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Sample records for rave system requirements

  1. Ukidna: the RAVE machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Andrew J.; Saunders, Will; Watson, Fred; Miziarski, Stan

    2004-09-01

    The Anglo-Australian Observatory is currently designing a new fibre positioner for the UK Schmidt Telescope. The instrument will have 2250 fibres, positioned with sub-arcsecond accuracy across a six degree field of view, and will have a reconfiguration time of one minute. The instrument is to enable the RAVE survey of high precision abundances and velocities for up to 50 million stars. The design is largely adapted from the AAO's FMOS-Echidna fibre positioner for Subaru. New design challenges for Ukidna include the enormous number of fibres, the large focal surface, and the field curvature of the Schmidt telescope. These features are mostly shared with the expected needs of future prime-focus multi-fibre systems on 8-30m class telescopes. We present details and performance of the multi-actuator design.

  2. Computational Experiments with the RAVE Heuristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, David; Müller, Martin

    The Monte-Carlo tree search algorithm Upper Confidence bounds applied to Trees (UCT) has become extremely popular in computer games research. The Rapid Action Value Estimation (RAVE) heuristic is a strong estimator that often improves the performance of UCT-based algorithms. However, there are situations where RAVE misleads the search whereas pure UCT search can find the correct solution. Two games, the simple abstract game Sum of Switches (SOS) and the game of Go, are used to study the behavior of the RAVE heuristic. In SOS, RAVE updates are manipulated to mimic game situations where RAVE misleads the search. Such false RAVE updates are used to create RAVE overestimates and underestimates. A study of the distributions of mean and RAVE values reveals great differences between Go and SOS. While the RAVE-max update rule is able to correct extreme cases of RAVE underestimation, it is not effective in closer to practical settings and in Go.

  3. THE RAVE SURVEY: RICH IN VERY METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Fulbright, Jon P.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Ruchti, Gregory R.; Gilmore, G. F.; Grebel, Eva; Bienayme, O.; Siebert, A.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Campbell, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Siviero, A.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Steinmetz, M.

    2010-11-20

    Very metal-poor stars are of obvious importance for many problems in chemical evolution, star formation, and galaxy evolution. Finding complete samples of such stars which are also bright enough to allow high-precision individual analyses is of considerable interest. We demonstrate here that stars with iron abundances [Fe/H] <-2 dex, and down to below -4 dex, can be efficiently identified within the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey of bright stars, without requiring additional confirmatory observations. We determine a calibration of the equivalent width of the calcium triplet lines measured from the RAVE spectra onto true [Fe/H], using high spectral resolution data for a subset of the stars. These RAVE iron abundances are accurate enough to obviate the need for confirmatory higher-resolution spectroscopy. Our initial study has identified 631 stars with [Fe/H] {<=}-2, from a RAVE database containing approximately 200,000 stars. This RAVE-based sample is complete for stars with [Fe/H] {approx_lt}-2.5, allowing statistical sample analysis. We identify three stars with [Fe/H] {approx_lt}-4. Of these, one was already known to be 'ultra metal-poor', one is a known carbon-enhanced metal-poor star, but we obtain [Fe/H] = -4.0, rather than the published [Fe/H] = -3.3, and derive [C/Fe] = +0.9, and [N/Fe] = +3.2, and the third is at the limit of our signal-to-noise ratio. RAVE observations are ongoing and should prove to be a rich source of bright, easily studied, very metal-poor stars.

  4. Mapping Tidal Streams and Tails around Galactic Globular Clusters using RAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunder, Andrea; Steinmetz, M.; RAVE Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Stellar population studies of globular clusters have suggested that the brightest globular clusters in the Galaxy are actually the remnant nuclei of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. If present Galactic globular clusters formed within larger stellar systems, they are likely surrounded by extra-tidal halos and tails made up of stars that were tidally stripped from their parent systems. Also, they would have lost the majority fraction of the initial mass due to their internal and external dynamical effects, such as tidal heating and stripping. This information suggests that surroundings around globular clusters can provide an excellent example of such a structure. We use the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) to search for signatures of tidal tails around the globular clusters prominently featured in the extensive RAVE footprint. Stars with RAVE metallicities, radial velocities and proper motions consistent with the abundance patterns and properties of the cluster are presented for Omega Centauri, NGC 3201, NGC 362, NGC 2808 and NGC 1851. The bright magnitudes of these stars make them easy targets for high resolution follow-up observations, allowing us to carry out chemical tagging to identify (or exclude) stars outside the tidal radius of the cluster as tidal debris. As these clusters are well studied with accurate abundances and distances, the RAVE stars located within the tidal radius of these clusters will also aid in the improvement of the stellar parameters and abundances extracted from the RAVE spectra.

  5. Polysubstance Use Patterns in Underground Rave Attenders: A Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Calderon, Fermin; Lozano, Oscar M.; Vidal, Claudio; Ortega, Josefa Gutierrez; Vergara, Esperanza; Gonzalez-Saiz, Francisco; Bilbao, Izaskun; Caluente, Marta; Cano, Tomas; Cid, Francisco; Dominguez, Celia; Izquierdo, Emcarni; Perez, Maria I.

    2011-01-01

    Drug use in mainstream rave parties has been widely documented in a large number of studies. However, not much is known about drug use in underground raves. The purpose of this study is to find out the polysubstance use patterns at underground raves. Two hundred and fifty-two young people between the ages of 18 and 30 who went to underground raves…

  6. System requirements. [Space systems

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, R.E.

    1982-06-01

    Requirements of future space systems, including large space systems, that operate beyond the space shuttle are discussed. Typical functions required of propulsion systems in this operational regime include payload placement, retrieval, observation, servicing, space debris control and support to large space systems. These functional requirements are discussed in conjunction with two classes of propulsion systems: (1) primary or orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) and (2) secondary or systems that generally operate within or relatively near an operational base orbit. Three propulsion system types are described in relation to these requirements: cryogenic OTV, teleoperator maneuvering system and a solar electric OTV.

  7. The Milky Way evolution under the RAVE perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopatis, Georges

    2016-08-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) collected from 2003 to 2013 medium resolution spectra for 5ċ105 low-mass stars of our Galaxy, improving our understanding of the Milky Way evolution and of its properties outside the Solar neighbourhood. This proceeding gives an overview of RAVE results obtained in the last two years.

  8. An Exploration of Recent Club Drug Use among Rave Attendees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacoubian, George S.; Peters, Ronald J.

    2007-01-01

    Raves are characterized by large numbers of youth dancing for long periods of time and by the use of "club drugs," such as 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"). While a small body of research has explored the use of ecstasy and other club drugs (EOCD) among club rave attendees in the United States, we are aware of no studies that…

  9. Polysubstance use patterns in underground rave attenders: a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Calderón, Fermín; Lozano, Oscar M; Vidal, Claudio; Ortega, Josefa Gutiérrez; Vergara, Esperanza; González-Sáiz, Francisco; Bilbao, Izaskun; Caluente, Marta; Cano, Tomás; Cid, Francisco; Dominguez, Celia; Izquierdo, Emcarni; Pérez, Maria I

    2011-01-01

    Drug use in mainstream rave parties has been widely documented in a large number of studies. However, not much is known about drug use in underground raves. The purpose of this study is to find out the polysubstance use patterns at underground raves. Two hundred and fifty-two young people between the ages of 18 and 30 who went to underground raves were interviewed. They were given a questionnaire to collect information on drug use at raves. Ravers used a mean of 4.9 different drugs at the last rave they had been to. Over 75% of them used tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, and amphetamine, and over half also used powder ecstasy. Two differentiated use patterns were found: one pattern concentrated more on the use of stimulants and the other on the use of hallucinogens. Underground ravers have a "standard" sociodemographic profile. The use of drugs is much higher than equivalent age group. Higher drug use prevalence than in mainstream rave parties is also observed. Different patterns of use appear which will be necessary to consider in designing preventions and risk reduction strategies, PMID:21888000

  10. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): THIRD DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Siviero, A.; Boeche, C.; Steinmetz, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Enke, H.; Anguiano, B.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Fulbright, J.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Munari, U.; Zwitter, T.; Watson, F. G.; Burton, D.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russel, K. S.

    2011-06-15

    We present the third data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) which is the first milestone of the RAVE project, releasing the full pilot survey. The catalog contains 83,072 radial velocity measurements for 77,461 stars in the southern celestial hemisphere, as well as stellar parameters for 39,833 stars. This paper describes the content of the new release, the new processing pipeline, as well as an updated calibration for the metallicity based upon the observation of additional standard stars. Spectra will be made available in a future release. The data release can be accessed via the RAVE Web site.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Omega Cen candidates RAVE-selected (Fernandez-Trincado+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Robin, A. C.; Vieira, K.; Moreno, E.; Bienayme, O.; Reyle, C.; Valenzuela, O.; Pichardo, B.; Robles-Valdez, F.; Martins, A. M. M.

    2015-11-01

    The sample was selected from the RAVE DR4 catalog (Kordopatis et al., 2013, Cat. III/272), which provides accurate radial velocities with typical errors of σRV~2km/s, and distances and individual abundances with errors of about 10-20%, determined for approximately 390000 relatively bright stars (9magRAVE DR4 were compiled from several catalogs, however, in this work we use UCAC4 (Zacharias et al., 2013, Cat. I/322). We used these data to make a kinematical selection of RAVE stars possibly related to omega Centauri, also taking spatial distribution and metallicity into account, as well as some additional quality control cuts to select robust data. In this work we restricted our study to RAVE stars with Galactic longitudes 240°required the stars to have high quality spectra ({chi}2<2000) with a signal-to-noise ratio S/N>20 (algo_conv=0 was required, indicating that the pipeline converges, see Kordopatis et al., 2013, Cat. III/272). This cut allowed us to obtain precise radial velocity measurements, typically σRV<2km/s, in order to constraint the full space motion. The metallicity [Fe/H] distribution for giant stars within Omega Centauri spans more than a magnitude order, from -2.2dex<[Fe/H]<-0.7dex (Johnson & Pilachowski, 2010, Cat. J/ApJ/722/1373), therefore we allowed stars in our sample to be in this range of metallicity. (1 data file).

  12. EXPLORING THE MORPHOLOGY OF RAVE STELLAR SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienayme, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M.; Watson, F. G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a medium-resolution (R {approx} 7500) spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way that has already obtained over half a million stellar spectra. They present a randomly selected magnitude-limited sample, so it is important to use a reliable and automated classification scheme that identifies normal single stars and discovers different types of peculiar stars. To this end, we present a morphological classification of {approx}350, 000 RAVE survey stellar spectra using locally linear embedding, a dimensionality reduction method that enables representing the complex spectral morphology in a low-dimensional projected space while still preserving the properties of the local neighborhoods of spectra. We find that the majority of all spectra in the database ({approx} 90%-95%) belong to normal single stars, but there is also a significant population of several types of peculiars. Among them, the most populated groups are those of various types of spectroscopic binary and chromospherically active stars. Both of them include several thousands of spectra. Particularly the latter group offers significant further investigation opportunities since activity of stars is a known proxy of stellar ages. Applying the same classification procedure to the sample of normal single stars alone shows that the shape of the projected manifold in two-dimensional space correlates with stellar temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity.

  13. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Fourth Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopatis, Georges; RAVE Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances and distances determined for 425 561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the intermediate spectroscopic stellar survey of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). Compared to previous RAVE data releases, the present one increases the available catalog size by an order of magnitude. The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the 2MASS photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline which is also improved compared to that available for the previous data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration website and the Vizier database.

  14. Very Metal-poor Stars Observed by the RAVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matijevič, Gal

    2016-08-01

    Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) observed ~500,000 southern sky stars between 2003 and 2013 in the infra-red calcium triplet (CaII) spectral region. In this study we extended the analysis of RAVE very metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] < -2) presented by Fulbright et al. (2010). We employed a novel method for identifying the metal-poor stars and developed a tool for modeling CaII lines where we also modeled the background noise to avoid systematical biases in the equivalent width (EW) measurements. Final metallicity values were derived with a flexible calibration approach using only 2MASS photometric data and EW measurements obtained from the RAVE spectra.

  15. Raves: a review of the culture, the drugs and the prevention of harm

    PubMed Central

    Weir, E

    2000-01-01

    Raves are all-night dance parties attended by large numbers of youth, sometimes in excess of 20,000. The rave scene, which is international in scope, is distinguished by clandestine venues, hypnotic electronic music and the liberal use of drugs such as ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate) and ketamine. Several rave-related deaths in Canada in 1999 alerted health authorities, parents and police to the health risks of rave attendance. Family physicians, emergency physicians and pediatricians should have some understanding of raves, the drugs and the health risks so they can effectively counsel and treat patients. The rave culture in Canada and the drugs commonly used at raves are reviewed, and strategies and initiatives for harm reduction are discussed. PMID:10906922

  16. Raves: a review of the culture, the drugs and the prevention of harm.

    PubMed

    Weir, E

    2000-06-27

    Raves are all-night dance parties attended by large numbers of youth, sometimes in excess of 20,000. The rave scene, which is international in scope, is distinguished by clandestine venues, hypnotic electronic music and the liberal use of drugs such as ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate) and ketamine. Several rave-related deaths in Canada in 1999 alerted health authorities, parents and police to the health risks of rave attendance. Family physicians, emergency physicians and pediatricians should have some understanding of raves, the drugs and the health risks so they can effectively counsel and treat patients. The rave culture in Canada and the drugs commonly used at raves are reviewed, and strategies and initiatives for harm reduction are discussed. PMID:10906922

  17. Substance-related health problems during rave parties in The Netherlands (1997-2008).

    PubMed

    Krul, Jan; Blankers, Matthijs; Girbes, Armand R J

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a 12-year (1997-2008) observation of substance-related incidents occurring at rave parties in the Netherlands, including length of visits to first-aid stations, substances used, and severity of the incidents. During rave parties, specifically trained medical and paramedical personnel staffed first aid stations. Visitors were diagnosed and treated, and their data were recorded using standardized methods. During the 12-year period with 249 rave parties involving about 3,800,000 visitors, 27,897 people visited a first aid station, of whom 10,100 reported having a substance-related problem. The mean age of these people was 22.3+/-5.4 years; 52.4% of them were male. Most (66.7%) substance-related problems were associated with ecstasy or alcohol use or both. Among 10,100 substance-related cases, 515 required professional medical care, and 16 of these cases were life threatening. People with a substance-related problem stayed 20 min at the first aid station, which was significantly longer than the 5 min that those without a substance-related health problem stayed. These unique data from the Netherlands identify a variety of acute health problems related to the use of alcohol, amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy, and GHB. Although most problems were minor, people using GHB more often required professional medical care those using the other substances. We recommended adherence to harm and risk reduction policy, and the use of first aid stations with specially trained staff for both minor and serious incidents. PMID:22216332

  18. Substance-Related Health Problems during Rave Parties in the Netherlands (1997–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Krul, Jan; Blankers, Matthijs; Girbes, Armand R. J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a 12-year (1997–2008) observation of substance-related incidents occurring at rave parties in the Netherlands, including length of visits to first-aid stations, substances used, and severity of the incidents. During rave parties, specifically trained medical and paramedical personnel staffed first aid stations. Visitors were diagnosed and treated, and their data were recorded using standardized methods. During the 12-year period with 249 rave parties involving about 3,800,000 visitors, 27,897 people visited a first aid station, of whom 10,100 reported having a substance-related problem. The mean age of these people was 22.3+/−5.4 years; 52.4% of them were male. Most (66.7%) substance-related problems were associated with ecstasy or alcohol use or both. Among 10,100 substance-related cases, 515 required professional medical care, and 16 of these cases were life threatening. People with a substance-related problem stayed 20 min at the first aid station, which was significantly longer than the 5 min that those without a substance-related health problem stayed. These unique data from the Netherlands identify a variety of acute health problems related to the use of alcohol, amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy, and GHB. Although most problems were minor, people using GHB more often required professional medical care those using the other substances. We recommended adherence to harm and risk reduction policy, and the use of first aid stations with specially trained staff for both minor and serious incidents. PMID:22216332

  19. Discovering system requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B.; Dean, F.F.

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  20. Transportation System Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

  1. The games: what can the sports medicine community learn from raves?

    PubMed

    Grange, Jeff T; Corbett, Stephen W; Downs, Dawn M

    2014-01-01

    Electronic dance music festivals, also known as raves, are increasing in popularity. Despite the occasional tragedy in the lay press regarding medical incidents at raves, such events are relatively safe when compared to other mass gatherings. While the medical usage rates are lower than rock concerts and marathons, there are many similarities to both types of events with regard to the types of injuries and medical complaints. This article may assist in planning medical support for raves in the future. PMID:24819006

  2. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): First Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, M.; Zwitter, T.; Siebert, A.; Watson, F. G.; Freeman, K. C.; Munari, U.; Campbell, R.; Williams, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Parker, Q. A.; Bienaymé, O.; Roeser, S.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Burton, D.; Cass, C. J. P.; Dawe, J. A.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russell, K. S.; Saunders, W.; Enke, H.; Bailin, J.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Dehnen, W.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Evans, N. W.; Fiorucci, M.; Fulbright, J. P.; Gerhard, O.; Jauregi, U.; Kelz, A.; Mijović, L.; Minchev, I.; Parmentier, G.; Peñarrubia, J.; Quillen, A. C.; Read, M. A.; Ruchti, G.; Scholz, R.-D.; Siviero, A.; Smith, M. C.; Sordo, R.; Veltz, L.; Vidrih, S.; von Berlepsch, R.; Boyle, B. J.; Schilbach, E.

    2006-10-01

    We present the first data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey to measure radial velocities and stellar atmosphere parameters (temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity) of up to one million stars using the Six Degree Field multiobject spectrograph on the 1.2 m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The RAVE program started in 2003, obtaining medium-resolution spectra (median R=7500) in the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795 Å) for southern hemisphere stars drawn from the Tycho-2 and SuperCOSMOS catalogs, in the magnitude range 9RAVE radial velocities are complemented in the data release with proper motions from Starnet 2.0, Tycho-2, and SuperCOSMOS, in addition to photometric data from the major optical and infrared catalogs (Tycho-2, USNO-B, DENIS, and the Two Micron All Sky Survey). The data release can be accessed via the RAVE Web site.

  3. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Second Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwitter, T.; Siebert, A.; Munari, U.; Freeman, K. C.; Siviero, A.; Watson, F. G.; Fulbright, J. P.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Campbell, R.; Seabroke, G. M.; Williams, M.; Steinmetz, M.; Bienaymé, O.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Anguiano, B.; Boeche, C.; Burton, D.; Cass, P.; Dawe, J.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russell, K.; Veltz, L.; Bailin, J.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brown, A.; Dehnen, W.; Evans, N. W.; Re Fiorentin, P.; Fiorucci, M.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B.; Kelz, A.; Kujken, K.; Matijevič, G.; Minchev, I.; Parker, Q. A.; Peñarrubia, J.; Quillen, A.; Read, M. A.; Reid, W.; Roeser, S.; Ruchti, G.; Scholz, R.-D.; Smith, M. C.; Sordo, R.; Tolstoi, E.; Tomasella, L.; Vidrih, S.; Wylie-de Boer, E.

    2008-07-01

    We present the second data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey to measure radial velocities and stellar atmosphere parameters (temperature, metallicity, surface gravity, and rotational velocity) of up to one million stars using the 6 dF multi-object spectrograph on the 1.2 m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO). The RAVE program started in 2003, obtaining medium resolution spectra (median R = 7500) in the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795 Å) for southern hemisphere stars drawn from the Tycho-2 and SuperCOSMOS catalogues, in the magnitude range 9 < I < 12. Following the first data release, the current release doubles the sample of published radial velocities, now containing 51,829 radial velocities for 49,327 individual stars observed on 141 nights between 2003 April 11 and 2005 March 31. Comparison with external data sets shows that the new data collected since 2004 April 3 show a standard deviation of 1.3 km s-1, about twice as good as for the first data release. For the first time, this data release contains values of stellar parameters from 22,407 spectra of 21,121 individual stars. They were derived by a penalized χ2 method using an extensive grid of synthetic spectra calculated from the latest version of Kurucz stellar atmosphere models. From comparison with external data sets, our conservative estimates of errors of the stellar parameters for a spectrum with an average signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of ~40 are 400 K in temperature, 0.5 dex in gravity, and 0.2 dex in metallicity. We note however that, for all three stellar parameters, the internal errors estimated from repeat RAVE observations of 855 stars are at least a factor 2 smaller. We demonstrate that the results show no systematic offsets if compared to values derived from photometry or complementary spectroscopic analyses. The data release includes proper motions from Starnet2, Tycho-2, and UCAC2 catalogs and photometric measurements

  4. Toward an Ecstasy and Other Club Drug (EOCD) Prevention Intervention for Rave Attendees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacoubian, George S., Jr.; Miller, Sarah; Pianim, Selwyn; Kunz, Michael; Orrick, Erin; Link, Tanja; Palacios, Wilson R.; Peters, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    A growing body of recent research has identified that "rave" attendees are at high risk for the use of "club drugs," such as 3,4-methylenedioxymeth-amphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"). Rave attendees, however, comprise only one of several club-going populations. In the current study, we explore the prevalence of ecstasy and other club drug (EOCD) use…

  5. The RAVE/VERTIGO vertex reconstruction toolkit and framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltenberger, W.; Mitaroff, W.; Moser, F.; Pflugfelder, B.; Riedel, H. V.

    2008-07-01

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE1) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO2) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state-of-the-art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available.

  6. Requirements management system browser software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, D.D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the essential user requirements for the Requirements Management System Browser (RMSB) application. This includes specifications for the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the supporting database structures. The RMSB application is needed to provide an easy to use PC-based interface to browse system engineering data stored and managed in a UNIX software application. The system engineering data include functions, requirements, and architectures that make up the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) technical baseline. This document also covers the requirements for a software application titled ``RMSB Data Loader (RMSB- DL)``, referred to as the ``Parser.`` The Parser is needed to read and parse a data file and load the data structure supporting the Browser.

  7. Illicit Drug Use among Rave Attendees in a Nationally Representative Sample of US High School Seniors

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Griffin-Tomas, Marybec; Ompad, Danielle C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The popularity of electronic dance music and rave parties such as dance festivals has increased in recent years. Targeted samples of party-goers suggest high rates of drug use among attendees, but few nationally representative studies have examined these associations. Methods We examined sociodemographic correlates of rave attendance and relationships between rave attendance and recent (12-month) use of various drugs in a representative US sample of high school seniors (modal age: 18) from the Monitoring the Future study (2011–2013; Weighted N= 7,373). Results One out of five students (19.8%) reported ever attending a rave, and 7.7% reported attending at least monthly. Females and highly religious students were less likely to attend raves, and Hispanics, students residing in cities, students with higher income and those who go out for fun multiple times per week were more likely to attend. Rave attendees were more likely than non-attendees to report use of an illicit drug other than marijuana (35.5% vs. 15.6%, p < .0001). Attendees were more likely to report use of each of the 18 drugs assessed, and attendees were more likely to report more frequent use (≥6 times) of each drug (ps < .0001). Controlling for sociodemographic covariates, frequent attendance (monthly or more often) was associated with higher odds of use of each drug (ps < .0001). Frequent attendees were at highest risk for use of “club drugs.” Discussion Findings from this study can help inform prevention and harm reduction among rave attendees at greatest risk for drug use. PMID:26005041

  8. Analysis of the first- and second-generation Raving Dragon Novelty Bath Salts containing methylone and pentedrone.

    PubMed

    Poklis, Justin L; Wolf, Carl E; ElJordi, Omar I; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Shijun; Poklis, Alphonse

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a large number of designer drugs sold as "Bath Salts" have appeared on the market. In July of 2011, Raving Dragon Novelty Bath Salts was obtained over the Internet. This product became unavailable in October of that year coinciding with the DEA issuing a temporarily schedule of mephedrone, methylone, and MDPV. Four months later in February of 2012, a new product was released from the same company under the new name Raving Dragon Voodoo Dust. The contents of both products were identified using spectroscopy methods: nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, UV-visible, tandem mass spectrometry, and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It was determined that Raving Dragon Novelty Bath Salts contained methylone. The replacement product Raving Dragon Voodoo Dust contained the unscheduled drug pentedrone. The Raving Dragon brand of products illustrates the rapid change of ingredients in these products to circumvent laws restricting availability, distribution, and use. PMID:25470207

  9. Requirements based system risk modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkat, Leila; Cornford, Steven; Feather, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The problem that we address in this paper is assessing the expected degree of success of the system or mission based on the degree to which each requirement is satisfied and the relative weight of the requirements. We assume a complete list of the requirements, the relevant risk elements and their probability of occurrence and the quantified effect of the risk elements on the requirements. In order to assess the degree to which each requirement is satisfied, we need to determine the effect of the various risk elements on the requirement.

  10. APASS Landolt-Sloan BVgri photometry of Rave stars. I. Data, effective temperatures, and reddenings

    SciTech Connect

    Munari, U.; Siviero, A.; Henden, A.; Frigo, A.; Bienaymé, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Kordopatis, G.; Helmi, A.; Levine, S. E.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; and others

    2014-11-01

    We provide AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) photometry in the Landolt BV and Sloan g'r'i' bands for all 425,743 stars included in the fourth RAVE Data Release. The internal accuracy of the APASS photometry of RAVE stars, expressed as the error of the mean of data obtained and separately calibrated over a median of four distinct observing epochs and distributed between 2009 and 2013, is 0.013, 0.012, 0.012, 0.014, and 0.021 mag for the B, V, g', r', and i' bands, respectively. The equally high external accuracy of APASS photometry has been verified on secondary Landolt and Sloan photometric standard stars not involved in the APASS calibration process and on a large body of literature data on field and cluster stars, confirming the absence of offsets and trends. Compared with the Carlsberg Meridian Catalog (CMC-15), APASS astrometry of RAVE stars is accurate to a median value of 0.098 arcsec. Brightness distribution functions for the RAVE stars have been derived in all bands. APASS photometry of RAVE stars, augmented by 2MASS JHK infrared data, has been χ{sup 2} fitted to a densely populated synthetic photometric library designed to widely explore temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and reddening. Resulting T {sub eff} and E {sub B–V}, computed over a range of options, are provided and discussed, and will be kept updated in response to future APASS and RAVE data releases. In the process, we find that the reddening caused by a homogeneous slab of dust, extending for 140 pc on either side of the Galactic plane and responsible for E{sub B−V}{sup poles} = 0.036 ± 0.002 at the Galactic poles, is a suitable approximation of the actual reddening encountered at Galactic latitudes |b| ≥ 25°.

  11. APASS Landolt-Sloan BVgri Photometry of RAVE Stars. I. Data, Effective Temperatures, and Reddenings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Henden, A.; Frigo, A.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Levine, S. E.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Smith, T. C.; Steinmetz, M.; Templeton, M.; Terrell, D.; Welch, D. L.; Williams, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2014-11-01

    We provide AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) photometry in the Landolt BV and Sloan g'r'i' bands for all 425,743 stars included in the fourth RAVE Data Release. The internal accuracy of the APASS photometry of RAVE stars, expressed as the error of the mean of data obtained and separately calibrated over a median of four distinct observing epochs and distributed between 2009 and 2013, is 0.013, 0.012, 0.012, 0.014, and 0.021 mag for the B, V, g', r', and i' bands, respectively. The equally high external accuracy of APASS photometry has been verified on secondary Landolt and Sloan photometric standard stars not involved in the APASS calibration process and on a large body of literature data on field and cluster stars, confirming the absence of offsets and trends. Compared with the Carlsberg Meridian Catalog (CMC-15), APASS astrometry of RAVE stars is accurate to a median value of 0.098 arcsec. Brightness distribution functions for the RAVE stars have been derived in all bands. APASS photometry of RAVE stars, augmented by 2MASS JHK infrared data, has been χ2 fitted to a densely populated synthetic photometric library designed to widely explore temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and reddening. Resulting T eff and E B - V , computed over a range of options, are provided and discussed, and will be kept updated in response to future APASS and RAVE data releases. In the process, we find that the reddening caused by a homogeneous slab of dust, extending for 140 pc on either side of the Galactic plane and responsible for EpolesB-V = 0.036 ± 0.002 at the Galactic poles, is a suitable approximation of the actual reddening encountered at Galactic latitudes |b| >= 25°.

  12. Business System Planning Project System Requirements Specification

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON, R.E.

    2000-09-08

    The purpose of the Business Systems Planning Project System Requirements Specification (SRS) is to provide the outline and contents of the requirements for the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) integrated business and technical information systems. The SRS will translate proposed objectives into the statement of the functions that are to be performed and data and information flows that they require. The requirements gathering methodology will use (1) facilitated group requirement sessions; (2) individual interviews; (3) surveys; and (4) document reviews. The requirements will be verified and validated through coordination of the technical requirement team and CHG Managers. The SRS document used the content and format specified in Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. Organization Standard Software Practices in conjunction with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 8340-1984 for Systems Requirements Documents.

  13. Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald R. Barden

    2012-07-01

    Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

  14. γ-Hydroxybutyrate: experience of 9 years of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB)-related incidents during rave parties in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Krul, Jan; Girbes, Armand R J

    2011-04-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to determine the health disturbances and to assess the severity of the incidents as reported during a 9-year experience of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB)-related First Aid Attendees attending First Aid Stations at rave parties. DESIGN. This study was a prospective observational study of self-referred patients from the year 2000 to 2008. During rave parties, First Aid Stations were staffed with specifically trained medical and paramedical personnel. Patients were diagnosed and treated, and data were recorded using standardized methods. RESULTS. During a 9-year period with 202 rave parties, involving approximately three million visitors, 22 604 First Aid Attendees visited the First Aid Stations, of which 771 reported GHB-related health problems. The mean age of the GHB-using First Aid Attendees was 25.7 ± 6.1 years, most of them (66.4%) were male. Approximately one-third (32.7%) of them used one substance, while 48.1% combined GHB with ecstasy, alcohol, or cannabis. One of five (19.2%) combined GHB with other substances or more than one substance. One case was categorized as severe/life-threatening and 202 (26.2%) cases as moderate, requiring further medical care. In total, 43 (5.6%) First Aid Attendees needed hospital care. The most encountered health disturbance was altered consciousness. Combinations of altered consciousness, vomiting, and/or low body temperature were found in 186 cases (24.1%) and considered to be potentially dangerous. GHB-related First Aid Attendees required a longer stay at the First Aid Stations than the total group First Aid Attendees did (median 45 min vs 10 min). CONCLUSION. We found very little, severe short-term GHB-related health disturbances during rave parties in The Netherlands. Hospital referrals were rare. The most found symptom was altered consciousness, sometimes accompanied by vomiting and low body temperature. At events where the visitors use GHB, a well-trained and qualified

  15. Very Metal-poor Stars in the RAVE Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matijevic, Gal

    2015-08-01

    Metal-poor stars have been the cornerstone of the galactic and stellar archeology for decades. Due to their intact nature they offer a unique insight into the early stages of the galactic evolution and help us understand the nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the creation of chemical elements. The number of discovered very metal-poor stars (metallicity [Fe/H] < -2.0) is still relatively low and it drops sharply towards even lower metallicities. Only a handful of known stars have [Fe/H] < -4.0. RAVE spectroscopic survey enabled us to serendipitously discover many new metal-poor stars due to its large sample size and the fact that its wavelength range is centered around the infra-red CaII triplet which has been shown to be a good metallicity estimator for even the most metal-poor stars. The parameter estimation pipeline used on the survey data has trouble with accurately recovering the metallicities (they can be severely overestimated) and other parameters of the metal-poor stars. This is due to the lack of strong features in their spectra and sometimes humble signal-to-noise values. To cope with that we reanalyzed all metal-poor star spectra by measuring the equivalent widths of the CaII triplet lines. We devised a novel method employing Gaussian processes to model the continuum variations and also to account for the shallower and blended spectral lines that would otherwise add to the total equivalent width and lead to unwanted biases. New metallicity values for those stars were calibrated using the high resolution observations of the subset of stars and the available 8-band BVg'r'i'JHKS photometry. All sources of the uncertainty were taken into account which brought the final metallicity uncertainties to ~0.3dex, including for stars with lowest metal abundances. The study enabled us to discover many new very metal poor stars, several of which fall in the extremely metal-poor domain and some of which are possibly ultra metal-poor. For all stars in our sample

  16. Johnson Noise Thermometry System Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Britton Jr, Charles L; Roberts, Michael; Ezell, N Dianne Bull; Qualls, A L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2013-01-01

    This document is intended to capture the requirements for the architecture of the developmental electronics for the ORNL-lead drift-free Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) project conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development (R&D) program. The requirements include not only the performance of the system but also the allowable measurement environment of the probe and the allowable physical environment of the associated electronics. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [1].

  17. Flight Guidance System Requirements Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven P.; Tribble, Alan C.; Carlson, Timothy M.; Danielson, Eric J.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes a requirements specification written in the RSML-e language for the mode logic of a Flight Guidance System of a typical regional jet aircraft. This model was created as one of the first steps in a five-year project sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center, Rockwell Collins Inc., and the Critical Systems Research Group of the University of Minnesota to develop new methods and tools to improve the safety of avionics designs. This model will be used to demonstrate the application of a variety of methods and techniques, including safety analysis of system and subsystem requirements, verification of key properties using theorem provers and model checkers, identification of potential sources mode confusion in system designs, partitioning of applications based on the criticality of system hazards, and autogeneration of avionics quality code. While this model is representative of the mode logic of a typical regional jet aircraft, it does not describe an actual or planned product. Several aspects of a full Flight Guidance System, such as recovery from failed sensors, have been omitted, and no claims are made regarding the accuracy or completeness of this specification.

  18. Kinematic Modeling Of The Milky Way Using The RAVE And GCS Stellar Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sanjib; Rave Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the kinematic parameters of the Milky Way disc using the Radial Velocity (RAVE) and Geneva-Copenhagen (GCS) stellar surveys. We do this by fitting a kinematic model to the data. Using two distinct Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques, we investigate the full posterior distributions of the parameters given the data. For RAVE, we restrict ourselves to angular position and radial velocity for each star since these quantities are determined to high accuracy. For GCS, the data consist of the full 6 dimensional phase space but, in contrast to RAVE, are confined to the Solar neighborhood only. We show results using the traditional Gaussian distribution function and compare to the Shu distribution function that handles non-circular orbits more accurately. We investigate the `age-velocity dispersion' relation (AVR) for the three kinematic components (σ_R,σ_φ, σ_z), the radial dependence of the velocity dispersions, the Solar peculiar motion (U_Sun,V_Sun, W_Sun) and the circular velocity (v_c) at the Sun. We investigate models with and without a thick disc. We find that the kinematic parameters derived from RAVE and GCS are in good agreement. The Shu model fits the RAVE data better than the Gaussian model, but a perfect fit could not be found for either model. Furthermore, the Gaussian model predicts a positive radial gradient for the velocity dispersion, while the Shu model does not. The measured Solar peculiar motion, U_Sun=10.5 ±0.13, V_Sun=10.27±0.11, and W_Sun=7.44± 0.09, is in good agreement with estimates of Schonrich et al (2010) but our values for (U_Sun, V_Sun) are slightly lower. We stress that V_Sun is a highly model-dependent quantity and claims of accuracy must be treated with caution. For RAVE, we find that v_c = 212 ±1.4 km/s ; this is a lower bound on the true value as the vertical dependence of asymmetric drift for an isothermal population has been ignored in our analysis.

  19. Identification of Globular Cluster Stars in RAVE data II: Extended tidal debris around NGC 3201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguiano, B.; De Silva, G. M.; Freeman, K.; Da Costa, G. S.; Zwitter, T.; Quillen, A. C.; Zucker, D. B.; Navarro, J. F.; Kunder, A.; Siebert, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Grebel, E. K.; Kordopatis, G.; Gibson, B. K.; Seabroke, G.; Sharma, S.; Wojno, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Steinmetz, M.; Boeche, C.; Gilmore, G.; Bienaymé, O.; Reid, W.; Watson, F.

    2016-04-01

    We report the identification of extended tidal debris potentially associated with the globular cluster NGC 3201, using the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) catalogue. We find the debris stars are located at a distance range of 1-7 kpc based on the forthcoming RAVE distance estimates. The derived space velocities and integrals of motion show interesting connections to NGC 3201, modulo uncertainties in the proper motions. Three stars, which are among the four most likely candidates for NGC 3201 tidal debris, are separated by 80° on the sky yet are well matched by the 12 Gyr, [Fe/H] = -1.5 isochrone appropriate for the cluster. This is the first time tidal debris around this cluster has been reported over such a large spatial extent, with implications for the cluster's origin and dynamical evolution.

  20. The RAVE complex is an isoform-specific V-ATPase assembly factor in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Smardon, Anne M.; Diab, Heba I.; Tarsio, Maureen; Diakov, Theodore T.; Nasab, Negin Dehdar; West, Robert W.; Kane, Patricia M.

    2014-01-01

    The regulator of ATPase of vacuoles and endosomes (RAVE) complex is implicated in vacuolar H+-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) assembly and activity. In yeast, rav1∆ mutants exhibit a Vma− growth phenotype characteristic of loss of V-ATPase activity only at high temperature. Synthetic genetic analysis identified mutations that exhibit a full, temperature-independent Vma− growth defect when combined with the rav1∆ mutation. These include class E vps mutations, which compromise endosomal sorting. The synthetic Vma− growth defect could not be attributed to loss of vacuolar acidification in the double mutants, as there was no vacuolar acidification in the rav1∆ mutant. The yeast V-ATPase a subunit is present as two isoforms, Stv1p in Golgi and endosomes and Vph1p in vacuoles. Rav1p interacts directly with the N-terminal domain of Vph1p. STV1 overexpression suppressed the growth defects of both rav1∆ and rav1∆vph1∆, and allowed RAVE-independent assembly of active Stv1p-containing V-ATPases in vacuoles. Mutations causing synthetic genetic defects in combination with rav1∆ perturbed the normal localization of Stv1–green fluorescent protein. We propose that RAVE is necessary for assembly of Vph1-containing V-ATPase complexes but not Stv1-containing complexes. Synthetic Vma− phenotypes arise from defects in Vph1p-containing complexes caused by rav1∆, combined with defects in Stv1p-containing V-ATPases caused by the second mutation. Thus RAVE is the first isoform-specific V-ATPase assembly factor. PMID:24307682

  1. RAVE spectroscopy of luminous blue variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Siviero, A.; Bienaymé, O.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Campbell, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Fulbright, J. P.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F. G.; Williams, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.

    2009-08-01

    Context: The RAVE spectroscopic survey for galactic structure and evolution obtains 8400-8800 Å spectra at 7500 resolving power at the UK Schmidt Telescope using the 6dF multi-fiber positioner. More than 300 000 9 ≤ IC ≤ 12 and |b| ≥ 25° southern stars have been observed to date. Aims: This paper presents the first intrinsic examination of stellar spectra from the RAVE survey, aimed at evaluating their diagnostic potential for peculiar stars and at contributing to the general understanding of luminous blue variables (LBVs). Methods: We used the multi-epoch spectra for all seven LBVs observed, between 2005 and 2008, in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the RAVE survey. Results: We demonstrate that RAVE spectra possess significant diagnostic potential when applied to peculiar stars and, in particular, LBVs. The behaviour of the radial velocities for both emission and absorption lines, and the spectral changes between outburst and quiescence states are described and found to agree with evidence gathered at more conventional wavelengths. The wind outflow signatures and their variability are investigated, with multi-components detected in S Doradus. Photoionisation modelling of the rich emission line spectrum of R 127 shows evidence of a massive detached ionised shell that was ejected during the 1982-2000 outburst. Surface inhomogeneities in the nuclear-processed material, brought to the surface by heavy mass loss, could have been observed in S Doradus, even if alternative explanations are possible. We also detect the transition from quiescence to outburst state in R 71. Finally, our spectrum of R 84 offers one of the clearest views of its cool companion.

  2. [Raves and drug use from an epidemiologic and psychosocial approach: a bibliographic systematic review].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calderón, Fermín; Lozano-Rojas, Óscar M; Rojas-Tejada, Antonio J

    2013-01-01

    The high drug use that occurs at raves and the specific characteristics of these parties make them a high risk recreational context the health of participants. The aim of this paper is to establish a categorization of research on drug use and raves according to their objectives and main results. Knowledge and research needs identified as a result of this review are discussed. To this end, a systematic review of scientific literature through Medline, Psycinfo and Psicodoc was conducted. After applying the inclusion criteria, 36 papers were obtained, classified into six categories. The results show that 23 studies aim psychosocial profile analysis, and the prevalence and patterns of drug use. Nine studies focus on risks related to drug use, and nine in the drug effects. Given the high risk associated with raves and the scarcity of empirical studies identified, the need to develop further empirical studies is addressed. There is still insufficient evidence to guide intervention strategies to prevent risks and harms among ravers. There is also a need to explore: polydrug use, harm reduction strategies, positive effects and motivations. PMID:23880840

  3. Chemical gradients in the Milky Way from the RAVE data. I. Dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeche, C.; Siebert, A.; Piffl, T.; Just, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Sharma, S.; Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Chiappini, C.; Williams, M.; Grebel, E. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gibson, B. K.; Munari, U.; Siviero, A.; Bienaymé, O.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Watson, F. G.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: We aim at measuring the chemical gradients of the elements Mg, Al, Si, and Fe along the Galactic radius to provide new constraints on the chemical evolution models of the Galaxy and Galaxy models such as the Besançon model. Thanks to the large number of stars of our RAVE sample we can study how the gradients vary as function of the distance from the Galactic plane. Methods: We analysed three different samples selected from three independent datasets: a sample of 19 962 dwarf stars selected from the RAVE database, a sample of 10 616 dwarf stars selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) dataset, and a mock sample (equivalent to the RAVE sample) created by using the GALAXIA code, which is based on the Besançon model. The three samples were analysed by using the very same method for comparison purposes. We integrated the Galactic orbits and obtained the guiding radii (Rg) and the maximum distances from the Galactic plane reached by the stars along their orbits (Zmax). We measured the chemical gradients as functions of Rg at different Zmax. Results: We found that the chemical gradients of the RAVE and GCS samples are negative and show consistent trends, although they are not equal: at Zmax< 0.4 kpc and 4.5 RAVE sample is d [Fe/H] /dRg = -0.065 dex kpc-1, whereas for the GCS sample it is d [Fe/H] /dRg = -0.043 dex kpc-1 with internal errors of ±0.002 and ±0.004 dex kpc-1, respectively. The gradients of the RAVE and GCS samples become flatter at larger Zmax. Conversely, the mock sample has a positive iron gradient of d [Fe/H] /dRg = +0.053 ± 0.003 dex kpc-1 at Zmax< 0.4 kpc and remains positive at any Zmax. These positive and unrealistic values originate from the lack of correlation between metallicity and tangential velocity in the Besançon model. In addition, the low metallicity and asymmetric drift of the thick disc causes a shift of the stars towards lower Rg and metallicity which, together with the thin

  4. The Requirements Generation System: A tool for managing mission requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, Sylvia B.

    1994-01-01

    Historically, NASA's cost for developing mission requirements has been a significant part of a mission's budget. Large amounts of time have been allocated in mission schedules for the development and review of requirements by the many groups who are associated with a mission. Additionally, tracing requirements from a current document to a parent document has been time-consuming and costly. The Requirements Generation System (RGS) is a computer-supported cooperative-work tool that assists mission developers in the online creation, review, editing, tracing, and approval of mission requirements as well as in the production of requirements documents. This paper describes the RGS and discusses some lessons learned during its development.

  5. Advanced EVA system design requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Design requirements and criteria for the Space Station Advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related extravehicular activity (EVA) support equipment were defined and established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as opertional, procedures, and training issues were considered.

  6. Classification of Field Dwarfs and Giants in RAVE and Its Use in Stellar Stream Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, R. J.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Fuchs, B.; Rix, H.-W.; Smith, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Samples of bright stars, as they emerge from surveys such as RAVE, contain comparable fractions of dwarf and giant stars. An efficient separation of these two luminosity classes is therefore important, especially for studies in which distances are estimated through photometric parallax relations. We use the available spectroscopic log g estimates from the second RAVE data release (DR2) to assign each star a probability for being a dwarf or subgiant/giant based on mixture model fits to the log g distribution in different color bins. We further attempt to use these stars as a labeled training set in order to classify stars which lack log g estimates into dwarfs and giants with a Support Vector Machine algorithm. We assess the performance of this classification against different choices of the input feature vector. In particular, we use different combinations of reduced proper motions, 2MASS JHK, DENIS IJK, and USNO-B B2R2 apparent magnitudes. Our study shows that—for our color ranges—the infrared bands alone provide no relevant information to separate dwarfs and giants. Even when optical bands and reduced proper motions are added, the fraction of true giants classified as dwarfs (the contamination) remains above 20%. Using only the dwarfs with available spectroscopic log g and distance estimates (the latter from Breddels et al.), we then repeat the stream search by Klementet al. (KFR08), which assumed that all stars were dwarfs and claimed the discovery of a new stellar stream at V ≈ -160 km s-1 in a sample of 7015 stars from RAVE DR1. The existence of the KFR08 stream has been supported by two recent studies using other independent data sets. Our re-analysis of the pure DR2 dwarf sample exhibits an overdensity of five stars at the phase-space position of the KFR08 stream, with a metallicity distribution that appears inconsistent with that of stars at comparably low rotational velocities. Compared to several smooth Milky Way models, the mean standardized

  7. Kinematic modeling of the Milky Way using the RAVE and GCS stellar surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Binney, J.; Freeman, K. C.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Bienaymé, O.; Siebert, A.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G. F.; Kordopatis, G.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. A.; Seabroke, G. M.; Watson, F.; and others

    2014-09-20

    We investigate the kinematic parameters of the Milky Way disk using the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) and Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) stellar surveys. We do this by fitting a kinematic model to the data and taking the selection function of the data into account. For stars in the GCS we use all phase-space coordinates, but for RAVE stars we use only (ℓ, b, v {sub los}). Using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, we investigate the full posterior distributions of the parameters given the data. We investigate the age-velocity dispersion relation for the three kinematic components (σ {sub R}, σ{sub φ}, σ {sub z}), the radial dependence of the velocity dispersions, the solar peculiar motion (U {sub ☉}, V {sub ☉}, W {sub ☉}), the circular speed Θ{sub 0} at the Sun, and the fall of mean azimuthal motion with height above the midplane. We confirm that the Besançon-style Gaussian model accurately fits the GCS data but fails to match the details of the more spatially extended RAVE survey. In particular, the Shu distribution function (DF) handles noncircular orbits more accurately and provides a better fit to the kinematic data. The Gaussian DF not only fits the data poorly but systematically underestimates the fall of velocity dispersion with radius. The radial scale length of the velocity dispersion profile of the thick disk was found to be smaller than that of the thin disk. We find that correlations exist between a number of parameters, which highlights the importance of doing joint fits. The large size of the RAVE survey allows us to get precise values for most parameters. However, large systematic uncertainties remain, especially in V {sub ☉} and Θ{sub 0}. We find that, for an extended sample of stars, Θ{sub 0} is underestimated by as much as 10% if the vertical dependence of the mean azimuthal motion is neglected. Using a simple model for vertical dependence of kinematics, we find that it is possible to match the Sgr A* proper motion without

  8. Age-metallicity-velocity relation of stars as seen by RAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojno, Jennifer; Kordopatis, Georges; Steinmetz, Matthias; Matijevič, Gal; McMillan, Paul J.

    2016-08-01

    Throughout the past decade, significant advances have been made in the size and scope of large-scale spectroscopic surveys, allowing for the opportunity to study in-depth the formation history of the Milky Way. Using the fourth data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), we study the age-metallicity-velocity space of ~ 100,000 FGK stars in the extended solar neighborhood in order to explore evolutionary processes. Combining these three parameters, we better constrain our understanding of these interconnected, fundamental processes.

  9. Land mobile satellite system requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesling, J. D.

    1983-05-01

    A Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) provides voice, data and related communications services to moving vehicles and persons. Communications between the mobiles and satellite are in the 806-890 MHz band. The satellite translates these signals to a ""fixed services band'' such as 14/12 GHz band (Ku-band), and communicates in this band with fixed terminals called gateways. The gateways are located at convenient places such as telephone switches (which provide entry into the national telephone system), dispatcher headquarters, computer centers, etc. Communications are therefore principally mobile to fixed. A third communications link, also at Ku-band, is needed between the satellite and a single fixed ground station. This link provides satellite command, telemetry and ranging and also provides a network control function. The latter, through a common signalling system, receives requests and assigns channel slots, and otherwise controls, monitors and polices the network and collects billing information.

  10. Land mobile satellite system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiesling, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) provides voice, data and related communications services to moving vehicles and persons. Communications between the mobiles and satellite are in the 806-890 MHz band. The satellite translates these signals to a ""fixed services band'' such as 14/12 GHz band (Ku-band), and communicates in this band with fixed terminals called gateways. The gateways are located at convenient places such as telephone switches (which provide entry into the national telephone system), dispatcher headquarters, computer centers, etc. Communications are therefore principally mobile to fixed. A third communications link, also at Ku-band, is needed between the satellite and a single fixed ground station. This link provides satellite command, telemetry and ranging and also provides a network control function. The latter, through a common signalling system, receives requests and assigns channel slots, and otherwise controls, monitors and polices the network and collects billing information.

  11. Addicted to Democracy: "South Park" and the Salutary Effects of Agitation (Reflections of a Ranting and Raving "South Park" Junkie)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruna, Katherine Richardson

    2004-01-01

    This article presents reflections of a ranting and raving "South Park" junkie. The church the author goes to is Unitarian Universalist (UU). UUism is the religion for people who don't believe in religion but somehow feel the need to regularly assemble in a religious tradition and affirm their nontraditional religiosity. From what the author can…

  12. On the Age-Metallicity-Velocity Relation in the Nearby Disk Using the RAVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguiano, Borja; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Steinmetz, Matthias; de Boer, Elizabeth Wylie

    The age-metallicity-velocity relation (AMVR) in the nearby disk is a fundamental issue in our understanding of the evolution of the Milky Way. However, there are still major differences between various versions of this relation (e.g., Twarog 1980, ApJ, 242, 242,Meusinger et al. 1991, A&A, 245, 57, Edvardsson et al. 1993, A&A, 275, 101, Rocha-Pinto et al. 2000, A &A, 358, 850,Quillen & Garnett 2001, Galaxy Disks and Disk Galaxies, ASP, San Francisco, CA, vol. 230, p. 87, Feltzing et al. 2001, A&A, 377,911, and Holmberg et al. 2007, A&A, 475, 519). Also, we have found considerable differences between different methods forage-dating stellar populations and have shown how different methods introduce bias in the AMVR. We are therefore working in a new derivation of these possible relations in the nearby disk, using a carefully selected sample of subgiants stars from RAVE and Geneva-Copenhagen surveys. RAVE provides accurate kinematics and a first estimate of metallicity, temperature, and gravity. Follow-up observations allow us to obtain accurate fundamental parameters via spectrophotometry and highresolution spectroscopy in order to derive reliable ages and generate an AMVR for stars of the Galactic disk.

  13. Requirements based system level risk modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkat, L.; Cornford, S. L.; Feather, M. S.

    2004-01-01

    The problem that we address in this paper is assessing the expected degree of success of the system or mission based on the degree to which each requirement is satisfied and the relative weight of the requirements.

  14. Requirements Analysis for Information-Intensive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callender, E. D.; Hartsough, C.; Morris, R. V.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Report discusses role of requirements analysis in development of information-intensive systems. System examined from variety of human viewpoints during design, development, and implementation. Such examination, called requirements analysis, ensures system simultaneously meets number of distinct but interacting needs. Viewpoints defined and integrated to help attain objectives.

  15. Methodology requirements for intelligent systems architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Terry; Colombano, Silvano

    1987-01-01

    The methodology required for the development of the 'intelligent system architecture' of distributed computer systems which integrate standard data processing capabilities with symbolic processing to provide powerful and highly autonomous adaptive processing capabilities must encompass three elements: (1) a design knowledge capture system, (2) computer-aided engineering, and (3) verification and validation metrics and tests. Emphasis must be put on the earliest possible definition of system requirements and the realistic definition of allowable system uncertainties. Methodologies must also address human factor issues.

  16. Taking the Pulse of a River System: Research on the Upper Mississippi River System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, Jennifer; Johnson, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Mark Twain raved about the Mississippi River basin as, 'the body of the Nation'. The 'upper body', upstream of the confluence with the Ohio River, includes commercially navigable reaches and branching tributaries that are recreationally and environmentally important. Together they feed and shelter an array of fish and wildlife in their flowing channels, floodplain lakes, backwaters, wetlands, and floodplain forests. Effective river management requires knowledge about factors controlling the dynamics and interactions of important ecosystem components. The Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) is the prized diagnostic tool in the Environmental Management Program for the Upper Mississippi River System that provides critical information about the status and trends of key environmental resources.

  17. Maintainability program requirements for space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This document is established to provide common general requirements for all NASA programs to: design maintainability into all systems where maintenance is a factor in system operation and mission success; and ensure that maintainability characteristics are developed through the systems engineering process. These requirements are not new. Design for ease of maintenance and minimization of repair time have always been fundamental requirements of the systems engineering process. However, new or reusable orbital manned and in-flight maintainable unmanned space systems demand special emphasis on maintainability, and this document has been prepared to meet that need. Maintainability requirements on many NASA programs differ in phasing and task emphasis from requirements promulgated by other Government agencies. This difference is due to the research and development nature of NASA programs where quantities produced are generally small; therefore, the depth of logistics support typical of many programs is generally not warranted. The cost of excessive maintenance is very high due to the logistics problems associated with the space environment. The ability to provide timely maintenance often involves safety considerations for manned space flight applications. This document represents a basic set of requirements that will achieve a design for maintenance. These requirements are directed primarily at manned and unmanned orbital space systems. To be effective, maintainability requirements should be tailored to meet specific NASA program and project needs and constraints. NASA activities shall invoke the requirements of this document consistent with program planning in procurements or on inhouse development efforts.

  18. Teleoperators - Manual/automatic system requirements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janow, C.; Malone, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    The teleoperator is defined as a remotely controlled, cybernetic, man-machine system designed to extend and augment man's sensory, manipulative, and cognitive capabilities. The teleoperator system incorporates the decision making, adaptive intelligence without requiring its presence. The man and the machine work as a team, each contributing unique and significant capabilities, and each depending on the other to achieve a common goal. Some of the more significant requirements associated with the development of teleoperator systems technology for space, industry, and medicine are examined. Emphasis is placed on the requirement to more effectively use the man and the machine in any man-machine system.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galactic open clusters in RAVE (Conrad+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, C.; Scholz, R.-D.; Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.; Roser, S.; Boeche, C.; Kordopatis, G.; Siebert, A.; Williams, M.; Munari, U.; Matijevic, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Zwitter, T.; de Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Gilmore, G.; Seabroke, G.; Freeman, K.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W.; Watson, F.; Gibson, B. K.; Bienayme, O.; Wyse, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Siviero, A.

    2014-01-01

    The presented tables summarise new radial velocities and average metallicities for Galactic open clusters extracted from the Catalogue of Open Cluster Data (COCD; Kharchenko et al. 2005, Cat. J/A+A/438/1163, J/A+A/440/403). The data were obtained from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE; Kordopatis et al. 2013AJ....146..134K) through a cross match with the stellar catalogues related to the COCD. The RV and [M/H] values were computed as weighted means, considering the individual uncertainties of the included members and their cluster membership probability based on position, proper motion, and photometry. The three uncertainties listed originate from different calculations: "RVRAVE" and "MetRAVE" are the weighted mean values for RV and [M/H] "errRV" and "errMet" are equivalent to the uncertainty of the mean values "sigRV" and "sigMet" are the standard deviations of the mean values "eRV" and "eMet" weighted mean values of the individual uncertainties of the included open cluster (OC) members For the calculations we primarily considered most probable OC members (best members) with a membership probability of at least 61%. Only in cases where just one or no most probable members was available we also included possible members (good members) with membership probabilities above 14%. In the table we include the numbers for both types of members separately: best members -> "bmem" and good members -> "gmem". We included reference values for RVs from the second version of the Catalogue of Radial Velocities with Astrometric Data (CRVAD-2) and the Catalogue of Radial Velocities of Open Clusters and Associations (CRVOCA) provided by Kharchenko et al. 2007, Cat. III/254). The CRVAD-2 reference values were computed according to the RAVE values for identified OC members. The CRVOCA references were directly extracted from the catalogue and number of OC members used are given in column "nmem". The reference values for [M/H] were obtained from the online compilation provided by Dias

  20. Maintenance requirements in solar air heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lof, G.O.G.; Junk, J.P.

    1983-06-01

    The maintenance requirements of a well designed and constructed solar air-heating system are comparable to those of conventional, forced warm air heating systems. One of the major reasons for this low maintenance is the absence of problems associated with corrosion, freezing, boiling, and leakage often encountered in solar liquid systems. Experience shows that most problems are due to overly complex designs, control problems, faulty installation, and adjustment of the moving parts in the system. Operational histories show negligible requirements for maintenance of air collectors, pebble-bed heat-storage bins, and system ducts and connections. Good quality control in the manufacture and installation of airtight collectors, heat-storage bins, and interconnecting ductwork is essential, however. The paper includes a description of solar air-heating systems and their characteristics, an evaluation of the various maintenance requirements, and several case histories illustrating the handling of solar air system maintenance.

  1. RAVE stars tidally stripped or ejected from the ω Centauri globular cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Robin, A. C.; Vieira, K.; Moreno, E.; Bienaymé, O.; Reylé, C.; Valenzuela, O.; Pichardo, B.; Robles-Valdez, F.; Martins, A. M. M.

    2015-11-01

    Using six-dimensional phase-space information from the Fourth Data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) over the range of Galactic longitude 240°RAVE stars that were originally selected as chemically and kinematically related to ω Centauri. The orbits were integrated in a Milky-Way-like axisymmetric Galactic potential, ignoring the effects of the dynamical evolution of ω Centauri due to the tidal effects of the Galaxy disk on the cluster along time. We also ignored secular changes in the Milky Way potential over time. In a Monte Carlo scheme, and under the assumption that the stars may have been ejected with velocities greater than the escape velocity (Vrel>Vesc,0) from the cluster, we identified 15 stars as having close encounters with ω Centauri: (i) 8 stars with relative velocities Vrel< 200 km s-1 may have been ejected ~200 Myr ago from ω Centauri; (ii) another group of 7 stars were identified with high relative velocity Vrel> 200 km s-1 during close encounters, and it seems unlikely that they were ejected from ω Centauri. We also confirm the link between J131340.4-484714 as a potential member of ω Centauri, and probably ejected ~2.0 Myr ago, with a relative velocity Vrel ~ 80 km s-1. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/583/A76

  2. Identifying Bright Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars in the RAVE Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placco, Vinicius; Beers, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Bright metal-poor stars are of great importance for high-resolution spectroscopic follow-up, since their brightness allows for detailed studies of the chemical compositions of their atmospheres, obtainable with short integration times on 4m-8m class telescopes. We have carried out a medium-resolution spectroscopic follow-up survey of very metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -2.0) stars selected from the RAVE catalog.Over the course of four semesters we observed over 1,200 stars with the Gemini North, Gemini South, SOAR, KPNO/Mayall, and ESO/NTT telescopes. These spectra are used to confirm the estimated atmospheric parameters from RAVE, as well as to determine [C/Fe], using our spectroscopic analysis pipeline. This information has already enabled the identification of many new carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, including representatives of the inner- and outer-halo populations of the Milky Way, for which high-resolution spectroscopy is in progress from the ground with the Magellan/Clay Telescope and with the South African Large Telescope (SALT). The most interesting stars from the high-resolution follow-up will be observed from space with HST/STIS or COS. In this talk I will present the results of the medium-resolution follow-up, and preliminary results from the high-resolution effort.We acknowledge partial support from the grant PHY 14-30152; Physics Frontier Center/JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE), awarded by the US National Science Foundation.

  3. Requirements for a database management system

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.D.; McCarthy, J.

    1984-09-01

    This document discusses the requirements for a database management system that would satisfy the scientific needs of the Scientific Database Project. We give the major requirements of scientific data management, based on a system developed by Deutsch. Actual requirements, for each category, are identified as mandatory, important, and optional. Mandatory - we should not consider a DBMS unless it satisfies all mandatory requirements. Important - these requirements, while not as crucial as the mandatory ones, are important to the easy and convenient implementation and operation of a scientific database. Optional - such features are nice extras. We expect that the scientific database project can be implemented and operated in any DBMS that meets all of the mandatory and most of the important requirements.

  4. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Trebules

    2006-06-02

    This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document.

  5. Defining Requirements for Improved Photovoltaic System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.B.

    1998-12-21

    Reliable systems are an essential ingredient of any technology progressing toward commercial maturity and large-scale deployment. This paper defines reliability as meeting system fictional requirements, and then develops a framework to understand and quantify photovoltaic system reliability based on initial and ongoing costs and system value. The core elements necessary to achieve reliable PV systems are reviewed. These include appropriate system design, satisfactory component reliability, and proper installation and servicing. Reliability status, key issues, and present needs in system reliability are summarized for four application sectors.

  6. Requirements for CEC POP machine protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I.

    2015-02-18

    The requirements of CEC POP machine protection system are meant to prevent damage to a vacuum chamber by a missteered electron beam. In this example, beam energy = 22 MeV, Maximal bunch charge = 5 nC, Maximal repetition rate = 78 kHz, Normalized emittance = 5 mm mrad, Minimal β-function = 1 m. From this information the requirements of the protection system can be calculated by factoring the information into equations to find beam densities and temperature excursions.

  7. Online mass storage system detailed requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The requirements for an online high density magnetic tape data storage system that can be implemented in a multipurpose, multihost environment is set forth. The objective of the mass storage system is to provide a facility for the compact storage of large quantities of data and to make this data accessible to computer systems with minimum operator handling. The results of a market survey and analysis of candidate vendor who presently market high density tape data storage systems are included.

  8. Calculating Storage Requirements for Office Practice Systems

    PubMed Central

    Stead, William W.; Hammond, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The disk space requirements of small and medium sized group practices using a comprehensive medical information system supported by either a micro-computer or a mini-computer are analyzed. Efficient operation requires that 23%-54% of a typical system disk be used for files other than patient records. Data is presented to allow prediction of both the number of records that will need to be maintained for a practice and the average size of each record based upon the type of data required by the practice.

  9. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    2004-02-04

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited.

  10. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, R. W.

    2004-02-01

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited.

  11. Networking and AI systems: Requirements and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The price performance benefits of network systems is well documented. The ability to share expensive resources sold timesharing for mainframes, department clusters of minicomputers, and now local area networks of workstations and servers. In the process, other fundamental system requirements emerged. These have now been generalized with open system requirements for hardware, software, applications and tools. The ability to interconnect a variety of vendor products has led to a specification of interfaces that allow new techniques to extend existing systems for new and exciting applications. As an example of the message passing system, local area networks provide a testbed for many of the issues addressed by future concurrent architectures: synchronization, load balancing, fault tolerance and scalability. Gold Hill has been working with a number of vendors on distributed architectures that range from a network of workstations to a hypercube of microprocessors with distributed memory. Results from early applications are promising both for performance and scalability.

  12. Energy requirements in pressure irrigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, R.; Rodríguez-Sinobas, L.; Juana, L.; Laguna, F. V.; Castañón, G.; Gil, M.; Benítez, J.

    2012-04-01

    Modernization of irrigation schemes, generally understood as transformation of surface irrigation systems into pressure -sprinkler and trickle- irrigation systems, aims at, among others, improving irrigation efficiency and reduction of operation and maintenance efforts made by the irrigators. However, pressure irrigation systems, in contrast, carry a serious energy cost. Energy requirements depend on decisions taken on management strategies during the operation phase, which are conditioned by previous decisions taken on the design project of the different elements which compose the irrigation system. Most of the countries where irrigation activity is significant bear in mind that modernization irrigation must play a key role in the agricultural infrastructure policies. The objective of this study is to characterize and estimate the mean and variation of the energy consumed by common types of irrigation systems and their management possibilities. The work includes all processes involved from the diversion of water into irrigation specific infrastructure to water discharge by the emitters installed on the crop fields. Simulation taking into account all elements comprising the irrigation system has been used to estimate the energy requirements of typical irrigation systems of several crop production systems. It has been applied to extensive and intensive crop systems, such us extensive winter crops, summer crops and olive trees, fruit trees and vineyards and intensive horticulture in greenhouses. The simulation of various types of irrigation systems and management strategies, in the framework imposed by particular cropping systems, would help to develop criteria for improving the energy balance in relation to the irrigation water supply productivity.

  13. Requirements development for a patient computing system.

    PubMed Central

    Wald, J. S.; Pedraza, L. A.; Reilly, C. A.; Murphy, M. E.; Kuperman, G. J.

    2001-01-01

    Critical parts of the software development life cycle are concerned with eliciting, understanding, and managing requirements. Though the literature on this subject dates back for several decades, practicing effective requirements development remains a current and challenging area. Some projects flourish with a requirements development process (RDP) that is implicit and informal, but this approach may be overly risky, particularly for large projects that involve multiple individuals, groups, and systems over time. At Partners HealthCare System in Boston, Massachusetts, we have applied a more formal approach for requirements development to the Patient Computing Project. The goal of the project is to create web-based software that connects patients electronically with their physician's offices and has the potential to improve care efficiency and quality. It is a large project, with over 500 function points. Like most technological innovation, the successful introduction of this system requires as much attention to understanding the business needs and workflow details as it does to technical design and implementation. This paper describes our RDP approach, and key business requirements discovered through this process. We believe that a formal RDP is essential, and that informatics as a field must include proficiencies in this area. PMID:11825282

  14. Test requirements for 42 V battery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weighall, M. J.

    The introduction of the 42 V PowerNet imposes new performance requirements on the battery. The required performance parameters will vary dependent on the application and to what extent the power train is hybridised, with additional features such as start-stop, launch assist etc. This makes it more difficult to specify relevant laboratory test procedures. This paper reviews the vehicle electrical system developments and the impact these developments will have on the battery performance and testing requirements. Suitable test equipment from Digatron/Firing Circuits is discussed and reviewed.

  15. Thermionic reactor electric propulsion system requirements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondt, J. F.; Sawyer, C. D.; Schaupp, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Results of mission analysis, system analysis and mission engineering studies to find a single nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) system which would be applicable for a broad range of unmanned outer planet missions. The NEP system studied uses an in-core nuclear thermionic reactor as the electric power source and mercury bombardment ion engines for propulsion. Many requirements, which are imposed on the NEP system by the mission, were determined from the studies in the process of trying to find a single NEP system for many missions. It is concluded that a single thermionic reactor NEP system could be useful for a broad range of unmanned outer planet missions. The thermionic reactor NEP system should have a power level in the range from 70 to 120 kWe, a system specific weight of approximately 30 kg/kWe, and a full power output capability of 20,000 hr.

  16. Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Kouts

    2006-05-10

    The CRD addresses the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3-Change 1, ''Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets'', by providing the Secretarial Acquisition Executive (Level 0) scope baseline and the Program-level (Level 1) technical baseline. The Secretarial Acquisition Executive approves the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) critical decisions and changes against the Level 0 baseline; and in turn, the OCRWM Director approves all changes against the Level 1 baseline. This baseline establishes the top-level technical scope of the CRMWS and its three system elements, as described in section 1.3.2. The organizations responsible for design, development, and operation of system elements described in this document must therefore prepare subordinate project-level documents that are consistent with the CRD. Changes to requirements will be managed in accordance with established change and configuration control procedures. The CRD establishes requirements for the design, development, and operation of the CRWMS. It specifically addresses the top-level governing laws and regulations (e.g., ''Nuclear Waste Policy Act'' (NWPA), 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 63, 10 CFR Part 71, etc.) along with specific policy, performance requirements, interface requirements, and system architecture. The CRD shall be used as a vehicle to incorporate specific changes in technical scope or performance requirements that may have significant program implications. Such may include changes to the program mission, changes to operational capability, and high visibility stakeholder issues. The CRD uses a systems approach to: (1) identify key functions that the CRWMS must perform, (2) allocate top-level requirements derived from statutory, regulatory, and programmatic sources, and (3) define the basic elements of the system architecture and operational concept. Project-level documents address CRD requirements by further

  17. Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A study to define the requirements for advanced extravehicular activities (AEVA) was conducted. The purpose of the study was to develop an understanding of the EVA technology requirements and to map a pathway from existing or developing technologies to an AEVA system capable of supporting long-duration missions on the lunar surface. The parameters of an AEVA system which must sustain the crewmembers and permit productive work for long periods in the lunar environment were examined. A design reference mission (DRM) was formulated and used as a tool to develop and analyze the EVA systems technology aspects. Many operational and infrastructure design issues which have a significant influence on the EVA system are identified.

  18. Advanced EVA system design requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. G.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of a study to identify specific criteria regarding space station extravehicular activity system (EVAS) hardware requirements. Key EVA design issues include maintainability, technology readiness, LSS volume vs. EVA time available, suit pressure/cabin pressure relationship and productivity effects, crew autonomy, integration of EVA as a program resource, and standardization of task interfaces. A variety of DOD EVA systems issues were taken into consideration. Recommendations include: (1) crew limitations, not hardware limitations; (2) capability to perform all of 15 generic missions; (3) 90 days on-orbit maintainability with 50 percent duty cycle as minimum; and (4) use by payload sponsors of JSC document 10615A plus a Generic Tool Kit and Specialized Tool Kit description. EVA baseline design requirements and criteria, including requirements of various subsystems, are outlined. Space station/EVA system interface requirements and EVA accommodations are discussed in the areas of atmosphere composition and pressure, communications, data management, logistics, safe haven, SS exterior and interior requirements, and SS airlock.

  19. Health requirements for advanced coal extraction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Health requirements were developed as long range goals for future advanced coal extraction systems which would be introduced into the market in the year 2000. The goal of the requirements is that underground coal miners work in an environment that is as close as possible to the working conditions of the general population, that they do not exceed mortality and morbidity rates resulting from lung diseases that are comparable to those of the general population, and that their working conditions comply as closely as possible to those of other industries as specified by OSHA regulations. A brief technique for evaluating whether proposed advanced systems meet these safety requirements is presented, as well as a discussion of the costs of respiratory disability compensation.

  20. Human Systems Integration: Requirements and Functional Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berson, Barry; Gershzohn, Gary; Boltz, Laura; Wolf, Russ; Schultz, Mike

    2005-01-01

    This deliverable was intended as an input to the Access 5 Policy and Simulation Integrated Product Teams. This document contains high-level pilot functionality for operations in the National Airspace System above FL430. Based on the derived pilot functions the associated pilot information and control requirements are given.

  1. User requirements for a patient scheduling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W.

    1979-01-01

    A rehabilitation institute's needs and wants from a scheduling system were established by (1) studying the existing scheduling system and the variables that affect patient scheduling, (2) conducting a human-factors study to establish the human interfaces that affect patients' meeting prescribed therapy schedules, and (3) developing and administering a questionnaire to the staff which pertains to the various interface problems in order to identify staff requirements to minimize scheduling problems and other factors that may limit the effectiveness of any new scheduling system.

  2. National Ignition Facility system design requirements Laser System SDR002

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.W.; Bowers, J.M.; Bliss, E.S.; Karpenko, V.P.; English, E.

    1996-08-20

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the NIP Laser System. The Laser System generates and delivers high-power optical pulses to the target chamber, and is composed of all optical puke creating and transport elements from Puke Generation through Final Optics as well as the special equipment that supports, energizes and controls them. The Laser System consists of the following WBS elements: 1.3 Laser System 1.4 Beam Transport System 1.6 Optical Components 1.7 Laser Control 1.8.7 Final Optics.

  3. Requirements for a transformerless power conditioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J.; Koerner, T.; Rippel, W.; Kalbach, J.

    1984-01-01

    Requirements for development of a Transformerless Power Conditioning Subsystem (TPCS) that will meet utility, manufacturer, and customer needs are detailed. Issues analyzed include current utility guidelines, safety and grounding issues that appear as local codes, various kinds of TPCS connections that can be developed, dc injection, and a brief survey of TPCS circuit topologies that will meet requirements. The major result is that a finite time exists for control operation before dc injection into the distribution transformer causes customer outage (on the order of seconds). This time permits the control system to sense a dc injection condition and remove the TPCS from the utility system. Requirements for such a control system are specified. A three wire connection will ensure balanced operation for customer loads and two wire connections caused average value dc to be injected into single phase loads. This type of connection also allows for the lowest array voltage. The conclusion is that requirements for a TPCS can be determined and that there are not showstopping issues preventing implementation. The actual design and topology of the TPCS was left for further study.

  4. Materiel requirements for airborne minefield detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, Karl A.; Huegle, Helmut

    1997-07-01

    Within the concept study, Material Requirements for an airborne minefield detection systems (AMiDS) the following topics were investigated: (i) concept concerning airborne minefield detection technique sand equipment, (ii) verification analysis of the AMiDS requirements using simulation models and (iii) application concept of AMiDS with regard o tactics and military operations. In a first approach the problems concerning unmanned airborne minefield detection techniques within a well-defined area were considered. The complexity of unmanned airborne minefield detection is a result of the following parameters: mine types, mine deployment methods, tactical requirements, topography, weather conditions, and the size of the area to be searched. In order to perform the analysis, a simulation model was developed to analyze the usability of the proposed remote controlled air carriers. The basic flight patterns for the proposed air carriers, as well as the preparation efforts of military operations and benefits of such a system during combat support missions were investigated. The results of the conceptual study showed that a proposed remote controlled helicopter drone could meet the stated German MOD scanning requirements of mine barriers. Fixed wing air carriers were at a definite disadvantage because of their inherently large turning loops. By implementing a mine detection system like AMiDS minefields can be reconnoitered before an attack. It is therefore possible either to plan, how the minefields can be circumvented or where precisely breaching lanes through the mine barriers are to be cleared for the advancing force.

  5. Future Orbital Power Systems Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA is actively involved in program planning for missions requiring several orders of magnitude, more energy than in the past. Therefore, a two-day symposium was held to review the technology requirements for future orbital power systems. The purpose of the meeting was to give leaders from government and industry a broad view of current government supported technology efforts and future program plans in space power. It provided a forum for discussion, through workshops, to comment on current and planned programs and to identify opportunities for technology investment. Several papers are presented to review the technology status and the planned programs.

  6. Local Stellar Kinematics from RAVE Data: IV. Solar Neighbourhood Age-Metallicity Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Ş.; Ak, S.; Bilir, S.; Karaali, S.; Ak, T.; Bostancı, Z. F.; Coşkunoğlu, B.

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the age-metallicity relation using a sample of 5691 F- and G-type dwarfs from RAdial Velocity Experiment Data Release 3 (RAVE DR3) by applying several constraints. (i) We selected stars with surface gravities log g(cm s-2) ≥ 3.8 and effective temperatures in the 5310 ≤ T_{eff}(K) ≤ 7300 range and obtained a dwarf sample. (ii) We plotted the dwarfs in metallicity sub-samples in the T_{eff}-(J-K_s)_0 plane to compare with the corresponding data of González Hernández & Bonifacio (2009) and identified the ones in agreement. (iii) We fitted the reduced dwarf sample obtained from constraints (i) and (ii) to the Padova isochrones and re-identified those which occupy the plane defined by isochrones with ages t ≤ 13 Gyr. (iv) Finally, we omitted dwarfs with total velocity errors larger than 10.63 km s-1. We estimated the ages using the Bayesian procedure of Jørgensen & Lindegren (2005). The largest age-metallicity slope was found for early F-type dwarfs. We found steeper slopes when we plotted the data as a function of spectral type rather than Galactic population. We noticed a substantial scatter in metallicity distribution at all ages. The metal-rich old dwarfs turned out to be G-type stars which can be interpreted as they migrated from the inner disc or bulge.

  7. Close encounters involving RAVE stars beyond the 47 Tucanae tidal radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Robin, A. C.; Reylé, C.; Vieira, K.; Palmer, M.; Moreno, E.; Valenzuela, O.; Pichardo, B.

    2016-09-01

    The most accurate six-dimensional (6D) phase-space information from the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) was used to integrate the orbits of 105 stars around the galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae, to look for close encounters between them in the past with a minimum distance approach less than the cluster tidal radius. The stars are currently spread over the distance range 3.0 kpc < d < 5.5 kpc. Using the uncertainties in the current position and velocity vector for both stars and cluster, 105 pairs of star-cluster orbits were generated in a Monte Carlo numerical scheme, integrated over 2 Gyr and considering an axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric Milky-Way-like Galactic potential, respectively. In this scheme, we identified 20 potential cluster members that had close encounters with the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, all of which have a relative velocity distribution (Vrel) less than 200 km s-1 at the minimum distance approach. Among these potential members, nine had close encounters with the cluster with velocities less than the escape velocity of 47 Tucanae; therefore a scenario of tidal stripping seems likely. These stars have been classified with a 93 per cent confidence level, leading to the identification of extratidal cluster stars. For the other 11 stars, Vrel exceeds the escape velocity of the cluster; therefore likely they were ejected or are unassociated interlopers.

  8. Club drugs: review of the 'rave' with a note of concern for the Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Neogi, Rajarshi; Basu, Debasish

    2011-06-01

    'Club drugs' which include Ecstasy, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), ketamine, and Rohypnol (flunitrazepam) have become popular with participants in 'raves', because they are perceived to enhance energy, endurance, sociability and sexual arousal. These drugs vary in their pharmacologic properties, physiological and psychological effects, and potential consequences. The use of club drugs by young people has increased in the last decade, and continue to get modified and evolve, making them very difficult to monitor. Further, these drugs are not picked up by routine drugs screening procedures, thereby making these popular with the criminals. India, which is in a phase of social transition, also faces this rising menace. Despite the nature and extent of this problem, this area has been under-researched. Data from India are sparse barring a few newspaper and police reports. Keeping abreast of current trends in club drug use prepares the clinician to recognize the clinical effects of club drug use, to manage club drug related emergencies, and to generate social awareness. PMID:21727657

  9. Cathodic protection requirements for deepwater systems

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, C.M.; Hanson, H.R.; Kane, R.D.; Farquhar, G.B.

    1999-07-01

    Field and laboratory experience related to requirements for cathodic protection (CP) in deep water are reviewed with emphasis on identification of the major variables that need to be specified for successful deepwater CP designs for offshore structures. The subject is addressed based on the historical development of cathodic protection design methodologies for offshore structures focusing on sacrificial anode systems and trends that have resulted in specific changes in design requirements. Three main subjects are discussed: (1) application of existing industry standards such as NACE RP0176; (2) environmental factors--dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, pH, water velocity and fouling; and (3) calcareous deposits--difference between shallow and deep waters. Current practice of design criteria and systems for deepwater applications is assessed, including initial polarization, use of coatings and anode materials. The results from laboratory tests are compared with available documented service experiences and field tests results.

  10. Mission Requirements and Data Systems Support Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This document was developed by the Flight Mission Support Office and prepared by the Forecast Analysis Section of the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) to provide NASA management with detailed mission information. It is one of a number of sources used in planning Mission Operations and Data Systems resource commitments in support of mission requirements. All mission dates are based on information available as of May 28, 1993.

  11. Large space systems auxiliary propulsion requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, J. E.; Smith, W. W.

    1983-05-01

    To meet the needs of a variety of civilian and military missions objectives large space systems (LSS) will become a greater percentage of our orbiting hardware. These LSS's will be transported to low Earth orbit (LEO) by the space transportation system (STS Shuttle). Concurrently, for LSS missions to orbit higher than LEO, the predominant mission scenario is that the LSS will be deployed or assembled in LEO and then transferred to a higher orbit. In support of the LSS concepts, the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) has sponsored studies to determine LSS mission propulsion requirements. Since the fall of 1979, the Boeing Aerospace Company, under contract to NASA and Lewis Research Center, has been studying the disturbance forces and torques that will be experienced by LSS, and they have identified some of the associated auxiliary propulsion systems (APS) requirements. This presentation provides an insight into the results of some of the APS studies, focusing primarily on the APS requirements of single Shuttle launchable LSS's.

  12. Intelligent redundant actuation system requirements and preliminary system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defeo, P.; Geiger, L. J.; Harris, J.

    1985-01-01

    Several redundant actuation system configurations were designed and demonstrated to satisfy the stringent operational requirements of advanced flight control systems. However, this has been accomplished largely through brute force hardware redundancy, resulting in significantly increased computational requirements on the flight control computers which perform the failure analysis and reconfiguration management. Modern technology now provides powerful, low-cost microprocessors which are effective in performing failure isolation and configuration management at the local actuator level. One such concept, called an Intelligent Redundant Actuation System (IRAS), significantly reduces the flight control computer requirements and performs the local tasks more comprehensively than previously feasible. The requirements and preliminary design of an experimental laboratory system capable of demonstrating the concept and sufficiently flexible to explore a variety of configurations are discussed.

  13. Power system scheduling with fuzzy reserve requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.; Luh, P.B.; Prasannan, B.

    1996-05-01

    The modeling of constraints is an important issue in power system scheduling. Constraints can be generally classified into two categories: (1) physical limits and (2) operating limits. A schedule violating physical limit or constraint would not be acceptable. An operating limit, however, is often imposed to enhance system security but does not represent a physical bound. This kind of soft limits can be temporarily violated a little bit if necessary, but not too much. These constraints are therefore fuzzy in nature, and crisp treatment of them may lead to over conservative solutions. In this paper, a fuzzy optimization-based method is developed to solve power system scheduling problem with fuzzy reserve requirements. The problem is first converted to a crisp and separable optimization problem. Lagrange multipliers are then used to relax system-wide constraints and decompose the problem into a number of unit-wise subproblems and a membership subproblem. These subproblems can be efficiently solved, and the multipliers are updated by using a subgradient method. Heuristics are then used to construct a feasible schedule based on subproblem solutions. Numerical testing results show that near optimal schedules are obtained, and the method can provide a good balance between reducing costs and satisfying reserve requirements.

  14. Advanced EVA system design requirements study: EVAS/space station system interface requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The definition of the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems interface requirements and accomodations for effective integration of a production EVA capability into the space station are contained. A description of the EVA systems for which the space station must provide the various interfaces and accomodations are provided. The discussion and analyses of the various space station areas in which the EVA interfaces are required and/or from which implications for EVA system design requirements are derived, are included. The rationale is provided for all EVAS mechanical, fluid, electrical, communications, and data system interfaces as well as exterior and interior requirements necessary to facilitate EVA operations. Results of the studies supporting these discussions are presented in the appendix.

  15. Vehicle systems and payload requirements evaluation. [computer programs for identifying launch vehicle system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, F. G.; Pittenger, J. L.; Conlon, R. J.; Allen, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques developed for identifying launch vehicle system requirements for NASA automated space missions are discussed. Emphasis is placed on development of computer programs and investigation of astrionics for OSS missions and Scout. The Earth Orbit Mission Program - 1 which performs linear error analysis of launch vehicle dispersions for both vehicle and navigation system factors is described along with the Interactive Graphic Orbit Selection program which allows the user to select orbits which satisfy mission requirements and to evaluate the necessary injection accuracy.

  16. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under the tracking system, reasons for...

  17. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under the tracking system, reasons for...

  18. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under the tracking system, reasons for...

  19. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under the tracking system, reasons for...

  20. Developing IVHM Requirements for Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajamani, Ravi; Saxena, Abhinav; Kramer, Frank; Augustin, Mike; Schroeder, John B.; Goebel, Kai; Shao, Ginger; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Lin, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The term Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) describes a set of capabilities that enable sustainable and safe operation of components and subsystems within aerospace platforms. However, very little guidance exists for the systems engineering aspects of design with IVHM in mind. It is probably because of this that designers have to use knowledge picked up exclusively by experience rather than by established process. This motivated a group of leading IVHM practitioners within the aerospace industry under the aegis of SAE's HM-1 technical committee to author a document that hopes to give working engineers and program managers clear guidance on all the elements of IVHM that they need to consider before designing a system. This proposed recommended practice (ARP6883 [1]) will describe all the steps of requirements generation and management as it applies to IVHM systems, and demonstrate these with a "real-world" example related to designing a landing gear system. The team hopes that this paper and presentation will help start a dialog with the larger aerospace community and that the feedback can be used to improve the ARP and subsequently the practice of IVHM from a systems engineering point-of-view.

  1. Tsunami Detection Systems for International Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Results are presented regarding the first commercially available, fully operational, tsunami detection system to have passed stringent U.S. government testing requirements and to have successfully demonstrated its ability to detect an actual tsunami at sea. Spurred by the devastation of the December 26, 2004, Indian Ocean tsunami that killed more than 230,000 people, the private sector actively supported the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission's (IOC"s) efforts to develop a tsunami warning system and mitigation plan for the Indian Ocean region. As each country in the region developed its requirements, SAIC recognized that many of these underdeveloped countries would need significant technical assistance to fully execute their plans. With the original focus on data fusion, consequence assessment tools, and warning center architecture, it was quickly realized that the cornerstone of any tsunami warning system would be reliable tsunami detection buoys that could meet very stringent operational standards. Our goal was to leverage extensive experience in underwater surveillance and oceanographic sensing to produce an enhanced and reliable deep water sensor that could meet emerging international requirements. Like the NOAA Deep-ocean Assessment and Recording of Tsunamis (DART TM ) buoy, the SAIC Tsunami Buoy (STB) system consists of three subsystems: a surfaccommunications buoy subsystem, a bottom pressure recorder subsystem, and a buoy mooring subsystem. With the operational success that DART has demonstrated, SAIC decided to build and test to the same high standards. The tsunami detection buoy system measures small changes in the depth of the deep ocean caused by tsunami waves as they propagate past the sensor. This is accomplished by using an extremely sensitive bottom pressure sensor/recorder to measure very small changes in pressure as the waves move past the buoy system. The bottom pressure recorder component includes a processor with algorithms that

  2. Kinematic analysis of solar-neighborhood stars based on RAVE4 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.; Bajkova, A. T.

    2016-02-01

    We consider stars with radial velocities, proper motions, and distance estimates from the RAVE4 catalogue. Based on a sample of more than 145 000 stars at distances r < 0.5 kpc, we have found the following kinematic parameters: ( U, V, W)_ ⊙ = (9.12, 20.80, 7.66) ± (0.10, 0.10, 0.08) km s-1, Ω0 = 28.71 ± 0.63 km s-1 kpc-1, and Ω0 ' = -4.28 ± 0.11 km s-1 kpc-2. This gives the linear rotation velocity V 0 = 230 ± 12 km s-1 (for the adopted R 0 = 8.0 ± 0.4 kpc) and the Oort constants A = 17.12 ± 0.45 km s-1 kpc-1 and B = -11.60 ± 0.77 km s-1 kpc-1. The 2D velocity distributions in the UV, UW, and VW planes have been constructed using a local sample, r < 0.25 kpc, consisting of ~47 000 stars. A difference of the UV velocity distribution from the previously known ones constructed from a smaller amount of data has been revealed. It lies in the fact that our distribution has an extremely enhanced branch near the Wolf 630 peak. A previously unknown peak at ( U, V) = (-96, -10) km s-1 and a separate new feature in the Wolf 630 stream, with the coordinates of its center being ( U, V) = (30, -40) km s-1, have been detected.

  3. Renal Athersosclerotic reVascularization Evaluation (RAVE Study): Study protocol of a randomized trial [NCT00127738

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Atri, M; Perkins, N; Pugash, R; Bell, Chaim M

    2007-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether patients with renal vascular disease will have renal or mortality benefit from re-establishing renal blood flow with renal revascularization procedures. The RAVE study will compare renal revascularization to medical management for people with atherosclerotic renal vascular disease (ARVD) and the indication for revascularization. Patients will be assessed for the standard nephrology research outcomes of progression to doubling of creatinine, need for dialysis, and death, as well as other cardiovascular outcomes. We will also establish whether the use of a new inexpensive, simple and available ultrasound test, the renal resistance index (RRI), can identify patients with renal vascular disease who will not benefit from renal revascularization procedures[1]. Methods/design This single center randomized, parallel group, pilot study comparing renal revascularization with medical therapy alone will help establish an infrastructure and test the feasibility of answering this important question in clinical nephrology. The main outcome will be a composite of death, dialysis and doubling of creatinine. Knowledge from this study will be used to better understand the natural history of patients diagnosed with renal vascular disease in anticipation of a Canadian multicenter trial. Data collected from this study will also inform the Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of Renal and Renal Vascular Disease. The expectation is that this program for ARVD, will enable community based programs to implement a comprehensive guidelines based diagnostic and treatment program, help create an evidence based approach for the management of patients with this condition, and possibly reduce or halt the progression of kidney disease in these patients. Discussion Results from this study will determine the feasibility of a multicentered study for the management of renovascular disease. PMID:17257413

  4. Design requirements for SRB production control system. Volume 2: System requirements and conceptual description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    In the development of the business system for the SRB automated production control system, special attention had to be paid to the unique environment posed by the space shuttle. The issues posed by this environment, and the means by which they were addressed, are reviewed. The change in management philosphy which will be required as NASA switches from one-of-a-kind launches to multiple launches is discussed. The implications of the assembly process on the business system are described. These issues include multiple missions, multiple locations and facilities, maintenance and refurbishment, multiple sources, and multiple contractors. The implications of these aspects on the automated production control system are reviewed including an assessment of the six major subsystems, as well as four other subsystem. Some general system requirements which flow through the entire business system are described.

  5. Superconducting Super Collider Magnet System requirements. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    1986-10-23

    This report discusses the Superconducting Super Collider magnet system requirements when the following categories: Functions; operational performance requirements; system configuration and essential features; structural requirements; availability/reliability; instrumentation and control requirements; design life; environment; maintenance requirements; interface systems; quality assurance; safety; and applicable codes and standards.

  6. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... all modifications or changes to the tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under...

  7. System requirements for computerized scan report generation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; De Puey, E.G.; Murphy, P.H.; Burdine, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A patient report generation system on a small computer (IBM series/1) has been designed for a large nuclear medicine department. Requirements for much a system differ considerably from those of computers used for image processing. This system has eleven terminals and four printers located in both the main laboratory and a satellite cardiac stress laboratory 23 floors below. Patient records are independently accessed by clerical staff, technologists, and physicians for the addition of information. Individual programs for each organ link and display screens of selectable statements. Those preprogrammed selections together with free text are processed to form a personalized report in complete sentences. Software design minimizes delays in computer response due to increasing numbers of users. Printer spooling enables the physician to immediately proceed to the next patient report without waiting for the previous one to finish printing. Logical decisions are made by the software to print reports in appropriate locations, such as near the cardiac clinic in the case of cardiac studies. One can display the status of the day's schedule with incomplete studies highlighted, and generate a list of billing charges at the end of each day. Logistical problems of transmitting dictated reports to a central office, having them transcribed, proofread, retyped and distributed to key areas of the hospital are eliminated. The authors' experience over a two year period has indicated that ''static screen'' terminal hardware capability, high terminal speed, and printer spooling are essential, all of which are commonplace on small business computers.

  8. A High-resolution, Multi-epoch Spectral Atlas of Peculiar Stars Including RAVE, GAIA , and HERMES Wavelength Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasella, Lina; Munari, Ulisse; Zwitter, Tomaž

    2010-12-01

    We present an Echelle+CCD, high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution (R = 20,000) spectroscopic atlas of 108 well-known objects representative of the most common types of peculiar and variable stars. The wavelength interval extends from 4600 to 9400 Å and includes the RAVE, Gaia, and HERMES wavelength ranges. Multi-epoch spectra are provided for the majority of the observed stars. A total of 425 spectra of peculiar stars, which were collected during 56 observing nights between 1998 November and 2002 August, are presented. The spectra are given in FITS format and heliocentric wavelengths, with accurate subtraction of both the sky background and the scattered light. Auxiliary material useful for custom applications (telluric dividers, spectrophotometric stars, flat-field tracings) is also provided. The atlas aims to provide a homogeneous database of the spectral appearance of stellar peculiarities, a tool useful both for classification purposes and inter-comparison studies. It could also serve in the planning and development of automated classification algorithms designed for RAVE, Gaia, HERMES, and other large-scale spectral surveys. The spectrum of XX Oph is discussed in some detail as an example of the content of the present atlas.

  9. A HIGH-RESOLUTION, MULTI-EPOCH SPECTRAL ATLAS OF PECULIAR STARS INCLUDING RAVE, GAIA , AND HERMES WAVELENGTH RANGES

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasella, Lina; Munari, Ulisse; Zwitter, Tomaz

    2010-12-15

    We present an Echelle+CCD, high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution (R = 20,000) spectroscopic atlas of 108 well-known objects representative of the most common types of peculiar and variable stars. The wavelength interval extends from 4600 to 9400 A and includes the RAVE, Gaia, and HERMES wavelength ranges. Multi-epoch spectra are provided for the majority of the observed stars. A total of 425 spectra of peculiar stars, which were collected during 56 observing nights between 1998 November and 2002 August, are presented. The spectra are given in FITS format and heliocentric wavelengths, with accurate subtraction of both the sky background and the scattered light. Auxiliary material useful for custom applications (telluric dividers, spectrophotometric stars, flat-field tracings) is also provided. The atlas aims to provide a homogeneous database of the spectral appearance of stellar peculiarities, a tool useful both for classification purposes and inter-comparison studies. It could also serve in the planning and development of automated classification algorithms designed for RAVE, Gaia, HERMES, and other large-scale spectral surveys. The spectrum of XX Oph is discussed in some detail as an example of the content of the present atlas.

  10. Materials Requirements for Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Cook, Mary Beth; Clinton, R. G., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's mission to "reach the Moon and Mars" will be obtained only if research begins now to develop materials with expanded capabilities to reduce mass, cost and risk to the program. Current materials cannot function satisfactorily in the deep space environments and do not meet the requirements of long term space propulsion concepts for manned missions. Directed research is needed to better understand materials behavior for optimizing their processing. This research, generating a deeper understanding of material behavior, can lead to enhanced implementation of materials for future exploration vehicles. materials providing new approaches for manufacture and new options for In response to this need for more robust materials, NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) has established a strategic research initiative dedicated to materials development supporting NASA's space propulsion needs. The Advanced Materials for Exploration (AME) element directs basic and applied research to understand material behavior and develop improved materials allowing propulsion systems to operate beyond their current limitations. This paper will discuss the approach used to direct the path of strategic research for advanced materials to ensure that the research is indeed supportive of NASA's future missions to the moon, Mars, and beyond.

  11. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section 971.204... MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems § 971.204 Management systems requirements....

  12. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section 971.204... MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems § 971.204 Management systems requirements....

  13. Engineered Barrier System performance requirements systems study report. Revision 02

    SciTech Connect

    Balady, M.A.

    1997-01-14

    This study evaluates the current design concept for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), in concert with the current understanding of the geologic setting to assess whether enhancements to the required performance of the EBS are necessary. The performance assessment calculations are performed by coupling the EBS with the geologic setting based on the models (some of which were updated for this study) and assumptions used for the 1995 Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The need for enhancements is determined by comparing the performance assessment results against the EBS related performance requirements. Subsystem quantitative performance requirements related to the EBS include the requirement to allow no more than 1% of the waste packages (WPs) to fail before 1,000 years after permanent closure of the repository, as well as a requirement to control the release rate of radionuclides from the EBS. The EBS performance enhancements considered included additional engineered components as well as evaluating additional performance available from existing design features but for which no performance credit is currently being taken.

  14. 46 CFR 63.20-1 - Specific control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specific control system requirements. 63.20-1 Section 63.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING AUTOMATIC AUXILIARY BOILERS Additional Control System Requirements § 63.20-1 Specific control system requirements. In addition to the requirements found...

  15. Information System Requirements Determination: Factors Impeding Stakeholders from Reaching Common Understandings and Agreements on Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gissel, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Information system implementations require developers to first know what they must create and then determine how best to create it. The requirements determination phase of the system development life cycle typically determines what functions a system must perform and how well it must accomplish required functions. Implementation success depends on…

  16. 30 CFR 250.803 - Additional production system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional production system requirements. 250... Production Safety Systems § 250.803 Additional production system requirements. (a) For all production platforms, you must comply with the following production safety system requirements, in addition to...

  17. 30 CFR 250.803 - Additional production system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Additional production system requirements. 250... Production Safety Systems § 250.803 Additional production system requirements. (a) For all production platforms, you must comply with the following production safety system requirements, in addition to...

  18. Automated Orbit Determination System (AODS) requirements definition and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, S. R.; Goorevich, C. E.; Teles, J.; Pajerski, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements definition for the prototype version of the automated orbit determination system (AODS) is presented including the AODS requirements at all levels, the functional model as determined through the structured analysis performed during requirements definition, and the results of the requirements analysis. Also specified are the implementation strategy for AODS and the AODS-required external support software system (ADEPT), input and output message formats, and procedures for modifying the requirements.

  19. Surveillance Analysis Computer System (SACS) software requirements specification (SRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Glasscock, J.A.; Flanagan, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document is the primary document establishing requirements for the Surveillance Analysis Computer System (SACS) Database, an Impact Level 3Q system. The purpose is to provide the customer and the performing organization with the requirements for the SACS Project.

  20. Advanced EVA system design requirements study, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Design requirements and criteria for the space station advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related EVA support equipment were established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as operational, procedures and training issues were considered.

  1. 46 CFR 167.45-50 - Foam smothering system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Foam smothering system requirements. 167.45-50 Section... NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Special Firefighting and Fire Prevention Requirements § 167.45-50 Foam smothering system requirements. (a) When a foam-type system is fitted, its capacity shall be such as to...

  2. 46 CFR 167.45-50 - Foam smothering system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Foam smothering system requirements. 167.45-50 Section... NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Special Firefighting and Fire Prevention Requirements § 167.45-50 Foam smothering system requirements. (a) When a foam-type system is fitted, its capacity shall be such as to...

  3. 46 CFR 167.45-50 - Foam smothering system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Foam smothering system requirements. 167.45-50 Section... NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Special Firefighting and Fire Prevention Requirements § 167.45-50 Foam smothering system requirements. (a) When a foam-type system is fitted, its capacity shall be such as to...

  4. 46 CFR 167.45-50 - Foam smothering system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foam smothering system requirements. 167.45-50 Section... NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Special Firefighting and Fire Prevention Requirements § 167.45-50 Foam smothering system requirements. (a) When a foam-type system is fitted, its capacity shall be such as to...

  5. 7 CFR 1767.12 - Accounting system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting system requirements. 1767.12 Section 1767..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ACCOUNTING REQUIREMENTS FOR RUS ELECTRIC BORROWERS Uniform System of Accounts § 1767.12 Accounting system requirements. (a) Each Rural Development electric borrower...

  6. 7 CFR 1767.12 - Accounting system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Accounting system requirements. 1767.12 Section 1767..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ACCOUNTING REQUIREMENTS FOR RUS ELECTRIC BORROWERS Uniform System of Accounts § 1767.12 Accounting system requirements. (a) Each Rural Development electric borrower...

  7. 7 CFR 1767.12 - Accounting system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accounting system requirements. 1767.12 Section 1767..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ACCOUNTING REQUIREMENTS FOR RUS ELECTRIC BORROWERS Uniform System of Accounts § 1767.12 Accounting system requirements. (a) Each Rural Development electric borrower...

  8. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements ancillary systems SSDR 1.5.6

    SciTech Connect

    Spann, J.; Reed, R.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Ancillary Systems, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  9. System requirements specification for SMART structures mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Specified here are the functional and informational requirements for software modules which address the geometric and data modeling needs of the aerospace structural engineer. The modules are to be included as part of the Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (SMART) package developed for the Vehicle Analysis Branch (VAB) at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The purpose is to precisely state what the SMART Structures modules will do, without consideration of how it will be done. Each requirement is numbered for reference in development and testing.

  10. System code requirements for SBWR LOCA predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Slovik, G.; Kroeger, P.

    1994-12-31

    The simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) is the latest design in the family of boiling water reactors (BWRs) from General Electric. The concept is based on many innovative, passive, safety systems that rely on naturally occurring phenomena, such as natural circulation, gravity flows, and condensation. Reliability has been improved by eliminating active systems such as pumps and valves. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is connected to heat exchangers submerged in individual water tanks, which are open to atmosphere. These heat exchanger, or isolation condensers (ICs), provide a heat sink to reduce the RPV pressure when isolated. The RPV is also connected to three elevated tanks of water called the gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS). During a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), the RPV is depressurized by the automatic depressurization system (ADS), allowing the gravity-driven flow from the GDCS tanks. The containment pressure is controlled by a passive containment cooling system (PCCS) and suppression pool. Similarly, there are new plant protection systems in the SBWR, such as fine-motion control rod drive, passive standby liquid control system, and the automatic feedwater runback system. These safety and plant protection systems respond to phenomena that are different from previous BWR designs. System codes must be upgraded to include models for the phenomena expected during transients for the SBWR.

  11. Satellite systems for Latin American telecommunication requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo, Eduardo L.

    Aspects of satellite telecommunications systems of interest to Latin America are discussed. Presently existing systems are described, including both state-run and international services. Services planned for the region are examined, including Geostar, a service that provides satellite radio determination and message services, a system which will provide a high-capacity digital voice and data service for airlines, and direct broadcast satellites. Applications of these systems in education, rural telephony, data transmission, news services, publishing, emergency communications, and mobile communications are addressed.

  12. Exploration Planetary Surface Structural Systems: Design Requirements and Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Surface Systems Project developed system concepts that would be necessary to establish and maintain a permanent human presence on the Lunar surface. A variety of specific system implementations were generated as a part of the scenarios, some level of system definition was completed, and masses estimated for each system. Because the architecture studies generally spawned a large number of system concepts and the studies were executed in a short amount of time, the resulting system definitions had very low design fidelity. This paper describes the development sequence required to field a particular structural system: 1) Define Requirements, 2) Develop the Design and 3) Demonstrate Compliance of the Design to all Requirements. This paper also outlines and describes in detail the information and data that are required to establish structural design requirements and outlines the information that would comprise a planetary surface system Structures Requirements document.

  13. Developing Systemic Theories Requires Formal Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobet, Fernand

    2012-01-01

    Ziegler and Phillipson (Z&P) advance an interesting and ambitious proposal, whereby current analytical/mechanistic theories of gifted education are replaced by systemic theories. In this commentary, the author focuses on the pros and cons of using systemic theories. He argues that Z&P's proposal both goes too far and not far enough. The future of…

  14. 14 CFR 121.127 - Flight following system; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight following system; requirements. 121... Supplemental Operations § 121.127 Flight following system; requirements. (a) Each certificate holder conducting supplemental operations using a flight following system must show that— (1) The system has adequate...

  15. 17 CFR 242.301 - Requirements for alternative trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... trading systems. 242.301 Section 242.301 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... FUTURES Regulation Ats-Alternative Trading Systems § 242.301 Requirements for alternative trading systems. (a) Scope of section. An alternative trading system shall comply with the requirements in...

  16. 48 CFR 252.215-7002 - Cost estimating system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cost estimating system... of Provisions And Clauses 252.215-7002 Cost estimating system requirements. As prescribed in 215.408(2), use the following clause: Cost Estimating System Requirements (DEC 2012) (a)...

  17. 48 CFR 252.215-7002 - Cost estimating system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cost estimating system... of Provisions And Clauses 252.215-7002 Cost estimating system requirements. As prescribed in 215.408(2), use the following clause: Cost Estimating System Requirements (DEC 2012) (a)...

  18. 48 CFR 252.215-7002 - Cost estimating system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cost estimating system... of Provisions And Clauses 252.215-7002 Cost estimating system requirements. As prescribed in 215.408(2), use the following clause: Cost Estimating System Requirements (FEB 2012) (a)...

  19. 48 CFR 252.215-7002 - Cost estimating system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost estimating system... of Provisions And Clauses 252.215-7002 Cost estimating system requirements. As prescribed in 215.408(2), use the following clause: Cost Estimating System Requirements (DEC 2006) (a)...

  20. 48 CFR 207.106 - Additional requirements for major systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements for major systems. 207.106 Section 207.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION PLANNING Acquisition Plans 207.106 Additional requirements for...

  1. Systems and context modeling approach to requirements analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Amrit; Muralikrishna, G.; Patwari, Puneet; Subhrojyoti, C.; Swaminathan, N.; Vin, Harrick

    2014-08-01

    Ensuring completeness and correctness of the requirements for a complex system such as the SKA is challenging. Current system engineering practice includes developing a stakeholder needs definition, a concept of operations, and defining system requirements in terms of use cases and requirements statements. We present a method that enhances this current practice into a collection of system models with mutual consistency relationships. These include stakeholder goals, needs definition and system-of-interest models, together with a context model that participates in the consistency relationships among these models. We illustrate this approach by using it to analyze the SKA system requirements.

  2. Traceability of Software Safety Requirements in Legacy Safety Critical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Janice L.

    2007-01-01

    How can traceability of software safety requirements be created for legacy safety critical systems? Requirements in safety standards are imposed most times during contract negotiations. On the other hand, there are instances where safety standards are levied on legacy safety critical systems, some of which may be considered for reuse for new applications. Safety standards often specify that software development documentation include process-oriented and technical safety requirements, and also require that system and software safety analyses are performed supporting technical safety requirements implementation. So what can be done if the requisite documents for establishing and maintaining safety requirements traceability are not available?

  3. SPS overview: Requirements, alternatives, and reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, L. E.

    1980-07-01

    Basic requirements for the SPS were established. The SPS is considered to be nondepletable with a large positive energy payback over its useful life, capable of base-load operation with no fundamental constraints on capacity. It is compatible with power grids, economically competitive and environmentally acceptable. It should not make excessive use of critical resources, and should be capable of development with reasonable cost, time, and risk. Several of the power generation options and equipment considered are discussed. The reference set of efficiencies defined to represent goals for each step in the power conversion-transmission-reception chain is also described.

  4. 46 CFR 28.845 - General requirements for electrical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General requirements for electrical systems. 28.845 Section 28.845 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.845 General requirements for electrical systems. (a) Electrical...

  5. 46 CFR 28.845 - General requirements for electrical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General requirements for electrical systems. 28.845 Section 28.845 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.845 General requirements for electrical systems. (a) Electrical...

  6. 46 CFR 28.845 - General requirements for electrical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General requirements for electrical systems. 28.845 Section 28.845 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.845 General requirements for electrical systems. (a) Electrical...

  7. Automated Derivation of Complex System Constraints from User Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muery, Kim; Foshee, Mark; Marsh, Angela

    2006-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) payload developers submit their payload science requirements for the development of on-board execution timelines. The ISS systems required to execute the payload science operations must be represented as constraints for the execution timeline. Payload developers use a software application, User Requirements Collection (URC), to submit their requirements by selecting a simplified representation of ISS system constraints. To fully represent the complex ISS systems, the constraints require a level of detail that is beyond the insight of the payload developer. To provide the complex representation of the ISS system constraints, HOSC operations personnel, specifically the Payload Activity Requirements Coordinators (PARC), manually translate the payload developers simplified constraints into detailed ISS system constraints used for scheduling the payload activities in the Consolidated Planning System (CPS). This paper describes the implementation for a software application, User Requirements Integration (URI), developed to automate the manual ISS constraint translation process.

  8. Facility Requirements for Integrated Learning Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knirk, Frederick G.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses features in the physical environment that need to be considered for integrated learning systems (ILSs). Highlights include ergonomics; lighting, including contrast and colors; space, furniture, and equipment, including keyboard, monitor, software, and printer; ambient noise and acoustics; temperature, humidity, and air quality control;…

  9. The 1990 system characteristics and requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Potential future developments that may occur in the air, truck, rail, and sea transportation industries were identified. Technological and operational developments were qualitatively evaluated for their potential effect upon the vehicle and institutional characteristics of the respective modes. Also identified were the multiplicity of cross impacts that must be considered when viewing air cargo as an integrated transport system.

  10. 78 FR 36738 - Signal System Reporting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... modernize our regulatory system and to reduce unjustified regulatory burdens and costs.'' See 77 FR 28469... annually. See 61 FR 33871 (July 1, 1996). FRA determined that a five-year reporting period would...). In 1984, FRA amended its Signal and Train Control Regulations, including 49 CFR Part 233. See 49...

  11. 40 CFR 141.712 - Unfiltered system Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... violation of the treatment technique requirement. (2) Systems that use UV light and fail to achieve the..., ozone, or UV as described in § 141.720 to meet the Cryptosporidium inactivation requirements of...

  12. 40 CFR 141.712 - Unfiltered system Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... violation of the treatment technique requirement. (2) Systems that use UV light and fail to achieve the..., ozone, or UV as described in § 141.720 to meet the Cryptosporidium inactivation requirements of...

  13. 40 CFR 141.712 - Unfiltered system Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... violation of the treatment technique requirement. (2) Systems that use UV light and fail to achieve the..., ozone, or UV as described in § 141.720 to meet the Cryptosporidium inactivation requirements of...

  14. Requirements document for mini system test unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garofolo, D.

    1981-01-01

    The mini system test unit (STU) for the Trace Gas Analyzer (TGA) is defined. The interface signals of the components used to implement the STU are also defined. The mini STU is used to support pre-flight ground test operations. The STU indications of TGA operation (organic and carbon monoxide analyses) and its ability to monitor gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer test signals are included.

  15. 23 CFR 973.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 973.204 Section 973.204 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS MANAGEMENT... Indian Affairs Management Systems § 973.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The BIA, in...

  16. 23 CFR 973.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 973.204 Section 973.204 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS MANAGEMENT... Indian Affairs Management Systems § 973.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The BIA, in...

  17. 23 CFR 973.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 973.204 Section 973.204 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS MANAGEMENT... Indian Affairs Management Systems § 973.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The BIA, in...

  18. 23 CFR 973.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 973.204 Section 973.204 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS MANAGEMENT... Indian Affairs Management Systems § 973.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The BIA, in...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.652 - Requirements for protective systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... together to prevent sliding, falling, kickouts, or other predictable failure. (ii) Support systems shall be... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for protective systems. 1926.652 Section 1926... Requirements for protective systems. (a) Protection of employees in excavations. (1) Each employee in...

  20. 46 CFR 16.500 - Management Information System requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Management Information System requirements. 16.500 Section 16.500 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN CHEMICAL TESTING Management Information System § 16.500 Management Information System requirements....

  1. 49 CFR 228.313 - Electrical system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electrical system requirements. 228.313 Section... § 228.313 Electrical system requirements. (a) All heating, cooking, ventilation, air conditioning, and... its compliance with that standard. (b) All electrical systems installed, including external...

  2. 49 CFR 228.313 - Electrical system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electrical system requirements. 228.313 Section... § 228.313 Electrical system requirements. (a) All heating, cooking, ventilation, air conditioning, and... its compliance with that standard. (b) All electrical systems installed, including external...

  3. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Command control system requirements. 417.303 Section 417.303 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.303 Command control system requirements. (a) General....

  4. Hanford PeopleCORE system requirements

    SciTech Connect

    McCargar, S.B.; Johnson, C.F.

    1990-05-01

    The Hanford People Core (HPC) System subject database concept consolidates information about people from diverse automated and nonautomated systems throughout the Hanford site in order to minimize duplication of data storage, data entry and information gathering and to improve consistency. The intent is to provide single point of entry data collection and maintenance so that data may be shared by various Hanford business functions to support a business objective of accurate and time information about people. Specific objectives to be accomplished are: establish a common database of basic information about people associated with the Hanford Site, standardize data element names and definitions, document the HPC data resource in the Site Data Dictionary, support site service organizations directly and by interface to eliminate redundant information entry, provide accurate and timely location information for individuals associated with the Hanford Site to various Hanford Business functions, track distribution information to identify the distribute material to specified individuals and/or companies associated with the Hanford Site, track WHC organizational structure information to establish organization charts and share organization data with other WHC applications, and provide data about WHC people to be shared by various WHC business applications.

  5. Requirement analysis of an intelligent, redundant, actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Feo, P.; Shih, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability and fault tolerance requirements of integrated, critical, digital fly-by-wire control systems for advanced military and civil aircraft requires redundant, reconfigurable implementations of the actuation system. An effective way for controlling the actuators and implementing the required fault detection and reconfiguration strategies is by means of dedicated microprocessors. This paper describes a laboratory implementation of a flexible intelligent redundant actuation system capable of demonstrating the concept and analyzing a variety of configurations and technical issues.

  6. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. Standards and Requirements Identification Document (SRID) Requirements Management System and Requirements Specification

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.L.

    2000-11-30

    The current Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) for the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (ORP), River Protection Project (RPP), CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), will use a computer based requirements management system. The system will serve as a tool to assist in identifying, capturing, and maintaining the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) requirements and links to implementing procedures and other documents. By managing requirements as one integrated set, CHG will be able to carry out its mission more efficiently and effectively. CHG has chosen the Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements System (DOORS{trademark}) as the preferred computer based requirements management system. Accordingly, the S/RID program will use DOORS{trademark}. DOORS{trademark} will replace the Environmental Requirements Management Interface (ERMI) system as the tool for S/RID data management. The DOORS{trademark} S/RID test project currently resides on the DOORSTM test server. The S/RID project will be migrated to the DOORS{trademark} production server. After the migration the S/RID project will be considered a production project and will no longer reside on the test server.

  7. Transportation system requirements document. Revision 1 DCN01. Supplement

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The original Transportation System Requirements Document described the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of that document was to define the system-level requirements. These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presented an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. This revision of the document contains only the pages that have been modified.

  8. 19 CFR 143.5 - System performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false System performance requirements. 143.5 Section 143... performance requirements. The performance requirements and operational standards for electronic data filing...), which is updated periodically. The User Support Services Division, Customs Headquarters, upon...

  9. Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) Software Requirements Specification

    SciTech Connect

    MAY, D.L.

    2000-03-22

    This document is the primary document establishing requirements for the Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) as it is converted to a client-server architecture. The purpose is to provide the customer and the performing organizations with the requirements for the SWITS in the new environment. This Software Requirement Specification (SRS) describes the system requirements for the SWITS Project, and follows the PHMC Engineering Requirements, HNF-PRO-1819, and Computer Software Qualify Assurance Requirements, HNF-PRO-309, policies. This SRS includes sections on general description, specific requirements, references, appendices, and index. The SWITS system defined in this document stores information about the solid waste inventory on the Hanford site. Waste is tracked as it is generated, analyzed, shipped, stored, and treated. In addition to inventory reports a number of reports for regulatory agencies are produced.

  10. An Analysis of System Balance Requirements for Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Sadaf R; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2006-08-01

    Scientific applications are diverse in terms of the resource requirements, and tend to vary significantly from commercial applications. In order to provide sustained performance, a target high performance computing (HPC) platform must offer a balance between CPU performance to memory, interconnect and I/O subsystems performance. We characterize the system balance requirements for two large-scale Office of Science applications, GYRO (fusion simulation) and POP (climate modeling), and develop platform-independent parameterized requirement models. We measure the parallel efficiencies for GYRO and POP on three multiprocessor systems: an SMP cluster (IBM p690), a shared-memory system (SGI Altix) and a vector supercomputer (Cray X1). The higher computational intensity and interconnect bandwidth requirements of GYRO result in higher performance efficiencies on the vector platform. At the same time, small message sizes in POP benefit from low MPI latencies of the shared-memory platform. Overall results confirm system balance requirements that are generated by the requirement models.

  11. BOUNDED MINIMUM INHERENT AVAILABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    L. Booth

    1998-03-13

    The purpose of this analysis is to establish bounded minimum inherent availability requirements for the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) System Description Documents (SDDs). The purpose of the bounded minimum inherent availability is to provide a lower bound on availability which will allow design to meet throughput requirements while not affecting the ability of the items to perform their intended safety function.

  12. 19 CFR 143.5 - System performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false System performance requirements. 143.5 Section 143.5 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Automated Broker Interface § 143.5 System performance requirements. The performance...

  13. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  14. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  15. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  16. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  17. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  18. 49 CFR 393.40 - Required brake systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Required brake systems. 393.40 Section 393.40... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.40 Required brake systems. (a) Each commercial motor vehicle must have brakes adequate to stop and hold the vehicle or combination of motor vehicles. Each...

  19. 49 CFR 393.40 - Required brake systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Required brake systems. 393.40 Section 393.40... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.40 Required brake systems. (a) Each commercial motor vehicle must have brakes adequate to stop and hold the vehicle or combination of motor vehicles. Each...

  20. 49 CFR 393.40 - Required brake systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Required brake systems. 393.40 Section 393.40... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.40 Required brake systems. (a) Each commercial motor vehicle must have brakes adequate to stop and hold the vehicle or combination of motor vehicles. Each...

  1. 49 CFR 393.40 - Required brake systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Required brake systems. 393.40 Section 393.40... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.40 Required brake systems. (a) Each commercial motor vehicle must have brakes adequate to stop and hold the vehicle or combination of motor vehicles. Each...

  2. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  3. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  4. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  5. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  6. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  7. Space station electric power system requirements and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teren, Fred

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the conceptual definition and design of the space station Electric Power System (EPS) is given. Responsibilities for the design and development of the EPS are defined. The EPS requirements are listed and discussed, including average and peak power requirements, contingency requirements, and fault tolerance. The most significant Phase B trade study results are summarized, and the design selections and rationale are given. Finally, the power management and distribution system architecture is presented.

  8. 23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... engineering support for the development, implementation, and maintenance of the management systems. (c) The... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section 970.204... SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management...

  9. 23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... engineering support for the development, implementation, and maintenance of the management systems. (c) The... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section 970.204... SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management...

  10. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... maintain the management systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process for data collection, processing, analysis, and updating for each management system. (c) All management systems will use...

  11. 2 CFR 25.215 - Requirements for agency information systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for agency information systems... information systems. Each agency that makes awards (as defined in § 25.325) must ensure that systems processing information related to the awards, and other systems as appropriate, are able to accept and...

  12. 17 CFR 242.301 - Requirements for alternative trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., and security of automated systems. (i) The alternative trading system shall comply with the... trading systems. 242.301 Section 242.301 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... FUTURES Regulation Ats-Alternative Trading Systems § 242.301 Requirements for alternative trading...

  13. 17 CFR 242.301 - Requirements for alternative trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., and security of automated systems. (i) The alternative trading system shall comply with the... trading systems. 242.301 Section 242.301 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... FUTURES Regulation Ats-Alternative Trading Systems § 242.301 Requirements for alternative trading...

  14. 17 CFR 242.301 - Requirements for alternative trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., and security of automated systems. (i) The alternative trading system shall comply with the... trading systems. 242.301 Section 242.301 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... FUTURES Regulation Ats-Alternative Trading Systems § 242.301 Requirements for alternative trading...

  15. 17 CFR 242.301 - Requirements for alternative trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and security of automated systems. (i) The alternative trading system shall comply with the... trading systems. 242.301 Section 242.301 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... FUTURES Regulation Ats-Alternative Trading Systems § 242.301 Requirements for alternative trading...

  16. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... transportation assets cost-effectively; (3) A description of each management system; (4) A process to operate and..., processing, analysis, and updating for each management system. (c) All management systems will use...

  17. 23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cost-effectively; (3) A description of each management system; (4) A process to operate and maintain..., processing, analysis and updating for each management system. (d) All management systems will use databases... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section...

  18. Space Station Information System requirements for integrated communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marker, W.; Whitelaw, V.; Muratore, J.; Bigham, J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Space Station Information System (SSIS) requirements for integrated end-to-end communications are presented. The SSIS is defined as the integrated set of space and ground data and information systems and networks which will provide required data services to the Space Station flight crew, ground operations personnel, and customer communities. This model is based on the International Standards Organization (ISO) layered model for Open System Interconnection (OSI). These SSIS requirements include grades of service, priority classifications, systems management, flow control, bandwidth allocation, and standard SSIS data services.

  19. Expert system verification and validation study. Phase 2: Requirements Identification. Delivery 2: Current requirements applicability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The second phase of a task is described which has the ultimate purpose of ensuring that adequate Expert Systems (ESs) Verification and Validation (V and V) tools and techniques are available for Space Station Freedom Program Knowledge Based Systems development. The purpose of this phase is to recommend modifications to current software V and V requirements which will extend the applicability of the requirements to NASA ESs.

  20. Teacher Requirements in the Composition Skills, Spelling, and Drama Instructional Systems and the Implications of the Requirements for Training Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Patricia; Lee, Dean R.

    This document describes teacher requirements in three different instructional systems and the implications of the requirements for teacher training. Short descriptions of the composition skills, spelling, and drama systems produced by the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) are given. Materials and procedures are briefly described for each…

  1. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements integrated safety systems SSDR 1.5.4

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Integrated Safety System, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  2. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements automatic alignment system SSDR 1.5.5

    SciTech Connect

    VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Automatic Alignment System, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  3. Space Transportation System Availability Requirements and Its Influencing Attributes Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Russell E.; Adams, Timothy C.; McCleskey, Carey M.

    2008-01-01

    It is important that engineering and management accept the need for an availability requirement that is derived with its influencing attributes. It is the intent of this paper to provide the visibility of relationships of these major attribute drivers (variables) to each other and the resultant system inherent availability. Also important to provide bounds of the variables providing engineering the insight required to control the system's engineering solution, e.g., these influencing attributes become design requirements also. These variables will drive the need to provide integration of similar discipline functions or technology selection to allow control of the total parts count. The relationship of selecting a reliability requirement will place a constraint on parts count to achieve a given availability requirement or if allowed to increase the parts count will drive the system reliability requirement higher. They also provide the understanding for the relationship of mean repair time (or mean down time) to maintainability, e.g., accessibility for repair, and both the mean time between failure, e.g., reliability of hardware and availability. The concerns and importance of achieving a strong availability requirement is driven by the need for affordability, the choice of using the two launch solution for the single space application, or the need to control the spare parts count needed to support the long stay in either orbit or on the surface of the moon. Understanding the requirements before starting the architectural design concept will avoid considerable time and money required to iterate the design to meet the redesign and assessment process required to achieve the results required of the customer's space transportation system. In fact the impact to the schedule to being able to deliver the system that meets the customer's needs, goals, and objectives may cause the customer to compromise his desired operational goal and objectives resulting in considerable

  4. Space Transportation System Availability Requirement and Its Influencing Attributes Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Russell E.; Adams, Timothy C.; McCleskey, Carey M.

    2008-01-01

    It is important that engineering and management accept the need for an availability requirement that is derived with its influencing attributes. It is the intent of this paper to provide the visibility of relationships of these major attribute drivers (variables) to each other and the resultant system inherent availability. Also important to provide bounds of the variables providing engineering the insight required to control the system's engineering solution, e.g., these influencing attributes become design requirements also. These variables will drive the need to provide integration of similar discipline functions or technology selection to allow control of the total parts count. The relationship of selecting a reliability requirement will place a constraint on parts count to achieve a given availability requirement or if allowed to increase the parts count will drive the system reliability requirement higher. They also provide the understanding for the relationship of mean repair time (or mean down time) to maintainability, e.g., accessibility for repair, and both the mean time between failure, e.g., reliability of hardware and availability. The concerns and importance of achieving a strong availability requirement is driven by the need for affordability, the choice of using the two launch solution for the single space application, or the need to control the spare parts count needed to support the long stay in either orbit or on the surface of the moon. Understanding the requirements before starting the architectural design concept will avoid considerable time and money required to iterate the design to meet the redesign and assessment process required to achieve the results required of the customer's space transportation system. In fact the impact to the schedule to being able to deliver the system that meets the customer's needs, goals, and objectives may cause the customer to compromise his desired operational goal and objectives resulting in considerable

  5. Large space systems requirements, deployable concepts, and technology issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, U. M.; Garrett, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the future civil missions requiring large space systems technologies. Antenna, collector, and reflector missions are generalized to define a similar set of system requirements and characteristics. Although many concepts exist for both deployable and space assemblable large structures, four technically mature deployable concepts are reviewed. Two of these concepts are probably applicable to only antenna/collector missions, whereas the other two employ continuous trusses which can be configured for a broad range of planar, linear, or curved structures. Finally, technology problems or needs associated with large deployable systems are reviewed to highlight additional research and development, both analytical and experimental, required to reduce mission risk.

  6. 5 CFR 9901.405 - Performance management system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance management system... DEFENSE NATIONAL SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Performance Management § 9901.405 Performance management system requirements. (a) The Secretary may issue implementing issuances further defining a...

  7. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... with a common or coordinated reference system, that can be used to geolocate all database information... in this subpart. If the State has established a management system for FH that fulfills...

  8. System Requirements for On-Line and Batch Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Information Science, Washington, DC. Special Interest Group on Computerized Retrieval Services.

    Three papers on system requirements for on-line and batch retrieval presented at the American Society for Information Science (ASIS) annual meeting are included here. At G.D. Searle, data for records related to pharmacology screening are used in a batch system, and an on-line system is used to search information on mutagenic, carcinogenic, and…

  9. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Training Requirements Analysis Model (TRAMOD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    The training requirements analysis model (TRAMOD) described in this report represents an important portion of the larger effort called the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Study. TRAMOD is the second of three models that comprise an LCC impact modeling system for use in the early stages of system development. As…

  10. 5 CFR 9901.405 - Performance management system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance management system... DEFENSE NATIONAL SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Performance Management § 9901.405 Performance management system requirements. (a) The Secretary may issue implementing issuances further defining a...

  11. Tank waste remediation system functions and requirements document

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, K.E

    1996-10-03

    This is the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Functions and Requirements Document derived from the TWRS Technical Baseline. The document consists of several text sections that provide the purpose, scope, background information, and an explanation of how this document assists the application of Systems Engineering to the TWRS. The primary functions identified in the TWRS Functions and Requirements Document are identified in Figure 4.1 (Section 4.0) Currently, this document is part of the overall effort to develop the TWRS Functional Requirements Baseline, and contains the functions and requirements needed to properly define the top three TWRS function levels. TWRS Technical Baseline information (RDD-100 database) included in the appendices of the attached document contain the TWRS functions, requirements, and architecture necessary to define the TWRS Functional Requirements Baseline. Document organization and user directions are provided in the introductory text. This document will continue to be modified during the TWRS life-cycle.

  12. Towards Requirements in Systems Engineering for Aerospace IVHM Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Lin, Wei; Goebel, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Health management (HM) technologies have been employed for safety critical system for decades, but a coherent systematic process to integrate HM into the system design is not yet clear. Consequently, in most cases, health management resorts to be an after-thought or 'band-aid' solution. Moreover, limited guidance exists for carrying out systems engineering (SE) on the subject of writing requirements for designs with integrated vehicle health management (IVHM). It is well accepted that requirements are key to developing a successful IVHM system right from the concept stage to development, verification, utilization, and support. However, writing requirements for systems with IVHM capability have unique challenges that require the designers to look beyond their own domains and consider the constraints and specifications of other interlinked systems. In this paper we look at various stages in the SE process and identify activities specific to IVHM design and development. More importantly, several relevant questions are posed that system engineers must address at various design and development stages. Addressing these questions should provide some guidance to systems engineers towards writing IVHM related requirements to ensure that appropriate IVHM functions are built into the system design.

  13. State analysis requirements database for engineering complex embedded systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Matthew B.; Rasmussen, Robert D.; Ingham, Michel D.

    2004-01-01

    It has become clear that spacecraft system complexity is reaching a threshold where customary methods of control are no longer affordable or sufficiently reliable. At the heart of this problem are the conventional approaches to systems and software engineering based on subsystem-level functional decomposition, which fail to scale in the tangled web of interactions typically encountered in complex spacecraft designs. Furthermore, there is a fundamental gap between the requirements on software specified by systems engineers and the implementation of these requirements by software engineers. Software engineers must perform the translation of requirements into software code, hoping to accurately capture the systems engineer's understanding of the system behavior, which is not always explicitly specified. This gap opens up the possibility for misinterpretation of the systems engineer's intent, potentially leading to software errors. This problem is addressed by a systems engineering tool called the State Analysis Database, which provides a tool for capturing system and software requirements in the form of explicit models. This paper describes how requirements for complex aerospace systems can be developed using the State Analysis Database.

  14. Propulsion element requirements using electrical power system unscheduled power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, Frank; Hodge, Kathy

    1989-01-01

    The suitability of using the electrical energy from the Space Station's Electrical Power System (EPS) during the periods of peak solar insolation which is currently not specifically allocated (unscheduled power) to produce propulsion propellants, gaseous hydrogen, and oxygen by electrolyzing water is investigated. Reboost propellant requirements are emphasized, but the results are more generally relevant because the balance of recurring propellant requirements are an order of magnitude smaller and the nonrecurring requirements are not significant on an average basis.

  15. Development and analysis of SCR requirements tables for system scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.; Morrison, Jeffery L.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the use of scenarios to develop and refine requirement tables for parts of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing EOSDIS as part of its Mission-To-Planet-Earth (MTPE) project to accept instrument/platform observation requests from end-user scientists, schedule and perform requested observations of the Earth from space, collect and process the observed data, and distribute data to scientists and archives. Current requirements for the system are managed with tools that allow developers to trace the relationships between requirements and other development artifacts, including other requirements. In addition, the user community (e.g., earth and atmospheric scientists), in conjunction with NASA, has generated scenarios describing the actions of EOSDIS subsystems in response to user requests and other system activities. As part of a research effort in verification and validation techniques, this paper describes our efforts to develop requirements tables from these scenarios for the EOSDIS Core System (ECS). The tables specify event-driven mode transitions based on techniques developed by the Naval Research Lab's (NRL) Software Cost Reduction (SCR) project. The SCR approach has proven effective in specifying requirements for large systems in an unambiguous, terse format that enhance identification of incomplete and inconsistent requirements. We describe development of SCR tables from user scenarios and identify the strengths and weaknesses of our approach in contrast to the requirements tracing approach. We also evaluate the capabilities of both approach to respond to the volatility of requirements in large, complex systems.

  16. 19 CFR 143.5 - System performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Automated Broker Interface § 143.5 System... are detailed in Customs Publication 552, Customs And Trade Automated Interface Requirements (CATAIR), which is updated periodically. The User Support Services Division, Customs Headquarters, upon...

  17. 19 CFR 143.5 - System performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Automated Broker Interface § 143.5 System... are detailed in Customs Publication 552, Customs And Trade Automated Interface Requirements (CATAIR), which is updated periodically. The User Support Services Division, Customs Headquarters, upon...

  18. 19 CFR 143.5 - System performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Automated Broker Interface § 143.5 System... are detailed in Customs Publication 552, Customs And Trade Automated Interface Requirements (CATAIR), which is updated periodically. The User Support Services Division, Customs Headquarters, upon...

  19. 27 CFR 25.41 - Measuring system required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Measurement of Beer § 25.41 Measuring system required. The brewer shall accurately and reliably measure the quantity of beer transferred from the brewery cellars...

  20. 27 CFR 25.41 - Measuring system required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Measurement of Beer § 25.41 Measuring system required. The brewer shall accurately and reliably measure the quantity of beer transferred from the brewery cellars...

  1. 27 CFR 25.41 - Measuring system required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Measurement of Beer § 25.41 Measuring system required. The brewer shall accurately and reliably measure the quantity of beer transferred from the brewery cellars...

  2. 27 CFR 25.41 - Measuring system required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Measurement of Beer § 25.41 Measuring system required. The brewer shall accurately and reliably measure the quantity of beer transferred from the brewery cellars...

  3. 27 CFR 25.41 - Measuring system required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Measurement of Beer § 25.41 Measuring system required. The brewer shall accurately and reliably measure the quantity of beer transferred from the brewery cellars...

  4. Information systems requirements for the microgravity science and applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kicza, M. E.; Kreer, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications (MSAD) Program is presented. Additionally, the types of information produced within the program and the anticipated growth in information system requirements as the program transitions to Space Station Freedom utilization are discussed. Plans for payload operations support in the Freedom era are addressed, as well as current activities to define research community requirements for data and sample archives.

  5. 46 CFR 63.20-1 - Specific control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... addition to the requirements found in ASME CSD-1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1), the... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specific control system requirements. 63.20-1 Section 63.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING...

  6. National Ignition Facility system design requirements conventional facilities SDR001

    SciTech Connect

    Hands, J.

    1996-04-09

    This System Design Requirements (SDR) document specifies the functions to be performed and the minimum design requirements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) site infrastructure and conventional facilities. These consist of the physical site and buildings necessary to house the laser, target chamber, target preparation areas, optics support and ancillary functions.

  7. 48 CFR 207.106 - Additional requirements for major systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics (USD (AT&L)) may waive this requirement if USD (AT&L... mobilization requirements are insufficient to meet the agency's mobilization needs; or (3) The Government is... performance-based logistics arrangements as well as to weapon systems and subsystems that are to be...

  8. 48 CFR 207.106 - Additional requirements for major systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics (USD (AT&L)) may waive this requirement if USD (AT&L... mobilization requirements are insufficient to meet the agency's mobilization needs; or (3) The Government is... performance-based logistics arrangements as well as to weapon systems and subsystems that are to be...

  9. The PPB Systems Analyst: Skills and Training Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Augustus B.

    Results are given of a six-week effort to (1) define the knowledge and skill requirements for successful performance as a Planning-Programming-Budgeting (PPB) systems analyst, (2) determine how these requirements are best acquired, and (3) evaluate the implications for the training programs of the Civil Service Commission. The findings in relation…

  10. 46 CFR 28.845 - General requirements for electrical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false General requirements for electrical systems. 28.845... COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.845 General requirements for electrical... waterproof or watertight, or enclosed in a watertight housing. (b) Aluminum must not be used for...

  11. 46 CFR 28.845 - General requirements for electrical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General requirements for electrical systems. 28.845... COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.845 General requirements for electrical... waterproof or watertight, or enclosed in a watertight housing. (b) Aluminum must not be used for...

  12. Information systems requirements for the Microgravity Science and Applications Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kicza, M. E.; Kreer, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications (MSAD) Program is presented. Additionally, the types of information produced wiithin the program and the anticipated growth in information system requirements as the program transitions to Space Station Freedom utilization are discussed. Plans for payload operations support in the Freedom era are addressed, as well as current activities to define research community requirements for data and sample archives.

  13. Robust requirements specifications for safety-critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, A.; Anderson, T.; Delemos, R.

    1993-10-01

    Experience in safety-critical systems has shown that deviations from assumed behavior can and do cause accidents. This suggests that the development of requirements specifications for such systems should be supported with a risk analysis. In this paper, we present an approach to the development of robust requirements specifications (i.e. specifications that are adequate for the risks involved), based on qualitative and quantitative analyses.

  14. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) interface requirements and prototyping plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Philips, John; Bassman, Mitchell; Williams, C.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the data collection and requirements analysis effort of the Ground System Development Environment (GSDE) Interface Requirements study. It identifies potential problems in the interfaces among applications and processors in the heterogeneous systems that comprises the GSDE. It describes possible strategies for addressing those problems. It also identifies areas for further research and prototyping to demonstrate the capabilities and feasibility of those strategies and defines a plan for building the necessary software prototypes.

  15. Classification and certification requirements for floating production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bowie, R.D.; Richardson, K.L.

    1995-12-31

    Floating Production Systems (FPSs) can be either, custom built or a converted semi-submersible, tanker or barge. The paper describes the necessary steps to be taken for the Classification and Certification of FPSs and FPSOS. The paper outlines the latest Classification and certification requirements for both semi-submersible and ship type FPSS. Classification and regulatory requirements for the Hull Structure, Stability, Station Keeping, Shipboard and Production Systems are discussed.

  16. Requirements Management System Browser (RMSB) software design description

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, D.D.

    1996-09-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide an ``as-built`` design description for the Requirements Management System Browser (RMSB) application. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) and database structure design are described for the RMSB application, referred to as the ``Browser.`` The RMSB application provides an easy to use PC-based interface to browse systems engineering data stored and managed in a UNIX software application. The system engineering data include functions, requirements, and architectures that make up the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) technical baseline.

  17. The 30/20 GHz communications system functional requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siperko, C. M.; Frankfort, M.; Markham, R.; Wall, M.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of 30/20 GHz usage in satellite systems to be used in support of projected communication requirements of the 1990's are defined. A requirements analysis which develops projected market demand for satellite services by general and specialized carriers and an analysis of the impact of propagation and system constraints on 30/20 GHz operation are included. A set of technical performance characteristics for the 30/20 GHz systems which can serve the resulting market demand and the experimental program necessary to verify technical and operational aspects of the proposed systems is also discussed.

  18. Defining Nursing Information System Requirements: A Linked Model

    PubMed Central

    Gassert, Carole A.

    1989-01-01

    There is increasing opportunity for nurses to make decisions about information systems. The purpose of this study was: to develop a model that provides nurses with a guiding framework for deriving nursing information system requirements needed to select, evaluate, enhance or design nursing information systems (NISs); and to test the model's completeness and usefulness. Five model elements were identified from the nursing informatics literature. Structured analysis was then used to identify sub-elements and to produce a graphic model. The Model for Defining Nursing Information System Requirements (MDNISR) was tested by surveying a purposive sample of 75 registered nurses who had made decisions about NISs in hospital settings. Findings support MDNISR as a complete and useful tool for defining requirements for nursing information systems.

  19. Analyzing Software Requirements Errors in Safety-Critical, Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Robyn R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyzes the root causes of safety-related software errors in safety-critical, embedded systems. The results show that software errors identified as potentially hazardous to the system tend to be produced by different error mechanisms than non- safety-related software errors. Safety-related software errors are shown to arise most commonly from (1) discrepancies between the documented requirements specifications and the requirements needed for correct functioning of the system and (2) misunderstandings of the software's interface with the rest of the system. The paper uses these results to identify methods by which requirements errors can be prevented. The goal is to reduce safety-related software errors and to enhance the safety of complex, embedded systems.

  20. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) interface requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Philips, John; Hartenstein, Ray; Bassman, Mitchell; Ruskin, Leslie; Perez-Davila, Alfredo

    1991-01-01

    A set of procedural and functional requirements are presented for the interface between software development environments and software integration and test systems used for space station ground systems software. The requirements focus on the need for centralized configuration management of software as it is transitioned from development to formal, target based testing. This concludes the GSDE Interface Requirements study. A summary is presented of findings concerning the interface itself, possible interface and prototyping directions for further study, and results of the investigation of the Cronus distributed applications environment.

  1. Reliability program requirements for Space and Terrestrial Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The objectives of the reliability program requirements described in this report are (1) to provide contractors with an outline of the reliability requirements established by the Department of Energy (DOE) in the areas of design, development, production, testing, and acceptance of space and terrestrial nuclear systems hardware, and (2) to guide the contractor in meeting these requirements. This publication or particular portions of it is applicable as specified in the contract. Whether the contractors/subcontractors are subject to all the requirements or only to part of them will be specified by contract, program letter, or by the contract statement-of-work.

  2. Patient Accounting Systems: Are They Fit with the Users' Requirements?

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Nazemi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A patient accounting system is a subsystem of a hospital information system. This system like other information systems should be carefully designed to be able to meet users' requirements. The main aim of this research was to investigate users' requirements and to determine whether current patient accounting systems meet users' needs or not. Methods This was a survey study, and the participants were the users of six patient accounting systems used in 24 teaching hospitals. A stratified sampling method was used to select the participants (n = 216). The research instruments were a questionnaire and a checklist. The mean value of ≥3 showed the importance of each data element and the capability of the system. Results Generally, the findings showed that the current patient accounting systems had some weaknesses and were able to meet between 70% and 80% of users' requirements. Conclusions The current patient accounting systems need to be improved to be able to meet users' requirements. This approach can also help to provide hospitals with more usable and reliable financial information. PMID:26893945

  3. Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document (MRS-SRD) describes the functions to be performed and technical requirements for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility subelement and the On-Site Transfer and Storage (OSTS) subelement. The MRS facility subelement provides for temporary storage, at a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operated site, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in an NRC-approved Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) storage mode, or other NRC-approved storage modes. The OSTS subelement provides for transfer and storage, at Purchaser sites, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in MPCs. Both the MRS facility subelement and the OSTS subelement are in support of the CRWMS. The purpose of the MRS-SRD is to define the top-level requirements for the development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. The document also presents an overall description of the MRS facility and the OSTS, their functions (derived by extending the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) Store Waste Document), their segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the top-level interface requirements of the MRS facility and the OSTS are included. As such, the MRS-SRD provides the technical baseline for the MRS Safety Analysis Report (SAR) design and the OSTS Safety Analysis Report design.

  4. Requirements for a Global Greenhouse Gas Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duren, R.; Boland, S.; Lempert, R.; Miller, C.

    2008-12-01

    A global greenhouse gas information system will prove a critical component of any successful effort to mitigate climate change which relies on limiting the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases. The system will provide the situational awareness necessary to actively reduce emissions, influence land use change, and sequester carbon. The information from such a system will be subject to intense scrutiny. Therefore, an effective system must openly and transparently produce data of unassailable quality. A global greenhouse gas information system will likely require a combination of space-and air-based remote- sensing assets, ground-based measurements, carbon cycle modeling and self-reporting. The specific requirements on such a system will be shaped by the degree of international cooperation it enjoys and the needs of the policy regime it aims to support, which might range from verifying treaty obligations, to certifying the tradable permits and offsets underlying a market in greenhouse gas emission reductions, to providing a comprehensive inventory of high and low emitters that could be used by non-governmental organizations and other international actors. While some technical studies have examined particular system components in single scenarios, there remains a need for a comprehensive survey of the range of potential requirements, options, and strategies for the overall system. We have initiated such a survey and recently hosted a workshop which engaged a diverse community of stakeholders to begin synthesizing requirements for such a system, with an initial focus on carbon dioxide. In this paper we describe our plan for completing the definition of the requirements, options, and strategies for a global greenhouse gas monitoring system. We discuss our overall approach and provide a status on the initial requirements synthesis activity.

  5. Mined Geologic Disposal System Requirements Document. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Mined Geologic Disposal System Requirements Document (MGDS-RD) describes the functions to be performed by, and the requirements for, a Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (including SNF loaded in multi-purpose canisters (MPCs)) and commercial and defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in support of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). The purpose of the MGDS-RD is to define the program-level requirements for the design of the Repository, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), and Surface Based Testing Facilities (SBTF). These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MGDS. The document also presents an overall description of the MGDS, its functions (derived using the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) documents as a starting point), its segments as described in Section 3.1.3, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the program-level interfaces of the MGDS are identified. As such, the MGDS-RD provides the technical baseline for the design of the MGDS.

  6. Structural Requirements for the Space Propulsion Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin K.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2004, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was given a vision for Space Exploration by President Bush, setting our sight on a bold new path to go back to the Moon, then to Mars and beyond. As NASA gets ready to meet the vision set by President Bush, failures are not an option. Reliability of the propulsion engine systems will play an important role in establishing an overall safe and reliable operation of these new space systems. A new standard, NASA-STD-5012, Strength and Life Assessment for Space Propulsion System Engines, has been developed to provide structural requirements for assessment of the propulsion systems engine. This standard is a complement to the current NASA-wide standard NASA-STD-5001, Structural Design and Test Factors of Safety for Spaceflight Hardware, which excluded the requirement for the engine systems (rotatory structures) along with pressure vessels. As developed, this document builds on the heritage of the multiple industrial standards related to strength and life assessment of the structures. For assuring a safe and reliable operation of a product and/or mission, establishing a set of structural assessment requirements is a key ingredient. Hence, a concentrated effort was made to improve the requirements where there are known lessons learned during the design, test, and operation phases of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and other engine development programs. Requirements delineated in this standard are also applicable for the reusable and/or human missions. It shall be noted that "reliability of a system cannot be tested and inspected but can only be achieved if it is first designed into a system." Hence, these strength and life assessment requirements for the space propulsion system engines shall be used along with other good engineering practices, requirements, and policies.

  7. Bantam System Technology Project Ground System Requirements Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, J. M.; Beveridge, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The Low Cost Booster Project (LCBP), also known as Bantam, is an element of the Advanced Space Transportation Program focused on Low Cost Booster Technologies. During FY 99 flight demonstrations are planned to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a booster capable of inserting a 150 kg payload into low earth orbit. The ground support system is an element of the full launch system. The ground support system provides for integration of the payload with the launch vehicle, preparation of the vehicle for launch (including maintenance, integration and test of the vehicle flight software), monitor and control of the launch sequence, range safety during launch, and collection of telemetry during the flight up to payload release. The ground support system is intended to make the maximum possible use of Government Off-the-Shelf (GOTS) or Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) hardware and software to obtain the best value in terms of development operations support and ultimate life cycle cost for the launch system.

  8. A Methodological Framework for Enterprise Information System Requirements Derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplinskas, Albertas; Paškevičiūtė, Lina

    Current information systems (IS) are enterprise-wide systems supporting strategic goals of the enterprise and meeting its operational business needs. They are supported by information and communication technologies (ICT) and other software that should be fully integrated. To develop software responding to real business needs, we need requirements engineering (RE) methodology that ensures the alignment of requirements for all levels of enterprise system. The main contribution of this chapter is a requirement-oriented methodological framework allowing to transform business requirements level by level into software ones. The structure of the proposed framework reflects the structure of Zachman's framework. However, it has other intentions and is purposed to support not the design but the RE issues.

  9. Results from Symposium on Future Orbital power systems technology requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorland, S.

    1979-01-01

    The technology requirements for future orbital power systems were reviewed. Workshops were held in 10 technology disciplines to discuss technology deficiencies, adequacy of current programs to resolve those deficiencies and recommendations for tasks that might reduce the testing and risks involved in future orbital energy systems. Those recommendations are summarized.

  10. Teaching the Free Enterprise System in Required Social Studies Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Curriculum Development.

    Guidelines are provided for integrating the teaching of the American free enterprise system into required high school social studies courses, as specified in Texas school accreditation standards. Five sample instructional units are included: an introductory unit which defines the essentials and benefits of the free enterprise system, and four…