Science.gov

Sample records for rational plane curves

  1. Craniofacial reconstruction using rational cubic ball curves.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R U; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  2. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  3. Finding Rational Parametric Curves of Relative Degree One or Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyles, Dave

    2010-01-01

    A plane algebraic curve, the complete set of solutions to a polynomial equation: f(x, y) = 0, can in many cases be drawn using parametric equations: x = x(t), y = y(t). Using algebra, attempting to parametrize by means of rational functions of t, one discovers quickly that it is not the degree of f but the "relative degree," that describes how…

  4. Integrable mappings of the plane preserving biquadratic invariant curves II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatrou, Apostolos; Roberts, John A. G.

    2002-03-01

    We review recently introduced curve-dependent McMillan maps which are mappings of the plane that preserve biquadratic foliations. We show that they are measure preserving and thus integrable. We discuss the geometry of these maps including their fixed points and their stability. We consider the normal forms of symmetric and asymmetric biquadratic curves and the normal forms for their associated McMillan maps. We further discuss the dynamics on biquadratic curves by considering the possibility of parametrizing them by Jacobian elliptic or rational functions.

  5. Differentialless geometry of plane curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latecki, Longin J.; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1997-10-01

    We introduce a class of planar arcs and curves, called tame arcs, which is general enough to describe the boundaries of planar real objects. A tame arc can have smooth parts as well as sharp corners; thus a polygonal arc is tame. On the other hand, this class of arcs is restrictive enough to rule out pathological arcs which have infinitely many inflections or which turn infinitely often: a tame arc can have only finitely many inflections, and its total absolute turn must be finite. In order to relate boundary properties of discrete objects obtained by segmenting digital images to the corresponding properties of their continuous originals, the theory of tame arcs is based on concepts that can be directly transferred from the continuous to the discrete domain. A tame arc is composed of a finite number of supported arcs. We define supported digital arcs and motivate their definition by the fact that hey can be obtained by digitizing continuous supported arcs. Every digital arc is tame, since it contains a finite number of points, and therefore it can be decomposed into a finite number of supported digital arcs.

  6. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  7. Microorganism billiards in closed plane curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Madison

    Recent experiments and numerical simulations have demonstrated that many species of microorganisms reflect aspecularly from a solid surface -- due to steric and hydrodynamic interactions with the wall, their outgoing angle is fixed and independent of the angle of incidence. Motivated by these results, we discuss theory and computation of the ``aspecular billiard'', a modification of the classical billiard in which the outgoing angle is constant. We restrict our attention to closed plane curves, focusing on three canonical examples: the ellipse, the Bunimovich stadium, and the Sinai billiard. These systems can have a rich array of orbits, and the Lyapunov exponent is shown to be dependent on the billiard geometry and the outgoing angle. We apply these results to the design of tunable passive sorting mechanisms.

  8. Renormalizations and Wandering Jordan Curves of Rational Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Guizhen; Peng, Wenjuan; Tan, Lei

    2016-05-01

    We realize a dynamical decomposition for a post-critically finite rational map which admits a combinatorial decomposition. We split the Riemann sphere into two completely invariant subsets. One is a subset of the Julia set consisting of uncountably many Jordan curve components. Most of them are wandering. The other consists of components that are pullbacks of finitely many renormalizations, together with possibly uncountably many points. The quotient action on the decomposed pieces is encoded by a dendrite dynamical system. We also introduce a surgery procedure to produce post-critically finite rational maps with wandering Jordan curves and prescribed renormalizations.

  9. Renormalizations and Wandering Jordan Curves of Rational Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Guizhen; Peng, Wenjuan; Tan, Lei

    2016-04-01

    We realize a dynamical decomposition for a post-critically finite rational map which admits a combinatorial decomposition. We split the Riemann sphere into two completely invariant subsets. One is a subset of the Julia set consisting of uncountably many Jordan curve components. Most of them are wandering. The other consists of components that are pullbacks of finitely many renormalizations, together with possibly uncountably many points. The quotient action on the decomposed pieces is encoded by a dendrite dynamical system. We also introduce a surgery procedure to produce post-critically finite rational maps with wandering Jordan curves and prescribed renormalizations.

  10. Curved-Focal-Plane Arrays Using Deformed-Membrane Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Jones, Todd

    2004-01-01

    A versatile and simple approach to the design and fabrication of curved-focal-plane arrays of silicon-based photodetectors is being developed. This approach is an alternative to the one described in "Curved Focal-Plane Arrays Using Back- Illuminated High-Purity Photodetectors" (NPO-30566), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 10 (October 2003), page 10a. As in the cited prior article, the basic idea is to improve the performance of an imaging instrument and simplify the optics needed to obtain a given level of performance by making an image sensor (in this case, an array of photodetectors) conform to a curved focal surface, instead of designing the optics to project an image onto a flat focal surface. There is biological precedent for curved-focal-surface designs: retinas - the image sensors in eyes - conform to the naturally curved focal surfaces of eye lenses. The present approach is applicable to both front-side- and back-side-illuminated, membrane photodetector arrays and is being demonstrated on charge-coupled devices (CCDs). The very-large scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry of such a CCD or other array is fabricated on the front side of a silicon substrate, then the CCD substrate is attached temporarily to a second substrate for mechanical support, then material is removed from the back to obtain the CCD membrane, which typically has a thickness between 10 and 20 m. In the case of a CCD designed to operate in back-surface illumination, delta doping can be performed after thinning to enhance the sensitivity. This approach is independent of the design and method of fabrication of the front-side VLSI circuitry and does not involve any processing of a curved silicon substrate. In this approach, a third substrate would be prepared by polishing one of its surfaces to a required focal-surface curvature. A CCD membrane fabricated as described above would be pressed against, deformed into conformity with, and bonded to, the curved surface. The technique used to press and

  11. A Curved, Elastostatic Boundary Element for Plane Anisotropic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S.; Klang, Eric C.

    2001-01-01

    The plane-stress equations of linear elasticity are used in conjunction with those of the boundary element method to develop a novel curved, quadratic boundary element applicable to structures composed of anisotropic materials in a state of plane stress or plane strain. The curved boundary element is developed to solve two-dimensional, elastostatic problems of arbitrary shape, connectivity, and material type. As a result of the anisotropy, complex variables are employed in the fundamental solution derivations for a concentrated unit-magnitude force in an infinite elastic anisotropic medium. Once known, the fundamental solutions are evaluated numerically by using the known displacement and traction boundary values in an integral formulation with Gaussian quadrature. All the integral equations of the boundary element method are evaluated using one of two methods: either regular Gaussian quadrature or a combination of regular and logarithmic Gaussian quadrature. The regular Gaussian quadrature is used to evaluate most of the integrals along the boundary, and the combined scheme is employed for integrals that are singular. Individual element contributions are assembled into the global matrices of the standard boundary element method, manipulated to form a system of linear equations, and the resulting system is solved. The interior displacements and stresses are found through a separate set of auxiliary equations that are derived using an Airy-type stress function in terms of complex variables. The capabilities and accuracy of this method are demonstrated for a laminated-composite plate with a central, elliptical cutout that is subjected to uniform tension along one of the straight edges of the plate. Comparison of the boundary element results for this problem with corresponding results from an analytical model show a difference of less than 1%.

  12. Interfacial Refraction Through Curved and Plane-Layered Media

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, A.B.

    2001-07-17

    Two laser beam tracing codes, AXIAL and CYLINDER, have been written to determine a laser beam path through plane and cylindrical interfaces. For cylindrical interfaces, an equation set was derived which describes the path of the laser beam. For plane interfaces, it was not possible to derive a single equation set. Instead, it was necessary to divide the domain up into small elements or regions. The laser beam path was then determined by calculating the path of the laser beam through each region. AXIAL and CYLINDER can be used to determine where an LDA should be positioned so that velocity measurements can be made at a specified point.

  13. A curve shortening flow rule for closed embedded plane curves with a prescribed rate of change in enclosed area

    PubMed Central

    Dallaston, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by a problem from fluid mechanics, we consider a generalization of the standard curve shortening flow problem for a closed embedded plane curve such that the area enclosed by the curve is forced to decrease at a prescribed rate. Using formal asymptotic and numerical techniques, we derive possible extinction shapes as the curve contracts to a point, dependent on the rate of decreasing area; we find there is a wider class of extinction shapes than for standard curve shortening, for which initially simple closed curves are always asymptotically circular. We also provide numerical evidence that self-intersection is possible for non-convex initial conditions, distinguishing between pinch-off and coalescence of the curve interior. PMID:26997898

  14. Performance characteristics of a curved-channel microchannel plate with a curved input face and a plane output face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1989-01-01

    The presently performance-evaluated format, in which a high-gain curved-channel microchannel plate (M2MCP) has a spherical concave input face and a plane output face, allows the input face of the MCP (1) to match such curved focal surfaces as that of a Rowland-circle spectrometer mounting, while (2) having a high-resolution plane readout array in proximity focus with the output face. This MCP has been evaluated in a discrete-anode multicathode microchannel array detector system. The saturated modal gain was found to be inversely proportional to the length/diameter ratio of the channels and directly proportional to the applied MCP voltage.

  15. A study of a collision avoidance system mounted on a curved ground plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, P. H.; Burnside, W. D.; Rojas, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    Research conducted on a traffic advisory and collision avoidance system (TCAS 2) mounted on a curved ground plane is described. It is found that a curved finite ground plane can be used as a good simulation model for the fuselage of an aircraft but may not be good enough to model a whole aircraft due to the shadowing of the vertical stabilizer, wings, etc. The surface curvature of this curved disc significantly affects the monopulse characteristics in the azimuth plane but not as much in the elevation plane. These variations of the monopulse characteristics verify the need of a lookup table for the 64 azimuth beam positions. The best location of a TCAS 2 array on a Boeing 737 is to move it as far from the vertical stabilizer as possible.

  16. Rationality.

    PubMed

    Sosis, Clifford; Bishop, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    A theory of rationality is a theory that evaluates instances of reasoning as rational, irrational, or (ir)rational to some degree. Theories can be categorized as rule-based or consequentialist. Rule-based theories say that rational reasoning accords with certain rules (e.g., of logic or probability). Consequentialist theories say that rational reasoning tends to produce good consequences. For instance, the reliabilist takes rationality to be reasoning that tends to produce mostly true beliefs. The pragmatist takes it to be reasoning that tends to produce mostly useful beliefs. This article reviews some of the features and the challenges of rule-based, reliabilist, and pragmatist theories of rationality. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:27-37. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1263 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304295

  17. On the grid generation methods in harmonic mapping on plane and curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sritharan, S. S.; Smith, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Harmonic grid generation methods for multiply connected plane regions and regions on curved surfaces are discussed. In particular, using a general formulation on an analytic Riemannian manifold, it is proved that these mappings are globally one-to-one and onto.

  18. Designing of skull defect implants using C1 rational cubic Bezier and offset curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Najihah; Majid, Ahmad Abd; Piah, Abd Rahni Mt; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    Some of the reasons to construct skull implant are due to head trauma after an accident or an injury or an infection or because of tumor invasion or when autogenous bone is not suitable for replacement after a decompressive craniectomy (DC). The main objective of our study is to develop a simple method to redesign missing parts of the skull. The procedure begins with segmentation, data approximation, and estimation process of the outer wall by a C1 continuous curve. Its offset curve is used to generate the inner wall. A metaheuristic algorithm, called harmony search (HS) is a derivative-free real parameter optimization algorithm inspired from the musical improvisation process of searching for a perfect state of harmony. In this study, data approximation by a rational cubic Bézier function uses HS to optimize position of middle points and value of the weights. All the phases contribute significantly in making our proposed technique automated. Graphical examples of several postoperative skulls are displayed to show the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  19. The Definition and Computation of a Metric on Plane Curves. The Meaning of a Face on a Geometric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Two topics in topology, the comparison of plane curves and faces on geometric models, are discussed. With regard to the first problem, a curve is defined to be a locus of points without any underlying parameterization. A metric on a class of plane curves is defined, a finite computation of this metric is given for the case of piecewise linear curves, and it is shown how to approximate curves that have bounded curvature by piecewise linear curves. In this way a bound on the distance between two curves can be computed. With regard to the second problem, the questions to be discussed are under what circumstances do geometrical faces make sense; how can they be explicity defined; and when are these geometrical faces homeomorphic to the realization of the abstract (topological) face.

  20. In-plane vibration analysis of curved carbon nanotubes conveying fluid embedded in viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Rafiei, Masoud; Daneshmand, Farhang

    2011-05-01

    The effect of the induced vibrations in the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arising from the internal fluid flow is a critical issue in the design of CNT-based fluidic devices. In this study, in-plane vibration analysis of curved CNTs conveying fluid embedded in viscoelastic medium is investigated. The CNT is modeled as a linear elastic cylindrical tube where the internal moving fluid is characterized by steady flow velocity and mass density of fluid. A modified-inextensible theory is used in formulation and the steady-state initial forces due to the centrifugal and pressure forces of the internal fluid are also taken into account. The finite element method is used to discretize the equation of motion and the frequencies are obtained by solving a quadratic eigenvalue problem. The effects of CNT opening angle, the elastic modulus and the damping factor of the viscoelastic surrounded medium and fluid velocity on the resonance frequencies are elucidated. It is shown that curved CNTs are unconditionally stable even for a system with sufficiently high flow velocity. The most results presented in this investigation have been absent from the literature for fluid-induced vibration of curved CNTs embedded in viscoelastic foundations.

  1. Hemispherical curved monolithic cooled and uncooled infrared focal plane arrays for compact cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekaya, Kevin; Fendler, Manuel; Dumas, Delphine; Inal, Karim; Massoni, Elisabeth; Gaeremynck, Yann; Druart, Guillaume; Henry, David

    2014-06-01

    InfraRed (IR) sensor systems like night vision goggles, missile approach warning systems and telescopes have an increasing interest in decreasing their size and weight. At the same time optical aberrations are always more difficult to optimize with larger Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) and larger field of view. Both challenges can now take advantage of a new optical parameter thanks to flexible microelectronics technologies: the FPA spherical curvature. This bio-inspired approach can correct optical aberrations and reduce the number of lenses in camera conception. Firstly, a new process to curve thin monolithic devices has been applied to uncooled microbolometers FPAs. A functional 256×320 25μm pitch (roughly 1cm2) uncooled FPA has been thinned and curved. Its electrical response showed no degradation after our process (variation of less than 2.3% on the response). Then a two lenses camera with a curved FPA is designed and characterized in comparison with a two lenses camera with a flat FPA. Their Modulation Transfer Functions (MTFs) show clearly an improvement in terms of beams dispersion. Secondly, a new process to fabricate monolithic cooled flip-chip MCT-IRCMOS FPAs was developed leading to the first spherical cooled IR FPA: with a radius of 550 mm. Other radii are achieved. A standard opto-electrical characterization at 80 K of the imager shows no additional short circuit and no mean response alteration compared to a standard IRCMOS shown in reference. Noise is also studied with a black body between 20 and 30°C.

  2. A unified approach for nonlinear vibration analysis of curved structures using non-uniform rational B-spline representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, H.; Esmailzadeh, E.; Barari, A.

    2015-09-01

    A novel procedure for the nonlinear vibration analysis of curved beam is presented. The Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) is combined with the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to define the curvature of the structure. The governing equation of motion and the general frequency formula, using the NURBS variables, is applicable for any type of curvatures, is developed. The Galerkin procedure is implemented to obtain the nonlinear ordinary differential equation of curved system and the multiple time scales method is utilized to find the corresponding frequency responses. As a case study, the nonlinear vibration of carbon nanotubes with different shapes of curvature is investigated. The effect of oscillation amplitude and the waviness on the natural frequency of the curved nanotube is evaluated and the primary resonance case of system with respect to the variations of different parameters is discussed. For the sake of comparison of the results obtained with those from the molecular dynamic simulation, the natural frequencies evaluated from the proposed approach are compared with those reported in literature for few types of carbon nanotube simulation.

  3. Dome Shape Optimization of Composite Pressure Vessels Based on Rational B-Spline Curve and Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaeesefat, Abbas

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for shape optimization of composite pressure vessels head. The shape factor which is defined as the ratio of internal volume to weight of the vessel is used as an objective function. Design constrains consist of the geometrical limitations, winding conditions, and Tsai-Wu failure criterion. The geometry of dome shape is defined by a B-spline rational curve. By altering the weights of control points, depth of dome, and winding angle, the dome shape is changed. The proposed algorithm uses genetic algorithm and finite element analysis to optimize the design parameters. The algorithm is applied on a CNG pressure vessel and the results show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently define the optimal dome shape. This algorithm is general and can be used for general shape optimization.

  4. Rotational Analysis of Phase Plane Curves: Complex and Pure Imaginary Eigenvalues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Russell H.

    2005-01-01

    Although the phase plane can be plotted and analyzed using an appropriate software package, the author found it worthwhile to engage the students with the theorem and the two proofs. The theorem is a powerful tool that provides insight into the rotational behavior of the phase plane diagram in a simple way: just check the signs of c and [alpha].…

  5. Development of cubic Bezier curve and curve-plane intersection method for parametric submarine hull form design to optimize hull resistance using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrismianto, Deddy; Zakki, Ahmad Fauzan; Arswendo, Berlian; Kim, Dong Joon

    2015-12-01

    Optimization analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) have been applied simultaneously, in which a parametric model plays an important role in finding the optimal solution. However, it is difficult to create a parametric model for a complex shape with irregular curves, such as a submarine hull form. In this study, the cubic Bezier curve and curve-plane intersection method are used to generate a solid model of a parametric submarine hull form taking three input parameters into account: nose radius, tail radius, and length-height hull ratio ( L/ H). Application program interface (API) scripting is also used to write code in the ANSYS design modeler. The results show that the submarine shape can be generated with some variation of the input parameters. An example is given that shows how the proposed method can be applied successfully to a hull resistance optimization case. The parametric design of the middle submarine type was chosen to be modified. First, the original submarine model was analyzed, in advance, using CFD. Then, using the response surface graph, some candidate optimal designs with a minimum hull resistance coefficient were obtained. Further, the optimization method in goal-driven optimization (GDO) was implemented to find the submarine hull form with the minimum hull resistance coefficient ( C t ). The minimum C t was obtained. The calculated difference in C t values between the initial submarine and the optimum submarine is around 0.26%, with the C t of the initial submarine and the optimum submarine being 0.001 508 26 and 0.001 504 29, respectively. The results show that the optimum submarine hull form shows a higher nose radius ( r n ) and higher L/ H than those of the initial submarine shape, while the radius of the tail ( r t ) is smaller than that of the initial shape.

  6. Transverse plane of apical vertebra of structural thoracic curve: vertebra displacement versus vertebral deformation.

    PubMed

    Kotwicki, Tomasz; Napiontek, Marek; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    CT transversal scans of the trunk provided at the level of Th8 or Th9 (apical vertebra) of 23 patients with structural thoracic scoliosis were reviewed. The following parameters were studied: 1) alpha angle formed by the axis of vertebra and the axis of spinous process, 2) beta concave and beta convex angle between the spinous process and the left and right transverse process respectively, 3) gamma concave and gamma convex angle between the axis of vertebra and the left and right transverse process respectively, 4) rotation angle to the sagittal plane according to Aaro and Dahlborn, 5) Cobb angle. Values of measured parameters demonstrated a common pattern of intravertebral deformity: counter clockwise deviation of the spinous process (alpha angle 15,0 +/-8,5 degrees), beta concave (69,8 +/-8,5 degrees) significantly greater than beta convex (38,8 +/-8,5 degrees), gamma concave (54,3 +/-7,8 degrees) not different from gamma convex (56,0 +/-8,0 degrees). Strong linear positive correlation between alpha angle and Aaro-Dahlborn angle was observed (r=0,78, p<0,05). Changes in morphology of apical vertebra due to intravertebral bone remodelling followed the vertebral spatial displacement and there existed a linear correlation in between. The two processes develop in opposite directions. PMID:17108421

  7. Pre-curving analysis of an opening crack in a magnetoelectroelastic strip under in-plane impact loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Keqiang; Chen, Zengtao

    2012-12-01

    An opening crack in a magnetoelectroelastic strip under in-plane mechanical, electric, and magnetic impact loadings is considered for magneto-electrically impermeable and permeable crack surface boundary conditions. Laplace and Fourier transforms are applied to reduce the mixed boundary value problem of the crack to dual integral equations, which are expressed in terms of Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. The asymptotic fields near the crack tip are obtained in explicit form and the corresponding field intensity factors are defined. The crack curving phenomena are investigated by applying the criterion of maximum hoop stress intensity factors. Numerical results show that the hoop stress intensity factors are influenced by the electric and magnetic loadings and the geometric size ratios.

  8. Traveling Wave Solutions of the Gardner Equation and Motion of Plane Curves Governed by the mKdV Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilev, V. M.; Djondjorov, P. A.; Hadzhilazova, M. Ts.; Mladenov, I. M.

    2011-11-29

    The Gardner equation is well-known in the mathematical literature since the late sixties of 20th century. Initially, it appeared in the context of the construction of local conservation laws admitted by the KdV equation. Later on, the Gardner equation was generalized and found to be applicable in various branches of physics (solid-state and plasma physics, fluid dynamics and quantum field theory). In this paper, we examine the travelling wave solutions of the Gardner equation and derive the full set of solutions to the corresponding reduced equation in terms of Weierstrass and Jacobi elliptic functions. Then, we use the travelling wave solutions of the focusing mKdV equation and obtain in explicit analytic form exact solutions of a special type of plane curve flow, known as the mKdV flow.

  9. On the cost of approximating and recognizing a noise perturbed straight line or a quadratic curve segment in the plane. [central processing units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. B.; Yalabik, N.

    1975-01-01

    Approximation of noisy data in the plane by straight lines or elliptic or single-branch hyperbolic curve segments arises in pattern recognition, data compaction, and other problems. The efficient search for and approximation of data by such curves were examined. Recursive least-squares linear curve-fitting was used, and ellipses and hyperbolas are parameterized as quadratic functions in x and y. The error minimized by the algorithm is interpreted, and central processing unit (CPU) times for estimating parameters for fitting straight lines and quadratic curves were determined and compared. CPU time for data search was also determined for the case of straight line fitting. Quadratic curve fitting is shown to require about six times as much CPU time as does straight line fitting, and curves relating CPU time and fitting error were determined for straight line fitting. Results are derived on early sequential determination of whether or not the underlying curve is a straight line.

  10. A Rational Expectations Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Norris A.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a simple classroom simulation of the Lucas supply curve mechanism with rational expectations. Concludes that the exercise has proved very useful as an introduction to the concepts of rational and adaptive expectations, the Lucas supply curve, the natural rate hypothesis, and random supply shocks. (DB)

  11. Electric Field Optimization in 170 kV Gas-Insulated Switchgear Spacer based on Non-Uniform Rational B-spline Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, In Su; Kim, Eung Sik; Min, Suk Won; Hur, Don; Park, Jong Keun

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, the electric field at the spacer in a 170 kV gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) is optimized. Initially, the tangential and total electric fields around the original shape of the 170 kV GIS produced by a Korean company are calculated using a combination of the charge simulation method (CSM) and surface charge method (SCM). The contour of the spacer in the 170 kV GIS is found using a non-uniform rational B-spline (NURB) curve the effectiveness of which has been proved. By moving some control points in the NURB curve, the initial shape of the 170 kV GIS can be determined so that we may begin to optimize the electric field. Owing to the proposed algorithm, the overall process has a stable convergence. The objects that we want to design are the upper and lower parts of the spacer. Finally, we can find the shapes in which the tangential and total electric fields are optimized.

  12. Surface Activation of Plane and Curved Automotive Polymer Surfaces by Using a Fittable Multi-Pin DBD Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörn, Heine; Roland, Damm; Christoph, Gerhard; Stephan, Wieneke; Wolfgang, Viöl

    2014-06-01

    In this work, surface activation of automotive polymers using atmospheric pressure plasmas was investigated. The aim was to increase the polar fraction of the surface energy of both plane and convex polymer devices with a radius in the range of 30 mm. For this purpose, a fittable low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma source based on capacitively coupled multi-pin electrodes was set up and applied. Each single electrode generates a treatment spot of approximately 2 cm2 with a tunable power density of up to 1.4 W/cm2. The surface energy was evaluated by contact angle measurements. After treatment at a low energy density of 1.01 J/cm2, the polar fraction of the surface energy of the investigated polymers was increased by a factor of 3.3 to 132, depending on the polymer materials. It was shown that by applying the presented fittable plasma source, this effect is independent of the surface radius of the polymer sample.

  13. The computation of all plane/surface intersections for CAD/CAM applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoitsma, D. H., Jr.; Roche, M.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of the computation and display of all intersections of a given plane with a rational bicubic surface patch for use on an interactive CAD/CAM system is examined. The general problem of calculating all intersections of a plane and a surface consisting of rational bicubic patches is reduced to the case of a single generic patch by applying a rejection algorithm which excludes all patches that do not intersect the plane. For each pertinent patch the algorithm presented computed the intersection curves by locating an initial point on each curve, and computes successive points on the curve using a tolerance step equation. A single cubic equation solver is used to compute the initial curve points lying on the boundary of a surface patch, and the method of resultants as applied to curve theory is used to determine critical points which, in turn, are used to locate initial points that lie on intersection curves which are in the interior of the patch. Examples are given to illustrate the ability of this algorithm to produce all intersection curves.

  14. Confucian Rationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Chi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, there is still a widely held view that the Chinese and Western modes of thought are quite distinct from each other. In particular, the Chinese mode of thought derived from Confucianism is considered as comparatively less rational than the Western one. In this article, I first argue that although the analogical mode of argumentation,…

  15. Acoustic plane waves normally incident on a clamped panel in a rectangular duct. [to explain noise reduction curves for reducing interior noise in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unz, H.; Roskam, J.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of acoustic plane wave normally incident on a clamped panel in a rectangular duct is developed. The coupling theory between the elastic vibrations of the panel (plate) and the acoustic wave propagation in infinite space and in the rectangular duct is considered. The partial differential equation which governs the vibration of the panel (plate) is modified by adding to its stiffness (spring) forces and damping forces, and the fundamental resonance frequency and the attenuation factor are discussed. The noise reduction expression based on the theory is found to agree well with the corresponding experimental data of a sample aluminum panel in the mass controlled region, the damping controlled region, and the stiffness controlled region. All the frequency positions of the upward and downward resonance spikes in the sample experimental data are identified theoretically as resulting from four cross interacting major resonance phenomena: the cavity resonance, the acoustic resonance, the plate resonance, and the wooden back panel resonance.

  16. An investigation of the diffraction of an acoustic plane wave by a curved surface of finite impedance. Ph.D. Thesis Final Technical Report, 1 Feb. 1985 - 1 Sep. 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearns, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Phenomena associated with long range propagation of sound over irregular topography motivated this work, which was to analyze the diffraction effects which would occur near the tops of hills and ridges. The diffraction of a high frequency plane wave due to its grazing of a two-dimensional curved surface of finite impedance was also studied. Laboratory scale models were constructed and measurements were made of the field on, above, and behind either of two curved surfaces possessing distinctly different impedances; that is, one was soft while the other was hard. The experimental technique consisted of simultaneously measuring the pressure at a reference point and at a field point due to a transient pulse generated by an electric spark. The pressure waveforms were digitized and processed. The ratio of the discrete Fourier transforms of the two waveforms provided an estimate of the insertion loss between them. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of a theory which was derived by Pierce using the method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions (MAE). The predictions relied upon the experimental evaluation of the impedance of each surface at grazing angles of incidence. This evaluation was achieved by a fairly standard technique involving empirical models of various generic types of surfaces. An example was shown of the important role that the structural intricacies of a surface play in the determination of an appropriate model. The comparison between the measurements and predictions indicated that the theory gives an excellent description of the field anywhere near a curved surface. Further, with a simple modification, the theory was also shown to give nearly as good of a description of the field surrounding a curved surface even at distances far behind the surface yet near the line of sight.

  17. Rationalization: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Rationalization was studied by Sigmund Freud and was specifically labeled by Ernest Jones. Rationalization ought to be differentiated from rational, rationality, logical analysis, etc. On the one hand, rationalization is considered a defense mechanism, on the other hand, rationality is not. Haan has done much work with self-report inventories and…

  18. RATIONAL SPLINE SUBROUTINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Scientific data often contains random errors that make plotting and curve-fitting difficult. The Rational-Spline Approximation with Automatic Tension Adjustment algorithm lead to a flexible, smooth representation of experimental data. The user sets the conditions for each consecutive pair of knots:(knots are user-defined divisions in the data set) to apply no tension; to apply fixed tension; or to determine tension with a tension adjustment algorithm. The user also selects the number of knots, the knot abscissas, and the allowed maximum deviations from line segments. The selection of these quantities depends on the actual data and on the requirements of a particular application. This program differs from the usual spline under tension in that it allows the user to specify different tension values between each adjacent pair of knots rather than a constant tension over the entire data range. The subroutines use an automatic adjustment scheme that varies the tension parameter for each interval until the maximum deviation of the spline from the line joining the knots is less than or equal to a user-specified amount. This procedure frees the user from the drudgery of adjusting individual tension parameters while still giving control over the local behavior of the spline The Rational Spline program was written completely in FORTRAN for implementation on a CYBER 850 operating under NOS. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 1500 words. The program was released in 1988.

  19. Birational maps that send biquadratic curves to biquadratic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John A. G.; Jogia, Danesh

    2015-02-01

    Recently, many papers have begun to consider so-called non-Quispel-Roberts-Thompson (QRT) birational maps of the plane. Compared to the QRT family of maps which preserve each biquadratic curve in a fibration of the plane, non-QRT maps send a biquadratic curve to another biquadratic curve belonging to the same fibration or to a biquadratic curve from a different fibration of the plane. In this communication, we give the general form of a birational map derived from a difference equation that sends a biquadratic curve to another. The necessary and sufficient condition for such a map to exist is that the discriminants of the two biquadratic curves are the same (and hence so are the j-invariants). The result allows existing examples in the literature to be better understood and allows some statements to be made concerning their generality.

  20. [Constitutional requirements of rationing].

    PubMed

    Kluth, Winfried

    2008-01-01

    Rationing is an emotive issue in the field of public health. This complicates the rational discourse, which is indispensable for analyzing the rationing conditions as set out by constitutional law and which requires manifold differentiation and consideration that shall briefly be outlined in the following short contribution. Of central significance is the distinction between indirect and direct rationing as well as the reference to the essential responsibility of legislators for rationing decisions. PMID:19004184

  1. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  2. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  3. Rationing medical education.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of rationing in medical education. Medical education is expensive and there is a limit to that which governments, funders or individuals can spend on it. Rationing involves the allocation of resources that are limited. This paper discussed the pros and cons of the application of rationing to medical education and the different forms of rationing that could be applied. Even though some stakeholders in medical education might be taken aback at the prospect of rationing, the truth is that rationing has always occurred in one form or another in medical education and in healthcare more broadly. Different types of rationing exist in healthcare professional education. For example rationing may be implicit or explicit or may be based on macro-allocation or micro-allocation decisions. Funding can be distributed equally among learners, or according to the needs of individual learners, or to ensure that overall usefulness is maximised. One final option is to allow the market to operate freely and to decide in that way. These principles of rationing can apply to individual learners or to institutions or departments or learning modes. Rationing is occurring in medical education, even though it might be implicit. It is worth giving consideration to methods of rationing and to make thinking about rationing more explicit. PMID:27358649

  4. Kinematic Source Inversion Using Smoothly Curved Fault Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, W.; Aoi, S.; Sekiguchi, H.

    2010-12-01

    necessary to express the fault geometry as curved surface. In this study we develop an inversion method to derive a kinematic source rupture process using a curved fault model. The fault surface is mathematically presented by Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS), which offers the flexible surface modeling. Multi-time-window linear waveform inversion scheme is implemented to the curved fault model. Points for calculating Green's function are generated at a shorter interval than subfaults for deriving slip history. This means that each subfault is also expressed by the curved surface, whereas the subfaults were based on the planar elements in most of previous studies that estimated source process on the curved fault. We apply the developed method to the 2008 Northern Iwate earthquake. Large slip areas are estimated at similar locations to the two-plane fault analysis. The synthetic waveforms agree with the observed ones comparably for both fault models. The total seismic moment is smaller for the curved fault than for the two-plane fault, which may indicate that inversion analysis using curved fault model could suppress artificial slip.

  5. Enculturated Chimpanzees Imitate Rationally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttelmann, David; Carpenter, Malinda; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Human infants imitate others' actions "rationally": they copy a demonstrator's action when that action is freely chosen, but less when it is forced by some constraint (Gergely, Bekkering & Kiraly, 2002). We investigated whether enculturated chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) also imitate rationally. Using Gergely and colleagues' (2002) basic procedure,…

  6. Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The final rules adopted by the President for a Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan are presented. The plan provides that eligibility for ration allotments will be determined primarily on the basis of motor vehicle registrations, taking into account historical differences in the use of gasoline among states. The regulations also provide authority for supplemental allotments to firms so that their allotment will equal a specified percentage of gasoline use during a base period. Priority classifications, i.e., agriculture, defense, etc., are established to assure adequate gasoline supplies for designated essential services. Ration rights must be provided by end-users to their suppliers for each gallon sold. DOE will regulate the distribution of gasoline at the wholesale level according to the transfer by suppliers of redeemed ration rights and the gasoline allocation regulations. Ration rights are transferable. A ration banking system is created to facilitate transfers of ration rights. Each state will be provided with a reserve of ration rights to provide for hardship needs and to alleviate inequities. (DC)

  7. The tail plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M

    1923-01-01

    This report deals with the calculation of the equilibrium, statistical stability, and damping of the tail plane. The author has simplified the present theory of longitudinal stability for the particular purpose of obtaining one definite coefficient characteristics of the effect of the tail plane. This coefficient is obtained by substituting certain aerodynamic characteristics and some dimensions of the airplane in a comparatively simple mathematical expression. Care has been taken to confine all aerodynamical information necessary for the calculation of the coefficient to the well-known curves representing the qualities of the wing section. This is done by making use of the present results of modern aerodynamics. All formulas and relations necessary for the calculation are contained in the paper. They give in some cases only an approximation of the real values. An example of calculation is added in order to illustrate the application of the method. The coefficient indicates not only whether the effect of the tail plane is great enough, but also whether it is not too great. It appears that the designer has to avoid a certain critical length of the fuselage, which inevitably gives rise to periodical oscillations of the airplane. The discussion also shows the way and in what direction to carry out experimental work.

  8. Orthogonal rational functions and quadrature on an interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Deun, J.; Bultheel, A.

    2003-04-01

    Rational functions with real poles and poles in the complex lower half-plane, orthogonal on the real line, are well known. Quadrature formulas similar to the Gauss formulas for orthogonal polynomials have been studied. We generalize to the case of arbitrary complex poles and study orthogonality on a finite interval. The zeros of the orthogonal rational functions are shown to satisfy a quadratic eigenvalue problem. In the case of real poles, these zeros are used as nodes in the quadrature formulas.

  9. F-theory and all things rational: surveying U(1) symmetries with rational sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, Craig; Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura; Wong, Jin-Mann

    2015-09-01

    We study elliptic fibrations for F-theory compactifications realizing 4d and 6d supersymmetric gauge theories with abelian gauge factors. In the fibration these U(1) symmetries are realized in terms of additional rational section. We obtain a universal characterization of all the possible U(1) charges of matter fields by determining the corresponding codimension two fibers with rational sections. In view of modelling supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories, one of the main examples that we analyze are U(1) symmetries for SU(5) gauge theories with overline{5} and 10 matter. We use a combination of constraints on the normal bundle of rational curves in Calabi-Yau three- and four-folds, as well as the splitting of rational curves in the fibers in codimension two, to determine the possible configurations of smooth rational sections. This analysis straightforwardly generalizes to multiple U(1)s. We study the flops of such fibers, as well as some of the Yukawa couplings in codimension three. Furthermore, we carry out a universal study of the U(1)-charged GUT singlets, including their KK-charges, and determine all realizations of singlet fibers. By giving vacuum expectation values to these singlets, we propose a systematic way to analyze the Higgsing of U(1)s to discrete gauge symmetries in F-theory.

  10. The Construction of Moral Rationality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moshman, D.

    1995-01-01

    Offers a theoretical account of moral rationality within a rational constructivist paradigm examining the nature and relationship of rationality and reasoning. Suggests progressive changes through developmental levels of moral rationality. Proposes a developmental moral epistemology that accommodates moral pluralism to a greater degree than does…

  11. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  12. [Rational use of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Walger, P

    2016-06-01

    International and national campaigns draw attention worldwide to the rational use of the available antibiotics. This has been stimulated by the high prevalence rates of drug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), a threatening spread of development of resistance in Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria and the selection of Clostridium difficile with a simultaneous clear reduction in the development of new antibiotics. The implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs aims to maintain their effectiveness by a rational use of the available antibiotics. The essential target of therapy with antibiotics is successful treatment of individual patients with bacterial infections. The optimal clinical treatment results can only be achieved when the toxicity, selection of pathogens and development of resistance are minimized. This article presents the principles of a rational antibiotic therapy. PMID:27246321

  13. The ethics of rationing.

    PubMed

    Weale, A

    1995-10-01

    Rationing can occur at three levels of health care choice: the individual, the institutional and the social, with each level posing its own ethical problems. The institutional level is the focus of this paper. The principle of effectiveness may seem attractive, since it promises to ease the institutional dilemmas of rationing, but it is not straightforward to implement in the face of uncertainty. Greater efficiency also promises much, but concepts of benefit are contested and improving contractual performance has complications. Fairness can be a powerful criterion, but there are contested cases, for example age, where its meaning is unclear. Democratic responsiveness, for all its difficulties, is important to maintain in whatever process of rationing is chosen and this can be done by adopting some procedural devices. PMID:8556292

  14. Recursive rational choice

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.A.

    1981-11-01

    It is the purpose of the present study to indicate the means by which Kramer's results may be generalized to considerations of stronger computing devices than the finite state automata considered in Kramer's approach, and to domains of alternatives having the cardinality of the continuum. The means we employ in the approach makes use of the theory of recursive functions in the context of Church's Thesis. The result, which we consider as a preliminary result to a more general research program, shows that a choice function that is rational in the sense of Richter (not necessarily regular) when defined on a restricted family of subsets of a continuum of alternatives, when recursively represented by a partial predicate on equivalence classes of approximations by rational numbers, is recursively unsolvable. By way of Church's Thesis, therefore, such a function cannot be realized by means of a very general class of effectively computable procedures. An additional consequence that can be derived from the result of recursive unsolvability of rational choice in this setting is the placement of a minimal bound on the amount of computational complexity entailed by effective realizations of rational choice.

  15. Rational Emotive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaus, William

    1977-01-01

    Rational Emotive Education--an outgrowth of theories developed by Albert Ellis--is a teaching design of mental health concepts and problem-solving activities designed to help students to approach and cope with their problems through experiential learning, via a structured, thematic sequence of emotive education lessons. (MJB)

  16. Rationality and social behavior.

    PubMed

    Tullberg, Jan

    2003-10-21

    This article penetrates the relationship between social behavior and rationality. A critical analysis is made of efforts to classify some behaviors as altruistic, as they simultaneously meet criteria of rationality by not truly being self-destructive. Newcomb's paradox is one attempt to create a hybrid behavior that is both irrational and still meets some criterion of rationality. Such dubious rationality is often seen as a source of altruistic behavior. Group selection is a controversial topic. Sober and Wilson (Unto Others--The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1998) suggest that a very wide concept of group selection might be used to explain altruism. This concept also includes kin selection and reciprocity, which blurs its focus. The latter mechanisms hardly need further arguments to prove their existence. This article suggests that it is group selection in a strict sense that should be investigated to limit semantic neologism and confusion. In evaluation, the effort to muster a mechanism for altruism out of group selection has not been successful. However, this is not the end to group selection, but rather a good reason to investigate more promising possibilities. There is little reason to burden group selection with the instability of altruism caused by altruistic members of a group having lower fitness than egoistic members. Group selection is much more likely to develop in combination with group egoism. A common project is supported by incitement against free riding, where conformist members joined in solidarity achieve a higher fitness than members pursuing more individualistic options. Group egoism is in no conflict with rationality, and the effects of group selection will be supported rather than threatened by individual selection. Empirical evidence indicates a high level of traits such as conformism and out-group antagonism in line with group egoism. These traits are also likely candidates for

  17. Rational enzyme redesign

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, R.L.

    1994-05-01

    Protein engineering is first a means of elucidating structure-function relations in an enzyme, and second, a means of changing a protein to make it serve a different, but generally related, purpose. In principle, one may change the functional characteristics of an enzyme by altering its substrate specificity, kinetics, optimum range of activity, and chemical mechanism. Obviously one cannot make all possible combinations of amino acid changes for even the smallest enzyme, so the essential question is which changes to make. The intent of rational protein/enzyme redesign is to alter a protein/enzyme in a timely and premeditated fashion. This article provides an outline of the process of rational enzyme redesign.

  18. Parabolic curves in Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, Michael

    2010-05-15

    To interpolate a sequence of points in Euclidean space, parabolic splines can be used. These are curves which are piecewise quadratic. To interpolate between points in a (semi-)Riemannian manifold, we could look for curves such that the second covariant derivative of the velocity is zero. We call such curves Jupp and Kent quadratics or JK-quadratics because they are a special case of the cubic curves advocated by Jupp and Kent. When the manifold is a Lie group with bi-invariant metric, we can relate JK-quadratics to null Lie quadratics which arise from another interpolation problem. We solve JK-quadratics in the Lie groups SO(3) and SO(1,2) and in the sphere and hyperbolic plane, by relating them to the differential equation for a quantum harmonic oscillator00.

  19. Monotonicity preserving splines using rational Ball cubic interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Wan Zafira Ezza Wan; Jamal, Ena; Ali, Jamaludin Md.

    2015-10-01

    In scientific application and Computer Aided Design (CAD), users usually need to generate a spline passing through a given set of data which preserves certain shape properties of the data such as positivity, monotonicity or convexity [1]. The required curves have to be a smooth shape-preserving interpolation. In this paper a rational cubic spline in Ball representation is developed to generate an interpolant that preserves monotonicity. In this paper to control the shape of the interpolant three shape parameters are introduced. The shape parameters in the description of the rational cubic interpolation are subjected to monotonicity constrained. The necessary and sufficient conditions of the rational cubic interpolation are derived and visually the proposed rational cubic interpolant gives a very pleasing result.

  20. Rational management of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Venkataraman

    2014-09-01

    Management of epilepsies in children has improved considerably over the last decade, all over the world due to the advances seen in the understanding of the patho-physiology of epileptogenesis, availability of both structural and functional imaging studies along with better quality EEG/video-EEG recordings and the availability of a plethora of newer anti-epileptic drugs which are tailormade to act on specific pathways. In spite of this, there is still a long way to go before one is able to be absolutely rational about which drug to use for which type of epilepsy. There have been a lot of advances in the area of epilepsy surgery and is certainly gaining ground for specific cases. Better understanding of the genetic basis of epilepsies will hopefully lead to a more rational treatment plan in the future. Also, a lot of work needs to be done to dispel various misunderstandings and myths about epilepsy which still exists in our country. PMID:24871077

  1. Rational solutions to the KPI equation and multi rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    We construct here rational solutions to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation (KPI) as a quotient of two polynomials in x, y and t depending on several real parameters. This method provides an infinite hierarchy of rational solutions written in terms of polynomials of degrees 2 N(N + 1) in x, y and t depending on 2 N - 2 real parameters for each positive integer N. We give explicit expressions of the solutions in the simplest cases N = 1 and N = 2 and we study the patterns of their modulus in the (x , y) plane for different values of time t and parameters.

  2. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve,…

  3. Rational Approximations to Rational Models: Alternative Algorithms for Category Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanborn, Adam N.; Griffiths, Thomas L.; Navarro, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Rational models of cognition typically consider the abstract computational problems posed by the environment, assuming that people are capable of optimally solving those problems. This differs from more traditional formal models of cognition, which focus on the psychological processes responsible for behavior. A basic challenge for rational models…

  4. Semistable modifications of families of curves and compactified Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, Eduardo; Pacini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Given a family of nodal curves, a semistable modification of it is another family made up of curves obtained by inserting chains of rational curves of any given length at certain nodes of certain curves of the original family. We give comparison theorems between torsion-free, rank-1 sheaves in the former family and invertible sheaves in the latter. We apply them to show that there are functorial isomorphisms between the compactifications of relative Jacobians of families of nodal curves constructed through Caporaso's approach and those constructed through Pandharipande's approach.

  5. Standard Mastery Curves and Skew Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warries, Egbert

    The objective of the study is to convince educational researchers of the necessity for "standard mastery curves" for the graphical representation of scores on summative tests for a group of students. Attention is drawn to the study of theoretical and empirical skew curves in education and biology. Use of standard mastery curves and study of skew…

  6. A Viewpoint on the Quantity "Plane Angle"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Properties of the quantity "plane angle" are explored under the hypothesis that it is a dimensional quantity. The exploration proceeds especially with respect to the physical concept, its mathematical treatment, vector concepts, measurement theory, units of related quantities, engineering pragmatism, and SI. An attempt is made to bring these different relations into a rational, logical and consistent framework, and thus to justify the hypothesis. Various types of vectorial quantities are recognized, and their properties described with an outline of the necessary algebraic manipulations. The concept of plane angle is amplified, and its interdependence with the circular arc is explored. The resulting units of plane angle form a class of similar scales of measurement. Consequences of the confirmed hypothesis are developed for mathematical expressions involving trigonometric functions, rotational volumes and areas, mathematical limits, differentiation and series expansion. Consequences for mechanical rotational quantities are developed, with proposals for revisions to a number of expressions for derived units within SI. A revised definition for the quantity "plane angle" is stated to take account of the developed insights. There is a clear need to reconsider the status of plane angle and some other quantities within the international framework of SI.

  7. Reasoning, decision making and rationality.

    PubMed

    Evans, J S; Over, D E; Manktelow, K I

    1993-01-01

    It is argued that reasoning in the real world supports decision making and is aimed at the achievement of goals. A distinction is developed between two notions of rationality: rationality which is reasoning in such a way as to achieve one's goals--within cognitive constraints--and rationality which is reasoning by a process of logic. This dichotomy is related to the philosophical distinction between practical and theoretical reasoning. It is argued that logicality (rationality) does not provide a good basis for rationality and some psychological research on deductive reasoning is re-examined in this light. First, we review belief bias effects in syllogistic reasoning, and argue that the phenomena do not support the interpretations of irrationality that are often placed upon them. Second, we review and discuss recent studies of deontic reasoning in the Wason selection task, which demonstrate the decision making, and rational nature of reasoning in realistic contexts. The final section of the paper examines contemporary decision theory and shows how it fails, in comparable manner to formal logic, to provide an adequate model for assessing the rationality of human reasoning and decision making. PMID:8287673

  8. Comparison of Two Algebraic Methods for Curve/curve Intersection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demontaudouin, Y.; Tiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    Most geometric modeling systems use either polynomial or rational functions to represent geometry. In such systems most computational problems can be formulated as systems of polynomials in one or more variables. Classical elimination theory can be used to solve such systems. Here Cayley's method of elimination is summarized and it is shown how it can best be used to solve the curve/curve intersection problem. Cayley's method was found to be a more straightforward approach. Furthermore, it is computationally simpler, since the elements of the Cayley matrix are one variable instead of two variable polynomials. Researchers implemented and tested both methods and found Cayley's to be more efficient. Six pairs of curves, representing mixtures of lines, circles, and cubic arcs were used. Several examples had multiple intersection points. For all six cases Cayley's required less CPU time than the other method. The average time ratio of method 1 to method 2 was 3.13:1, the least difference was 2.33:1, and the most dramatic was 6.25:1. Both of the above methods can be extended to solve the surface/surface intersection problem.

  9. Experiments with Planing Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1934-01-01

    A previous report discusses the experimental program of a systematic exploration of all questions connected with the planing problem as well as the first fundamental results of the investigation of a flat planing surface. The present report is limited to the conversion of the model test data to full scale.

  10. Detoxifying the concept of rationing.

    PubMed

    Sabin, James

    2014-01-01

    Andrew Hantel's proposal for dealing with cancer drug shortages exemplifies the kind of clinician-led discussion of rationing the U.S. political process requires. I argue that the U.S. will not get a grip on healthcare cost escalation until we set true budgets for healthcare. We will not be able to do that until the public accepts that rationing, done right, is an ethical necessity, not an ethical abomination. Because endorsing rationing is a third rail for politicians, "top down" leadership is currently impossible. As a result, health professionals must lead a "bottom up" educational process. Hantel shows how this can be done. PMID:24972061

  11. Explicit superconic curves.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunggoo

    2016-09-01

    Conics and Cartesian ovals are extremely important curves in various fields of science. In addition, aspheric curves based on conics are useful in optical design. Superconic curves, recently suggested by Greynolds, are extensions of both conics and Cartesian ovals and have been applied to optical design. However, they are not extensions of aspheric curves based on conics. In this work, we investigate another type of superconic curves. These superconic curves are extensions of not only conics and Cartesian ovals but also aspheric curves based on conics. Moreover, these are represented in explicit form, while Greynolds's superconic curves are in implicit form. PMID:27607506

  12. Crack growth measured on flat and curved surfaces at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Multiple element continuity gage measures plane stress crack growth plus surface crack growth under plane strain conditions. The gage measures flat and curved surfaces and operates at cryogenic temperatures.

  13. Managed care and efficient rationing.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Meredith B; Newhouse, Joseph P

    2002-01-01

    Widespread dissatisfaction with managed care has led to calls for major reform and consumer protection. Although some have concluded that managed care backlash is simply a result of too much rationing, we propose an alternative view that focuses on the nature of services eliminated by managed care. In particular, we point out that managed care rations services largely without regard to consumer preferences. We question whether managed care's emphasis on supply-side control of moral hazard is consistent with the principles of efficient rationing. Further research on the nature of provider and consumer rationing decisions is needed to inform the design of supply-side and demand-side incentives that will lead to an efficient allocation of services. PMID:12148660

  14. The rationing agenda in the NHS. Rationing Agenda Group.

    PubMed Central

    New, B.

    1996-01-01

    The Rationing Agenda Group has been founded to deepen the British debate on rationing health care. It believes that rationing in health care is inevitable and that the public must be involved in the debate about issues relating to rationing. The group comprises people from all parts of health care, none of whom represent either their group or their institutions. RAG has begun by producing this document, which attempts to set an agenda of all the issues that need to be considered when debating the rationing of health care. We hope for responses to the document. The next stage will be to incorporate the responses into the agenda. Then RAG will divide the agenda into manageable chunks and commission expert, detailed commentaries. From this material a final paper will be published and used to prompt public debate. This stage should be reached early in 1997. While these papers are being prepared RAG is developing ways to involve the public in the debate and evaluate the whole process. We present as neutrally as possible all the issues related to rationing and priority setting in the NHS. We focus on the NHS for two reasons. Firstly, for those of us resident in the United Kingdom the NHS is the health care system with which we are most familiar and most concerned. Secondly, focusing on one system alone allows more coherent analysis than would be possible if issues in other systems were included as well. Our concern is with the delivery of health care, not its finance, though we discuss the possible effects of changing the financing system of the NHS. Finally, though our position is neutral, we hold two substantive views--namely, that rationing is unavoidable and that there should be more explicit debate about the principles and issues concerned. We consider the issues under four headings: preliminaries, ethics, democracy, and empirical questions. Preliminaries deal with the semantics of rationing, whether rationing is necessary, and with the range of services to which

  15. The rationing agenda in the NHS. Rationing Agenda Group.

    PubMed

    New, B

    1996-06-22

    The Rationing Agenda Group has been founded to deepen the British debate on rationing health care. It believes that rationing in health care is inevitable and that the public must be involved in the debate about issues relating to rationing. The group comprises people from all parts of health care, none of whom represent either their group or their institutions. RAG has begun by producing this document, which attempts to set an agenda of all the issues that need to be considered when debating the rationing of health care. We hope for responses to the document. The next stage will be to incorporate the responses into the agenda. Then RAG will divide the agenda into manageable chunks and commission expert, detailed commentaries. From this material a final paper will be published and used to prompt public debate. This stage should be reached early in 1997. While these papers are being prepared RAG is developing ways to involve the public in the debate and evaluate the whole process. We present as neutrally as possible all the issues related to rationing and priority setting in the NHS. We focus on the NHS for two reasons. Firstly, for those of us resident in the United Kingdom the NHS is the health care system with which we are most familiar and most concerned. Secondly, focusing on one system alone allows more coherent analysis than would be possible if issues in other systems were included as well. Our concern is with the delivery of health care, not its finance, though we discuss the possible effects of changing the financing system of the NHS. Finally, though our position is neutral, we hold two substantive views--namely, that rationing is unavoidable and that there should be more explicit debate about the principles and issues concerned. We consider the issues under four headings: preliminaries, ethics, democracy, and empirical questions. Preliminaries deal with the semantics of rationing, whether rationing is necessary, and with the range of services to which

  16. Optical conductivity of curved graphene.

    PubMed

    Chaves, A J; Frederico, T; Oliveira, O; de Paula, W; Santos, M C

    2014-05-01

    We compute the optical conductivity for an out-of-plane deformation in graphene using an approach based on solutions of the Dirac equation in curved space. Different examples of periodic deformations along one direction translates into an enhancement of the optical conductivity peaks in the region of the far- and mid-infrared frequencies for periodicities ∼100 nm. The width and position of the peaks can be changed by dialling the parameters of the deformation profiles. The enhancement of the optical conductivity is due to intraband transitions and the translational invariance breaking in the geometrically deformed background. Furthermore, we derive an analytical solution of the Dirac equation in a curved space for a general deformation along one spatial direction. For this class of geometries, it is shown that curvature induces an extra phase in the electron wave function, which can also be explored to produce interference devices of the Aharonov-Bohm type. PMID:24759188

  17. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  18. A Simple Experiment Demonstrating the Relationship between Response Curves and Absorption Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chia-yu

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment for recording two individual spectrophotometer response curves. The two curves are directly related to the power of transmitted beams that pass through a solvent and solution. An absorption spectrum of the solution can be constructed from the calculated rations of the curves as a function of wavelength. (JN)

  19. Diffusion-limited aggregation on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Crowdy, D.; Bazant, M. Z.

    2010-08-01

    We develop a general theory of transport-limited aggregation phenomena occurring on curved surfaces, based on stochastic iterated conformal maps and conformal projections to the complex plane. To illustrate the theory, we use stereographic projections to simulate diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on surfaces of constant Gaussian curvature, including the sphere (K>0) and the pseudo-sphere (K<0), which approximate "bumps" and "saddles" in smooth surfaces, respectively. Although the curvature affects the global morphology of the aggregates, the fractal dimension (in the curved metric) is remarkably insensitive to curvature, as long as the particle size is much smaller than the radius of curvature. We conjecture that all aggregates grown by conformally invariant transport on curved surfaces have the same fractal dimension as DLA in the plane. Our simulations suggest, however, that the multifractal dimensions increase from hyperbolic (K<0) to elliptic (K>0) geometry, which we attribute to curvature-dependent screening of tip branching.

  20. 2. VIEW SOUTH, INCLINE PLANE CAR, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, INCLINE PLANE CAR, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER STATION. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  1. Sibling Curves and Complex Roots 2: Looking Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Ansie; Engelbrecht, Johann

    2007-01-01

    This paper, the second of a two part article, expands on an idea that appeared in literature in the 1950s to show that by restricting the domain to those complex numbers that map onto real numbers, representations of functions other than the ones in the real plane are obtained. In other words, the well-known curves in the real plane only depict…

  2. Rationalizing the Promotion of Non-Rational Behaviors in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter A. C.; Sharma, Meenakshi

    2002-01-01

    Organizations must balance rational/technical efficiency and emotions. Action learning has been proven to be effective for developing emotional openness in the workplace. Facilitators of action learning should draw upon the disciplines of counseling, Gestalt, psychodynamics, and Eastern philosophies. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  3. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  4. Spectral Methods Using Rational Basis Functions on an Infinite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, John P.

    1987-03-01

    By using the map y = L cot( t) where L is a constant, differential equations on the interval yɛ [- ∞, ∞] can be transformed into tɛ [0, π] and solved by an ordinary Fourier series. In this article, earlier work by Grosch and Orszag ( J. Comput. Phys.25, 273 (1977)), Cain, Ferziger, and Reynolds ( J. Comput. Phys.56, 272 (1984)), and Boyd ( J. Comput. Phys.25, 43 (1982); 57, 454 (1985); SIAM J. Numer. Anal. (1987)) is extended in several ways. First, the series of orthogonal rational functions converge on the exterior of bipolar coordinate surfaces in the complex y-plane. Second, Galerkin's method will convert differential equations with polynomial or rational coefficients into banded matrix problems. Third, with orthogonal rational functions it is possible to obtain exponential convergence even for u( y) that asymptote to a constant although this behavior would wreck alternatives such as Hermite or sinc expansions. Fourth, boundary conditions are usually "natural" rather than "essential" in the sense that the singularities of the differential equation will force the numerical solution to have the correct behavior at infinity even if no constraints are imposed on the basis functions. Fifth, mapping a finite interval to an infinite one and then applying the rational Chebyshev functions gives an exponentially convergent method for functions with bounded endpoint singularities. These concepts are illustrated by five numerical examples.

  5. Rational Exponentials and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Using continued fraction expansions, we can approximate constants, such as pi and e, using an appropriate integer n raised to the power x[superscript 1/x], x a suitable rational. We review continued fractions and give an algorithm for producing these approximations.

  6. On Counting the Rational Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almada, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we show how to construct a function from the set N of natural numbers that explicitly counts the set Q[superscript +] of all positive rational numbers using a very intuitive approach. The function has the appeal of Cantor's function and it has the advantage that any high school student can understand the main idea at a glance…

  7. Teaching Rational Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolever, Roberts

    1978-01-01

    Presented is an outline of a college course, "Education in American Society," that focused on teaching students rational decision-making skills while examining current issues in American Education. The outline is followed by student comments, reactions, and evaluations of the course. (JMD)

  8. Rational Suicide among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphry, Derek

    1992-01-01

    Contends that old age, in and of itself, should never need to be a cause for self-destruction. Further argues that suicide and assisted suicide carried out in the face of terminal illness causing unbearable suffering should be ethically and legally acceptable. Outlines a perspective on rational suicide among the elderly. (Author/NB)

  9. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  10. DLCQ and plane wave matrix Big Bang models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Matthias; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2008-09-01

    We study the generalisations of the Craps-Sethi-Verlinde matrix big bang model to curved, in particular plane wave, space-times, beginning with a careful discussion of the DLCQ procedure. Singular homogeneous plane waves are ideal toy-models of realistic space-time singularities since they have been shown to arise universally as their Penrose limits, and we emphasise the role played by the symmetries of these plane waves in implementing the flat space Seiberg-Sen DLCQ prescription for these curved backgrounds. We then analyse various aspects of the resulting matrix string Yang-Mills theories, such as the relation between strong coupling space-time singularities and world-sheet tachyonic mass terms. In order to have concrete examples at hand, in an appendix we determine and analyse the IIA singular homogeneous plane wave - null dilaton backgrounds.

  11. "The Bell Curve": Ringing in the Contract with America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Walter C., Jr.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Herrnstein and Murray's "The Bell Curve" claims that IQ is hereditary and that African Americans consistently score 15 points lower than other racial groups. Coolly received by academics, the book is being warmly embraced by Republican politicians endorsing fiscal austerity and social mean-spiritedness. The book rationalizes a conservative…

  12. Self-calibration of Antenna Errors Using Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napier, P. J.; Cornwell, T. J.

    The thery of focal-plane correlation is reviewed and applied to the problem of the self-calibration and self-correction of a radio telescope with errors in its reflecting surface. Curves are presented which allow the estimation of focal-plane array size and integration time needed for telescopes with varying amounts of error. It is suggested that the technique may have application to the problem of the construction of large telescopes in space.

  13. A variational characterization and geometric integration for Bertrand curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Pascual; Ortega-Yagües, José Antonio

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a class of functionals, in the three-dimensional semi-Euclidean space {R}^3_q, having an energy density that depends only on curvature and whose moduli space of trajectories consists of LW-curves, i.e., curves with curvature κ and torsion τ for which there are three real constants λ, μ, ρ such that λκ + μτ = ρ, with λ2 + μ2 > 0. This family of curves includes plane curves, helices, curves of constant curvature, curves of constant torsion, Lancret curves (also called generalized helices), and Bertrand curves. We present an algorithm to construct Bertrand curves in {R}^3_q by using an arclength parametrized curve in a totally umbilical surface {S}^2, {S}^2_1, or {H}^2 and prove that every Bertrand curve in {R}^3_q can be obtained in this way. A second algorithm is presented for the construction of LW-curves by using a curve of constant slope in the ruled surface Sα whose directrix is a certain curve α with non-zero curvature and whose rulings are generated by its modified Darboux vector field.

  14. A method of plane geometry primitive presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Anbo; Luo, Haibo; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Point feature and line feature are basic elements in object feature sets, and they play an important role in object matching and recognition. On one hand, point feature is sensitive to noise; on the other hand, there are usually a huge number of point features in an image, which makes it complex for matching. Line feature includes straight line segment and curve. One difficulty in straight line segment matching is the uncertainty of endpoint location, the other is straight line segment fracture problem or short straight line segments joined to form long straight line segment. While for the curve, in addition to the above problems, there is another difficulty in how to quantitatively describe the shape difference between curves. Due to the problems of point feature and line feature, the robustness and accuracy of target description will be affected; in this case, a method of plane geometry primitive presentation is proposed to describe the significant structure of an object. Firstly, two types of primitives are constructed, they are intersecting line primitive and blob primitive. Secondly, a line segment detector (LSD) is applied to detect line segment, and then intersecting line primitive is extracted. Finally, robustness and accuracy of the plane geometry primitive presentation method is studied. This method has a good ability to obtain structural information of the object, even if there is rotation or scale change of the object in the image. Experimental results verify the robustness and accuracy of this method.

  15. Analytical investigation of curved steel girder behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Michael Donald

    Horizontally curved bridges meet an increasing demand for complex highway geometries in congested urban areas. A popular type of curved bridge consists of steel I-girders interconnected by cross-frames and a composite concrete deck slab. Prior to hardening of the concrete deck each I-girder is susceptible to a lateral torsional buckling-type failure. Unlike a straight I-girder, a curved I-girder resists major components of stress resulting from strong axis bending, weak axis bending and warping. The combination of these stresses reduce the available strength of a curved girder versus that of an equivalent straight girder. Experiments demonstrating the ultimate strength characteristics of curved girders are few in number. Of the available experimental research, few studies have used full scale-tests and boundary conditions indicative of those found in an actual bridge structure. Unlike straight girders, curved girders are characterized by nonlinear out-of-plane deformations which, depending upon the magnitude of curvature, may occur at very low load levels. Because of the inherent nonlinear behaviour, some have questioned the application of the term lateral torsional buckling to curved girders; rather curved girders behave in a manner consistent with a deflection-amplification problem. Even with the advent of sophisticated analytical techniques, there is a glaring void in the documented literature regarding calibration of these techniques with known experimental curved girder behaviour. Presented here is an analytical study of the nonlinear modelling of curved steel girders and bridges. This is accomplished by incorporating large deflection and nonlinear material behaviour into three dimensional finite element models generated using the program ANSYS. Emphasis is placed on the calibration of the finite method with known experimental ultimate strength data. It is demonstrated that accurate predictions of load deformation and ultimate strength are attainable via the

  16. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  17. Psychology and the Rationality of Emotion*

    PubMed Central

    Clore, Gerald L.

    2014-01-01

    Questions addressed by recent psychological research on emotion include questions about how thought shapes emotion and how emotion, in turn, shapes thought. Research on emotion and cognition paints a somewhat different picture than that seen in traditional discussions of passion and reason. This article reviews several aspects of this research, concentrating specifically on three views of rationality: Rationality as Process, Rationality as Product, and Rationality as Outcome. PMID:25125770

  18. Lower extremity kinematics of athletics curve sprinting.

    PubMed

    Alt, Tobias; Heinrich, Kai; Funken, Johannes; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Curve running requires the generation of centripetal force altering the movement pattern in comparison to the straight path run. The question arises which kinematic modulations emerge while bend sprinting at high velocities. It has been suggested that during curve sprints the legs fulfil different functions. A three-dimensional motion analysis (16 high-speed cameras) was conducted to compare the segmental kinematics of the lower extremity during the stance phases of linear and curve sprints (radius: 36.5 m) of six sprinters of national competitive level. Peak joint angles substantially differed in the frontal and transversal plane whereas sagittal plane kinematics remained unchanged. During the prolonged left stance phase (left: 107.5 ms, right: 95.7 ms, straight: 104.4 ms) the maximum values of ankle eversion (left: 12.7°, right: 2.6°, straight: 6.6°), hip adduction (left: 13.8°, right: 5.5°, straight: 8.8°) and hip external rotation (left: 21.6°, right: 12.9°, straight: 16.7°) were significantly higher. The inside leg seemed to stabilise the movement in the frontal plane (eversion-adduction strategy) whereas the outside leg provided and controlled the motion in the horizontal plane (rotation strategy). These results extend the principal understanding of the effects of curve sprinting on lower extremity kinematics. This helps to increase the understanding of nonlinear human bipedal locomotion, which in turn might lead to improvements in athletic performance and injury prevention. PMID:25495196

  19. Rational Thinking in School-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary Kristen; Flynn, Perry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We reflect on Alan Kamhi's (2011) prologue on balancing certainty and uncertainty as it pertains to school-based practice. Method: In schools, rational thinking depends on effective team processes, much like professional learning communities. We consider the conditions that are required for rational thinking and how rational team dialogue…

  20. Rationality and the Logic of Good Reasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Walter R.

    This paper contends that the rationality of the logic of good reasons is constituted in its use. To support this claim, the paper presents an analysis of the relationship between being reasonable and being rational. It then considers how following the logic of good reasons leads to rationality in the behavior of individuals and groups; the latter…

  1. Book Selection, Collection Development, and Bounded Rationality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews previously proposed schemes of classical rationality in book selection, describes new approaches to rational choice behavior, and presents a model of book selection based on bounded rationality in a garbage can decision process. The role of tacit knowledge and symbolic content in the selection process are also discussed. (102 references)…

  2. Large-degree asymptotics of rational Painlevé-II functions: critical behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Robert J.; Miller, Peter D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper is a continuation of our analysis, begun in Buckingham and Miller (2014 Nonlinearity 27 2489-577), of the rational solutions of the inhomogeneous Painlevé-II equation and associated rational solutions of the homogeneous coupled Painlevé-II system in the limit of large degree. In this paper we establish asymptotic formulae valid near a certain curvilinear triangle in the complex plane that was previously shown to separate two distinct types of asymptotic behaviour. Our results display both a trigonometric degeneration of the rational Painlevé-II functions and also a degeneration to the tritronquée solution of the Painlevé-I equation. Our rigorous analysis is based on the steepest descent method applied to a Riemann-Hilbert representation of the rational Painlevé-II functions, and supplies leading-order formulae as well as error estimates.

  3. Analysis of Basal Plane Bending and Basal Plane Dislocations in 4H-SiC Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Noboru; Katsuno, Masakazu; Fujimoto, Tatsuo; Nakabayashi, Masashi; Tsuge, Hiroshi; Yashiro, Hirokatsu; Aigo, Takashi; Hirano, Hosei; Hoshino, Taizo; Ohashi, Wataru

    2009-06-01

    4H-SiC single crystals were grown by the physical vapor transport (PVT) growth method under different thermoelastic stress conditions, and the degree of basal plane bending in the crystals was characterized by the peak shift measurement of X-ray rocking curves. The results indicate that the degree of basal plane bending largely depends on the magnitude of the thermoelastic stresses imposed on the crystals during PVT growth. Quantitative analysis of basal plane bending revealed that the density of basal plane dislocations (BPDs) estimated from basal plane bending is much smaller than that obtained from defect-selective etching. It was also found that the BPD density is correlated with the threading screw dislocation (TSD) density in PVT-grown SiC crystals. These aspects of BPDs were discussed in terms of the BPD multiplication process triggered by the intersection of BPDs with a forest of TSDs extending along the c-axis.

  4. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  5. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  6. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  7. NURBS distance fields for extremely curved cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla, Ruben; Barbieri, Ettore

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes for the first time an intrinsic enrichment for extremely curved cracks in a meshfree framework. The unique property of the proposed method lies in the exact geometric representation of cracks using non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS). A distance function algorithm for NURBS is presented, resulting in a spatial field which is simultaneously discontinuous over the (finite) curved crack and continuous all around the crack tips. Numerical examples show the potential of the proposed approach and illustrate its advantages with respect to other techniques usually employed to model fracture, including standard finite elements with remeshing and the extended finite element method. This work represents a further step in an ongoing effort in the community to integrate computer aided design with numerical simulations.

  8. Propagation of guided modes in curved nanoribbon waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.; Ye, Zhuo; Hu, Xinhua; Li, Ming; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2006-08-23

    The authors develop a plane-wave-based transfer matrix method in curvilinear coordinates to study the guided modes in curved nanoribbon waveguides. The problem of a curved structure is transformed into an equivalent one of a straight structure with spatially dependent tensors of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability. The authors investigate the coupling between the eigenmodes of the straight part and those of the curved part when the waveguide is bent. The authors show that curved sections can result in strong oscillations in the transmission spectrum similar to the recent experimental results of Lawet al.

  9. Degeneration of the Julia set to singular loci of algebraic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Satoru; Saitoh, Noriko; Harada, Hiromitsu; Yumibayashi, Tsukasa; Wakimoto, Yuki

    2013-06-01

    We show that, when a non-integrable rational map changes to an integrable one continuously, a large part of the Julia set of the map approach indeterminate points (IDP) of the map along algebraic curves. We will see that the IDPs are singular loci of the curves.

  10. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  11. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  12. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David L.; Horner, Scott D.; Aamodt, Earl K.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in systems engineering, applied sciences, and manufacturing technologies have enabled the development of large ground based and spaced based astronomical instruments having a large Field of View (FOV) to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A larger FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optical elements, improved support structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPA). A mFPA designed for astronomy can use multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single camera baseplate integrated at the instrument plane of focus. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tighter control on the design trades, component development, CCD characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the capability Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company's (LMSSC) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed to perform CCD characterization, mFPA assembly and alignment, and mFPA system level testing.

  13. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D.; Horner, S.; Aamodt, E.

    Advances in manufacturing and applied sciences have enabled the development of large ground and spaced based astronomical instruments having a Field of View (FOV) large enough to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A large FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optics, improved structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPAs). A mFPA comprises multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single baseplate integrated at the focus plane of the instrument. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tight control on the design trades of component development, CCD definition and characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the results of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Advanced Technology Center (ATC) developed mFPA. The design trades and performance characterization are services provided by the LMSSC ATC but not detailed in this paper.

  14. Out-of-plane properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes three areas of research which were performed to characterize out-of-plane properties of composite materials. In the first investigation, a series of tests was run to characterize the through-the-thickness tensile strength for a variety of composites that included 2D braids, 2D and 3D weaves, and prepreg tapes. A new test method based on a curved beam was evaluated. Failures were significantly different between the 2D materials and the 3D weaves. The 2D materials delaminated between layers due to out-of-plane tensile stresses while the 3D weaves failed due to the formation of radial cracks between the surface plies caused by high circumferential stresses along the inner radius. The strength of the 2D textile composites did not increase relative to the tapes. Final failure in the 3D weaves was caused by a circumferential crack similar to the 2D materials and occurred at a lower bending moment than in other materials. The early failures in the 3D weaves were caused by radial crack formation rather than a low through-the-thickness strength. The second investigation focused on the development of a standard impact test method to measure impact damage resistance. The only impact tests that currently exist are compression after impact (CAI) tests which incorporate elements of both damage resistance and damage tolerance. A new impact test method is under development which uses a quasi-static indentation (QSI) test to directly measure damage resistance. Damage resistance is quantified in terms of the contact force to produce a unit of damage where a metric for damage may be area in C-scan, depth of residual dent , penetration, damage growth, etc. A final draft of an impact standard that uses a QSI test method will be presented to the ASTM Impact Task Group on impact. In the third investigation, the impact damage resistance behavior of a variety of textile materials was studied using the QSI test method. In this study, the force where large damage

  15. The Three Planes of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Gloria

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the language sciences place together four different forms of mental activity on one plane of language, which results in confusion. This paper presents arguments from metaphysics, hermeneutics, and semiotics to demonstrate that there are actually three planes of language (a biologically-based information processing plane, a literal…

  16. Rational exemption to vaccination for non-fatal SIS diseases: globally stable and oscillatory endemicity.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Bruno; D'Onofrio, Alberto; Lacitignola, Deborah

    2010-07-01

    'Rational' exemption to vaccination is due to a pseudo-rational comparison between the low risk of infection, and the perceived risk of side effects from the vaccine. Here we consider rational exemption in an SI model with information dependent vaccination where individuals use information on the disease's spread as their information set. Using suitable assumptions, we show the dynamic implications of the interaction between rational exemption, current and delayed information. In particular, if vaccination decisions are based on delayed informations, we illustrate both global attractivity to an endemic state, and the onset, through Hopf bifurcations, of general Yakubovich oscillations. Moreover, in some relevant cases, we plot the Hopf bifurcation curves and we give a behavioural interpretation of their meaning. PMID:20578786

  17. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  18. Rational Prescription for a Dermatologist

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Bhanu; Nadig, Prathiba; Nayak, Amitha

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal in dermatological therapy is to use the safest and least number of drugs in order to obtain the best possible effect in the shortest period and at reasonable cost. Rational drug use (RDU) is conventionally defined as the use of an appropriate, efficacious, safe and cost-effective drug given for the right indications in the right dose and formulation, at right time intervals. WHO estimates that more than half of all medicines are prescribed, dispensed or sold inappropriately, and that half of all patients fail to take them correctly as prescribed by the doctor. The process of Rational prescription for a Dermatologist (RPD) involves a series of steps such as defining the patient's illness, specifying the treatment objectives, using the principle of P-treatment, starting the treatment, providing appropriate information and monitoring the treatment. Reasons for irrational prescription could be physician related, patient related, industry related, regulations related. Practicing medicine irrationally can lead to disastrous events like increased morbidity and mortality, drain of resources, drug resistance etc. Principles to enhance the RDU in our practice and minimize errors of prescription are discussed in detail in this article. PMID:26955092

  19. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains how our weather occurs, and why Solar radiation is responsible. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  20. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how they form. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  1. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how these affect weather patterns. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  2. Intertwined Hamiltonians in two-dimensional curved spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Aghababaei Samani, Keivan . E-mail: samani@cc.iut.ac.ir; Zarei, Mina

    2005-04-01

    The problem of intertwined Hamiltonians in two-dimensional curved spaces is investigated. Explicit results are obtained for Euclidean plane, Minkowski plane, Poincare half plane (AdS{sub 2}), de Sitter plane (dS{sub 2}), sphere, and torus. It is shown that the intertwining operator is related to the Killing vector fields and the isometry group of corresponding space. It is shown that the intertwined potentials are closely connected to the integral curves of the Killing vector fields. Two problems are considered as applications of the formalism presented in the paper. The first one is the problem of Hamiltonians with equispaced energy levels and the second one is the problem of Hamiltonians whose spectrum is like the spectrum of a free particle.

  3. Curve Stitching in LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscat, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    Uses LOGO to enhance the applicability of curve stitching in the mathematics curriculum. Presents the formulas and computer programs for the construction of parabolas, concentric circles, and epicycloids. Diagrams of constructed figures are provided. (MDH)

  4. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  5. Dynamics of dislocations described as evolving curves interacting with obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauš, Petr; Beneš, Michal; Kolář, Miroslav; Kratochvíl, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we describe the model of glide dislocation interaction with obstacles based on the planar curve dynamics. The dislocations are represented as smooth curves evolving in a slip plane according to the mean curvature motion law, and are mathematically described by the parametric approach. We enhance the parametric model by employing so called tangential redistribution of curve points to increase the stability during numerical computation. We developed additional algorithms for topological changes (i.e. merging and splitting of dislocation curves) enabling a detailed modelling of dislocation interaction with obstacles. The evolving dislocations are approximated as a moving piece-wise linear curves. The obstacles are represented as idealized circular areas of a repulsive stress. Our model is numerically solved by means of semi-implicit flowing finite volume method. We present results of qualitative and quantitative computational studies where we demonstrate the topological changes and discuss the effect of tangential redistribution of curve points on computational results.

  6. Decision making: rational or hedonic?

    PubMed Central

    Cabanac, Michel; Bonniot-Cabanac, Marie-Claude

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments studied the hedonicity of decision making. Participants rated their pleasure/displeasure while reading item-sentences describing political and social problems followed by different decisions (Questionnaire 1). Questionnaire 2 was multiple-choice, grouping the items from Questionnaire 1. In Experiment 1, participants answered Questionnaire 2 rapidly or slowly. Both groups selected what they had rated as pleasant, but the 'leisurely' group maximized pleasure less. In Experiment 2, participants selected the most rational responses. The selected behaviors were pleasant but less than spontaneous behaviors. In Experiment 3, Questionnaire 2 was presented once with items grouped by theme, and once with items shuffled. Participants maximized the pleasure of their decisions, but the items selected on Questionnaires 2 were different when presented in different order. All groups maximized pleasure equally in their decisions. These results support that decisions are made predominantly in the hedonic dimension of consciousness. PMID:17848195

  7. Rational design of helical architectures

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Fejer, Szilard N.; Wales, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Nature has mastered the art of creating complex structures through self-assembly of simpler building blocks. Adapting such a bottom-up view provides a potential route to the fabrication of novel materials. However, this approach suffers from the lack of a sufficiently detailed understanding of the noncovalent forces that hold the self-assembled structures together. Here we demonstrate that nature can indeed guide us, as we explore routes to helicity with achiral building blocks driven by the interplay between two competing length scales for the interactions, as in DNA. By characterizing global minima for clusters, we illustrate several realizations of helical architecture, the simplest one involving ellipsoids of revolution as building blocks. In particular, we show that axially symmetric soft discoids can self-assemble into helical columnar arrangements. Understanding the molecular origin of such spatial organisation has important implications for the rational design of materials with useful optoelectronic applications.

  8. Max Weber's Types of Rationality: Cornerstones for the Analysis of Rationalization Processes in History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalberg, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    Explores rationality in Max Weber's works and identifies four types of rationality which play major roles in his writing--practical, theoretical, substantive, and formal. Implications for society and education are discussed. (DB)

  9. Plane Mercury librations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    theory of Mercury librations in longitude by using three characteristics of Mercury rotation determined in the paper [3]. Two from these parameters are values of angle of librations in longitude and angular velocity in moment of passage of perihelion of Mercury orbit on 17 April 2002: (^g)0 = 0007 ± 0001, (^?•? )0 = (2.10± 0.06)•? ars/d. Third parameter determined in [3] is a dynamical coefficient: K = (B -A)•(4Cm ) = (5.08± 0.30) × 10-5. B > A are principal moment of inertia, corresponding to equatorial axes of inertia; Cm is a polar moment of inertia of the mantle of Mercury. 1 Analytical theory of plane Mercury librations. This theory describes forced and free librations of Mercury in longitude in the frame of plane problem about resonant librations of Mercury considered or as non-spherical rigid body, or as system of rigid non-spherical mantle and liquid ellipsoidal core. Saving the main terms for the perturbations of angle of librations ^g and angular velocity ^? in both mentioned cases we will have formulae [6]: ^g = K(E sin M + E sin2M + E sin 3M + E sin4M + E sin5M ) 1 2 3 4 5+K0 sin(E šKM- - φ) (A)

  10. The Rationality of Alcoholics Anonymous and the Spirituality of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velten, Emmett

    1996-01-01

    Argues that Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) share important rational objectives and numerous cognitive-behavioral methods. Both emphasize a philosophical shift as a principal ingredient for change. Provides definitions of rationality and spirituality and explains how REBT and smart recovery are spiritual…

  11. IGMtransmission: Transmission curve computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher M.; Meiksin, Avery; Stock, David

    2015-04-01

    IGMtransmission is a Java graphical user interface that implements Monte Carlo simulations to compute the corrections to colors of high-redshift galaxies due to intergalactic attenuation based on current models of the Intergalactic Medium. The effects of absorption due to neutral hydrogen are considered, with particular attention to the stochastic effects of Lyman Limit Systems. Attenuation curves are produced, as well as colors for a wide range of filter responses and model galaxy spectra. Photometric filters are included for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Keck telescope, the Mt. Palomar 200-inch, the SUBARU telescope and UKIRT; alternative filter response curves and spectra may be readily uploaded.

  12. Kummer surfaces associated with Seiberg-Witten curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmendier, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    By carrying out a rational transformation on the base curve C of the Seiberg-Witten curve for N=2 supersymmetric pure SU(2)-gauge theory, we obtain a family of Jacobian elliptic K3 surfaces of Picard rank 17. The isogeny relating the Seiberg-Witten curve for pure SU(2)-gauge theory to the one for SU(2)-gauge theory with Nf=2 massless hypermultiplets extends to define a Nikulin involution on each K3 surface in the family. We show that the desingularization of the quotient of the K3 surface by the involution is isomorphic to a Kummer surface of the Jacobian variety of a curve of genus two. We then derive a relation between the Yukawa coupling associated with the elliptic K3 surface and the Yukawa coupling of pure SU(2)-gauge theory.

  13. Developing Critical Rationality as a Pedagogical Aim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winch, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The development of a conception of critical pedagogy is itself an aspect of the development of critical rationality within late modern societies, closely connected with the role of education in developing critical rationality. The role of critique pervades all aspects of life: for people as citizens, workers and self-determining private…

  14. Decision Making: Rational, Nonrational, and Irrational.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Herbert A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the current state of knowledge about human decision-making and problem-solving processes, explaining recent developments and their implications for management and management training. Rational goal-setting is the key to effective decision making and accomplishment. Bounded rationality is a realistic orientation, because the world is too…

  15. Rationality and Belief in Learning Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tony

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that rationality and belief are mutually formative dimensions of school mathematics, where each term is more politically embedded than often depicted in the field of mathematics education research. School mathematics then presents not so much rational mathematical thought distorted by irrational beliefs but rather a particular…

  16. The Emotional and Moral Basis of Rationality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boostrom, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the basis of rationality, arguing that critical thinking tends to be taught in schools as a set of skills because of the failure to recognize that choosing to think critically depends on the prior development of stable sentiments or moral habits that nourish a rational self. Primary among these stable sentiments are the…

  17. Neurophysiology and Rationality in Political Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Steven A.

    Research both in cognitive psychology and psychobiology suggests that political behavior is often less rational than individuals believe it to be. Information processing, memory, and decision making are interlinked processes. Studies in cognitive psychology reveal that even though decision making requires rationality, individuals often adopt…

  18. On rational integrals of geodesic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valery V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of first integrals of the equations of geodesics on two-dimensional surfaces that are rational in the velocities (or momenta). The existence of nontrivial rational integrals with given values of the degrees of the numerator and the denominator is proved using the Cauchy-Kovalevskaya theorem.

  19. Fiber sources for complete calf starter rations.

    PubMed

    Murdock, F R; Wallenius, R W

    1980-11-01

    Complete calf starter rations containing either 1) alfalfa hay, 2) cottonseed hulls, or 3) alfalfa-beet pulp as sources of fiber were fed to Holstein heifer calves at two locations on a limited milk program from 3 days to 12 wk of age. Rations were isonitrogenous and similar in content of crude fiber and acid detergent fiber. Although growth and development were normal on all rations, calves fed the cottonseed hull ration consumed more starter and gained more body weight than calves fed the other sources of fiber. The similarity of feed efficiencies, rumen pH, and molar ratios of volatile fatty acids between rations indicated no appreciable differences in rumen development or function. The growth response of calves fed the cottonseed hull ration appeared to be a result of better ration acceptability for which no reason was evident. Calves raised at Puyallup gained more body weight than calves at Pullman, and these gains were made more efficiently. These location effects may be related to seasonal differences and greater demands for production of body heat. Although the incidence of scours was less for calves fed alfalfa hay starter, the incidence and severity of bloat were higher for that ration. PMID:6255021

  20. Professionalization in a Rationally Managed Corporate Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alie, Raymond E.

    1982-01-01

    Explored the relationship of professionalization and rational corporate management. Subjects were 320 engineers in a merged manufacturing firm. Results indicated a relationship between graduate degree activity and organization membership, and confirmed that engineers exhibit greater professionalization in a rationally managed organization. (WAS)

  1. Are Grade Expectations Rational? A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Belayet; Tsigaris, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    This study examines students' expectations about their final grade. An attempt is made to determine whether students form expectations rationally. Expectations in economics, rational or otherwise, carry valuable information and have important implications in terms of both teaching effectiveness and the role of grades as an incentive structure…

  2. The extended polar writhe: a tool for open curves mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Christopher B.; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    A measure of the writhing of a curve is introduced and is used to extend the Călugăreanu decomposition for closed curves, as well as the polar decomposition for curves bound between planes. The new writhe measure is also shown to be able to assess changes in linking due to belt-trick and knotting type deformations, and further its utility is illustrated on examples taken from elastic rod parameter-continuation studies. Finally C++ and mathematica codes are made available and shown to be faster than existing algorithms for the numerical computation of the writhe.

  3. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  4. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  5. Curve of Spee - from orthodontic perspective.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Sushma

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a curve of Spee (COS) of variable depth is common finding in the occlusal arrangement and is sixth key of occlusion The understanding of COS in the field of orthodontics is very important as orthodontists deal with it in virtually every patient they treat. An excessive COS is a common form of malocclusion that may be addressed in many ways, including posterior extrusion, anterior intrusion, and incisor proclination. The specific approach to leveling of COS should be selected based on each patient's needs. Soft tissue, crown-gingival relations, occlusal plane, and skeletofacial concerns are among the special considerations for treatment planning for leveling of COS. PMID:26752075

  6. Invariant rotational curves in Sitnikov's Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Alfaro, J.; Chiralt, Cristina

    1993-04-01

    The Sitnikov's Problem is a restricted three-body problem of celestial mechanics depending on the eccentricity, e. The Hamiltonian, H(z, v, t, e), does not depend on t if e = 0 and we have an integrable system; if e is small the KAM Theory proves the existence of invariant rotational curves, IRC. For larger eccentricities, we show that there exist two complementary sequences of intervals of values of e that accumulate to the maximum admissible value of the eccentricity, 1, and such that, for one of the sequences IRC around a fixed point persist. Moreover, they shrink to the plane z = 0 as e tends to 1.

  7. Curve of Spee - from orthodontic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Sushma

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a curve of Spee (COS) of variable depth is common finding in the occlusal arrangement and is sixth key of occlusion The understanding of COS in the field of orthodontics is very important as orthodontists deal with it in virtually every patient they treat. An excessive COS is a common form of malocclusion that may be addressed in many ways, including posterior extrusion, anterior intrusion, and incisor proclination. The specific approach to leveling of COS should be selected based on each patient's needs. Soft tissue, crown–gingival relations, occlusal plane, and skeletofacial concerns are among the special considerations for treatment planning for leveling of COS. PMID:26752075

  8. A theory for turbulent curved wall jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1986-01-01

    A simple theoretical model is proposed to describe the flow of a turbulent wall jet along a curved surface into a quiescent atmosphere. An integral method is used to solve the momentum equation and identifies three contributions to the spreading rate of the wall jet: (1) turbulent diffusion in the wall jet; (2) wall curvature; and (3) rate of change of wall curvature. Closed from approximate solutions are found for the case of a plane wall, a circular cylinder, and a logarithmic spiral surface. Comparison with experimental data for these three cases is made showing good agreement.

  9. Approaches towards rational antiviral chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Present epidemic influenza is uncontrolled by immuno- or chemoprophylaxis. Mutants of varying antigenic composition arise with relatively high frequency in nature and are able to circumvent herd, or induced, immunity. Also, drug-resistant viruses can be selected in vitro and this resistance can be exchanged to other viruses by gene reassortment. Combined immuno- and chemoprophylaxis may provide a more effective approach to the ultimate control of the disease. Most antiviral compounds have been selected by random screening in the laboratory. Application of more specific enzyme assays such as the virion-associated RNA transcriptase assays may produce other compounds with a defined mode of action - semi-rational chemotherapy. RNA and polypeptide sequence studies are in progress elsewhere to define transcription and translation initiation sites or virus adsorption sites. Such knowledge could lead to a new generation of antiviral compounds. Specific delivery of virus inhibitory compounds is an interesting problem. Liposomes are lipid spheres, and these have been used for the delivery of antiviral compounds. Images Fig. 3a. Fig. 3b. Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:461275

  10. Being 'rational' and being 'human': How National Health Service rationing decisions are constructed as rational by resource allocation panels.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jill; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2014-09-01

    The English National Health Service Constitution states that patients have the right to expect all decisions about access to medicines and treatments to be made 'rationally'. Rationality in health care can be framed as instrumental, institutional or practical. In this article, we present a case example from an ethnographic study of the work of 'Individual Funding Request' panels to explore how rationality is enacted and accounted for in deliberations about the rationing of health care in the National Health Service. Our rhetorical analysis highlights how an embodied, practical rationality emerges as a significant aspect of rationality in practice, but at the same time has a problematic status in formal accounts of decision-making. We suggest that being both 'human' and 'rational' is a 'delicate balance' and creates a dilemma for Individual Funding Request panels. Aristotle's notion of phronesis provides a useful lens for theorising our observation of panel deliberations, and we argue for greater attention to the value of narrative ethics in helping us understand the challenges faced by resource allocators. PMID:24287296

  11. Curved butterfly bileaflet prosthetic cardiac valve

    DOEpatents

    McQueen, David M.; Peskin, Charles S.

    1991-06-25

    An annular valve body having a central passageway for the flow of blood therethrough with two curved leaflets each of which is pivotally supported on an accentric positioned axis in the central passageway for moving between a closed position and an open position. The leaflets are curved in a plane normal to the eccentric axis and positioned with the convex side of the leaflets facing each other when the leaflets are in the open position. Various parameters such as the curvature of the leaflets, the location of the eccentric axis, and the maximum opening angle of the leaflets are optimized according to the following performance criteria: maximize the minimum peak velocity through the valve, maximize the net stroke volume, and minimize the mean forward pressure difference, thereby reducing thrombosis and improving the hemodynamic performance.

  12. Strong imploding shock - The representative curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishkin, E. A.; Alejaldre, C.

    1981-02-01

    The representative curve of the ideal gas behind the front of a spherically or cylindrically asymmetric strong imploding shock is derived. The partial differential equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations by the method of quasi-separation of variables, following which the reduced pressure and density as functions of the radius with respect to the shock front are explicit functions of coordinates defining the phase plane of the self-similar solution. The curve in phase space representing the state of the imploded gas behind the shock front is shown to pass through the point where the reduced pressure is maximum, which is located somewhat behind the shock front and ahead of the tail of the shock.

  13. Curved butterfly bileaflet prosthetic cardiac valve

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, D.M.; Peskin, C.S.

    1991-06-25

    An annular valve body having a central passageway for the flow of blood with two curved leaflets is described. Each of the leaflets is pivotally supported on an accentric positioned axis in the central passageway for moving between a closed position and an open position. The leaflets are curved in a plane normal to the eccentric axis and positioned with the convex side of the leaflets facing each other when the leaflets are in the open position. Various parameters such as the curvature of the leaflets, the location of the eccentric axis, and the maximum opening angle of the leaflets are optimized according to the following performance criteria: maximize the minimum peak velocity through the valve, maximize the net stroke volume, and minimize the mean forward pressure difference, thereby reducing thrombosis and improving the hemodynamic performance. 26 figures.

  14. On the equivariant algebraic Jacobian for curves of genus two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athorne, Chris

    2012-04-01

    We present a treatment of the algebraic description of the Jacobian of a generic genus two plane curve which exploits an SL2(k) equivariance and clarifies the structure of Flynn's 72 defining quadratic relations. The treatment is also applied to the Kummer variety.

  15. Sibling Curves 3: Imaginary Siblings and Tracing Complex Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Ansie; Engelbrecht, Johann

    2009-01-01

    Visualizing complex roots of a quadratic equation has been a quest since the inception of the Argand plane in the 1800s. Many algebraic and numerical methods exist for calculating complex roots of an equation, but few visual methods exist. Following on from papers by Harding and Engelbrecht (A. Harding and J. Engelbrecht, "Sibling curves and…

  16. Pleats in crystals on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Irvine, William T M; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Chaikin, Paul M

    2010-12-16

    Hexagons can easily tile a flat surface, but not a curved one. Introducing heptagons and pentagons (defects with topological charge) makes it easier to tile curved surfaces; for example, soccer balls based on the geodesic domes of Buckminster Fuller have exactly 12 pentagons (positive charges). Interacting particles that invariably form hexagonal crystals on a plane exhibit fascinating scarred defect patterns on a sphere. Here we show that, for more general curved surfaces, curvature may be relaxed by pleats: uncharged lines of dislocations (topological dipoles) that vanish on the surface and play the same role as fabric pleats. We experimentally investigate crystal order on surfaces with spatially varying positive and negative curvature. On cylindrical capillary bridges, stretched to produce negative curvature, we observe a sequence of transitions-consistent with our energetic calculations-from no defects to isolated dislocations, which subsequently proliferate and organize into pleats; finally, scars and isolated heptagons (previously unseen) appear. This fine control of crystal order with curvature will enable explorations of general theories of defects in curved spaces. From a practical viewpoint, it may be possible to engineer structures with curvature (such as waisted nanotubes and vaulted architecture) and to develop novel methods for soft lithography and directed self-assembly. PMID:21164482

  17. Design of large aperture focal plane shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-wen; Ma, Wen-li; Huang, Jin-long

    2012-09-01

    To satisfy the requirement of large telescope, a large aperture focal plane shutter with aperture size of φ200mm was researched and designed to realize, which could be started and stopped in a relative short time with precise position, and also the blades could open and close at the same time at any orientation. Timing-belts and stepper motors were adopted as the drive mechanism. Velocity and position of the stepper motors were controlled by the PWM pulse generated by DSP. Exponential curve is applied to control the velocity of the stepper motors to make the shutter start and stop in a short time. The closing/open time of shutter is 0.2s, which meets the performance requirements of large telescope properly.

  18. Traffic noise and the hyperbolic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, G.W. Warnick, C.M.

    2010-04-15

    We consider the problem of sound propagation in a wind. We note that the rays, as in the absence of a wind, are given by Fermat's principle and show how to map them to the trajectories of a charged particle moving in a magnetic field on a curved space. For the specific case of sound propagating in a stratified atmosphere with a small wind speed, we show that the corresponding particle moves in a constant magnetic field on the hyperbolic plane. In this way, we give a simple 'straightedge and compass' method to estimate the intensity of sound upwind and downwind. We construct Mach envelopes for moving sources. Finally, we relate the problem to that of finding null geodesics in a squashed anti-de Sitter spacetime and discuss the SO(3,1)xR symmetry of the problem from this point of view.

  19. Factorization with genus 2 curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosset, Romain

    2010-04-01

    The elliptic curve method (ECM) is one of the best factorization methods available. It is possible to use hyperelliptic curves instead of elliptic curves but it is in theory slower. We use special hyperelliptic curves and Kummer surfaces to reduce the complexity of the algorithm. Our implementation GMP-HECM is faster than GMP-ECM for factoring large numbers.

  20. [The rational diagnostic of cholangiocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Rydlo, Martin; Dvořáčková, Jana; Kupka, Tomáš; Klvaňa, Pavel; Havelka, Jaroslav; Uvírová, Magdalena; Geryk, Edvard; Czerný, Daniel; Jonszta, Tomáš; Bojková, Martina; Hrabovský, Vladimír; Jelínková, Veronika; Martínek, Arnošt; Dítě, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a rare malignant tumour arising from cholangiocytes, and its prognosis is usually unfavourable, mostly as a result of late diagnosis of the tumour. The current incidence of cholangiocarcinoma in the Czech Republic is 1.4/100,000 inhabitants per year; in less than 30 % of patients with CC, one of the known risk factors can be identified, most frequently, primary sclerosing cholangitis. Only patients with early diagnosed and surgically amenable cholangiocarcinoma are likely to have a longer survival time; in their case, survival for more than five years has been achieved in 20 % to 40 %. From the perspective of the need for early diagnosis of CC, a significant part is played by imaging and histopathologic evaluation; the early diagnostic significance of oncomarkers is limited. The rational early diagnosis of CC consists in effective use of differentiated advantages of different imaging modalities - MRI with DSA appears to be the optimal method, endosonography is a sensitive method for the identification of malignancy in the hepatic hilum or distal common bile duct, MRCP (magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) is used to display pathological changes in the biliary tree, ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) allows material removal for histopathological examination. Other new approaches are also beneficial, such as IDUS - intraductal ultrasonography of biliary tract or SPY-GLASS, enabling examination of the bile ducts by direct view with the possibility of taking targeted biopsies. Sensitivity and specificity of histology and cytology can be increased by using the molecular cytogenetic FISH method, i.e. fluorescence in situ by hybridization, with a specificity of 97 %. PMID:27172439

  1. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Atlas was developed to serve engineers who are looking for fatigue data on a particular metal or alloy. Having these curves compiled in a single book will also facilitate the computerization of the involved data. It is pointed out that plans are under way to make the data in this book available in ASCII files for analysis by computer programs. S-N curves which typify effects of major variables are considered along with low-carbon steels, medium-carbon steels, alloy steels, HSLA steels, high-strength alloy steels, heat-resisting steels, stainless steels, maraging steels, cast irons, and heat-resisting alloys. Attention is also given to aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, molybdenum, tin alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, steel castings, closed-die forgings, powder metallurgy parts, composites, effects of surface treatments, and test results for component parts.

  2. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  3. Spinal curves and scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    Scoliosis, an abnormal side-to-side curve of the spine with associated vertebral rotation, affects as many as 4% of all adolescents. Several different categories of scoliosis exist, and treatment can range from observation and follow-up to bracing and surgical correction. This article discusses special imaging series for scoliosis and emphasizes the need for proper radiation protection techniques for patients with scoliosis, most of whom are girls in their early to mid-teens. PMID:17848532

  4. Modeling magnetization curves in magnetic thin films with striped patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro Martínez, M.; Milano, J.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.; Bustingorry, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we study magnetic thin films presenting magnetic stripe patterns. A fingerprint of such domains is a linear behavior of the in-plane magnetization curves below a given saturation field. We present free energy models for the in-plane magnetization curves which permit us to extract key geometrical information about the stripe patterns, such as the maximum canted angle of the magnetization and the domain wall width. As an example, we discuss in this work magnetization curves for Fe1-x Ga x magnetic films which present a stripe pattern with a period of 160 nm and we found a typical maximum canted angle of {{85}{^\\circ}} and a domain wall width around 30 nm.

  5. The Stephan Curve revisited.

    PubMed

    Bowen, William H

    2013-01-01

    The Stephan Curve has played a dominant role in caries research over the past several decades. What is so remarkable about the Stephan Curve is the plethora of interactions it illustrates and yet acid production remains the dominant focus. Using sophisticated technology, it is possible to measure pH changes in plaque; however, these observations may carry a false sense of accuracy. Recent observations have shown that there may be multiple pH values within the plaque matrix, thus emphasizing the importance of the milieu within which acid is formed. Although acid production is indeed the immediate proximate cause of tooth dissolution, the influence of alkali production within plaque has received relative scant attention. Excessive reliance on Stephan Curve leads to describing foods as "safe" if they do not lower the pH below the so-called "critical pH" at which point it is postulated enamel dissolves. Acid production is just one of many biological processes that occur within plaque when exposed to sugar. Exploration of methods to enhance alkali production could produce rich research dividends. PMID:23224410

  6. Ankle moment generation and maximum-effort curved sprinting performance.

    PubMed

    Luo, Geng; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2012-11-15

    Turning at high speed along acute curves is crucial for athletic performance. One determinant of curved sprinting speed is the ground reaction force that can be created by the supporting limb; the moment generated at the ankle joint may influence such force generation. Body lean associated with curved sprints positions the ankle joints in extreme in-/eversion, and may hinder the ankle moment generation. To examine the influence of ankle moment generation on curved sprinting performance, 17 male subjects performed maximum-effort curved sprints in footwear with and without a wedge. The wedged footwear was constructed with the intention to align the ankle joints closer to their neutral frontal-plane configuration during counter-clockwise curved sprints so greater joint moments might be generated. We found, with the wedged footwear, the average eversion angle of the inside leg ankle was reduced, and the plantarflexion moment generation increased significantly. Meanwhile, the knee extension moment remained unchanged. With the wedged footwear, stance-average centripetal ground reaction force increased significantly while no difference in the vertical ground reaction force was detected. The subjects created a greater centripetal ground reaction impulse in the wedged footwear despite a shortened stance phase when compared to the control. Stance-average curved sprinting speed improved by 4.3% with the wedged footwear. The changes in ankle moment and curved sprinting speed observed in the current study supports the notion that the moment generation at the ankle joint may be a performance constraint for curved sprinting. PMID:23022207

  7. Rationing of health care: is there an economic rationality to it?

    PubMed

    Zweifel, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The point of departure of this Editorial is the fact that we all are engaged in self-rationing in our everyday lives. We would like to spend more money on all sorts of nice things and devote more time to our cherished activities. Imposed rationing is characteristic of wartime governments, who seek to prevent the rich from gobbling up the resources left by the army. Since the publication in 1987 of David Callahan's Setting Limits: Medical Goals in an Aging Society (Callahan, Setting limits: medical goals in an aging society, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1987), rationing of health care has become a widely debated issue (the Internet is full of pertinent entries). While rationing has also been addressed by health economists, there are three puzzling observations. First, Callahan (Callahan, Setting limits: medical goals in an aging society, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1987) wrote for an American audience whereas rationing was introduced by the British National Health Service (NHS) well before 1987, with little debate. Second, the economic theory of rationing had been laid out by James Tobin [Ectrica 20(4): 521-533, 1952] as early as 1952--but health economists seem to have neglected his groundwork when writing about rationing. Third, they accept government-imposed rationing as inevitable in the case of health care, as though the self-rationing alternative was unavailable. An attempt is made here to provide rational explanations for these puzzles. PMID:25847329

  8. Interactive visualizations of blowups of the plane.

    PubMed

    Schenzel, Peter; Stussak, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Blowups are an important technique in algebraic geometry that permit the smoothing of singular algebraic varieties. It is a challenge to visualize this process even in the case of blowups of points X in the affine plane AA(IR)(2). First results were obtained by Brodmann with the aid of the so-called toroidal blowup, a compact embedding of the blowup into affine 3-space. In fact, Brodmann provides a rational parametrization of the toroidal blowup, but its visualization fails in the neighborhood of X because the parametrization tends to indefinite terms of the form 0/0. Our approach is based on implicitization of the parametric form. By methods from commutative algebra we are able to reduce the implicitization to the computation of a single, fairly simple resultant. This provides an algebraic equation of the implicit surface of the toroidal blowup including the so-called exceptional fiber associated with X. Surprisingly, the degree of the equation grows only linearly with the degree of the parametrization. By applying additional clipping techniques to the implicit surface we are able to visualize the toroidal blowup as well as its deformations by several parameters interactively in real time using GPU-based ray casting techniques. The methods of the paper provide insights in the structure of blowups of points, even if the points are interactively moved or tend to degenerations. PMID:22802122

  9. Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve belonging to the Bertrand curves pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenyurt, Süleyman; Altun, Yasin; Cevahir, Ceyda

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve which drawn by the unit Darboux vector of the Bertrand partner curve. Some results have been obtained. These results were expressed as the depends Bertrand curve.

  10. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  11. Pandemic Ventilator Rationing and Appeals Processes

    PubMed Central

    Patrone, Daniel; Resnik, David

    2014-01-01

    In a severe influenza pandemic, hospitals will likely experience serious and widespread shortages of patient pulmonary ventilators and of staff qualified to operate them. Deciding who will receive access to mechanical ventilation will often determine who lives and who dies. This prospect raises an important question whether pandemic preparedness plans should include some process by which individuals affected by ventilator rationing would have the opportunity to appeal adverse decisions. However, the issue of appeals processes to ventilator rationing decisions has been largely neglected in state pandemic planning efforts. If we are to devise just and effective plans for coping with a severe influenza pandemic, more attention to the issue of appeals processes for pandemic ventilator rationing decisions is needed. Arguments for and against appeals processes are considered, and some suggestions are offered to help efforts at devising more rational pandemic preparedness plans. PMID:20354793

  12. Orthogonal rational functions and tridiagonal matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultheel, A.; González-Vera, P.; Hendriksen, E.; Njåstad, O.

    2003-04-01

    We study the recurrence relation for rational functions whose poles are in a prescribed sequence of numbers that are real or infinite and that are orthogonal with respect to an Hermitian positive linear functional. We especially discuss the interplay between finite and infinite poles. The recurrence relation will also be described in terms of a tridiagonal matrix which is a generalization of the Jacobi. matrix of the polynomial situation which corresponds to placing all the poles at infinity. This matrix not only describes the recurrence relation, but it can be used to give a determinant expression for the orthogonal rational functions and it also allows for the formulation of a generalized eigenvalue problem whose eigenvalues are the zeros of an orthogonal rational function. These nodes can be used in rational Gauss-type quadrature formulas and the corresponding weights can be obtained from the first components of the corresponding eigenvectors.

  13. Rationality and allocating scarce medical resources.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, R P

    1995-02-01

    In an article titled, "Who Shall Live When Not All Can?", James Childress proposes a system for allocating scarce lifesaving medical resources based on random selection procedures. Childress writes of random selection procedures, [They] "cannot be dismissed as a 'non-rational' and 'non-human' ...without an inquiry into the reasons, including human values which might justify it." My thesis is that once we concentrate on determining the rationality of random selection procedures, we will see that Childress's claim that we cannot dismiss such procedures as 'non-rational' is open to question. My claim will be that while both random selection and social worth procedures are rationally defensible systems, random selection procedures easily lead to specific choices that are objectively irrational, apart from the limited perspective of the random selection process itself. PMID:7738457

  14. Skyrmions, rational maps, and scaling identities

    SciTech Connect

    Charalampidis, E. G.; Ioannidou, T. A.; Manton, N. S.

    2011-03-15

    Starting from approximate Skyrmion solutions obtained using the rational map ansatz, improved approximate Skyrmions are constructed using scaling arguments. Although the energy improvement is small, the change of shape clarifies whether the true Skyrmions are more oblate or prolate.

  15. Validation Testing of the Rational Behavior Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteman, Victor L.; Shorkey, Clayton T.

    1978-01-01

    The validity of the Rational Behavior Inventory was investigated by examining its relationship with four other measures of personality in addition to class standing and age. Results supported the validity of the measure. (JKS)

  16. A framework for rationing by clinical judgment.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Samia A; Danis, Marion

    2007-09-01

    Although rationing by clinical judgment is controversial, its acceptability partly depends on how it is practiced. In this paper, rationing by clinical judgment is defined in three different circumstances that represent increasingly wider circles of resource pools in which the rationing decision takes place: triage during acute shortage, comparison to other potential patients in a context of limited but not immediately strained resources, and determination of whether expected benefit of an intervention is deemed sufficient to warrant its cost by reference to published population based thresholds. Notions of procedural justice are applied along with an analytical framework of six minimal requisites in order to facilitate fair bedside rationing: (1) a closed system that offers reciprocity, (2) attention to general concerns of justice, (3) respect for individual variations, (4) application of a consistent process, (5) explicitness, and (6) review of decisions. The process could be monitored for its applicability and appropriateness. PMID:18210983

  17. Determining the pivotal plane of fluid lipid membranes in simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Deserno, Markus

    2015-10-28

    Each leaflet of a curved lipid membrane contains a surface at which the area strain vanishes, the so-called pivotal plane. Its distance z0 from the bilayer's midplane arises in numerous contexts, for instance the connection between monolayer and bilayer moduli, stress-profile moments, or area-difference elasticity theories. Here, we propose two precise methods for determining the location of the pivotal plane in computer simulations, both of which rely on monitoring the lipid imbalance across a curved bilayer. The first method considers the ratio of lipid number between the two leaflets of cylindrical or spherical vesicles; it hence requires lipid flip-flop for equilibration. The second method looks at the leaflet difference across local sections cut out from a buckled membrane; this observable equilibrates even in the absence of flip-flop. We apply our methods to two different coarse-grained lipid models, the generic three-bead solvent-free Cooke model and a ten-bead representation of dimyristoylphosphocholine with the explicit solvent MARTINI model. The Cooke model is amenable to both methods and gives results that agree at the percent level. Using it, we also show that the pivotal plane moves outward as lipid curvature becomes more positive. The MARTINI model can only be analyzed with the buckling method; the obtained value z0 = 0.850(11) nm lies about 0.4 nm inwards of the glycerol backbone and is hence unexpectedly small. We attribute this to limitations of the coarse-grained description, suggesting that the location of the pivotal plane might be a good indicator for how well lipid models capture the microscopic origins of curvature elasticity. Finally, we also show that the pivotal plane position itself moves as the membrane is bent. The leading correction is linear in curvature, dependent on the Poisson ratio, and can matter when analyzing experimental results obtained from highly curved inverse hexagonal phases. PMID:26520500

  18. Determining the pivotal plane of fluid lipid membranes in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Deserno, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Each leaflet of a curved lipid membrane contains a surface at which the area strain vanishes, the so-called pivotal plane. Its distance z0 from the bilayer's midplane arises in numerous contexts, for instance the connection between monolayer and bilayer moduli, stress-profile moments, or area-difference elasticity theories. Here, we propose two precise methods for determining the location of the pivotal plane in computer simulations, both of which rely on monitoring the lipid imbalance across a curved bilayer. The first method considers the ratio of lipid number between the two leaflets of cylindrical or spherical vesicles; it hence requires lipid flip-flop for equilibration. The second method looks at the leaflet difference across local sections cut out from a buckled membrane; this observable equilibrates even in the absence of flip-flop. We apply our methods to two different coarse-grained lipid models, the generic three-bead solvent-free Cooke model and a ten-bead representation of dimyristoylphosphocholine with the explicit solvent MARTINI model. The Cooke model is amenable to both methods and gives results that agree at the percent level. Using it, we also show that the pivotal plane moves outward as lipid curvature becomes more positive. The MARTINI model can only be analyzed with the buckling method; the obtained value z0 = 0.850(11) nm lies about 0.4 nm inwards of the glycerol backbone and is hence unexpectedly small. We attribute this to limitations of the coarse-grained description, suggesting that the location of the pivotal plane might be a good indicator for how well lipid models capture the microscopic origins of curvature elasticity. Finally, we also show that the pivotal plane position itself moves as the membrane is bent. The leading correction is linear in curvature, dependent on the Poisson ratio, and can matter when analyzing experimental results obtained from highly curved inverse hexagonal phases.

  19. Quantum Curves for Hitchin Fibrations and the Eynard-Orantin Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Olivia; Mulase, Motohico

    2014-06-01

    We generalize the topological recursion of Eynard-Orantin (JHEP 0612:053, 2006; Commun Number Theory Phys 1:347-452, 2007) to the family of spectral curves of Hitchin fibrations. A spectral curve in the topological recursion, which is defined to be a complex plane curve, is replaced with a generic curve in the cotangent bundle T* C of an arbitrary smooth base curve C. We then prove that these spectral curves are quantizable, using the new formalism. More precisely, we construct the canonical generators of the formal -deformation family of D modules over an arbitrary projective algebraic curve C of genus greater than 1, from the geometry of a prescribed family of smooth Hitchin spectral curves associated with the -character variety of the fundamental group π1( C). We show that the semi-classical limit through the WKB approximation of these -deformed D modules recovers the initial family of Hitchin spectral curves.

  20. Connectivity of Julia Sets for Singularly Perturbed Rational Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaney, Robert L.; Russell, Elizabeth D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we consider the family of rational maps of the form Fλ(z) = zn + λ/zn where n ≥ 2. It is known that there are two cases where the Julia sets of these maps are not connected. If the critical values of Fλ lie in the basin of ∞, then the Julia set is a Cantor set. And if the critical values lie in the preimage of the basin surrounding the pole at 0, then the Julia set is a Cantor set of concentric simple closed curves around the origin. We prove in this paper that, in all other cases, the Julia set of Fλ is a connected set.

  1. Nanoindentation on the doubler plane of KDP single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoguang, Guo; Xiaoji, Zhang; Xianzhao, Tang; Dongming, Guo; Hang, Gao; Xiaoji, Teng

    2013-03-01

    The nanohardness is from 1.44 to 2.61 GPa, the Vickers hardness is from 127 to 252 Vickers, and elastic modulus is from 52 to 123 GPa by the nanoindentation experiments on the doubler plane of KDP crystal. An indentation size effect is observed on the doubler plane in the test as the nanohardness and elastic modulus decreases with the increase of the maximum load. Slippage is identified as the major mode of plastic deformation, and pop-in events are attributed to the initiation of slippage. And the variation of unloading curve end is the result of stick effects between the indenter and the contact surface. The depth of the elastic deformation, which is between 40 and 75 nm, is responsible for the elastic deformation. The doubler plane of KDP crystal has anisotropy, and the relative anisotropy of nanohardness is 8.2% and the relative anisotropy of elastic modulus is 8.0%.

  2. Intergroup Conflict and Rational Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Tur, Vicente; Peñarroja, Vicente; Serrano, Miguel A.; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Moliner, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia; Alacreu-Crespo, Adrián; Gracia, Esther; Molina, Agustín

    2014-01-01

    The literature has been relatively silent about post-conflict processes. However, understanding the way humans deal with post-conflict situations is a challenge in our societies. With this in mind, we focus the present study on the rationality of cooperative decision making after an intergroup conflict, i.e., the extent to which groups take advantage of post-conflict situations to obtain benefits from collaborating with the other group involved in the conflict. Based on dual-process theories of thinking and affect heuristic, we propose that intergroup conflict hinders the rationality of cooperative decision making. We also hypothesize that this rationality improves when groups are involved in an in-group deliberative discussion. Results of a laboratory experiment support the idea that intergroup conflict –associated with indicators of the activation of negative feelings (negative affect state and heart rate)– has a negative effect on the aforementioned rationality over time and on both group and individual decision making. Although intergroup conflict leads to sub-optimal decision making, rationality improves when groups and individuals subjected to intergroup conflict make decisions after an in-group deliberative discussion. Additionally, the increased rationality of the group decision making after the deliberative discussion is transferred to subsequent individual decision making. PMID:25461384

  3. The solar system's invariable plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souami, D.; Souchay, J.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The dynamics of solar system objects, such as dwarf planets and asteroids, has become a well-established field of celestial mechanics in the past thirty years, owing to the improvements that have been made in observational techniques and numerical studies. In general, the ecliptic is taken as the reference plane in these studies, although there is no dynamical reason for doing so. In contrast, the invariable plane as originally defined by Laplace, seems to be a far more natural choice. In this context, the latest study of this plane dates back to Burkhardt. Aims: We define and determine the orientation of the invariable plane of the solar system with respect to both the ICRF and the equinox-ecliptic of J2000.0, and evaluate the accuracy of our determination. Methods: Using the long-term numerical ephemerides DE405, DE406, and INPOP10a over their entire available time span, we computed the total angular momentum of the solar system, as well as the individual contribution to it made by each of the planets, the dwarf planets Pluto and Ceres, and the two asteroids Pallas and Vesta. We then deduced the orientation of the invariable plane from these ephemerides. Results: We update the previous results on the determination of the orientation of the invariable plane with more accurate data, and a more complete analysis of the problem, taking into account the effect of the dwarf planet (1) Ceres as well as two of the biggest asteroids, (4) Vesta and (2) Pallas. We show that the inclusion of these last three bodies significantly improves the accuracy of determination of the invariable plane, whose orientation over a 100 y interval does not vary more than 0.1 mas in inclination, and 0.3 mas in longitude of the ascending node. Moreover, we determine the individual contributions of each body to the total angular momentum of the solar system, as well as the inclination and longitude of the node with respect to this latter plane. Conclusions: Owing to the high accuracy

  4. Anterior Overgrowth in Primary Curves, Compensatory Curves and Junctional Segments in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    van Stralen, Marijn; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Ng, Bobby K. W.; Vincken, Koen L.; Cheng, Jack C. Y.; Castelein, René M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although much attention has been given to the global three-dimensional aspect of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the accurate three-dimensional morphology of the primary and compensatory curves, as well as the intervening junctional segments, in the scoliotic spine has not been described before. Methods A unique series of 77 AIS patients with high-resolution CT scans of the spine, acquired for surgical planning purposes, were included and compared to 22 healthy controls. Non-idiopathic curves were excluded. Endplate segmentation and local longitudinal axis in endplate plane enabled semi-automatic geometric analysis of the complete three-dimensional morphology of the spine, taking inter-vertebral rotation, intra-vertebral torsion and coronal and sagittal tilt into account. Intraclass correlation coefficients for interobserver reliability were 0.98–1.00. Coronal deviation, axial rotation and the exact length discrepancies in the reconstructed sagittal plane, as defined per vertebra and disc, were analyzed for each primary and compensatory curve as well as for the junctional segments in-between. Results The anterior-posterior difference of spinal length, based on “true” anterior and posterior points on endplates, was +3.8% for thoracic and +9.4% for (thoraco)lumbar curves, while the junctional segments were almost straight. This differed significantly from control group thoracic kyphosis (-4.1%; P<0.001) and lumbar lordosis (+7.8%; P<0.001). For all primary as well as compensatory curves, we observed linear correlations between the coronal Cobb angle, axial rotation and the anterior-posterior length difference (r≥0.729 for thoracic curves; r≥0.485 for (thoraco)lumbar curves). Conclusions Excess anterior length of the spine in AIS has been described as a generalized growth disturbance, causing relative anterior spinal overgrowth. This study is the first to demonstrate that this anterior overgrowth is not a generalized phenomenon. It is

  5. Automatic location of microscopic focal planes for computerized stereology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elozory, Daniel T.; Bonam, Om Pavithra; Kramer, Kurt; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Mangual, Osvaldo; Mouton, Peter R.

    2011-03-01

    When applying design-based stereology to biological tissue, there are two primary applications for an auto-focusing function in the software of computerized stereology system. The system must first locate the in-focus optical planes at the upper and lower surfaces of stained tissue sections, thus identifying the top and bottom as well as the thickness of the tissue. Second, the system must find the start and end along the Z-axis of stained objects within a Z-stack of images through tissue sections. In contrast to traditional autofocus algorithms that seek a global maximum or peak on the focus curve, the goal of this study was to find the two "knees" of the focus curve that represent the "just out-of-focus" focal planes. The upper surface of the tissue section is defined as the image just before focus is detected moving down the Z-stack. Continuing down, the lower surface is defined as the first image of the last set of adjacent images where focus is no longer detected. The performance of seven focus algorithms in locating the top and bottom focal planes of tissue sections was analyzed by comparing each algorithm on 34 Z-stacks including a total of 828 images. The Thresholded Absolute Gradient algorithm outperformed all others, correctly identifying the top or bottom focal plane within an average of 1 μm on the training data as well as the test data.

  6. A program to compute EM scattering of plane wave by a perfectly conducting half-plane in a finitely conducting layered half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Dhanasekaran, P.; Poddar, M.

    A FORTRAN program utilizing an integral equation calculates 10 field quantities relating to the electromagnetic (EM) scattering of plane wave by a perfectly conducting half-plane buried in a finitely conducting layered half-space. The computing algorithm is executable on a computer of small storage capacity such as PDP 11/40 and as such is useful to many exploration scientists without the facility of a mainframe computer, for computing model curves to interpret field data.

  7. Navigating solid medical images by pencils of sectioning planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookstein, Fred L.; Athey, Brian D.; Green, William D. K.; Wetzel, Arthur W.

    2000-10-01

    Beyond their involvement in ordinary surface rendering, the boundaries of organs in medical images have differential properties that make them quite useful for quantitative understanding. In particular, their geometry affords a framework for navigating the original solid, representing its R3 contents quite flexibility as multiple pseudovolumes R2 x T, where T is ar eal-valued parameter standing for screen time. A navigation is a smoothly parameterized series of image sections characterized by normal direction, centerpoint, scale and orientation. Such filmstrips represent a radical generalization of conventional medical image dynamics. The lances encountered in these navigations can be represented by constructs from classic differential geometry. Sequences of plane sections can be formalized as continuous pencils of planes, sets of cardinality (infinity) 1 that are sometimes explicitly characterized by a real-value parameter and sometimes defined implicitly as the intersection (curve of common elements) of a pair of bundles of (infinity) 2 planes. An example of the first type of navigation is the pencil of planes through the tangent line at one point of a curve; of the second type, the cone of planes through a point tangent to a surface. The further enhancements of centering, orienting, and rescaling in the medical context are intended to leave landmark points or boundary intersections invariant on the screen. Edgewarp, a publicly available software package, allows free play with pencils of planes like these as they section one single enormous medical data resource, the Visible Human data sets from the National Library of Medicine. This paper argues the relative merits of such visualizations over conventional surface-rendered flybys for understanding and communication of associated anatomical knowledge.

  8. When Is a Bernstein-bezier Curve the Graph of a Function?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    The question of determining when a Bernstein-Bezier cubic curve in the plane can be represented as the graph of function in some fixed orthogonal coordinate system is considered. The notion of a curve being monotone in a given direction is introduced to aid in the analysis.

  9. The Characteristic Curves of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Arnold; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2016-09-01

    In 1960, E. H. Brown defined a set of characteristic curves (also known as ideal curves) of pure fluids, along which some thermodynamic properties match those of an ideal gas. These curves are used for testing the extrapolation behaviour of equations of state. This work is revisited, and an elegant representation of the first-order characteristic curves as level curves of a master function is proposed. It is shown that Brown's postulate—that these curves are unique and dome-shaped in a double-logarithmic p, T representation—may fail for fluids exhibiting a density anomaly. A careful study of the Amagat curve (Joule inversion curve) generated from the IAPWS-95 reference equation of state for water reveals the existence of an additional branch.

  10. A heuristic for the distribution of point counts for random curves over a finite field

    PubMed Central

    Achter, Jeffrey D.; Erman, Daniel; Kedlaya, Kiran S.; Wood, Melanie Matchett; Zureick-Brown, David

    2015-01-01

    How many rational points are there on a random algebraic curve of large genus g over a given finite field ? We propose a heuristic for this question motivated by a (now proven) conjecture of Mumford on the cohomology of moduli spaces of curves; this heuristic suggests a Poisson distribution with mean q+1+1/(q−1). We prove a weaker version of this statement in which g and q tend to infinity, with q much larger than g. PMID:25802415

  11. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  12. Plane waves as tractor beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that in a large class of systems, plane waves act as tractor beams: i.e., an incident plane wave can exert a pulling force on the scatterer. The underlying physical mechanism for the pulling force is due to the sufficiently strong scattering of the incoming wave into another mode carrying more momentum, in which case excess momentum is created behind the scatterer. This tractor beam or negative radiation pressure (NRP) effect, is found to be generic in systems with multiple scattering channels. In a birefringent medium, electromagnetic plane waves incident on a thin plate exert NRP of the same order of magnitude as optical radiation pressure, while in artificial dielectrics (metamaterials), the magnitude of NRP can even be macroscopic. In two dimensions, we study various scattering situations on vortices, and NRP is shown to occur by the scattering of heavy baryons into light leptons off cosmic strings, and by neutron scattering off vortices in the XY model.

  13. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  14. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  15. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. The Laplace Planes of Uranus and Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite orbits close to an oblate planet precess about its equatorial plane, while distant satellites precess around the plane of the planet's heliocentric orbit. In between, satellites in nearly circular orbits precess about a warped intermediate surface called the Laplace 'plane.' Herein we derive general formulas for locating the Laplace plane. Because Uranus and Pluto have high obliquities, their Laplace planes are severely warped. We present maps of these Laplace planes, of interest in telescopic searches for new satellites. The Laplace plane of the Solar System as a whole is similarly distorted, but comets in the inner Oort cloud precess too slowly to sense the Laplace plane.

  17. Plane waves in noncommutative fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, M. C. B.; Holender, L.; Santos, M. A.; Vancea, I. V.

    2013-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the noncommutative fluid in the Snyder space perturbatively at the first order in powers of the noncommutative parameter. The linearized noncommutative fluid dynamics is described by a system of coupled linear partial differential equations in which the variables are the fluid density and the fluid potentials. We show that these equations admit a set of solutions that are monochromatic plane waves for the fluid density and two of the potentials and a linear function for the third potential. The energy-momentum tensor of the plane waves is calculated.

  18. Space-Plane Spreadsheet Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale

    1993-01-01

    Basic Hypersonic Data and Equations (HYPERDATA) spreadsheet computer program provides data gained from three analyses of performance of space plane. Equations used to perform analyses derived from Newton's second law of physics, derivation included. First analysis is parametric study of some basic factors affecting ability of space plane to reach orbit. Second includes calculation of thickness of spherical fuel tank. Third produces ratio between volume of fuel and total mass for each of various aircraft. HYPERDATA intended for use on Macintosh(R) series computers running Microsoft Excel 3.0.

  19. Dilemmas in rationing health care services: the case for implicit rationing.

    PubMed Central

    Mechanic, D.

    1995-01-01

    With tension between the demand for health services and the cost of providing them, rationing is increasingly evident in all medical systems. Until recently, rationing was primarily through the ability to pay or achieved implicitly by doctors working within fixed budgets. Such forms of rationing are commonly alleged to be inequitable and inefficient and explicit rationing is advocated as more appropriate. Utilisation management in the United States and quasi-markets separating purchasing from provision in the United Kingdom are seen as ways of using resources more efficiently and are increasingly explicit. There is also advocacy to ration explicitly at the point of service. Mechanic reviews the implications of these developments and explains why explicit approaches are likely to focus conflict and dissatisfaction and be politically unstable. Explicit rationing is unlikely to be as equitable as its proponents argue and is likely to make dissatisfaction and perceived deprivation more salient. Despite its limitations, implicit rationing at the point of service is more sensitive to the complexity of medical decisions and the needs and personal and cultural preferences of patients. All systems use a mix of rationing devices, but the clinical allocation of services should substantially depend on the discretion of professionals informed by practice guidelines, outcomes research, and other informational aids. Images p1657-a p1659-a PMID:7795458

  20. Section curve reconstruction and mean-camber curve extraction of a point-sampled blade surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-long; Xie, He; Li, Qi-dong; Zhou, Li-ping; Yin, Zhou-ping

    2014-01-01

    The blade is one of the most critical parts of an aviation engine, and a small change in the blade geometry may significantly affect the dynamics performance of the aviation engine. Rapid advancements in 3D scanning techniques have enabled the inspection of the blade shape using a dense and accurate point cloud. This paper proposes a new method to achieving two common tasks in blade inspection: section curve reconstruction and mean-camber curve extraction with the representation of a point cloud. The mathematical morphology is expanded and applied to restrain the effect of the measuring defects and generate an ordered sequence of 2D measured points in the section plane. Then, the energy and distance are minimized to iteratively smoothen the measured points, approximate the section curve and extract the mean-camber curve. In addition, a turbine blade is machined and scanned to observe the curvature variation, energy variation and approximation error, which demonstrates the availability of the proposed method. The proposed method is simple to implement and can be applied in aviation casting-blade finish inspection, large forging-blade allowance inspection and visual-guided robot grinding localization. PMID:25551467

  1. Section Curve Reconstruction and Mean-Camber Curve Extraction of a Point-Sampled Blade Surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-long; Xie, He; Li, Qi-dong; Zhou, Li-ping; Yin, Zhou-ping

    2014-01-01

    The blade is one of the most critical parts of an aviation engine, and a small change in the blade geometry may significantly affect the dynamics performance of the aviation engine. Rapid advancements in 3D scanning techniques have enabled the inspection of the blade shape using a dense and accurate point cloud. This paper proposes a new method to achieving two common tasks in blade inspection: section curve reconstruction and mean-camber curve extraction with the representation of a point cloud. The mathematical morphology is expanded and applied to restrain the effect of the measuring defects and generate an ordered sequence of 2D measured points in the section plane. Then, the energy and distance are minimized to iteratively smoothen the measured points, approximate the section curve and extract the mean-camber curve. In addition, a turbine blade is machined and scanned to observe the curvature variation, energy variation and approximation error, which demonstrates the availability of the proposed method. The proposed method is simple to implement and can be applied in aviation casting-blade finish inspection, large forging-blade allowance inspection and visual-guided robot grinding localization. PMID:25551467

  2. Structured eigenvalue problems for rational gauss quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasino, Dario; Gemignani, Luca

    2007-08-01

    The connection between Gauss quadrature rules and the algebraic eigenvalue problem for a Jacobi matrix was first exploited in the now classical paper by Golub and Welsch (Math. Comput. 23(106), 221?230, 1969). From then on many computational problems arising in the construction of (polynomial) Gauss quadrature formulas have been reduced to solving direct and inverse eigenvalue problems for symmetric tridiagonals. Over the last few years (rational) generalizations of the classical Gauss quadrature formulas have been studied, i.e., formulas integrating exactly in spaces of rational functions. This paper wants to illustrate that stable and efficient procedures based on structured numerical linear algebra techniques can also be devised for the solution of the eigenvalue problems arising in the field of rational Gauss quadrature.

  3. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  4. Partition of perceived space within the fusional area on the basis of apparent fronto-parallel plane criterion.

    PubMed

    Drobe, B; Monot, A

    1997-07-01

    The relationship between visual space and physical space was investigated by means of the apparent fronto-parallel plane percept. A set of curves in physical space, corresponding to fronto-parallel planes perceived in front or behind a given fixation point, was determined. The curvature at the apex of these curves follows a hyperbolic law that depends on the distance between the perceived plane and the fixation point. Our results are interpreted by distinguishing absolute disparity, which sets the position of the perceived plane, from relative disparity measured by adjusting in this plane eccentric vertical lines. We show that Foley's model, which interprets the shape of the apparent fronto-parallel planes on the mis-evaluation of egocentric distance, works for absolute disparity judgements, but seems to be inadequate for relative disparity judgements in our experimental conditions. PMID:9390378

  5. Rationality: a social-epistemology perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vanpoucke, Danny E. P.; Douven, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Both in philosophy and in psychology, human rationality has traditionally been studied from an “individualistic” perspective. Recently, social epistemologists have drawn attention to the fact that epistemic interactions among agents also give rise to important questions concerning rationality. In previous work, we have used a formal model to assess the risk that a particular type of social-epistemic interactions lead agents with initially consistent belief states into inconsistent belief states. Here, we continue this work by investigating the dynamics to which these interactions may give rise in the population as a whole. PMID:24994987

  6. An Atlas for Interpreting γ-Ray Pulsar Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, Kyle P.; Romani, Roger W.; Weltevrede, Patrick; Johnston, Simon

    2009-04-01

    We have simulated a population of young spin-powered pulsars and computed the beaming pattern and light curves for the three main geometrical models: polar-cap emission, two-pole caustic ("slot gap") emission and outer-magnetosphere emission. The light curve shapes depend sensitively on the magnetic inclination α and viewing angle ζ. We present the results as maps of observables such as peak multiplicity and γ-ray peak separation in the (α, ζ) plane. These diagrams can be used to locate allowed regions for radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars and to convert observed fluxes to true all-sky emission.

  7. Bimetallic PtxCoy nanoparticles with curved faces for highly efficient hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yan; Zhao, Yonghui; Wu, Panpan; Yang, Bo; Yang, Nating; Zhu, Yan

    2016-05-01

    The control of the curved structure of bimetallic nanocrystals is a challenge, due to the rate differential for atom deposition and surface diffusion of alien atomic species on specific crystallographic planes of seeds. Herein, we report how to tune the degree of concavity of bimetallic PtxCoy concave nanoparticles using carboxylic acids as surfactants with an oleylamine system, leading to the specific crystallographic planes being exposed. The terminal carboxylic acids with a bridge ring or a benzene ring serving as structure regulators could direct the formation of curved faces with exposed high-index facets, and long-chain saturated fatty acids favored the production of curved faces with exposed low-index facets, while long-chain olefin acids alone benefited the formation of a flat surface with exposed low-index planes. Furthermore, these PtxCoy particles with curved faces displayed superior catalytic behaviour to cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation when compared with PtxCoy with flat faces. PtxCoy nanoparticles with curved faces exhibited over 6-fold increase in catalytic activity compared to PtxNiy nanoparticles with curved faces, and near 40-fold activity increase was observed in comparison with PtxFey nanoparticles with curved faces.The control of the curved structure of bimetallic nanocrystals is a challenge, due to the rate differential for atom deposition and surface diffusion of alien atomic species on specific crystallographic planes of seeds. Herein, we report how to tune the degree of concavity of bimetallic PtxCoy concave nanoparticles using carboxylic acids as surfactants with an oleylamine system, leading to the specific crystallographic planes being exposed. The terminal carboxylic acids with a bridge ring or a benzene ring serving as structure regulators could direct the formation of curved faces with exposed high-index facets, and long-chain saturated fatty acids favored the production of curved faces with exposed low-index facets, while long

  8. Optimization of starshades: focal plane versus pupil plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamary, R.; Aime, C.

    2014-09-01

    We search for the best possible transmission for an external occulter coronagraph that is dedicated to the direct observation of terrestrial exoplanets. We show that better observation conditions are obtained when the flux in the focal plane is minimized in the zone in which the exoplanet is observed, instead of for the total flux received by the telescope. We describe the transmission of the occulter as a sum of basis functions. For each element of the basis, we numerically computed the Fresnel diffraction at the aperture of the telescope and the complex amplitude at its focus. The basis functions are circular disks that are linearly apodized over a few centimeters (truncated cones). We complemented the numerical calculation of the Fresnel diffraction for these functions by a comparison with pure circular disks (cylinder) for which an analytical expression, based on a decomposition in Lommel series, is available. The technique of deriving the optimal transmission for a given spectral bandwidth is a classical regularized quadratic minimization of intensities, but linear optimizations can be used as well. Minimizing the integrated intensity on the aperture of the telescope or for selected regions of the focal plane leads to slightly different transmissions for the occulter. For the focal plane optimization, the resulting residual intensity is concentrated behind the geometrical image of the occulter, in a blind region for the observation of an exoplanet, and the level of background residual starlight becomes very low outside this image. Finally, we provide a tolerance analysis for the alignment of the occulter to the telescope, which also favors the focal plane optimization. This means that telescope offsets of a few decimeters do not strongly reduce the efficiency of the occulter.

  9. Curved laser microjet in near field.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Stafeev, Sergey S; Kovalev, Alexey A

    2013-06-20

    With the use of the finite-difference time-domain-based simulation and a scanning near-field optical microscope that has a metal cantilever tip, the diffraction of a linearly polarized plane wave of wavelength λ by a glass corner step of height 2λ is shown to generate a low divergence laser jet of a root-parabolic form: over a distance of 4.7λ on the optical axis, the beam path is shifted by 2.1λ. The curved laser jet of the FWHM length depth of focus=9.5λ has the diameter FWHM=1.94λ over the distance 5.5λ, and the intensity maximum is 5 times higher than the incident wave intensity. The discrepancy between the analytical and the experimental results amounts to 11%. PMID:23842153

  10. Out-of-Plane Deflections as a Diagnostic Tool and Application to PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco

    2001-02-01

    We derive simplified formulae that relate the ''out-of-plane'' beam-beam deflections of colliding e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams, to the off-diagonal entry of the {Sigma}-matrix expressing the convoluted beam sizes. These formulae can be used to fit measured deflection curves and extract information about the relative tilt angle of two colliding bunches in the transverse plane.

  11. Expressive Thought and Non-Rational Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Richard F.

    A significant problem with inquiry teaching is that too much emphasis is placed on inquiry as a logical, scientific, and rational way of knowing. Feelings and mood are rarely dealt with except in rather off-handed remarks about intuitive leaps and creative encounters. Few consider what a model of inquiry based on mood and feeling might look like.…

  12. Rational Landen transformations on mathbb{R}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Dante; Moll, Victor H.

    2007-12-01

    The Landen transformation (a,b) mapsto ( (a+b)/2,sqrt{ab} ) preserves the value of an elliptic integral, and its iteration produces the classical arithmetic-geometric mean AGM (a,b) . We present analogous transformations for rational functions integrated over the whole real line.

  13. The Assessment of Rational Thinking: IQ ? RQ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Keith E.; West, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    In this article the authors argue that distinguishing between rationality and intelligence helps explain how people can be, at the same time, intelligent and irrational (Stanovich, 2009). As such, researchers need to study separately the individual differences in cognitive skills that underlie intelligence and the individual differences in…

  14. Solving Rational Expectations Models Using Excel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strulik, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Simple problems of discrete-time optimal control can be solved using a standard spreadsheet software. The employed-solution method of backward iteration is intuitively understandable, does not require any programming skills, and is easy to implement so that it is suitable for classroom exercises with rational-expectations models. The author…

  15. RATIONALIZATION OF THE RURAL-URBAN MIGRATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MIRENGOFF, WILLIAM

    ALTHOUGH THE PATTERN OF RURAL TO URBAN MIGRATION IS BEGINNING TO SUBSIDE, THE PROBLEMS OF EMPLOYMENT FACED BY THESE RURAL MIGRANTS ARE CONTINUING. PROGRAMS TO DEAL EFFECTIVELY WITH THEIR RELOCATION AND EMPLOYMENT HAVE NOT BEEN DEVISED, AND EFFORTS TO DATE HAVE BEEN CURATIVE RATHER THAN PREVENTIVE. A PRACTICAL WAY TO RATIONALIZE THE RURAL-URBAN…

  16. Opinion Expression as a Rational Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sei-Hill

    This study looks at individuals' opinion expressions as a rational behavior based on a conscious calculus of expected benefits and costs (economic analysis). The influences of "issue benefit,""opinion congruence," and "issue knowledge," as sources of benefits and costs on opinion expression were hypothesized and tested. The study also examined the…

  17. Imitation in Infancy: Rational or Motor Resonance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulus, Markus; Hunnius, Sabine; Vissers, Marlies; Bekkering, Harold

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the contribution of 2 mechanisms to imitation in infancy. The principle of rational action suggests that infants normatively evaluate the efficiency of observed actions. In contrast, it has been proposed that motor resonance (i.e., the mapping of others' actions onto one's own motor repertoire) plays a central role…

  18. Rational Suggestions for Pre-Marital Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, J.D.; Henning, Lawrence H.

    1981-01-01

    To demonstrate the utility of Rational Emotive Therapy in pre-marital counseling, examples of specific irrational beliefs which clinicians can use to help couples are presented. Mental health practitioners are encouraged to apply these principles to other specific irrationalities they may discover in their own work experience. (Author)

  19. Some Contemporary Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Songs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Richard E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents several new rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) songs. Claims that the songs may be used in both academic and therapeutic settings as a humorous way to address cognitive distortions or irrational beliefs. Reports that students and clients have responded favorably to these songs. (RJM)

  20. Reflections on Rational-Emotive Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1993-01-01

    Reflects rational-emotive therapy (RET) in 1955 and discusses some of its recent constructivist and humanist theories and practice. Distinguishes between general RET, called synonymous with general cognitive-behavioral therapy, from preferential RET, called unique kind of cognitive therapy that partially overlaps with general cognitive-behavioral…

  1. Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy with Troubled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zionts, Paul; Zionts, Laura

    1997-01-01

    Based on the early work of Albert Ellis, seeks to identify and challenge irrational beliefs that underlie behavior problems. Outlines concepts and methods of Rational Emotive Behavior Theory and describes the application both in counseling and as a mental health curriculum for troubled children and youth. Offers classroom techniques. (RJM)

  2. Macroeconomics after Two Decades of Rational Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, Bennett T.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses real business cycle analysis, growth theory, and other economic concepts in the context of the rational expectations revolution in macroeconomics. Focuses on post-1982 research. Concludes that the rejuvenation of growth analysis is an encouraging development because it could lead to changes in welfare policy. (CFR)

  3. Rational Rhymes for Addressing Common Childhood Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Music-based interventions are valuable tools counselors can use when working with children. Specific types of music-based interventions, such as songs or rhymes, can be especially pertinent in addressing the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of children. Rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT) provides a therapeutic framework that encourages…

  4. Rational and Mechanistic Perspectives on Reinforcement Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This special issue describes important recent developments in applying reinforcement learning models to capture neural and cognitive function. But reinforcement learning, as a theoretical framework, can apply at two very different levels of description: "mechanistic" and "rational." Reinforcement learning is often viewed in mechanistic terms--as…

  5. Adaptive signed distance transform for curves with guaranteed error bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D A; Duchaineau, M A; Max, N L

    2000-12-04

    We present an adaptive signed distance transform algorithm for curves in the plane. The algorithm provides guaranteed error bounds with a selective refinement approach. The domain over which the signed distance function is desired is adaptive triangulated and piecewise discontinuous linear approximations are constructed within each triangle. The resulting transform performs work only were requested and does not rely on a preset sampling rate or other constraints.

  6. Synthetic RR Lyrae velocity curves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tianxing Boston Univ., MA )

    1991-02-01

    An amplitude correlation between the pulsation velocity curves and visual light curves of ab-type RR Lyrae stars is derived from a large number of RR Lyrae that have high-precision radial-velocity and photometric data. Based on the determined AVp, AV ralation, a synthetic radial-velocity curve for a typical ab-type RR Lyrae star is constructed. This would be of particular use in determining the systemic velocities of RR Lyrae. 17 refs.

  7. Plane Wave and Coulomb Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, P. G.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2004-01-01

    A simple plane wave solution of the Schrödinger Helmholtz equation is a quantum eigenfunction obeying both energy and linear momentum correspondence principles. Inclusion of the outgoing wave with scattering amplitude f obeys unitarity and the optical theorem. By closely considering the standard asymptotic development of the plane wave, we show that there is a problem with angular momentum when we consider forward scattering at the point of closest approach and at large impact parameter given semiclassically by (l + 1/2)/k where l is the azimuthal quantum number and may be large (J Leech et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 257901 (2002)). The problem is resolved via non-uniform, non-standard analysis involving the Heaviside step function, unifying classical, semiclassical and quantum mechanics, and the treatment is extended to the case of pure Coulomb scattering.

  8. Eight plane IPND mechanical testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, A.; Guarino, V.; Wood, K.; Nephew, T.; Ayres, D.; Lee, A.; High Energy Physics; FNAL

    2008-03-18

    A mechanical test of an 8 plane IPND mechanical prototype, which was constructed using extrusions from the testing/tryout of the 16 cell prototype extrusion die in Argonne National Laboratory, was conducted. There were 4 vertical and 4 horizontal planes in this 8 plane IPND prototype. Each vertical plane had four 16 cell extrusions, while each horizontal plane had six 16 cell extrusions. Each plane was glued together using the formulation of Devcon adhesive, Devcon 60. The vertical extrusions used in the vertical planes shares the same dimensions as the horizontal extrusions in the horizontal planes with the average web thickness of 2.1 mm and the average wall thickness of 3.1 mm. This mechanical prototype was constructed with end-seals on the both ends of the vertical extrusions. The gaps were filled with epoxy between extrusions and end-seals. The overall dimension of IPND is 154.8 by 103.1 by 21.7 inches with the weight of approximately 1200 kg, as shown in a figure. Two similar mechanical tests of 3 layer and 11 layer prototypes have been done in order to evaluate the strength of the adhesive joint between extrusions in the NOvA detector. The test showed that the IPND prototype was able to sustain under the loading of weight of itself and scintillator. Two FEA models were built to verify the measurement data from the test. The prediction from FEA slice model seems correlated reasonably well to the test result, even under a 'rough' estimated condition for the wall thickness (from an untuned die) and an unknown property of 'garage type' extrusion. A full size of FEA 3-D model also agrees very well with the test data from strain gage readings. It is worthy to point out that the stress distribution of the structure is predominantly determined by the internal pressure, while the buckling stability relies more on the loading weight from the extrusions themselves and scintillate. Results of conducted internal pressure tests, including 3- cell, 11-cell and the IPND

  9. Growth and energy budget of juvenile lenok Brachymystax lenok in relation to ration level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Zhongjie; Zhang, Tanglin; Yuan, Jing; Mou, Zhenbo; Liu, Jiashou

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of ration level (RL) on the growth and energy budget of lenok Brachymystax lenok. Juvenile lenok (initial mean body weight 3.06±0.13 g) were fed for 21 d at five different ration levels: starvation, 2%, 3%, 4% bwd (body weight per day, based on initial mean values), and apparent satiation. Feed consumption, apparent digestibility, and growth were directly measured. Specific growth rates in terms of wet weight, dry weight, protein, and energy increased logarithmically with an increase in ration levels. The relationship between specific growth rate in terms of wet weight (SGRw, %/d) and RL (%) was characterized by a decelerating curve: SGRw=-1.417+3.166ln(RL+1). The apparent digestibility coefficients of energy exhibited a decreasing pattern with increasing ration level, and there was a significant difference among different RLs. Body composition was significantly affected by ration size. The relationship between feed efficiency rate in terms of energy (FERe) and RL was: FERe=-14.167+23.793RL-3.367(RL)2, and the maximum FERe was observed at a 3.53% ration. The maintenance requirement for energy of juvenile lenok was 105.39 kJ BW (kg)-0.80/d, the utilization efficiency of DE for growth was 0.496. The energy budget equation at satiation was: 100IE=29.03FE+5.78(ZE+UE)+39.56 HE+25.63 RE, where IE is feed energy, FE is fecal energy, ZE+UE is excretory energy, HE is heat production, and RE is recovered energy. Our results suggest that the most suitable feeding rate for juvenile lenok aquaculture for wet weight growth is 2.89% bwd, whereas for energy growth, the suggested rate is 3.53% bwd at this growth stage.

  10. Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Patrick M.

    2003-01-01

    Lockheed Martin has been an active participant in NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) programs over the past several years. SLI, part of NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), was restructured in November of 2002 to focus the overall theme of safer, more afford-able space transportation along two paths - the Orbital Space Plane Program and the Next Generation Launch Technology programs. The Orbital Space Plane Program has the goal of providing rescue capability from the International Space Station by 2008 and transfer capability for crew (and limited cargo) by 2012. The Next Generation Launch Technology program is combining research and development efforts from the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2GRLV) program with cutting-edge, advanced space transportation programs (previously designated 3rd Generation) into one program aimed at enabling safe, reliable, cost-effective reusable launch systems by the middle of the next decade. Lockheed Martin is one of three prime contractors working to bring Orbital Space Plane system concepts to a system definition level of maturity by December of 2003. This paper and presentation will update the international community on the progress of the' OSP program, from an industry perspective, and provide insights into Lockheed Martin's role in enabling the vision of a safer, more affordable means of taking people to and from space.

  11. Symmetry in finite phase plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, J.

    2010-03-01

    The known symmetries in one-dimensional systems are inversion and translations. These symmetries persist in finite phase plane, but a novel symmetry arises in view of the discrete nature of the coordinate xi and the momentum pi : xi and pi can undergo permutations. Thus, if xi assumes M discrete values, i = 0, 1,2,..., M - 1, a permutation will change the order of the set x0,x1,..., xM-1 into a new ordered set. Such a symmetry element does not exist for a continuous x-coordinate in an infinite phase plane. Thus, in a finite phase plane, translations can be replaced by permutations. This is also true for the inversion operator. The new permutation symmetry has been used for the construction of conjugate representations and for the splitting of the M-dimensional vector space into independent subspaces. This splitting is exhaustive in the sense that if M = iMi with Mi being prime numbers, the M-dimensional space splits into M1,M2,...Mn-dimensional independent subspaces. It is shown that following this splitting one can design new potentials with appropriate constants of motion. A related problem is the Weyl-Heisenberg group in the M-dimensional space which turns into a direct product of its subgroups in the Mi-dimensional subspaces. As an example we consider the case of M = 8.

  12. In-plane magnetization behaviors in the Shastry-Sutherland system TbB{sub 4}: Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J. J.; Li, W. C.; Qin, M. H. E-mail: liujm@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Y. L.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M. E-mail: liujm@nju.edu.cn; Jia, X. T.

    2015-05-07

    The in-plane magnetization behaviors in TbB{sub 4} are theoretically studied using the frustrated classical XY model, including the exchange and biquadratic interactions, and the anisotropy energy. The magnetization curves at various temperatures are simulated, and the magnetic orders are uncovered by the tracking of the spin configurations. In addition, the effects of the in-plane anisotropy and biquadratic interaction on the magnetization curves are investigated in detail. The simulated results suggest that the magnetic anisotropy within the (001) plane owes to the complex interplay between these couplings, and the anisotropy term plays an important role.

  13. Theory of rigid-plane phonon modes in layered crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, K. H.; Verberck, B.

    2012-03-01

    The lattice dynamics of low-frequency rigid-plane modes in metallic (graphene multilayers, GML) and in insulating (hexagonal boron-nitride multilayers, BNML) layered crystals is investigated. The frequencies of shearing and compression (stretching) modes depend on the layer number N and are presented in the form of fan diagrams. The results for GML and BNML are very similar. In both cases, only the interactions (van der Waals and Coulomb) between nearest-neighbor planes are effective, while the interactions between more distant planes are screened. A comparison with recent Raman scattering results on low-frequency shear modes in GML [Tan , Nat. Mater., in press, doi:10.1038/nmat3245, (2012)] is made. Relations with the low-lying rigid-plane phonon dispersions in the bulk materials are established. Master curves, which connect the fan diagram frequencies for any given N, are derived. Static and dynamic thermal correlation functions for rigid-layer shear and compression modes are calculated. The results might be of use for the interpretation of friction force experiments on multilayer crystals.

  14. Rational Choice and Developmental Influences on Recidivism Among Adolescent Felony Offenders.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Jeffrey; Piquero, Alex R

    2007-12-01

    Recent case law and social science both have claimed that the developmental limitations of adolescents affect their capacity for control and decision making with respect to crime, diminishing their culpability and reducing their exposure to punishment. Social science has focused on two concurrent adolescent developmental influences: the internalization of legal rules and norms that regulate social and antisocial behaviors, and the development of rationality to frame behavioral choices and decisions. The interaction of these two developmental processes, and the identification of one domain of socialization and development as the primary source of motivation or restraint in adolescence, is the focus of this article. Accordingly, we combine rational choice and legal socialization frameworks into an integrated, developmental model of criminality. We test this framework in a large sample of adolescent felony offenders who have been interviewed at six-month intervals for two years. Using hierarchical and growth curve models, we show that both legal socialization and rational choice factors influence patterns of criminal offending over time. When punishment risks and costs are salient, crime rates are lower over time. We show that procedural justice is a significant antecedent of legal socialization, but not of rational choice. We also show that both mental health and developmental maturity moderate the effects of perceived crime risks and costs on criminal offending. PMID:20148123

  15. Rational Choice and Developmental Influences on Recidivism Among Adolescent Felony Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Jeffrey; Piquero, Alex R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent case law and social science both have claimed that the developmental limitations of adolescents affect their capacity for control and decision making with respect to crime, diminishing their culpability and reducing their exposure to punishment. Social science has focused on two concurrent adolescent developmental influences: the internalization of legal rules and norms that regulate social and antisocial behaviors, and the development of rationality to frame behavioral choices and decisions. The interaction of these two developmental processes, and the identification of one domain of socialization and development as the primary source of motivation or restraint in adolescence, is the focus of this article. Accordingly, we combine rational choice and legal socialization frameworks into an integrated, developmental model of criminality. We test this framework in a large sample of adolescent felony offenders who have been interviewed at six-month intervals for two years. Using hierarchical and growth curve models, we show that both legal socialization and rational choice factors influence patterns of criminal offending over time. When punishment risks and costs are salient, crime rates are lower over time. We show that procedural justice is a significant antecedent of legal socialization, but not of rational choice. We also show that both mental health and developmental maturity moderate the effects of perceived crime risks and costs on criminal offending. PMID:20148123

  16. Motion of an inclined cylinder on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2015-09-01

    We consider in this paper the motion of an inclined cylinder on an inclined plane. At low inclined plane angles, the cylinder rolls without slipping across the incline, in a direction perpendicular to its long axis. At steeper angles, long cylinders follow a straight line path in a direction that veers away from the low angle path. Short cylinders follow a curved path. These effects are described in terms of a transition from rolling to sliding as the incline angle is increased. The results help to explain why a vehicle normally turns in the direction that the wheels are pointing and why a vehicle can veer away from that direction on a slippery surface.

  17. Surface path lines in plane stokes flow driven by capillarity

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, R.W.

    1993-05-03

    Consider the free creeping viscous plane flow in a region, bounded by a simple smooth closed curve and driven solely by surface tension. The shape evolution may in principle, and often in practice, be described by a time-dependent mapping z = {Omega}({zeta},t) of the unit circle, conformal on {vert_bar}{zeta}{vert_bar} {le} 1. It is shown that the path lines of fluid elements at the surface are determined by a first-order ordinary differential equation involving {Omega}({zeta},t), together with an initial condition. Typically, this must be integrated numerically. Velocities are not needed. The analogous theory for maps from the half-plane Im {zeta} {ge} 0 is presented. Surface path lines of a collapsing elliptic hole, in two reference frames, are calculated.

  18. Digital-voltage curve generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.

    1970-01-01

    Curve generator capable of producing precisely repeatable curve for any single-valued function of voltage versus time uses digital approach, implemented by means of clocked feedback shift register, large scale integrated circuit diode matrix comprising about 12,000 diodes, counter, and digital-to-analog converter.

  19. Tool For Making Curved Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Robert; Calve, Andrew; Pastreck, Edwin; Padden, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Tool for use in electrical-discharge machining (EDM) guides EDM electrode in making curved holes. Guide rod fits in slot in arm, which moves through arc. Motion drives electrode into workpiece along desired curved path. Electrode burns into workpiece while arm rotates on spindle. Discharge cuts hole of same radius of curvature.

  20. Quantum field theories on algebraic curves. I. Additive bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takhtajan, Leon A.

    2013-04-01

    Using Serre's adelic interpretation of cohomology, we develop a `differential and integral calculus' on an algebraic curve X over an algebraically closed field k of constants of characteristic zero, define algebraic analogues of additive multi-valued functions on X and prove the corresponding generalized residue theorem. Using the representation theory of the global Heisenberg algebra and lattice Lie algebra, we formulate quantum field theories of additive and charged bosons on an algebraic curve X. These theories are naturally connected with the algebraic de Rham theorem. We prove that an extension of global symmetries (Witten's additive Ward identities) from the k-vector space of rational functions on X to the vector space of additive multi-valued functions uniquely determines these quantum theories of additive and charged bosons.

  1. The dyadic diffraction coefficient for a curved edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouyoumjian, R. G.; Pathak, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    A compact dyadic diffraction coefficient for electromagnetic waves obliquely incident on a curved edge formed by perfectly conducting curved or plane surfaces is obtained. This diffraction coefficent remains valid in the transition regions adjacent to shadow and reflection boundaries, where the diffraction coefficients of Keller's original theory fail. The method is on Keller's method of the canonical problem, which in this case is the perfectly conducting wedge illuminated by plane, cylindrical, conical, and spherical waves. When the proper ray fixed coordinate system is introduced, the dyadic diffraction coefficient for the wedge is found to be the sum of only two dyads, and it is shown that this is also true for the dyadic diffraction coefficients of higher order edges. One dyad contains the acoustic soft diffraction coefficient; the other dyad contains the acoustic hard diffraction coefficient. The expressions for the acoustic wedge diffraction coefficients contain Fresnel integrals, which ensure that the total field is continuous at shadow and reflection boundaries. The diffraction coefficients have the same form for the different types of edge illumination; only the arguments of the Fresnel integrals are different. Since diffraction is a local phenomenon, and locally the curved edge structure is wedge shaped, this result is readily extended to the curved edge.

  2. Computation of Bound Orbits in the Plane of a Galaxy with a Flat Rotation Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, M. E.; Sharrar, Amber

    2010-01-01

    A standard topic in an advanced undergraduate classical mechanics course is the determination of the orbits in a gravitational field. In the present paper we report on the calculation of bound orbits in the gravitational field of a spiral galaxy. Calculations such as these could serve to focus attention on an area of cutting edge astrophysics and…

  3. Focal properties of a plane grating in a convergent beam.

    PubMed

    Hall, J T

    1966-06-01

    Focusing from a plane grating can be accomplished by using convergent radiation incident on the grating in such a manner that any incident angle alpha(n), the resulting diffraction angle beta(n), will be on the same side of the grating normal. The theory for the focal properties is developed by applying Fermat's principle of least time to selected terms resulting from a finite series expansion of the system's distance function. Derivations are given for finding the focal curve equation, astigmatism, and coma, of the most usable configuration of the optical components. Discussions of the aberrations disclose methods for eliminating the astigmatism and reducing the coma. PMID:20049009

  4. Cognitive Distance, Absorptive Capacity and Group Rationality: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Curşeu, Petru Lucian; Krehel, Oleh; Evers, Joep H. M.; Muntean, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a simulation study in which we explore the joint effect of group absorptive capacity (as the average individual rationality of the group members) and cognitive distance (as the distance between the most rational group member and the rest of the group) on the emergence of collective rationality in groups. We start from empirical results reported in the literature on group rationality as collective group level competence and use data on real-life groups of four and five to validate a mathematical model. We then use this mathematical model to predict group level scores from a variety of possible group configurations (varying both in cognitive distance and average individual rationality). Our results show that both group competence and cognitive distance are necessary conditions for emergent group rationality. Group configurations, in which the groups become more rational than the most rational group member, are groups scoring low on cognitive distance and scoring high on absorptive capacity. PMID:25314132

  5. Development of the Rational Behavior Inventory: Initial Validity and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorkey, Clayton T.; Whiteman, Victor L.

    1977-01-01

    The results of initial validity and reliability studies on the Rational Behavior Inventory are presented. The instrument was developed to be used for assessment, treatment planning, and evaluation of clients by counselors who use Rational Emotive Therapy. (Author/JKS)

  6. Rationally Irrational: The Case of Sexual Burglary.

    PubMed

    Pedneault, Amelie; Beauregard, Eric; Harris, Danielle A; Knight, Raymond A

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated rationality in sexually motivated burglaries. Specifically, we analyzed the situational cues identified by sexual burglars in their target selection. The research project investigated 224 individual incidents of residential burglary with apparent sexual motivations. Situational characteristics of the incidents were recorded and analyzed using forward sequential regressions. Results indicated that most sexually motivated burglaries occurred in occupied residences with deficient physical guardianship, when the victim was alone. Violence, theft, penetration, and fetishism were found to be committed in circumstances that increased the benefits and lowered the risks. Results showed that sexual burglary is rational in nature-sexual burglars chose residences that were easy to break into. We found little support for the premise that such opportunities arose while carrying out regular burglaries. Instead, the data indicated that sexual burglars acted opportunistically on situational cues that are markedly dissimilar to those of regular burglars. PMID:24469848

  7. Rational orbits around charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Vedant; Levin, Janna

    2010-10-15

    We show that all eccentric timelike orbits in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime can be classified using a taxonomy that draws upon an isomorphism between periodic orbits and the set of rational numbers. By virtue of the fact that the rationals are dense, the taxonomy can be used to approximate aperiodic orbits with periodic orbits. This may help reduce computational overhead for calculations in gravitational wave astronomy. Our dynamical systems approach enables us to study orbits for both charged and uncharged particles in spite of the fact that charged particle orbits around a charged black hole do not admit a simple one-dimensional effective potential description. Finally, we show that comparing periodic orbits in the Reissner-Nordstroem and Schwarzschild geometries enables us to distinguish charged and uncharged spacetimes by looking only at the orbital dynamics.

  8. Moral Credentialing and the Rationalization of Misconduct

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ryan P.; Tamborski, Michael; Wang, Xiaoqian; Barnes, Collin D.; Mumford, Michael D.; Connelly, Shane; Devenport, Lynn D.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies lead to the paradoxical conclusion that the act of affirming one’s egalitarian or pro-social values and virtues might subsequently facilitate prejudiced or self-serving behavior, an effect previously referred to as “moral credentialing.” The present study extends this paradox to the domain of academic misconduct and investigates the hypothesis that such an effect might be limited by the extent to which misbehavior is rationalizable. Using a paradigm designed to investigate deliberative and rationalized forms of cheating (von Hippel, Lakin, & Shakarchi, 2005), we found that when participants had credentialed themselves (versus a non-close acquaintance) via a set of hypothetical moral dilemmas, they were more likely to cheat on a subsequent math task, but only if cheating was highly rationalizable. When cheating was difficult to rationalize, moral credentialing had almost no impact on cheating. PMID:21503267

  9. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  10. National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, William M.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the technology development management objectives thus far planned for the DOD/NASA National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The technology required by NASP will first be developed in ground-based facilities and then integrated during the design and construction of the X-30 experimental aircraft. Five airframe and three powerplant manufacturers are currently engaged in an 18-month effort encompassing design studies and tradeoff analyses. The first flight of the X-30 is scheduled for early 1993.

  11. [What did bachelard mean by "applied rationalism" ?].

    PubMed

    Tiles, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Bachelard was concerned with the processes whereby scientific knowledge is acquired, including the activity of knowing subjects. He did not equate reasoning with logic but rather argued that reasoning resulted from the use of mathematics in organizing both thought and experimental practices, which is why he conceived science as applied mathematics. This had material and technical implications, for Bachelard was concerned with the element of reason inherent in technical materialism as well as the concrete reality inherent in applied rationalism. PMID:24091650

  12. Suicide: Rationality and Responsibility for Life

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Angela Onkay

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Death by suicide is widely held as an undesirable outcome. Most Western countries place emphasis on patient autonomy, a concept of controversy in relation to suicide. This paper explores the tensions between patients’ rights and many societies’ overarching desire to prevent suicide, while clarifying the relations between mental disorders, mental capacity, and rational suicide. Methods: A literature search was conducted using search terms of suicide and ethics in the PubMed and LexisNexis Academic databases. Article titles and abstracts were reviewed and deemed relevant if the paper addressed topics of rational suicide, patient autonomy or rights, or responsibility for life. Further articles were found from reference lists and by suggestion from preliminary reviewers of this paper. Results: Suicidal behaviour in a person cannot be reliably predicted, yet various associations and organizations have developed standards of care for managing patients exhibiting suicidal behaviour. The responsibility for preventing suicide tends to be placed on the treating clinician. In cases where a person is capable of making treatment decisions—uninfluenced by any mental disorder—there is growing interest in the concept of rational suicide. Conclusions: There is much debate about whether suicide can ever be rational. Designating suicide as an undesirable event that should never occur raises the debate of who is responsible for one’s life and runs the risk of erroneously attributing blame for suicide. While upholding patient rights of autonomy in psychiatric care is laudable, cases of suicidality warrant a delicate consideration of clinical judgment, duty of care, and legal obligations. PMID:24881162

  13. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renyuan; Zhang, Lianbin; Wang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits. It is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will hinge upon further developments in nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes on `design-for-purpose' and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress in rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil-water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid to the chemical concepts related to nanomaterial design throughout the review.

  14. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Renyuan; Zhang, Lianbin; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits. It is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will hinge upon further developments in nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes on 'design-for-purpose' and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress in rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil-water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid to the chemical concepts related to nanomaterial design throughout the review. PMID:26437738

  15. Promoting rational prescribing: an international perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Hogerzeil, H V

    1995-01-01

    Irrational prescribing is a global problem. Rational prescribing cannot be defined without a method of measurement and a reference standard. The former is now available but the latter needs further development. Proven effective interventions to promote rational prescribing in developed countries are treatment protocols based on wide consultation and consensus, properly introduced and with a possibility of feedback; face-to-face education focussed on a particular prescribing problem in selected individuals; structured order forms; and focussed educational campaigns. Essential drugs lists are probably effective when based on consensus and used within a comprehensive educational programme. Printed materials alone are not effective. In most cases the usefulness of such strategies in developing countries has not been proven and should be studied. Medical education in clinical pharmacology and pharmacotherapy should be based on the practical needs of future prescribes, should include the principles of rational therapeutics and problem solving, and should immunize the students against the influences they are likely to encounter in their professional life, such as patient pressure, drug promotion and irrational prescribing by peers. Within the scope of a national formulary, specialist departments in teaching hospitals should define prescribing policies as the basis for prescribing, teaching, examinations and medical audit. PMID:7756093

  16. Linear parameter estimation of rational biokinetic functions.

    PubMed

    Doeswijk, T G; Keesman, K J

    2009-01-01

    For rational biokinetic functions such as the Michaelis-Menten equation, in general, a nonlinear least-squares method is a good estimator. However, a major drawback of a nonlinear least-squares estimator is that it can end up in a local minimum. Rearranging and linearizing rational biokinetic functions for parameter estimation is common practice (e.g. Lineweaver-Burk linearization). By rearranging, however, the error is distorted. In addition, the rearranged model frequently leads to a so-called 'errors-in-variables' estimation problem. Applying the ordinary least squares (OLS) method to the linearly reparameterized function ensures a global minimum, but its estimates become biased if the regression variables contain errors and thus bias compensation is needed. Therefore, in this paper, a bias compensated total least squares (CTLS) method, which as OLS is a direct method, is proposed to solve the estimation problem. The applicability of a general linear reparameterization procedure and the advances of CTLS over ordinary least squares and nonlinear least squares approaches are shown by two simulation examples. The examples contain Michaelis-Menten kinetics and enzyme kinetics with substrate inhibition. Furthermore, CTLS is demonstrated with real data of an activated sludge experiment. It is concluded that for rational biokinetic models CTLS is a powerful alternative to the existing least-squares methods. PMID:19004464

  17. Logical and Psychological Aspects of Rational Number Pedagogical Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Robert E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Synthesizes research on content knowledge of rational numbers, the learning of rational number order and equivalence concepts, and teachers' pedagogical reasoning about these concepts. Uses teachers' descriptions of how a hypothetical student would understand rational numbers to sketch a formative model of pedagogical reasoning. (16 references)…

  18. Cognitive Rationality and Its Logic-Mathematical Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masalova, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the cognitive (flexible) rationality, combining rational and irrational moments of the scientific search of the cognizing subject. Linguo-cognitive model of the concept as the flexible regulative rationality reveals the activity of the cognitive processes and the mentality of the epistemological-ontic subject, its leading…

  19. Rational Analyses of Information Foraging on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirolli, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This article describes rational analyses and cognitive models of Web users developed within information foraging theory. This is done by following the rational analysis methodology of (a) characterizing the problems posed by the environment, (b) developing rational analyses of behavioral solutions to those problems, and (c) developing cognitive…

  20. Bimetallic PtxCoy nanoparticles with curved faces for highly efficient hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yan; Zhao, Yonghui; Wu, Panpan; Yang, Bo; Yang, Nating; Zhu, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The control of the curved structure of bimetallic nanocrystals is a challenge, due to the rate differential for atom deposition and surface diffusion of alien atomic species on specific crystallographic planes of seeds. Herein, we report how to tune the degree of concavity of bimetallic PtxCoy concave nanoparticles using carboxylic acids as surfactants with an oleylamine system, leading to the specific crystallographic planes being exposed. The terminal carboxylic acids with a bridge ring or a benzene ring serving as structure regulators could direct the formation of curved faces with exposed high-index facets, and long-chain saturated fatty acids favored the production of curved faces with exposed low-index facets, while long-chain olefin acids alone benefited the formation of a flat surface with exposed low-index planes. Furthermore, these PtxCoy particles with curved faces displayed superior catalytic behaviour to cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation when compared with PtxCoy with flat faces. PtxCoy nanoparticles with curved faces exhibited over 6-fold increase in catalytic activity compared to PtxNiy nanoparticles with curved faces, and near 40-fold activity increase was observed in comparison with PtxFey nanoparticles with curved faces. PMID:27176571

  1. Rewritable photochromic focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Bianco, Andrea; Bortoletto, Fabio; Conconi, Paolo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Gallazzi, Maria C.; Giro, Enrico; Lucotti, Andrea; Pernechele, Claudio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    The application of organic photochromic materials in astronomy is opening new possibilities which we are investigating in order to design innovative devices for future instrumentation. The photochromic property of transparent/opaque transition (although in a limited wavelength range) and the changes in intrinsic refractive index have led our studies to application in astronomic spectrographs, both as focal plane mask (for MOS application) and as dispersive elements (volume phase holographic gratings, VPHG), respectively. In both cases the possibility to write and erase devices with suitable irradiation has revealed a new perspective for non-disposable and fully customizable items for spectroscopy. Pursuing this goal we have synthesized a series of novel photochromic materials belonging to the diarylethenes. They fulfill the requirements of thermal stability and fatigue resistance necessary to build functional devices. Prototypes of high contrast focal plane mask working in the H-alpha spectral region have been manufactured and characterized both in laboratory and with the AFOSC camera at Asiago telescope (1.8 m). A custom writing robot (ARATRO) which, taking imaging frames and with the aid of interactive mask design software and ad hoc control electronics, is able to write MOS masks, has been constructed. The design of the MOS masks allow the fitting in the AFOSC slit wheel. The overall set-up is ready for the sky tests.

  2. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  3. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements. PMID:22034331

  4. Poiseuille flow in curved spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debus, J.-D.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Poiseuille channel flow through intrinsically curved media, equipped with localized metric perturbations. To this end, we study the flux of a fluid driven through the curved channel in dependence of the spatial deformation, characterized by the parameters of the metric perturbations (amplitude, range, and density). We find that the flux depends only on a specific combination of parameters, which we identify as the average metric perturbation, and derive a universal flux law for the Poiseuille flow. For the purpose of this study, we have improved and validated our recently developed lattice Boltzmann model in curved space by considerably reducing discrete lattice effects.

  5. Poiseuille flow in curved spaces.

    PubMed

    Debus, J-D; Mendoza, M; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Poiseuille channel flow through intrinsically curved media, equipped with localized metric perturbations. To this end, we study the flux of a fluid driven through the curved channel in dependence of the spatial deformation, characterized by the parameters of the metric perturbations (amplitude, range, and density). We find that the flux depends only on a specific combination of parameters, which we identify as the average metric perturbation, and derive a universal flux law for the Poiseuille flow. For the purpose of this study, we have improved and validated our recently developed lattice Boltzmann model in curved space by considerably reducing discrete lattice effects. PMID:27176437

  6. The prevalence of tori amongst constant mean curvature planes in R3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carberry, Emma; Schmidt, Martin Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Constant mean curvature (CMC) tori in Euclidean 3-space are described by an algebraic curve, called the spectral curve, together with a line bundle on this curve and a point on S1, called the Sym point. For a given spectral curve the possible choices of line bundle and Sym point are easily described. The space of spectral curves of tori is totally disconnected. Hence to characterise the "moduli space" of CMC tori one should, for each genus g, determine the closure Pg bar of spectral curves of CMC tori within the spectral curves of CMC planes having spectral genus g. We identify a real subvariety Rg and a subset Sg ⊆Rg such that Rmaxg ⊆Pg bar ⊆Sg, where Rmaxg denotes the points of Rg having maximal dimension. The lowest spectral genus for which tori exist is g = 2 and in this case R2 = Rmax2 =P2 bar =S2. For g > 2, we conjecture that Rg ⊋ Rmaxg =Sg. We give a number of alternative characterisations of Rmaxg and in particular introduce a new integer invariant of a CMC plane of finite type, called its winding number.

  7. Curved characteristics behind blast waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laporte, O.; Chang, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of nonisentropic flow behind a propagating blast wave is theoretically studied. Exact solutions, expressed in closed form in terms of elementary functions, are presented for three sets of curved characteristicseind a self-similar, strong blast wave.

  8. Flow over riblet curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J. B. R.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The present work studies the mechanics of turbulent drag reduction over curved surfaces by riblets. The effects of surface modification on flow separation over steep and smooth curved surfaces are investigated. Four types of two-dimensional surfaces are studied based on the morphometric parameters that describe the body of a blue whale. Local measurements of mean velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained through laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  9. What Information Theory Says about Bounded Rational Best Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2005-01-01

    Probability Collectives (PC) provides the information-theoretic extension of conventional full-rationality game theory to bounded rational games. Here an explicit solution to the equations giving the bounded rationality equilibrium of a game is presented. Then PC is used to investigate games in which the players use bounded rational best-response strategies. Next it is shown that in the continuum-time limit, bounded rational best response games result in a variant of the replicator dynamics of evolutionary game theory. It is then shown that for team (shared-payoff) games, this variant of replicator dynamics is identical to Newton-Raphson iterative optimization of the shared utility function.

  10. Characterization of rational biomarkers accompanying fever in yeast-induced pyrexia rats using urine metabolic footprint analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxing; Gu, Hao; Song, Yuelin; Peng, Long; Liu, Haiyu; Zhang, Li; Lin, Zhaozhou; Wang, Yun; Gao, Xiaoyan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-07-01

    Fever is a prominent feature of diseases and is an ongoing process that is always accompanied by metabolic changes in the body system. Despite the success of temperature regulation theory, the underlying biological process remains unclear. To truly understand the nature of the febrile response, it is crucial to confirm the biomarkers during the entire biological process. In the current study, a 73-h metabolic footprint analysis of the urine from yeast-induced pyrexia rats was performed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Potential biomarkers were selected using orthogonal partial least squares-discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA), the rational biomarkers were verified by Pearson correlation analysis, and the predictive power was evaluated using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. A metabolic network constructed using traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) grammar systems was used to validate the rationality of the verified biomarkers. Finally, five biomarkers, including indoleacrylic acid, 3-methyluridine, tryptophan, nicotinuric acid and PI (37:3), were confirmed as rational biomarkers because their correlation coefficients were all greater than 0.87 and because all of the correlation coefficients between any pair of these biomarkers were higher than 0.75. The areas under the ROC curves were all greater than 0.84, and their combined predictive power was considered reliable because the greatest area under the ROC curve was 0.968. A metabolic network also demonstrated the rationality of these five biomarkers. Therefore, these five metabolites can be adopted as rational biomarkers to reflect the process of the febrile response in inflammation-induced pyrexia. PMID:24631712

  11. Optimal focal-plane restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    Image restoration can be implemented efficiently by calculating the convolution of the digital image and a small kernel during image acquisition. Processing the image in the focal-plane in this way requires less computation than traditional Fourier-transform-based techniques such as the Wiener filter and constrained least-squares filter. Here, the values of the convolution kernel that yield the restoration with minimum expected mean-square error are determined using a frequency analysis of the end-to-end imaging system. This development accounts for constraints on the size and shape of the spatial kernel and all the components of the imaging system. Simulation results indicate the technique is effective and efficient.

  12. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  13. Contactless Visualization of Latent Fingerprints on Nonporous Curved Surfaces of Circular Cross Section.

    PubMed

    Low, Wei Zeng; Khoo, Bee Ee; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim Bin

    2016-07-01

    Nondestructive techniques for gathering evidence are important in the field of forensics. Due to the geometry of the substrates, nondestructive visualization of fingermarks on curved surfaces remains challenging. A novel contactless technique was developed for visualizing and recording fingermark patterns on nonporous curved surfaces of circular cross section. The technique utilizes a plane mirror to transmit rays from a light source to illuminate the area of interest for fingermark visualization. The fingermark acquisition system consists of a digital single-lens reflex (SLR) camera, a plane mirror, and a white light source. Mathematical equations are used to calculate the mirror size. Experiments were performed on various curved surfaces to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of the technique. Spectral Image Validation and Verification (SIVV) was used to analyze the captured images. The results of this study indicate that the technique described here is able to reveal fingermark patterns on curved surfaces of circular cross section. PMID:27364293

  14. Research on bounded rationality of fuzzy choice functions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinlin; Zhao, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The rationality of a fuzzy choice function is a hot research topic in the study of fuzzy choice functions. In this paper, two common fuzzy sets are studied and analyzed in the framework of the Banerjee choice function. The complete rationality and bounded rationality of fuzzy choice functions are defined based on the two fuzzy sets. An assumption is presented to study the fuzzy choice function, and especially the fuzzy choice function with bounded rationality is studied combined with some rationality conditions. Results show that the fuzzy choice function with bounded rationality also satisfies some important rationality conditions, but not vice versa. The research gives supplements to the investigation in the framework of the Banerjee choice function. PMID:24782677

  15. 2-tier in-plane motion correction and out-of-plane motion filtering for contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Casey N.; Eghtedari, Mohammad; Mattrey, Robert F.; Kono, Yuko; Kummel, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) cines of focal liver lesions (FLL) can be quantitatively analyzed to measure tumor perfusion on a pixel-by-pixel basis for diagnostic indication. However, CEUS cines acquired freehand and during free breathing cause non-uniform in-plane and out-of-plane motion from frame to frame. These motions create fluctuations in the time-intensity curves (TIC), reducing accuracy of quantitative measurements. Out-of-plane motion cannot be corrected by image registration in 2D CEUS and degrades the quality of in-plane motion correction (IPMC). A 2-tier IPMC strategy and adaptive out-of-plane motion filter (OPMF) are proposed to provide a stable correction of non-uniform motion to reduce the impact of motion on quantitative analyses. Materials and Methods 22 cines of FLLs were imaged with dual B-mode and contrast specific imaging to acquire a 3-minute TIC. B-mode images were analyzed for motion, and the motion correction was applied to both B-mode and contrast images. For IPMC, the main reference frame was automatically selected for each cine, and subreference frames were selected in each respiratory cycle and sequentially registered toward the main reference frame. All other frames were sequentially registered toward the local subreference frame. Four OPMFs were developed and tested: subsample Normalized Correlation (NC), subsample Sum of Absolute Differences (SAD), mean frame NC, and histogram. The frames that were most dissimilar to the OPMF reference frame using one of the four above criteria in each respiratory cycle were adaptively removed by thresholding against the low-pass filter of the similarity curve. OPMF was quantitatively evaluated by an out-of-plane motion metric (OPMM) that measured normalized variance in the high-pass filtered time-intensity curve within the tumor region-of-interest with low OPMM being the goal. IPMC and OPMF results were qualitatively evaluated by two blinded observers who ranked the motion in the

  16. [The impact of ethical and moral competence in decision making on rationalism and rationing nursing interventions].

    PubMed

    Schwerdt, R

    2005-08-01

    The intraprofessional discourse about economical aspects in nursing from an ethical point of view has not taken place yet. To cope with the increasing restriction of resources, some preconditions have to be met: It is necessary to communicate issues in rationalizing and rationing in nursing openly. Person-oriented criteria in the nursing process indicate a high level of competence and user-oriented quality in nursing care. But nursing professionals do not decide in favor or against resources to perform this task on a high or poor quality level. Democratic decision-making on providing nursing services depends on a continuous societal discourse about allocation criteria. PMID:16133753

  17. Surface Reconstruction From Non-parallel Curve Networks

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Building surfaces from cross-section curves has wide applications including bio-medical modeling. Previous work in this area has mostly focused on connecting simple closed curves on parallel cross-sections. Here we consider the more general problem where input data may lie on non-parallel cross-sections and consist of curve networks that represent the segmentation of the underlying object by different material or tissue types (e.g., skin, muscle, bone, etc.) on each cross-section. The desired output is a surface network that models both the exterior surface and the internal partitioning of the object. We introduce an algorithm that is capable of handling curve networks of arbitrary shape and topology on cross-section planes with arbitrary orientations. Our algorithm is simple to implement and is guaranteed to produce a closed surface network that interpolates the curve network on each cross-section. Our method is demonstrated on both synthetic and bio-medical examples. PMID:19718278

  18. A new numerical method of finding potentiometric titration end-points by use of rational spline functions.

    PubMed

    Ren, K; Ren-Kurc, A

    1986-08-01

    A new numerical method of determining the position of the inflection point of a potentiometric titration curve is presented. It consists of describing the experimental data (emf, volume data-points) by means of a rational spline function. The co-ordinates of the titration end-point are determined by analysis of the first and second derivatives of the spline function formed. The method also allows analysis of distorted titration curves which cannot be interpreted by Gran's or other computational methods. PMID:18964159

  19. Radiologic presentations in relation to curve severity in scoliosis associated with syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yong; Zhu, Zezhang; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yang

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to further explore the radiological presentations of scoliosis associated with syringomyelia in relation to curve severity. 87 children and adolescents were divided into three groups: Group I (10 degrees 60 degrees). Curves were classified into typical and atypical patterns in the coronal plane and the sagittal profile measured. Cerebellar tonsillar descent or syrinx patterns in relation to curve severity and the frequency of atypical curves were also investigated. The frequency of atypical curve patterns from Group 1 to 2 was 46.2%, 45.2%, and 40.7% respectively. 65.3% patients with typical curve patterns had atypical features in all of the three groups. There was a significant difference of kyphotic angle among the three groups. Both the degree of cerebellar tonsillar descent and syrinx patterns had no correlation with the curve severity or the frequency of atypical curves. These results show that radiographic presentations, including atypical curve patterns, atypical features in typical curve patterns, and a normal to hyperkyphotic thoracic spine may suggest the need for preoperative MRI. There is no evidence to suggest that the degree of cerebellar tonsillar descent and syrinx patterns have an effect on the progress of scoliosis and the frequency of atypical curves. PMID:17108484

  20. Rational instability in the natural coalition forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Galina; Galam, Serge

    2013-12-01

    The work aims to investigate a paradigm of instability in coalition forming among countries, using a model inspired from Statistical Physics. The instability is a consequence of decentralized maximization of the individual benefits where contradictory associations into coalitions occur due to independent evolution of pairwise propensity bonds. In contrast to the existing literature we analyze the phenomena within a long horizon rationality of actors. This allows to explore the complex behaviors and phenomena such as instability, infinite cycling and non-optimal stability. Along with the formal implementation, we illustrate the phenomena in a multi-thread simulation created for this aim, and provide analysis of several real cases including the Eurozone.

  1. Improving Learning Performance Through Rational Resource Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratch, J.; Chien, S.; DeJong, G.

    1994-01-01

    This article shows how rational analysis can be used to minimize learning cost for a general class of statistical learning problems. We discuss the factors that influence learning cost and show that the problem of efficient learning can be cast as a resource optimization problem. Solutions found in this way can be significantly more efficient than the best solutions that do not account for these factors. We introduce a heuristic learning algorithm that approximately solves this optimization problem and document its performance improvements on synthetic and real-world problems.

  2. Curved surfaces upon dissolution as a manifestation of physicochemical properties of crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rakin, V. I.

    2011-03-15

    The curved surfaces of natural diamond are described by central second-order surfaces: a pair of planes, an elliptical cylinder, and a triaxial ellipsoid. The curved form of the elementary surface area of diamond maps the characteristic surface of the second-rank tensor, which describes the stability of the chemical bonds of atoms on an arbitrary crystal surface during normal dissolution. Diagrams of diamond forms are proposed for the descriptive presentation of the crystal form.

  3. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  4. Propagation of a curved weak shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monica, A.; Prasad, Phoolan

    2001-05-01

    Propagation of a curved shock is governed by a system of shock ray equations which is coupled to an infinite system of transport equations along these rays. For a two-dimensional weak shock, it has been suggested that this system can be approximated by a hyperbolic system of four partial differential equations in a ray coordinate system, which consists of two independent variables ([zeta], t) where the curves t = constant give successive positions of the shock and [zeta] = constant give rays. The equations show that shock rays not only stretch longitudinally due to finite amplitude on a shock front but also turn due to a non-uniform distribution of the shock strength on it. These changes finally lead to a modification of the amplitude of the shock strength. Since discontinuities in the form of kinks appear on the shock, it is necessary to study the problem by using the correct conservation form of these equations. We use such a system of equations in conservation form to construct a total-variation-bounded finite difference scheme. The numerical solution captures converging shock fronts with a pair of kinks on them the shock front emerges without the usual folds in the caustic region. The shock strength, even when the shock passes through the caustic region, remains so small that the small-amplitude theory remains valid. The shock strength ultimately decays with a well-defined geometrical shape of the shock front a pair of kinks which separate a central disc from a pair of wings on the two sides. We also study the ultimate shape and decay of shocks of initially periodic shapes and plane shocks with a dent and a bulge.

  5. The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hoare, M. G.; Longmore, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Davis, C. J.; Adamson, A.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; de Grijs, R.; Smith, M.; Gosling, A.; Mitchison, S.; Gáspár, A.; Coe, M.; Tamura, M.; Parker, Q.; Irwin, M.; Hambly, N.; Bryant, J.; Collins, R. S.; Cross, N.; Evans, D. W.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hodgkin, S.; Lewis, J.; Read, M.; Riello, M.; Sutorius, E. T. W.; Lawrence, A.; Drew, J. E.; Dye, S.; Thompson, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near-infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 deg2 of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5° < b < 5° in the J, H and K filters and a ~200-deg2 area of the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud complex in these three filters and the 2.12 μm (1-0) H2 filter. It will provide data on ~2 × 109 sources. Here we describe the properties of the data set and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science comprises six studies. (1) A GPS-Spitzer-GLIMPSE cross-match for the star formation region G28.983-0.603 to identify YSOs. This increases the number of YSOs identified by a factor of 10 compared to GLIMPSE alone. (2) A wide-field study of the M17 nebula, in which an extinction map of the field is presented and the effect of source confusion on luminosity functions in different subregions is noted. (3) H2 emission in the ρ Ophiuchi dark cloud. All the molecular jets are traced back to a single active clump containing only a few protostars, which suggests that the duration of strong jet activity and associated rapid accretion in low-mass protostars is brief. (4) X-ray sources in the nuclear bulge. The GPS data distinguishes local main-sequence counterparts with soft X-ray spectra from nuclear bulge giant counterparts with hard X-ray spectra. (5) External galaxies in the zone of avoidance. The galaxies are clearly distinguished from stars in fields at longitudes l > 90°. (6) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. The (i' - J) versus (J - H) diagram is used to distinguish A-F type

  6. Rational development of radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Maldarelli, Frank; Eckelman, William C; Neumann, Ronald D

    2014-04-01

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A "rational" development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings. PMID:24607432

  7. Rational Combinations of Targeted Agents in AML

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Prithviraj; Grant, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Despite modest improvements in survival over the last several decades, the treatment of AML continues to present a formidable challenge. Most patients are elderly, and these individuals, as well as those with secondary, therapy-related, or relapsed/refractory AML, are particularly difficult to treat, owing to both aggressive disease biology and the high toxicity of current chemotherapeutic regimens. It has become increasingly apparent in recent years that coordinated interruption of cooperative survival signaling pathways in malignant cells is necessary for optimal therapeutic results. The modest efficacy of monotherapy with both cytotoxic and targeted agents in AML testifies to this. As the complex biology of AML continues to be elucidated, many “synthetic lethal” strategies involving rational combinations of targeted agents have been developed. Unfortunately, relatively few of these have been tested clinically, although there is growing interest in this area. In this article, the preclinical and, where available, clinical data on some of the most promising rational combinations of targeted agents in AML are summarized. While new molecules should continue to be combined with conventional genotoxic drugs of proven efficacy, there is perhaps a need to rethink traditional philosophies of clinical trial development and regulatory approval with a focus on mechanism-based, synergistic strategies. PMID:26113989

  8. Strategies in the rational drug design.

    PubMed

    Mavromoustakos, T; Durdagi, S; Koukoulitsa, C; Simcic, M; Papadopoulos, M G; Hodoscek, M; Grdadolnik, S Golic

    2011-01-01

    Rational design is applied in the discovery of novel lead drugs. Its rapid development is mainly attributed to the tremendous advancements in the computer science, statistics, molecular biology, biophysics, biochemistry, medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics experienced in the last few decades. The promising feature that characterizes the application of rational drug design is that it uses for developing potential leads in drug discovery all known theoretical and experimental knowledge of the system under study. The utilization of the knowledge of the molecular basis of the system ultimately aims to reduce human power cost, time saving and laboratory expenses in the drug discovery. In this review paper various strategies applied for systems which include: (i) absence of knowledge of the receptor active site; (ii) the knowledge of a homology model of a receptor, (iii) the knowledge of the experimentally determined (i.e. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy) coordinates of the active site of the protein in absence and (iv) the presence of the ligand will be analyzed. PMID:21568895

  9. Of Models and Machines: Implementing Bounded Rationality.

    PubMed

    Dick, Stephanie

    2015-09-01

    This essay explores the early history of Herbert Simon's principle of bounded rationality in the context of his Artificial Intelligence research in the mid 1950s. It focuses in particular on how Simon and his colleagues at the RAND Corporation translated a model of human reasoning into a computer program, the Logic Theory Machine. They were motivated by a belief that computers and minds were the same kind of thing--namely, information-processing systems. The Logic Theory Machine program was a model of how people solved problems in elementary mathematical logic. However, in making this model actually run on their 1950s computer, the JOHNNIAC, Simon and his colleagues had to navigate many obstacles and material constraints quite foreign to the human experience of logic. They crafted new tools and engaged in new practices that accommodated the affordances of their machine, rather than reflecting the character of human cognition and its bounds. The essay argues that tracking this implementation effort shows that "internal" cognitive practices and "external" tools and materials are not so easily separated as they are in Simon's principle of bounded rationality--the latter often shaping the dynamics of the former. PMID:26685521

  10. Local Convexity-Preserving C2 Rational Cubic Spline for Convex Data

    PubMed Central

    Abd Majid, Ahmad; Ali, Jamaludin Md.

    2014-01-01

    We present the smooth and visually pleasant display of 2D data when it is convex, which is contribution towards the improvements over existing methods. This improvement can be used to get the more accurate results. An attempt has been made in order to develop the local convexity-preserving interpolant for convex data using C2 rational cubic spline. It involves three families of shape parameters in its representation. Data dependent sufficient constraints are imposed on single shape parameter to conserve the inherited shape feature of data. Remaining two of these shape parameters are used for the modification of convex curve to get a visually pleasing curve according to industrial demand. The scheme is tested through several numerical examples, showing that the scheme is local, computationally economical, and visually pleasing. PMID:24757421

  11. Relative Locality in Curved Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy; Rosati, Giacomo

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we construct the action describing dynamics of the particle moving in curved spacetime, with a nontrivial momentum space geometry. Curved momentum space is the core feature of theories where relative locality effects are present. So far aspects of nonlinearities in momentum space have been studied only for flat or constantly expanding (de Sitter) spacetimes, relying on their maximally symmetric nature. The extension of curved momentum space frameworks to arbitrary spacetime geometries could be relevant for the opportunities to test Planck-scale curvature/deformation of particles momentum space. As a first example of this construction we describe the particle with κ-Poincaré momentum space on a circular orbit in Schwarzschild spacetime, where the contributes of momentum space curvature turn out to be negligible. The analysis of this problem relies crucially on the solution of the soccer ball problem.

  12. Phase nucleation in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo; García, Nicolás; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Daniel, Vega

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature (Gómez, L. R. et al. Phase nucleation in curved space. Nat. Commun. 6:6856 doi: 10.1038/ncomms7856 (2015).).

  13. Duel-Plane Optical Disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsky, B. E.; Eichinger, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    Acquiring better drop-size distributions of rainfall will improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall. In order to fully capture the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall, a robust, calibration free, low-cost instrument that provides an accurate drop-size distribution is required. Therefore, The University of Iowa Lidar Group has developed and built a new duel-plane optical disdrometer that meets these criteria. Two sheets of laser light, vertically spaced by 1 cm are produced by two 670nm laser beams passing through a collecting lens and culminating lens, respectively. The two sheets of laser light then pass through a convex lens located 20 cm from the lasers that focuses the light on a photo detector. A computer reads in and stores the voltages at 10 kHz. The velocity, diameter, shape and drop-size distribution of raindrops are extracted from the voltage measurements. Rainfall data collected in Iowa City, IA tested our disdrometer's robustness and accuracy of providing drop-size distributions. Our distrometer is advantageous because it is simple, low-cost, and requires no calibration.

  14. Reflections on the Hyperbolic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecian, Orchidea Maria

    2013-12-01

    The most general solution to the Einstein equations in 4 = 3 + 1 dimensions in the asymptotic limit close to the cosmological singularity under the BKL (Belinskii-Khalatnikov-Lifshitz) hypothesis can be visualized by the behavior of a billiard ball in a triangular domain on the Upper Poincaré Half Plane (UPHP). The billiard system (named "big billiard") can be schematized by dividing the successions of trajectories according to Poincaré return map on the sides of the billiard table, according to the paradigms implemented by the BKL investigation and by the CB-LKSKS (Chernoff-Barrow-Lifshitz-Khalatnikov-Sinai-Khanin-Shchur) one. Different maps are obtained, according to different symmetry-quotienting mechanisms used to analyze the dynamics. In the inhomogeneous case, new structures have been uncovered, such that, in this framework, the billiard table (named "small billiard") consists of 1/6 of the previous one. The connections between the symmetry-quotienting mechanisms are further investigated on the UPHP. The relation between the complete billiard and the small billiard are also further explained according to the role of Weyl reflections. The quantum properties of the system are sketched as well, and the physical interpretation of the wave function is further developed. In particular, a physical interpretation for the symmetry-quotienting maps is proposed.

  15. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  16. Three-dimensional broadband ground-plane cloak made of metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hui Feng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2010-01-01

    Since invisibility cloaks were first suggested by transformation optics theory, there has been much work on the theoretical analysis and design of various types and a few experimental verifications at microwave and optical frequencies within two-dimensional limits. Here, we realize the first practical implementation of a fully 3D broadband and low-loss ground-plane cloak at microwave frequencies. The cloak, realized by drilling inhomogeneous holes in multi-layered dielectric plates, can conceal a 3D object located under a curved conducting plane from all viewing angles by imitating the reflection of a flat conducting plane. We also designed and realized, using non-resonant metamaterials, a high-gain lens antenna that can produce narrow-beam plane waves in the near-field region in a broad frequency band. The antenna constitutes the transmitter of the measurement system and is essential for the measurement of cloaking behaviour. PMID:20975696

  17. Three-dimensional broadband ground-plane cloak made of metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui Feng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2010-01-01

    Since invisibility cloaks were first suggested by transformation optics theory, there has been much work on the theoretical analysis and design of various types and a few experimental verifications at microwave and optical frequencies within two-dimensional limits. Here, we realize the first practical implementation of a fully 3D broadband and low-loss ground-plane cloak at microwave frequencies. The cloak, realized by drilling inhomogeneous holes in multi-layered dielectric plates, can conceal a 3D object located under a curved conducting plane from all viewing angles by imitating the reflection of a flat conducting plane. We also designed and realized, using non-resonant metamaterials, a high-gain lens antenna that can produce narrow-beam plane waves in the near-field region in a broad frequency band. The antenna constitutes the transmitter of the measurement system and is essential for the measurement of cloaking behaviour. PMID:20975696

  18. A Collaborative Knowledge Plane for Autonomic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Maïssa; Krief, Francine

    Autonomic networking aims to give network components self-managing capabilities. Several autonomic architectures have been proposed. Each of these architectures includes sort of a knowledge plane which is very important to mimic an autonomic behavior. Knowledge plane has a central role for self-functions by providing suitable knowledge to equipment and needs to learn new strategies for more accuracy.However, defining knowledge plane's architecture is still a challenge for researchers. Specially, defining the way cognitive supports interact each other in knowledge plane and implementing them. Decision making process depends on these interactions between reasoning and learning parts of knowledge plane. In this paper we propose a knowledge plane's architecture based on machine learning (inductive logic programming) paradigm and situated view to deal with distributed environment. This architecture is focused on two self-functions that include all other self-functions: self-adaptation and self-organization. Study cases are given and implemented.

  19. Collinearity-preserving functions between Desarguesian planes

    PubMed Central

    Carter, David S.; Vogt, Andrew

    1980-01-01

    Using concepts from valuation theory, we obtain a characterization of all collinearity-preserving functions from one affine or projective Desarguesian plane into another. The case in which the planes are projective and the range contains a quadrangle has been treated previously in the literature. Our results permit one or both planes to be affine and include cases in which the range contains a triangle but no quadrangle. A key theorem is that, with the exception of certain embeddings defined on planes of order 2 and 3, every collinearity-preserving function from one affine Desarguesian plane into another can be extended to a collinearity-preserving function between enveloping projective planes. PMID:16592845

  20. Diurnal Curve of the Ocular Perfusion Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, TCA; Bezerra, BSP; Vianello, MP; Corradi, J; Dorairaj, SK; Prata, TS

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the diurnal variation of the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in normal, suspects and glaucoma patients. Materials and methods: Seventy-nine subjects were enrolled in a prospective study. The diurnal curve of intraocular pressure (IOP) was performed and blood pressure measurements were obtained. Each participant was grouped into one of the following based upon the clinical evaluation of the optic disk, IOP and standard achromatic perimetry (SAP): 18 eyes were classified as normal (normal SAP, normal optic disk evaluation and IOP < 21 mm Hg in two different measurements), 30 eyes as glaucoma suspect (GS) (normal SAP and mean deviation (MD), C/D ration > 0.5 or asymmetry > 0.2 and/or ocular hypertension), 31 eyes as early glaucoma (MD < -6 dB, glaucomatous optic neuropathy and SAP and MDs on SAP. Standard achromatic perimetry was performed with the Octopus 3.1.1 Dynamic 24-2 program. Intraocular pressure and blood pressure measurements were taken at 6 am, 9 am, 12, 3 and 6 pm. The patients stayed in the seated position for 5 minutes prior to blood pressure measurements. Results: The mean IOP values in all groups did not follow any regular pattern. The peak IOP was found to be greater in suspect [18.70 ± 3.31 (mm Hg ± SD)] and glaucoma (18.77 ± 4.30 mm Hg) patients as compared to normal subjects (16.11 ± 2.27 mm Hg). In studying the diurnal variation of the OPP, we found lower values at 3 pm in normals (34.21 ± 2.07 mm Hg), at 9 am in suspects (54.35 ± 3.32 mm Hg) and at 12 pm in glaucoma patients (34.84 ± 1.44 mm Hg). Conclusion: Each group has a specific OPP variation during the day with the most homogeneous group being the suspect one. It is important to keep studying the IOP and OPP variation for increased comprehension of the pathophysiology of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. How to cite this article: Kanadani FN, Moreira TCA, Bezerra BSP, Vianello MP, Corradi J, Dorairaj SK, Prata TS. Diurnal Curve of the Ocular Perfusion

  1. Active particles on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael

    Active systems have proved to be very sensitive to the geometry of their environment. This is often achieved by spending significant time at the boundary, probing its shape by gliding along it. I will discuss coarse graining the microscopic dynamics of self-propelled particles on a general curved surface to predict the way the density profile on the surface depends on its geometry. Beyond confined active particles, this formalism is a natural starting point to study objects that cannot leave the boundary at all, such as cells crawling on a curved substrate, animals running on uneven ground, or active colloids trapped at an interface.

  2. Fitting curves to cyclic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, W.B.

    1955-01-01

    A common problem in hydrology is to fit a smooth curve to cyclic or periodic data, either to define the most probable values of the data or to test some principle that one wishes to demonstrate.  This study treats of those problems where the length or period of the cycle is know beforehand - as a day, year, or meander length for example.  Curve-fitting can be made by free-hand drawing, and where the data are closely aligned this method offers the simplest and most direct course.  However, there are many problems where the best fit is far from obvious, and analytical methods may be necessary.

  3. Computational verification of the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture for individual elliptic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorov, Grigor; Jorza, Andrei; Patrikis, Stefan; Stein, William A.; Tarnita, Corina

    2009-12-01

    We describe theorems and computational methods for verifying the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjectural formula for specific elliptic curves over mathbb{Q} of analytic ranks 0 and 1 . We apply our techniques to show that if E is a non-CM elliptic curve over mathbb{Q} of conductor leq 1000 and rank 0 or 1 , then the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjectural formula for the leading coefficient of the L -series is true for E , up to odd primes that divide either Tamagawa numbers of E or the degree of some rational cyclic isogeny with domain E . Since the rank part of the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture is a theorem for curves of analytic rank 0 or 1 , this completely verifies the full conjecture for these curves up to the primes excluded above.

  4. Computing Melnikov Curves for Periodically Perturbed Piecewise Smooth Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dua, Aseem; Marathe, Amol

    Curves dividing the parameter plane into regions according to the presence or absence of homoclinic or heteroclinic tangle corresponding to the periodically perturbed saddle of the piecewise smooth oscillator are studied using Melnikov analysis. The analysis is not simplified by choosing the discontinuity plane at a convenient location. Separatrix of the unperturbed system is parametrized exactly in a piecewise manner. Switching times, i.e. parameter values at which the separatrix crosses the discontinuity plane, are obtained. Switching times split the Melnikov integral into various subintegrals which are evaluated either exactly using term-wise integration of the infinite series of the integrand or approximately using a finite-term series approximation of the integrand, the latter being computationally an extensive task. Integral evaluations though approximate, are purely analytical expressions in terms of special functions such as digamma and hypergeometric. Melnikov plots show that the boundary between three regions in the parameter plane differ qualitatively in case of parametric and external excitations, however; adding self-excitation to the external one does not much alter the boundary qualitatively and quantitatively.

  5. NEXT Performance Curve Analysis and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, Pratik; Cardiff, Eric; Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Performance curves of the NEXT thruster are highly important in determining the thruster's ability in performing towards mission-specific goals. New performance curves are proposed and examined here. The Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG) is used to verify variations in mission solutions based on both available thruster curves and the new curves generated. Furthermore, variations in BOL and EOL curves are also examined. Mission design results shown here validate the use of EMTG and the new performance curves.

  6. Sagittal plane biomechanics. American Diabetes Association.

    PubMed

    Dananberg, H J

    2000-01-01

    During walking, the center of body mass must pass from behind the weightbearing foot to in front of it. For this to take place, the foot must function as a sagittal plane pivot. Because the range required for this motion is approximately five times as great as both frontal and transverse plane motion, its evaluation should become an essential part of a podiatric biomechanical assessment. Lack of proper sagittal plane motion and its sequelae are described. PMID:10659532

  7. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-03-21

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  8. Recent developments in surgical skin planing.

    PubMed

    AYRES, S; WILSON, J W; LUIKART, R

    1958-02-01

    In surgical skin planing steel wire brushes have been largely replaced by the less hazardous diamond chip burs or "fraises" and serrated steel wheels. In addition to acne pits and wrinkling, multiple actinic (senile) keratoses are an important indication for planing. Planing provides a nonscarring method for the treatment of existing keratoses, as well as a prophylaxis against skin cancer by replacing the sun-damaged, precancerous epidermis with new epidermal cells derived from the cutaneous adnexa (pilosebaceous and sweat gland units). There are clinical landmarks indicating the depth of planing which can serve as a guide to the operator and can be correlated with microscopic findings. The results of experiments on the comparative effects of refrigerants on animal and human skin indicate that human facial skin can tolerate considerable freezing with ethyl chloride or dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon 114) but that mixtures containing large proportions of the much colder dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12) may be undesirable. Refreezing an area of the skin in order to perform a more adequate planing is not considered hazardous.THE REGENERATION OF THE SKIN FOLLOWING PLANING HAS THREE COMPONENTS: Epidermal, adnexal and dermal. The cells of the epidermis and the adnexa are equipotential. A knowledge of the anatomy of the acne pit enables the operator to decide which pits can be benefited by planing and which should be excised before planing. The successful treatment of acne pits of the face by planing in patients having keloids elsewhere on the body is reported. PMID:13500217

  9. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  10. Spiral Galaxy Central Bulge Tangential Speed of Revolution Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taff, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    The objective was to, for the first time in a century, scientifically analyze the ``rotation curves'' (sic) of the central bulges of scores of spiral galaxies. I commenced with a methodological, rational, geometrical, arithmetic, and statistical examination--none of them carried through before--of the radial velocity data. The requirement for such a thorough treatment is the paucity of data typically available for the central bulge: fewer than 10 observations and frequently only five. The most must be made of these. A consequence of this logical handling is the discovery of a unique model for the central bulge volume mass density resting on the positive slope, linear, rise of its tangential speed of revolution curve and hence--for the first time--a reliable mass estimate. The deduction comes from a known physics-based, mathematically valid, derivation (not assertion). It rests on the full (not partial) equations of motion plus Poisson's equation. Following that is a prediction for the gravitational potential energy and thence the gravitational force. From this comes a forecast for the tangential speed of revolution curve. It was analyzed in a fashion identical to that of the data thereby closing the circle and demonstrating internal self-consistency. This is a hallmark of a scientific method-informed approach to an experimental problem. Multiple plots of the relevant quantities and measures of goodness of fit will be shown. Astronomy related

  11. Supply Curves of Conserved Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan Kevin

    1982-05-01

    Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes. The conservation supply curve concept can be applied to peak power, water, pollution, and other markets where consumers demand a service rather than a particular good.

  12. Interpolation and Polynomial Curve Fitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yajun; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2014-01-01

    Two points determine a line. Three noncollinear points determine a quadratic function. Four points that do not lie on a lower-degree polynomial curve determine a cubic function. In general, n + 1 points uniquely determine a polynomial of degree n, presuming that they do not fall onto a polynomial of lower degree. The process of finding such a…

  13. Geomorphological origin of recession curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Basudev; Marani, Marco

    2010-12-01

    We identify a previously undetected link between the river network morphology and key recession curves properties through a conceptual-physical model of the drainage process of the riparian unconfined aquifer. We show that the power-law exponent, α, of -dQ/dt vs. Q curves is related to the power-law exponent of N(l) vs. G(l) curves (which we show to be connected to Hack's law), where l is the downstream distance from the channel heads, N(l) is the number of channel reaches exactly located at a distance l from their channel head, and G(l) is the total length of the network located at a distance greater or equal to l from channel heads. Using Digital Terrain Models and daily discharge observations from 67 US basins we find that geomorphologic α estimates match well the values obtained from recession curves analyses. Finally, we argue that the link between recession flows and network morphology points to an important role of low-flow discharges in shaping the channel network.

  14. CURVES, VERTICES, KNOTS AND SUCH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOLEY, JACK L.

    THIS BOOKLET, ONE OF A SERIES, HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PROJECT, A PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED PUPILS. A PROJECT TEAM, INCLUDING INSERVICE TEACHERS, IS BEING USED TO WRITE AND DEVELOP THE MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN THIS BOOKLET INCLUDE SUCH CONCEPTS AS (1) SIMPLE CLOSED CURVES, (2) NETWORKS, (3) MAP…

  15. Time series prediction using a rational fraction neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Lee, Y.C.; Barnes, C.; Aldrich, C.H.; Kindel, J.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient neural network based on a rational fraction representation has been trained to perform time series prediction. The network is a generalization of the Volterra-Wiener network while still retaining the computational efficiency of the latter. Because of the second order convergent nature of the learning algorithm, the rational net is computationally far more efficient than multilayer networks. The rational fractional representation is, however, more restrictive than the multilayer networks.

  16. Positivity preserving using GC1 rational quartic spline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Karim, Samsul Ariffin; Pang, Kong Voon; Hashim, Ishak

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we study the shape preserving interpolation for positive data using a rational quartic spline which has a quartic numerator and linear denominator. The rational quartic splines have GC1 continuity at join knots. Simple data dependent constraints are derived on the shape parameters in the description of the rational interpolant. Numerical comparison between the proposed scheme and the existing scheme is discussed. The results indicate that the proposed scheme works well for all tested data sets.

  17. Static properties of hydrostatic thrust gas bearings with curved surfaces.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehsteiner, F. H.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The classical treatment of circular, hydrostatic, orifice-regulated thrust gas bearings, in which perfectly plane bearing plates are assumed, is extended to include axisymmetric, but otherwise arbitrary, plate profiles. Plate curvature has a strong influence on bearing load capability, static stiffness, tilting stiffness, and side force per unit misalignment angle. By a suitable combination of gas inlet impedance and concave plate profile, the static stiffness can be made almost constant over a wide load range, and to remain positive at the closure load. Extensive measurements performed with convex and concave plates agree with theory to within the experimental error throughout and demonstrate the practical feasibility of using curved plates.

  18. Refraction at a curved dielectric interface - Geometrical optics solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.-W.; Sheshadri, M. S.; Mittra, R.; Jamnejad, V.

    1982-01-01

    The transmission of a spherical or plane wave through an arbitrarily curved dielectric interface is solved by the geometrical optics theory. The transmitted field is proportional to the product of the conventional Fresnel's transmission coefficient and a divergence factor (DF), which describes the cross-sectional variation (convergence or divergence) of a ray pencil as the latter propagates in the transmitted region. The factor DF depends on the incident wavefront, the curvatures of the interface, and the relative indices of the two media. Explicit matrix formulas for calculating DF are given, and its physical significance is illustrated via examples.

  19. Solar concentration by curved-base Fresnel lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The solar concentration performance of idealized curved base line focusing Fresnel lenses is analyzed. A simple optical model was introduced to study the effects of base curvature and lens f-number. Thin lens ray tracing and the laws of reflection and refraction are used to develop expression for lens transmittance and image plane intensity profiles. The intensity distribution over the solar spectrum, lens dispersion effects, and absorption by the lens material are included in the analysis. Model capabilities include assessment of lens performance in the presence of small transverse tracking errors and the sensitivity of solar image characteristics to focusing.

  20. Rationally designed nanovehicles to overcome cancer chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Livney, Yoav D; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2013-11-01

    Drug resistance is a primary hindrance towards curative cancer chemotherapy. Nanotechnology holds great promise in establishing efficacious and innovative strategies to overcome chemoresistance, and markedly facilitate complementary treatments and cancer diagnostics. Various nanomedical devices are being introduced and evaluated, demonstrating encouraging results. While stealth liposomes serve as a benchmark, astonishing progress is witnessed in polymeric nanovehicles, sometimes combined with low molecular weight surfactants, some of which inhibit drug resistance in addition to solubilizing drugs. Cutting edge multifunctional or quadrugnostic nanoparticles currently developed offer simultaneous targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics and chemosensitizers or drug-resistance gene silencing cargo, along with diagnostic imaging agents, like metallic NPs. Viral and cellular components offer exciting new routes for cancer targeting and treatment. Targeting intracellular compartments is another challenging frontier spawning pioneering approaches and results. To further enhance rational design of nanomedicine for overcoming drug resistance, we review the latest thoughts and accomplishments in recent literature. PMID:23954781

  1. Update on rational targeted therapy in AML.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Danielle; Grant, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenge to both patients and clinicians. Despite improvements in our understanding of the disease, treatment has changed minimally and outcomes remain poor for the majority of patients. Within the last decade, there have been an increasing number of potential targets and pathways identified for development in AML. The classes of agents described in this review include but are not limited to epigenetic modifiers such as IDH inhibitors, BET inhibitors, and HDAC inhibitors as well as cell cycle and signaling inhibitors such as Aurora kinase inhibitors and CDK inhibitors. While the developments are encouraging, it is unlikely that targeting a single pathway will result in long-term disease control. Accordingly, we will also highlight potential rational partners for the novel agents described herein. PMID:26972558

  2. Rationalizing radio medical advice for maritime emergencies.

    PubMed

    Aujla, K; Nag, R; Ferguson, J; Howell, M; Cahill, C

    2003-01-01

    The provision of radio medical advice by the National Health Service for British coastal waters has developed in an ad hoc fashion. In 1999, the closure of one of the two centres providing such advice led to unexpected problems. The demographic characteristics of the offshore population covered by each centre were markedly different and this resulted in a different spectrum of medical emergencies presenting to the sole remaining centre. Subsequent data collection of the details of medical emergencies presenting from offshore allowed an audit to inform the development of training packages for both base and remote practitioners. This has led to an ongoing national rationalization of ship-to-shore radio medical advice for the UK. PMID:12952706

  3. Rational elicitation of cold-sensitive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Chetana; Majhi, Sandipan; Mondal, Kajari; Bhattacharjee, Antara; VijayRaghavan, K; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-05-01

    Cold-sensitive phenotypes have helped us understand macromolecular assembly and biological phenomena, yet few attempts have been made to understand the basis of cold sensitivity or to elicit it by design. We report a method for rational design of cold-sensitive phenotypes. The method involves generation of partial loss-of-function mutants, at either buried or functional sites, coupled with selective overexpression strategies. The only essential input is amino acid sequence, although available structural information can be used as well. The method has been used to elicit cold-sensitive mutants of a variety of proteins, both monomeric and dimeric, and in multiple organisms, namely Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Drosophila melanogaster This simple, yet effective technique of inducing cold sensitivity eliminates the need for complex mutations and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for eliciting cold-sensitive phenotypes. PMID:27091994

  4. Rational Design of Biobetters with Enhanced Stability.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Fabienne; Schneider, Curtiss P; Agrawal, Neeraj J; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2015-08-01

    Biotherapeutics are the fastest growing class of pharmaceutical with a rapidly evolving market facing the rise of biosimilar and biobetter products. In contrast to a biosimilar, which is derived from the same gene sequence as the innovator product, a biobetter has enhanced properties, such as enhanced efficacy or reduced immunogenicity. Little work has been carried out so far to increase the intrinsic stability of biotherapeutics via sequence changes, even though, aggregation, the primary degradation pathway of proteins, leads to issues ranging from manufacturing failure to immunological response and to loss of therapeutic activity. Using our spatial aggregation propensity tool as a first step to a rational design approach to identify aggregation-prone regions, biobetters of rituximab have been produced with enhanced stability by introducing site-specific mutations. Significant stabilization against aggregation was achieved for rituximab with no decrease in its binding affinity to the antigen. PMID:26096711

  5. Rational design of class I MHC ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognan, D.; Scapozza, L.; Folkers, G.; Daser, Angelika

    1995-04-01

    From the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of a class I MHC protein, several non natural peptides were designed in order to either optimize the interactions of one secondary anchor amino acid with its HLA binding pocket or to substitute the non interacting part with spacer residues. All peptides were synthesized and tested for binding to the class I MHC protein in an in vitro reconstitution assay. As predicted, the non natural peptides present an enhanced binding to the HLA-B27 molecule with respect to their natural parent peptides. This study constitutes the first step towards the rational design of non peptidic MHC ligands that should be very promising tools for the selective immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases.

  6. Rationalization of some genetic anticodonic assignments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Hall, L. M.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The hydrophobicity of most amino acids correlates well with that of their anticodon nucleotides, with Trp, Tyr, Ile, and Ser being the exceptions to this rule. Using previous data on hydrophobicity and binding constants, and new data on rates of esterification of polyadenylic acid with several N-acetylaminoacyl imidazolides, several of the anticodon assignments are rationalized. Chemical reasons are shown supporting the idea of the inclusion of the Ile in the catalog of biological amino acids late in the evolution, through a mutation of the existing tRNA and its aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase. It was found that an addition of hexane increases the incorporation of hydrophobic Ac-Phe into poly-A, in support of the Fox (1965) and Oparin (1965) emphasis on the biogenetic importance of phase-separated systems.

  7. Update on rational targeted therapy in AML

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Danielle; Grant, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenge to both patients and clinicians. Despite improvements in our understanding of the disease, treatment has changed minimally and outcomes remain poor for the majority of patients. Within the last decade, there have been an increasing number of potential targets and pathways identified for development in AML. The classes of agents described in this review include but are not limited to epigenetic modifiers such as IDH inhibitors, BET inhibitors, and HDAC inhibitors as well as cell cycle and signaling inhibitors such as Aurora kinase inhibitors and CDK inhibitors. While the developments are encouraging, it is unlikely that targeting a single pathway will result in long-term disease control. Accordingly, we will also highlight potential rational partners for the novel agents described herein. PMID:26972558

  8. Allowable rotation numbers for Siegel disks of rational maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manlove, Joseph Michael

    The results presented here answers in part a conjecture of Douady about sharpness of the Brjuno condition. Douady hypothesized that a Siegel disk exists for a rational function if and only if the Brjuno condition is satisfied by the rotation number. It is known that the Brjuno condition is sharp for quadratic polynomials and many special families. This thesis focuses on a class of rational functions, many of which have not been considered previously. Specific examples of maps for which these results apply include quadratic rational maps with an attracting cycle. Also included are those rational functions arising of Newton's method on cubic polynomials with distinct roots.

  9. Cyborg pantocrator: international relations theory from decisionism to rational choice.

    PubMed

    Guilhot, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    International relations theory took shape in the 1950s in reaction to the behavioral social science movement, emphasizing the limits of rationality in a context of high uncertainty, weak rules, and the possibility of lethal conflict. Yet the same discipline rapidly developed "rational choice" models applied to foreign policy decision making or nuclear strategy. This paper argues that this transformation took place almost seamlessly around the concept of "decision." Initially associated with an antirationalist or "decisionist" approach to politics, the sovereign decision became the epitome of political rationality when it was redescribed as "rational choice," thus easing the cultural acceptance of political realism in the postwar years. PMID:21732376

  10. Profile Detection in Medical and Astronomical Images by Means of the Hough Transform of Special Classes of Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massone, A. M.; Perasso, A.; Campi, C.; Beltrametti, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We develop a formal procedure for the automated recognition of rational and elliptic curves in medical and astronomical images. The procedure is based on the extension of the Hough transform concept to the definition of Hough transform of special classes of algebraic curves. We first introduce a catalogue of curves that satisfy the conditions to be automatically extracted from an image and the recognition algorithm, then we illustrate the power of this method to identify skeleton profiles in clinical X-ray tomography maps and front ends of solar eruptions in astronomical images provided by the NASA solar dynamics observatory satellite.

  11. The rational use of drugs and WHO.

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    On November 25-29, 1985, the World Health Organization held a Conference in Nairobi of Experts on the Rational Use of Drugs. In the early 1980s, both the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association (IFPMA) and Health Action International (HAI) had developed codes of pharmaceutical marketing practices in order to come to terms with the malpractices in this field. A more comprehensive approach was needed, however. Prime responsibility for rational drug use must rest with the member governments, operating through national regulatory authorities and assisted in their work by guidelines on minimum requirements for national drug regulation prepared by WHO. The Dag Hammarskjold Foundation organized a seminar on Another Development in Pharmaceuticals as an independent contribution to the international debate on this global issue. The seminar emphasized that development should be need-oriented, self-reliant, and based on structural transformations. Governments view the pharmaceutical crisis as 1 facet of the more general problem of spiralling health costs which put an intolerable burden on already overstretched welfare services. The pharmaceutical industry sees the crisis largely in terms of excessively restrictive regulations which stifle innovation of products. Some doctors and pharmacists feel that increased regulatory measures will erode their rights to prescribe and to control the supply and information to patients. On the other hand, some clinical pharmacologists and administrators express concern about excessive, irrational and uneconomic prescribing and its effects on public health. Consumer groups define the problem in terms of an overbearing and greedy business community. The general public fail to understand the effects of pharmaceuticals. PMID:12341043

  12. Dynamics of curved fronts in systems with power-law memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Hamed, M.; Nepomnyashchy, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of a curved front in a plane between two stable phases with equal potentials is modeled via two-dimensional fractional in time partial differential equation. A closed equation governing a slow motion of a small-curvature front is derived and applied for two typical examples of the potential function. Approximate axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric solutions are obtained.

  13. Modeling and Visualization Process of the Curve of Pen Point by GeoGebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktümen, Muharem; Horzum, Tugba; Ceylan, Tuba

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the mathematical construction of a real-life model by means of parametric equations, as well as the two- and three-dimensional visualization of the model using the software GeoGebra. The model was initially considered as "determining the parametric equation of the curve formed on a plane by the point of a pen, positioned…

  14. Evaluation depth of the curve of Spee in class I, class II, and class III malocclusion: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Dinakarsamy, V.; Santhosh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long-span posterior restorations are designed. When restorations are added to an existing tooth arrangement characterized by rotated, tipped, or extruded teeth, excursive interferences may be incorporated, resulting in detrimental squeal. The curve of Spee, which exists in the ideal natural dentition, allows harmony to exist between the anterior tooth and condylar guidance. This curve exists in the sagittal plane and is the best viewed from a lateral aspect. It permits total posterior disclusion on mandibular protrusion, given proper anterior tooth guidance. It is unclear that whether the curve of Spee is a description of the occlusal surface of each arch separately or in maximal intercuspation. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in the depth of curve of Spee between the class I, class II, class III and to investigate the relationship of depth of curve of Spee with over jet, over-bite. PMID:26015764

  15. Excitation and geometrically matched local encoding of curved slices.

    PubMed

    Weber, Hans; Gallichan, Daniel; Schultz, Gerrit; Cocosco, Chris A; Littin, Sebastian; Reichardt, Wilfried; Welz, Anna; Witschey, Walter; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2013-05-01

    In this work, the concept of excitation and geometrically matched local in-plane encoding of curved slices (ExLoc) is introduced. ExLoc is based on a set of locally near-orthogonal spatial encoding magnetic fields, thus maintaining a local rectangular shape of the individual voxels and avoiding potential problems arising due to highly irregular voxel shapes. Unlike existing methods for exciting curved slices based on multidimensional radiofrequency-pulses, excitation and geometrically matched local encoding of curved slices does not require long duration or computationally expensive radiofrequency-pulses. As each encoding field consists of a superposition of potentially arbitrary (spatially linear or nonlinear) magnetic field components, the resulting field shape can be adapted with high flexibility to the specific region of interest. For extended nonplanar structures, this results in improved relevant volume coverage for fewer excited slices and thus increased efficiency. In addition to the mathematical description for the generation of dedicated encoding fields and data reconstruction, a verification of the ExLoc concept in phantom experiments and examples for in vivo curved single and multislice imaging are presented. PMID:22711656

  16. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2014-01-07

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  17. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  18. Slipping and Rolling on an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ([mu]). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is…

  19. Study the Z-Plane Strip Capacitance

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, H.; Swain, S.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    The BaBaR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is currently undergoing an upgrade to improve its muon and neutral hadron detection system. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that had been used till now have deteriorated in performance over the past few years and are being replaced by Limited Streamer Tube (LSTs). Each layer of the system consists of a set of up to 10 streamer tube modules which provide one coordinate ({phi} coordinate) and a single ''Z-plane'' which provides the Z coordinate of the hit. The large area Z-planes (up to 12m{sup 2}) are 1mm thick and contain 96 copper strips that detect the induced charge from avalanches created in the streamer tube wires. All the Z-planes needed for the upgrade have already been constructed, but only a third of the planes were installed last summer. After installing the 24 Z-planes last year, it was learned that 0.7% of the strips were dead when put inside the detector. This was mainly due to the delicate solder joint between the read-out cable and the strip, and since it is difficult to access or replace the Z-planes inside the detector, it is very important to perform various tests to make sure that the Z-planes will be efficient and effective in the long term. We measure the capacitance between the copper strips and the ground plane, and compare it to the theoretical value that we expect. Instead of measuring the capacitance channel by channel, which would be a very tedious job, we developed a more effective method of measuring the capacitance. Since all the Z-planes were built at SLAC, we also built a smaller 46 cm by 30 cm Z-plane with 12 strips just to see how they were constructed and to gain a better understanding about the solder joints.

  20. A half plane and a strip with an arbitrarily located crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Arin, K.

    1973-01-01

    A technique is presented for dealing with the problem of an elastic domain containing an arbitrarily oriented internal crack. The problem is formulated as a system of integral equations for a fictitious layer of body forces imbedded in the plane along a closed smooth curve encircling the original domain. The problems of a half plane with a crack in the neighborhood of its free boundary and of an infinite strip containing a symmetrically located internal crack with an arbitrary orientation are considered as examples. In each case the stress intensity factors are computed and are given as functions of the crack angle.

  1. Flow Through Randomly Curved Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational study of the transport properties of campylotic (intrinsically curved) media. It is found that the relation between the flow through a campylotic media, consisting of randomly located curvature perturbations, and the average Ricci scalar of the system, exhibits two distinct functional expressions, depending on whether the typical spatial extent of the curvature perturbation lies above or below the critical value maximizing the overall scalar of curvature. Furthermore, the flow through such systems as a function of the number of curvature perturbations is found to present a sublinear behavior for large concentrations, due to the interference between curvature perturbations leading to an overall less curved space. We have also characterized the flux through such media as a function of the local Reynolds number and the scale of interaction between impurities. For the purpose of this study, we have also developed and validated a new lattice Boltzmann model. PMID:24173367

  2. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  3. Quantum walking in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrighi, Pablo; Facchini, Stefano; Forets, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    A discrete-time quantum walk (QW) is essentially a unitary operator driving the evolution of a single particle on the lattice. Some QWs admit a continuum limit, leading to familiar PDEs (e.g., the Dirac equation). In this paper, we study the continuum limit of a wide class of QWs and show that it leads to an entire class of PDEs, encompassing the Hamiltonian form of the massive Dirac equation in (1+1) curved spacetime. Therefore, a certain QW, which we make explicit, provides us with a unitary discrete toy model of a test particle in curved spacetime, in spite of the fixed background lattice. Mathematically, we have introduced two novel ingredients for taking the continuum limit of a QW, but which apply to any quantum cellular automata: encoding and grouping.

  4. Gravitational-wave sensitivity curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Cole, R. H.; Berry, C. P. L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several common conventions in use by the gravitational-wave community to describe the amplitude of sources and the sensitivity of detectors. These are frequently confused. We outline the merits of and differences between the various quantities used for parameterizing noise curves and characterizing gravitational-wave amplitudes. We conclude by producing plots that consistently compare different detectors. Similar figures can be generated on-line for general use at http://rhcole.com/apps/GWplotter.

  5. Phase Curves of Eccentric Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; de Wit, Julien; Laughlin, Gregory P.; Knutson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 15% of the known exoplanet population have significantly eccentric orbits (e > 0.25). Systems with planets on highly eccentric orbits provide natural laboratories to test theories of orbital evolution, tidal forcing, and atmospheric response. The two best studied eccentric exoplanets are HAT-P-2b (e~0.5) and HD 80606 b (e~0.9). Both of these eccentric planets have full or partial orbit phase curve observations taken with the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 micron channels of the Spitzer IRAC instrument. These phase-curve observations of HAT-P-2b and HD 80606 b have given us important insights into atmospheric radiative timescales, planetary rotation rates and orbital evolution, and planet-star tidal interactions. Here I will overview the key results from the Spitzer observational campaigns for HAT-P-2b and HD 80606 b and look toward the future of phase curve observations of eccentric exoplanets in the era of JWST.

  6. Growth curves for Laron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Laron, Z; Lilos, P; Klinger, B

    1993-01-01

    Growth curves for children with Laron syndrome were constructed on the basis of repeated measurements made throughout infancy, childhood, and puberty in 24 (10 boys, 14 girls) of the 41 patients with this syndrome investigated in our clinic. Growth retardation was already noted at birth, the birth length ranging from 42 to 46 cm in the 12/20 available measurements. The postnatal growth curves deviated sharply from the normal from infancy on. Both sexes showed no clear pubertal spurt. Girls completed their growth between the age of 16-19 years to a final mean (SD) height of 119 (8.5) cm whereas the boys continued growing beyond the age of 20 years, achieving a final height of 124 (8.5) cm. At all ages the upper to lower body segment ratio was more than 2 SD above the normal mean. These growth curves constitute a model not only for primary, hereditary insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency (Laron syndrome) but also for untreated secondary IGF-I deficiencies such as growth hormone gene deletion and idiopathic congenital isolated growth hormone deficiency. They should also be useful in the follow up of children with Laron syndrome treated with biosynthetic recombinant IGF-I. PMID:8333769

  7. Towards the Rational Design of Nanoparticle Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Priyabrat

    This research is focused on development of routes towards the rational design of nanoparticle catalysts. Primarily, it is focused on two main projects; (1) the use of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) as greener media for the design of quasi-homogeneous nanoparticle catalysts and (2) the rational design of heterogeneous-supported nanoparticle catalysts from structured nanoparticle precursors. Each project has different studies associated with the main objective of the design of nanoparticle catalysts. In the first project, imidazolium-based ionic liquids have been used for the synthesis of nanoparticle catalysts. In particular, studies on recyclability, reuse, mode-of-stability, and long-term stability of these ionic-liquid supported nanoparticle catalysts have been done; all of which are important factors in determining the overall "greenness" of such synthetic routes. Three papers have been published/submitted for this project. In the first publication, highly stable polymer-stabilized Au, Pd and bimetallic Au-Pd nanoparticle catalysts have been synthesized in imidazolium-based 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF6) ionic liquid (Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical, 2008, 286, 114). The resulting nanoparticles were found to be effective and selective quasi-homogeneous catalysts towards a wide-range of hydrogenation reactions and the catalyst solution was reused for further catalytic reactions with minimal loss in activity. The synthesis of very pure and clean ILs has allowed a platform to study the effects of impurities in the imidazolium ILs on nanoparticle stability. In a later study, a new mode of stabilization was postulated where the presence of low amounts of 1-methylimidazole has substantial effects on the resulting stability of Au and Pd-Au nanoparticles in these ILs (Chemical Communications, 2009, 812). In further continuation of this study, a comparative study involving four stabilization protocols for nanoparticle

  8. Rational Decisionmaking in Higher Education. An NCHEMS Executive Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle

    Five models of organizational decision-making are described, and a case study of the rational model as seen in the budget process at Stanford University during the 1970s is presented. Several issues are addressed to help administrators who are interested in increasing the organization's rational decision-making. The five models are as follows: the…

  9. Imagination and the Pursuit of a Rational Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, David E.

    The works of certain rhetorical thinkers contain strategies directed at achieving assent or cooperation. Such writings demonstrate means by which readers' rational responses can be deliberately challenged and disrupted. While people often cite Aristotle's maxim "Man is a rational animal," critics have asserted that the statement misrepresents both…

  10. Studying Quality beyond Technical Rationality: Political and Symbolic Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco Ramírez, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The underlying paradigms that influence research on quality have remained alarmingly under-researched; this article analyses the constraints that a technical-rational approach for the study of quality in higher education imposes. Technical rationality has been the dominant paradigm that shapes research on quality in higher education.…

  11. An Empirical Evaluation of Ellis' Rational Emotive Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Loyd S.; Couch, R. David

    Ellis' rational emotive theory is based on the assumption that people are born with a potential for both rational and irrational thinking. To analyze the relationship of irrational beliefs to sensitivity, depression, submission, anxiety, and neuroticism, an Irrationality Scale, containing eight irrational beliefs, was constructed from a review of…

  12. Counseling Children and Adolescents: Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Describes specific parallels between rational emotive behavior therapy and humanism. Places specific emphasis on the application of these principles with children and adolescents. Concepts are illustrated with case studies and a description of the similarities between rational emotive and humanistic, or affective, education. Highlights emotional…

  13. Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Has a Humanistic Orientation-Definitely.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Paul J.

    1996-01-01

    Challenges criticisms that rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) is not humanistic. Responds to misconceptions regarding the term "rational" and concludes that, although REBT is closely identified with secular humanism, REBT can also be seen as a set of analytical and therapeutic skills that religious humanists can use. (RJM)

  14. Bounded Rationality, Retaliation, and the Spread of Urban Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce A.; Wright, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from in-depth interviews with 52 active street criminals, this article examines the grounded theoretic implications of bounded rationality for retaliatory street violence. The bounds on rationality that this article explores are anger, uncertainty, and time pressure. These bounds create imperfections in the retaliatory decision-making…

  15. An Educational Interpretation of Jurgen Habermas's Communicative Rationality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Gicheol

    2002-01-01

    Suggests taking Habermas's notion of communicative rationality as a reference point from which to organize educational activities and evaluate their "being educational" in the classroom. Communicative rationality in the classroom provides a perspective from which one can establish a normative standard for being educational. (Contains endnotes and…

  16. Rationality and Integration in a Family Childrearing Decision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diana, Mark S.

    This paper illuminates how concepts of rationality developed by Diesing in l962 are reflected in parents' childrearing decisions. After examining technical (TR), economic (ER), social (SR), legal (LR), and political (PR) rationalities or decision-making styles, consideration is given to integrative effects and the influence of parents' friends and…

  17. Passionate Rationalism: The Role of Emotion in Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakomski, Gabriele; Evers, Colin W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to argue that emotion has a central role to play in rational decision making based on recent research in the neuroanatomy of emotion. As a result, traditional rational decision-making theories, including Herbert Simon's modified model of satisficing that sharply demarcates emotions and values from rationality…

  18. Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy: Origins, Constructs, and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Joshua C.

    In 1956, Dr. Albert Ellis presented his seminal work on Rational Therapy, subsequently renamed Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) in 1993. This paper explores the origins, theoretical foundations, applications, and implications of REBT and provides a look at the empirical research available in support of the approach's efficacy. REBT is…

  19. The Rationality of Narrative Inquiry in Research and Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conle, Carola

    2001-01-01

    Using Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action and concept of communicative rationality, the paper proposes that narrative inquiry can be a rational enterprise, presenting narrative inquiry as a narrative discourse which has the dual function of being a method of inquiry and a means of personal and professional development in teacher education.…

  20. Rational Experimental Design for Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, V.; Pidlisecky, A.; Knight, R.

    2008-12-01

    Over the past several decades advances in the acquisition and processing of electrical resistivity data, through multi-channel acquisition systems and new inversion algorithms, have greatly increased the value of these data to near-surface environmental and hydrological problems. There has, however, been relatively little advancement in the design of actual surveys. Data acquisition still typically involves using a small number of traditional arrays (e.g. Wenner, Schlumberger) despite a demonstrated improvement in data quality from the use of non-standard arrays. While optimized experimental design has been widely studied in applied mathematics and the physical and biological sciences, it is rarely implemented for non-linear problems, such as electrical resistivity imaging (ERI). We focus specifically on using ERI in the field for monitoring changes in the subsurface electrical resistivity structure. For this application we seek an experimental design method that can be used in the field to modify the data acquisition scheme (spatial and temporal sampling) based on prior knowledge of the site and/or knowledge gained during the imaging experiment. Some recent studies have investigated optimized design of electrical resistivity surveys by linearizing the problem or with computationally-intensive search algorithms. We propose a method for rational experimental design based on the concept of informed imaging, the use of prior information regarding subsurface properties and processes to develop problem-specific data acquisition and inversion schemes. Specifically, we use realistic subsurface resistivity models to aid in choosing source configurations that maximize the information content of our data. Our approach is based on first assessing the current density within a region of interest, in order to provide sufficient energy to the region of interest to overcome a noise threshold, and then evaluating the direction of current vectors, in order to maximize the

  1. Plane shock wave studies of Westerly granite and Nugget sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.B.; Anderson, G.D.

    1980-12-01

    Plane shock wave experiments were performed by using a light-gas gun on dry and water-saturated Westerly granite and dry Nugget sandstone. Changes in the slopes of the shock velocity versus particle velocity curves at 2 to 3 GPa and 1 to 2 GPa for dry granite and for dry sandstone, respectively, are attributed to the onset of pore collapse. However, there is little apparent loss of shear strength in either dry rock over the stress range of the experiments (i.e., 9.3 GPa in Westerly granite and 9.2 GPa in Nugget sandstone). Agreement between the shock wave data and quasistatic, uniaxial strain data for the dry rock implies the absence of rate-dependence in uniaxial strain. The shock data on saturated granite agree well with those for dry granite, thus suggesting there was no loss in shear strength as a result of pore pressure buildup.

  2. Capacitance of edge plane of pyrolytic graphite in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Minick, S.K.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-05-01

    The capacitance of the edge plane of pyrolytic graphite electrodes, in acetonitrile solutions, is measured by recording the current response to an applied triangular voltage sweep; TVS, and then fitting the current response with an appropriate function, (via a set of adjustable parameters). The pretreatment of the electrodes, the supporting electrolyte concentration used, and the frequency of the input TVS, were all found to affect the measured capacitance. In these experiments, a background current was also seen and the shape of the current output for the TVS; the charging/discharging curve, is shown to correlate with the magnitude of this background current. In addition, the size of the background current was found to have some dependence on the type of electrode pretreatment procedure used. 60 refs., 49 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Stress-Strain Behaviour of a Micacious Sand in Plane Strain Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, S. J. M.; Tatsuoka, F.

    Unusual failures of river banks and river training structures have been reported during construction and shortly after commissioning of several structures along Jamuna river in Bangladesh that raised widespread questions regarding the design principles and parameters used. The natural sand deposit along the Jamuna river contain relatively larger amount of mica than most other natural soils. Jamuna sand needs to be studied under wide range of loading conditions (such as triaxial, plane strain, simple shear etc.), drainage and density conditions (i.e. drained / undrained, dry / saturated, dense/loose state etc.) to reveal the extent of variation of its strength and deformation characteristics in order to facilitate understanding of the mechanism of past failures of structures and suggest rational design parameters. A series of plane strain compression tests were performed on Jamuna sand. It is observed that Jamuna sand is highly contractive under shear and more anisotropic than other non-mica sands.

  4. Fatal SIR diseases and rational exemption to vaccination.

    PubMed

    d'Onofrio, Alberto; Manfredi, Piero; Salinelli, Ernesto

    2008-12-01

    A challenge to disease control in modern societies is the spread of rational exemption to vaccination as a consequence of the rational comparison between the steadily declining risk of infection and the risk of side effects from the vaccine. Here, we consider rational exemption in an susceptible-infectious-removed (SIR) model with information-dependent vaccination where individuals use information on the disease's mortality as their information set. Using suitable assumptions on the dynamics of the population, we show the dynamic implications of the interaction between rational exemption, current and delayed information and the risk of death by the disease. In particular, we illustrate the onset of the long cycles caused by rational exemption when vaccination decisions are based on delayed informations. PMID:18840601

  5. Cognitive Rationalizations for Tanning-Bed Use: A Preliminary Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Smita C.; Hay, Jennifer L.; Greene, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine construct and predictive utility of an adapted cognitive rationalization scale for tanning-bed use. Methods Current/former tanning-bed-using undergraduate students (N = 216; 87.6% females; 78.4% white) at a large northeastern university participated in a survey. A cognitive rationalization for tanning-bed use scale was adapted. Standardized self-report measures of past tanning-bed use, advantages of tanning, perceived vulnerability to photoaging, tanning-bed use dependence, and tanning- bed use intention were also administered. Results The cognitive rationalization scale exhibited strong construct and predictive validity. Current tanners and tanning-bed-use-dependent participants endorsed rationalizations more strongly than did former tanners and not-tanning-bed-use-dependent participants respectively. Conclusions Findings indicate that cognitive rationalizations help explain discrepancy between inconsistent cognitions. PMID:23985280

  6. Rational choice, neuroeconomy and mixed emotions.

    PubMed

    Livet, Pierre

    2010-01-27

    Experimental psychology has shown differences between predictions of theory of decision and human choices. Emotions like regret can partly explain these differences. Neuroimagery used in combination with behavioural economics (neuroeconomics) has been used in order to try to disentangle the different emotional and rational factors (regret, rejoicing, reward, costs, uncertainty, trade-off between positive and negative aspects of different options). Emotions then appear as much more complex and mixed affective states than usually assumed. Not only might we feel a positive affect in punishing unfair partners, but mixed emotions can, for example, combine transmutation of previous anxiety into relief and elation by comparison with another less exciting option (elating relief). At the level of complexity of these mixed emotions--which we formally represent by comparisons between 'unexpected utilities' and expected ones--the main biases that Kahnemann and Tversky have shown can be explained. In spite of the complexity of these mixed emotions, some of these hypotheses might be partially tested by brain imagery. PMID:20026464

  7. Biodiversity, conservation biology, and rational choice.

    PubMed

    Frank, David

    2014-03-01

    This paper critically discusses two areas of Sahotra Sarkar's recent work in environmental philosophy: biodiversity and conservation biology and roles for decision theory in incorporating values explicitly in the environmental policy process. I argue that Sarkar's emphasis on the practices of conservation biologists, and especially the role of social and cultural values in the choice of biodiversity constituents, restricts his conception of biodiversity to particular practical conservation contexts. I argue that life scientists have many reasons to measure many types of diversity, and that biodiversity metrics could be value-free. I argue that Sarkar's emphasis on the limitations of normative decision theory is in tension with his statement that decision theory can "put science and ethics together." I also challenge his claim that multi-criteria decision tools lacking axiomatic foundations in preference and utility theory are "without a rational basis," by presenting a case of a simple "outranking" multi-criteria decision rule that can violate a basic normative requirement of preferences (transitivity) and ask whether there may nevertheless be contexts in which such a procedure might assist decision makers. PMID:24216191

  8. Rationalizing meat consumption. The 4Ns.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Jared; Ruby, Matthew B; Loughnan, Steve; Luong, Mischel; Kulik, Juliana; Watkins, Hanne M; Seigerman, Mirra

    2015-08-01

    Recent theorizing suggests that the 4Ns - that is, the belief that eating meat is natural, normal, necessary, and nice - are common rationalizations people use to defend their choice of eating meat. However, such theorizing has yet to be subjected to empirical testing. Six studies were conducted on the 4Ns. Studies 1a and 1b demonstrated that the 4N classification captures the vast majority (83%-91%) of justifications people naturally offer in defense of eating meat. In Study 2, individuals who endorsed the 4Ns tended also to objectify (dementalize) animals and included fewer animals in their circle of moral concern, and this was true independent of social dominance orientation. Subsequent studies (Studies 3-5) showed that individuals who endorsed the 4Ns tend not to be motivated by ethical concerns when making food choices, are less involved in animal-welfare advocacy, less driven to restrict animal products from their diet, less proud of their animal-product decisions, tend to endorse Speciesist attitudes, tend to consume meat and animal products more frequently, and are highly committed to eating meat. Furthermore, omnivores who strongly endorsed the 4Ns tended to experience less guilt about their animal-product decisions, highlighting the guilt-alleviating function of the 4Ns. PMID:25865663

  9. Learning rational temporal eye movement strategies.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, David; Rothkopf, Constantin A

    2016-07-19

    During active behavior humans redirect their gaze several times every second within the visual environment. Where we look within static images is highly efficient, as quantified by computational models of human gaze shifts in visual search and face recognition tasks. However, when we shift gaze is mostly unknown despite its fundamental importance for survival in a dynamic world. It has been suggested that during naturalistic visuomotor behavior gaze deployment is coordinated with task-relevant events, often predictive of future events, and studies in sportsmen suggest that timing of eye movements is learned. Here we establish that humans efficiently learn to adjust the timing of eye movements in response to environmental regularities when monitoring locations in the visual scene to detect probabilistically occurring events. To detect the events humans adopt strategies that can be understood through a computational model that includes perceptual and acting uncertainties, a minimal processing time, and, crucially, the intrinsic costs of gaze behavior. Thus, subjects traded off event detection rate with behavioral costs of carrying out eye movements. Remarkably, based on this rational bounded actor model the time course of learning the gaze strategies is fully explained by an optimal Bayesian learner with humans' characteristic uncertainty in time estimation, the well-known scalar law of biological timing. Taken together, these findings establish that the human visual system is highly efficient in learning temporal regularities in the environment and that it can use these regularities to control the timing of eye movements to detect behaviorally relevant events. PMID:27382164

  10. Failure Criteria for FRP Laminates in Plane Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.

    2003-01-01

    A new set of six failure criteria for fiber reinforced polymer laminates is described. Derived from Dvorak's fracture mechanics analyses of cracked plies and from Puck's action plane concept, the physically-based criteria, denoted LaRC03, predict matrix and fiber failure accurately without requiring curve-fitting parameters. For matrix failure under transverse compression, the fracture plane is calculated by maximizing the Mohr-Coulomb effective stresses. A criterion for fiber kinking is obtained by calculating the fiber misalignment under load, and applying the matrix failure criterion in the coordinate frame of the misalignment. Fracture mechanics models of matrix cracks are used to develop a criterion for matrix in tension and to calculate the associated in-situ strengths. The LaRC03 criteria are applied to a few examples to predict failure load envelopes and to predict the failure mode for each region of the envelope. The analysis results are compared to the predictions using other available failure criteria and with experimental results. Predictions obtained with LaRC03 correlate well with the experimental results.

  11. Compression of contour data through exploiting curve-to-curve dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalabik, N.; Cooper, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    An approach to exploiting curve-to-curve dependencies in order to achieve high data compression is presented. One of the approaches to date of along curve compression through use of cubic spline approximation is taken and extended by investigating the additional compressibility achievable through curve-to-curve structure exploitation. One of the models under investigation is reported on.

  12. Analysis of growing crack tip deformation using both in-plane deformation and caustics obtained from out-of-plane displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.F.; Wang, J.S.; Chao, Y.J.; Sutton, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    The stereo vision is used to study the fracture behavior in the compact tension (CT) specimen made from 304L stainless steel. During crack tip blunting, initiation, and growth in the CT specimen, both in-plane and out-of-plane displacement fields near the crack tip are measured by the stereo vision. Based on the plane stress assumption and the deformation theory of plasticity, the J integral is evaluated along several rectangular paths surrounding the crack tip by using the measured in-plane displacement field. Prior to crack growth, the J integral is path independent. For crack extension up to {Delta}a {approx} 3 mm, the near field J integral values are 6% to 10% lower than far field J integral values. For the crack extension of {Delta}a {approx} 4 mm, the J integral lost path independence. The far field J integral values are in good agreement with results obtained from Merkle-Corten`s formula. Both J-{Delta}a and CTOA-{Delta}a are obtained by computing the J integral value and crack tip opening angle (CTOA) at each {Delta}a. Results indicate that CTOA reached a nearly constant value at a crack extension of {Delta}a = 3 mm with a leveled resistance curve thereafter. Also, the J integral value is determined by the maximum transverse diameter of the shadow spots, which are generated by using the out-of-plane displacement field. Results indicate that for crack extension up to 0.25 mm, the J integral values evaluated by using the out-of- plane displacement are close to those obtained by using in-plane displacements and Merkle-Corten`s formula.

  13. Deciphering Biochemical Network: from particles to planes then to spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xinhao; Zhang, Siliang; Engineer Research CenterBiotechnology, National

    2004-03-01

    Today when we are still infatuated with the booming systematic fashion in life science, we, especially as biologist, ironically have fallen down into a sub-systematic maze. That is, although rapid advances in "omics" sciences ceaselessly provided so-called global or large-scale maps to exhibit the corresponding subnet, seldom paid attention to connecting these distinct but close-knit functional modules. Fortunately, a group of physicists recently cast off this natural moat and integrated multi-scale biological network into a simple life's pyramid. However, if extended this pyramid to a 3D structure in view of XYZ axis constructed by the temporal, spatial and organized characteristics respectively, it should be noted that this from-universal-to-particular pyramid is only a transverse section while the achievements in diverse "omics" sciences consist of relative longitudinal ones. On that footing, if analogizing the development of systems biology in last decades as a huge leap from discrete particles (typically in "a paper = a gene" era) to several planes (that is relative to corresponding OMICS science), we might rationally predict a next "space" era is coming soon to untangle and map the multi-tiered biological network really in a whole.

  14. A two-axis in-plane motion measurement system based on optical beam deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriramshankar, R.; Mrinalini, R. Sri Muthu; Jayanth, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    Measurement of in-plane motion with high resolution and large bandwidth enables model-identification and real-time control of motion-stages. This paper presents an optical beam deflection based system for measurement of in-plane motion of both macro- and micro-scale motion stages. A curved reflector is integrated with the motion stage to achieve sensitivity to in-plane translational motion along two axes. Under optimal settings, the measurement system is shown to theoretically achieve sub-angstrom measurement resolution over a bandwidth in excess of 1 kHz and negligible cross-sensitivity to linear motion. Subsequently, the proposed technique is experimentally demonstrated by measuring the in-plane motion of a piezo flexure stage and a scanning probe microcantilever. For the former case, reflective spherical balls of different radii are employed to measure the in-plane motion and the measured sensitivities are shown to agree with theoretical values, on average, to within 8.3%. For the latter case, a prototype polydimethylsiloxane micro-reflector is integrated with the microcantilever. The measured in-plane motion of the microcantilever probe is used to identify nonlinearities and the transient dynamics of the piezo-stage upon which the probe is mounted. These are subsequently compensated by means of feedback control.

  15. A two-axis in-plane motion measurement system based on optical beam deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Sriramshankar, R.; Mrinalini, R. Sri Muthu; Jayanth, G. R.

    2013-10-15

    Measurement of in-plane motion with high resolution and large bandwidth enables model-identification and real-time control of motion-stages. This paper presents an optical beam deflection based system for measurement of in-plane motion of both macro- and micro-scale motion stages. A curved reflector is integrated with the motion stage to achieve sensitivity to in-plane translational motion along two axes. Under optimal settings, the measurement system is shown to theoretically achieve sub-angstrom measurement resolution over a bandwidth in excess of 1 kHz and negligible cross-sensitivity to linear motion. Subsequently, the proposed technique is experimentally demonstrated by measuring the in-plane motion of a piezo flexure stage and a scanning probe microcantilever. For the former case, reflective spherical balls of different radii are employed to measure the in-plane motion and the measured sensitivities are shown to agree with theoretical values, on average, to within 8.3%. For the latter case, a prototype polydimethylsiloxane micro-reflector is integrated with the microcantilever. The measured in-plane motion of the microcantilever probe is used to identify nonlinearities and the transient dynamics of the piezo-stage upon which the probe is mounted. These are subsequently compensated by means of feedback control.

  16. Fracture toughness curve shift method

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to examine the technical basis for the currently accepted methods for shifting fracture toughness curves to account for irradiation damage, and to work through national codes and standards bodies to revise those methods, if a change is warranted. During this reporting period, data from all the relevant HSSI Programs were acquired and stored in a database and evaluated. The results from that evaluation have been prepared in a draft letter report and are summarized here. A method employing Weibull statistics was applied to analyze fracture toughness properties of unirradiated and irradiated pressure vessel steels. Application of the concept of a master curve for irradiated materials was examined and used to measure shifts of fracture toughness transition curves. It was shown that the maximum likelihood approach gave good estimations of the reference temperature, T{sub o}, determined by rank method and could be used for analyzing of data sets where application of the rank method did not prove to be feasible. It was shown that, on average, the fracture toughness shifts generally exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts; a linear least-squares fit to the data set yielded a slope of 1.15. The observed dissimilarity was analyzed by taking into account differences in effects of irradiation on Charpy impact and fracture toughness properties. Based on these comparisons, a procedure to adjust Charpy 41-J shifts for achieving a more reliable correlation with the fracture toughness shifts was evaluated. An adjustment consists of multiplying the 41-J energy level by the ratio of unirradiated to irradiated Charpy upper shelves to determine an irradiated transition temperature, and then subtracting the unirradiated transition temperature determined at 41 J. For LUS welds, however, an unirradiated level of 20 J (15 ft-1b) was used for the corresponding adjustment for irradiated material.

  17. NLINEAR - NONLINEAR CURVE FITTING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    A common method for fitting data is a least-squares fit. In the least-squares method, a user-specified fitting function is utilized in such a way as to minimize the sum of the squares of distances between the data points and the fitting curve. The Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, is an interactive curve fitting routine based on a description of the quadratic expansion of the chi-squared statistic. NLINEAR utilizes a nonlinear optimization algorithm that calculates the best statistically weighted values of the parameters of the fitting function and the chi-square that is to be minimized. The inputs to the program are the mathematical form of the fitting function and the initial values of the parameters to be estimated. This approach provides the user with statistical information such as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters that produce the highest degree of correlation between the experimental data and the mathematical model. In the mathematical formulation of the algorithm, the Taylor expansion of chi-square is first introduced, and justification for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations are derived, which are solved by matrix algebra. To achieve convergence, the algorithm requires meaningful initial estimates for the parameters of the fitting function. NLINEAR is written in Fortran 77 for execution on a CDC Cyber 750 under NOS 2.3. It has a central memory requirement of 5K 60 bit words. Optionally, graphical output of the fitting function can be plotted. Tektronix PLOT-10 routines are required for graphics. NLINEAR was developed in 1987.

  18. Spatial Reasoning Training Through Light Curves Of Model Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziffer, Julie; Nakroshis, Paul A.; Rudnick, Benjamin T.; Brautigam, Maxwell J.; Nelson, Tyler W.

    2015-11-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that spatial reasoning skills, long known to be crucial to math and science success, are teachable. Even short stints of training can improve spatial reasoning skills among students who lack them (Sorby et al., 2006). Teaching spatial reasoning is particularly valuable to women and minorities who, through societal pressure, often doubt their spatial reasoning skill (Hill et al., 2010). We have designed a hands on asteroid rotation lab that provides practice in spatial reasoning tasks while building the student’s understanding of photometry. For our tool, we mount a model asteroid, with any shape of our choosing, on a slowly rotating motor shaft, whose speed is controlled by the experimenter. To mimic an asteroid light curve, we place the model asteroid in a dark box, shine a movable light source upon our asteroid, and record the light reflected onto a moveable camera. Students may then observe changes in the light curve that result from varying a) the speed of rotation, b) the model asteroid’s orientation with respect to the motor axis, c) the model asteroid’s shape or albedo, and d) the phase angle. After practicing with our tool, students are asked to pair new objects to their corresponding light curves. To correctly pair objects to their light curves, students must imagine how light scattering off of a three dimensional rotating object is imaged on a ccd sensor plane, and then reduced to a series of points on a light curve plot. Through the use of our model asteroid, the student develops confidence in spatial reasoning skills.

  19. Reconnaissance with slant plane circular SAR imaging.

    PubMed

    Soumekh, M

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a method for imaging from the slant plane data collected by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) over the full rotation or a partial segment of a circular flight path. A Fourier analysis for the Green's function of the imaging system is provided. This analysis is the basis of an inversion for slant plane circular SAR data. The reconstruction algorithm and resolution for this SAR system are outlined. It is shown that the slant plane circular SAR, unlike the slant plane linear SAR, has the capability to extract three-dimensional imaging information of a target scene. The merits of the algorithm are demonstrated via a simulated target whose ultra wideband foliage penetrating (FOPEN) or ground penetrating (GPEN) ultrahigh frequency (UHF) radar signature varies with the radar's aspect angle. PMID:18285213

  20. Dirac's aether in curved spacetime.

    PubMed

    Oliveira; Teixeira

    2000-06-01

    Proca's equations for two types of fields in a Dirac's aether with electric conductivity sigma are solved exactly. The Proca electromagnetic fields are assumed with cylindrical symmetry. The background is a static, curved spacetime whose spatial section is homogeneous and has the topology of either the three-sphere S 3 or the projective three-space P 3. Simple relations between the range of Proca field lambda, the Universe radius R, the limit of photon rest mass mgamma and the conductivity sigma are written down. PMID:10932114

  1. Seeing effects on occultation curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation of seeing effects on the light curve of a stellar occultation by the moon. Some theoretical studies of Fried (1966) and Hulett (1967) on the linear size of the downward-looking seeing disk are cited, showing that the seeing blur amounts to a few centimeters for a star in the zenith and that the linear blur must grow approximately as (sec z) to the 3/2 power. For most observations the seeing blur will not exceed 8 to 10 cm. The limitation on angular resolution imposed by this seeing effect is calculated.

  2. Observable Zitterbewegung in curved spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Manning, Adrian; Tureanu, Anca

    2016-06-01

    Zitterbewegung, as it was originally described by Schrödinger, is an unphysical, non-observable effect. We verify whether the effect can be observed in non-inertial reference frames/curved spacetimes, where the ambiguity in defining particle states results in a mixing of positive and negative frequency modes. We explicitly demonstrate that such a mixing is in fact necessary to obtain the correct classical value for a particle's velocity in a uniformly accelerated reference frame, whereas in cosmological spacetime a particle does indeed exhibit Zitterbewegung.

  3. Attitude analysis in Flatland: The plane truth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuster, Malcolm D.

    1993-01-01

    Many results in attitude analysis are still meaningful when the attitude is restricted to rotations about a single axis. Such a picture corresponds to attitude analysis in the Euclidean plane. The present report formalizes the representation of attitude in the plane and applies it to some well-known problems. In particular, we study the connection of the 'additive' and 'multiplicative' formulations of the differential corrector for the quaternion in its two-dimensional setting.

  4. Optimization of the performances of correlation filters by pre-processing the input plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzidi, F.; Elbouz, M.; Alfalou, A.; Brosseau, C.; Fakhfakh, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report findings on the optimization of the performances of correlation filters. First, we propound and validate an optimization of ROC curves adapted to correlation technique. Then, analysis suggests that a pre-processing of the input plane leads to a compromise between the robustness of the adapted filter and the discrimination of the inverse filter for face recognition applications. Rewardingly, our technical results demonstrate that this method is remarkably efficient to increase the performances of a VanderLugt correlator.

  5. Deep plane facelifting for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Neil; Adam, Stewart

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide the facial plastic surgeon with anatomical and embryologic evidence to support the use of the deep plane technique for optimal treatment of facial aging. A detailed description of the procedure is provided to allow safe and consistent performance. Insights into anatomical landmarks, technical nuances, and alternative approaches for facial variations are presented. The following points will be further elucidated in the article. The platysma muscle/submuscular aponeurotic system/galea are the continuous superficial cervical fascia encompassing the majority of facial fat, and this superficial soft tissue envelope is poorly anchored to the face. The deep cervical fascia binds the structural aspects of the face and covers the facial nerve and buccal fat pad. Facial aging is mainly due to gravity's long-term effects on the superficial soft tissue envelope, with more subtle effects on the deeper structural compartments. The deep plane is the embryologic cleavage plane between these fascial layers, and is the logical place for facial dissection. The deep plane allows access to the buccal fat pad for treatment of jowling. Soft tissue mobilization is maximized in deep plane dissections and requires careful hairline planning. Flap advancement creates tension only at the fascia level allowing natural, tension-free skin closure, and long-lasting outcomes. The deep plane advancement flap is well vascularized and resistant to complications. PMID:25076447

  6. Novel isochronous N-body problems featuring N arbitrary rational coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calogero, F.

    2016-07-01

    A novel class of N-body problems is identified, with N an arbitrary positive integer (N ≥ 2). These models are characterized by Newtonian ("accelerations equal forces") equations of motion describing N equal point-particles moving in the complex z-plane. These highly nonlinear equations feature N arbitrary coupling constants, yet they can be solved by algebraic operations and if all the N coupling constants are real and rational the corresponding N-body problem is isochronous: its generic solutions are all completely periodic with an overall period T independent of the initial data (but many solutions feature subperiods T/p with p integer). It is moreover shown that these models are Hamiltonian.

  7. Rational management of diarrhoea in children.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    Most health professionals in developing and developed countries consider oral rehydration therapy (ORT) to be the most effective treatment for diarrhea. An estimated 1,500 million episodes of diarrhea occur annually and 3 million of these results in death of children 5 years old. Caretakers must give increased amounts of fluids (rice water, tea, and gruel) to children with diarrhea to prevent dehydration. If they become dehydrated, caretakers must take them to a health workers so he/she can assess and treat them with oral rehydration solution (ORS) or, in the case of severe dehydration, rehydrate them intravenously. Drugs should not be used to treat diarrhea cases. Nevertheless, surveys in 4 Asian nations indicated that drug use ranged from 22-68% of diarrhea episodes and ORS use ranged only from 9-21%. Drug use is very expensive. In fact, Peru spent US$2 million on antidiarrheals in 1988- 1989. Further, drugs often make up 40% of health care costs in developing countries, so ORS use reduces these costs. Indeed drug us deflects from correct case management of diarrhea. In addition, drugs have no proven value for acute diarrhea. They do not decrease the fluid loss responsible for death and may even have serious side effects, such as central nerve depression and gastrointestinal toxicity. If health workers suspect cholera or dysentery, however, they can administer effective and relatively inexpensive antibiotics. Since the early 1980s, almost all developing countries had a national control of diarrheal disease program. In several countries, hospital admission rates for diarrhea fell 61% and the case fatality rate fell 71% after ORT introduction. Some hospitals have even saved as much as 60% in costs due to these declines. WHO has a book available which covers rational use of drugs in managing acute diarrhea in children. PMID:12284331

  8. Rationally designed substrates for SERS biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo

    The large electromagnetic field enhancement provided by nanostructured noble metal surfaces forms the foundation for a series of enabling optical analytical techniques, such as surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), surface enhanced IR absorption spectroscopy (SEIRA), surface enhanced fluorescent microscopy (SEF), to name only a few. Critical sensing applications have, however, other substrate requirements than mere peak signal enhancement. The substrate needs to be reliable, provide reproducible signal enhancements, and be amenable to a combination with microfluidic chips or other integrated sensor platforms. These needs motivate the development of engineerable SERS substrate "chips" with defined near- and far-field responses. In this dissertation, two types of rationally designed SERS substrates - nanoparticle cluster arrays (NCAs) and SERS stamp - will be introduced and characterized. NCAs were fabricated through a newly developed template guided self-assembly fabrication approach, in which chemically synthesized nanoparticles are integrated into predefined patterns using a hybrid top-down/bottom-up approach. Since this method relies on chemically defined building blocks, it can overcome the resolution limit of conventional lithographical methods and facilitates higher structural complexity. NCAs sustain near-field interactions within individual clusters as well as between entire neighboring clusters and create a multi-scale cascaded E-field enhancement throughout the entire array. SERS stamps were generated using an oblique angle metal deposition on a lithographically defined piston. When mounted on a nanopositioning stage, the SERS stamps were enabled to contact biological surfaces with pristine nanostructured metal surfaces for a label-free spectroscopic characterization. The developed engineered substrates were applied and tested in critical sensing applications, including the ultra-trace detection of explosive vapors, the rapid discrimination of

  9. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

    PubMed Central

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L’Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  10. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  11. Reciprocal relations between kinetic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yablonsky, G. S.; Gorban, A. N.; Constales, D.; Galvita, V. V.; Marin, G. B.

    2011-01-01

    We study coupled irreversible processes. For linear or linearized kinetics with microreversibility, \\dot{x}=Kx , the kinetic operator K is symmetric in the entropic inner product. This form of Onsager's reciprocal relations implies that the shift in time, exp(Kt), is also a symmetric operator. This generates the reciprocity relations between the kinetic curves. For example, for the Master equation, if we start the process from the i-th pure state and measure the probability pj(t) of the j-th state (j≠i), and, similarly, measure pi(t) for the process, which starts at the j-th pure state, then the ratio of these two probabilities pj(t)/pi(t) is constant in time and coincides with the ratio of the equilibrium probabilities. We study similar and more general reciprocal relations between the kinetic curves. The experimental evidence provided as an example is from the reversible water gas shift reaction over iron oxide catalyst. The experimental data are obtained using Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) pulse-response studies. These offer excellent confirmation within the experimental error.

  12. Implicit dose-response curves.

    PubMed

    Pérez Millán, Mercedes; Dickenstein, Alicia

    2015-06-01

    We develop tools from computational algebraic geometry for the study of steady state features of autonomous polynomial dynamical systems via elimination of variables. In particular, we obtain nontrivial bounds for the steady state concentration of a given species in biochemical reaction networks with mass-action kinetics. This species is understood as the output of the network and we thus bound the maximal response of the system. The improved bounds give smaller starting boxes to launch numerical methods. We apply our results to the sequential enzymatic network studied in Markevich et al. (J Cell Biol 164(3):353-359, 2004) to find nontrivial upper bounds for the different substrate concentrations at steady state. Our approach does not require any simulation, analytical expression to describe the output in terms of the input, or the absence of multistationarity. Instead, we show how to extract information from effectively computable implicit dose-response curves, with the use of resultants and discriminants. We moreover illustrate in the application to an enzymatic network, the relation between the exact implicit dose-response curve we obtain symbolically and the standard hysteresis diagram provided by a numerical ode solver. The setting and tools we propose could yield many other results adapted to any autonomous polynomial dynamical system, beyond those where it is possible to get explicit expressions. PMID:25008963

  13. Scanning path planning for laser bending of straight tube into curve tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Wang, J.; Xu, W. J.; Guo, D. M.

    2014-03-01

    A bending method is presented based on geometric curvatures along the tube curves in which a scanning path planning for laser bending of a straight tube into a curve tube in a two- and three-dimension space. In two-dimensional (plane) bending, there are several segments divided on the curve tube according to extreme point and inflection point of the expected shape of the tube. It is taking the extreme point as the initial place of the path planning, using different scanning spaces for every subsection in order to identify the scanning paths. In three-dimensional bending, a projection decomposition method is used, where the three-dimension is decomposed into two two-dimension planes, and respective scanning path planning and process parameters are thus acquired. Then, the three-dimension scanning path plane was obtained by combining the data in the two-dimension planes. Finally, an experimental verification is carried out to bend straight tubes into a two-dimension sinusoidal and a three-dimension helical tube/coil-shaped. The results show that the scanning path planning proposed in this paper is effective and feasible.

  14. Practical sliced configuration spaces for curved planar pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, E.

    1999-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a practical configuration-space computation algorithm for pairs of curved planar parts, based on the general algorithm developed by Bajaj and the author. The general algorithm advances the theoretical understanding of configuration-space computation, but is too slow and fragile for some applications. The new algorithm solves these problems by restricting the analysis to parts bounded by line segments and circular arcs, whereas the general algorithm handles rational parametric curves. The trade-off is worthwhile, because the restricted class handles most robotics and mechanical engineering applications. The algorithm reduces run time by a factor of 60 on nine representative engineering pairs, and by a factor of 9 on two human-knee pairs. It also handles common special pairs by specialized methods. A survey of 2,500 mechanisms shows that these methods cover 90% of pairs and yield an additional factor of 10 reduction in average run time. The theme of this article is that application requirements, as well as intrinsic theoretical interest, should drive configuration-space research.

  15. Rational eating: can it lead to overweightness or underweightness?

    PubMed

    Levy, Amnon

    2002-09-01

    Although a deviation from the physiologically optimal weight increases the probability of dying, the steady state for an expected lifetime-utility maximiser is a state of overweightness. However, even a small initial deviation from this rationally stationary weight is followed by explosive oscillations. These oscillations might lead to severe and chronic underweightness in a late stage of life. In the presence of socio-cultural norms of appearance, the rationally stationary weight of fat people is lower than otherwise and the rationally stationary weight of lean people is greater than otherwise. PMID:12349887

  16. Rational choices for the wavelengths of a two color interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jobes, F.C.

    1995-07-01

    If in a two color interferometer for plasma density measurements, the two wavelengths are chosen to have a ratio that is a rational number, and if the signals from each of the wavelengths are multiplied in frequency by the appropriate integer of the rational number and then heterodyned together, the resultant signal will have all effects of component motion nulled out. A phase measurement of this signal will have only plasma density information in it. With CO{sub 2} lasers, it is possible to find suitable wavelength pairs which are close enough to rational numbers to produce an improvement of about 100 in density resolution, compared to standard two color interferometers.

  17. Monotonicity preserving using GC1 rational quartic spline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul; Pang, Kong Voon

    2012-09-01

    This paper proposed GC1 rational quartic spline (quartic numerator and linear denominator) with two parameters to preserve the shape of the monotone data. Simple data dependent constraints will be derived on one of the parameters while the other is free to modify and refine the resultant shape of the data. Both parameters are independent to each other. The method under consideration here, avoid the modification of the derivative when the sufficient condition for the monotonicity are violated as can be noticed in the original construction of C1 rational quartic spline with linear denominator. Numerical comparison between the proposed scheme and C1 rational quartic spline will be given.

  18. Galois Representations Connected with Hyperbolic Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voevodskiĭ, V. A.

    1992-06-01

    The author considers Galois group actions on the fundamental groups of curves of hyperbolic type, and proves certain cases of Grothendieck's conjecture about the possibility of recovering a curve from its Galois representation.

  19. Texture development and hardening characteristics of steel sheets under plane-strain compression

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, P.A.; Liao, K.C.; Pan, J.; Barlat, F.

    1999-04-01

    Crystallographic texture development and hardening characteristics of a hot-rolled, low-carbon steel sheet due to cold rolling were investigated by idealizing the cold rolling process as plane-strain compression. The starting anisotropy of the test material was characterized by examination of the grain structure by optical microscopy and the preferred crystal orientation distribution by x-ray diffraction. Various heat treatments were used in an effort to remove the initial deformation texture resulting from hot rolling. The plastic anisotropy of the starting material was investigated with tensile tests on samples with the tensile axis parallel, 45{degree}, and perpendicular to the rolling direction. The grain structure after plane-strain compression was studied by optical microscopy, and the new deformation texture was characterized by x-ray diffraction pole figures. These figures are compared with the theoretical pole figures produced from a Taylor-like polycrystal model based on a pencil-glide slip system. The uniaxial tensile stress-strain curve and the plane-strain, compressive stress-strain curve of the sheet were used to calibrate the material parameters in the model. The experimental pole figures were consistent with the findings in the theoretical study. The experimental and theoretical results suggest that the initial texture due to hot rolling was insignificant as compared with the texture induced by large strains under plane-strain compression.

  20. m-plane GaN layers grown by rf-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy with varying Ga/N flux ratios on m-plane 4H-SiC substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, R.; Horita, M.; Suda, J.; Kimoto, T.

    2007-02-01

    A series of m-plane GaN layers with the Ga beam-equivalent pressure (BEP) as the only varied parameter was grown by rf-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on m-plane 4H-SiC substrates using AlN buffer layers. The smoothest growth surfaces and most complete film coalescence were found for the highest Ga BEP corresponding to the Ga droplet accumulation regime. However, better structural quality as assessed by x-ray rocking curves was observed for growth at a lower Ga BEP value below the droplet limit. The variation of rocking curve widths for planes inclined with respect to the epilayer c axis followed a different trend with Ga BEP than those of reflections parallel to the c axis. The GaN layers were found to exhibit a large residual compressive strain along the a axis.

  1. Method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion

    DOEpatents

    Fong, James T.

    1996-01-01

    A method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion of a large and thick walled vessel for a defect by computed tomography is provided. A collimated source of radiation is placed adjacent one side of the wall portion and an array of detectors for the radiation is placed on the other side adjacent the source. The radiation from the source passing through the wall portion is then detected with the detectors over a limited angle, dependent upon the curvature of the wall of the vessel, to obtain a dataset. The source and array are then coordinately moved relative to the wall portion in steps and a further dataset is obtained at each step. The plurality of datasets obtained over the limited angle is then processed to produce a tomogram of the wall portion to determine the presence of a defect therein. In a preferred embodiment, the curved wall portion has a center of curvature so that the source and the array are positioned at each step along a respective arc curved about the center. If desired, the detector array and source can be reoriented relative to a new wall portion and an inspection of the new wall portion can be easily obtained. Further, the source and detector array can be indexed in a direction perpendicular to a plane including the limited angle in a plurality of steps so that by repeating the detecting and moving steps at each index step, a three dimensional image can be created of the wall portion.

  2. The general efficiency curve for air propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1924-01-01

    This report presents a formula which may be used to obtain a "general efficiency curve" in addition to the well-known maximum efficiency curve. These two curves, when modified somewhat by experimental data, enable performance calculations to be made without detailed knowledge of the propeller. The curves may also be used to estimate the improvement in efficiency due to reduction gearing, or to judge the performance of a new propeller design.

  3. Implementation strategy of wafer-plane and aerial-plane inspection for advanced mask manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Sun; Chung, Dong-Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Cho, HanKu; Huang, William; Miller, John; Inderhees, Gregg; Pinto, Becky; Hur, Jiuk; Park, Kihun; Han, Jay

    2009-04-01

    Inspection of aggressive Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) designs, improvement of usable sensitivity, and reduction of cost of ownership are the three major challenges for today's mask inspection methodologies. In this paper we will discuss using aerial-plane inspection and wafer-plane inspection as novel approaches to address these challenges for advanced reticles. Wafer-plane inspection (WPI) and aerial-plane inspection (API) are two lithographic inspection modes. This suite of new inspection modes is based on high resolution reflected and transmitted light images in the reticle plane. These images together with scanner parameters are used to generate the aerial plane image using either vector or scalar models. Then information about the resist is applied to complete construction of the wafer plane image. API reports defects based on intensity differences between test and reference images at the aerial plane, whereas WPI applies a resist model to the aerial image to enhance discrimination between printable and non-printable defects at the wafer plane. The combination of WPI and API along with the industry standard Reticle Plane Inspection (RPI) is designed to handle complex OPC features, improve usable sensitivity and reduce the cost of ownership. This paper will explore the application of aerial-plane and wafer-plane die-to-die inspections on advanced reticles. Inspection sensitivity, inspectability, and comparison with Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMSTM[1]) or wafer-print-line will be analyzed. Most importantly, the implementation strategy of a combination of WPI and API along with RPI leading-edge mask manufacturing will be discussed.

  4. Double plane wave reverse time migration with plane wave Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Sen, M. K.; Stoffa, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is effective in obtaining complex subsurface structures from seismic data. By solving the two-way wave equation, RTM can use entire wavefield for imaging. Although powerful computer are becoming available, the conventional pre-stack shot gather RTM is still computationally expensive. Solving forward and backward wavefield propagation for each source location and shot gather is extremely time consuming, especially for large seismic datasets. We present an efficient, accurate and flexible plane wave RTM in the frequency domain where we utilize a compressed plane wave dataset, known as the double plane wave (DPW) dataset. Provided with densely sampled seismic dataset, shot gathers can be decomposed into source and receiver plane wave components with minimal artifacts. The DPW RTM is derived under the Born approximation and utilizes frequency domain plane wave Green's function for imaging. Time dips in the shot profiles can help to estimate the range of plane wave components present in shot gathers. Therefore, a limited number of plane wave Green's functions are needed for imaging. Plane wave Green's functions can be used for imaging both source and receiver plane waves. Source and receiver reciprocity can be used for imaging plane wave components at no cost and save half of the computation time. As a result, the computational burden for migration is substantially reduced. Plane wave components can be migrated independently to recover specific targets with given dips, and ray parameter common image gathers (CIGs) can be generated after migration directly. The ray parameter CIGs can be used to justify the correctness of velocity models. Subsurface anisotropy effects can also be included in our imaging condition, provided with plane wave Green's functions in the anisotropic media.

  5. Development and application of spherically curved charge-coupled device imagers.

    PubMed

    Gregory, J A; Smith, A M; Pearce, E C; Lambour, R L; Shah, R Y; Clark, H R; Warner, K; Osgood, R M; Woods, D F; DeCew, A E; Forman, S E; Mendenhall, L; DeFranzo, C M; Dolat, V S; Loomis, A H

    2015-04-01

    Operation of a CCD imager on a curved focal surface offers advantages to flat focal planes, especially for lightweight, relatively simple optical systems. The first advantage is that the modulation transfer function can approach diffraction-limited performance for a spherical focal surface employed in large field-of-view or large-format imagers. The second advantage is that a curved focal surface maintains more uniform illumination as a function of radius from the field center. Examples of applications of curved imagers, described here, include a small compact imager and the large curved array used in the Space Surveillance Telescope. The operational characteristics and mechanical limits of an imager deformed to a 15 mm radius are also described. PMID:25967223

  6. Flipping and scooping of curved 2D rigid fibers in simple shear: The Jeffery equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowdy, Darren

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical system governing the motion of a curved rigid two-dimensional circular-arc fiber in simple shear is derived in analytical form. This is achieved by finding the solution for the associated low-Reynolds-number flow around such a fiber using the methods of complex analysis. Solutions of the dynamical system display the "flipping" and "scooping" recently observed in computational studies of three-dimensional fibers using linked rigid rod and bead-shell models [J. Wang et al., "Flipping, scooping, and spinning: Drift of rigid curved nonchiral fibers in simple shear flows," Phys. Fluids 24, 123304 (2012)]. To complete the Jeffery-type equations for a curved fiber in a linear flow field we also derive its evolution equations in an extensional flow. It is expected that the equations derived here also govern the motion of slender, curved, three-dimensional rigid fibers when they evolve purely in the plane of shear or strain.

  7. Euler characteristics and elliptic curves.

    PubMed

    Coates, J; Howson, S

    1997-10-14

    Let E be a modular elliptic curve over [symbol, see text], without complex multiplication; let p be a prime number where E has good ordinary reduction; and let Finfinity be the field obtained by adjoining [symbol, see text] to all p-power division points on E. Write Ginfinity for the Galois group of Finfinity over [symbol, see text]. Assume that the complex L-series of E over [symbol, see text] does not vanish at s = 1. If p >/= 5, we make a precise conjecture about the value of the Ginfinity-Euler characteristic of the Selmer group of E over Finfinity. If one makes a standard conjecture about the behavior of this Selmer group as a module over the Iwasawa algebra, we are able to prove our conjecture. The crucial local calculations in the proof depend on recent joint work of the first author with R. Greenberg. PMID:11607752

  8. Spinning bodies in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Ambrosi, G.; Satish Kumar, S.; van de Vis, J.; van Holten, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    We study the motion of neutral and charged spinning bodies in curved spacetime in the test-particle limit. We construct equations of motion using a closed covariant Poisson-Dirac bracket formulation that allows for different choices of the Hamiltonian. We derive conditions for the existence of constants of motion and apply the formalism to the case of spherically symmetric spacetimes. We show that the periastron of a spinning body in a stable orbit in a Schwarzschild or Reissner-Nordstrøm background not only precesses but also varies radially. By analyzing the stability conditions for circular motion we find the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) as a function of spin. It turns out that there is an absolute lower limit on the ISCOs for increasing prograde spin. Finally we establish that the equations of motion can also be derived from the Einstein equations using an appropriate energy-momentum tensor for spinning particles.

  9. Hexatic undulations in curved geometries.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Peter; Nelson, David R

    2003-03-01

    We discuss the influence of two-dimensional hexatic order on capillary waves and undulation modes in spherical and cylindrical geometries. In planar geometries, extended bond-orientational order has only a minor effect on the fluctuations of liquid surfaces or lipid bilayers. However, in curved geometries, the long-wavelength spectrum of these ripples is altered. We calculate this frequency shift and discuss applications to spherical vesicles, liquid metal droplets, bubbles and cylindrical jets coated with surface-active molecules, and to multielectron bubbles in liquid helium at low temperatures. Hexatic order also leads to a shift in the threshold for the fission instability of charged droplets and bubbles, and for the Plateau-Rayleigh instability of liquid jets. PMID:12689068

  10. Caloric curve of star clusters.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results. PMID:23005049

  11. AKLSQF - LEAST SQUARES CURVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Least Squares Curve Fitting program, AKLSQF, computes the polynomial which will least square fit uniformly spaced data easily and efficiently. The program allows the user to specify the tolerable least squares error in the fitting or allows the user to specify the polynomial degree. In both cases AKLSQF returns the polynomial and the actual least squares fit error incurred in the operation. The data may be supplied to the routine either by direct keyboard entry or via a file. AKLSQF produces the least squares polynomial in two steps. First, the data points are least squares fitted using the orthogonal factorial polynomials. The result is then reduced to a regular polynomial using Sterling numbers of the first kind. If an error tolerance is specified, the program starts with a polynomial of degree 1 and computes the least squares fit error. The degree of the polynomial used for fitting is then increased successively until the error criterion specified by the user is met. At every step the polynomial as well as the least squares fitting error is printed to the screen. In general, the program can produce a curve fitting up to a 100 degree polynomial. All computations in the program are carried out under Double Precision format for real numbers and under long integer format for integers to provide the maximum accuracy possible. AKLSQF was written for an IBM PC X/AT or compatible using Microsoft's Quick Basic compiler. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2.1 using 23K of RAM. AKLSQF was developed in 1989.

  12. Towards Rational Decision-Making in Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Elchanan

    Without a conscious effort to achieve optimum resource allocation, there is a real danger that educational resources may be wasted. This document uses input-output analysis to develop a model for rational decision-making in secondary education. (LLR)

  13. Rationally designing the mechanical properties of protein hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    Naturally occurring biomaterials possess diverse mechanical properties, which are critical to their unique biological functions. However, it remains challenging to rationally control the mechanical properties of synthetic biomaterials. Here we provide a bottom-up approach to rationally design the mechanical properties of protein-based hydrogels. We first use atomic fore microscope (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy to characterize the mechanical stability of individual protein building blocks. We then rationally design the mechanical properties of hydrogels by selecting different combination of protein building blocks of known mechanical properties. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the engineering of hydrogels of distinct extensibility and toughness. This simple combinatorial approach allows direct translation of the mechanical properties of proteins from the single molecule level to the macroscopic level and represents an important step towards rationally designing the mechanical properties of biomaterials.

  14. Strange Bedfellows?: Rational-Emotive Therapy and Pastoral Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Constance; Huber, Charles H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses integrating Rational-Emotive Therapy with biblical precepts as a basis for pastoral counselors to bridge the gap between religion and psychotherapy. Illustrates the use of biblical quotations in disputing irrational beliefs. Presents a case example. (Author/RC)

  15. Finding Bounded Rational Equilibria. Part 1; Iterative Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    A long-running difficulty with conventional game theory has been how to modify it to accommodate the bounded rationality characterizing all real-world players. A recurring issue in statistical physics is how best to approximate joint probability distributions with decoupled (and therefore far more tractable) distributions. It has recently been shown that the same information theoretic mathematical structure, known as Probability Collectives (PC) underlies both issues. This relationship between statistical physics and game theory allows techniques and insights from the one field to be applied to the other. In particular, PC provides a formal model-independent definition of the degree of rationality of a player and of bounded rationality equilibria. This pair of papers extends previous work on PC by introducing new computational approaches to effectively find bounded rationality equilibria of common-interest (team) games.

  16. Cubic Polynomials with Rational Roots and Critical Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Shiv K.; Szymanski, Waclaw

    2010-01-01

    If you want your students to graph a cubic polynomial, it is best to give them one with rational roots and critical points. In this paper, we describe completely all such cubics and explain how to generate them.

  17. Innovation in energy systems: a case study of gasoline rationing

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a theoretical understanding of the implementation of new programs (innovations) by organizations, verify concepts with a case study of gasoline rationing, and apply knowledge gained to an analysis of the Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan. Major hypotheses of the study are: (1) Role specialization is required during the initial stage of implementation. (2) Decentralization is required during the initial stage of implementation. (3) Role specialization hinders implementation during the later stage. (4) Centralization is required during the later stage of implementation. The concept of technology delivery system is employed to demonstrate how organizational structure (degree of specialization centralization, etc.) is related to technological requirements and social need. The four major hypotheses were verified with the innovation theory as well as the case study of rationing. Application to the Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan leads to the conclusion that major problems would occur with plan implementation.

  18. What Rational-Emotive Therapy Is and Is Not

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1974-01-01

    Albert Ellis refutes a review of the functional characteristics of Rational-Emotive Therapy given by Dugald S. Arbuckle. Ellis concludes that Arbuckle only minimally understands RET theory or the behaviors consequent to it. (PC)

  19. The Rational Approach to Budget Cuts: One University's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    The University of Montreal's choice of the rational model of decision-making in managing budget cutbacks is explored and compared with other approaches, including the bureaucratic, garbage can, political, and collegial models. (MSE)

  20. INTERIOR OF SECOND FLOOR BRIDGE BETWEEN PLANING MILL AND CAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF SECOND FLOOR BRIDGE BETWEEN PLANING MILL AND CAR MACHINE SHOP, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD PLANING MILL. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Planing Mill, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  1. GLAMER - II. Multiple-plane gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Margarita; Metcalf, R. Benton; Giocoli, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    We present an extension to multiple planes of the gravitational lensing code GLAMER. The method entails projecting the mass in the observed light-cone on to a discrete number of lens planes and inverse ray-shooting from the image to the source plane. The mass on each plane can be represented as haloes, simulation particles, a projected mass map extracted form a numerical simulation or any combination of these. The image finding is done in a source-oriented fashion, where only regions of interest are iteratively refined on an initially coarse image plane grid. The calculations are performed in parallel on shared memory machines. The code is able to handle different types of analytic haloes (NFW, NSIE, power law, etc.), haloes extracted from numerical simulations and clusters constructed from semi-analytic models (MOKA). Likewise, there are several different options for modelling the source(s) which can be distributed throughout the light-cone. The distribution of matter in the light-cone can be either taken from a pre-existing N-body numerical simulations, from halo catalogues, or are generated from an analytic mass function. We present several tests of the code and demonstrate some of its applications such as generating mock images of galaxy and galaxy cluster lenses.

  2. Focal Plane Metrology for the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Hale, Layton; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric; Perl, Martin; Schindler, Rafe; Takacs, Peter; Thurston, Timothy; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    Meeting the science goals for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) translates into a demanding set of imaging performance requirements for the optical system over a wide (3.5{sup o}) field of view. In turn, meeting those imaging requirements necessitates maintaining precise control of the focal plane surface (10 {micro}m P-V) over the entire field of view (640 mm diameter) at the operating temperature (T {approx} -100 C) and over the operational elevation angle range. We briefly describe the hierarchical design approach for the LSST Camera focal plane and the baseline design for assembling the flat focal plane at room temperature. Preliminary results of gravity load and thermal distortion calculations are provided, and early metrological verification of candidate materials under cold thermal conditions are presented. A detailed, generalized method for stitching together sparse metrology data originating from differential, non-contact metrological data acquisition spanning multiple (non-continuous) sensor surfaces making up the focal plane, is described and demonstrated. Finally, we describe some in situ alignment verification alternatives, some of which may be integrated into the camera's focal plane.

  3. Pharmacodynamics of nicotine: implications for rational treatment of nicotine addiction.

    PubMed

    Benowitz, N L

    1991-05-01

    Rational treatment of the pharmacologic aspects of tobacco addiction includes nicotine substitution therapy. Understanding the pharmacodynamics of nicotine and its role in the addiction process provides a basis for rational therapeutic intervention. Pharmacodynamic considerations are discussed in relation to the elements of smoking cessation therapy: setting objectives, selecting appropriate medication and dosing form, selecting the optimal doses and dosage regimens, assessing therapeutic outcome, and adjusting therapy to optimize benefits and minimize risks. PMID:1859911

  4. Rational-driver approximation in car-following theory.

    PubMed

    Lubashevsky, Ihor; Wagner, Peter; Mahnke, Reinhard

    2003-11-01

    The problem of a car following a lead car driven with constant velocity is considered. To derive the governing equations for the following car dynamics a cost functional is constructed. This functional ranks the outcomes of different driving strategies, which applies to fairly general properties of the driver behavior. Assuming rational-driver behavior, the existence of the Nash equilibrium is proved. Rational driving is defined by supposing that a driver corrects continuously the car motion to follow the optimal path minimizing the cost functional. The corresponding car-following dynamics is described quite generally by a boundary value problem based on the obtained extremal equations. Linearization of these equations around the stationary state results in a generalization of the widely used optimal velocity model. Under certain conditions (the "dense traffic" limit) the rational car dynamics comprises two stages, fast and slow. During the fast stage a driver eliminates the velocity difference between the cars, the subsequent slow stage optimizes the headway. In the dense traffic limit an effective Hamiltonian description is constructed. This allows a more detailed nonlinear analysis. Finally, the differences between rational and bounded rational driver behavior are discussed. The latter, in particular, justifies some basic assumptions used recently by the authors to construct a car-following model lying beyond the frameworks of rationality. PMID:14682848

  5. Plane gravitational waves in real connection variables

    SciTech Connect

    Hinterleitner, Franz; Major, Seth

    2011-02-15

    We investigate using plane-fronted gravitational wave space-times as model systems to study loop quantization techniques and dispersion relations. In this classical analysis we start with planar symmetric space-times in the real connection formulation. We reduce via Dirac constraint analysis to a final form with one canonical pair and one constraint, equivalent to the metric and Einstein equations of plane-fronted-with-parallel-rays waves. Because of the symmetries and use of special coordinates, general covariance is broken. However, this allows us to simply express the constraints of the consistent system. A recursive construction of Dirac brackets results in nonlocal brackets, analogous to those of self-dual fields, for the triad variables. Not surprisingly, this classical analysis produces no evidence for dispersion, i.e. a variable propagation speed of gravitational plane-fronted-with-parallel-rays waves.

  6. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  7. Turbulent boundary layers over nonstationary plane boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, A. T.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of predicting integral parameters and skin-friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers developing over moving-ground-planes are evaluated using test information from three different wind tunnel facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. These data include test information from the VSTOL tunnel which is presented for the first time. The three methods evaluated were: (1) relative integral parameter method, (2) relative power law method, and (3) modified law of the wall method. Methods (1) and (2) can be used to predict moving-ground-plane shape factors with an expected accuracy of + or - 10%. They may also be used to predict moving-ground-plane displacement and momentum thicknesses with lower expected accuracy. This decrease in accuracy can be traced to the failure of approximations upon which these methods are based to prove universal when compared with VSTOL tunnel test results.

  8. Hemispherical infrared focal plane arrays: a new design parameter for the instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendler, M.; Dumas, D.; Chemla, F.; Cohen, M.; Laporte, P.; Tekaya, K.; Le Coarer, E.; Primot, J.; Ribot, H.

    2012-07-01

    In ground based astronomy, mainly all designs of sky survey telescopes are limited by the requirement that the detecting surface is flat whereas the focal surface is curved. Two kinds of solution have been investigated up to now. The first one consists in adding optical systems to flatten the image surface; however this solution complicates the design and increases the system size. Somehow, this solution increases, in the same time, the weight and price of the instrument. The second solution consists in curving artificially the focal surface by using a mosaic of several detectors, which are positioned in a spherical shape. However, this attempt is dedicated to low curvature and is limited by the technical difficulty to control the detectors alignment and tilt between each others. Today we would like to propose an ideal solution which is to curve the focal plane array in a spherical shape, thanks to our monolithic process developed at CEA-LETI based on thinned silicon substrates which allows a 100% optical fill factor. Two infrared uncooled cameras have been performed, using 320 x 256 pixels and 25 μm pitch micro-bolometer arrays curved at a bending radius of 80 mm. These two micro-cameras illustrate the optical system simplification and miniaturization involved by curved focal plane arrays. Moreover, the advantages of curved detectors on the optical performances (Point Spreading Function), as well as on volume and cost savings have been highlighted by the simulation of the opto-mechanical architecture of the spectrometer OptiMOS-EVE for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT).

  9. Structural anisotropic properties of a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lotsari, A.; Kehagias, Th.; Katsikini, M.; Arvanitidis, J.; Ves, S.; Komninou, Ph.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Tsagaraki, K.; Georgakilas, A.; Christofilos, D.

    2014-06-07

    Heteroepitaxial non-polar III-Nitride layers may exhibit extensive anisotropy in the surface morphology and the epilayer microstructure along distinct in-plane directions. The structural anisotropy, evidenced by the “M”-shape dependence of the (112{sup ¯}0) x-ray rocking curve widths on the beam azimuth angle, was studied by combining transmission electron microscopy observations, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy in a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The structural anisotropic behavior was attributed quantitatively to the high dislocation densities, particularly the Frank-Shockley partial dislocations that delimit the I{sub 1} intrinsic basal stacking faults, and to the concomitant plastic strain relaxation. On the other hand, isotropic samples exhibited lower dislocation densities and a biaxial residual stress state. For PAMBE growth, the anisotropy was correlated to N-rich (or Ga-poor) conditions on the surface during growth, that result in formation of asymmetric a-plane GaN grains elongated along the c-axis. Such conditions enhance the anisotropy of gallium diffusion on the surface and reduce the GaN nucleation rate.

  10. Improvements in in-plane electrophoretic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzen, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Electronic paper is now developing fast into an accepted alternative for paper. Its applications nowadays seem focused on books, documents and newspapers. Development of credible color implementations of electrophoretic displays has been initiated, focusing on multi-layer in-plane electrophoresis, but the difficulties associated with these systems (particle drift, aperture, accuracy) were so far not solved. Electro-osmotic principles lead to openings towards multi-layer color displays as well as fast switching, high reflectance grayscale displays. Drift, aperture and accuracy can be brought to the level necessary to create in-plane switching electro-osmotic displays without the need for encapsulation

  11. Hybrid Extrinsic Silicon Focal Plane Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerrenig, D. H.; Meinhardt, T.; Lowe, J.

    1981-02-01

    Large-area focal planes require mechanical assembly techniques which must be compatible with optical alignment, minimum deadspace, and cryogenic requirements in order to achieve optimum performance. Hybrid extrinsic silicon has been found particularly suitable for such an application. It will be shown that by choosing a large-area extrinsic silicon detector array which is hybrid-mated to a multiplicity of multiplexers a very cost-effective and high-density focal plane module can be assembled. Other advantages of this approach are inherent optical alignment and excellent performance.

  12. Horizons and plane waves: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2003-11-06

    We review the attempts to construct black hole/string solutions in asymptotically plane wave spacetimes. First, we demonstrate that geometries admitting a covariantly constant null Killing vector cannot admit event horizons, which implies that pp-waves can't describe black holes. However, relaxing the symmetry requirements allows us to generate solutions which do possess regular event horizons while retaining the requisite asymptotic properties. In particular, we present two solution generating techniques and use them to construct asymptotically plane wave black string/brane geometries.

  13. Note: A novel integrated microforce measurement system for plane-plane contact research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Rostoucher, D.; Gauthier, M.

    2010-11-01

    The evaluation of plane-plane contact force has become a big issue in micro-/nano research, for example in microassembly. However with the lack of effective experimental equipments, the research on plane-plane contact has been limited to theoretical formulations or virtual simulation. In this paper, a microforce sensor and precision parallel robot integrated system is proposed for the microforce measurement of plane-plane contact. In the proposed system, the two objects are fixed on the parallel robot end-platform and the microforce sensor probe tip, respectively, and the high precision robot system is employed to provide six degree-of-freedom motions between both objects. So it is convenient for the microforce measurement between the planar objects with different orientations. As a significant application, the proposed system is utilized for measurements of pull-off force between planar objects, in which the validation of the system is demonstrated in practice. The proposed microforce measurement system is generic, which can be extended to a variety of microforce measurements in plane-plane contact.

  14. A Selective Refinement Approach for Computing the Distance Functions of Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D A; Duchaineau, M A; Max, N L

    2000-12-01

    We present an adaptive signed distance transform algorithm for curves in the plane. A hierarchy of bounding boxes is required for the input curves. We demonstrate the algorithm on the isocontours of a turbulence simulation. The algorithm provides guaranteed error bounds with a selective refinement approach. The domain over which the signed distance function is desired is adaptively triangulated and piecewise discontinuous linear approximations are constructed within each triangle. The resulting transform performs work only were requested and does not rely on a preset sampling rate or other constraints.

  15. Rational polypharmacy in the bipolar affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Post, R M; Ketter, T A; Pazzaglia, P J; Denicoff, K; George, M S; Callahan, A; Leverich, G; Frye, M

    1996-01-01

    positive response in longer-term prophylaxis. Hypnotic benzodiazepines with anticonvulsant properties, such as clonazepam or lorazepam, are often used to help to induce sleep in escalating bipolar patients, and may be useful adjuncts as well. Patients who were inadequately responsive to either carbamazepine or valproate alone may be responsive to the anticonvulsant combination. In a similar fashion, one can also utilize several mood-stabilizing drugs (lithium and an anticonvulsant such as carbamazepine or valproate) in the treatment of depressive breakthroughs, and then augment this combination (if necessary) with a catecholamine-active antidepressant such as bupropion or a serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline or if necessary a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI). Once the patient has responded to a combination of drugs, it becomes problematic to decide whether the last agent added was the crucial ingredient in helping the patient achieve remission or that remission might have occurred with this agent alone. A conservative approach would have merit in patients who are finally stabilized on complex polypharmacy regimens only after many years of sequential trials; in this instance, the potential risk of re-exacerbating the illness with a taper of one of the drugs in the regimen. Rational polypharmacy should thus be implemented with careful delineation of the prior course of illness (typically using life chart methodology) and targeted treatment outcomes titrated against side effects, using sequential clinical trials in individual patients who have not adequately responded to monotherapy. In this fashion, it is hoped that pharmacodynamic differences among agents can be maximized and pharmacokinetic and side effects minimized. PMID:9294735

  16. Why subduction zones are curved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.; Bendick, R.; Liang, Haiyi

    2010-12-01

    We give an explanation for the polarity, localization, shape, size, and initiation of subduction zones on Earth. By considering a soft, thin, curved lithospheric cap with either elastic or viscous rheology supported by a thick, nearly incompressible mantle, we find two different characteristic subduction geometries arise depending on boundary conditions: (1) plate boundaries where subduction results primarily from the gravitational body force (free subduction) have characteristic plate lengths and form arc-shaped dimpled segments resulting from the competition between bending and stretching in edge buckling modes of thin spherical shells, and (2) subduction zones due to localized applied loads that push one slab of thin, positively buoyant lithosphere beneath an overriding plate (forced subduction) form localized straight segments, consistent with the deformation of indented spherical shells. Both types of subduction are nonlinear subcritical instabilities, so small perturbations in the mechanical properties of the lithosphere have pronounced effects on subduction initiation and evolution. Yet in both cases, geometric relationships determined by the shape of the Earth itself play the most critical role in controlling the basic morphology and characteristic length scales of subduction zones.

  17. Learning curve of speech recognition.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Tomi A; Kaipio, Johanna; Koivikko, Mika P

    2013-12-01

    Speech recognition (SR) speeds patient care processes by reducing report turnaround times. However, concerns have emerged about prolonged training and an added secretarial burden for radiologists. We assessed how much proofing radiologists who have years of experience with SR and radiologists new to SR must perform, and estimated how quickly the new users become as skilled as the experienced users. We studied SR log entries for 0.25 million reports from 154 radiologists and after careful exclusions, defined a group of 11 experienced radiologists and 71 radiologists new to SR (24,833 and 122,093 reports, respectively). Data were analyzed for sound file and report lengths, character-based error rates, and words unknown to the SR's dictionary. Experienced radiologists corrected 6 characters for each report and for new users, 11. Some users presented a very unfavorable learning curve, with error rates not declining as expected. New users' reports were longer, and data for the experienced users indicates that their reports, initially equally lengthy, shortened over a period of several years. For most radiologists, only minor corrections of dictated reports were necessary. While new users adopted SR quickly, with a subset outperforming experienced users from the start, identification of users struggling with SR will help facilitate troubleshooting and support. PMID:23779151

  18. Quantum fields in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollands, Stefan; Wald, Robert M.

    2015-04-01

    We review the theory of quantum fields propagating in an arbitrary, classical, globally hyperbolic spacetime. Our review emphasizes the conceptual issues arising in the formulation of the theory and presents known results in a mathematically precise way. Particular attention is paid to the distributional nature of quantum fields, to their local and covariant character, and to microlocal spectrum conditions satisfied by physically reasonable states. We review the Unruh and Hawking effects for free fields, as well as the behavior of free fields in deSitter spacetime and FLRW spacetimes with an exponential phase of expansion. We review how nonlinear observables of a free field, such as the stress-energy tensor, are defined, as well as time-ordered-products. The "renormalization ambiguities" involved in the definition of time-ordered products are fully characterized. Interacting fields are then perturbatively constructed. Our main focus is on the theory of a scalar field, but a brief discussion of gauge fields is included. We conclude with a brief discussion of a possible approach towards a nonperturbative formulation of quantum field theory in curved spacetime and some remarks on the formulation of quantum gravity.

  19. Crack curving in a ductile pressurized fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Paul W.

    magnitude of CTOA and CTOD depends on the structural geometry, and including plasticity increases the crack tip displacements. An estimate of the strain in the skin flaps at the crack tip may indicate the tendency for flapping. Out-of-plane effects become significant as the crack propagates and curves.

  20. Approaches to rationing antiretroviral treatment: ethical and equity implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Sara; Chanfreau, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Despite a growing global commitment to the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART), its availability is still likely to be less than the need. This imbalance raises ethical dilemmas about who should be granted access to publicly-subsidized ART programmes. This paper reviews the eligibility and targeting criteria used in four case-study countries at different points in the scale-up of ART, with the aim of drawing lessons regarding ethical approaches to rationing. Mexico, Senegal, Thailand and Uganda have each made an explicit policy commitment to provide antiretrovirals to all those in need, but are achieving this goal in steps--beginning with explicit rationing of access to care. Drawing upon the case-studies and experiences elsewhere, categories of explicit rationing criteria have been identified. These include biomedical factors, adherence to treatment, prevention-driven factors, social and economic benefits, financial factors and factors driven by ethical arguments. The initial criteria for determining eligibility are typically clinical criteria and assessment of adherence prospects, followed by a number of other factors. Rationing mechanisms reflect several underlying ethical theories and the ethical underpinnings of explicit rationing criteria should reflect societal values. In order to ensure this alignment, widespread consultation with a variety of stakeholders, and not only policy-makers or physicians, is critical. Without such explicit debate, more rationing will occur implicitly and this may be more inequitable. The effects of rationing mechanisms upon equity are critically dependent upon the implementation processes. As antiretroviral programmes are implemented it is crucial to monitor who gains access to these programmes. PMID:16175829

  1. Plane Smoothers for Multiblock Grids: Computational Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llorente, Ignacio M.; Diskin, Boris; Melson, N. Duane

    1999-01-01

    Standard multigrid methods are not well suited for problems with anisotropic discrete operators, which can occur, for example, on grids that are stretched in order to resolve a boundary layer. One of the most efficient approaches to yield robust methods is the combination of standard coarsening with alternating-direction plane relaxation in the three dimensions. However, this approach may be difficult to implement in codes with multiblock structured grids because there may be no natural definition of global lines or planes. This inherent obstacle limits the range of an implicit smoother to only the portion of the computational domain in the current block. This report studies in detail, both numerically and analytically, the behavior of blockwise plane smoothers in order to provide guidance to engineers who use block-structured grids. The results obtained so far show alternating-direction plane smoothers to be very robust, even on multiblock grids. In common computational fluid dynamics multiblock simulations, where the number of subdomains crossed by the line of a strong anisotropy is low (up to four), textbook multigrid convergence rates can be obtained with a small overlap of cells between neighboring blocks.

  2. Some Reflections on Plane Mirrors and Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galili, Igal; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the following questions based on the assumption that students' personal experiences and prior beliefs about plane mirrors can promote interesting discussions: (1) How mirror images are formed? (2) Why doesn't paper behave like a mirror? (3) Does a mirror left-right reverse objects? and (4) Why are corner images of two perpendicular…

  3. Crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, D.K.M.; Merkle, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for estimating the decrease in crack-initiation toughness, from a reference plane strain value, due to positive straining along the crack front of a circumferential flaw in a reactor pressure vessel is presented in this study. This method relates crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions with material failure at points within a distance of a few crack-tip-opening displacements ahead of a crack front, and involves the formulation of a micromechanical crack-initiation model. While this study is intended to address concerns regarding the effects of positive out-of- plane straining on ductile crack initiation, the approach adopted in this work can be extended in a straightforward fashion to examine conditions of macroscopic cleavage crack initiation. Provided single- parameter dominance of near-tip fields exists in the flawed structure, results from this study could be used to examine the appropriateness of applying plane strain fracture toughness to the evaluation of circumferential flaws, in particular to those in ring-forged vessels which have no longitudinal welds. In addition, results from this study could also be applied toward the analysis of the effects of thermal streaming on the fracture resistance of circumferentially oriented flaws in a pressure vessel. 37 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Hands-On Discovery of Mirror Planes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Deborah A.; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.

    2001-01-01

    In the study of chemical applications of group theory, some students find it difficult to identify the symmetry elements in a simple geometrical figure or molecular model. Suggests that pattern blocks and mirrors can identify mirror planes in geometrical figures to help students construct, develop, and explain concepts of symmetry elements. (ASK)

  5. MTI Focal Plane Assembly Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, M.; Rienstra, J.L.

    1999-06-17

    The focal plane assembly for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) consists of sensor chip assemblies, optical filters, and a vacuum enclosure. Sensor chip assemblies, composed of linear detector arrays and readout integrated circuits, provide spatial resolution in the cross-track direction for the pushbroom imager. Optical filters define 15 spectral bands in a range from 0.45 {micro}m to 10.7 {micro}m. All the detector arrays are mounted on a single focal plane and are designed to operate at 75 K. Three pairs of sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) are required to provide cross-track coverage in all 15 spectral bands. Each pair of SCAs includes detector arrays made from silicon, iridium antimonide, and mercury cadmium telluride. Read out integrated circuits multiplex the signals from the detectors to 18 separate video channels. Optical filter assemblies defining the spectral bands are mounted over the linear detector arrays. Each filter assembly consists of several filter strips bonded together side-by-side. The MTI focal plane assembly has been integrated with the rest of the payload and has undergone detailed testing and calibration. This paper includes representative test data for the various spectral bands and the overall performance of the focal plane assembly.

  6. Optical interconnections to focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rienstra, J.L.; Hinckley, M.K.

    2000-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated an optical data interconnection from the output of a focal plane array to the downstream data acquisition electronics. The demonstrated approach included a continuous wave laser beam directed at a multiple quantum well reflectance modulator connected to the focal plane array analog output. The output waveform from the optical interconnect was observed on an oscilloscope to be a replica of the input signal. They fed the output of the optical data link to the same data acquisition system used to characterize focal plane array performance. Measurements of the signal to noise ratio at the input and output of the optical interconnection showed that the signal to noise ratio was reduced by a factor of 10 or more. Analysis of the noise and link gain showed that the primary contributors to the additional noise were laser intensity noise and photodetector receiver noise. Subsequent efforts should be able to reduce these noise sources considerably and should result in substantially improved signal to noise performance. They also observed significant photocurrent generation in the reflectance modulator that imposes a current load on the focal plane array output amplifier. This current loading is an issue with the demonstrated approach because it tends to negate the power saving feature of the reflectance modulator interconnection concept.

  7. Spatial Reasoning and Polya's Five Planes Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Sean P.; Diaz, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Middle and High school students of the twenty-first century possess surprising powers of spatial reasoning. They are assisted by technologies not available to earlier generations. Both of these assertions are demonstrated by students who are challenged with George Polya's classic Five Planes Problem. (Contains 5 figures.)

  8. Simple Harmonic Motion in Harmonic Plane Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benumof, Reuben

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the distribution of kinetic and potential energy in transverse and longitudinal waves and examines the transmission of power and momentum. This discussion is intended to aid in understanding the simple harmonic motion of a particle involved in the propagation of a harmonic mechanical plane wave. (HM)

  9. Wafer plane inspection evaluated for photomask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily; Badger, Karen; Lawliss, Mark; Kodera, Yutaka; Azpiroz, Jaione Tirapu; Pang, Song; Zhang, Hongqin; Eugenieva, Eugenia; Clifford, Chris; Goonesekera, Arosha; Tian, Yibin

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to inspection, developed to enable high inspectability on fragmented mask features at the optimal defect sensitivity. It builds on well-established high resolution inspection capabilities to complement existing manufacturing methods. The production of defect-free photomasks is practical today only because of informed decisions on the impact of defects identified. The defect size, location and its measured printing impact can dictate that a mask is perfectly good for lithographic purposes. This inspection - verification - repair loop is timeconsuming and is predicated on the fact that detectable photomask defects do not always resolve or matter on wafer. This paper will introduce and evaluate an alternative approach that moves the mask inspection to the wafer plane. WPI uses a high NA inspection of the mask to construct a physical mask model. This mask model is used to create the mask image in the wafer plane. Finally, a threshold model is applied to enhance sensitivity to printing defects. WPI essentially eliminates the non-printing inspection stops and relaxes some of the pattern restrictions currently placed on incoming photomask designs. This paper outlines the WPI technology and explores its application to patterns and substrates representative of 32nm designs. The implications of deploying Wafer Plane Inspection will be discussed.

  10. Electrostatic Image Problems with Plane Boundaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terras, Riho; Swanson, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    Considers the electrostatic problem of a point charge in a domain bounded by conducting planes. Lists all such domains for which a solution by images exists, describes the image charge arrays in familiar crystallographic terms, and gives an illustrative example. (Author/GS)

  11. Dual band QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Choi, Kwong Kit (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) that provides two-color image sensing. Two different quantum wells are configured to absorb two different wavelengths. The QWIPs are arrayed in a focal plane array (FPA). The two-color QWIPs are selected for readout by selective electrical contact with the two different QWIPs or by the use of two different wavelength sensitive gratings.

  12. Deep-Plane Lipoabdominoplasty in East Asians

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun-Young; Hong, Yoon Gi; Sim, Hyung Bo; Sun, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop a new surgical technique by combining traditional abdominoplasty with liposuction. This combination of operations permits simpler and more accurate management of various abdominal deformities. In lipoabdominoplasty, the combination of techniques is of paramount concern. Herein, we introduce a new combination of liposuction and abdominoplasty using deep-plane flap sliding to maximize the benefits of both techniques. Methods Deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty was performed in 143 patients between January 2007 and May 2014. We applied extensive liposuction on the entire abdomen followed by a sliding flap through the deep plane after repairing the diastasis recti. The abdominal wound closure was completed with repair of Scarpa's fascia. Results The average amount of liposuction aspirate was 1,400 mL (700–3,100 mL), and the size of the average excised skin ellipse was 21.78×12.81 cm (from 15×10 to 25×15 cm). There were no major complications such as deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. We encountered 22 cases of minor complications: one wound infection, one case of skin necrosis, two cases of undercorrection, nine hypertrophic scars, and nine seromas. These complications were solved by conservative management or simple revision. Conclusions The use of deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty can correct abdominal deformities more effectively and with fewer complications than traditional abdominoplasty. PMID:27462568

  13. Microscale out-of-plane anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A microscale out-of-plane thermal sensor. A resistive heater is suspended over a substrate by supports raised with respect to the substrate to provide a clearance underneath the resistive heater for fluid flow. A preferred fabrication process for the thermal sensor uses surface micromachining and a three-dimensional assembly to raise the supports and lift the resistive heater over the substrate.

  14. Selective plane illumination microscopy on a chip.

    PubMed

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Bassi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto

    2016-04-26

    Selective plane illumination microscopy can image biological samples at a high spatiotemporal resolution. Complex sample preparation and system alignment normally limit the throughput of the method. Using femtosecond laser micromachining, we created an integrated optofluidic device that allows obtaining continuous flow imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction and high-throughput analysis of large multicellular spheroids at a subcellular resolution. PMID:27030116

  15. Trajectory optimization for the National Aerospace Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this second phase research is to investigate the optimal ascent trajectory for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) from runway take-off to orbital insertion and address the unique problems associated with the hypersonic flight trajectory optimization. The trajectory optimization problem for an aerospace plane is a highly challenging problem because of the complexity involved. Previous work has been successful in obtaining sub-optimal trajectories by using energy-state approximation and time-scale decomposition techniques. But it is known that the energy-state approximation is not valid in certain portions of the trajectory. This research aims at employing full dynamics of the aerospace plane and emphasizing direct trajectory optimization methods. The major accomplishments of this research include the first-time development of an inverse dynamics approach in trajectory optimization which enables us to generate optimal trajectories for the aerospace plane efficiently and reliably, and general analytical solutions to constrained hypersonic trajectories that has wide application in trajectory optimization as well as in guidance and flight dynamics. Optimal trajectories in abort landing and ascent augmented with rocket propulsion and thrust vectoring control were also investigated. Motivated by this study, a new global trajectory optimization tool using continuous simulated annealing and a nonlinear predictive feedback guidance law have been under investigation and some promising results have been obtained, which may well lead to more significant development and application in the near future.

  16. Towards Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Rafol, S. B.; Salazar, D.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024 x 1024 pixel quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes have been demonstrated with excellent imaging performance. The MWIR QWIP detector array has demonstrated a noise equivalent differential temperature (NEDT) of 17 mK at a 95 K operating temperature with f/2.5 optics at 300 K background and the LWIR detector array has demonstrated a NEDT of 13 mK at a 70 K operating temperature with the same optical and background conditions as the MWIR detector array after the subtraction of system noise. Both MWIR and LWIR focal planes have shown background limited performance (BLIP) at 90 K and 70 K operating temperatures respectively, with similar optical and background conditions. In addition, we have demonstrated MWIR and LWIR pixel co-registered simultaneously readable dualband QWIP focal plane arrays. In this paper, we will discuss the performance in terms of quantum efficiency, NEDT, uniformity, operability, and modulation transfer functions of the 1024 x 1024 pixel arrays and the progress of dualband QWIP focal plane array development work.

  17. Large Format Multicolor QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, A.; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Nguyen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) multicolor focal plane array (FPA) cameras are essential for many DoD and NASA applications including Earth and planetary remote sensing. In this paper we summarize our recent development of large format multicolor QWIP FPA that cover MWIR and LWIR bands.

  18. Evaluation of curving characteristics of flexible liquid crystal displays fabricated using polycarbonate substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akihito; Ishinabe, Takahiro; Fujikake, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of the contrast ratio of flexible liquid crystal displays (LCDs) fabricated using plastic substrates in a curved state is an important problem to achieve high-quality flexible LCDs. In this study, we evaluated the distributions of in-plane phase retardation and slow axis direction of polycarbonate substrates and the effects of curvature on the electro-optical properties of flexible LCDs. As a result, we clarified that the polycarbonate substrates have high uniformity in the in-plane phase retardation and slow axis direction, and that the change in the phase retardation of the polycarbonate substrate caused by the curvature deformation has a small effect on the electro-optical characteristics of flexible LCDs. We successfully achieved a high contrast ratio of 1042:1 by fabricating the device using polycarbonate substrates. This result indicates that it is possible to realize high-quality images in flexible LCDs fabricated using polycarbonate substrates even in the curved state.

  19. Pure radiation metric with stable closed timelike curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Debojit; Patgiri, Mahadev; Ahmed, Faiz Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Here we present an example of an axially symmetric spacetime, representing pure radiation, and admitting circular closed timelike curves (CTCs) on the . The spacetime is regular everywhere, having no curvature singularities and is locally isometric to (non-vacuum) pp wave spacetimes. The stability of the CTCs under linear perturbations is studied and they are found to be stable from a calculation of the Lyapunov exponent for the deviation vector. We also demonstrate that the spacetime also admits non-circular CTCs which do not lie in this plane. A modification of the metric is also studied and we find that a region of this spacetime behaves like a time-machine where CTCs appear after a certain instant of time.

  20. String Theory on Elliptic Curve Orientifolds and KR-Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Charles; Méndez-Diez, Stefan; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the brane content and charges in all of the orientifold string theories on space-times of the form , where E is an elliptic curve with holomorphic or anti-holomorphic involution. Many of these theories involve "twistings" coming from the B-field and/or sign choices on the orientifold planes. A description of these theories from the point of view of algebraic geometry, using the Legendre normal form, naturally divides them into three groupings. The physical theories within each grouping are related to one another via sequences of T-dualities. Our approach agrees with both previous topological calculations of twisted KR-theory and known physics arguments, and explains how the twistings originate from both a mathematical and a physical perspective.

  1. Fault Plane Orientations of Intermediate-Depth Earthquakes in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Extending from Colombia in the north to Chile and Argentina in the south, the South American subduction zone exhibits considerable variation: the subduction angle alternates between flat and steep; the subducting plate has complex structures such as ridges, plateaus, and fracture zones; and late Cenozoic volcanism in the overlying plate has gaps. I investigate the effect of these differences in incoming plate structure and subduction geometry on intermediate-depth earthquakes and use the results to test hypotheses for why intermediate-depth earthquakes occur. For all large (Mw ≥5.7) intermediate-depth earthquakes (60-360 km depth) in South America since 1990, I analyze rupture directivity to try to distinguish which of the two possible fault planes of the focal mechanism slipped in the earthquake. Of the 163 earthquakes that met the selection criteria, half were recorded with a sufficient distribution of stations to determine if there was directivity to the rupture and fault planes were identified for 31 events. Fault plane orientations are spatially coherent. In regions with "normal" subduction angles, such as the Central Volcanic Zone (southern Peru to central Chile), results are consistent with previous studies in Central America and the western Pacific subduction zones: most earthquakes rupture along subhorizontal faults and rupture azimuths are randomly distributed. In the Peruvian Flat Slab, identified fault planes dip eastward. After taking into account the angle of subduction, these faults are perpendicular to the faults that rupture in regions with normal subduction angles. Within sharply curved slab segments, such as the rebending of the plate at the eastern edge of the Peruvian flat slab, both orientations of faults slip. The observed flip in dominant fault plane orientation on either side of sharply curved slab segments suggests that bending and unbending stresses have an important role in controlling fault orientations. Pre-existing weak zones may

  2. X-ray diffraction study of A- plane non-polar InN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret, Matthieu; Briot, Olivier; Gil, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Strong polarisation-induced electric fields in C-plane oriented nitrides semiconductor layers reduce the performance of devices. Eliminating the polarization fields can be achieved by growing nitrides along non polar direction. We have grown non polar A-plane oriented InN on R-plane (1‾102) nitridated sapphire substrate by MOCVD. We have studied the structural anisotropy observed in these layers by analyzing High Resolution XRay Diffraction rocking curve (RC) experiments as a function of the in-plane beam orientation. A-plane InN epilayer have a unique epitaxial relationship on R-Plane sapphire and show a strong structural anisotropy. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the InN(11‾20) XRD RC values are contained between 44 and 81 Arcmin. FWHM is smaller when the diffraction occurs along the [0001] and the largest FWHM values, of the (11‾20) RC, are obtained when the diffraction occurs along the [1‾100] in-plane direction. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed morphologies with well organized crystallites. The grains are structured along a unique crystallographic orientation of InN, leading to larger domains in this direction. This structural anisotropy can be, in first approximation, attributed to the difference in the domain sizes observed. XRD reciprocal space mappings (RSM) were performed in asymmetrical configuration on (13‾40) and (2‾202) diffraction plane. RSM are measured with a beam orientation corresponding to a maximal and a minimal width of the (11‾20) Rocking curves, respectively. A simple theoretical model is exposed to interpret the RSM. We concluded that the dominant contribution to the anisotropy is due to the scattering coherence length anisotropy present in our samples.

  3. The Whipple Mission: Design and development of the focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, A.; Kraft, R.; Murray, S. S.; Gauron, T.; Alcock, C.; Vrtilek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Whipple is a proposed space borne mission intended to detect and characterize thesize and spatial distribution of Trans Neptunian Objects (TNOs) using the ``blind'' occultation technique. This technique measures the size of, and distance to, a TNO by discerning features of the Fresnel diffraction pattern that is produced when a TNO intercepts the light path between a distant star and the observatory. As the observatory transects the diffraction pattern, it resolves that pattern as a light curve using a differential photometer. The light curve decrement is relatively large (few percent) and the temporal duration is short. For a TNO in the Kuiper Belt the duration is a fraction of a second. For objects in the Oort cloud the duration is ~ a few seconds. Since a blind occultation event is rare, tens of thousands of stars need to be observed simultaneously over several years to accumulate sufficient statistics. Stars need to be observed at cadences up to 40 Hz with a read noise <20e rms (post CDS)Though this is beyond the capability of CCDs, such a high speed, low noise, multi-object differential photometer instrument can be implemented with CMOS imaging technology. The proposed focal plane for the Whipple photometer consists of nine Teledyne HyVISI Silicon hybrid CMOS detectors behind a 77cm F1.34 optic. The detectors consist of 1k by 1k 36 micron pitch pixels and each detector is connected to its own SIDECAR ASIC. Due to the high cadence required, the detectors are operatedin window readout mode. Approximately 700 stars per detector, each in a 2x2 pixel window, will be read out at 40Hz. Progressively more stars can be observed as the cadence decreases, until the limit of the SIDECAR memory is reached at about 4,000 windows The lack of atmospheric turbulence combined with the large field of view and high, speed low noise performance of the focal plane will provide the Whipple mission with unprecedented capability in exploring our Solar System.

  4. Deployment of a Curved Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Structures capable of deployment into complex, three-dimensional trusses have well known space technology applications such as the support of spacecraft payloads, communications antennas, radar reflectors, and solar concentrators. Such deployable trusses could also be useful in terrestrial applications such as the rapid establishment of structures in military and emergency service situations, in particular with regard to the deployment of enclosures for habitat or storage. To minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a single arch-shaped truss is preferable to multiple straight trusses arranged vertically and horizontally. To further minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a synchronous deployment with a single degree of freedom is also preferable. One method of synchronizing deployment of a truss is the use of a series of gears; this makes the deployment sequence predictable and testable, allows the truss to have a minimal stowage volume, and the deployed structure exhibits the excellent stiffness-to-mass and strength-to-mass ratios characteristic of a truss. A concept for using gears with varying ratios to deploy a truss into a curved shape has been developed and appears to be compatible with both space technology applications as well as potential use in terrestrial applications such as enclosure deployment. As is the case with other deployable trusses, this truss is formed using rigid elements (e.g., composite tubes) along the edges, one set of diagonal elements composed of either cables or folding/hinged rigid members, and the other set of diagonal elements formed by a continuous cable that is tightened by a motor or hand crank in order to deploy the truss. Gears of varying ratios are used to constrain the deployment to a single degree of freedom, making the deployment synchronous, predictable, and repeatable. The relative sizes of the gears and the relative dimensions of the diagonal elements determine the deployed geometry (e

  5. The Effects of Rational and Irrational Self-Verbalizations on Performance Efficiency and Levels of Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosin, Lindsay; Nelson, W. M. III

    1983-01-01

    Investigated effects of rational vs. irrational belief systems and rational vs. irrational self-verbalizations on anxiety and persistence. Subjects (N=40) were instructed to assemble a virtually insolvable task called Soma, and were assigned to either a rational or irrational self-talk condition. Rational self-talk subjects showed a significant…

  6. Length and Width Effects of Metal Films on Stress-Induced Bending of Surface Micromachined Cantilever Curved Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ju-Nan

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the length and width effects of metal films on the stress-induced bending of a surface micromachined cantilever curved grating are systematically investigated. A characterization of cantilever curved gratings with various lengths and widths was conducted to observe out-of-plane deformation. A finite element model was established to analyze the deformation. Finite element analysis and experimental results indicate that the commonly used beam theory formula for predicting the deformation of surface micromachined cantilever curved gratings is not valid for these devices. Experiments show that the shape of a cantilever curved grating and residual stress have a close relationship. As the length increases, the residual stress of the metal increases, resulting in a larger out-of-plane deformation of the cantilever curved grating. The tip deflection gradually decreases as the length-to-width ratio of the cantilever curved grating increases. A more reliable shape design of metal films on the stress-induced bending of surface micromachined cantilever curved gratings can thus be achieved.

  7. Composite curved frames for helicopter fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.; Lowry, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the results of analysis and testing of composite curved frames. A major frame was selected from the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter and designed as a composite structure. The curved beam effects were expected to increase flange axial stresses and induce transverse bending. A NASTRAN finite element analysis was conducted and the results were used in the design of composite curved frame specimens. Three specimens were fabricated and five static tests were conducted. The NASTRAN analysis and test results are compared for axial, transverse, and Web strains. Results show the curved beam effects are closely predicted by a NASTRAN analysis and the effects increase with loading on the composite frames.

  8. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  9. Titania nanorods curve to lower their energy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengzhong; Finnegan, Michael P; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous formation of curved nanorods is generally unexpected, since curvature introduces strain energy. However, electron microscopy shows that under hydrothermal conditions, some nanorods grown by oriented attachment of small anatase particles on {101} surfaces are curved and dislocation free. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the lattice energy of a curved anatase rod is actually lower than that of a linear rod due to more attractive long-range interatomic Coulombic interactions among atoms in the curved rod. The thermodynamic driving force stemming from lattice energy could be harnessed to produce asymmetric morphologies unexpected from classical Ostwald ripening with unusual shapes and properties. PMID:23794056

  10. Dissociative Recombination without a Curve Crossing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations show that a curve crossing is not always needed for a high dissociative- recombination cross section. For HeH(+), in which no neutral states cross the ion potential curve, dissociative recombination is driven by the nuclear kinetic-energy operator on adiabatic potential curves. The kinetic-energy derivative operator allows for capture into repulsive curves that are outside of the classical turning points for the nuclear motion. The dominant dissociative route is the C (2)Sigma(+) state leading to H(n = 2) atoms. An analogous mechanism is proposed for the dissociative recombination of H3(+).

  11. Ab initio yield curve dynamics [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Roy Frieden, B.; D'Anna, Joseph L.

    2005-09-01

    We derive an equation of motion for interest-rate yield curves by applying a minimum Fisher information variational approach to the implied probability density. By construction, solutions to the equation of motion recover observed bond prices. More significantly, the form of the resulting equation explains the success of the Nelson Siegel approach to fitting static yield curves and the empirically observed modal structure of yield curves. A practical numerical implementation of this equation of motion is found by using the Karhunen Lòeve expansion and Galerkin's method to formulate a reduced-order model of yield curve dynamics.

  12. Varied line spacing plane holographic grating recorded by using uniform line spacing plane gratings.

    PubMed

    Qing, Ling; Gang, Wu; Bin, Liu; Qiuping, Wang

    2006-07-20

    Uniform line spacing plane gratings are introduced into a recording system to generate aspherical wavefronts for recording varied line spacing plane holographic gratings. Analytical expressions of groove parameters are derived to the fourth order. A ray-tracing validation algorithm is provided based on Fermat's principle and a local search method. The recording parameters are optimized to record a varied line spacing plane holographic grating with the aid of derived analytical expressions. A design example demonstrates the exactness of the analytical expressions and the superiority of recording optics with auxiliary gratings. PMID:16826244

  13. Curved CCD detector devices and arrays for multispectral astrophysical applications and terrestrial stereo panoramic cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Pradyumna; Mark, David

    2004-09-01

    The emergence of curved CCD detectors as individual devices or as contoured mosaics assembled to match the curved focal planes of astronomical telescopes and terrestrial stereo panoramic cameras represents a major optical design advancement that greatly enhances the scientific potential of such instruments. In altering the primary detection surface within the telescope"s optical instrumentation system from flat to curved, and conforming the applied CCD"s shape precisely to the contour of the telescope"s curved focal plane, a major increase in the amount of transmittable light at various wavelengths through the system is achieved. This in turn enables multi-spectral ultra-sensitive imaging with much greater spatial resolution necessary for large and very large telescope applications, including those involving infrared image acquisition and spectroscopy, conducted over very wide fields of view. For earth-based and space-borne optical telescopes, the advent of curved CCD"s as the principle detectors provides a simplification of the telescope"s adjoining optics, reducing the number of optical elements and the occurrence of optical aberrations associated with large corrective optics used to conform to flat detectors. New astronomical experiments may be devised in the presence of curved CCD applications, in conjunction with large format cameras and curved mosaics, including three dimensional imaging spectroscopy conducted over multiple wavelengths simultaneously, wide field real-time stereoscopic tracking of remote objects within the solar system at high resolution, and deep field survey mapping of distant objects such as galaxies with much greater multi-band spatial precision over larger sky regions. Terrestrial stereo panoramic cameras equipped with arrays of curved CCD"s joined with associative wide field optics will require less optical glass and no mechanically moving parts to maintain continuous proper stereo convergence over wider perspective viewing fields than

  14. Growth of p-type and n-type m-plane GaN by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McLaurin, M.; Mates, T. E.; Wu, F.; Speck, J. S.

    2006-09-15

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxial growth of Mg-doped, p-type and Si-doped, n-type m-plane GaN on 6H m-plane SiC is demonstrated. Phase-pure, m-plane GaN films exhibiting a large anisotropy in film mosaic ({approx}0.2 deg. full width at half maximum, x-ray rocking curve scan taken parallel to [1120] versus {approx}2 deg. parallel to [0001]) were grown on m-plane SiC substrates. Maximum hole concentrations of {approx}7x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} were achieved with p-type conductivities as high as {approx}5 {omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} without the presence of Mg-rich inclusions or inversion domains as viewed by cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements indicate that the Mg-related acceptor state in m-plane GaN is the same as that exhibited in c-plane GaN. Free electron concentrations as high as {approx}4x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} were measured in the Si-doped m-plane GaN with corresponding mobilities of {approx}500 cm{sup 2}/V s measured parallel to the [1120] direction.

  15. Linear instability of supersonic plane wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, D. T.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical and numerical study of the growth of linear disturbances in the high-Reynolds-number and laminar compressible wake behind a flat plate which is aligned with a uniform stream. No ad hoc assumptions are made as to the nature of the undisturbed flow (in contrast to previous investigations) but instead the theory is developed rationally by use of proper wake-profiles which satisfy the steady equations of motion. The initial growth of near wake perturbation is governed by the compressible Rayleigh equation which is studied analytically for long- and short-waves. These solutions emphasize the asymptotic structures involved and provide a rational basis for a nonlinear development. The evolution of arbitrary wavelength perturbations is addressed numerically and spatial stability solutions are presented that account for the relative importance of the different physical mechanisms present, such as three-dimensionality, increasing Mach numbers enough (subsonic) Mach numbers, there exists a region of absolute instability very close to the trailing-edge with the majority of the wake being convectively unstable. At higher Mach numbers (but still not large-hypersonic) the absolute instability region seems to disappear and the maximum available growth-rates decrease considerably. Three-dimensional perturbations provide the highest spatial growth-rates.

  16. Rational approximations to linear forms of exponentials and binomials

    PubMed Central

    Chudnovsky, G. V.

    1983-01-01

    Mahler proved the following quantitative result supplementing the Lindemann-Weierstrass theorem: ǀΣi=0nCieriǀ > H-n-ε for any distinct rational numbers r0,r1,..., rn and rational integers C0,C1,...,Cn with H = max0≤i≤n ǀCiǀ. We improve Mahler's estimate by replacing exponentials eri by linearly independent linear forms Li = Σ Lijesij with rational Lij,siji = 0,1,...,n. Similar results are obtained for binomials (a/b)ri or Σ Lij(a/b)sij with integers a,b and logǀbǀ/logǀaǀ > 1 - ε. The simplest examples of new numbers with the irrationality exponent “2 + ε” are sinh 1 or sin 1. PMID:16593320

  17. Poker as a skill game: rational versus irrational behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2015-03-01

    In many countries poker is one of the most popular card games. Although each variant of poker has its own rules, all involve the use of money to make the challenge meaningful. Nowadays, in the collective consciousness, some variants of poker are referred to as games of skill, others as gambling. A poker table can be viewed as a psychology lab, where human behavior can be observed and quantified. This work provides a preliminary analysis of the role of rationality in poker games, using a stylized version of Texas Hold'em. In particular, we compare the performance of two different kinds of players, i.e. rational versus irrational players, during a poker tournament. Results show that these behaviors (i.e. rationality and irrationality) affect both the outcomes of challenges and the way poker should be classified.

  18. On the irrationality of emotion and the rationality of awareness.

    PubMed

    Lambie, John A

    2008-09-01

    It is argued that one answer to the question of the rationality of emotion hinges on the different roles in action selection played by emotions when one is aware of them versus when one is not aware of them (awareness being indexed by the ability to report one's emotion). When unaware of one's emotions, they are: (a) not able to enter into one's deliberations about what to do, and (b) more likely to be automatically acted out. This is a problem for rationality because (partly due to the logic of signal detection theory) emotional action urges are often "false positives". In contrast, awareness of emotions crucially allows emotional responses to be inhibited: such inhibition is necessary for truly rational action selection. Furthermore, awareness enables Reflective Revision--the modification of one's theories and action plans as a result of awareness of inconsistencies between theories and data, and action plans and goals. PMID:17451970

  19. Rational accountability and rational autonomy in academic practice: An extended case study of the communicative ethic of interdisciplinary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Susan Margaret

    The dissertation investigates the interaction of rational accountability and rational autonomy in interdisciplinary science within the lifeworld of the university. It focuses on the cultural, social and motivational forces that university researchers draw on, and develop, to constitute and regulate interdisciplinary science. Findings are analyzed within an applied critical social theory framework that attends to the interaction of instrumental and communicative rational action within the public spaces that constitute the lifeworld of the university as a public sphere in society. The research raises questions of how academics practice interdisciplinary science and how these practices relate to the reproduction of the regulative ideal of the university as a community that practices public reason. The conceptual framework informing the research is Habermas' (1984) theory of communicative action. Using Burawoy's (1991) extended case study method as an operational strategy, two modes of constituting and regulating interdisciplinary science were found. Instrumental rational modes dominated in social contexts of interdisciplinary science where consensus on the normative goals and purposes of rational academic action were pre-existing and pre-supposed by participants. Communicative rational modes dominated in social contexts of interdisciplinary science where the normative goals and purposes of rational academic action entered a contested domain. Endorsements for interdisciplinary science policies are coinciding with demands for increased accountability and relevance of Canada's university system. At the same time that the university system must respond to external demands, it must reproduce itself as a public institution open to the discursive redemption of factual and normative validity claims. The study found that academics participate in, but also contest the instrumental regulation of academic inquiry and conduct by using their constitutional autonomy and freedom to

  20. In-plane vibrations of a rectangular plate: Plane wave expansion modelling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreola-Lucas, A.; Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Báez, G.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2015-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results for in-plane vibrations of a uniform rectangular plate with free boundary conditions are obtained. The experimental setup uses electromagnetic-acoustic transducers and a vector network analyzer. The theoretical calculations were obtained using the plane wave expansion method applied to the in-plane thin plate vibration theory. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent for the lower 95 modes covering a very wide frequency range from DC to 20 kHz. Some measured normal-mode wave amplitudes were compared with the theoretical predictions; very good agreement was observed. The excellent agreement of the classical theory of in-plane vibrations confirms its reliability up to very high frequencies

  1. Polar flexoelectric in-plane and out-of-plane switching in bent core nematic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamain, Omaima; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Komitov, Lachezar

    2016-07-01

    Polar electro-optic response, arising from the coupling between an applied in-plane and out-of-plane dc electric field, respectively, and the flexoelectric polarization of bent core nematic liquid crystal mixtures with hybrid alignment is studied in conventional sandwich cells with homeotropic anchoring at one of the cell substrates and planar at the other. Such a hybrid alignment, however, results in a splay/bend elastic deformation of the nematic giving rise of a flexoelectric polarization. It was found that a pronounced polar electro-optic response, both in-plane and out of plane, took place in the bent core nematic mixtures at very low voltages due to the high flexoelectric polarization in these mixtures, compared with the one observed in calamitic liquid crystals.

  2. Dynamics in the turbulent wake of a curved circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, José P.; Pettersen, Bjørnar; Andersson, Helge I.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the physics of turbulent wakes is an essential, yet complex task in the study of turbulent flows. In the present paper we investigate the flow past a curved body of circular cross-section. The inflow velocity is aligned with the curvature of the cylinder and directed towards its convex face. We conduct direct numerical simulations at a Reynolds number of 3900 in order to obtain a fully turbulent wake. The instantaneous vortical structures reveal that the primary vortices are roughly aligned with the curved axis. Despite the presence of isolated splitting events in the frequency of the vortex shedding, there is one single shedding frequency that dominates this process. Velocity time-traces confirm that the shear layers exhibit intermittency, which is manifested as large amplitude fluctuations. The intensity of these instabilities is increased by the secondary flow along the recirculation region, thereby influencing the dynamics of the near wake. Several spots of zero mean velocity reside next to the baseline within the recirculation region, displacing the back-flow region further downstream. It is suggested that this displacement is induced by the secondary flow, in combination with the symmetry boundary condition imposed at the top plane.

  3. The iPTF Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher; Prince, Thomas A.; Miller, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Kupfer, Thomas; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank J.; Oded Ofek, Eran; Shupe, David L.; Surace, Jason A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2013, the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory has conducted a survey of the Northern Galactic Plane. The major science goals of the survey include mapping variable stars throughout the Galaxy; discovering outbursting sources such as Cataclysmic Variables, FU Ori outbursts, and M-dwarf flares; and identifying rare types of compact binaries. Through 2015 the survey has obtained an average of 60 epochs in R-band in the spatial region 0 < l < 150 degrees, |b| < 20 degrees, with greatest coverage in the |b| < 5 degree region.I will describe the performance of the survey and present initial results, with a focus on variability-based identification of X-ray sources. The Zwicky Transient Facility, to begin in 2017, will include an extensive public variability survey of the Galactic Plane.

  4. Teal Amber Visible Focal Plane Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Charles R.; Burczewski, Ron

    1981-12-01

    Deep-space surveillance missions have imposed severe demands on existing technology and simulated the search for new, advanced technology developments to provide higher performance. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored Teal Amber as a visible charge-coupled device (CCD) and associated focal plane signal processing technology development and demonstration program. This paper describes this large-scale, staring-array-sensor concept. The current state of art in the resulting visibled CCD imagers is specified, along with the focal plane signal processor implementation in low power-weight-volume large-scale integrated (LSI) circuitry. Performance requirements and analytic predictions are compared to demonstration system results from an electro-optical test site in White Sands, New Mexico.

  5. Image-plane processing of visual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Fales, C. L.; Park, S. K.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Shannon's theory of information is used to optimize the optical design of sensor-array imaging systems which use neighborhood image-plane signal processing for enhancing edges and compressing dynamic range during image formation. The resultant edge-enhancement, or band-pass-filter, response is found to be very similar to that of human vision. Comparisons of traits in human vision with results from information theory suggest that: (1) Image-plane processing, like preprocessing in human vision, can improve visual information acquisition for pattern recognition when resolving power, sensitivity, and dynamic range are constrained. Improvements include reduced sensitivity to changes in lighter levels, reduced signal dynamic range, reduced data transmission and processing, and reduced aliasing and photosensor noise degradation. (2) Information content can be an appropriate figure of merit for optimizing the optical design of imaging systems when visual information is acquired for pattern recognition. The design trade-offs involve spatial response, sensitivity, and sampling interval.

  6. Intraoperative tracking of aortic valve plane.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D L H; Garreau, M; Auffret, V; Le Breton, H; Verhoye, J P; Haigron, P

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to track the aortic valve plane in intra-operative fluoroscopic images in order to optimize and secure Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) procedure. This paper is focused on the issue of aortic valve calcifications tracking in fluoroscopic images. We propose a new method based on the Tracking-Learning-Detection approach, applied to the aortic valve calcifications in order to determine the position of the aortic valve plane in intra-operative TAVI images. This main contribution concerns the improvement of object detection by updating the recursive tracker in which all features are tracked jointly. The approach has been evaluated on four patient databases, providing an absolute mean displacement error less than 10 pixels (≈2mm). Its suitability for the TAVI procedure has been analyzed. PMID:24110703

  7. Split-field pupil plane determination apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Joseph T.

    1996-01-01

    A split-field pupil plane determination apparatus (10) having a wedge assembly (16) with a first glass wedge (18) and a second glass wedge (20) positioned to divide a laser beam (12) into a first laser beam half (22) and a second laser beam half (24) which diverge away from the wedge assembly (16). A wire mask (26) is positioned immediately after the wedge assembly (16) in the path of the laser beam halves (22, 24) such that a shadow thereof is cast as a first shadow half (30) and a second shadow half (32) at the input to a relay telescope (14). The relay telescope (14) causes the laser beam halves (22, 24) to converge such that the first shadow half (30) of the wire mask (26) is aligned with the second shadow half (32) at any subsequent pupil plane (34).

  8. The national aero-space plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendez, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    The National Aerospace Plane is an extremely versatile and adaptable aircraft. It can be developed into an Orient Express that would dramatically improve trade with countries in Asia and elsewhere: a commuter transport to ferry men and materials to space, an advanced tactical fighter or bomber, and an unparalleled high altitude spy-plane to observe troubled spots all over the globe. Utilizing the technology developed by this pilot program, it will be possible to quickly and easily get to low Earth orbit, go halfway around the world in a fraction of the time it previously took, and lead the world in the development of advanced technology to improve our lives and the lives of many others.

  9. The crack problem for a nonhomogeneous plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for a nonhomogeneous medium containing a crack is considered. It is assumed that the Poisson's ratio of the medium is constant and the Young's modulus E varies exponentially with the coordinate parallel to the crack. First the half plane problem is formulated and the solution is given for arbitrary tractions along the boundary. Then the integral equation for the crack problem is derived. It is shown that the integral equation having the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the density function has a simple Cauchy type kernel. Hence, its solution and the stresses around the crack tips have the conventional square root singularity. The solution is given for various loading conditions. The results show that the effect of the Poisson's ratio and consequently that of the thickness constraint on the stress intensity factors are rather negligible.

  10. Crack problem for a nonhomogeneous plane

    SciTech Connect

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-09-01

    This study considers the plane elasticity problem for a nonhomogeneous medium containing a crack. It is assumed that the Poisson's ratio of the medium is constant and the Young's modulus E varies exponentially with the coordinate parallel to the crack. First the half plane problem is formulated and the solution is given for arbitrary tractions along the boundary. Then, the integral equation for the crack problem is derived. It is shown that the integral equation having the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the density function has a simple Cauchy-type kernel. Hence, its solution and the stresses around the crack tips have the conventional square-root singularity. The solution is given for various loading conditions. The results show that the effect of the Poisson's ratio and consequently that of the thickness constraint on the stress intensity factors are rather negligible. 14 references.

  11. The crack problem for a nonhomogeneous plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for a nonhomogeneous medium containing a crack is considered. It is assumed that the Poisson's ratio of the medium is constant and the Young's modulus E varies exponentially with the coordinate parallel to the crack. First the half plane problem is formulated and the solution is given for arbitrary tractions along the boundary. Then the integral equation for the crack problem is derived. It is shown that the integral equation having the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the density function has a simple Cauchy type kernel. Hence, its solution and the stresses around the crack tips have the conventional square root singularity. The solution is given for various loading conditions. The results show that the effect of the Poisson's ratio and consequently that of the thickness constraint on the stress intensity factors are rather negligible.

  12. Structure analysis for plane geometry figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tianxiao; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Keqiang; Tang, Zhi

    2013-12-01

    As there are increasing numbers of digital documents for education purpose, we realize that there is not a retrieval application for mathematic plane geometry images. In this paper, we propose a method for retrieving plane geometry figures (PGFs), which often appear in geometry books and digital documents. First, detecting algorithms are applied to detect common basic geometry shapes from a PGF image. Based on all basic shapes, we analyze the structural relationships between two basic shapes and combine some of them to a compound shape to build the PGF descriptor. Afterwards, we apply matching function to retrieve candidate PGF images with ranking. The great contribution of the paper is that we propose a structure analysis method to better describe the spatial relationships in such image composed of many overlapped shapes. Experimental results demonstrate that our analysis method and shape descriptor can obtain good retrieval results with relatively high effectiveness and efficiency.

  13. Porridge and peas: C. Stanton Hicks and Australian army rations.

    PubMed

    Collingham, Lizzie

    2009-09-01

    In 1942 Australian troops came back from fighting the Japanese in New Guinea exhausted and malnourished. The army rations of bully beef and biscuits were insufficiently rich in vitamins to sustain men in combat in tropical conditions. The nutritionist C. Stanton Hicks was one of a vast army of scientists who worked behind the scenes to maximize the war effort. He made it his mission to improve the army diet. He set up the Australian Army Catering Corps, invented combat ration packs and tried to introduce vitamin-rich foods into the soldiers' diet. Two of his more idiosyncratic innovations were wheat porridge and Tasmanian blue peas. PMID:19539373

  14. Current Density and Plasma Displacement Near Perturbed Rational Surface

    SciTech Connect

    A.H. Boozer and N. Pomphrey

    2010-10-10

    The current density in the vicinity of a rational surface of a force-free magnetic field subjected to an ideal perturbation is shown to be the sum of both a smooth and a delta-function distribution, which give comparable currents. The maximum perturbation to the smooth current density is comparable to a typical equilibrium current density and the width of the layer in which the current flows is shown to be proportional to the perturbation amplitude. In the standard linearized theory, the plasma displacement has an unphysical jump across the rational surface, but the full theory gives a continuous displacement.

  15. Sex and the Barnum effect: rationality versus helpfulness.

    PubMed

    Layne, C

    1999-08-01

    In 1998 Piper-Terry and Downey found that women accepted friends' bogus test interpretations more readily than did men and the researchers attributed this to women's helpfulness. Layne countered that women are more open and thus rationally expected their friends' interpretations to be more accurate. Later Downey asked participants how accurately they believed their friends could describe their personalities. Although this pilot study's sensitivity to differences was low, the women's accuracy ratings still tended to exceed those of men (p < .06) as Layne predicted. This may suggest that the rationality hypothesis is better supported than the female-helpfulness hypothesis. PMID:10575985

  16. An algorithm for surface smoothing with rational splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, James R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed is an algorithm for smoothing surfaces with spline functions containing tension parameters. The bivariate spline functions used are tensor products of univariate rational-spline functions. A distinct tension parameter corresponds to each rectangular strip defined by a pair of consecutive spline knots along either axis. Equations are derived for writing the bivariate rational spline in terms of functions and derivatives at the knots. Estimates of these values are obtained via weighted least squares subject to continuity constraints at the knots. The algorithm is illustrated on a set of terrain elevation data.

  17. Wafer plane inspection for advanced reticle defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Rajesh; Ghadiali, Firoz; Kim, Jun; Huang, Tracy; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    Readiness of new mask defect inspection technology is one of the key enablers for insertion & transition of the next generation technology from development into production. High volume production in mask shops and wafer fabs demands a reticle inspection system with superior sensitivity complemented by a low false defect rate to ensure fast turnaround of reticle repair and defect disposition (W. Chou et al 2007). Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to mask defect inspection, complementing the high resolution inspection capabilities of the TeraScanHR defect inspection system. WPI is accomplished by using the high resolution mask images to construct a physical mask model (D. Pettibone et al 1999). This mask model is then used to create the mask image in the wafer aerial plane. A threshold model is applied to enhance the inspectability of printing defects. WPI can eliminate the mask restrictions imposed on OPC solutions by inspection tool limitations in the past. Historically, minimum image restrictions were required to avoid nuisance inspection stops and/or subsequent loss of sensitivity to defects. WPI has the potential to eliminate these limitations by moving the mask defect inspections to the wafer plane. This paper outlines Wafer Plane Inspection technology, and explores the application of this technology to advanced reticle inspection. A total of twelve representative critical layers were inspected using WPI die-to-die mode. The results from scanning these advanced reticles have shown that applying WPI with a pixel size of 90nm (WPI P90) captures all the defects of interest (DOI) with low false defect detection rates. In validating CD predictions, the delta CDs from WPI are compared against Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMS), where a good correlation is established between WPI and AIMSTM.

  18. The Fisher Shannon information plane for atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J. B.; Sen, K. D.; Nagy, Á.

    2008-03-01

    The Fisher-Shannon information product and plane for atoms are presented analytically assuming Thomas-Fermi-Gáspár statistical model. A comparison with the Hartree-Fock densities reveals that the atomic shell structure is inadequately expressed information theoretically in the statistical model. The shape complexity measure of Lopez et al. is found to have a better large Z dependence than the one obtained from non-relativistic Hartree-Fock densities.

  19. Similitude in hydrodynamic tests involving planing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruson, M F

    1936-01-01

    The problems of using models in planing tests are addressed. If one passes from the model to a hull of linear dimensions n times greater, the speeds are connected by the law of mechanical similitude. The normal forces given by the hydrodynamic equations (perfect fluid) also follow the law of dynamic similitude (Reech's method) and are multiplied by n(exp 3). A series of tests were performed and the actual results were compared to theoretical results.

  20. Numerical analysis of curved frequency selective surface by finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin-yi; Wang, Jian-bo; Chen, Gui-bo; Sun, Guan-cheng; Lu, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Frequency selective surface is a monolayer or multilayer 2D periodic structure which is composed of multiple resonance units scattering by a two-dimensional periodic array on dielectric layer. FSS can't absorb radio frequency energy, but can filter the frequency which is therefore applied in microwave technique or stealth technology. The relative research on curved FSS is relatively scarce since the curved FSS structure can be obtained only when FSS is attached on the materials surfaces of curved structures in engineering application. However, curved FSS is widely applied in practical engineering; therefore, the research on curved FSS structure has important significance. In this paper, a curved FSS structure model of Y-pore unit is established and numerical simulated by means of FDTD. The influence of curvature on FSS transmission characteristics is studied according to the analysis on the changing of radar cross section (RCS). The results show: the center frequency point of the plane band pass FSS structure drifts after the curve surface deformation of the structure; the center frequency point of the curved band pass FSS structure drifts with the changing of the curvature radius, i. e. with the decreasing of curvature radius, the frequency point drifts towards high points and the transmittance decreases. The design of FSS radome demands of accurate and stable center resonance frequency; therefore, the actual situation of curved surface should be considered in practical engineering application when band pass FSS is made into frequency selection filtering radome. The curvature radius should be long enough to avoid center frequency drifting and transmittance deceasing.