matthews, H. E.; Ferris, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The abundance ratio of the isomers HCN and HNC has been investigated in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) through observations of the J = 4-3 rotational transitions of both species for heliocentric distances 0.93 < r < 3 AU, both pre- and post-perihelion. After correcting for the optical depth of the stronger HCN line, we find that the column density ratio of HNC/HCN in our telescope beam increases significantly as the comet approaches the Sun. We compare this behavior to that predicted from an ion-molecule chemical model and conclude that the HNC is produced in significant measure by chemical processes in the coma; i.e., for comet Hale-Bopp, HNC is not a parent molecule sublimating from the nucleus.