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Sample records for raw repeat protein

  1. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  2. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  3. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  4. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-04-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family.

  5. Sequence repeats and protein structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh X.; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2012-11-01

    Repeats are frequently found in known protein sequences. The level of sequence conservation in tandem repeats correlates with their propensities to be intrinsically disordered. We employ a coarse-grained model of a protein with a two-letter amino acid alphabet, hydrophobic (H) and polar (P), to examine the sequence-structure relationship in the realm of repeated sequences. A fraction of repeated sequences comprises a distinct class of bad folders, whose folding temperatures are much lower than those of random sequences. Imperfection in sequence repetition improves the folding properties of the bad folders while deteriorating those of the good folders. Our results may explain why nature has utilized repeated sequences for their versatility and especially to design functional proteins that are intrinsically unstructured at physiological temperatures.

  6. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  7. RepeatsDB: a database of tandem repeat protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Tomás; Potenza, Emilio; Walsh, Ian; Gonzalo Parra, R.; Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Piovesan, Damiano; Ihsan, Awais; Ferrari, Carlo; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2014-01-01

    RepeatsDB (http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Tandem repeats pose a difficult problem for the analysis of protein structures, as the underlying sequence can be highly degenerate. Several repeat types haven been studied over the years, but their annotation was done in a case-by-case basis, thus making large-scale analysis difficult. We developed RepeatsDB to fill this gap. Using state-of-the-art repeat detection methods and manual curation, we systematically annotated the Protein Data Bank, predicting 10 745 repeat structures. In all, 2797 structures were classified according to a recently proposed classification schema, which was expanded to accommodate new findings. In addition, detailed annotations were performed in a subset of 321 proteins. These annotations feature information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units. RepeatsDB is an ongoing effort to systematically classify and annotate structural protein repeats in a consistent way. It provides users with the possibility to access and download high-quality datasets either interactively or programmatically through web services. PMID:24311564

  8. Multifunctional protein: cardiac ankyrin repeat protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xie, Xiao-jie; Wang, Jian-an

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) not only serves as an important component of muscle sarcomere in the cytoplasm, but also acts as a transcription co-factor in the nucleus. Previous studies have demonstrated that CARP is up-regulated in some cardiovascular disorders and muscle diseases; however, its role in these diseases remains controversial now. In this review, we will discuss the continued progress in the research related to CARP, including its discovery, structure, and the role it plays in cardiac development and heart diseases. PMID:27143260

  9. Control of repeat protein curvature by computational protein design

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keunwan; Shen, Betty W.; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Huang, Po-Ssu; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Shape complementarity is an important component of molecular recognition, and the ability to precisely adjust the shape of a binding scaffold to match a target of interest would greatly facilitate the creation of high affinity protein reagents and therapeutics. Here we describe a general approach to control the shape of the binding surface on repeat protein scaffolds, and apply it to leucine rich repeat proteins. First, a set of self-compatible building block modules are designed that when polymerized each generate surfaces with unique but constant curvatures. Second, a set of junction modules that connect the different building blocks are designed. Finally, new proteins with custom designed shapes are generated by appropriately combining building block and junction modules. Crystal structures of the designs illustrate the power of the approach in controlling repeat protein curvature. PMID:25580576

  10. Nanostructured functional films from engineered repeat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tijana Z.; Regan, Lynne; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental advances in biotechnology, medicine, environment, electronics and energy require methods for precise control of spatial organization at the nanoscale. Assemblies that rely on highly specific biomolecular interactions are an attractive approach to form materials that display novel and useful properties. Here, we report on assembly of films from the designed, rod-shaped, superhelical, consensus tetratricopeptide repeat protein (CTPR). We have designed three peptide-binding sites into the 18 repeat CTPR to allow for further specific and non-covalent functionalization of films through binding of fluorescein labelled peptides. The fluorescence signal from the peptide ligand bound to the protein in the solid film is anisotropic, demonstrating that CTPR films can impose order on otherwise isotropic moieties. Circular dichroism measurements show that the individual protein molecules retain their secondary structure in the film, and X-ray scattering, birefringence and atomic force microscopy experiments confirm macroscopic alignment of CTPR molecules within the film. This work opens the door to the generation of innovative biomaterials with tailored structure and function. PMID:23594813

  11. Repeating covalent structure of streptococcal M protein.

    PubMed Central

    Beachey, E H; Seyer, J M; Kang, A H

    1978-01-01

    We have attempted to identify the covalent structure of the M protein molecule of group A streptococci that is responsible for inducing type-specific, protective immunity. M protein was extracted from type 24 streptococci, purified, and cleaved with cyanogen bromide. Seven cyanogen bromide peptides were purified and further characterized. Together, the peptides account for the entire amino acid content of the M protein molecule. Each of the purified peptides possessed the type-specific determinant that inhibits opsonic antibodies for group A streptococci. The primary structures of the amino-terminal regions of each of the purified peptides was studied by automated Edman degradation. The partial sequences of two of the peptides were found to be identical to each other and to that of the uncleaved M protein molecule through at least the first 27 residues. The amino-terminal sequences of the remaining five peptides were identical to each other through the twentieth residue but completely different from the amino-terminal region of the other two peptides. However, the type-specific immunoreactivity and the incomplete analysis of the primary structure of the seven peptides suggest that the antiphagocytic determinant resides in a repeating amino acid sequence in the M protein molecule. PMID:80011

  12. All Repeats are Not Equal: A Module-Based Approach to Guide Repeat Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Repeat proteins composed of tandem arrays of a short structural motif often mediate protein-protein interactions. Past efforts to design repeat protein-based molecular recognition tools have focused on the creation of templates from the consensus of individual repeats, regardless of their natural context. Such an approach assumes that all repeats are essentially equivalent. In this study we present the results of a ‘module-based’ approach, in which modules composed of tandem repeats are aligned to identify repeat-specific features. Using this approach to analyze tetratricopeptide repeat modules that contain 3 tandem repeats (3TPRs), we identify two classes of 3TPR modules with distinct structural signatures that are correlated with different sets of functional residues. Our analyses also reveal a high degree of correlation between positions across the entire ligand-binding surface, indicative of a coordinated, coevolving binding surface. Extension of our analyses to different repeat protein modules reveals more examples of repeat-specific features, especially in armadillio repeat (ARM) modules. In summary, the module-based analyses that we present effectively capture key repeat-specific features that will be important to include in future repeat protein design templates. PMID:23434848

  13. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Verstraete, Nina; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins. PMID:26691182

  14. Rapid automatic detection and alignment of repeats in protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Heger, A; Holm, L

    2000-11-01

    Many large proteins have evolved by internal duplication and many internal sequence repeats correspond to functional and structural units. We have developed an automatic algorithm, RADAR, for segmenting a query sequence into repeats. The segmentation procedure has three steps: (i) repeat length is determined by the spacing between suboptimal self-alignment traces; (ii) repeat borders are optimized to yield a maximal integer number of repeats, and (iii) distant repeats are validated by iterative profile alignment. The method identifies short composition biased as well as gapped approximate repeats and complex repeat architectures involving many different types of repeats in the query sequence. No manual intervention and no prior assumptions on the number and length of repeats are required. Comparison to the Pfam-A database indicates good coverage, accurate alignments, and reasonable repeat borders. Screening the Swissprot database revealed 3,000 repeats not annotated in existing domain databases. A number of these repeats had been described in the literature but most were novel. This illustrates how in times when curated databases grapple with ever increasing backlogs, automatic (re)analysis of sequences provides an efficient way to capture this important information. PMID:10966575

  15. Ising Model Reprogramming of a Repeat Protein's Equilibrium Unfolding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Millership, C; Phillips, J J; Main, E R G

    2016-05-01

    Repeat proteins are formed from units of 20-40 aa that stack together into quasi one-dimensional non-globular structures. This modular repetitive construction means that, unlike globular proteins, a repeat protein's equilibrium folding and thus thermodynamic stability can be analysed using linear Ising models. Typically, homozipper Ising models have been used. These treat the repeat protein as a series of identical interacting subunits (the repeated motifs) that couple together to form the folded protein. However, they cannot describe subunits of differing stabilities. Here we show that a more sophisticated heteropolymer Ising model can be constructed and fitted to two new helix deletion series of consensus tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (CTPRs). This analysis, showing an asymmetric spread of stability between helices within CTPR ensembles, coupled with the Ising model's predictive qualities was then used to guide reprogramming of the unfolding pathway of a variant CTPR protein. The designed behaviour was engineered by introducing destabilising mutations that increased the thermodynamic asymmetry within a CTPR ensemble. The asymmetry caused the terminal α-helix to thermodynamically uncouple from the rest of the protein and preferentially unfold. This produced a specific, highly populated stable intermediate with a putative dimerisation interface. As such it is the first step in designing repeat proteins with function regulated by a conformational switch. PMID:26947150

  16. Assessing Intervention Effects on Repeated Standardized Test Performance: Examining Raw Percentage Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frierson, Henry T., Jr.

    Effects of test-taking instruction for University of North Carolina medical students who failed end-of-year examinations were studied. The exam is compensatory and includes a number of subtests, including National Board (NB) Part I standardized subtests in pathology, pharmacology, and physiology. Students who had to repeat NB Part I subtests were…

  17. Tandem-repeat protein domains across the tree of life

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    Tandem-repeat protein domains, composed of repeated units of conserved stretches of 20–40 amino acids, are required for a wide array of biological functions. Despite their diverse and fundamental functions, there has been no comprehensive assessment of their taxonomic distribution, incidence, and associations with organismal lifestyle and phylogeny. In this study, we assess for the first time the abundance of armadillo (ARM) and tetratricopeptide (TPR) repeat domains across all three domains in the tree of life and compare the results to our previous analysis on ankyrin (ANK) repeat domains in this journal. All eukaryotes and a majority of the bacterial and archaeal genomes analyzed have a minimum of one TPR and ARM repeat. In eukaryotes, the fraction of ARM-containing proteins is approximately double that of TPR and ANK-containing proteins, whereas bacteria and archaea are enriched in TPR-containing proteins relative to ARM- and ANK-containing proteins. We show in bacteria that phylogenetic history, rather than lifestyle or pathogenicity, is a predictor of TPR repeat domain abundance, while neither phylogenetic history nor lifestyle predicts ARM repeat domain abundance. Surprisingly, pathogenic bacteria were not enriched in TPR-containing proteins, which have been associated within virulence factors in certain species. Taken together, this comparative analysis provides a newly appreciated view of the prevalence and diversity of multiple types of tandem-repeat protein domains across the tree of life. A central finding of this analysis is that tandem repeat domain-containing proteins are prevalent not just in eukaryotes, but also in bacterial and archaeal species. PMID:25653910

  18. A General Computational Approach for Repeat Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Huang, Po-Ssu; Vorobiev, Sergey; Xiao, Rong; Park, Keunwan; Caprari, Silvia; Su, Min; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Mao, Lei; Janjua, Haleema; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Hunt, John; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Repeat proteins have considerable potential for use as modular binding reagents or biomaterials in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here we describe a general computational method for building idealized repeats that integrates available family sequences and structural information with Rosetta de novo protein design calculations. Idealized designs from six different repeat families were generated and experimentally characterized; 80% of the proteins were expressed and soluble and more than 40% were folded and monomeric with high thermal stability. Crystal structures determined for members of three families are within 1 Å root-mean-square deviation to the design models. The method provides a general approach for fast and reliable generation of stable modular repeat protein scaffolds. PMID:25451037

  19. A general computational approach for repeat protein design.

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Huang, Po-Ssu; Vorobiev, Sergey; Xiao, Rong; Park, Keunwan; Caprari, Silvia; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Mao, Lei; Janjua, Haleema; Montelione, Gaetano T; Hunt, John; Baker, David

    2015-01-30

    Repeat proteins have considerable potential for use as modular binding reagents or biomaterials in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here we describe a general computational method for building idealized repeats that integrates available family sequences and structural information with Rosetta de novo protein design calculations. Idealized designs from six different repeat families were generated and experimentally characterized; 80% of the proteins were expressed and soluble and more than 40% were folded and monomeric with high thermal stability. Crystal structures determined for members of three families are within 1Å root-mean-square deviation to the design models. The method provides a general approach for fast and reliable generation of stable modular repeat protein scaffolds. PMID:25451037

  20. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects

    PubMed Central

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G.; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  1. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects.

    PubMed

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R E

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  2. Distribution and Evolution of Yersinia Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueming; Huang, He; Hui, Xinjie; Cheng, Xi; White, Aaron P; Zhao, Zhendong; Wang, Yejun

    2016-08-01

    Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, playing important roles in various protein-protein interaction processes. In Yersinia, the well-characterized type III secreted effector YopM also belongs to the LRR protein family and is encoded by virulence plasmids. However, little has been known about other LRR members encoded by Yersinia genomes or their evolution. In this study, the Yersinia LRR proteins were comprehensively screened, categorized, and compared. The LRR proteins encoded by chromosomes (LRR1 proteins) appeared to be more similar to each other and different from those encoded by plasmids (LRR2 proteins) with regard to repeat-unit length, amino acid composition profile, and gene expression regulation circuits. LRR1 proteins were also different from LRR2 proteins in that the LRR1 proteins contained an E3 ligase domain (NEL domain) in the C-terminal region or an NEL domain-encoding nucleotide relic in flanking genomic sequences. The LRR1 protein-encoding genes (LRR1 genes) varied dramatically and were categorized into 4 subgroups (a to d), with the LRR1a to -c genes evolving from the same ancestor and LRR1d genes evolving from another ancestor. The consensus and ancestor repeat-unit sequences were inferred for different LRR1 protein subgroups by use of a maximum parsimony modeling strategy. Structural modeling disclosed very similar repeat-unit structures between LRR1 and LRR2 proteins despite the different unit lengths and amino acid compositions. Structural constraints may serve as the driving force to explain the observed mutations in the LRR regions. This study suggests that there may be functional variation and lays the foundation for future experiments investigating the functions of the chromosomally encoded LRR proteins of Yersinia. PMID:27217422

  3. WDSPdb: a database for WD40-repeat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Hu, Xue-Jia; Zou, Xu-Dong; Wu, Xian-Hui; Ye, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    WD40-repeat proteins, as one of the largest protein families, often serve as platforms to assemble functional complexes through the hotspot residues on their domain surfaces, and thus play vital roles in many biological processes. Consequently, it is highly required for researchers who study WD40 proteins and protein–protein interactions to obtain structural information of WD40 domains. Systematic identification of WD40-repeat proteins, including prediction of their secondary structures, tertiary structures and potential hotspot residues responsible for protein–protein interactions, may constitute a valuable resource upon this request. To achieve this goal, we developed a specialized database WDSPdb (http://wu.scbb.pkusz.edu.cn/wdsp/) to provide these details of WD40-repeat proteins based on our recently published method WDSP. The WDSPdb contains 63 211 WD40-repeat proteins identified from 3383 species, including most well-known model organisms. To better serve the community, we implemented a user-friendly interactive web interface to browse, search and download the secondary structures, 3D structure models and potential hotspot residues provided by WDSPdb. PMID:25348404

  4. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-06-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap results in complete unfolding of PP32. Removing the N-cap has a much less severe effect, decreasing stability but retaining much of its secondary structure. In contrast, the dynamics and tertiary structure of the first two repeats are significantly perturbed, based on (1)H-(15)N relaxation studies, chemical shift perturbations, and residual dipolar couplings. However, more distal repeats (3 to C-cap) retain their native tertiary structure. In this regard, the N-cap drives the folding of adjacent repeats from what appears to be a molten-globule-like state. This interpretation is supported by extensive analysis using core packing substitutions in the full-length and N-cap-truncated PP32. This work highlights the importance of caps to the stability and structural integrity of β-strand-containing LRR proteins, and emphasizes the different contributions of the N- and C-terminal caps. PMID:24659532

  5. Amino acid repeats and the structure and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Albà, M M; Tompa, P; Veitia, R A

    2007-01-01

    Many proteins have repeats or runs of single amino acids. The pathogenicity of some repeat expansions has fueled proteomic, genomic and structural explorations of homopolymeric runs not only in human but in a wide variety of other organisms. Other types of amino acid repetitive structures exhibit more complex patterns than homopeptides. Irrespective of their precise organization, repetitive sequences are defined as low complexity or simple sequences, as one or a few residues are particularly abundant. Prokaryotes show a relatively low frequency of simple sequences compared to eukaryotes. In the latter the percentage of proteins containing homopolymeric runs varies greatly from one group to another. For instance, within vertebrates, amino acid repeat frequency is much higher in mammals than in amphibians, birds or fishes. For some repeats, this is correlated with the GC-richness of the regions containing the corresponding genes. Homopeptides tend to occur in disordered regions of transcription factors or developmental proteins. They can trigger the formation of protein aggregates, particularly in 'disease' proteins. Simple sequences seem to evolve more rapidly than the rest of the protein/gene and may have a functional impact. Therefore, they are good candidates to promote rapid evolutionary changes. All these diverse facets of homopolymeric runs are explored in this review. PMID:18753788

  6. The first crystal structure of an archaeal helical repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Tsuge, Hideaki; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Kawabata, Takeshi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of ST1625p, a protein encoded by a hypothetical open reading frame ST1625 in the genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii, was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The only sequence similarity exhibited by the amino-acid sequence of ST1625p was a 33% identity with the sequence of SSO0983p from S. solfataricus. The 19 kDa monomeric protein was observed to consist of a right-handed superhelix assembled from a tandem repeat of ten α-­helices. A structural homology search using the DALI and MATRAS algorithms indicates that this protein can be classified as a helical repeat protein. PMID:16511116

  7. Gastric protein hydrolysis of raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Gail M; Drechsler, Krista C; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, R Paul

    2016-11-15

    Gastric protein hydrolysis may influence gastric emptying rate and subsequent protein digestibility in the small intestine. This study examined the gastric hydrolysis of dietary protein from raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig as a model for the adult human. The gastric hydrolysis of almond proteins was quantified by performing tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent image analysis. There was an interaction between digestion time, stomach region, and almond type for gastric protein hydrolysis (p<0.05). Gastric emptying rate of protein was a significant (p<0.05) covariate in the gastric protein hydrolysis. In general, greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in raw almonds (compared to roasted almonds), hypothesized to be related to structural changes in almond proteins during roasting. Greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in the distal stomach (compared to the proximal stomach), likely related to the lower pH in the distal stomach. PMID:27283660

  8. Muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed diets containing raw legumes as the main source of protein

    SciTech Connect

    Goena, M.; Santidrian, S.; Cuevillas, F.; Larralde, J.

    1986-03-01

    Although legumes are widely used as protein sources, their effects on protein metabolism remain quite unexplored. The authors have measured the rates of gastrocnemius muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed ad libitum over periods of 12 days on diets containing raw field bean (Vicia faba L.), raw kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and raw bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia L.) as the major sources of protein. Diets were isocaloric and contained about 12% protein. Protein synthesis was evaluated by the constant-intravenous-infusion method, using L-//sup 14/C/-tyrosine, as well as by the determination of the RNA-activity (g of newly synthesized protein/day/g RNA). Results showed that, as compared to well-fed control animals, those fed the raw legume diets exhibited a marked reduction in the rate of growth with no changes in the amount of food intake (per 100 g b.wt.). These changes were accompanied by a significant reduction in the rate of muscle protein synthesis in all legume-treated rats, being this reduction greater in the animals fed the Ph. vulgaris and V. ervilia diets. Liver protein synthesis was slightly higher in the rats fed the V. faba and V. ervilia diets, and smaller in the Ph. vulgaris-fed rats. It is suggested that both sulfur amino acid deficiency and the presence of different anti-nutritive factors in raw legumes may account for these effects.

  9. Protein landscape at Drosophila melanogaster telomere-associated sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Antão, José M; Mason, James M; Déjardin, Jérôme; Kingston, Robert E

    2012-06-01

    The specific set of proteins bound at each genomic locus contributes decisively to regulatory processes and to the identity of a cell. Understanding of the function of a particular locus requires the knowledge of what factors interact with that locus and how the protein composition changes in different cell types or during the response to internal and external signals. Proteomic analysis of isolated chromatin segments (PICh) was developed as a tool to target, purify, and identify proteins associated with a defined locus and was shown to allow the purification of human telomeric chromatin. Here we have developed this method to identify proteins that interact with the Drosophila telomere-associated sequence (TAS) repeats. Several of the purified factors were validated as novel TAS-bound proteins by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and the Brahma complex was confirmed as a dominant modifier of telomeric position effect through the use of a genetic test. These results offer information on the efficacy of applying the PICh protocol to loci with sequence more complex than that found at human telomeres and identify proteins that bind to the TAS repeats, which might contribute to TAS biology and chromatin silencing. PMID:22493064

  10. A designed repeat protein as an affinity capture reagent.

    PubMed

    Speltz, Elizabeth B; Brown, Rebecca S H; Hajare, Holly S; Schlieker, Christian; Regan, Lynne

    2015-10-01

    Repeat proteins are an attractive target for protein engineering and design. We have focused our attention on the design and engineering of one particular class: tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins. In previous work, we have shown that the structure and stability of TPR proteins can be manipulated in a rational fashion [Cortajarena (2011) Prot. Sci. 20: , 1042-1047; Main (2003) Structure 11: , 497-508]. Building on those studies, we have designed and characterized a number of different peptide-binding TPR modules and we have also assembled these modules into supramolecular arrays [Cortajarena (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 5: , 545-552; Cortajarena (2008) ACS Chem. Biol. 3: , 161-166; Jackrel (2009) Prot. Sci. 18: , 762-774; Kajander (2007) Acta Crystallogr. D Biol. Crystallogr. 63: , 800-811]. Here we focus on the development of one such TPR-peptide interaction for a practical application, affinity purification. We illustrate the general utility of our designed protein interaction. Furthermore, this example highlights how basic research on protein-peptide interactions can lead to the development of novel reagents with important practical applications. PMID:26517897

  11. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  12. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Hamiaux, Cyril; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms. PMID:26557126

  13. C9orf72 repeat expansions cause neurodegeneration in Drosophila through arginine-rich proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ridler, Charlotte E.; Clayton, Emma L.; Devoy, Anny; Moens, Thomas; Norona, Frances E.; Woollacott, Ione O.C.; Pietrzyk, Julian; Cleverley, Karen; Nicoll, Andrew J.; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Dols, Jacqueline; Cabecinha, Melissa; Hendrich, Oliver; Fratta, Pietro; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Partridge, Linda; Isaacs, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    An expanded GGGGCC repeat in C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A fundamental question is whether toxicity is driven by the repeat RNA itself and/or by dipeptide repeat proteins generated by repeat-associated, non-ATG translation. To address this question we developed in vitro and in vivo models to dissect repeat RNA and dipeptide repeat protein toxicity. Expression of pure repeats in Drosophila caused adult-onset neurodegeneration attributable to poly-(glycine-arginine) proteins. Thus expanded repeats promoted neurodegeneration through neurotoxic proteins. Expression of individual dipeptide repeat proteins with a non-GGGGCC RNA sequence showed both poly-(glycine-arginine) and poly-(proline-arginine) proteins caused neurodegeneration. These findings are consistent with a dual toxicity mechanism, whereby both arginine-rich proteins and repeat RNA contribute to C9orf72-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:25103406

  14. Tandem Repeats in Proteins: Prediction Algorithms and Biological Role.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Tandem repetitions in protein sequence and structure is a fascinating subject of research which has been a focus of study since the late 1990s. In this survey, we give an overview on the multi-faceted aspects of research on protein tandem repeats (PTR for short), including prediction algorithms, databases, early classification efforts, mechanisms of PTR formation and evolution, and synthetic PTR design. We also touch on the rather open issue of the relationship between PTR and flexibility (or disorder) in proteins. Detection of PTR either from protein sequence or structure data is challenging due to inherent high (biological) signal-to-noise ratio that is a key feature of this problem. As early in silico analytic tools have been key enablers for starting this field of study, we expect that current and future algorithmic and statistical breakthroughs will have a high impact on the investigations of the biological role of PTR. PMID:26442257

  15. Tandem Repeats in Proteins: Prediction Algorithms and Biological Role

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Tandem repetitions in protein sequence and structure is a fascinating subject of research which has been a focus of study since the late 1990s. In this survey, we give an overview on the multi-faceted aspects of research on protein tandem repeats (PTR for short), including prediction algorithms, databases, early classification efforts, mechanisms of PTR formation and evolution, and synthetic PTR design. We also touch on the rather open issue of the relationship between PTR and flexibility (or disorder) in proteins. Detection of PTR either from protein sequence or structure data is challenging due to inherent high (biological) signal-to-noise ratio that is a key feature of this problem. As early in silico analytic tools have been key enablers for starting this field of study, we expect that current and future algorithmic and statistical breakthroughs will have a high impact on the investigations of the biological role of PTR. PMID:26442257

  16. Pro-inflammatory effects of a litchi protein extract in murine RAW264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yan, Huiqing; Ma, Zhaocheng; Deng, Xiuxin

    2016-01-01

    It has been observed that the consumption of litchi often causes symptoms characterized by itching or sore throat, gum swelling, oral cavity ulcers and even fever and inflammation, which significantly impair the quality of life of a large population. Using the RAW264.7 cell line, a step-by-step strategy was used to screen for the components in litchi fruits that elicited adverse reactions. The adverse reaction fractions were identified by mass spectrometry and analyzed using the SMART program, and a sequence alignment of the homologous proteins was performed. MTT tests were used to determine the cytotoxicity of a litchi protein extract in RAW264.7 macrophages, and real-time PCR was applied to analyze the expression of inflammatory genes in the RAW264.7 cells treated with lipopolysaccharide or the litchi protein extract. The results showed that the litchi water-soluble protein extract could increase the production of the pro-inflammatory mediators IL-1β, iNOS and COX-2, and the anti-inflammatory mediator HO-1 in the RAW264.7 cell line. The 14-3-3-like proteins GF14 lambda, GF14 omega and GF14 upsilon were likely the candidate proteins that caused the adverse effects. PMID:27195125

  17. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2015-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein-protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  18. Analyses of Physcomitrella patens Ankyrin Repeat Proteins by Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Niaz; Tamanna, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Ankyrin (ANK) repeat containing proteins are evolutionary conserved and have functions in crucial cellular processes like cell cycle regulation and signal transduction. In this study, through an entirely in silico approach using the first release of the moss genome annotation, we found that at least 54 ANK proteins are present in P. patens. Based on their differential domain composition, the identified ANK proteins were classified into nine subfamilies. Comparative analysis of the different subfamilies of ANK proteins revealed that P. patens contains almost all the known subgroups of ANK proteins found in the other angiosperm species except for the ones having the TPR domain. Phylogenetic analysis using full length protein sequences supported the subfamily classification where the members of the same subfamily almost always clustered together. Synonymous divergence (dS) and nonsynonymous divergence (dN) ratios showed positive selection for the ANK genes of P. patens which probably helped them to attain significant functional diversity during the course of evolution. Taken together, the data provided here can provide useful insights for future functional studies of the proteins from this superfamily as well as comparative studies of ANK proteins. PMID:27429806

  19. Digestibility of cooked and raw egg protein in humans as assessed by stable isotope techniques.

    PubMed

    Evenepoel, P; Geypens, B; Luypaerts, A; Hiele, M; Ghoos, Y; Rutgeerts, P

    1998-10-01

    Egg proteins contribute substantially to the daily nitrogen allowances in Western countries and are generally considered to be highly digestible. However, information is lacking on the true ileal digestibility of either raw or cooked egg protein. The recent availability of stable isotope-labeled egg protein allowed determination of the true ileal digestibility of egg protein by means of noninvasive tracer techniques. Five ileostomy patients were studied, once after ingestion of a test meal consisting of 25 g of cooked 13C- and 15N-labeled egg protein, and once after ingestion of the same test meal in raw form. Ileal effluents and breath samples were collected at regular intervals after consumption of the test meal and analyzed for 15N- and 13C-content, respectively. The true ileal digestibility of cooked and raw egg protein amounted to 90.9 +/- 0.8 and 51.3 +/- 9.8%, respectively. A significant negative correlation (r = -0.92, P < 0.001) was found between the 13C-recovery in breath and the recovery of exogenous N in the ileal effluents. In summary, using the 15N-dilution technique we demonstrated that the assimilation of cooked egg protein is efficient, albeit incomplete, and that the true ileal digestibility of egg protein is significantly enhanced by heat-pretreatment. A simple 13C-breath test technique furthermore proved to be a suitable alternative for the evaluation of the true ileal digestibility of egg protein. PMID:9772141

  20. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein–protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  1. The evolution and function of protein tandem repeats in plants.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Elke; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Sequence tandem repeats (TRs) are abundant in proteomes across all domains of life. For plants, little is known about their distribution or contribution to protein function. We exhaustively annotated TRs and studied the evolution of TR unit variations for all Ensembl plants. Using phylogenetic patterns of TR units, we detected conserved TRs with unit number and order preserved during evolution, and those TRs that have diverged via recent TR unit gains/losses. We correlated the mode of evolution of TRs to protein function. TR number was strongly correlated with proteome size, with about one-half of all TRs recognized as common protein domains. The majority of TRs have been highly conserved over long evolutionary distances, some since the separation of red algae and green plants c. 1.6 billion yr ago. Conversely, recurrent recent TR unit mutations were rare. Our results suggest that the first TRs by far predate the first plants, and that TR appearance is an ongoing process with similar rates across the plant kingdom. Interestingly, the few detected highly mutable TRs might provide a source of variation for rapid adaptation. In particular, such TRs are enriched in leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) commonly found in R genes, where TR unit gain/loss may facilitate resistance to emerging pathogens. PMID:25420631

  2. Deep Conservation of Human Protein Tandem Repeats within the Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, Elke; Gascuel, Olivier; Anisimova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are a major element of protein sequences in all domains of life. They are particularly abundant in mammals, where by conservative estimates one in three proteins contain a TR. High generation-scale duplication and deletion rates were reported for nucleic TR units. However, it is not known whether protein TR units can also be frequently lost or gained providing a source of variation for rapid adaptation of protein function, or alternatively, tend to have conserved TR unit configurations over long evolutionary times. To obtain a systematic picture, we performed a proteome-wide analysis of the mode of evolution for human protein TRs. For this purpose, we propose a novel method for the detection of orthologous TRs based on circular profile hidden Markov models. For all detected TRs, we reconstructed bispecies TR unit phylogenies across 61 eukaryotes ranging from human to yeast. Moreover, we performed additional analyses to correlate functional and structural annotations of human TRs with their mode of evolution. Surprisingly, we find that the vast majority of human TRs are ancient, with TR unit number and order preserved intact since distant speciation events. For example, ≥61% of all human TRs have been strongly conserved at least since the root of all mammals, approximately 300 Ma. Further, we find no human protein TR that shows evidence for strong recent duplications and deletions. The results are in contrast to the high generation-scale mutability of nucleic TRs. Presumably, most protein TRs fold into stable and conserved structures that are indispensable for the function of the TR-containing protein. All of our data and results are available for download from http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/TRE. PMID:24497029

  3. Characterization of Idealized Helical Repeat Proteins in Silicon Nitride Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiali; Ledden, Bradley; Talaga, David; Cortajarena, Aitziber; Regan, Lynne

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we report the measurement of consensus tetratricopeptide repeat (CTPR) proteins with single silicon nitride nanopores. The CTPR proteins were measured in KCl solution at pH below and above its isoelectric point (pI), as well as with and without denaturing agent, Guanidine HCl. When a CTPR protein molecule transits through a nanopore driven by an applied voltage, it partially blocks the ions (K^+ and Cl^-) flow in the nanopore and generates a characteristic electric current blockage signal. The current blockage signal reveals information about the size, conformation, and primary sequence of the CTPR protein molecule. Previous translocation studies carried out with DNA have established that higher bias voltages result in shorter duration current blockages indicating that DNA translocates faster at a stronger electric field. However, our CTPR translocation studies show that longer duration current blockades were observed at higher bias voltages. We discuss how the inhomogeneous distribution of the primary charge sequence of the CTPR proteins predicts translocation barriers that are proportional to the bias voltage. Larger barriers at higher bias voltages will result in longer translocation times, consistent with our experimental results.

  4. Bidirectional transcripts of the expanded C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat are translated into aggregating dipeptide repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohji; Arzberger, Thomas; Grässer, Friedrich A; Gijselinck, Ilse; May, Stephanie; Rentzsch, Kristin; Weng, Shih-Ming; Schludi, Martin H; van der Zee, Julie; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Haass, Christian; Edbauer, Dieter

    2013-12-01

    Massive GGGGCC repeat expansion in the first intron of the gene C9orf72 is the most common known cause of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Despite its intronic localization and lack of an ATG start codon, the repeat region is translated in all three reading frames into aggregating dipeptide-repeat (DPR) proteins, poly-(Gly-Ala), poly-(Gly-Pro) and poly-(Gly-Arg). We took an antibody-based approach to further validate the translation of DPR proteins. To test whether the antisense repeat RNA transcript is also translated, we raised antibodies against the predicted products, poly-(Ala-Pro) and poly-(Pro-Arg). Both antibodies stained p62-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions throughout the cerebellum and hippocampus indicating that not only sense but also antisense strand repeats are translated into DPR proteins in the absence of ATG start codons. Protein products of both strands co-aggregate suggesting concurrent translation of both strands. Moreover, an antibody targeting the putative carboxyl terminus of DPR proteins can detect inclusion pathology in C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers suggesting that the non-ATG translation continues through the entire repeat and beyond. A highly sensitive monoclonal antibody against poly-(Gly-Arg), visualized abundant inclusion pathology in all cortical regions and some inclusions also in motoneurons. Together, our data show that the GGGGCC repeat is bidirectionally translated into five distinct DPR proteins that co-aggregate in the characteristic p62-positive TDP-43 negative inclusions found in FTLD/ALS cases with C9orf72 repeat expansion. Novel monoclonal antibodies against poly-(Gly-Arg) will facilitate pathological diagnosis of C9orf72 FTLD/ALS. PMID:24132570

  5. Reduced hnRNPA3 increases C9orf72 repeat RNA levels and dipeptide-repeat protein deposition.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohji; Nihei, Yoshihiro; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhou, Qihui; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hermann, Andreas; Hanisch, Frank; Kamp, Frits; Nuscher, Brigitte; Orozco, Denise; Edbauer, Dieter; Haass, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Intronic hexanucleotide (G4C2) repeat expansions in C9orf72 are genetically associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The repeat RNA accumulates within RNA foci but is also translated into disease characterizing dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR). Repeat-dependent toxicity may affect nuclear import. hnRNPA3 is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, which specifically binds to the G4C2 repeat RNA We now report that a reduction of nuclear hnRNPA3 leads to an increase of the repeat RNA as well as DPR production and deposition in primary neurons and a novel tissue culture model that reproduces features of the C9orf72 pathology. In fibroblasts derived from patients carrying extended C9orf72 repeats, nuclear RNA foci accumulated upon reduction of hnRNPA3. Neurons in the hippocampus of C9orf72 patients are frequently devoid of hnRNPA3. Reduced nuclear hnRNPA3 in the hippocampus of patients with extended C9orf72 repeats correlates with increased DPR deposition. Thus, reduced hnRNPA3 expression in C9orf72 cases leads to increased levels of the repeat RNA as well as enhanced production and deposition of DPR proteins and RNA foci. PMID:27461252

  6. Truly Absorbed Microbial Protein Synthesis, Rumen Bypass Protein, Endogenous Protein, and Total Metabolizable Protein from Starchy and Protein-Rich Raw Materials: Model Comparison and Predictions.

    PubMed

    Parand, Ehsan; Vakili, Alireza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; van Duinkerken, Gert; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-07-29

    This study was carried out to measure truly absorbed microbial protein synthesis, rumen bypass protein, and endogenous protein loss, as well as total metabolizable protein, from starchy and protein-rich raw feed materials with model comparisons. Predictions by the DVE2010 system as a more mechanistic model were compared with those of two other models, DVE1994 and NRC-2001, that are frequently used in common international feeding practice. DVE1994 predictions for intestinally digestible rumen undegradable protein (ARUP) for starchy concentrates were higher (27 vs 18 g/kg DM, p < 0.05, SEM = 1.2) than predictions by the NRC-2001, whereas there was no difference in predictions for ARUP from protein concentrates among the three models. DVE2010 and NRC-2001 had highest estimations of intestinally digestible microbial protein for starchy (92 g/kg DM in DVE2010 vs 46 g/kg DM in NRC-2001 and 67 g/kg DM in DVE1994, p < 0.05 SEM = 4) and protein concentrates (69 g/kg DM in NRC-2001 vs 31 g/kg DM in DVE1994 and 49 g/kg DM in DVE2010, p < 0.05 SEM = 4), respectively. Potential protein supplies predicted by tested models from starchy and protein concentrates are widely different, and comparable direct measurements are needed to evaluate the actual ability of different models to predict the potential protein supply to dairy cows from different feedstuffs. PMID:26118653

  7. New type of starch-binding domain: the direct repeat motif in the C-terminal region of Bacillus sp. no. 195 alpha-amylase contributes to starch binding and raw starch degrading.

    PubMed

    Sumitani, J; Tottori, T; Kawaguchi, T; Arai, M

    2000-09-01

    The alpha-amylase from Bacillus sp. no. 195 (BAA) consists of two domains: one is the catalytic domain similar to alpha-amylases from animals and Streptomyces in the N-terminal region; the other is the functionally unknown domain composed of an approx. 90-residue direct repeat in the C-terminal region. The gene coding for BAA was expressed in Streptomyces lividans TK24. Three active forms of the gene products were found. The pH and thermal profiles of BAAs, and their catalytic activities for p-nitrophenyl maltopentaoside and soluble starch, showed almost the same behaviours. The largest, 69 kDa, form (BAA-alpha) was of the same molecular mass as that of the mature protein estimated from the nucleotide sequence, and had raw-starch-binding and -degrading abilities. The second largest, 60 kDa, form (BAA-beta), whose molecular mass was the same as that of the natural enzyme from Bacillus sp. no. 195, was generated by proteolytic processing between the two repeat sequences in the C-terminal region, and had lower activities for raw starch binding and degrading than those of BAA-alpha. The smallest, 50 kDa, form (BAA-gamma) contained only the N-terminal catalytic domain as a result of removal of the C-terminal repeat sequence, which led to loss of binding and degradation of insoluble starches. Thus the starch adsorption capacity and raw-starch-degrading activity of BAAs depends on the existence of the repeat sequence in the C-terminal region. BAA-alpha was specifically adsorbed on starch or dextran (alpha-1,4 or alpha-1,6 glucan), and specifically desorbed with maltose or beta-cyclodextrin. These observations indicated that the repeat sequence of the enzyme was functional in the starch-binding domain (SBD). We propose the designation of the homologues to the SBD of glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger as family I SBDs, the homologues to that of glucoamylase from Rhizopus oryzae as family II, and the homologues of this repeat sequence of BAA as family III. PMID:10947962

  8. A WD-repeat protein stabilizes ORC binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhen; Sathyan, Kizhakke M; Geng, Yijie; Zheng, Ruiping; Chakraborty, Arindam; Freeman, Brian; Wang, Fei; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2010-10-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC) plays critical roles in the initiation of DNA replication and cell-cycle progression. In metazoans, ORC associates with origin DNA during G1 and with heterochromatin in postreplicated cells. However, what regulates the binding of ORC to chromatin is not understood. We have identified a highly conserved, leucine-rich repeats and WD40 repeat domain-containing protein 1 (LRWD1) or ORC-associated (ORCA) in human cells that interacts with ORC and modulates chromatin association of ORC. ORCA colocalizes with ORC and shows similar cell-cycle dynamics. We demonstrate that ORCA efficiently recruits ORC to chromatin. Depletion of ORCA in human primary cells and embryonic stem cells results in loss of ORC association to chromatin, concomitant reduction of MCM binding, and a subsequent accumulation in G1 phase. Our results suggest ORCA-mediated association of ORC to chromatin is critical to initiate preRC assembly in G1 and chromatin organization in post-G1 cells. PMID:20932478

  9. Deletion of internal structured repeats increases the stability of a leucine-rich repeat protein, YopM

    PubMed Central

    Barrick, Doug

    2011-01-01

    Mapping the stability distributions of proteins in their native folded states provides a critical link between structure, thermodynamics, and function. Linear repeat proteins have proven more amenable to this kind of mapping than globular proteins. C-terminal deletion studies of YopM, a large, linear leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein, show that stability is distributed quite heterogeneously, yet a high level of cooperativity is maintained [1]. Key components of this distribution are three interfaces that strongly stabilize adjacent sequences, thereby maintaining structural integrity and promoting cooperativity. To better understand the distribution of interaction energy around these critical interfaces, we studied internal (rather than terminal) deletions of three LRRs in this region, including one of these stabilizing interfaces. Contrary to our expectation that deletion of structured repeats should be destabilizing, we find that internal deletion of folded repeats can actually stabilize the native state, suggesting that these repeats are destabilizing, although paradoxically, they are folded in the native state. We identified two residues within this destabilizing segment that deviate from the consensus sequence at a position that normally forms a stacked leucine ladder in the hydrophobic core. Replacement of these nonconsensus residues with leucine is stabilizing. This stability enhancement can be reproduced in the context of nonnative interfaces, but it requires an extended hydrophobic core. Our results demonstrate that different LRRs vary widely in their contribution to stability, and that this variation is context-dependent. These two factors are likely to determine the types of rearrangements that lead to folded, functional proteins, and in turn, are likely to restrict the pathways available for the evolution of linear repeat proteins. PMID:21764506

  10. Altered surfactant protein A gene expression and protein metabolism associated with repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    George, Caroline L S; White, Misty L; O'Neill, Marsha E; Thorne, Peter S; Schwartz, David A; Snyder, Jeanne M

    2003-12-01

    Chronically inhaled endotoxin, which is ubiquitous in many occupational and domestic environments, can adversely affect the respiratory system resulting in an inflammatory response and decreased lung function. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) is part of the lung innate immune system and may attenuate the inflammatory response in various types of lung injury. Using a murine model to mimic occupational exposures to endotoxin, we hypothesized that SP-A gene expression and protein would be elevated in response to repeat exposure to inhaled grain dust and to purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrate that repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin, either in the form of grain dust or purified LPS, results in increased whole lung SP-A gene expression and type II alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia, whereas SP-A protein levels in lung lavage fluid are decreased. Furthermore, these alterations in SP-A gene activity and protein metabolism are dependent on an intact endotoxin signaling system. PMID:12922979

  11. Rational design of alpha-helical tandem repeat proteins with closed architectures

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Lindsey; Hallinan, Jazmine; Bolduc, Jill; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L.; Bradley, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Tandem repeat proteins, which are formed by repetition of modular units of protein sequence and structure, play important biological roles as macromolecular binding and scaffolding domains, enzymes, and building blocks for the assembly of fibrous materials1,2. The modular nature of repeat proteins enables the rapid construction and diversification of extended binding surfaces by duplication and recombination of simple building blocks3,4. The overall architecture of tandem repeat protein structures – which is dictated by the internal geometry and local packing of the repeat building blocks – is highly diverse, ranging from extended, super-helical folds that bind peptide, DNA, and RNA partners5–9, to closed and compact conformations with internal cavities suitable for small molecule binding and catalysis10. Here we report the development and validation of computational methods for de novo design of tandem repeat protein architectures driven purely by geometric criteria defining the inter-repeat geometry, without reference to the sequences and structures of existing repeat protein families. We have applied these methods to design a series of closed alpha-solenoid11 repeat structures (alpha-toroids) in which the inter-repeat packing geometry is constrained so as to juxtapose the N- and C-termini; several of these designed structures have been validated by X-ray crystallography. Unlike previous approaches to tandem repeat protein engineering12–20, our design procedure does not rely on template sequence or structural information taken from natural repeat proteins and hence can produce structures unlike those seen in nature. As an example, we have successfully designed and validated closed alpha-solenoid repeats with a left-handed helical architecture that – to our knowledge – is not yet present in the protein structure database21. PMID:26675735

  12. Rational design of α-helical tandem repeat proteins with closed architectures.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Lindsey; Hallinan, Jazmine; Bolduc, Jill; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L; Bradley, Philip

    2015-12-24

    Tandem repeat proteins, which are formed by repetition of modular units of protein sequence and structure, play important biological roles as macromolecular binding and scaffolding domains, enzymes, and building blocks for the assembly of fibrous materials. The modular nature of repeat proteins enables the rapid construction and diversification of extended binding surfaces by duplication and recombination of simple building blocks. The overall architecture of tandem repeat protein structures--which is dictated by the internal geometry and local packing of the repeat building blocks--is highly diverse, ranging from extended, super-helical folds that bind peptide, DNA, and RNA partners, to closed and compact conformations with internal cavities suitable for small molecule binding and catalysis. Here we report the development and validation of computational methods for de novo design of tandem repeat protein architectures driven purely by geometric criteria defining the inter-repeat geometry, without reference to the sequences and structures of existing repeat protein families. We have applied these methods to design a series of closed α-solenoid repeat structures (α-toroids) in which the inter-repeat packing geometry is constrained so as to juxtapose the amino (N) and carboxy (C) termini; several of these designed structures have been validated by X-ray crystallography. Unlike previous approaches to tandem repeat protein engineering, our design procedure does not rely on template sequence or structural information taken from natural repeat proteins and hence can produce structures unlike those seen in nature. As an example, we have successfully designed and validated closed α-solenoid repeats with a left-handed helical architecture that--to our knowledge--is not yet present in the protein structure database. PMID:26675735

  13. Analysis of repeat-protein folding using nearest-neighbor statistical mechanical models

    PubMed Central

    Aksel, Tural; Barrick, Doug

    2010-01-01

    The linear “Ising” model, which has been around for nearly a century, treats the behavior of linear arrays of repetitive, interacting subunits. Linear “repeat-proteins” have only been described in the last decade or so, and their folding energies have only been characterized very recently. Owing to their repetitive structures, linear repeat-proteins are particularly well suited for analysis by the nearest-neighbor Ising formalism. After briefly describing the historical origins and applications of the Ising model to biopolymers, and introducing repeat protein structure, this chapter will focus on the application of the linear Ising model to repeat proteins. When applied to homopolymers, the model can be represented and applied in a fairly simplified form. When applied to heteropolymers, where differences in energies among individual subunits (i.e. repeats) must be included, some (but not all) of this simplicity is lost. Derivations of the linear Ising model for both homopolymer and heteropolymer repeat-proteins will be presented. With the increased complexity required for analysis of heteropolymeric repeat proteins, the ability to resolve different energy terms from experimental data can be compromised. Thus, a simple matrix approach will be developed to help inform on the degree to which different thermodynamic parameters can be extracted from a particular set of unfolding curves. Finally, we will describe the application of these models to analyze repeat-protein folding equilibria, focusing on simplified repeat proteins based on “consensus” sequence information. PMID:19289204

  14. Lactational performance of dairy cows fed raw soybeans, with or without animal by-product proteins, or roasted soybeans.

    PubMed

    Grummer, R R; Luck, M L; Barmore, J A

    1994-05-01

    Twelve multiparous Holstein cows averaged 10 wk postpartum and were used in a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design to compare two feeding strategies for increasing the ratio of dietary undegradable to degradable protein. Treatments were raw soybeans, with or without meat and bone meal plus blood meal, and roasted soybeans as the primary protein supplements. Meat and bone meal and blood meal were fed at 4.0 and .9% of dietary DM, respectively. Basal diets were 30% alfalfa silage, 18% corn silage, and 52% corn-based concentrate mix. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric. Estimated undegradable protein contents, as a percentage of total CP, were 32.2, 36.2, and 34.3 for diets containing raw soybeans, raw soybeans plus animal by-product proteins, and roasted soybeans, respectively. The undegradable protein estimates were calculated from NRC values for basal feeds and from results of in vitro analysis of test protein supplements. Yields of milk and 3.5% FCM of cows receiving raw soybeans plus animal by-product proteins (45.5 and 43.4 kg/d) and roasted soybeans (44.7 and 42.7 kg/d) were greater than those of cows receiving raw soybeans alone (43.2 and 41.3 kg/d). Increasing the ratio of undegradable to degradable dietary protein also increased yields of milk protein and fat. No differences occurred in lactation performance among cows fed the two diets containing higher undegradable protein. The DMI was not influenced by treatment. Increasing the ratio of undegradable to degradable dietary protein by feeding animal by-product proteins or heated soybeans enhanced lactation performance. PMID:8046075

  15. Protein quality of various raw and rendered by-product meals commonly incorporated into companion animal diets.

    PubMed

    Cramer, K R; Greenwood, M W; Moritz, J S; Beyer, R S; Parsons, C M

    2007-12-01

    Several experiments were conducted to evaluate the protein quality of various raw and rendered animal by-product meals commonly used in companion animal diets. Six freeze-dried raw animal meals (beef lungs, pork lungs, sheep lungs, pork livers, oceanfish, chicken necks) and 3 rendered animal meals (lamb meal, regular ash poultry by-product meal, and low ash poultry by-product meal) were fed in chick assays to determine Lys and TSAA bioavailability, protein efficiency ratio (PER), and net protein ratio (NPR). Each experimental diet was offered to 4 replicates of 5 chicks per pen in all growth assays. Furthermore, each animal by-product meal was fed to mature White Leghorn roosters for determination of true AA digestibility. All freeze-dried, raw animal meals were offered to 5 replicate roosters, and all rendered animal meals were offered to 4 replicate roosters. Most raw animal meals exhibited moderate to high protein quality. Lysine bio-availabilities ranged from 86 to 107% and 70 to 99% for raw and rendered animal meals, respectively. Bio-availability of TSAA ranged from 64 to 99% and 61 to 78% for raw and rendered animal meals, respectively. The PER values ranged from 2.83 to 4.03 and 2.01 to 3.34 for raw and rendered animal meals, respectively. The NPR values ranged from 3.83 to 4.8 and 3.05 to 4.12 for raw and rendered animal meals, respectively. Despite a numeric increase in NPR vs. PER values, the overall ranking of animal meals remained similar. Lamb meal had the poorest PER and NPR values, and pork lungs had the greatest values. Total essential AA digestibility and total AA digestibility ranged from 93.6 to 96.7 and 90.3 to 95.5%, respectively, for raw animal meals and 84.0 to 87.7 and 79.2 to 84.8%, respectively, for rendered animal meals. Rendered animal meals generally had lower protein quality than raw animal meals, with lamb meal consistently having the poorest protein quality and pork livers having the greatest protein quality. PMID:17609474

  16. Repeat-protein folding: new insights into origins of cooperativity, stability, and topology

    PubMed Central

    Kloss, Ellen; Courtemanche, Naomi; Barrick, Doug

    2008-01-01

    Although our understanding of globular protein folding continues to advance, the irregular tertiary structures and high cooperativity of globular proteins complicates energetic dissection. Recently, proteins with regular, repetitive tertiary structures have been identified that sidestep limitations imposed by globular protein architecture. Here we review recent studies of repeat-protein folding. These studies uniquely advance our understanding of both the energetics and kinetics of protein folding. Equilibrium studies provide detailed maps of local stabilities, access to energy landscapes, insights into cooperativity, determination of nearest-neighbor interaction parameters using statistical thermodynamics, relationships between consensus sequences and repeat-protein stability. Kinetic studies provide insight into the influence of short-range topology on folding rates, the degree to which folding proceeds by parallel (versus localized) pathways, and the factors that select among multiple potential pathways. The recent application of force spectroscopy to repeat-protein unfolding is providing a unique route to test and extend many of these findings. PMID:17963718

  17. Label-free detection repeatability of protein microarrays by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jun; Li, Lin; Wang, JingYi; He, LiPing; Lu, HuiBin; Ruan, KangCheng; Jin, KuiJuan; Yang, GuoZhen

    2012-12-01

    We examine the repeatabilities of oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OIRD) method for label-free detecting biological molecular interaction using protein microarrays. The experimental results show that the repeatabilities are the same in a given microarray or microarray-microarray and are consistent, indicating that OIRD is a promising label-free detection technique for biological microarrays.

  18. De-coding and re-coding RNA recognition by PUF and PPR repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Hall, Traci M Tanaka

    2016-02-01

    PUF and PPR proteins are two families of α-helical repeat proteins that recognize single-stranded RNA sequences. Both protein families hold promise as scaffolds for designed RNA-binding domains. A modular protein RNA recognition code was apparent from the first crystal structures of a PUF protein in complex with RNA, and recent studies continue to advance our understanding of natural PUF protein recognition (de-coding) and our ability to engineer specificity (re-coding). Degenerate recognition motifs make de-coding specificity of individual PPR proteins challenging. Nevertheless, re-coding PPR protein specificity using a consensus recognition code has been successful. PMID:26874972

  19. Ab initio detection of fuzzy amino acid tandem repeats in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tandem repetitions within protein amino acid sequences often correspond to regular secondary structures and form multi-repeat 3D assemblies of varied size and function. Developing internal repetitions is one of the evolutionary mechanisms that proteins employ to adapt their structure and function under evolutionary pressure. While there is keen interest in understanding such phenomena, detection of repeating structures based only on sequence analysis is considered an arduous task, since structure and function is often preserved even under considerable sequence divergence (fuzzy tandem repeats). Results In this paper we present PTRStalker, a new algorithm for ab-initio detection of fuzzy tandem repeats in protein amino acid sequences. In the reported results we show that by feeding PTRStalker with amino acid sequences from the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot database we detect novel tandemly repeated structures not captured by other state-of-the-art tools. Experiments with membrane proteins indicate that PTRStalker can detect global symmetries in the primary structure which are then reflected in the tertiary structure. Conclusions PTRStalker is able to detect fuzzy tandem repeating structures in protein sequences, with performance beyond the current state-of-the art. Such a tool may be a valuable support to investigating protein structural properties when tertiary X-ray data is not available. PMID:22536906

  20. Detection of alpha-rod protein repeats using a neural network and application to huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Palidwor, Gareth A; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Huska, Matthew R; Rasko, Tamas; Stelzl, Ulrich; Arumughan, Anup; Foulle, Raphaele; Porras, Pablo; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Wanker, Erich E; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2009-03-01

    A growing number of solved protein structures display an elongated structural domain, denoted here as alpha-rod, composed of stacked pairs of anti-parallel alpha-helices. Alpha-rods are flexible and expose a large surface, which makes them suitable for protein interaction. Although most likely originating by tandem duplication of a two-helix unit, their detection using sequence similarity between repeats is poor. Here, we show that alpha-rod repeats can be detected using a neural network. The network detects more repeats than are identified by domain databases using multiple profiles, with a low level of false positives (<10%). We identify alpha-rod repeats in approximately 0.4% of proteins in eukaryotic genomes. We then investigate the results for all human proteins, identifying alpha-rod repeats for the first time in six protein families, including proteins STAG1-3, SERAC1, and PSMD1-2 & 5. We also characterize a short version of these repeats in eight protein families of Archaeal, Bacterial, and Fungal species. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of these predictions in directing experimental work to demarcate three alpha-rods in huntingtin, a protein mutated in Huntington's disease. Using yeast two hybrid analysis and an immunoprecipitation technique, we show that the huntingtin fragments containing alpha-rods associate with each other. This is the first definition of domains in huntingtin and the first validation of predicted interactions between fragments of huntingtin, which sets up directions toward functional characterization of this protein. An implementation of the repeat detection algorithm is available as a Web server with a simple graphical output: http://www.ogic.ca/projects/ard. This can be further visualized using BiasViz, a graphic tool for representation of multiple sequence alignments. PMID:19282972

  1. Spontaneous self-assembly of engineered armadillo repeat protein fragments into a folded structure.

    PubMed

    Watson, Randall P; Christen, Martin T; Ewald, Christina; Bumbak, Fabian; Reichen, Christian; Mihajlovic, Maja; Schmidt, Elena; Güntert, Peter; Caflisch, Amedeo; Plückthun, Andreas; Zerbe, Oliver

    2014-07-01

    Repeat proteins are built of modules, each of which constitutes a structural motif. We have investigated whether fragments of a designed consensus armadillo repeat protein (ArmRP) recognize each other. We examined a split ArmRP consisting of an N-capping repeat (denoted Y), three internal repeats (M), and a C-capping repeat (A). We demonstrate that the C-terminal MA fragment adopts a fold similar to the corresponding part of the entire protein. In contrast, the N-terminal YM2 fragment constitutes a molten globule. The two fragments form a 1:1 YM2:MA complex with a nanomolar dissociation constant essentially identical to the crystal structure of the continuous YM3A protein. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the complex is structurally stable over a 1 μs timescale and reveal the importance of hydrophobic contacts across the interface. We propose that the existence of a stable complex recapitulates possible intermediates in the early evolution of these repeat proteins. PMID:24931467

  2. A MORN Repeat Protein Facilitates Protein Entry into the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma brucei lives in the bloodstream of infected mammalian hosts, fully exposed to the adaptive immune system. It relies on a very high rate of endocytosis to clear bound antibodies from its cell surface. All endo- and exocytosis occurs at a single site on its plasma membrane, an intracellular invagination termed the flagellar pocket. Coiled around the neck of the flagellar pocket is a multiprotein complex containing the repeat motif protein T. brucei MORN1 (TbMORN1). In this study, the phenotypic effects of TbMORN1 depletion in the mammalian-infective form of T. brucei were analyzed. Depletion of TbMORN1 resulted in a rapid enlargement of the flagellar pocket. Dextran, a polysaccharide marker for fluid phase endocytosis, accumulated inside the enlarged flagellar pocket. Unexpectedly, however, the proteins concanavalin A and bovine serum albumin did not do so, and concanavalin A was instead found to concentrate outside it. This suggests that TbMORN1 may have a role in facilitating the entry of proteins into the flagellar pocket. PMID:26318396

  3. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats.

    PubMed

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as "junk" sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in shaping

  4. Structural Studies of a Four-MBT Repeat Protein MBTD1

    SciTech Connect

    Eryilmaz, Jitka; Pan, Patricia; Amaya, Maria F.; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dong, Aiping; Adams-Cioaba, Melanie A.; MacKenzie, Farrell; Vedadi, Masoud; Min, Jinrong

    2010-08-17

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins is a family of important developmental regulators. The respective members function as large protein complexes involved in establishment and maintenance of transcriptional repression of developmental control genes. MBTD1, Malignant Brain Tumor domain-containing protein 1, is one such PcG protein. MBTD1 contains four MBT repeats. We have determined the crystal structure of MBTD1 (residues 130-566aa covering the 4 MBT repeats) at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution by X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure of MBTD1 reveals its similarity to another four-MBT-repeat protein L3MBTL2, which binds lower methylated lysine histones. Fluorescence polarization experiments confirmed that MBTD1 preferentially binds mono- and di-methyllysine histone peptides, like L3MBTL1 and L3MBTL2. All known MBT-peptide complex structures characterized to date do not exhibit strong histone peptide sequence selectivity, and use a 'cavity insertion recognition mode' to recognize the methylated lysine with the deeply buried methyl-lysine forming extensive interactions with the protein while the peptide residues flanking methyl-lysine forming very few contacts. Nevertheless, our mutagenesis data based on L3MBTL1 suggested that the histone peptides could not bind to MBT repeats in any orientation. The four MBT repeats in MBTD1 exhibits an asymmetric rhomboid architecture. Like other MBT repeat proteins characterized so far, MBTD1 binds mono- or dimethylated lysine histones through one of its four MBT repeats utilizing a semi-aromatic cage.

  5. Preparation and properties of flours and protein concentrates from raw, fermented and germinated fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis Hook) seeds.

    PubMed

    Giami, S Y; Isichei, I

    1999-01-01

    In vitro protein digestibility, chemical composition and selected functional properties of flours and protein concentrates prepared from raw, fermented and germinated fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis Hook) seeds were studied. Protein concentrates prepared by an alkaline extraction process had increased crude protein contents (61.5-70.8%) compared to flour samples (46.4-52.7%). The yields of protein concentrates ranged from 24.5% to 29.4% while values for protein recoveries varied between 64.8% and 65.2%. Protein concentrates also had increased foam volume and decreased foam stability (100% decrease over a 2 h period), compared to flour samples. Fermentation and germination were observed to significantly (p < 0.05) lower polyphenol and phytic acid contents, but increased protein digestibility of fluted pumpkin seed flours and concentrates. Both raw flour and concentrate were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in water absorption capacity than germinated or fermented flours and concentrates. Protein concentrates had comparatively better fat absorption properties than the flour samples. Hence protein concentrates may prove to have useful applications in ground meat formulations. PMID:10646631

  6. Molecular tandem repeat strategy for elucidating mechanical properties of high-strength proteins.

    PubMed

    Jung, Huihun; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Saadat, Alham; Sebastian, Aswathy; Kim, Dong Hwan; Hamilton, Reginald F; Albert, Istvan; Allen, Benjamin D; Demirel, Melik C

    2016-06-01

    Many globular and structural proteins have repetitions in their sequences or structures. However, a clear relationship between these repeats and their contribution to the mechanical properties remains elusive. We propose a new approach for the design and production of synthetic polypeptides that comprise one or more tandem copies of a single unit with distinct amorphous and ordered regions. Our designed sequences are based on a structural protein produced in squid suction cups that has a segmented copolymer structure with amorphous and crystalline domains. We produced segmented polypeptides with varying repeat number, while keeping the lengths and compositions of the amorphous and crystalline regions fixed. We showed that mechanical properties of these synthetic proteins could be tuned by modulating their molecular weights. Specifically, the toughness and extensibility of synthetic polypeptides increase as a function of the number of tandem repeats. This result suggests that the repetitions in native squid proteins could have a genetic advantage for increased toughness and flexibility. PMID:27222581

  7. Conformational modulation mediated by polyglutamine expansion in CAG repeat expansion disease-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Verani, Margherita; Bustamante, Maria; Martufi, Paola; Daldin, Manuel; Cariulo, Cristina; Azzollini, Lucia; Fodale, Valentina; Puglisi, Francesca; Weiss, Andreas; Macdonald, Douglas; Petricca, Lara; Caricasole, Andrea

    2016-09-16

    We have previously reported TR-FRET based immunoassays to detect a conformational change imparted on huntingtin protein by the polyglutamine expansion, which we confirmed using biophysical methodologies. Using these immunoassays, we now report that polyglutamine expansion influences the conformational properties of other polyglutamine disease proteins, exemplified by the androgen receptor (associated with spinal bulbar muscular atrophy) and TATA binding protein (associated with spinocerebellar ataxia 17). Using artificial constructs bearing short or long polyglutamine expansions or a multimerized, unrelated epitope (mimicking the increase in anti-polyglutamine antibody epitopes present in polyglutamine repeats of increasing length) we confirmed that the conformational TR-FRET based immunoassay detects an intrinsic conformational property of polyglutamine repeats. The TR-FRET based conformational immunoassay may represent a rapid, scalable tool to identify modulators of polyglutamine-mediated conformational change in different proteins associated with CAG triplet repeat disorders. PMID:27520369

  8. Biomimetic repeat protein derived from Xenopus tropicalis for fibrous scaffold fabrication.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yunkyeoung; Yang, Yun Jung; Jung, Dooyup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-12-01

    Collagen, silk, and elastin are the fibrous proteins consist of representative amino acid repeats. Because these proteins exhibited distinguishing mechanical properties, they have been utilized in diverse applications, such as fiber-based sensors, filtration membranes, supporting materials, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Despite their infinite prevalence and potential, most studies have only focused on a few repeat proteins. In this work, the hypothetical protein with a repeat motif derived from the frog Xenopus tropicalis was obtained and characterized for its potential as a novel protein-based material. The codon-optimized recombinant frog repeat protein, referred to as 'xetro', was produced at a high rate in a bacterial system, and an acid extraction-based purified xetro protein was successfully fabricated into microfibers and nanofibers using wet spinning and electrospinning, respectively. Specifically, the wet-spun xetro microfibers demonstrated about 2- and 1.5-fold higher tensile strength compared with synthetic polymer polylactic acid and cross-linked collagen, respectively. In addition, the wet-spun xetro microfibers showed about sevenfold greater stiffness than collagen. Therefore, the mass production potential and greater mechanical properties of the xetro fiber may result in these fibers becoming a new promising fiber-based material for biomedical engineering. PMID:26297878

  9. Differential interaction and aggregation of 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau isoforms with 14-3-3{zeta} protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sadik, Golam; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Kato, Kiyoko; Yanagi, Kentaro; Kudo, Takashi; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2009-05-22

    Tau isoforms, 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat tau (4R), are differentially involved in neuronal development and in several tauopathies. 14-3-3 protein binds to tau and 14-3-3/tau association has been found both in the development and in tauopathies. To understand the role of 14-3-3 in the differential regulation of tau isoforms, we have performed studies on the interaction and aggregation of 3R-tau and 4R-tau, either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated, with 14-3-3{zeta}. We show by surface plasmon resonance studies that the interaction between unphosphorylated 3R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta} is {approx}3-folds higher than that between unphosphorylated 4R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta}. Phosphorylation of tau by protein kinase A (PKA) increases the affinity of both 3R- and 4R-tau for 14-3-3{zeta} to a similar level. An in vitro aggregation assay employing both transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the aggregation of unphosphorylated 4R-tau to be significantly higher than that of unphosphorylated 3R-tau following the induction of 14-3-3{zeta}. The filaments formed from 3R- and 4R-tau were almost similar in morphology. In contrast, the aggregation of both 3R- and 4R-tau was reduced to a similar low level after phosphorylation with PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that 14-3-3{zeta} exhibits a similar role for tau isoforms after PKA-phosphorylation, but a differential role for unphosphorylated tau. The significant aggregation of 4R-tau by 14-3-3{zeta} suggests that 14-3-3 may act as an inducer in the generation of 4R-tau-predominant neurofibrillary tangles in tauopathies.

  10. Sequestration of multiple RNA recognition motif-containing proteins by C9orf72 repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; Walsh, Matthew J; Higginbottom, Adrian; Robin Highley, J; Dickman, Mark J; Edbauer, Dieter; Ince, Paul G; Wharton, Stephen B; Wilson, Stuart A; Kirby, Janine; Hautbergue, Guillaume M; Shaw, Pamela J

    2014-07-01

    GGGGCC repeat expansions of C9orf72 represent the most common genetic variant of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal degeneration, but the mechanism of pathogenesis is unclear. Recent reports have suggested that the transcribed repeat might form toxic RNA foci that sequester various RNA processing proteins. Consensus as to the identity of the binding partners is missing and whole neuronal proteome investigation is needed. Using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization we first identified nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA foci in peripheral and central nervous system biosamples from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with a repeat expansion of C9orf72 (C9orf72+), but not from those patients without a repeat expansion of C9orf72 (C9orf72-) or control subjects. Moreover, in the cases examined, the distribution of foci-positive neurons correlated with the clinical phenotype (t-test P < 0.05). As expected, RNA foci are ablated by RNase treatment. Interestingly, we identified foci in fibroblasts from an asymptomatic C9orf72+ carrier. We next performed pulldown assays, with GGGGCC5, in conjunction with mass spectrometry analysis, to identify candidate binding partners of the GGGGCC repeat expansion. Proteins containing RNA recognition motifs and involved in splicing, messenger RNA nuclear export and/or translation were significantly enriched. Immunohistochemistry in central nervous system tissue from C9orf72+ patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis demonstrated co-localization of RNA foci with SRSF2, hnRNP H1/F, ALYREF and hnRNP A1 in cerebellar granule cells and with SRSF2, hnRNP H1/F and ALYREF in motor neurons, the primary target of pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Direct binding of proteins to GGGGCC repeat RNA was confirmed in vitro by ultraviolet-crosslinking assays. Co-localization was only detected in a small proportion of RNA foci, suggesting dynamic sequestration rather than irreversible binding. Additional immunohistochemistry

  11. A matricellular protein and EGF-like repeat signalling in the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-12-01

    Matricellular proteins interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and modulate cellular processes by binding to cell surface receptors and initiating intracellular signal transduction. Their association with the ECM and the ability of some members of this protein family to regulate cell motility have opened up new avenues of research to investigate their functions in normal and diseased cells. In this review, we summarize the research on CyrA, an ECM calmodulin-binding protein in Dictyostelium. CyrA is proteolytically cleaved into smaller EGF-like (EGFL) repeat containing cleavage products during development. The first EGFL repeat of CyrA binds to the cell surface and activates a novel signalling pathway that modulates cell motility in this model organism. The similarity of CyrA to the most well-characterized matricellular proteins in mammals allows it to be designated as the first matricellular protein identified in Dictyostelium. PMID:22782112

  12. Reversible and Irreversible Aggregation of Proteins from the FET Family: Influence of Repeats in Protein Chain on Its Aggregation Capacity.

    PubMed

    Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of protein chain regions responsible for protein aggregation is an important result of studying of the molecular mechanisms of prion diseases and different proteinopathies associated with the formation of pathological aggregations through the prion mechanism. The ability to control aggregation of proteins could be an important tool in the arsenal of the drug development. Here we demonstrate, on an example of RNA-binding proteins of the FET family from six animal species (human, gorilla, pig, mouse, chicken, zebra fish), the possible role of repeats within the disordered regions. For these proteins, different repeats are revealed in the prion-like (N-terminal disordered) domains, and in the C-terminal disordered regions, predicted using bioinformatics methods. Moreover, we have found that in more complex organisms the number of repeats is increased. It can be hypothesized that the presence of a large number of repeats in the disordered regions in the proteins of the FET-family could both modulate and accelerate the formation of a dynamic cross-beta structure, and pathological aggregates. PMID:26100283

  13. Myotonin protein-kinase [AGC]n trinucleotide repeat in seven nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Novelli, G.; Sineo, L.; Pontieri, E. ||

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is due to a genomic instability of a trinucleotide [AGC]n motif, located at the 3{prime} UTR region of a protein-kinase gene (myotonin protein kinase, MT-PK). The [AGC] repeat is meiotically and mitotically unstable, and it is directly related to the manifestations of the disorder. Although a gene dosage effect of the MT-PK has been demonstrated n DM muscle, the mechanism(s) by which the intragenic repeat expansion leads to disease is largely unknown. This non-standard mutational event could reflect an evolutionary mechanism widespread among animal genomes. We have isolated and sequenced the complete 3{prime}UTR region of the MT-PK gene in seven primates (macaque, orangutan, gorilla, chimpanzee, gibbon, owl monkey, saimiri), and examined by comparative sequence nucleotide analysis the [AGC]n intragenic repeat and the surrounding nucleotides. The genomic organization, including the [AGC]n repeat structure, was conserved in all examined species, excluding the gibbon (Hylobates agilis), in which the [AGC]n upstream sequence (GGAA) is replaced by a GA dinucleotide. The number of [AGC]n in the examined species ranged between 7 (gorilla) and 13 repeats (owl monkeys), with a polymorphism informative content (PIC) similar to that observed in humans. These results indicate that the 3{prime}UTR [AGC] repeat within the MT-PK gene is evolutionarily conserved, supporting that this region has important regulatory functions.

  14. The Repeat Region of the Circumsporozoite Protein is Critical for Sporozoite Formation and Maturation in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Wall, Richard J.; Hopp, Christine S.; Poulin, Benoit; Mohmmed, Asif; Malhotra, Pawan; Coppi, Alida; Sinnis, Photini; Tewari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is the major surface protein of the sporozoite stage of malaria parasites and has multiple functions as the parasite develops and then migrates from the mosquito midgut to the mammalian liver. The overall structure of CSP is conserved among Plasmodium species, consisting of a species-specific central tandem repeat region flanked by two conserved domains: the NH2-terminus and the thrombospondin repeat (TSR) at the COOH-terminus. Although the central repeat region is an immunodominant B-cell epitope and the basis of the only candidate malaria vaccine in Phase III clinical trials, little is known about its functional role(s). We used the rodent malaria model Plasmodium berghei to investigate the role of the CSP tandem repeat region during sporozoite development. Here we describe two mutant parasite lines, one lacking the tandem repeat region (ΔRep) and the other lacking the NH2-terminus as well as the repeat region (ΔNΔRep). We show that in both mutant lines oocyst formation is unaffected but sporozoite development is defective. PMID:25438048

  15. Chlorovirus Skp1-Binding Ankyrin Repeat Protein Interplay and Mimicry of Cellular Ubiquitin Ligase Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Eric A.; Kang, Ming; Adamec, Jiri; Oyler, George A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin-proteasome system is targeted by many viruses that have evolved strategies to redirect host ubiquitination machinery. Members of the genus Chlorovirus are proposed to share an ancestral lineage with a broader group of related viruses, nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV). Chloroviruses encode an Skp1 homolog and ankyrin repeat (ANK) proteins. Several chlorovirus-encoded ANK repeats contain C-terminal domains characteristic of cellular F-boxes or related NCLDV chordopox PRANC (pox protein repeats of ankyrin at C-terminal) domains. These observations suggested that this unique combination of Skp1 and ANK repeat proteins might form complexes analogous to the cellular Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. We identified two ANK proteins from the prototypic chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1 (PBCV-1) that functioned as binding partners for the virus-encoded Skp1, proteins A682L and A607R. These ANK proteins had a C-terminal Skp1 interactional motif that functioned similarly to cellular F-box domains. A C-terminal motif of ANK protein A682L binds Skp1 proteins from widely divergent species. Yeast two-hybrid analyses using serial domain deletion constructs confirmed the C-terminal localization of the Skp1 interactional motif in PBCV-1 A682L. ANK protein A607R represents an ANK family with one member present in all 41 sequenced chloroviruses. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of these related ANK and viral Skp1 proteins suggested partnered function tailored to the host alga or common ancestral heritage. Here, we show protein-protein interaction between corresponding family clusters of virus-encoded ANK and Skp1 proteins from three chlorovirus types. Collectively, our results indicate that chloroviruses have evolved complementing Skp1 and ANK proteins that mimic cellular SCF-associated proteins. IMPORTANCE Viruses have evolved ways to direct ubiquitination events in order to create environments conducive to their

  16. Helical repeats modular proteins are major players for organelle gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamel; Bonnard, Géraldine; Bouchoucha, Ayoub; Gobert, Anthony; Pinker, Franziska; Salinas, Thalia; Giegé, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts are often described as semi-autonomous organelles because they have retained a genome. They thus require fully functional gene expression machineries. Many of the required processes going all the way from transcription to translation have specificities in organelles and arose during eukaryote history. Most factors involved in these RNA maturation steps have remained elusive for a long time. The recent identification of a number of novel protein families including pentatricopeptide repeat proteins, half-a-tetratricopeptide proteins, octotricopeptide repeat proteins and mitochondrial transcription termination factors has helped to settle long-standing questions regarding organelle gene expression. In particular, their functions have been related to replication, transcription, RNA processing, RNA editing, splicing, the control of RNA turnover and translation throughout eukaryotes. These families of proteins, although evolutionary independent, seem to share a common overall architecture. For all of them, proteins contain tandem arrays of repeated motifs. Each module is composed of two to three α-helices and their succession forms a super-helix. Here, we review the features characterising these protein families, in particular, their distribution, the identified functions and mode of action and propose that they might share similar substrate recognition mechanisms. PMID:24021622

  17. PPR (pentatricopeptide repeat) proteins in mammals: important aids to mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, Robert N; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2008-11-15

    Genes encoding PPR (pentatricopeptide repeat)-containing proteins constitute one of the largest gene families in plants. The majority of these proteins are predicted to target organelles and to bind to RNA. Strikingly, there is a dearth of these proteins in mammals, although genomic searches reveal six candidates, all of which are also predicted to target the mitochondrion. Two of these proteins, POLRMT (the mitochondrial RNA polymerase) and MRPS27, a mitoribosomal protein, are involved in transcription and translation respectively. PTCD1 (pentatricopeptide repeat domain protein 1) and PTCD3 are predicted to be involved in the assembly of respiratory chain complexes, whereas mutations in one other protein, LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat cassette), have been shown to cause defects in the levels of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal member of the respiratory chain. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Xu et al. turn their attention to the remaining candidate, PTCD2. Depletion in a mouse model led to deficiencies of the third complex of the respiratory chain that caused profound ultrastructural changes in the heart. The exact molecular function of PTCD2 remains unclear, but depletion leads to an apparent lack of processing of the mitochondrial transcript encoding apocytochrome b, a critical member of complex III. These data are consistent with PTCD2 playing an important role in the post-transcriptional expression of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:18939947

  18. Structural and functional discussion of the tetra-trico-peptide repeat, a protein interaction module.

    PubMed

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Zarivach, Raz

    2012-03-01

    Tetra-trico-peptide repeat (TPR) domains are found in numerous proteins, where they serve as interaction modules and multiprotein complex mediators. TPRs can be found in all kingdoms of life and regulate diverse biological processes, such as organelle targeting and protein import, vesicle fusion, and biomineralization. This review considers the structural features of TPR domains that permit the great ligand-binding diversity of this motif, given that TPR-interacting partners display variations in both sequence and secondary structure. In addition, tools for predicting TPR-interacting partners are discussed, as are the abilities of TPR domains to serve as protein-protein interaction scaffolds in biotechnology and therapeutics. PMID:22404999

  19. The contribution of entropy, enthalpy, and hydrophobic desolvation to cooperativity in repeat-protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aksel, Tural; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cooperativity is a defining feature of protein folding, but its thermodynamic and structural origins are not completely understood. By constructing consensus ankyrin repeat protein arrays that have nearly identical sequences, we quantify cooperativity by resolving stability into intrinsic and interfacial components. Heteronuclear NMR and CD spectroscopy show that these constructs adopt ankyrin repeat structures. Applying a one-dimensional Ising model to a series of constructs chosen to maximize information content in unfolding transitions, we quantify stabilities of the terminal capping repeats, and resolve the effects of denaturant into intrinsic and interfacial components. Reversible thermal denaturation resolves interfacial and intrinsic free energies into enthalpic, entropic, and heat capacity terms. Intrinsic folding is entropically disfavored, whereas interfacial interaction is entropically favored and attends a decrease in heat capacity. These results suggest that helix formation and backbone ordering occurs upon intrinsic folding, whereas hydrophobic desolvation occurs upon interfacial interaction, contributing to cooperativity. PMID:21397186

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mediates DBP-maf-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Reddy, C Damodar; Swamy, Narasimha

    2003-09-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage-activating factor (DBP-maf) is derived from serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP) by selective deglycosylation during inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DBP-maf on RAW 264.7 macrophages and the underlying intracellular signal transduction pathways. DBP-maf increased proapoptotic caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. However, DBP, the precursor to DBP-maf did not induce apoptosis in these cells. Cell cycle analysis of DBP-maf-treated RAW 264.7 cells revealed growth arrest with accumulation of cells in sub-G(0)/G(1) phase. We also investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in the DBP-maf-induced apoptosis of RAW264.7 cells. DBP-maf increased the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK1/2, while it decreased the ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB202190, attenuated DBP-maf-induced apoptosis. PD98059, a MEK specific inhibitor, did not show a significant inhibition of apoptosis induced by DBP-maf. Taken together, these results suggest that the p38 MAPK pathway plays a crucial role in DBP-maf-mediated apoptosis of macrophages. Our studies indicate that, during inflammation DBP-maf may function positively by causing death of the macrophages when activated macrophages are no longer needed at the site of inflammation. In summary, we report for the first time that DBP-maf induces apoptosis in macrophages via p38 and JNK1/2 pathway. PMID:12938159

  1. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF A RING DOMAIN ANKYRIN REPEAT PROTEIN THAT IS HIGHLY EXPRESSED DURING FLOWER SENESCENCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gene encoding a RING zinc finger ankyrin repeat protein (MjXB3), a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, is highly expressed in petals of senescing four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) flowers, increasing >40 000-fold during the onset of visible senescence. The gene has homologues in many other species, and t...

  2. Analysis of protein binding to the Sma/Cla DNA repeat in pathogenic Neisseriae.

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, L A; Frangipane, J V; Seifert, H S

    1997-01-01

    Antigenic variation of the pilus is an essential component of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pathogenesis. Unidirectional recombination of silent pilin DNA into an expressed pilin gene allows for substantial sequence variation of this highly immunogenic surface structure. While the RecA protein is required for pilin gene recombination, the factors which maintain the silent reservoir of pilin sequences and/or allow unidirectional recombination from silent to expression loci remain undefined. We have previously shown that a conserved sequence at the 3'end of all pilin loci (the Sma/Cla repeat) is required to be present at the expression locus for efficient recombination from the silent loci. In this study, the binding of gonococcal proteins to this DNA sequence was investigated. Gel mobility shift assays and competition experiments using deletion derivatives of the repeat, show that multiple activities bind to different regions of the Sma/Cla repeat and define the boundaries of the binding sequences. Moreover, only the pathogenic Neisseria harbor proteins which specifically bind to this repeat, suggesting a correlation between the expression of these DNA binding proteins and the potential to cause disease. PMID:9060430

  3. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  4. Ankyrin-repeat containing proteins of microbes: a conserved structure with functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Price, Christopher T.; Kalia, Awdhesh; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2009-01-01

    Summary The ankyrin repeat (ANK) is the most common protein-protein interaction motif in nature and predominantly found in eukaryotic proteins. The genome sequencing of various pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria and eukaryotic viruses identified numerous genes encoding ANK-containing proteins that were proposed to have been acquired from eukaryotes by horizontal gene transfer. However, the recent discovery of additional ANK-containing proteins encoded in the genomes of archaea and free-living bacteria suggests either a more ancient origin of the ANK motif or multiple convergent evolution events. Many bacterial pathogens employ various types of secretion systems to deliver ANK-containing proteins into eukaryotic cells where they mimic or manipulate various host functions. Understanding the molecular and biochemical functions of this family of proteins will enhance our understanding of important host-microbe interactions. PMID:19962898

  5. Molecular Effects of the CTG Repeats in Mutant Dystrophia Myotonica Protein Kinase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Llamusí, Beatriz; Artero, Ruben

    2008-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multi-system disorder characterized by muscle wasting, myotonia, cardiac conduction defects, cataracts, and neuropsychological dysfunction. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3´untranslated region (UTR) of the Dystrophia Myotonica Protein Kinase (DMPK) gene. A body of work demonstrates that DMPK mRNAs containing abnormally expanded CUG repeats are toxic to several cell types. A core mechanism underlying symptoms of DM1 is that mutant DMPK RNA interferes with the developmentally regulated alternative splicing of defined pre-mRNAs. Expanded CUG repeats fold into ds(CUG) hairpins that sequester nuclear proteins including human Muscleblind-like (MBNL) and hnRNP H alternative splicing factors. DM1 cells activate CELF family member CUG-BP1 protein through hyperphosphorylation and stabilization in the cell nucleus. CUG-BP1 and MBNL1 proteins act antagonistically in exon selection in several pre-mRNA transcripts, thus MBNL1 sequestration and increase in nuclear activity of CUG-BP1 both act synergistically to missplice defined transcripts. Mutant DMPK-mediated effect on subcellular localization, and defective phosphorylation of cytoplasmic CUG-BP1, have additionally been linked to defective translation of p21 and MEF2A in DM1, possibly explaining delayed differentiation of DM1 muscle cells. Mutant DMPK transcripts bind and sequester transcription factors such as Specificity protein 1 leading to reduced transcription of selected genes. Recently, transcripts containing long hairpin structures of CUG repeats have been shown to be a Dicer ribonuclease target and Dicer-induced downregulation of the mutant DMPK transcripts triggers silencing effects on RNAs containing long complementary repeats. In summary, mutant DMPK transcripts alter gene transcription, alternative splicing, and translation of specific gene transcripts, and have the ability to trigger gene-specific silencing effects in DM1 cells. Therapies aimed at reversing

  6. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Teramachi, Junpei; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Kanji; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  7. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  8. Anchoring skeletal muscle development and disease: the role of ankyrin repeat domain containing proteins in muscle physiology.

    PubMed

    Tee, Jin-Ming; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P

    2010-08-01

    The ankyrin repeat is a protein module with high affinity for other ankyrin repeats based on strong Van der Waals forces. The resulting dimerization is unusually resistant to both mechanical forces and alkanization, making this module exceedingly useful for meeting the extraordinary demands of muscle physiology. Many aspects of muscle function are controlled by the superfamily ankyrin repeat domain containing proteins, including structural fixation of the contractile apparatus to the muscle membrane by ankyrins, the archetypical member of the family. Additionally, other ankyrin repeat domain containing proteins critically control the various differentiation steps during muscle development, with Notch and developmental stage-specific expression of the members of the Ankyrin repeat and SOCS box (ASB) containing family of proteins controlling compartment size and guiding the various steps of muscle specification. Also, adaptive responses in fully formed muscle require ankyrin repeat containing proteins, with Myotrophin/V-1 ankyrin repeat containing proteins controlling the induction of hypertrophic responses following excessive mechanical load, and muscle ankyrin repeat proteins (MARPs) acting as protective mechanisms of last resort following extreme demands on muscle tissue. Knowledge on mechanisms governing the ordered expression of the various members of superfamily of ankyrin repeat domain containing proteins may prove exceedingly useful for developing novel rational therapy for cardiac disease and muscle dystrophies. PMID:20515317

  9. Characterization of human proteins that bind the repeated sequences in the squirrel monkey retrovirus enhancer.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Watanabe, T; Ohmatsu, M; Oda, T

    1995-12-01

    We have recently identified two different human DNA-binding proteins, SMBP1 (35 kDa) and SMBP2 (17 kDa), that specifically interact with the direct repeats of the enhancer sequence in the squirrel monkey retrovirus long terminal repeat. Herein, we report several biochemical properties of the human DNA-binding proteins. SMBP1 and 2 recognized an overlapped sequence of the 5' region of the repeat which contains a palindrome of CCAATGG. Both proteins required divalent cations such as Mg2+ and Ca2+ for their specific DNA binding at the optimum concentration of 1 mM. SMBP2 is a thermostable protein that binds tightly to the DNA sequence even by treatment at 80 degrees C for 15 min. The SMBP2-DNA complex was also stable in the presence of 300 mM NaCl. The resistance of SMBP2 to heat and salt treatment is a prominent character distinguishable from SMBP1 and other known transcriptional factors. SMBP1 and 2 can be easily separated by heparin-agarose chromatography. These DNA-binding proteins were found to be present in nuclear extracts from several human cell lines including T cell, B cell, and epithelial cell. PMID:8747092

  10. Shifting transition states in the unfolding of a large ankyrin repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Rowling, Pamela J. E.; Chellamuthu, Vasuki R.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2008-01-01

    The 33-amino-acid ankyrin motif comprises a β-turn followed by two anti-parallel α-helices and a loop and tandem arrays of the motif pack in a linear fashion to produce elongated structures characterized by short-range interactions. In this article we use site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the kinetic unfolding mechanism of D34, a 426-residue, 12-ankyrin repeat fragment of the protein ankyrinR. The data are consistent with a model in which the N-terminal half of the protein unfolds first by unraveling progressively from the start of the polypeptide chain to form an intermediate; in the next step, the C-terminal half of the protein unfolds via two pathways whose transition states have either the early or the late C-terminal ankyrin repeats folded. We conclude that the two halves of the protein unfold by different mechanisms because the N-terminal moiety folds and unfolds in the context of a folded C-terminal moiety, which therefore acts as a “seed” and confers a unique directionality on the process, whereas the C-terminal moiety folds and unfolds in the context of an unfolded N-terminal moiety and therefore behaves like a single-domain ankyrin repeat protein, having a high degree of symmetry and consequently more than one unfolding pathway accessible to it. PMID:18632570

  11. LRR Conservation Mapping to Predict Functional Sites within Protein Leucine-Rich Repeat Domains

    PubMed Central

    Helft, Laura; Reddy, Vignyan; Chen, Xiyang; Koller, Teresa; Federici, Luca; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Gupta, Rishabh; Bent, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Computational prediction of protein functional sites can be a critical first step for analysis of large or complex proteins. Contemporary methods often require several homologous sequences and/or a known protein structure, but these resources are not available for many proteins. Leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) are ligand interaction domains found in numerous proteins across all taxonomic kingdoms, including immune system receptors in plants and animals. We devised Repeat Conservation Mapping (RCM), a computational method that predicts functional sites of LRR domains. RCM utilizes two or more homologous sequences and a generic representation of the LRR structure to identify conserved or diversified patches of amino acids on the predicted surface of the LRR. RCM was validated using solved LRR+ligand structures from multiple taxa, identifying ligand interaction sites. RCM was then used for de novo dissection of two plant microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) receptors, EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR) and FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2). In vivo testing of Arabidopsis thaliana EFR and FLS2 receptors mutagenized at sites identified by RCM demonstrated previously unknown functional sites. The RCM predictions for EFR, FLS2 and a third plant LRR protein, PGIP, compared favorably to predictions from ODA (optimal docking area), Consurf, and PAML (positive selection) analyses, but RCM also made valid functional site predictions not available from these other bioinformatic approaches. RCM analyses can be conducted with any LRR-containing proteins at www.plantpath.wisc.edu/RCM, and the approach should be modifiable for use with other types of repeat protein domains. PMID:21789174

  12. Functional analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana CHLOROPLAST BIOGENESIS 19 pentatricopeptide repeat editing protein.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Vega, Maricela; Guevara-García, Arturo; Llamas, Ernesto; Sánchez-León, Nidia; Olmedo-Monfil, Vianey; Vielle-Calzada, Jean Philippe; León, Patricia

    2015-10-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family of proteins contains several degenerate 35-aa motifs named PPR repeats. These proteins control diverse post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, including RNA editing. CLB19 belongs to the PLS subfamily of PPR proteins and is essential for the editing and functionality of the subunit A of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (RpoA) and the catalytic subunit of the Clp protease (ClpP1). We demonstrate in vitro that CLB19 has a specific interaction with these two targets, in spite of their modest sequence similarity. Using site-directed mutagenesis of the rpoA target, we analyzed the essential nucleotides required for CLB19-rpoA interactions. We verified that, similar to other editing proteins, the C-terminal E domain of CLB19 is essential for editing but not for RNA binding. Using biomolecular fluorescence complementation, we demonstrated that the E domain of CLB19 interacts with the RNA-interacting protein MORF2/RIP2 but not with MORF9/RIP9. An interesting finding from this analysis was that overexpression of a truncated CLB19 protein lacking the E domain interferes with cell fate during megasporogenesis and the subsequent establishment of a female gametophyte, supporting an important role of plastids in female gametogenesis. Together these analyses provide important clues about the particularities of the CLB19 editing protein. PMID:25980341

  13. Telomere repeat binding proteins are functional components of Arabidopsis telomeres and interact with telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Procházková Schrumpfová, Petra; Vychodilová, Ivona; Dvořáčková, Martina; Majerská, Jana; Dokládal, Ladislav; Schořová, Šárka; Fajkus, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Although telomere-binding proteins constitute an essential part of telomeres, in vivo data indicating the existence of a structure similar to mammalian shelterin complex in plants are limited. Partial characterization of a number of candidate proteins has not identified true components of plant shelterin or elucidated their functional mechanisms. Telomere repeat binding (TRB) proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana bind plant telomeric repeats through a Myb domain of the telobox type in vitro, and have been shown to interact with POT1b (Protection of telomeres 1). Here we demonstrate co-localization of TRB1 protein with telomeres in situ using fluorescence microscopy, as well as in vivo interaction using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Classification of the TRB1 protein as a component of plant telomeres is further confirmed by the observation of shortening of telomeres in knockout mutants of the trb1 gene. Moreover, TRB proteins physically interact with plant telomerase catalytic subunits. These findings integrate TRB proteins into the telomeric interactome of A. thaliana. PMID:24397874

  14. Structural basis for specific single-stranded RNA recognition by designer pentatricopeptide repeat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cuicui; Zhang, Delin; Guan, Zeyuan; Liu, Yexing; Yang, Zhao; Yang, Yan; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, QunXia; Fan, Shilong; Zou, Tingting; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As a large family of RNA-binding proteins, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins mediate multiple aspects of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. Binding to their target single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) in a modular and base-specific fashion, PPR proteins can serve as designable modules for gene manipulation. However, the structural basis for nucleotide-specific recognition by designer PPR (dPPR) proteins remains to be elucidated. Here, we report four crystal structures of dPPR proteins in complex with their respective ssRNA targets. The dPPR repeats are assembled into a right-handed superhelical spiral shell that embraces the ssRNA. Interactions between different PPR codes and RNA bases are observed at the atomic level, revealing the molecular basis for the modular and specific recognition patterns of the RNA bases U, C, A and G. These structures not only provide insights into the functional study of PPR proteins but also open a path towards the potential design of synthetic sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins. PMID:27088764

  15. Structural basis for specific single-stranded RNA recognition by designer pentatricopeptide repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cuicui; Zhang, Delin; Guan, Zeyuan; Liu, Yexing; Yang, Zhao; Yang, Yan; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, QunXia; Fan, Shilong; Zou, Tingting; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As a large family of RNA-binding proteins, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins mediate multiple aspects of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. Binding to their target single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) in a modular and base-specific fashion, PPR proteins can serve as designable modules for gene manipulation. However, the structural basis for nucleotide-specific recognition by designer PPR (dPPR) proteins remains to be elucidated. Here, we report four crystal structures of dPPR proteins in complex with their respective ssRNA targets. The dPPR repeats are assembled into a right-handed superhelical spiral shell that embraces the ssRNA. Interactions between different PPR codes and RNA bases are observed at the atomic level, revealing the molecular basis for the modular and specific recognition patterns of the RNA bases U, C, A and G. These structures not only provide insights into the functional study of PPR proteins but also open a path towards the potential design of synthetic sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins. PMID:27088764

  16. An essential yeast gene encoding a TTAGGG repeat-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Brigati, C. Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa ); Kurtz, S.; Balderes, D.; Shore, D. ); Vidali, G. )

    1993-02-01

    Among all eukaryotes examined to date, telomere is a highly conserved structure. It is designed to protect chromosomes from degradation and fusion. Telomeres are composed of multiple repeats of short sequence elements and range in length from a few repeat units to > kb. The repeated sequence TTAGGG is found at telomeres in all vertebrates, certain slime molds, and trypanosomes. Because sequence TTAGGG is present at the telomere of all of these divergent organisms, it is likely that it constitutes a binding site for highly conserved proteins with important roles in chromosomal structure and function. The occurrence of a TTAGGG-binding activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the presence of TTAGGG sequences at telomere junctions raise the possibility that there is a related factor with a functional role at telomeres in S. cervisiae. The research in this paper tests this hypothesis. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Molecular phylogeny of the kelch-repeat superfamily reveals an expansion of BTB/kelch proteins in animals

    PubMed Central

    Prag, Soren; Adams, Josephine C

    2003-01-01

    Background The kelch motif is an ancient and evolutionarily-widespread sequence motif of 44–56 amino acids in length. It occurs as five to seven repeats that form a β-propeller tertiary structure. Over 28 kelch-repeat proteins have been sequenced and functionally characterised from diverse organisms spanning from viruses, plants and fungi to mammals and it is evident from expressed sequence tag, domain and genome databases that many additional hypothetical proteins contain kelch-repeats. In general, kelch-repeat β-propellers are involved in protein-protein interactions, however the modest sequence identity between kelch motifs, the diversity of domain architectures, and the partial information on this protein family in any single species, all present difficulties to developing a coherent view of the kelch-repeat domain and the kelch-repeat protein superfamily. To understand the complexity of this superfamily of proteins, we have analysed by bioinformatics the complement of kelch-repeat proteins encoded in the human genome and have made comparisons to the kelch-repeat proteins encoded in other sequenced genomes. Results We identified 71 kelch-repeat proteins encoded in the human genome, whereas 5 or 8 members were identified in yeasts and around 18 in C. elegans, D. melanogaster and A. gambiae. Multiple domain architectures were identified in each organism, including previously unrecognised forms. The vast majority of kelch-repeat domains are predicted to form six-bladed β-propellers. The most prevalent domain architecture in the metazoan animal genomes studied was the BTB/kelch domain organisation and we uncovered 3 subgroups of human BTB/kelch proteins. Sequence analysis of the kelch-repeat domains of the most robustly-related subgroups identified differences in β-propeller organisation that could provide direction for experimental study of protein-binding characteristics. Conclusion The kelch-repeat superfamily constitutes a distinct and evolutionarily

  18. DNA-binding proteins from marine bacteria expand the known sequence diversity of TALE-like repeats

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Thiel, Philipp; Krüger, Jens; Kleusch, Christian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lahaye, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) of Xanthomonas bacteria are programmable DNA binding proteins with unprecedented target specificity. Comparative studies into TALE repeat structure and function are hindered by the limited sequence variation among TALE repeats. More sequence-diverse TALE-like proteins are known from Ralstonia solanacearum (RipTALs) and Burkholderia rhizoxinica (Bats), but RipTAL and Bat repeats are conserved with those of TALEs around the DNA-binding residue. We study two novel marine-organism TALE-like proteins (MOrTL1 and MOrTL2), the first to date of non-terrestrial origin. We have assessed their DNA-binding properties and modelled repeat structures. We found that repeats from these proteins mediate sequence specific DNA binding conforming to the TALE code, despite low sequence similarity to TALE repeats, and with novel residues around the BSR. However, MOrTL1 repeats show greater sequence discriminating power than MOrTL2 repeats. Sequence alignments show that there are only three residues conserved between repeats of all TALE-like proteins including the two new additions. This conserved motif could prove useful as an identifier for future TALE-likes. Additionally, comparing MOrTL repeats with those of other TALE-likes suggests a common evolutionary origin for the TALEs, RipTALs and Bats. PMID:26481363

  19. Telomeric Repeats Facilitate CENP-ACnp1 Incorporation via Telomere Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Araceli G.; Pidoux, Alison L.; Catania, Sandra; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Choi, Eun Shik; Hamilton, Georgina; Ekwall, Karl; Allshire, Robin C.

    2013-01-01

    The histone H3 variant, CENP-A, is normally assembled upon canonical centromeric sequences, but there is no apparent obligate coupling of sequence and assembly, suggesting that centromere location can be epigenetically determined. To explore the tolerances and constraints on CENP-A deposition we investigated whether certain locations are favoured when additional CENP-ACnp1 is present in fission yeast cells. Our analyses show that additional CENP-ACnp1 accumulates within and close to heterochromatic centromeric outer repeats, and over regions adjacent to rDNA and telomeres. The use of minichromosome derivatives with unique DNA sequences internal to chromosome ends shows that telomeres are sufficient to direct CENP-ACnp1 deposition. However, chromosome ends are not required as CENP-ACnp1 deposition also occurs at telomere repeats inserted at an internal locus and correlates with the presence of H3K9 methylation near these repeats. The Ccq1 protein, which is known to bind telomere repeats and recruit telomerase, was found to be required to induce H3K9 methylation and thus promote the incorporation of CENP-ACnp1 near telomere repeats. These analyses demonstrate that at non-centromeric chromosomal locations the presence of heterochromatin influences the sites at which CENP-A is incorporated into chromatin and, thus, potentially the location of centromeres. PMID:23936074

  20. Telomeric repeats facilitate CENP-A(Cnp1) incorporation via telomere binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Araceli G; Pidoux, Alison L; Catania, Sandra; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Choi, Eun Shik; Hamilton, Georgina; Ekwall, Karl; Allshire, Robin C

    2013-01-01

    The histone H3 variant, CENP-A, is normally assembled upon canonical centromeric sequences, but there is no apparent obligate coupling of sequence and assembly, suggesting that centromere location can be epigenetically determined. To explore the tolerances and constraints on CENP-A deposition we investigated whether certain locations are favoured when additional CENP-A(Cnp1) is present in fission yeast cells. Our analyses show that additional CENP-A(Cnp1) accumulates within and close to heterochromatic centromeric outer repeats, and over regions adjacent to rDNA and telomeres. The use of minichromosome derivatives with unique DNA sequences internal to chromosome ends shows that telomeres are sufficient to direct CENP-A(Cnp1) deposition. However, chromosome ends are not required as CENP-A(Cnp1) deposition also occurs at telomere repeats inserted at an internal locus and correlates with the presence of H3K9 methylation near these repeats. The Ccq1 protein, which is known to bind telomere repeats and recruit telomerase, was found to be required to induce H3K9 methylation and thus promote the incorporation of CENP-A(Cnp1) near telomere repeats. These analyses demonstrate that at non-centromeric chromosomal locations the presence of heterochromatin influences the sites at which CENP-A is incorporated into chromatin and, thus, potentially the location of centromeres. PMID:23936074

  1. Structural and Functional Insights into Small, Glutamine-Rich, Tetratricopeptide Repeat Protein Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Joanna D.; Thapaliya, Arjun; Martínez-Lumbreras, Santiago; Krysztofinska, Ewelina M.; Isaacson, Rivka L.

    2015-01-01

    The small glutamine-rich, tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha (SGTA) is an emerging player in the quality control of secretory and membrane proteins mislocalized to the cytosol, with established roles in tail-anchored (TA) membrane protein biogenesis. SGTA consists of three structural domains with individual functions, an N-terminal dimerization domain that assists protein sorting pathways, a central tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain that mediates interactions with heat-shock proteins, proteasomal, and hormonal receptors, and viral proteins, and a C-terminal glutamine rich region that binds hydrophobic substrates. SGTA has been linked to viral lifecycles and hormone receptor signaling, with implications in the pathogenesis of various disease states. Thus far, a range of biophysical techniques have been employed to characterize SGTA structure in some detail, and to investigate its interactions with binding partners in different biological contexts. A complete description of SGTA structure, together with further investigation into its function as a co-chaperone involved quality control, could provide us with useful insights into its role in maintaining cellular proteostasis, and broaden our understanding of mechanisms underlying associated pathologies. This review describes how some structural features of SGTA have been elucidated, and what this has uncovered about its cellular functions. A brief background on the structure and function of SGTA is given, highlighting its importance to biomedicine and related fields. The current level of knowledge and what remains to be understood about the structure and function of SGTA is summarized, discussing the potential direction of future research. PMID:26734616

  2. Gudu, an Armadillo repeat-containing protein, is required for spermatogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila annotated gene CG5155 encodes a protein that contains 10 Armadillo-repeats and has an unknown function. To fill this gap, we performed loss-of-function studies using RNAi. By analysis of four independent Drosophila RNAi lines targeting two non-overlapping regions of the CG5155 transcript, we demonstrate that this gene is required for male fertility. Therefore, we have named this gene Gudu. The transcript of Gudu is highly enriched in adult testes. Knockdown of Gudu by a ubiquitous driver leads to defects in the formation of the individualization complex that is required for spermatid maturation, thereby impairing spermatogenesis. Furthermore, testis-specific knockdown of Gudu by crossing the RNAi lines with the bam-Gal4 driver is sufficient to cause the infertility and defective spermatogenesis. Since Gudu is highly homologous to vertebrate ARMC4, also an Armadillo-repeat-containing protein enriched in testes, our results suggest that Gudu and ARMC4 is a subfamily of Armadillo-repeat containing proteins that may have an evolutionarily conserved function in spermatogenesis. PMID:24055424

  3. Generation of Fluorogen-Activating Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (FADAs) as Versatile Sensor Tools.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marco; Batyuk, Alexander; Klenk, Christoph; Kummer, Lutz; de Picciotto, Seymour; Gülbakan, Basri; Wu, Yufan; Newby, Gregory A; Zosel, Franziska; Schöppe, Jendrik; Sedlák, Erik; Mittl, Peer R E; Zenobi, Renato; Wittrup, K Dane; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-03-27

    Fluorescent probes constitute a valuable toolbox to address a variety of biological questions and they have become irreplaceable for imaging methods. Commonly, such probes consist of fluorescent proteins or small organic fluorophores coupled to biological molecules of interest. Recently, a novel class of fluorescence-based probes, fluorogen-activating proteins (FAPs), has been reported. These binding proteins are based on antibody single-chain variable fragments and activate fluorogenic dyes, which only become fluorescent upon activation and do not fluoresce when free in solution. Here we present a novel class of fluorogen activators, termed FADAs, based on the very robust designed ankyrin repeat protein scaffold, which also readily folds in the reducing environment of the cytoplasm. The FADA generated in this study was obtained by combined selections with ribosome display and yeast surface display. It enhances the fluorescence of malachite green (MG) dyes by a factor of more than 11,000 and thus activates MG to a similar extent as FAPs based on single-chain variable fragments. As shown by structure determination and in vitro measurements, this FADA was evolved to form a homodimer for the activation of MG dyes. Exploiting the favorable properties of the designed ankyrin repeat protein scaffold, we created a FADA biosensor suitable for imaging of proteins on the cell surface, as well as in the cytosol. Moreover, based on the requirement of dimerization for strong fluorogen activation, a prototype FADA biosensor for in situ detection of a target protein and protein-protein interactions was developed. Therefore, FADAs are versatile fluorescent probes that are easily produced and suitable for diverse applications and thus extend the FAP technology. PMID:26812208

  4. The solution structure of the pentatricopeptide repeat protein PPR10 upon binding atpH RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gully, Benjamin S.; Cowieson, Nathan; Stanley, Will A.; Shearston, Kate; Small, Ian D.; Barkan, Alice; Bond, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family is a large family of RNA-binding proteins that is characterized by tandem arrays of a degenerate 35-amino-acid motif which form an α-solenoid structure. PPR proteins influence the editing, splicing, translation and stability of specific RNAs in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Zea mays PPR10 is amongst the best studied PPR proteins, where sequence-specific binding to two RNA transcripts, atpH and psaJ, has been demonstrated to follow a recognition code where the identity of two amino acids per repeat determines the base-specificity. A recently solved ZmPPR10:psaJ complex crystal structure suggested a homodimeric complex with considerably fewer sequence-specific protein–RNA contacts than inferred previously. Here we describe the solution structure of the ZmPPR10:atpH complex using size-exclusion chromatography-coupled synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SEC-SY-SAXS). Our results support prior evidence that PPR10 binds RNA as a monomer, and that it does so in a manner that is commensurate with a canonical and predictable RNA-binding mode across much of the RNA–protein interface. PMID:25609698

  5. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  6. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  7. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  8. TolC-Dependent Secretion of an Ankyrin Repeat-Containing Protein of Rickettsia typhi

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Ceraul, Shane M.; Gillespie, Joseph J.; Azad, Abdu F.

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi, the causative agent of murine (endemic) typhus, is an obligate intracellular pathogen with a life cycle involving both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In this study, we characterized a gene (RT0218) encoding a C-terminal ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein, named Rickettsia ankyrin repeat protein 1 (RARP-1), and identified it as a secreted effector protein of R. typhi. RT0218 showed differential transcript abundance at various phases of R. typhi intracellular growth. RARP-1 was secreted by R. typhi into the host cytoplasm during in vitro infection of mammalian cells. Transcriptional analysis revealed that RT0218 was cotranscribed with adjacent genes RT0217 (hypothetical protein) and RT0216 (TolC) as a single polycistronic mRNA. Given one of its functions as a facilitator of extracellular protein secretion in some Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, we tested the possible role of TolC in the secretion of RARP-1. Using Escherichia coli C600 and an isogenic tolC insertion mutant as surrogate hosts, our data demonstrate that RARP-1 is secreted in a TolC-dependent manner. Deletion of either the N-terminal signal peptide or the C-terminal ankyrin repeats abolished RARP-1 secretion by wild-type E. coli. Importantly, expression of R. typhi tolC in the E. coli tolC mutant restored the secretion of RARP-1, suggesting that TolC has a role in RARP-1 translocation across the outer membrane. This work implies that the TolC component of the putative type 1 secretion system of R. typhi is involved in the secretion process of RARP-1. PMID:22773786

  9. Role of protein kinase C δ in apoptotic signaling of oxidized phospholipids in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vogl, F; Humpolícková, J; Amaro, M; Koller, D; Köfeler, H; Zenzmaier, E; Hof, M; Hermetter, A

    2016-04-01

    The oxidized phospholipids (oxPl) 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PGPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC) are cytotoxic components of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Sustained exposure to oxLDL or isolated oxPl induces apoptotic signaling in vascular cells, which is a hallmark of the late phase of atherosclerosis. Activation of sphingomyelinase, the coordinate formation of ceramide and activation of caspase 3/7 as well as the activation of stress-associated kinases are causally involved in this process. Here, we provide evidence for a role of PKCδ in oxPl cytotoxicity. Silencing of the enzyme by siRNA significantly reduced caspase 3/7 activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages under the influence of oxPl. Concomitantly, PKCδ was phosphorylated as a consequence of cell exposure to PGPC or POVPC. Single molecule fluorescence microscopy provided direct evidence for oxPl-protein interaction. Both oxPl recruited an RFP-tagged PKCδ to the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, two color cross-correlation number and brightness (ccN&B) analysis of the molecular motions revealed that fluorescently labeled PGPC or POVPC analogs co-diffuse and are associated with the fluorescent protein kinase in live cells. The underlying lipid-protein interactions may be due to chemical bonding (imine formation between the phospholipid aldehyde POVPC with protein amino groups) and physical association (with POVPC or PGPC). In summary, our data supports the assumption that PKCδ acts as a proapototic kinase in oxPl-included apoptosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages. The direct association of the bioactive lipids with this enzyme seems to be an important step in the early phase of apoptotic signaling. PMID:26707247

  10. Structural and functional dissection of Toxoplasma gondii armadillo repeats only protein.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Christina; Samoo, Atta; Hammoudi, Pierre-Mehdi; Klages, Natacha; Kallio, Juha Pekka; Kursula, Inari; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    Rhoptries are club-shaped, regulated secretory organelles that cluster at the apical pole of apicomplexan parasites. Their discharge is essential for invasion and the establishment of an intracellular lifestyle. Little is known about rhoptry biogenesis and recycling during parasite division. In Toxoplasma gondii, positioning of rhoptries involves the armadillo repeats only protein (ARO) and myosin F (MyoF). Here, we show that two ARO partners, ARO-interacting protein (AIP) and adenylate cyclase β (ACβ) localize to a rhoptry subcompartment. In absence of AIP, ACβ disappears from the rhoptries. By assessing the contribution of each ARO armadillo (ARM) repeat, we provide evidence that ARO is multifunctional, participating not only in positioning but also in clustering of rhoptries. Structural analyses show that ARO resembles the myosin-binding domain of the Caenorhabditis elegans myosin chaperone UNC-45. A conserved patch of aromatic and acidic residues denotes the putative MyoF-binding site, and the overall arrangement of the ARM repeats explains the dramatic consequences of deleting each of them. Finally, Plasmodium falciparum ARO functionally complements ARO depletion and interacts with the same partners, highlighting the conservation of rhoptry biogenesis in Apicomplexa. PMID:26769898

  11. The impact of Fusarium culmorum infection on the protein fractions of raw barley and malted grains.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro M; Waters, Deborah M; Arendt, Elke K

    2013-03-01

    Contaminating fungi, such as Fusarium species, produce metabolites that may interfere with normal barley grain proteolysis pattern and consequently, affect malt and beer quality. Protein compositional changes of an initial mixture of 20 % Fusarium culmorum infected and 80 % noninfected mature barley grains and respective malt are reported here. Proteolytic activity of infected barley grains (IBG) and respective malt, with controls (uninfected grains), were characterized using protease inhibitors from each class of this enzyme, including metallo-, cysteine, serine, and aspartic proteases, as well as uninhibited protease fractions. The proteins were extracted according to the Osborne fractionation and separated by size exclusion chromatography. Additionally, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis (GE) was used to analyze hydrophobic storage proteins isolated from the control and IBG. Analyses revealed that F. culmorum IBG had a twofold increase of proteolytic activity compared to the control sample, which showed an increase in all protease classes with aspartic proteases dominating. Infected and control malt grains were comparable with cysteine proteases representing almost 50 % of all proteolytic enzymes detected. Protein extractability was 31 % higher in IBG compared to the control barley. The albumin fraction showed that several metabolic proteins decreased and increased at different rates during infection and malting, thus showing a complex F. culmorum infection interdependence. Prolamin storage proteins were more hydrophobic during barley fungal infection. F. culmorum interfered with the grain hydrolytic protein profile, thereby altering the grain's protein content and quality. PMID:23371295

  12. Nanoparticles Self-Assembly Driven by High Affinity Repeat Protein Pairing.

    PubMed

    Gurunatha, Kargal L; Fournier, Agathe C; Urvoas, Agathe; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Marchi, Valérie; Minard, Philippe; Dujardin, Erik

    2016-03-22

    Proteins are the most specific yet versatile biological self-assembling agents with a rich chemistry. Nevertheless, the design of new proteins with recognition capacities is still in its infancy and has seldom been exploited for the self-assembly of functional inorganic nanoparticles. Here, we report on the protein-directed assembly of gold nanoparticles using purpose-designed artificial repeat proteins having a rigid but modular 3D architecture. αRep protein pairs are selected for their high mutual affinity from a library of 10(9) variants. Their conjugation onto gold nanoparticles drives the massive colloidal assembly of free-standing, one-particle thick films. When the average number of proteins per nanoparticle is lowered, the extent of self-assembly is limited to oligomeric particle clusters. Finally, we demonstrate that the aggregates are reversibly disassembled by an excess of one free protein. Our approach could be optimized for applications in biosensing, cell targeting, or functional nanomaterials engineering. PMID:26863288

  13. ST proteins, a new family of plant tandem repeat proteins with a DUF2775 domain mainly found in Fabaceae and Asteraceae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many proteins with tandem repeats in their sequence have been described and classified according to the length of the repeats: I) Repeats of short oligopeptides (from 2 to 20 amino acids), including structural cell wall proteins and arabinogalactan proteins. II) Repeats that range in length from 20 to 40 residues, including proteins with a well-established three-dimensional structure often involved in mediating protein-protein interactions. (III) Longer repeats in the order of 100 amino acids that constitute structurally and functionally independent units. Here we analyse ShooT specific (ST) proteins, a family of proteins with tandem repeats of unknown function that were first found in Leguminosae, and their possible similarities to other proteins with tandem repeats. Results ST protein sequences were only found in dicotyledonous plants, limited to several plant families, mainly the Fabaceae and the Asteraceae. ST mRNAs accumulate mainly in the roots and under biotic interactions. Most ST proteins have one or several Domain(s) of Unknown Function 2775 (DUF2775). All deduced ST proteins have a signal peptide, indicating that these proteins enter the secretory pathway, and the mature proteins have tandem repeat oligopeptides that share a hexapeptide (E/D)FEPRP followed by 4 partially conserved amino acids, which could determine a putative N-glycosylation signal, and a fully conserved tyrosine. In a phylogenetic tree, the sequences clade according to taxonomic group. A possible involvement in symbiosis and abiotic stress as well as in plant cell elongation is suggested, although different STs could play different roles in plant development. Conclusions We describe a new family of proteins called ST whose presence is limited to the plant kingdom, specifically to a few families of dicotyledonous plants. They present 20 to 40 amino acid tandem repeat sequences with different characteristics (signal peptide, DUF2775 domain, conservative repeat regions) from the

  14. The Role of Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing Protein 10 (LRRC10) in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Matthew J.; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiomyocyte-specific member of the Leucine-rich repeat containing (LRRC) protein superfamily with critical roles in cardiac function and disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have identified LRRC10 mutations in human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Lrrc10 homozygous knockout mice develop DCM, strongly linking LRRC10 to the molecular etiology of DCM. LRRC10 localizes to the dyad region in cardiomyocytes where it can interact with actin and α-actinin at the Z-disc and associate with T-tubule components. Indeed, this region is becoming increasingly recognized as a signaling center in cardiomyocytes, not only for calcium cycling, excitation-contraction coupling, and calcium-sensitive hypertrophic signaling, but also as a nodal signaling hub where the myocyte can sense and respond to mechanical stress. Disruption of a wide range of critical structural and signaling molecules in cardiomyocytes confers susceptibility to cardiomyopathies in addition to the more classically studied mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM remain unclear. Here, we review what is known about the cardiomyocyte functions of LRRC10, lessons learned about LRRC10 and DCM from the Lrrc10 knockout mouse model, and discuss ongoing efforts to elucidate molecular mechanisms whereby mutation or absence of LRRC10 mediates cardiac disease. PMID:27536250

  15. Replication stalling at unstable inverted repeats: Interplay between DNA hairpins and fork stabilizing proteins

    PubMed Central

    Voineagu, Irina; Narayanan, Vidhya; Lobachev, Kirill S.; Mirkin, Sergei M.

    2008-01-01

    DNA inverted repeats (IRs) are hotspots of genomic instability in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This feature is commonly attributed to their ability to fold into hairpin- or cruciform-like DNA structures interfering with DNA replication and other genetic processes. However, direct evidence that IRs are replication stall sites in vivo is currently lacking. Here, we show by 2D electrophoretic analysis of replication intermediates that replication forks stall at IRs in bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells. We found that DNA hairpins, rather than DNA cruciforms, are responsible for the replication stalling by comparing the effects of specifically designed imperfect IRs with varying lengths of their central spacer. Finally, we report that yeast fork-stabilizing proteins, Tof1 and Mrc1, are required to counteract repeat-mediated replication stalling. We show that the function of the Tof1 protein at DNA structure-mediated stall sites is different from its previously described effect on protein-mediated replication fork barriers. PMID:18632578

  16. The Role of Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing Protein 10 (LRRC10) in Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Brody, Matthew J; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiomyocyte-specific member of the Leucine-rich repeat containing (LRRC) protein superfamily with critical roles in cardiac function and disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have identified LRRC10 mutations in human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Lrrc10 homozygous knockout mice develop DCM, strongly linking LRRC10 to the molecular etiology of DCM. LRRC10 localizes to the dyad region in cardiomyocytes where it can interact with actin and α-actinin at the Z-disc and associate with T-tubule components. Indeed, this region is becoming increasingly recognized as a signaling center in cardiomyocytes, not only for calcium cycling, excitation-contraction coupling, and calcium-sensitive hypertrophic signaling, but also as a nodal signaling hub where the myocyte can sense and respond to mechanical stress. Disruption of a wide range of critical structural and signaling molecules in cardiomyocytes confers susceptibility to cardiomyopathies in addition to the more classically studied mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM remain unclear. Here, we review what is known about the cardiomyocyte functions of LRRC10, lessons learned about LRRC10 and DCM from the Lrrc10 knockout mouse model, and discuss ongoing efforts to elucidate molecular mechanisms whereby mutation or absence of LRRC10 mediates cardiac disease. PMID:27536250

  17. Identification and characterization of GSRP-56, a novel Golgi-localized spectrin repeat-containing protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yuko . E-mail: yu-kobayashi@kinran.ac.jp; Katanosaka, Yuki; Iwata, Yuko; Matsuoka, Masayuki; Shigekawa, Munekazu; Wakabayashi, Shigeo . E-mail: wak@ri.ncvc.go.jp

    2006-10-01

    Spectrin repeat (SR)-containing proteins are important for regulation of integrity of biomembranes, not only the plasma membrane but also those of intracellular organelles, such as the Golgi, nucleus, endo/lysosomes, and synaptic vesicles. We identified a novel SR-containing protein, named GSRP-56 (Golgi-localized SR-containing protein-56), by a yeast two-hybrid method, using a member of the transient receptor potential channel family, TRPV2, as bait. GSRP-56 is an isoform derived from a giant SR-containing protein, Syne-1 (synaptic nuclear envelope protein-1, also referred to as Nesprin-1 or Enaptin), predicted to be produced by alternative splicing. Immunological analysis demonstrated that this isoform is a 56-kDa protein, which is localized predominantly in the Golgi apparatus in cardiomyocytes and C2C12 myoblasts/myotubes, and we found that two SR domains were required both for Golgi targeting and for interaction with TRPV2. Interestingly, overexpression of GSRP-56 resulted in a morphological change in the Golgi structure, characterized by its enlargement of cis-Golgi marker antibody-staining area, which would result partly from fragmentation of Golgi membranes. Our findings indicate that GSRP-56 is a novel, particularly small Golgi-localized member of the spectrin family, which possibly play a role in maintenance of the Golgi structure.

  18. RRW: repeated random walks on genome-scale protein networks for local cluster discovery

    PubMed Central

    Macropol, Kathy; Can, Tolga; Singh, Ambuj K

    2009-01-01

    Background We propose an efficient and biologically sensitive algorithm based on repeated random walks (RRW) for discovering functional modules, e.g., complexes and pathways, within large-scale protein networks. Compared to existing cluster identification techniques, RRW implicitly makes use of network topology, edge weights, and long range interactions between proteins. Results We apply the proposed technique on a functional network of yeast genes and accurately identify statistically significant clusters of proteins. We validate the biological significance of the results using known complexes in the MIPS complex catalogue database and well-characterized biological processes. We find that 90% of the created clusters have the majority of their catalogued proteins belonging to the same MIPS complex, and about 80% have the majority of their proteins involved in the same biological process. We compare our method to various other clustering techniques, such as the Markov Clustering Algorithm (MCL), and find a significant improvement in the RRW clusters' precision and accuracy values. Conclusion RRW, which is a technique that exploits the topology of the network, is more precise and robust in finding local clusters. In addition, it has the added flexibility of being able to find multi-functional proteins by allowing overlapping clusters. PMID:19740439

  19. The αRep artificial repeat protein scaffold: a new tool for crystallization and live cell applications.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Chevrel, Anne; Guellouz, Asma; Ferrandez, Yann; Mesneau, Agnès; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    We have designed a new family of artificial proteins, named αRep, based on HEAT (acronym for Huntingtin, elongation factor 3 (EF3), protein pphosphatase 2A (PP2A), yeast kinase Tor1) repeat proteins containing an α-helical repeated motif. The sequence of the repeated motifs, first identified in a thermostable archae protein was optimized using a consensus design strategy and used for the construction of a library of artificial proteins. All proteins from this library share the same general fold but differ both in the number of repeats and in five highly randomized amino acid positions within each repeat. The randomized side chains altogether provide a hypervariable surface on αRep variants. Sequences from this library are efficiently expressed as soluble, folded and very stable proteins. αRep binders with high affinity for various protein targets were selected by phage display. Low micromolar to nanomolar dissociation constants between partners were measured and the structures of several complexes (specific αRep/protein target) were solved by X-ray crystallography. Using GFP as a model target, it was demonstrated that αReps can be used as bait in pull-down experiments. αReps can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and specifically interact with their target addressed to different cell compartments. PMID:26517888

  20. A combined NMR and computational approach to investigate peptide binding to a designed Armadillo repeat protein.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Christina; Christen, Martin T; Watson, Randall P; Mihajlovic, Maja; Zhou, Ting; Honegger, Annemarie; Plückthun, Andreas; Caflisch, Amedeo; Zerbe, Oliver

    2015-05-22

    The specific recognition of peptide sequences by proteins plays an important role both in biology and in diagnostic applications. Here we characterize the relatively weak binding of the peptide neurotensin (NT) to the previously developed Armadillo repeat protein VG_328 by a multidisciplinary approach based on solution NMR spectroscopy, mutational studies, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, totaling 20μs for all MD runs. We describe assignment challenges arising from the repetitive nature of the protein sequence, and we present novel approaches to address them. Partial assignments obtained for VG_328 in combination with chemical shift perturbations allowed us to identify the repeats not involved in binding. Their subsequent elimination resulted in a reduced-size binder with very similar affinity for NT, for which near-complete backbone assignments were achieved. A binding mode suggested by automatic docking and further validated by explicit solvent MD simulations is consistent with paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data collected using spin-labeled NT. Favorable intermolecular interactions are observed in the MD simulations for the residues that were previously shown to contribute to binding in an Ala scan of NT. We further characterized the role of residues within the N-cap for protein stability and peptide binding. Our multidisciplinary approach demonstrates that an initial low-resolution picture for a low-micromolar-peptide binder can be refined through the combination of NMR, protein design, docking, and MD simulations to establish its binding mode, even in the absence of crystallographic data, thereby providing valuable information for further design. PMID:25816772

  1. Highly Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers for Repeated Protein Digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byoung Chan; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Lee, Sang-mok; Ahn, Hye-kyung; Nair, Sujith; Kim, Seong H.; Kim, Beom S.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Camp, David G.; Grate, Jay W.; Smith, Richard D.; Koo, Yoon-mo; Gu, Man Bock; Kim, Jungbae

    2009-04-01

    A stable and robust trypsin-based biocatalytic system was developed and demonstrated for proteomic applications. The system utilizes polymer nanofibers coated with trypsin aggregates for immobilized protease digestions. After covalently attaching an initial layer of trypsin to the polymer nanofibers, highly concentrated trypsin molecules are crosslinked to the layered trypsin by way of a glutaraldehyde treatment. This new process produced a 300-fold increase in trypsin activity compared with a conventional method for covalent trypsin immobilization and proved to be robust in that it still maintained a high level of activity after a year of repeated recycling. This highly stable form of immobilized trypsin was also resistant to autolysis, enabling repeated digestions of bovine serum albumin over 40 days and successful peptide identification by LC-MS/MS. Finally, the immobilized trypsin was resistant to proteolysis when exposed to other enzymes (i.e. chymotrypsin), which makes it suitable for use in “real-world” proteomic applications. Overall, the biocatalytic nanofibers with enzyme aggregate coatings proved to be an effective approach for repeated and automated protein digestion in proteomic analyses.

  2. Elemental Analysis and Protein Quantification of Raw Natural Rubber of IAC Series 400 Clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein, nitrogen and sulfur contents were investigated for natural rubber from commercial Hevea, synthetic polyisoprene, and new IAC clones from Mococa city (IAC 405, 406, 410, 413, and 420), Jaú city (IAC 400, 401, 402, and 417), and from RRIM 600 clone (used as a control in both cases). IAC 405 a...

  3. Crystallization of a pentapeptide-repeat protein by reductive cyclic pentylation of free amines with glutaraldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Vetting, Matthew W. Hegde, Subray S.; Blanchard, John S.

    2009-05-01

    A method to modify proteins with glutaraldehyde under reducing conditions is presented. Treatment with glutaraldehyde and dimethylaminoborane was found to result in cyclic pentylation of free amines and facilitated the structural determination of a protein previously recalcitrant to the formation of diffraction quality crystals. The pentapeptide-repeat protein EfsQnr from Enterococcus faecalis protects DNA gyrase from inhibition by fluoroquinolones. EfsQnr was cloned and purified to homogeneity, but failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals in initial crystallization screens. Treatment of EfsQnr with glutaraldehyde and the strong reducing agent borane–dimethylamine resulted in a derivatized protein which produced crystals that diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution; their structure was subsequently determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Analysis of the derivatized protein using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry indicated a mass increase of 68 Da per free amino group. Electron-density maps about a limited number of structurally ordered lysines indicated that the modification was a cyclic pentylation of free amines, producing piperidine groups.

  4. Characterization of Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Proteins Critical for Cilia Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanan; Cao, Jingli; Huang, Shan; Feng, Di; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Xueliang; Yan, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    Cilia formation and function require a special set of trafficking machinery termed intraflagellar transport (IFT), consisting mainly of protein complexes IFT-A, IFT-B, BBSome, and microtubule-dependent molecular motors. Tetratricopeptide repeat-containing (TTC) proteins are widely involved in protein complex formation. Nine of them are known to serve as components of the IFT or BBSome complexes. How many TTC proteins are cilia-related and how they function, however, remain unclear. Here we show that twenty TTC genes were upregulated by at least 2-fold during the differentiation of cultured mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs) into multiciliated cells. Our systematic screen in zebrafish identified four novel TTC genes, ttc4, -9c, -36, and -39c, that are critical for cilia formation and motility. Accordingly, their zebrafish morphants displayed typical ciliopathy-related phenotypes, including curved body, abnormal otolith, hydrocephalus, and defective left-right patterning. The morphants of ttc4 and ttc25, a known cilia-related gene, additionally showed pronephric cyst formation. Immunoprecipitation indicated associations of TTC4, -9c, -25, -36, and -39c with components or entire complexes of IFT-A, IFT-B, or BBSome, implying their participations in IFT or IFT-related activities. Our results provide a global view for the relationship between TTC proteins and cilia. PMID:25860617

  5. Identification and characterization of the RNA binding surface of the pentatricopeptide repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Kawabata, Masuyo; Hisano, Keizo; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsuoka, Ken; Sugita, Mamoru; Nakamura, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    The expressions of chloroplast and mitochondria genes are tightly controlled by numerous nuclear-encoded proteins, mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Recent analyses have identified a large, plant-specific family of pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing proteins that are exclusively involved in RNA metabolism of organelle genes via sequence-specific RNA binding. A tandem array of PPR motifs within the protein is believed to facilitate the RNA interaction, although little is known of the mechanism. Here, we describe the RNA interacting framework of a PPR protein, Arabidopsis HCF152. First, we demonstrated that a Pfam model could be relevant to the PPR motif function. A series of proteins with two PPR motifs showed significant differences in their RNA binding affinities, indicating functional differences among PPR motifs. Mutagenesis and informatics analysis putatively identified five amino acids organizing its RNA binding surface [the 1st, 4th, 8th, 12th and ‘ii’(-2nd) amino acids] and their complex connections. SELEX (Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and nucleobase preference assays determined the nucleobases with high affinity for HCF152 and suggested several characteristic amino acids that may be involved in determining specificity and/or affinity of the PPR/RNA interaction. PMID:22127869

  6. Role of extracytoplasmic leucine rich repeat proteins in plant defence mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, V

    2005-01-01

    Plant-pathogen interactions involve highly complex series of reactions in disease development. Plants are endowed with both, resistance and defence genes. The activation of defence genes after contact with avirulence gene products of pathogens depends on signals transduced by leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) contained in resistance genes. Additionally, LRRs play roles for various actions following ligand recognition. Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs), the only plant LRR protein with known ligands, are pectinase inhibitors, bound by ionic interactions to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of plant cells. They have a high affinity for fungal endopolygalacturonases (endoPGs). PGIP genes are organised in families encoding proteins with similar physical characteristics but different specificities. They are induced by infection and stress related signals. The molecular basis of PG-PGIP interaction serves as a model to understand the evolution of plant LRR proteins in recognising non-self-molecules. Extensins form a different class of structural proteins with repetitive sequences. They are also regulated by wounding and pathogen infection. Linkage of extensins with LRR motifs is highly significant in defending host tissues against pathogen invasion. Overexpression of PGIPs or expression of several PGIPs in a plant tissue, and perhaps manipulation of extensin expression could be possible strategies for disease management. PMID:15782942

  7. Raw materials.

    PubMed

    Peters, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    Industrial fermentations need raw materials that fulfill the requirements of the organism (suitable carbon and nitrogen source, minerals and specific nutrients) and that are available in a high quantity and quality. This contribution gives a comprehensive overview, including the new trends and progress of recent years. The use of feedstock based on several raw materials such as sugar, starch, inulin and lignocellulose is discussed. Biomass-based raw materials are by far the most applied feedstocks for fermentation. However, there are also raw materials for fermentations derived from the petrochemical industry. These substrates are especially hydrocarbons, alcohols and carboxylic acids. Some applications are given in this chapter. PMID:17408080

  8. Dietary Protein Sources Affect Internal Quality of Raw and Cooked Shell Eggs under Refrigerated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. C.; Zhang, H. J.; Wu, S. G.; Yue, H. Y.; Wang, J.; Li, J.; Qi, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of various protein sources (soybean meal, SBM; cottonseed protein, CSP; double-zero rapeseed meal, DRM) on the internal quality of refrigerated eggs. A total of 360 laying hens (32 wk of age) were randomly allotted to six treatment groups (five replicates per treatment) and fed diets containing SBM, CSP, or DRM individually or in combination with equal crude protein content (SBM-CSP, SBM-DRM, and CSP-DRM) as the protein ingredient(s). A 6×3 factorial arrangement was employed with dietary types and storage time (0 d, 2 wk, and 4 wk) as the main effects. After 12 wk of diet feeding, a total of 270 eggs were collected for egg quality determination. The egg Haugh unit (HU) in the CSP, SBM-DRM, and DRM groups were significantly lower than those in the SBM and SBM-CSP groups. The hardness and springiness of the cooked yolk in the CSP group were significantly higher than those in the other treatment groups. A lower HU, lower yolk index and higher albumen pH were observed in the DRM group compared to the SBM and SBM-CSP groups when the eggs were stored to 4 wk, and the HU was improved in the CSP-DRM group compared to the DRM group (p<0.05). Higher yolk hardness was observed in the CSP group compared to the other groups during storage (p<0.05), but the hardness of the cooked yolk in the SBM-CSP and CSP-DRM groups showed no difference in comparison to the SBM group. In conclusion, CSP may ameliorate the negative effects of DRM on the HU of refrigerated eggs, and SBM or DRM may alleviate the adverse effects of CSP on yolk hardness. PMID:26580286

  9. WD40-Repeat Proteins in Plant Cell Wall Formation: Current Evidence and Research Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Ezcurra, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic complexity of living organisms relies on supramolecular protein structures which ensure vital processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In eukaryotes WD40-repeat (WDR) proteins often function as molecular “hubs” mediating supramolecular interactions. WDR proteins may display a variety of interacting partners and participate in the assembly of complexes involved in distinct cellular functions. In plants, the formation of lignocellulosic biomass involves extensive synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides, a process that requires the assembly of large transmembrane enzyme complexes, intensive vesicle trafficking, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and coordinated gene expression. Because of their function as supramolecular hubs, WDR proteins could participate in each or any of these steps, although to date only few WDR proteins have been linked to the cell wall by experimental evidence. Nevertheless, several potential cell wall-related WDR proteins were recently identified using in silico approaches, such as analyses of co-expression, interactome and conserved gene neighborhood. Notably, some WDR genes are frequently genomic neighbors of genes coding for GT2-family polysaccharide synthases in eukaryotes, and this WDR-GT2 collinear microsynteny is detected in diverse taxa. In angiosperms, two WDR genes are collinear to cellulose synthase genes, CesAs, whereas in ascomycetous fungi several WDR genes are adjacent to chitin synthase genes, chs. In this Perspective we summarize and discuss experimental and in silico studies on the possible involvement of WDR proteins in plant cell wall formation. The prospects of biotechnological engineering for enhanced biomass production are discussed. PMID:26734023

  10. An update on polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), a leucine-rich repeat protein that protects crop plants against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kalunke, Raviraj M.; Tundo, Silvio; Benedetti, Manuel; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall proteins that inhibit the pectin-depolymerizing activity of polygalacturonases secreted by microbial pathogens and insects. These ubiquitous inhibitors have a leucine-rich repeat structure that is strongly conserved in monocot and dicot plants. Previous reviews have summarized the importance of PGIP in plant defense and the structural basis of PG-PGIP interaction; here we update the current knowledge about PGIPs with the recent findings on the composition and evolution of pgip gene families, with a special emphasis on legume and cereal crops. We also update the information about the inhibition properties of single pgip gene products against microbial PGs and the results, including field tests, showing the capacity of PGIP to protect crop plants against fungal, oomycetes and bacterial pathogens. PMID:25852708

  11. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  12. BB0238, a Presumed Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Protein, Is Required during Borrelia burgdorferi Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Groshong, Ashley M.; Fortune, Danielle E.; Moore, Brendan P.; Spencer, Horace J.; Skinner, Robert A.; Bellamy, William T.

    2014-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, occupies both a tick vector and mammalian host in nature. Considering the unique enzootic life cycle of B. burgdorferi, it is not surprising that a large proportion of its genome is composed of hypothetical proteins not found in other bacterial pathogens. bb0238 encodes a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function that is predicted to contain a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain, a structural motif responsible for mediating protein-protein interactions. To evaluate the role of bb0238 during mammalian infection, a bb0238-deficient mutant was constructed. The bb0238 mutant was attenuated in mice infected via needle inoculation, and complementation of bb0238 expression restored infectivity to wild-type levels. bb0238 expression does not change in response to varying culture conditions, and thus, it appears to be constitutively expressed under in vitro conditions. bb0238 is expressed in murine tissues during infection, though there was no significant change in expression levels among different tissue types. Localization studies indicate that BB0238 is associated with the inner membrane of the spirochete and is therefore unlikely to promote interaction with host ligands during infection. B. burgdorferi clones containing point mutations in conserved residues of the putative TPR motif of BB0238 demonstrated attenuation in mice that was comparable to that in the bb0238 deletion mutant, suggesting that BB0238 may contain a functional TPR domain. PMID:25069985

  13. BB0238, a presumed tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein, is required during Borrelia burgdorferi mammalian infection.

    PubMed

    Groshong, Ashley M; Fortune, Danielle E; Moore, Brendan P; Spencer, Horace J; Skinner, Robert A; Bellamy, William T; Blevins, Jon S

    2014-10-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, occupies both a tick vector and mammalian host in nature. Considering the unique enzootic life cycle of B. burgdorferi, it is not surprising that a large proportion of its genome is composed of hypothetical proteins not found in other bacterial pathogens. bb0238 encodes a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function that is predicted to contain a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain, a structural motif responsible for mediating protein-protein interactions. To evaluate the role of bb0238 during mammalian infection, a bb0238-deficient mutant was constructed. The bb0238 mutant was attenuated in mice infected via needle inoculation, and complementation of bb0238 expression restored infectivity to wild-type levels. bb0238 expression does not change in response to varying culture conditions, and thus, it appears to be constitutively expressed under in vitro conditions. bb0238 is expressed in murine tissues during infection, though there was no significant change in expression levels among different tissue types. Localization studies indicate that BB0238 is associated with the inner membrane of the spirochete and is therefore unlikely to promote interaction with host ligands during infection. B. burgdorferi clones containing point mutations in conserved residues of the putative TPR motif of BB0238 demonstrated attenuation in mice that was comparable to that in the bb0238 deletion mutant, suggesting that BB0238 may contain a functional TPR domain. PMID:25069985

  14. Pentapeptide-repeat proteins that act as topoisomerase poison resistance factors have a common dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Zhang, Yong; Blanchard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The protein AlbG is a self-resistance factor against albicidin, a nonribosomally encoded hybrid polyketide-peptide with antibiotic and phytotoxic properties produced by Xanthomonas albilineans. Primary-sequence analysis indicates that AlbG is a member of the pentapeptide-repeat family of proteins (PRP). The structure of AlbG from X. albilineans was determined at 2.0 Å resolution by SAD phasing using data collected from a single trimethyllead acetate derivative on a home source. AlbG folds into a right-handed quadrilateral β-helix composed of approximately eight semi-regular coils. The regularity of the β-­helix is blemished by a large loop/deviation in the β-helix between coils 4 and 5. The C-terminus of the β-helix is capped by a dimerization module, yielding a dimer with a 110 Å semi-collinear β-helical axis. This method of dimer formation appears to be common to all PRP proteins that confer resistance to topoisomerase poisons and contrasts with most PRP proteins, which are typically monomeric. PMID:21393830

  15. A Wd Repeat Protein, Rec14, Essential for Meiotic Recombination in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D. H.; Li, Y. F.; Fox, M. E.; Smith, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe rec14 gene reduce meiotic recombination by as much as a factor of 1000 in the three intervals tested on chromosomes I and III. A DNA clone complementing the rec14 mutation was shown by genetic and physical analysis to contain the rec14 gene, which was functional in plasmid-borne inserts as small as 1.4 kb. The rec14 gene contains two exons separated by a 53-bp intron, which was confirmed by analysis of rec14 transcripts. The spliced transcript encodes a protein product of 302 amino acids, which contains six WD repeat motifs found in the G-beta transducin family of proteins and other proteins, including the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ski8 (Rec103) protein. Although the rec14 transcripts were present in mitotically dividing cells, rec14 mutations had no detectable effect on mitotic recombination. The pattern of expression of rec14 differs from that of previously analyzed S. pombe rec genes. Based upon mutant phenotypes and amino acid sequence similarities, we propose that S. pombe Rec14 is a functional homologue of S. cerevisiae Rec103. PMID:9258671

  16. Sustained downregulation of YY1-associated protein-related protein gene expression in rat hippocampus induced by repeated electroconvulsive shock.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Takayuki; Kanamatsu, Tomoyuki; Fujita, Mariko; Takagi, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Junji

    2011-01-01

    YY1AP-related protein (YARP) is a structural homolog of YY1-associated protein (YY1AP), which has a YY1-binding domain. During perinatal development, YARP mRNA expression is increased at a late stage of embryonic neurogenesis. It is not known whether YARP expression is regulated during adult neurogenesis. Electroconvulsive shock (ECS), a model for a highly effective depression treatment, is known to induce hippocampal neurogenesis after repeated treatment, so we employed ECS to measure the expression of YARP mRNA. Northern blots revealed significantly decreased expression of the YARP gene after repeated ECS but not single ECS. In situ hybridization clearly demonstrated a reduction of YARP mRNA expression in the CA (CA1, CA2, and CA3) subfields. Although clonic-tonic seizure was induced not only by ECS but also by injection of kainic acid to the striatum, the regulation of YARP mRNA expression was different between ECS and kainic acid. YARP mRNA was decreased only by the ECS method, suggesting that YARP expression is different at embryonic and adult neurogenic stage. PMID:21415536

  17. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a pentapeptide-repeat protein (Rfr23) from bacterium Cyanothece 511421

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Ni, Shuisong; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2006-12-01

    A unique feature of cyanobacteria genomes is the abundance of genes that code for hypothetical proteins containing tandem pentapeptide repeats approximately described by the consensus motif A[N/D]LXX. Too date, structures of two pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) have been determined with the tandem pentapeptide repeat sequences observed to adopt a novel right-handed quadrilateral b-helix, or Rfr-fold, in both structures. One structure, Mycobacterium tuberculosis MfpA, is a 183-residue protein that contains 30 consecutive pentapeptide repeats and appears to offer antibiotic resistance by acting as a DNA mimic. The other structure, Cyanothece Rfr32, is a 167-residue protein that contains 21 consecutive pentapeptide repeats. The function of Rfr32, like the other 35 hypothetical PRPs identified in the genome of Cyanothece, is unknown. In an effort to understand the role of PRPs in cyanobacteria, and to better characterize the structural properties of Rfr-folds with different amino acid sequences, a second PRP from Cyanothece 51142, Rfr23, has been cloned, expressed, and purified. Selenomethione substituted protein was crystallized by vapor diffusion in hanging drops. MAD diffraction data were collected on these crystals to 2.? Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to space group I41 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.23 Å, c = 52.40 Å. Analysis of the 172-residue protein sequence suggests that Rfr23 contains 26 pentapeptide repeats interrupted by eight residues near the N-terminus. The electron density map suggests that the pentapeptide repeats adopt a similar right-handed quadrilateral b-helix as observed in the other two PRP structures, however, the eight residue interruption in the string of pentapeptide repeats appears to create a distortion in the Rfr-fold.

  18. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zemin; Tan, Jianjie; Shi, Zhenying; Xie, Qingjun; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-06-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3' untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  19. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprCN and TprCC) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSPN and MOSPC) of Treponema denticola and that TprCC is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSPC-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSPN-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSPC-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSPN and MOSPC-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSPN-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. PMID:25805501

  20. Expression of Anaplasma marginale ankyrin repeat-containing proteins during infection of the mammalian host and tick vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using searches of the NCBI conserved domain database and SMART genomic architecture analysis, we identified three ankyrin repeat-containing genes in Anaplasma marginale: AM705, AM926 and AM638. Recombinant protein was used to immunize mice and generate fusion hybridomas secreting protein-specific mo...

  1. Destabilizing an interacting motif strengthens the association of a designed ankyrin repeat protein with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shoeb; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Dreier, Birgit; Hamdane, Djemel; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Plückthun, Andreas; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Affinity maturation by random mutagenesis and selection is an established technique to make binding molecules more suitable for applications in biomedical research, diagnostics and therapy. Here we identified an unexpected novel mechanism of affinity increase upon in vitro evolution of a tubulin-specific designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin). Structural analysis indicated that in the progenitor DARPin the C-terminal capping repeat (C-cap) undergoes a 25° rotation to avoid a clash with tubulin upon binding. Additionally, the C-cap appears to be involved in electrostatic repulsion with tubulin. Biochemical and structural characterizations demonstrated that the evolved mutants achieved a gain in affinity through destabilization of the C-cap, which relieves the need of a DARPin conformational change upon tubulin binding and removes unfavorable interactions in the complex. Therefore, this specific case of an order-to-disorder transition led to a 100-fold tighter complex with a subnanomolar equilibrium dissociation constant, remarkably associated with a 30% decrease of the binding surface. PMID:27380724

  2. Destabilizing an interacting motif strengthens the association of a designed ankyrin repeat protein with tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shoeb; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Dreier, Birgit; Hamdane, Djemel; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Plückthun, Andreas; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Affinity maturation by random mutagenesis and selection is an established technique to make binding molecules more suitable for applications in biomedical research, diagnostics and therapy. Here we identified an unexpected novel mechanism of affinity increase upon in vitro evolution of a tubulin-specific designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin). Structural analysis indicated that in the progenitor DARPin the C-terminal capping repeat (C-cap) undergoes a 25° rotation to avoid a clash with tubulin upon binding. Additionally, the C-cap appears to be involved in electrostatic repulsion with tubulin. Biochemical and structural characterizations demonstrated that the evolved mutants achieved a gain in affinity through destabilization of the C-cap, which relieves the need of a DARPin conformational change upon tubulin binding and removes unfavorable interactions in the complex. Therefore, this specific case of an order-to-disorder transition led to a 100-fold tighter complex with a subnanomolar equilibrium dissociation constant, remarkably associated with a 30% decrease of the binding surface. PMID:27380724

  3. TAPO: A combined method for the identification of tandem repeats in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Do Viet, Phuong; Roche, Daniel B; Kajava, Andrey V

    2015-09-14

    In recent years, there has been an emergence of new 3D structures of proteins containing tandem repeats (TRs), as a result of improved expression and crystallization strategies. Databases focused on structure classifications (PDB, SCOP, CATH) do not provide an easy solution for selection of these structures from PDB. Several approaches have been developed, but no best approach exists to identify the whole range of 3D TRs. Here we describe the TAndem PrOtein detector (TAPO) that uses periodicities of atomic coordinates and other types of structural representation, including strings generated by conformational alphabets, residue contact maps, and arrangements of vectors of secondary structure elements. The benchmarking shows the superior performance of TAPO over the existing programs. In accordance with our analysis of PDB using TAPO, 19% of proteins contain 3D TRs. This analysis allowed us to identify new families of 3D TRs, suggesting that TAPO can be used to regularly update the collection and classification of existing repetitive structures. PMID:26320412

  4. Leucine-rich pentatricopeptide-repeat containing protein regulates mitochondrial transcription.

    PubMed

    Sondheimer, Neal; Fang, Ji-Kang; Polyak, Erzsebet; Falk, Marni J; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2010-09-01

    Mitochondrial function depends upon the coordinated expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Although the basal factors that carry out the process of mitochondrial transcription are known, the regulation of this process is incompletely understood. To further our understanding of mitochondrial gene regulation, we identified proteins that bound to the previously described point of termination for the major mRNA-coding transcript H2. One was the leucine-rich pentatricopeptide-repeat containing protein (LRPPRC), which has been linked to the French-Canadian variant of Leigh syndrome. Cells with reduced expression of LRPPRC had a reduction in oxygen consumption. The expression of mitochondrial mRNA and tRNA was dependent upon LRPPRC levels, but reductions in LRPPRC did not affect the expression of mitochondrial rRNA. Reduction of LRPPRC levels interfered with mitochondrial transcription in vitro but did not affect the stability of mitochondrial mRNAs or alter the expression of nuclear genes responsible for mitochondrial transcription in vivo. These findings demonstrate the control of mitochondrial mRNA synthesis by a protein that has an established role in regulating nuclear transcription and a link to mitochondrial disease. PMID:20677761

  5. CD4-Specific Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins Are Novel Potent HIV Entry Inhibitors with Unique Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Andreas; Rusert, Peter; Berlinger, Livia; Ruprecht, Claudia R.; Mann, Axel; Corthésy, Stéphanie; Turville, Stuart G.; Aravantinou, Meropi; Fischer, Marek; Robbiani, Melissa; Amstutz, Patrick; Trkola, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation of a novel type of HIV entry inhibitor using the recently developed Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARPin) technology. DARPin proteins specific for human CD4 were selected from a DARPin DNA library using ribosome display. Selected pool members interacted specifically with CD4 and competed with gp120 for binding to CD4. DARPin proteins derived in the initial selection series inhibited HIV in a dose-dependent manner, but showed a relatively high variability in their capacity to block replication of patient isolates on primary CD4 T cells. In consequence, a second series of CD4-specific DARPins with improved affinity for CD4 was generated. These 2nd series DARPins potently inhibit infection of genetically divergent (subtype B and C) HIV isolates in the low nanomolar range, independent of coreceptor usage. Importantly, the actions of the CD4 binding DARPins were highly specific: no effect on cell viability or activation, CD4 memory cell function, or interference with CD4-independent virus entry was observed. These novel CD4 targeting molecules described here combine the unique characteristics of DARPins—high physical stability, specificity and low production costs—with the capacity to potently block HIV entry, rendering them promising candidates for microbicide development. PMID:18654624

  6. Characterization of the Plasmodium Interspersed Repeats (PIR) proteins of Plasmodium chabaudi indicates functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Yam, Xue Yan; Brugat, Thibaut; Siau, Anthony; Lawton, Jennifer; Wong, Daniel S; Farah, Abdirahman; Twang, Jing Shun; Gao, Xiaohong; Langhorne, Jean; Preiser, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium multigene families play a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria. The Plasmodium interspersed repeat (pir) genes comprise the largest multigene family in many Plasmodium spp. However their function(s) remains unknown. Using the rodent model of malaria, Plasmodium chabaudi, we show that individual CIR proteins have differential localizations within infected red cell (iRBC), suggesting different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. Some CIRs appear to be located on the surface of iRBC and merozoites and are therefore well placed to interact with host molecules. In line with this hypothesis, we show for the first time that a subset of recombinant CIRs bind mouse RBCs suggesting a role for CIR in rosette formation and/or invasion. Together, our results unravel differences in subcellular localization and ability to bind mouse erythrocytes between the members of the cir family, which strongly suggest different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. PMID:26996203

  7. Characterization of the Plasmodium Interspersed Repeats (PIR) proteins of Plasmodium chabaudi indicates functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Xue Yan; Brugat, Thibaut; Siau, Anthony; Lawton, Jennifer; Wong, Daniel S.; Farah, Abdirahman; Twang, Jing Shun; Gao, Xiaohong; Langhorne, Jean; Preiser, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium multigene families play a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria. The Plasmodium interspersed repeat (pir) genes comprise the largest multigene family in many Plasmodium spp. However their function(s) remains unknown. Using the rodent model of malaria, Plasmodium chabaudi, we show that individual CIR proteins have differential localizations within infected red cell (iRBC), suggesting different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. Some CIRs appear to be located on the surface of iRBC and merozoites and are therefore well placed to interact with host molecules. In line with this hypothesis, we show for the first time that a subset of recombinant CIRs bind mouse RBCs suggesting a role for CIR in rosette formation and/or invasion. Together, our results unravel differences in subcellular localization and ability to bind mouse erythrocytes between the members of the cir family, which strongly suggest different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. PMID:26996203

  8. Programmable DNA-binding proteins from Burkholderia provide a fresh perspective on the TALE-like repeat domain

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Dietze, Jörn; Elsaesser, Janett; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The tandem repeats of transcription activator like effectors (TALEs) mediate sequence-specific DNA binding using a simple code. Naturally, TALEs are injected by Xanthomonas bacteria into plant cells to manipulate the host transcriptome. In the laboratory TALE DNA binding domains are reprogrammed and used to target a fused functional domain to a genomic locus of choice. Research into the natural diversity of TALE-like proteins may provide resources for the further improvement of current TALE technology. Here we describe TALE-like proteins from the endosymbiotic bacterium Burkholderia rhizoxinica, termed Bat proteins. Bat repeat domains mediate sequence-specific DNA binding with the same code as TALEs, despite less than 40% sequence identity. We show that Bat proteins can be adapted for use as transcription factors and nucleases and that sequence preferences can be reprogrammed. Unlike TALEs, the core repeats of each Bat protein are highly polymorphic. This feature allowed us to explore alternative strategies for the design of custom Bat repeat arrays, providing novel insights into the functional relevance of non-RVD residues. The Bat proteins offer fertile grounds for research into the creation of improved programmable DNA-binding proteins and comparative insights into TALE-like evolution. PMID:24792163

  9. Identification of protein phosphatase 2A as an interacting protein of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis S; Jacob, Wright; Neumann, Sebastian; Kutsch, Miriam; Wolters, Dirk; Tan, Eng K; Bichler, Zoë; Herrmann, Christian; Heumann, Rolf

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the gene coding for the multi-domain protein leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the leading cause of genetically inherited Parkinson's disease (PD). Two of the common found mutations are the R1441C and G2019S. In this study we identified protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as an interacting partner of LRRK2. We were able to demonstrate that the Ras of complex protein (ROC) domain is sufficient to interact with the three subunits of PP2A in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and in HeLa cells. The alpha subunit of PP2A is interacting with LRRK2 in the perinuclear region of HeLa cells. Silencing the catalytic subunit of PP2A by shRNA aggravated cellular degeneration induced by the pathogenic R1441C-LRRK2 mutant expressed in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. A similar enhancement of apoptotic nuclei was observed by downregulation of the catalytic subunit of PP2A in cultured cortical cells derived from neurons overexpressing the pathogenic mutant G2019S-LRRK2. Conversely, pharmacological activation of PP2A by sodium selenate showed a partial neuroprotection from R1441C-LRRK2-induced cellular degeneration. All these data suggest that PP2A is a new interacting partner of LRRK2 and reveal the importance of PP2A as a potential therapeutic target in PD. PMID:26894577

  10. The Protein Synthesis Inhibitor Blasticidin S Enters Mammalian Cells via Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Protein 8D

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clarissa C.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Sabatini, David M.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2014-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing 8 (LRRC8) proteins have been identified as putative receptors involved in lymphocyte development and adipocyte differentiation. They remain poorly characterized, and no specific function has been assigned to them. There is no consensus on how this family of proteins might function because homology searches suggest that members of the LRRC8 family act not as plasma membrane receptors, but rather as channels that mediate cell-cell signaling. Here we provide experimental evidence that supports a role for LRRC8s in the transport of small molecules. We show that LRRC8D is a mammalian protein required for the import of the antibiotic blasticidin S. We characterize localization and topology of LRRC8A and LRRC8D and demonstrate that LRRC8D interacts with LRRC8A, LRRC8B, and LRRC8C. Given the suggested involvement in solute transport, our results support a model in which LRRC8s form one or more complexes that may mediate cell-cell communication by transporting small solutes. PMID:24782309

  11. Characterization of TtALV2, an Essential Charged Repeat Motif Protein of the Tetrahymena thermophila Membrane Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    El-Haddad, Houda; Przyborski, Jude M.; Kraft, Lesleigh G. K.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Waller, Ross F.

    2013-01-01

    Alveolins are a recently described class of proteins common to all members of the superphylum Alveolata that are characterized by conserved charged repeat motifs (CRMs) but whose exact function remains unknown. We have analyzed the smaller of the two alveolins of Tetrahymena thermophila, TtALV2. The protein localizes to dispersed, broken patches arranged between the rows of the longitudinal microtubules. Macronuclear knockdown of Ttalv2 leads to multinuclear cells with no apparent cell polarity and randomly occurring cell protrusions, either by interrupting pellicle integrity or by disturbing cytokinesis. Correct association of TtALV2 with the alveoli or the pellicle is complex and depends on both the termini as well as the charged repeat motifs of the protein. Proteins containing similar CRMs are a dominant part of the ciliate membrane cytoskeleton, suggesting that these motifs may play a more general role in mediating membrane attachment and/or cytoskeletal association. To better understand their integration into the cytoskeleton, we localized a range of CRM-based fusion proteins, which suggested there is an inherent tendency for proteins with CRMs to be located in the peripheral cytoskeleton, some nucleating as filaments at the basal bodies. Even a synthetic protein, mimicking the charge and repeat pattern of these proteins, directed a reporter protein to a variety of peripheral cytoskeletal structures in Tetrahymena. These motifs might provide a blueprint for membrane and cytoskeleton affiliation in the complex pellicles of Alveolata. PMID:23606287

  12. Characterization of TtALV2, an essential charged repeat motif protein of the Tetrahymena thermophila membrane skeleton.

    PubMed

    El-Haddad, Houda; Przyborski, Jude M; Kraft, Lesleigh G K; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Waller, Ross F; Gould, Sven B

    2013-06-01

    Alveolins are a recently described class of proteins common to all members of the superphylum Alveolata that are characterized by conserved charged repeat motifs (CRMs) but whose exact function remains unknown. We have analyzed the smaller of the two alveolins of Tetrahymena thermophila, TtALV2. The protein localizes to dispersed, broken patches arranged between the rows of the longitudinal microtubules. Macronuclear knockdown of Ttalv2 leads to multinuclear cells with no apparent cell polarity and randomly occurring cell protrusions, either by interrupting pellicle integrity or by disturbing cytokinesis. Correct association of TtALV2 with the alveoli or the pellicle is complex and depends on both the termini as well as the charged repeat motifs of the protein. Proteins containing similar CRMs are a dominant part of the ciliate membrane cytoskeleton, suggesting that these motifs may play a more general role in mediating membrane attachment and/or cytoskeletal association. To better understand their integration into the cytoskeleton, we localized a range of CRM-based fusion proteins, which suggested there is an inherent tendency for proteins with CRMs to be located in the peripheral cytoskeleton, some nucleating as filaments at the basal bodies. Even a synthetic protein, mimicking the charge and repeat pattern of these proteins, directed a reporter protein to a variety of peripheral cytoskeletal structures in Tetrahymena. These motifs might provide a blueprint for membrane and cytoskeleton affiliation in the complex pellicles of Alveolata. PMID:23606287

  13. Ribosome-associated pentatricopeptide repeat proteins function as translational activators in mitochondria of trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A; Qian, Yu; Huang, Lan; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, eubacterial-type ribosomal proteins, polypeptides lacking discernible motifs and approximately 20 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA binding proteins. Several PPRs also populate the polyadenylation complex; among these, KPAF1 and KPAF2 function as general mRNA 3' adenylation/uridylation factors. The A/U-tail enables mRNA binding to the small ribosomal subunit and is essential for translation. The presence of A/U-tail also correlates with requirement for translation of certain mRNAs in mammalian and insect parasite stages. Here, we inquired whether additional PPRs activate translation of individual mRNAs. Proteomic analysis identified KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 as components of the small ribosomal subunit in mammalian and insect forms, but also revealed their association with the polyadenylation complex in the latter. RNAi knockdowns demonstrated essential functions of KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 in the actively respiring insect stage, but not in the mammalian stage. In the KRIPP1 knockdown, A/U-tailed mRNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 declined concomitantly with the de novo synthesis of this subunit whereas polyadenylation and translation of cyb mRNA were unaffected. In contrast, the KRIPP8 knockdown inhibited A/U-tailing and translation of both CO1 and cyb mRNAs. Our findings indicate that ribosome-associated PPRs may selectively activate mRNAs for translation. PMID:26713541

  14. The tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein slow green1 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhihong; Xu, Fan; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    A new gene, SG1, was identified in a slow-greening mutant (sg1) isolated from an ethylmethanesulphonate-mutagenized population of Arabidopsis thaliana. The newly formed leaves of sg1 were initially albino, but gradually became pale green. After 3 weeks, the leaves of the mutant were as green as those of the wild-type plants. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed delayed proplastid to chloroplast transition. The results of map-based cloning showed that SG1 encodes a chloroplast-localized tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription–PCR data demonstrated the presence of SG1 gene expression in all tissues, particularly young green tissues. The sg1 mutation disrupted the expression levels of several genes associated with chloroplast development, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll biosynthesis. The results of genetic analysis indicated that gun1 and gun4 partially restored the expression patterns of the previously detected chloroplast-associated genes, thereby ameliorating the slow-greening phenotype of sg1. Taken together, the results suggest that the newly identified protein, SG1, is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. PMID:24420572

  15. Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma (PRAME) and the PRAME Family of Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Nora; Kewitz, Stefanie; Staege, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) is the best characterized member of the PRAME family of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins. Mammalian genomes contain multiple members of the PRAME family whereas in other vertebrate genomes only one PRAME-like LRR protein was identified. PRAME is a cancer/testis antigen that is expressed at very low levels in normal adult tissues except testis but at high levels in a variety of cancer cells. In contrast to most other cancer/testis antigens, PRAME is expressed not only in solid tumors but also in leukemia cells. Expression of PRAME and other members of the PRAME family is regulated epigenetically. PRAME interacts with varying pathways that might be directly involved in the malignant phenotype of cancer cells. For instance, PRAME is able to dominantly repress retinoic acid signaling in these cells. On the other hand, PRAME-derived peptides can be recognized as epitopes by cytotoxic T cells and PRAME represents an attractive target for immunological treatment strategies. PMID:26694250

  16. WD Repeat-containing Protein 5 (WDR5) Localizes to the Midbody and Regulates Abscission*

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Jeffrey K.; Fields, Alexander T.; Cheng, Kaijian; Lee, Albert; Wagenaar, Eric; Lagrois, Remy; Schmidt, Bailey; Xia, Bin; Ma, Dzwokai

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinesis partitions the cytoplasm of a parent cell into two daughter cells and is essential for the completion of cell division. The final step of cytokinesis in animal cells is abscission, which is a process leading to the physical separation of two daughter cells. Abscission requires membrane traffic and microtubule disassembly at a specific midbody region called the secondary ingression. Here, we report that WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5), a core subunit of COMPASS/MLL family histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase (H3K4MT) complexes, resides at the midbody and associates with a subset of midbody regulatory proteins, including PRC1 and CYK4/MKLP1. Knockdown of WDR5 impairs abscission and increases the incidence of multinucleated cells. Further investigation revealed that the abscission delay is primarily due to slower formation of secondary ingressions in WDR5 knockdown cells. Consistent with these defects, midbody microtubules in WDR5 knockdown cells also display enhanced resistance to depolymerization by nocodazole. Recruitment of WDR5 to the midbody dark zone appears to require integrity of the WDR5 central arginine-binding cavity, as mutations that disrupt histone H3 and MLL1 binding to this pocket also abolish the midbody localization of WDR5. Taken together, these data suggest that WDR5 is specifically targeted to the midbody in the absence of chromatin and that it promotes abscission, perhaps by facilitating midbody microtubule disassembly. PMID:25666610

  17. Solution structure of a two-repeat fragment of major vault protein.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Vavelyuk, Olga; Minailiuc, Ovidiu; Banville, Denis; Gehring, Kalle; Ekiel, Irena

    2006-02-17

    Major vault protein (MVP) is the main constituent of vaults, large ribonucleoprotein particles implicated in resistance to cancer therapy and correlated with poor survival prognosis. Here, we report the structure of the main repeat element in human MVP. The approximately 55 amino acid residue MVP domain has a unique, novel fold that consists of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. The solution NMR structure of a two-domain fragment reveals the interdomain contacts and relative orientations of the two MVP domains. We use these results to model the assembly of 672 MVP domains from 96 MVP molecules into the ribs of the 13MDa vault structure. The unique features include a thin, skin-like structure with polar residues on both the cytoplasmic and internal surface, and a pole-to-pole arrangement of MVP molecules. These studies provide a starting point for understanding the self-assembly of MVP into vaults and their interactions with other proteins. Chemical shift perturbation studies identified the binding site of vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, another component of vault particles, indicating that MVP domains form a new class of interaction-mediating modules. PMID:16373071

  18. Ribosome-associated pentatricopeptide repeat proteins function as translational activators in mitochondria of trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Qian, Yu; Huang, Lan; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E.; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, eubacterial-type ribosomal proteins, polypeptides lacking discernible motifs and approximately 20 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA binding proteins. Several PPRs also populate the polyadenylation complex; among these, KPAF1 and KPAF2 function as general mRNA 3′ adenylation/uridylation factors. The A/U-tail enables mRNA binding to the small ribosomal subunit and is essential for translation. The presence of A/U-tail also correlates with requirement for translation of certain mRNAs in mammalian and insect parasite stages. Here, we inquired whether additional PPRs activate translation of individual mRNAs. Proteomic analysis identified KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 as components of the small ribosomal subunit in mammalian and insect forms, but also revealed their association with the polyadenylation complex in the latter. RNAi knockdowns demonstrated essential functions of KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 in the actively respiring insect stage, but not in the mammalian stage. In the KRIPP1 knockdown, A/U-tailed mRNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 declined concomitantly with the de novo synthesis of this subunit whereas polyadenylation and translation of cyb mRNA were unaffected. In contrast, the KRIPP8 knockdown inhibited A/U-tailing and translation of both CO1 and cyb mRNAs. Our findings indicate that ribosome-associated PPRs may selectively activate mRNAs for translation. PMID:26713541

  19. Ternary WD40 Repeat-Containing Protein Complexes: Evolution, Composition and Roles in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jimi C.; Chezem, William R.; Clay, Nicole K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants, like mammals, rely on their innate immune system to perceive and discriminate among the majority of their microbial pathogens. Unlike mammals, plants respond to this molecular dialog by unleashing a complex chemical arsenal of defense metabolites to resist or evade pathogen infection. In basal or non-host resistance, plants utilize signal transduction pathways to detect “non-self,” “damaged-self,” and “altered-self”- associated molecular patterns and translate these “danger” signals into largely inducible chemical defenses. The WD40 repeat (WDR)-containing proteins Gβ and TTG1 are constituents of two independent ternary protein complexes functioning at opposite ends of a plant immune signaling pathway. They are also encoded by single-copy genes that are ubiquitous in higher plants, implying the limited diversity and functional conservation of their respective complexes. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about the evolutionary history of these WDR-containing ternary complexes, their repertoire and combinatorial interactions, and their downstream effectors and pathways in plant defense. PMID:26779203

  20. Invertebrate and Vertebrate Class III Myosins Interact with MORN Repeat-Containing Adaptor Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mecklenburg, Kirk L.; Freed, Stephanie A.; Raval, Manmeet; Quintero, Omar A.; Yengo, Christopher M.; O'Tousa, Joseph. E.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila photoreceptors, the NINAC-encoded myosin III is found in a complex with a small, MORN-repeat containing, protein Retinophilin (RTP). Expression of these two proteins in other cell types showed NINAC myosin III behavior is altered by RTP. NINAC deletion constructs were used to map the RTP binding site within the proximal tail domain of NINAC. In vertebrates, the RTP ortholog is MORN4. Co-precipitation experiments demonstrated that human MORN4 binds to human myosin IIIA (MYO3A). In COS7 cells, MORN4 and MYO3A, but not MORN4 and MYO3B, co-localize to actin rich filopodia extensions. Deletion analysis mapped the MORN4 binding to the proximal region of the MYO3A tail domain. MYO3A dependent MORN4 tip localization suggests that MYO3A functions as a motor that transports MORN4 to the filopodia tips and MORN4 may enhance MYO3A tip localization by tethering it to the plasma membrane at the protrusion tips. These results establish conserved features of the RTP/MORN4 family: they bind within the tail domain of myosin IIIs to control their behavior. PMID:25822849

  1. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle

    PubMed Central

    Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Meyer, Moritz T.; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K.; Mitchell, Madeline C.; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S.; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2. Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2. We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1’s four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  2. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle.

    PubMed

    Mackinder, Luke C M; Meyer, Moritz T; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K; Mitchell, Madeline C; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-05-24

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2 Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2 We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1's four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  3. Tandem repeat recombinant proteins as potential antigens for the sero-diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Kalenda, Yombo Dan Justin; Kato, Kentaro; Goto, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Yoshito; Hamano, Shinjiro

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis of schistosome infection, followed by effective treatment and/or mass drug administration, is crucial to reduce the disease burden. Suitable diagnostic tests and field-applicable tools are required to sustain schistosomiasis control programs. We therefore assessed the potential of tandem repeat (TR) proteins for sero-diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infection using an experimental mouse model. TR genes in the genome of S. mansoni were searched in silico and 7 candidates, named SmTR1, 3, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 15, were selected. Total RNA was extracted from S. mansoni adult worms and eggs. Target TR genes were amplified, cloned, and the proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli competent cells. Female BALB/c mice were infected with 100 S. mansoni cercariae and sera were collected each week post-infection for 18 weeks. The levels of IgG antibodies to SmTR antigens were compared to those to soluble egg antigen (SEA) and to soluble worm antigen preparation (SWAP). Sera of infected mice reacted to all the antigens whereas those of naïve mice did not. IgG responses to SmTR1, 3, 9 and 10 were detected at the early stage of infection. Interestingly, antibodies reacting to SmTR3, 9, 10 and 15 dramatically decreased 4 weeks after treatment with praziquantel, while those against SEA and SWAP remained elevated. Our study suggests that TR proteins, especially SmTR10, may be suitable antigens for sero-diagnosis of infection by S. mansoni and are potential markers for monitoring and surveillance of schistosomiasis, including re-infection after treatment with praziquantel. PMID:26148816

  4. Serine-rich repeat proteins and pili promote Streptococcus agalactiae colonization of the vaginal tract.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Tamsin R; Jimenez, Alyssa; Wang, Nai-Yu; Banerjee, Anirban; van Sorge, Nina M; Doran, Kelly S

    2011-12-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is a Gram-positive bacterium found in the female rectovaginal tract and is capable of producing severe disease in susceptible hosts, including newborns and pregnant women. The vaginal tract is considered a major reservoir for GBS, and maternal vaginal colonization poses a significant risk to the newborn; however, little is known about the specific bacterial factors that promote GBS colonization and persistence in the female reproductive tract. We have developed in vitro models of GBS interaction with the human female cervicovaginal tract using human vaginal and cervical epithelial cell lines. Analysis of isogenic mutant GBS strains deficient in cell surface organelles such as pili and serine-rich repeat (Srr) proteins shows that these factors contribute to host cell attachment. As Srr proteins are heavily glycosylated, we confirmed that carbohydrate moieties contribute to the effective interaction of Srr-1 with vaginal epithelial cells. Antibody inhibition assays identified keratin 4 as a possible host receptor for Srr-1. Our findings were further substantiated in an in vivo mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, where mice inoculated with an Srr-1-deficient mutant exhibited decreased GBS vaginal persistence compared to those inoculated with the wild-type (WT) parental strain. Furthermore, competition experiments in mice showed that WT GBS exhibited a significant survival advantage over the ΔpilA or Δsrr-1 mutant in the vaginal tract. Our results suggest that these GBS surface proteins contribute to vaginal colonization and may offer new insights into the mechanisms of vaginal niche establishment. PMID:21984789

  5. The Octatricopeptide Repeat Protein Raa8 Is Required for Chloroplast trans Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Christina; Wünsch, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The mRNA maturation of the tripartite chloroplast psaA gene from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii depends on various nucleus-encoded factors that participate in trans splicing of two group II introns. Recently, a multiprotein complex was identified that is involved in processing the psaA precursor mRNA. Using coupled tandem affinity purification (TAP) and mass spectrometry analyses with the trans-splicing factor Raa4 as a bait protein, we recently identified a multisubunit ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex comprising the previously characterized trans-splicing factors Raa1, Raa3, Raa4, and Rat2 plus novel components. Raa1 and Rat2 share a structural motif, an octatricopeptide repeat (OPR), that presumably functions as an RNA interaction module. Two of the novel RNP complex components also exhibit a predicted OPR motif and were therefore considered potential trans-splicing factors. In this study, we selected bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones encoding these OPR proteins and conducted functional complementation assays using previously generated trans-splicing mutants. Our assay revealed that the trans-splicing defect of mutant F19 was restored by a new factor we named RAA8; molecular characterization of complemented strains verified that Raa8 participates in splicing of the first psaA group II intron. Three of six OPR motifs are located in the C-terminal end of Raa8, which was shown to be essential for restoring psaA mRNA trans splicing. Our results support the important role played by OPR proteins in chloroplast RNA metabolism and also demonstrate that combining TAP and mass spectrometry with functional complementation studies represents a vigorous tool for identifying trans-splicing factors. PMID:26209695

  6. Creation and structure determination of an artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Motoyasu; Shimizu, Rumi; Kuroki, Ryota; Blaber, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Symfoil-4P is a de novo protein exhibiting the threefold symmetrical β-trefoil fold designed based on the human acidic fibroblast growth factor. First three asparagine-glycine sequences of Symfoil-4P are replaced with glutamine-glycine (Symfoil-QG) or serine-glycine (Symfoil-SG) sequences protecting from deamidation, and His-Symfoil-II was prepared by introducing a protease digestion site into Symfoil-QG so that Symfoil-II has three complete repeats after removal of the N-terminal histidine tag. The Symfoil-QG and SG and His-Symfoil-II proteins were expressed in Eschericha coli as soluble protein, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Symfoil-II was further purified by anion-exchange chromatography after removing the HisTag by proteolysis. Both Symfoil-QG and Symfoil-II were crystallized in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0) containing 1.8 M ammonium sulfate as precipitant at 293 K; several crystal forms were observed for Symfoil-QG and II. The maximum diffraction of Symfoil-QG and II crystals were 1.5 and 1.1 Å resolution, respectively. The Symfoil-II without histidine tag diffracted better than Symfoil-QG with N-terminal histidine tag. Although the crystal packing of Symfoil-II is slightly different from Symfoil-QG and other crystals of Symfoil derivatives having the N-terminal histidine tag, the refined crystal structure of Symfoil-II showed pseudo-threefold symmetry as expected from other Symfoils. Since the removal of the unstructured N-terminal histidine tag did not affect the threefold structure of Symfoil, the improvement of diffraction quality of Symfoil-II may be caused by molecular characteristics of Symfoil-II such as molecular stability. PMID:24121347

  7. Characterization of two potentially universal turn motifs that shape the repeated five-residues fold - Crystal structure of a lumenal pentapeptide repeat protein from Cyanothece 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Ni, Shuisong; Robinson, Howard; Welsh, Eric A.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2006-11-01

    The genome of the diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 has recently been sequenced and observed to contain 35 pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs). These proteins, while present throughout the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms, are most abundant in cyanobacteria. The sheer number of PRPs in cyanobacteria coupled with their predicted location in all the cyanobacteria cellular compartments argues for important, yet unknown, physiological and biochemical functions. To gain insights into the biochemical function of PRPs in cyanobacteria, the first crystal structure of a PRP from Cyanothece has been determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The native protein, annotated Rfr32 for repeated five-residue, is a 167-residue protein with an N-terminal 29-residue signal peptide. The signal peptide was replaced with a 43-residue tag that was invisible in the electron density maps of two different crystal forms from which essentially identical structures were solved. The structure is dominated by 21 tandem pentapeptide repeats that fold into a right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a “square” tower with four distinct faces. Four consecutive pentapeptide repeats define a “floor” of the tower with a single repeat occupying a face. The Rfr-fold contains five complete, stacked, ascending floors (coils) that complete a revolution every 20 residues with a ~4.8 Å rise along the helix axis. The main chain backbone of the floors are held together with a narrow parallel β-sheet on one face and stacked parallel The main chain backbone of the floors are held together with a narrow parallel β-sheet on one face and stacked parallel β-bridges (single-residue β-sheets) on the other three faces. The regular shape of the tower is maintained by two distinct types of four-residue turns labeled pseudo type II and pseudo type IV β-turns. The interior of the Rfr-fold is primarily hydrophobic, with all side chains of the i and i-2 residues inserted into the

  8. Thermodynamics, kinetics, and salt-dependence of folding of YopM, a large leucine-rich repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Kloss, Ellen; Barrick, Doug

    2011-01-01

    Small globular proteins have many contacts between residues that are distant in primary sequence. These contacts create a complex network between sequence-distant segments of secondary structure, which may be expected to promote the cooperative folding of globular proteins. Although repeat proteins, which are made up of tandem modular units, lack sequence-distant contacts, several of considerable length have been shown to undergo cooperative two-state folding. To explore the limits of cooperativity in repeat proteins, we have studied the unfolding of YopM, a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein of over 400 residues. Despite its large size and modular architecture (15 repeats), YopM equilibrium unfolding is highly cooperative, and shows a very strong dependence on urea concentration. In contrast, kinetic studies of YopM folding indicate a mechanism that includes one or more transient intermediates. The urea dependence of the folding and unfolding rates suggests a relatively small transition state ensemble. As with the urea dependence, we have found an extreme dependence of the free energy of unfolding on salt concentration. This salt dependence likely results from general screening of a large number of unfavorable columbic interactions in the folded state, rather than from specific cation binding. PMID:18793647

  9. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 7 in the Regulation of TNF-α Production in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Huiyun; Lee, In-Seon; Park, Jae Eun; Park, Sung Goo; Lee, Do Hee; Park, Byoung Chul; Cho, Sayeon

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases play key roles in a diverse range of cellular processes such as differentiation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, immunological signaling, and cytoskeletal function. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 7 (PTPN7), a member of the phosphatase family, specifically inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Here, we report that PTPN7 acts as a regulator of pro-inflammatory TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells that are stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that acts as an endotoxin and elicits strong immune responses in animals. Stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS leads to a transient decrease in the levels of PTPN7 mRNA and protein. The overexpression of PTPN7 inhibits LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) analysis showed that knock-down of PTPN7 in RAW 264.7 cells increased TNF-α production. PTPN7 has a negative regulatory function to extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 that increase LPS-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. Thus, our data presents PTPN7 as a negative regulator of TNF-α expression and the inflammatory response in macrophages. PMID:24265715

  10. Characterization of epiphycan, a small proteoglycan with a leucine-rich repeat core protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, H J; Rosenberg, L; Choi, H U; Garza, S; Höök, M; Neame, P J

    1997-07-25

    The epiphysis of developing bones is a cartilaginous structure that is eventually replaced by bone during skeletal maturation. We have separated a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, epiphycan, from decorin and biglycan by using dissociative extraction of bovine fetal epiphyseal cartilage, followed by sequential ion-exchange, gel permeation, hydrophobic, and Zn2+ chelate chromatographic steps. Epiphycan is a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family, contains seven leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), is related to osteoglycin (osteoinductive factor) (Bentz, H., Nathan, R. M., Rosen, D. M., Armstrong, R. M., Thompson, A. Y., Segarini, P. R., Mathews, M. C., Dasch, J., Piez, K. A., and Seyedin, S. M. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 20805-20810), and appears to be the bovine equivalent of the chick proteoglycan PG-Lb (Shinomura, T., and Kimata, K. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 1265-1270). The intact proteoglycan had a median size of approximately 133 kDa. The core protein was 46 kDa by electrophoretic analysis, had a calculated size of 34,271 Da, and had two approximately equimolar N termini (APTLES ... and ETYDAT ... ) separated by 11 amino acids. There were at least three O-linked oligosaccharides in the N-terminal region of the protein, based on blank cycles in Edman degradation and corresponding serine or threonine residues in the translated cDNA sequence. The glycosaminoglycans ranged in size from 23 to 34 kDa were more heterogeneous than those in other dermatan sulfate small leucine-rich proteoglycans and were found in the acidic N-terminal region of the protein core, N-terminal to the LRRs. A four-cysteine cluster was present at the N terminus of the LRRs, and a disulfide-bonded cysteine pair was present at the C terminus of the protein core. The seventh LRR and an N-linked oligosaccharide were between the two C-terminal cysteines. An additional potential N-glycosylation site near the C terminus did not appear to be substituted at a significant level. PMID:9228042

  11. Downregulation of Notch-regulated Ankyrin Repeat Protein Exerts Antitumor Activities against Growth of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Bing-Feng; Qin, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Sheng-Lai; Quan, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Ming-Di; Bi, Jian-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Notch-regulated ankyrin repeat protein (NRARP) is recently found to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells. The role of NRARP in carcinogenesis deserves extensive investigations. This study attempted to investigate the expression of NRARP in thyroid cancer tissues and assess the influence of NRARP on cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and invasion in thyroid cancer. Methods: Thirty-four cases with thyroid cancer were collected from the Department of General Surgery, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine between 2011 and 2012. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the level of NRARP in cancer tissues. Lentivirus carrying NRARP-shRNA (Lenti-NRARP-shRNA) was applied to down-regulate NRARP expression. Cell viability was tested after treatment with Lenti-NRARP-shRNA using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were determined by flow cytometry. Cell invasion was tested using Transwell invasion assay. In addition, expressions of several cell cycle-associated and apoptosis-associated proteins were examined using Western blotting after transfection. Student's t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), or Kaplan–Meier were used to analyze the differences between two group or three groups. Results: NRARP was highly expressed in thyroid cancer tissues. Lenti-NRARP-shRNA showed significantly inhibitory activities against cell growth at a multiplicity of infection of 10 or higher (P < 0.05). Lenti-NRARP-shRNA-induced G1 arrest (BHT101: 72.57% ± 5.32%; 8305C: 75.45% ± 5.26%) by promoting p21 expression, induced apoptosis by promoting bax expression and suppressing bcl-2 expression, and inhibited cell invasion by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. Conclusion: Downregulation of NRARP expression exerts significant antitumor activities against cell growth and invasion of thyroid cancer, that suggests a potential role of NRARP in

  12. SorLA Complement-type Repeat Domains Protect the Amyloid Precursor Protein against Processing*

    PubMed Central

    Mehmedbasic, Arnela; Christensen, Sofie K.; Nilsson, Jonas; Rüetschi, Ulla; Gustafsen, Camilla; Poulsen, Annemarie Svane Aavild; Rasmussen, Rikke W.; Fjorback, Anja N.; Larson, Göran; Andersen, Olav M.

    2015-01-01

    SorLA is a neuronal sorting receptor that is genetically associated with Alzheimer disease. SorLA interacts directly with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and affects the processing of the precursor, leading to a decreased generation of the amyloid-β peptide. The SorLA complement-type repeat (CR) domains associate in vitro with APP, but the precise molecular determinants of SorLA·APP complex formation and the mechanisms responsible for the effect of binding on APP processing have not yet been elucidated. Here, we have generated protein expression constructs for SorLA devoid of the 11 CR-domains and for two SorLA mutants harboring substitutions of the fingerprint residues in the central CR-domains. We generated SH-SY5Y cell lines that stably express these SorLA variants to study the binding and processing of APP using co-immunoprecipitation and Western blotting/ELISAs, respectively. We found that the SorLA CR-cluster is essential for interaction with APP and that deletion of the CR-cluster abolishes the protection against APP processing. Mutation of identified fingerprint residues in the SorLA CR-domains leads to changes in the O-linked glycosylation of APP when expressed in SH-SY5Y cells. Our results provide novel information on the mechanisms behind the influence of SorLA activity on APP metabolism by controlling post-translational glycosylation in the Golgi, suggesting new strategies against amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer disease. PMID:25525276

  13. SorLA complement-type repeat domains protect the amyloid precursor protein against processing.

    PubMed

    Mehmedbasic, Arnela; Christensen, Sofie K; Nilsson, Jonas; Rüetschi, Ulla; Gustafsen, Camilla; Poulsen, Annemarie Svane Aavild; Rasmussen, Rikke W; Fjorback, Anja N; Larson, Göran; Andersen, Olav M

    2015-02-01

    SorLA is a neuronal sorting receptor that is genetically associated with Alzheimer disease. SorLA interacts directly with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and affects the processing of the precursor, leading to a decreased generation of the amyloid-β peptide. The SorLA complement-type repeat (CR) domains associate in vitro with APP, but the precise molecular determinants of SorLA·APP complex formation and the mechanisms responsible for the effect of binding on APP processing have not yet been elucidated. Here, we have generated protein expression constructs for SorLA devoid of the 11 CR-domains and for two SorLA mutants harboring substitutions of the fingerprint residues in the central CR-domains. We generated SH-SY5Y cell lines that stably express these SorLA variants to study the binding and processing of APP using co-immunoprecipitation and Western blotting/ELISAs, respectively. We found that the SorLA CR-cluster is essential for interaction with APP and that deletion of the CR-cluster abolishes the protection against APP processing. Mutation of identified fingerprint residues in the SorLA CR-domains leads to changes in the O-linked glycosylation of APP when expressed in SH-SY5Y cells. Our results provide novel information on the mechanisms behind the influence of SorLA activity on APP metabolism by controlling post-translational glycosylation in the Golgi, suggesting new strategies against amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer disease. PMID:25525276

  14. Group B Streptococcal Serine-Rich Repeat Proteins Promote Interaction With Fibrinogen and Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nai-Yu; Patras, Kathryn A.; Seo, Ho Seong; Cavaco, Courtney K.; Rösler, Berenice; Neely, Melody N.; Sullam, Paul M.; Doran, Kelly S.

    2014-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) can cause severe disease in susceptible hosts, including newborns, pregnant women, and the elderly. GBS serine-rich repeat (Srr) surface glycoproteins are important adhesins/invasins in multiple host tissues, including the vagina. However, exact molecular mechanisms contributing to their importance in colonization are unknown. We have recently determined that Srr proteins contain a fibrinogen-binding region (BR) and hypothesize that Srr-mediated fibrinogen binding may contribute to GBS cervicovaginal colonization. In this study, we observed that fibrinogen enhanced wild-type GBS attachment to cervical and vaginal epithelium, and that this was dependent on Srr1. Moreover, purified Srr1-BR peptide bound directly to host cells, and peptide administration in vivo reduced GBS recovery from the vaginal tract. Furthermore, a GBS mutant strain lacking only the Srr1 “latching” domain exhibited decreased adherence in vitro and decreased persistence in a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, suggesting the importance of Srr–fibrinogen interactions in the female reproductive tract. PMID:24620021

  15. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-01-01

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 Å, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface. PMID:20089642

  16. Examination of the dimerization states of the single-stranded RNA recognition protein pentatricopeptide repeat 10 (PPR10).

    PubMed

    Li, Quanxiu; Yan, Chuangye; Xu, Huisha; Wang, Zheng; Long, Jiafu; Li, Wenqi; Wu, Jianping; Yin, Ping; Yan, Nieng

    2014-11-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, particularly abundant in plastids and mitochrondria of angiosperms, include a large number of sequence-specific RNA binding proteins that are involved in diverse aspects of organelle RNA metabolisms. PPR proteins contain multiple tandom repeats, and each repeat can specifically recognize a RNA base through residues 2, 5, and 35 in a modular fashion. The crystal structure of PPR10 from maize chloroplast exhibits dimeric existence both in the absence and presence of the 18-nucleotide psaJ RNA element. However, previous biochemical analysis suggested a monomeric shift of PPR10 upon RNA binding. In this report, we show that the amino-terminal segments of PPR10 determine the dimerization state of PPR10. A single amino acid alteration of cysteine to serine within repeat 10 of PPR10 further drives dimerization of PPR10. The biochemical elucidation of the determinants for PPR10 dimerization may provide an important foundation to understand the working mechanisms of PPR proteins underlying their diverse physiological functions. PMID:25231995

  17. Examination of the Dimerization States of the Single-stranded RNA Recognition Protein Pentatricopeptide Repeat 10 (PPR10)*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quanxiu; Yan, Chuangye; Xu, Huisha; Wang, Zheng; Long, Jiafu; Li, Wenqi; Wu, Jianping; Yin, Ping; Yan, Nieng

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, particularly abundant in plastids and mitochrondria of angiosperms, include a large number of sequence-specific RNA binding proteins that are involved in diverse aspects of organelle RNA metabolisms. PPR proteins contain multiple tandom repeats, and each repeat can specifically recognize a RNA base through residues 2, 5, and 35 in a modular fashion. The crystal structure of PPR10 from maize chloroplast exhibits dimeric existence both in the absence and presence of the 18-nucleotide psaJ RNA element. However, previous biochemical analysis suggested a monomeric shift of PPR10 upon RNA binding. In this report, we show that the amino-terminal segments of PPR10 determine the dimerization state of PPR10. A single amino acid alteration of cysteine to serine within repeat 10 of PPR10 further drives dimerization of PPR10. The biochemical elucidation of the determinants for PPR10 dimerization may provide an important foundation to understand the working mechanisms of PPR proteins underlying their diverse physiological functions. PMID:25231995

  18. The major clotting protein from guinea pig seminal vesicle contains eight repeats of a 24-amino acid domain.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J T; Hagstrom, J; McCormick, D J; Harvey, S; Madden, B; Holicky, E; Stanford, D R; Wieben, E D

    1987-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major clotting protein from the guinea pig seminal vesicle (SVP-1) has been determined by nucleotide sequencing of cDNA clones corresponding to the 3' terminus of an mRNA that codes for a protein precursor to SVP-1. The first 40 amino acids of the derived protein sequence are identical to those determined by N-terminal sequencing of SVP-1 isolated from the lumen of the seminal vesicle. This finding confirms that SVP-1 is cleaved from the C terminus of a larger precursor protein. The portion of the nucleotide sequence that codes for SVP-1 contains eight highly homologous but imperfect repeats of a 72-nucleotide domain. This repeated structure is also evident at the amino acid level. The consensus 24-amino acid repeat unit contains two lysine and three glutamine residues. Since the clotting of SVP-1 is known to involve the formation of gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine crosslinks, it is likely that the 24-amino acid repeating unit is the unit of function of SVP-1. PMID:3477802

  19. Accumulation of dipeptide repeat proteins predates that of TDP‐43 in frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 gene

    PubMed Central

    Baborie, Atik; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Jaros, Evelyn; Perry, Robert; McKeith, Ian G.; Burn, David J.; Masuda‐Suzukake, Masami; Hasegawa, Masato; Rollinson, Sara; Pickering‐Brown, Stuart; Robinson, Andrew C.; Davidson, Yvonne S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and motor neurone disease are linked by the possession of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72, and both show neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions within cerebellar and hippocampal neurones which are TDP‐43 negative but immunoreactive for p62 and dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR), these being generated by a non‐ATG RAN translation of the expanded region of the gene. Methods Twenty‐two cases of FTLD from Newcastle were analysed for an expansion in C9ORF72 by repeat primed PCR and Southern blot. Detailed case note analysis was performed, and blinded retrospective clinical impressions were achieved by review of clinical histories. Sections from all major brain regions were immunostained for TDP‐43, p62 and DPR. The extent of TDP‐43 and DPR pathology in expansion bearers was compared with that in 13 other previously identified cases from the Manchester Brain Bank with established disease. Results Three Newcastle patients bearing an expansion in C9ORF72 were identified. These three patients died prematurely, two from bronchopneumonia within 10 months and 3 years of onset, and one from myocardial infarction 3 years after onset. In all three, DPR were plentiful throughout all cerebral cortical regions, hippocampus and cerebellum, but TDP‐43 pathological changes were sparse. The severity of DPR pathological changes in these three patients was similar to that in the Manchester series, although the extent of TDP‐43 pathology was significantly less. Conclusion Widespread accumulation of DPR within nerve cells may occur much earlier than that of TDP‐43 in patients with FTLD bearing expansion in C9ORF72. PMID:25185840

  20. CREB Binding Protein Interacts with Nucleoporin-Specific FG Repeats That Activate Transcription and Mediate NUP98-HOXA9 Oncogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Lawryn H.; Brindle, Paul K.; Schnabel, Catherine A.; Pritchard, Colin E. J.; Cleary, Michael L.; van Deursen, Jan M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Genes encoding the Phe-Gly (FG) repeat-containing nucleoporins NUP98 and CAN/NUP214 are at the breakpoints of several chromosomal translocations associated with human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their role in oncogenesis is unclear. Here we demonstrate that the NUP98-HOXA9 fusion gene encodes two nuclear oncoproteins with either 19 or 37 NUP98 FG repeats fused to the DNA binding and PBX heterodimerization domains of the transcription factor HOXA9. Both NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras transformed NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, and this transformation required the HOXA9 domains for DNA binding and PBX interaction. Surprisingly, the FG repeats acted as very potent transactivators of gene transcription. This NUP98-derived activity is essential for transformation and can be replaced by the bona fide transactivation domain of VP16. Interestingly, FG repeat-containing segments derived from the nucleoporins NUP153 and CAN/NUP214 functioned similarly to those from NUP98. We further demonstrate that transactivation by FG repeat-rich segments of NUP98 correlates with their ability to interact functionally and physically with the transcriptional coactivators CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300. This finding shows, for the first time, that a translocation-generated fusion protein appears to recruit CBP/p300 as an important step of its oncogenic mechanism. Together, our results suggest that NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras are aberrant transcription factors that deregulate HOX-responsive genes through the transcriptional activation properties of nucleoporin-specific FG repeats that recruit CBP/p300. Indeed, FG repeat-mediated transactivation may be a shared pathogenic function of nucleoporins implicated human AML. PMID:9858599

  1. Effects of Tannic Acid on Lipid and Protein Oxidation, Color, and Volatiles of Raw and Cooked Chicken Breast Meat during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hijazeen, Marwan; Lee, Eun Joo; Mendonca, Aubrey; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tannic acid (TA) on the oxidative stability and the quality characteristics of ground chicken breast meat. Five treatments including (1) control (none added), (2) 2.5 ppm TA, (3) 5 ppm TA, (4) 10 ppm TA, and (5) 5 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were added to boneless, skinless ground chicken breast meat, and used for both raw and cooked meat studies. For the raw meat study, the ground chicken breast meat was packaged in oxygen-permeable bags and stored at 4 °C for 7 days. For the cooked study, raw ground meat samples were vacuum-packaged in oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags, cooked in-bag to the internal temperature of 75 °C, re-packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, and then stored. Both raw and cooked meats were analyzed for lipid and protein oxidation, color, and volatiles (cooked meat only) at 0, 3, and 7 days of storage. Raw meats with 10 ppm of TA added had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower lipid and protein oxidation than other treatments during storage. In addition, TA at 10 ppm level maintained the highest color a*- and L*-values during storage. Cooked chicken breast meat with 5 and 10 ppm TA added produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower amounts of off-odor volatiles than other treatments. Among the volatile compounds, the amount of hexanal increased rapidly during storage for cooked meat. However, meats with 5 and 10 ppm TA added showed the lowest amount of hexanal and other aldehydes related to lipid oxidation, indicating a strong antioxidant effect of TA in cooked chicken breast meat. Furthermore, the differences in aldehydes among the treatments were bigger in cooked than in raw meat, indicating that the antioxidant effect of TA in cooked meat was greater than that in raw meat. Therefore, TA at >5 ppm can be used as a good natural preservative in cooked chicken meat to maintain its quality during storage. PMID:27304971

  2. Effects of Tannic Acid on Lipid and Protein Oxidation, Color, and Volatiles of Raw and Cooked Chicken Breast Meat during Storage.

    PubMed

    Al-Hijazeen, Marwan; Lee, Eun Joo; Mendonca, Aubrey; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tannic acid (TA) on the oxidative stability and the quality characteristics of ground chicken breast meat. Five treatments including (1) control (none added), (2) 2.5 ppm TA, (3) 5 ppm TA, (4) 10 ppm TA, and (5) 5 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were added to boneless, skinless ground chicken breast meat, and used for both raw and cooked meat studies. For the raw meat study, the ground chicken breast meat was packaged in oxygen-permeable bags and stored at 4 °C for 7 days. For the cooked study, raw ground meat samples were vacuum-packaged in oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags, cooked in-bag to the internal temperature of 75 °C, re-packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, and then stored. Both raw and cooked meats were analyzed for lipid and protein oxidation, color, and volatiles (cooked meat only) at 0, 3, and 7 days of storage. Raw meats with 10 ppm of TA added had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower lipid and protein oxidation than other treatments during storage. In addition, TA at 10 ppm level maintained the highest color a*- and L*-values during storage. Cooked chicken breast meat with 5 and 10 ppm TA added produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower amounts of off-odor volatiles than other treatments. Among the volatile compounds, the amount of hexanal increased rapidly during storage for cooked meat. However, meats with 5 and 10 ppm TA added showed the lowest amount of hexanal and other aldehydes related to lipid oxidation, indicating a strong antioxidant effect of TA in cooked chicken breast meat. Furthermore, the differences in aldehydes among the treatments were bigger in cooked than in raw meat, indicating that the antioxidant effect of TA in cooked meat was greater than that in raw meat. Therefore, TA at >5 ppm can be used as a good natural preservative in cooked chicken meat to maintain its quality during storage. PMID:27304971

  3. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q) tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5) and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was identified. Conclusions

  4. Protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase pathways regulate lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide synthase activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, A; Pendreigh, R H; Plevin, R

    1995-01-01

    1. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gamma-interferon (IFN gamma) alone or in combination stimulated the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and increased the expression of the 130 kDa isoform of NOS. 2. LPS-induced NOS activity was reduced by incubation with CD14 neutralising antibodies and abolished in macrophages deprived of serum. 3. LPS stimulated a small increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages which was dependent on the presence of serum. However, IFN gamma did not potentiate LPS-stimulated PKC activity. 4. The protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro-318220, abolished both LPS- and IFN gamma-stimulated protein kinase C activity and the induction of NOS activity. 5. LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genestein. Genestein also reduced LPS-stimulated protein kinase C activity but did not affect the response to the protein kinase C activator, tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA). 6. Nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly-ADP ribosylation, abolished LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity. 7. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of a factor which stimulates nucleotide exchange activity on the 21 kDa ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF, reduced LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity by approximately 80%. 8. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase and poly-ADP ribosylation pathways in the regulation of the induction of nitric oxide synthase in RAW 264.7 macrophages by LPS and IFN gamma. Images Figure 2 PMID:7533621

  5. Structural characterization of a novel subfamily of leucine-rich repeat proteins from the human pathogen Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Miras, Isabelle; Saul, Frederick; Nowakowski, Mireille; Weber, Patrick; Haouz, Ahmed; Shepard, William; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2015-06-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. are the agents of leptospirosis, an emerging zoonotic disease. Analyses of Leptospira genomes have shown that the pathogenic leptospires (but not the saprophytes) possess a large number of genes encoding proteins containing leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. In other pathogenic bacteria, proteins with LRR domains have been shown to be involved in mediating host-cell attachment and invasion, but their functions remain unknown in Leptospira. To gain insight into the potential function of leptospiral LRR proteins, the crystal structures of four LRR proteins that represent a novel subfamily with consecutive stretches of a 23-amino-acid LRR repeat motif have been solved. The four proteins analyzed adopt the characteristic α/β-solenoid horseshoe fold. The exposed residues of the inner concave surfaces of the solenoid, which constitute a putative functional binding site, are not conserved. The various leptospiral LRR proteins could therefore recognize distinct structural motifs of different host proteins and thus serve separate and complementary functions in the physiology of these bacteria. PMID:26057675

  6. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; McDonald, W Hayes; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Shen, Rong-Fong; Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2010-01-01

    Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping) is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS). After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  7. Selection of Specific Protein Binders for Pre-Defined Targets from an Optimized Library of Artificial Helicoidal Repeat Proteins (alphaRep)

    PubMed Central

    Chevrel, Anne; Graille, Marc; Fourati-Kammoun, Zaineb; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We previously designed a new family of artificial proteins named αRep based on a subgroup of thermostable helicoidal HEAT-like repeats. We have now assembled a large optimized αRep library. In this library, the side chains at each variable position are not fully randomized but instead encoded by a distribution of codons based on the natural frequency of side chains of the natural repeats family. The library construction is based on a polymerization of micro-genes and therefore results in a distribution of proteins with a variable number of repeats. We improved the library construction process using a “filtration” procedure to retain only fully coding modules that were recombined to recreate sequence diversity. The final library named Lib2.1 contains 1.7×109 independent clones. Here, we used phage display to select, from the previously described library or from the new library, new specific αRep proteins binding to four different non-related predefined protein targets. Specific binders were selected in each case. The results show that binders with various sizes are selected including relatively long sequences, with up to 7 repeats. ITC-measured affinities vary with Kd values ranging from micromolar to nanomolar ranges. The formation of complexes is associated with a significant thermal stabilization of the bound target protein. The crystal structures of two complexes between αRep and their cognate targets were solved and show that the new interfaces are established by the variable surfaces of the repeated modules, as well by the variable N-cap residues. These results suggest that αRep library is a new and versatile source of tight and specific binding proteins with favorable biophysical properties. PMID:24014183

  8. AMPK-Activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Ccr2 Expression by Inhibiting the NF-κB Pathway in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kumase, Fumiaki; Takeuchi, Kimio; Morizane, Yuki; Suzuki, Jun; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Kataoka, Keiko; Al-Moujahed, Ahmad; Maidana, Daniel E.; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) is a key pro-inflammatory marker of classic (M1) macrophage activation. Although Ccr2 is known to be expressed both constitutively and inductively, the full regulatory mechanism of its expression remains unclear. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is not only a master regulator of energy homeostasis but also a central regulator of inflammation. In this study, we sought to assess AMPK’s role in regulating RAW264.7 macrophage Ccr2 protein levels in resting (M0) or LPS-induced M1 states. In both M0 and M1 RAW264.7 macrophages, knockdown of the AMPKα1 subunit by siRNA led to increased Ccr2 levels whereas pharmacologic (A769662) activation of AMPK, attenuated LPS-induced increases in Ccr2 expression in an AMPK dependent fashion. The increases in Ccr2 levels by AMPK downregulation were partially reversed by NF-κB inhibition whereas TNF-a inhibition had minimal effects. Our results indicate that AMPK is a negative regulator of Ccr2 expression in RAW264.7 macrophages, and that the mechanism of action of AMPK inhibition of Ccr2 is mediated, in part, through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26799633

  9. Angiopoietin-Like Protein 7 Promotes an Inflammatory Phenotype in RAW264.7 Macrophages Through the P38 MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Qian, Tao; Wang, Kun; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Yiduo; Yang, Zaiqing

    2016-06-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 7 (Angptl7) has been extensively studied for decades, but its potential immune functions have not been characterized. Hence, we investigated the relationship between Angptl7 and inflammation by using RAW264.7 monocyte/macrophage cells. The expression of genes encoding inflammation-associated factors cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1)) decreased after RAW264.7 cells were treated with anti-Angptl7 polyclonal antibody but increased after the cells were transfected with an Angptl7-expressing plasmid. Angptl7 overexpression enhanced phagocytosis and inhibited the proliferation of RAW264.7 cells. In addition, Angptl7 antagonized the anti-inflammatory effects of TGF-β1 and dexamethasone. Pathway analysis showed that Angptl7 promoted the phosphorylation of both p65 and p38, but only the P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway mediated Angptl7-associated inflammatory functions. Additionally, after 1 week of daily intraperitoneal injections of recombinant TNF-α in a mouse model of peripheral inflammation, Angptl7 expression increased in the mouse eyes. Thus, Angptl7 is a factor that promotes pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages through the P38 MAPK signaling pathway and represents a potential therapeutic target for treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:26973239

  10. TMTC1 and TMTC2 Are Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Tetratricopeptide Repeat-containing Adapter Proteins Involved in Calcium Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Sunryd, Johan C.; Cheon, Banyoon; Graham, Jill B.; Giorda, Kristina M.; Fissore, Rafael A.; Hebert, Daniel N.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is organized in part by adapter proteins that nucleate the formation of large protein complexes. Tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) are well studied protein structural motifs that support intermolecular protein-protein interactions. TMTC1 and TMTC2 were identified by an in silico search as TPR-containing proteins possessing N-terminal ER targeting signal sequences and multiple hydrophobic segments, suggestive of polytopic membrane proteins that are targeted to the secretory pathway. A variety of cell biological and biochemical assays was employed to demonstrate that TMTC1 and TMTC2 are both ER resident integral membrane proteins with multiple clusters of TPR domains oriented within the ER lumen. Proteomic analysis followed by co-immunoprecipitation verification found that both proteins associated with the ER calcium uptake pump SERCA2B, and TMTC2 also bound to the carbohydrate-binding chaperone calnexin. Live cell calcium measurements revealed that overexpression of either TMTC1 or TMTC2 caused a reduction of calcium released from the ER following stimulation, whereas the knockdown of TMTC1 or TMTC2 increased the stimulated calcium released. Together, these results implicate TMTC1 and TMTC2 as ER proteins involved in ER calcium homeostasis. PMID:24764305

  11. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K.; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K. Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  12. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  13. A protein kinase that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J M; Greenleaf, A L

    1989-01-01

    The unique C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (IIa) of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II consists of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide consensus sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser. The number of repeats ranges from 26 in yeast to 42 in Drosophila to 52 in mouse. The CTD is essential in vivo, but its structure and function are not yet understood. The CTD can be phosphorylated at multiple serine and threonine residues, generating a form of the largest subunit (II0) with markedly reduced mobility in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. To investigate this extensive phosphorylation, which presumably modulates functional properties of RNA polymerase II, we began efforts to purify a specific CTD kinase. Using CTD-containing fusion proteins as substrates, we have purified a CTD kinase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme extensively phosphorylates the CTD portion of both the fusion proteins and intact subunit IIa, producing products with reduced electrophoretic mobilities. The properties of the CTD kinase suggest that it is distinct from previously described protein kinases. Analogous activities were also detected in Drosophila and HeLa cell extracts. Images PMID:2657724

  14. Quantitative analysis and clinico-pathological correlations of different dipeptide repeat protein pathologies in C9ORF72 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Ian R A; Frick, Petra; Grässer, Friedrich A; Gendron, Tania F; Petrucelli, Leonard; Cashman, Neil R; Edbauer, Dieter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Prudlo, Johannes; Troost, Dirk; Neumann, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease. One consequence of the mutation is the formation of different potentially toxic polypeptides composed of dipeptide repeats (DPR) (poly-GA, -GP, -GR, -PA, -PR) generated by repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation. While previous studies focusing on poly-GA pathology have failed to detect any clinico-pathological correlations in C9ORF72 mutation cases, recent data from animal and cell culture models suggested that it may be only specific DPR species that are toxic and only when accumulated in certain intracellular compartments. Therefore, we performed a systematic clinico-pathological correlative analysis with counting of actual numbers of distinct types of inclusion (neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions, dystrophic neurites) for each DPR protein in relevant brain regions (premotor cortex, lower motor neurons) in a cohort of 35 C9ORF72 mutation cases covering the clinical spectrum from those with pure MND, mixed FTD/MND and pure FTD. While each DPR protein pathology had a similar pattern of anatomical distribution, the total amount of inclusions for each DPR protein varied remarkably (poly-GA > GP > GR > PR/PA), indicating that RAN translation seems to be more effective from sense than from antisense transcripts. Importantly, with the exception of moderate associations for the amount of poly-GA-positive dystrophic neurites with degeneration in the frontal cortex and total burden of poly-GA pathology with disease onset, no relationship was identified for any other DPR protein pathology with degeneration or phenotype. Biochemical analysis revealed a close correlation between insoluble DPR protein species and numbers of visible inclusions, while we did not find any evidence for the presence of soluble DPR protein species. Thus, overall our findings strongly argue against a role of DPR protein aggregation as major and

  15. The WD40 repeat PtdIns(3)P-binding protein EPG-6 regulates progression of omegasomes to autophagosomes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qun; Yang, Peiguo; Huang, Xinxin; Hu, Wanqiu; Guo, Bin; Wu, Fan; Lin, Long; Kovács, Attila L; Yu, Li; Zhang, Hong

    2011-08-16

    PtdIns(3)P plays critical roles in the autophagy pathway. However, little is known about how PtdIns(3)P effectors act with autophagy proteins in autophagosome formation. Here we identified an essential autophagy gene in C. elegans, epg-6, which encodes a WD40 repeat-containing protein with PtdIns(3)P-binding activity. EPG-6 directly interacts with ATG-2. epg-6 and atg-2 regulate progression of omegasomes to autophagosomes, and their loss of function causes accumulation of enlarged early autophagic structures. Another WD40 repeat PtdIns(3)P effector, ATG-18, plays a distinct role in autophagosome formation. We also established the hierarchical relationship of autophagy genes in degradation of protein aggregates and revealed that the UNC-51/Atg1 complex, EPG-8/Atg14, and binding of lipidated LGG-1 to protein aggregates are required for omegasome formation. Our study demonstrates that autophagic PtdIns(3)P effectors play distinct roles in autophagosome formation and also provides a framework for understanding the concerted action of autophagy genes in protein aggregate degradation. PMID:21802374

  16. Specific Binding of Tetratricopeptide Repeat Proteins to Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Is Regulated by Affinity and Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Assimon, Victoria A; Southworth, Daniel R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2015-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) require the help of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing cochaperones for many of their functions. Each monomer of Hsp70 or Hsp90 can interact with only a single TPR cochaperone at a time, and each member of the TPR cochaperone family brings distinct functions to the complex. Thus, competition for TPR binding sites on Hsp70 and Hsp90 appears to shape chaperone activity. Recent structural and biophysical efforts have improved our understanding of chaperone-TPR contacts, focusing on the C-terminal EEVD motif that is present in both chaperones. To better understand these important protein-protein interactions on a wider scale, we measured the affinity of five TPR cochaperones, CHIP, Hop, DnaJC7, FKBP51, and FKBP52, for the C-termini of four members of the chaperone family, Hsc70, Hsp72, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β, in vitro. These studies identified some surprising selectivity among the chaperone-TPR pairs, including the selective binding of FKBP51/52 to Hsp90α/β. These results also revealed that other TPR cochaperones are only able to weakly discriminate between the chaperones or between their paralogs. We also explored whether mimicking phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues near the EEVD motif might impact affinity and found that pseudophosphorylation had selective effects on binding to CHIP but not other cochaperones. Together, these findings suggest that both intrinsic affinity and post-translational modifications tune the interactions between the Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins and the TPR cochaperones. PMID:26565746

  17. Head-to-Head Comparison of Three Vaccination Strategies Based on DNA and Raw Insect-Derived Recombinant Proteins against Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, María del Carmen; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Rodríguez, Fernando; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Escribano, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic diseases plague billions of people among the poorest, killing millions annually, and causing additional millions of disability-adjusted life years lost. Leishmaniases affect more than 12 million people, with over 350 million people at risk. There is an urgent need for efficacious and cheap vaccines and treatments against visceral leishmaniasis (VL), its most severe form. Several vaccination strategies have been proposed but to date no head-to-head comparison was undertaken to assess which is the best in a clinical model of the disease. We simultaneously assayed three vaccination strategies against VL in the hamster model, using KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and PAPLE22 vaccine candidate antigens. Four groups of hamsters were immunized using the following approaches: 1) raw extracts of baculovirus-infected Trichoplusia ni larvae expressing individually one of the four recombinant proteins (PROT); 2) naked pVAX1 plasmids carrying the four genes individually (DNA); 3) a heterologous prime-boost (HPB) strategy involving DNA followed by PROT (DNA-PROT); and 4) a Control including empty pVAX1 plasmid followed by raw extract of wild-type baculovirus-infected T. ni larvae. Hamsters were challenged with L. infantum promastigotes and maintained for 20 weeks. While PROT vaccine was not protective, DNA vaccination achieved protection in spleen. Only DNA-PROT vaccination induced significant NO production by macrophages, accompanied by a significant parasitological protection in spleen and blood. Thus, the DNA-PROT strategy elicits strong immune responses and high parasitological protection in the clinical model of VL, better than its corresponding naked DNA or protein versions. Furthermore, we show that naked DNA coupled with raw recombinant proteins produced in insect larvae biofactories –the cheapest way of producing DNA-PROT vaccines– is a practical and cost-effective way for potential “off the shelf” supplying vaccines at very low prices for the protection against

  18. Helicobacter pylori protein HP0986 (TieA) interacts with mouse TNFR1 and triggers proinflammatory and proapoptotic signaling pathways in cultured macrophage cells (RAW 264.7).

    PubMed

    Ansari, Suhail A; Devi, Savita; Tenguria, Shivendra; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2014-08-01

    HP0986 protein of Helicobacter pylori has been shown to trigger induction of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and TNF-α) through the activation of NF-κB and also to induce Fas mediated apoptosis of human macrophage cells (THP-1). In this study, we unravel mechanistic details of the biological effects of this protein in a murine macrophage environment. Up regulation of MCP-1 and TNF-α in HP0986-induced RAW 264.7 cells occurred subsequent to the activation and translocation of NF-κB to the cell nucleus. Further, HP0986 induced apoptosis of RAW 264.7 cells through Fas activation and this was in agreement with previous observations made with THP-1 cells. Our studies indicated activation of TNFR1 through interaction with HP0986 and this elicited the aforementioned responses independent of TLR2, TLR4 or TNFR2. We found that mouse TNFR1 activation by HP0986 facilitates formation of a complex comprising of TNFR1, TRADD and TRAF2, and this occurs upstream of NF-κB activation. Furthermore, FADD also forms a second complex, at a later stage, together with TNFR1 and TRADD, resulting in caspase-8 activation and thereby the apoptosis of RAW 264.7 cells. In summary, our observations reveal finer details of the functional activity of HP0986 protein in relation to its behavior in a murine macrophage cell environment. These findings reconfirm the proinflammatory and apoptotic role of HP0986 signifying it to be an important trigger of innate responses. These observations form much needed baseline data entailing future in vivo studies of the functions of HP0986 in a murine model. PMID:24767863

  19. GRR1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for glucose repression and encodes a protein with leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Flick, J S; Johnston, M

    1991-01-01

    Growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose leads to repression of transcription of many genes required for alternative carbohydrate metabolism. The GRR1 gene appears to be of central importance to the glucose repression mechanism, because mutations in GRR1 result in a pleiotropic loss of glucose repression (R. Bailey and A. Woodword, Mol. Gen. Genet. 193:507-512, 1984). We have isolated the GRR1 gene and determined that null mutants are viable and display a number of growth defects in addition to the loss of glucose repression. Surprisingly, grr1 mutations convert SUC2, normally a glucose-repressed gene, into a glucose-induced gene. GRR1 encodes a protein of 1,151 amino acids that is expressed constitutively at low levels in yeast cells. GRR1 protein contains 12 tandem repeats of a sequence similar to leucine-rich motifs found in other proteins that may mediate protein-protein interactions. Indeed, cell fractionation studies are consistent with this view, suggesting that GRR1 protein is tightly associated with a particulate protein fraction in yeast extracts. The combined genetic and molecular data are consistent with the idea that GRR1 protein is a primary response element in the glucose repression pathway and is required for the generation or interpretation of the signal that induces glucose repression. Images PMID:1922034

  20. A candidate gene for developmental dyslexia encodes a nuclear tetratricopeptide repeat domain protein dynamically regulated in brain.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Mikko; Kaminen, Nina; Nopola-Hemmi, Jaana; Haltia, Tuomas; Myllyluoma, Birgitta; Lyytinen, Heikki; Muller, Kurt; Kaaranen, Minna; Lindsberg, Perttu J; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Kere, Juha

    2003-09-30

    Approximately 3-10% of people have specific difficulties in reading, despite adequate intelligence, education, and social environment. We report here the characterization of a gene, DYX1C1 near the DYX1 locus in chromosome 15q21, that is disrupted by a translocation t(2;15)(q11;q21) segregating coincidentally with dyslexia. Two sequence changes in DYX1C1, one involving the translation initiation sequence and an Elk-1 transcription factor binding site (-3G --> A) and a codon (1249G --> T), introducing a premature stop codon and truncating the predicted protein by 4 aa, associate alone and in combination with dyslexia. DYX1C1 encodes a 420-aa protein with three tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, thought to be protein interaction modules, but otherwise with no homology to known proteins. The mouse Dyx1c1 protein is 78% identical to the human protein, and the nonhuman primates differ at 0.5-1.4% of residues. DYX1C1 is expressed in several tissues, including the brain, and the protein resides in the nucleus. In human brain, DYX1C1 protein localizes to a fraction of cortical neurons and white matter glial cells. We conclude that DYX1C1 should be regarded as a candidate gene for developmental dyslexia. Detailed study of its function may open a path to understanding a complex process of development and maturation of the human brain. PMID:12954984

  1. Sodium selenate, a protein phosphatase 2A activator, mitigates hyperphosphorylated tau and improves repeated mild traumatic brain injury outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xin L; Wright, David K; Liu, Shijie; Hovens, Christopher; O'Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R

    2016-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries may result in cumulative brain damage and neurodegenerative disease. To date, there is no pharmaceutical intervention known to prevent these consequences. Hyperphosphorylated tau has been associated in this process, and protein phosphatase 2A 55 kDa regulatory B subunit (PP2A/PR55) - the major tau phosphatase - is decreased after a brain insult. Sodium selenate up-regulates PP2A/PR55 and dephosphorylates tau, and may hold promise as a treatment in the mild brain injury setting. Here we investigated sodium selenate treatment in rats given repeated mild traumatic brain injuries. Rats were given three mild fluid percussion injuries or three sham-injuries, and treated with sodium selenate (1 mg/kg/day) or saline-vehicle for three months before undergoing behavioral testing, MRI, and post-mortem analysis of brain tissue. Repeated mild traumatic brain injuries increased the phosphorylation of tau and decreased PP2A/PR55, whilst inducing brain atrophy and cognitive and sensorimotor deficits. Sodium selenate treatment increased PP2A/PR55, and decreased tau phosphorylation, brain damage, and cognitive and motor impairments in rats given repeated mild traumatic brain injuries. Our findings implicate PP2A/PR55 and tau as important mechanisms in the pathophysiological aftermath of repeated mild brain traumas, and support sodium selenate as a novel and translatable treatment for these common injuries. PMID:27163189

  2. Multiple Orientia tsutsugamushi Ankyrin Repeat Proteins Interact with SCF1 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex and Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1 α

    PubMed Central

    Min, Chan-Ki; Kwon, Ye-Jin; Ha, Na-Young; Cho, Bon-A; Kim, Jo-Min; Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Myung-Sik; Kim, Ik-Sang; Cho, Nam-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Background Orientia tsutsugamushi, the causative agent of scrub typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium. Previously, a large number of genes that encode proteins containing eukaryotic protein-protein interaction motifs such as ankyrin-repeat (Ank) domains were identified in the O. tsutsugamushi genome. However, little is known about the Ank protein function in O. tsutsugamushi. Methodology/Principal Findings To characterize the function of Ank proteins, we investigated a group of Ank proteins containing an F-box–like domain in the C-terminus in addition to the Ank domains. All nine selected ank genes were expressed at the transcriptional level in host cells infected with O. tsutsugamushi, and specific antibody responses against three Ank proteins were detected in the serum from human patients, indicating an active expression of the bacterial Ank proteins post infection. When ectopically expressed in HeLa cells, the Ank proteins of O. tsutsugamushi were consistently found in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm. In GST pull-down assays, multiple Ank proteins specifically interacted with Cullin1 and Skp1, core components of the SCF1 ubiquitin ligase complex, as well as the eukaryotic elongation factor 1 α (EF1α). Moreover, one Ank protein co-localized with the identified host targets and induced downregulation of EF1α potentially via enhanced ubiquitination. The downregulation of EF1α was observed consistently in diverse host cell types infected with O. tsutsugamushi. Conclusion/Significance These results suggest that conserved targeting and subsequent degradation of EF1α by multiple O. tsutsugamushi Ank proteins could be a novel bacterial strategy for replication and/or pathogenesis during mammalian host infection. PMID:25166298

  3. Interrogation of the Protein-Protein Interactions between Human BRCA2 BRC Repeats and RAD51 Reveals Atomistic Determinants of Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Daniel J.; Rajendra, Eeson; Roberts-Thomson, Meredith; Hardwick, Bryn; McKenzie, Grahame J.; Payne, Mike C.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-01-01

    The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 controls the recombinase RAD51 in the reactions that mediate homologous DNA recombination, an essential cellular process required for the error-free repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. The primary mode of interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51 is through the BRC repeats, which are ∼35 residue peptide motifs that interact directly with RAD51 in vitro. Human BRCA2, like its mammalian orthologues, contains 8 BRC repeats whose sequence and spacing are evolutionarily conserved. Despite their sequence conservation, there is evidence that the different human BRC repeats have distinct capacities to bind RAD51. A previously published crystal structure reports the structural basis of the interaction between human BRC4 and the catalytic core domain of RAD51. However, no structural information is available regarding the binding of the remaining seven BRC repeats to RAD51, nor is it known why the BRC repeats show marked variation in binding affinity to RAD51 despite only subtle sequence variation. To address these issues, we have performed fluorescence polarisation assays to indirectly measure relative binding affinity, and applied computational simulations to interrogate the behaviour of the eight human BRC-RAD51 complexes, as well as a suite of BRC cancer-associated mutations. Our computational approaches encompass a range of techniques designed to link sequence variation with binding free energy. They include MM-PBSA and thermodynamic integration, which are based on classical force fields, and a recently developed approach to computing binding free energies from large-scale quantum mechanical first principles calculations with the linear-scaling density functional code onetep. Our findings not only reveal how sequence variation in the BRC repeats directly affects affinity with RAD51 and provide significant new insights into the control of RAD51 by human BRCA2, but also exemplify a palette of computational and experimental tools for the

  4. Interrogation of the protein-protein interactions between human BRCA2 BRC repeats and RAD51 reveals atomistic determinants of affinity.

    PubMed

    Cole, Daniel J; Rajendra, Eeson; Roberts-Thomson, Meredith; Hardwick, Bryn; McKenzie, Grahame J; Payne, Mike C; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-07-01

    The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 controls the recombinase RAD51 in the reactions that mediate homologous DNA recombination, an essential cellular process required for the error-free repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. The primary mode of interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51 is through the BRC repeats, which are ∼35 residue peptide motifs that interact directly with RAD51 in vitro. Human BRCA2, like its mammalian orthologues, contains 8 BRC repeats whose sequence and spacing are evolutionarily conserved. Despite their sequence conservation, there is evidence that the different human BRC repeats have distinct capacities to bind RAD51. A previously published crystal structure reports the structural basis of the interaction between human BRC4 and the catalytic core domain of RAD51. However, no structural information is available regarding the binding of the remaining seven BRC repeats to RAD51, nor is it known why the BRC repeats show marked variation in binding affinity to RAD51 despite only subtle sequence variation. To address these issues, we have performed fluorescence polarisation assays to indirectly measure relative binding affinity, and applied computational simulations to interrogate the behaviour of the eight human BRC-RAD51 complexes, as well as a suite of BRC cancer-associated mutations. Our computational approaches encompass a range of techniques designed to link sequence variation with binding free energy. They include MM-PBSA and thermodynamic integration, which are based on classical force fields, and a recently developed approach to computing binding free energies from large-scale quantum mechanical first principles calculations with the linear-scaling density functional code onetep. Our findings not only reveal how sequence variation in the BRC repeats directly affects affinity with RAD51 and provide significant new insights into the control of RAD51 by human BRCA2, but also exemplify a palette of computational and experimental tools for the

  5. Identification of antigenic epitopes in an alanine-rich repeating region of a surface protein antigen of Streptococcus mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, N; Takahashi, I; Nakai, M; Senpuku, H; Nisizawa, T; Koga, T

    1993-01-01

    A surface protein antigen (PAc) of Streptococcus mutans with a molecular mass of 190 kDa is considered to play an important role in the initial attachment of this streptococcus to the tooth surface. Two internal repeating amino acid sequences are present in the PAc molecule. One repeating region located in the N-terminal region is rich in alanine (A-region), and the other, located in the central region, is rich in proline (P-region). To identify antigenic epitopes on the A-region of the PAc protein, 82 sequential overlapping synthetic decapeptides covering one of the repetitive units of the A-region were synthesized. In the epitope scanning analyses using murine antisera raised against recombinant PAc (rPAc), multiple antigenic epitopes were found in the repetitive unit of the A-region, and some of them reacted with antisera to rPAc from BALB/c, B10, B10.D2, and B10.BR mice. In particular, a peptide YEAALKQY (residues 366 to 373) was recognized by anti-rPAc sera from all four strains of mice. The reactivities of anti-rPAc sera in the epitope scanning were confirmed by using a purified synthetic peptide, NAKATYEAALKQYEADLAA (corresponding to residues 361 to 379). Furthermore, antisera against a surface protein antigen PAg (SpaA) of Streptococcus sobrinus from BALB/c mice reacted strongly to residues 330 to 337, 362 to 369, and 366 to 373 of the PAc protein by the epitope scanning analysis. An AKATYEAALKQY (residues 362 to 373 of the PAc protein)-like sequence, AKANYEAKLAQY, was found within the A-region of S. sobrinus PAg, suggesting that the amino acid sequences AKA-YEA and YEA-L-QY may be major cross-reactive epitopes of the S. mutans PAc protein and the S. sobrinus PAg protein. PMID:7681043

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Arabidopsis Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins Reveals Their Essential Role in Organelle BiogenesisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lurin, Claire; Andrés, Charles; Aubourg, Sébastien; Bellaoui, Mohammed; Bitton, Frédérique; Bruyère, Clémence; Caboche, Michel; Debast, Cédrig; Gualberto, José; Hoffmann, Beate; Lecharny, Alain; Le Ret, Monique; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Mireau, Hakim; Peeters, Nemo; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Szurek, Boris; Taconnat, Ludivine; Small, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The complete sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome revealed thousands of previously unsuspected genes, many of which cannot be ascribed even putative functions. One of the largest and most enigmatic gene families discovered in this way is characterized by tandem arrays of pentatricopeptide repeats (PPRs). We describe a detailed bioinformatic analysis of 441 members of the Arabidopsis PPR family plus genomic and genetic data on the expression (microarray data), localization (green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein fusions), and general function (insertion mutants and RNA binding assays) of many family members. The basic picture that arises from these studies is that PPR proteins play constitutive, often essential roles in mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably via binding to organellar transcripts. These results confirm, but massively extend, the very sparse observations previously obtained from detailed characterization of individual mutants in other organisms. PMID:15269332

  7. Insights into the structural variation between pentapeptide repeat proteins - Crystal structure of Rfr23 from Cyanothece 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2008-04-10

    Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains 35 pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs), proteins that contain a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. Published crystal structures of PRPs show that the tandem pentapeptide repeats adopt a type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix called an Rfr-fold. To characterize how structural features of Rfr-folds vary with different amino acid sequences, the crystal structure of Cyanothece Rfr23 (174 residues) was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure is dominated by an Rfr-fold capped at the N-terminus with a nine-residue α-helix (M26* - E34). The Rfr-fold of Rfr23 contains four structural features previously unobserved in Rfr-folds. First, Rfr23 is composed entirely of type II β-turns. Second, the pentapeptide repeats are not all tandem in the primary amino acid sequence. Rfr23 contains a 24-residue loop protruding outside one corner of the first complete N-terminal coil of the Rfr-fold (L56 – P79) for which little electron density is observed (24-residue loop). Third, a disulfide bond exists at the corner of one β-turn in the first coil (disulfide bracket). Size exclusion chromatography and NMR and CD spectroscopy indicate that the reduction of the disulfide bracket with the addition of DTT destroys the entire Rfr-fold. Fourth, a single-residue loop in the C-terminal coil perturbs the last coil slightly about one corner of the Rfr-fold (single-residue loop).

  8. The gene for the TATA binding protein (TBP) that contains a highly polymorphic protein coding CAG repeat maps to 6q27

    SciTech Connect

    Imbert, G.; Trottier, Y.; Mandel, J.L.

    1994-06-01

    The gene for TATA binding protein (TBP, an important general transcription initiation factor) was shown to contain a long polymorphic imperfect CAG repeat in the form (CAG){sub 3} (CAA){sub 3} (CAG){sub 7-11} CAA CAG CAA (CAG){sub 9-21} CAA CAG. The gene was tentatively assigned to chromosome 6 using a somatic cell hybrid panel.

  9. Leucine-rich Repeats of Bacterial Surface Proteins Serve as Common Pattern Recognition Motifs of Human Scavenger Receptor gp340*

    PubMed Central

    Loimaranta, Vuokko; Hytönen, Jukka; Pulliainen, Arto T.; Sharma, Ashu; Tenovuo, Jorma; Strömberg, Nicklas; Finne, Jukka

    2009-01-01

    Scavenger receptors are innate immune molecules recognizing and inducing the clearance of non-host as well as modified host molecules. To recognize a wide pattern of invading microbes, many scavenger receptors bind to common pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as lipopolysaccharides and lipoteichoic acids. Similarly, the gp340/DMBT1 protein, a member of the human scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein family, displays a wide ligand repertoire. The peptide motif VEVLXXXXW derived from its scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains is involved in some of these interactions, but most of the recognition mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we used mass spectrometry sequencing, gene inactivation, and recombinant proteins to identify Streptococcus pyogenes protein Spy0843 as a recognition receptor of gp340. Antibodies against Spy0843 are shown to protect against S. pyogenes infection, but no function or host receptor have been identified for the protein. Spy0843 belongs to the leucine-rich repeat (Lrr) family of eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins. Experiments with truncated forms of the recombinant proteins confirmed that the Lrr region is needed in the binding of Spy0843 to gp340. The same motif of two other Lrr proteins, LrrG from the Gram-positive S. agalactiae and BspA from the Gram-negative Tannerella forsythia, also mediated binding to gp340. Moreover, inhibition of Spy0843 binding occurred with peptides containing the VEVLXXXXW motif, but also peptides devoid of the XXXXW motif inhibited binding of Lrr proteins. These results thus suggest that the conserved Lrr motif in bacterial proteins serves as a novel pattern recognition motif for unique core peptides of human scavenger receptor gp340. PMID:19465482

  10. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. A putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.

  11. Identification of a pentatricopeptide repeat protein implicated in splicing of intron 1 of mitochondrial nad7 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Koprivova, Anna; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Calder, Grant; Mugford, Sam T; Tanz, Sandra; Lee, Bok-Rye; Zechmann, Bernd; Small, Ian; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2010-10-15

    Splicing of plant organellar transcripts is facilitated by members of a large protein family, the pentatricopeptide repeat proteins. We have identified a pentatricopeptide repeat protein in a genetic screen for mutants resistant to inhibition of root growth by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis and consequently named BIR6 (BSO-insensitive roots 6). BIR6 is involved in splicing of intron 1 of the mitochondrial nad7 transcript. Loss-of-function mutations in BIR6 result in a strongly reduced accumulation of fully processed nad7 transcript. This affects assembly of Complex I and results in moderate growth retardation. In agreement with disruption of Complex I function, the genes encoding alternative NADH oxidizing enzymes are induced in the mutant, and the mutant plants are less sensitive to mannitol and salt stress. Mutation in the BIR6 gene allowed normal root growth in presence of BSO and strongly attenuated depletion of glutathione content at these conditions. The same phenotype was observed with other mutants affected in function of Complex I, thus reinforcing the importance of Complex I function for cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:20682769

  12. Identification of a Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Implicated in Splicing of Intron 1 of Mitochondrial nad7 Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Koprivova, Anna; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Calder, Grant; Mugford, Sam T.; Tanz, Sandra; Lee, Bok-Rye; Zechmann, Bernd; Small, Ian; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Splicing of plant organellar transcripts is facilitated by members of a large protein family, the pentatricopeptide repeat proteins. We have identified a pentatricopeptide repeat protein in a genetic screen for mutants resistant to inhibition of root growth by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis and consequently named BIR6 (BSO-insensitive roots 6). BIR6 is involved in splicing of intron 1 of the mitochondrial nad7 transcript. Loss-of-function mutations in BIR6 result in a strongly reduced accumulation of fully processed nad7 transcript. This affects assembly of Complex I and results in moderate growth retardation. In agreement with disruption of Complex I function, the genes encoding alternative NADH oxidizing enzymes are induced in the mutant, and the mutant plants are less sensitive to mannitol and salt stress. Mutation in the BIR6 gene allowed normal root growth in presence of BSO and strongly attenuated depletion of glutathione content at these conditions. The same phenotype was observed with other mutants affected in function of Complex I, thus reinforcing the importance of Complex I function for cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:20682769

  13. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. Amore » putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.« less

  14. Ligand-Binding Properties of the Carboxyl-Terminal Repeat Domain of Streptococcus mutans Glucan-Binding Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Wolfgang; Banas, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan. PMID:10633107

  15. Ligand-binding properties of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain of Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A.

    PubMed

    Haas, W; Banas, J A

    2000-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan. PMID:10633107

  16. Characterization of Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Like Proteins in Francisella tularensis and Identification of a Novel Locus Required for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dankova, Vera; Balonova, Lucie; Straskova, Adela; Spidlova, Petra; Putzova, Daniela; Kijek, Todd; Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher; Mou, Sherry; Worsham, Patricia; Szotakova, Barbora; Stulik, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium that causes the potentially lethal disease tularemia. This extremely virulent bacterium is able to replicate in the cytosolic compartments of infected macrophages. To invade macrophages and to cope with their intracellular environment, Francisella requires multiple virulence factors, which are still being identified. Proteins containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like domains seem to be promising targets to investigate, since these proteins have been reported to be directly involved in virulence-associated functions of bacterial pathogens. Here, we studied the role of the FTS_0201, FTS_0778, and FTS_1680 genes, which encode putative TPR-like proteins in Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200. Mutants defective in protein expression were prepared by TargeTron insertion mutagenesis. We found that the locus FTS_1680 and its ortholog FTT_0166c in the highly virulent Francisella tularensis type A strain SchuS4 are required for proper intracellular replication, full virulence in mice, and heat stress tolerance. Additionally, the FTS_1680-encoded protein was identified as a membrane-associated protein required for full cytopathogenicity in macrophages. Our study thus identifies FTS_1680/FTT_0166c as a new virulence factor in Francisella tularensis. PMID:25245806

  17. aPPRove: An HMM-Based Method for Accurate Prediction of RNA-Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Binding Events.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Thomas; Ruiz, Jaime; Sloan, Daniel B; Ben-Hur, Asa; Boucher, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat containing proteins (PPRs) bind to RNA transcripts originating from mitochondria and plastids. There are two classes of PPR proteins. The [Formula: see text] class contains tandem [Formula: see text]-type motif sequences, and the [Formula: see text] class contains alternating [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] type sequences. In this paper, we describe a novel tool that predicts PPR-RNA interaction; specifically, our method, which we call aPPRove, determines where and how a [Formula: see text]-class PPR protein will bind to RNA when given a PPR and one or more RNA transcripts by using a combinatorial binding code for site specificity proposed by Barkan et al. Our results demonstrate that aPPRove successfully locates how and where a PPR protein belonging to the [Formula: see text] class can bind to RNA. For each binding event it outputs the binding site, the amino-acid-nucleotide interaction, and its statistical significance. Furthermore, we show that our method can be used to predict binding events for [Formula: see text]-class proteins using a known edit site and the statistical significance of aligning the PPR protein to that site. In particular, we use our method to make a conjecture regarding an interaction between CLB19 and the second intronic region of ycf3. The aPPRove web server can be found at www.cs.colostate.edu/~approve. PMID:27560805

  18. Immunogenicity of IMS 1113 plus soluble subunit and chimeric proteins containing Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae P97 C-terminal repeat regions.

    PubMed

    Barate, Abhijit K; Cho, Youngjae; Truong, Quang Lam; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2014-03-01

    The surface adhesin P97 mediates the adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to swine cilia. Two reiterated repeats R1 and R2 are located at the C-terminus of P97. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immunogenicity of Montanide adjuvant IMS 1113 plus soluble subunit proteins rR1, rR1R2 and their chimeric forms coupled with B subunit of the heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LTB). Each recombinant protein in this study was capable of eliciting anti-R1 specific humoral antibodies (IgG), mucosal antibodies (IgG and IgA) and IFN-γ production. The chimeric protein rLTBR1R2 elicited the quickest humoral antibody response among the recombinant proteins. Serum and bronchoalveolar lavage analysis revealed that each recombinant protein was capable of inducing both Th1 and Th2 responses. Importantly, all of the proteins induced an anti-R1-specific Th2-biased response in both humoral and mucosal compartments, similar to the response observed in a natural infection or vaccination process. These observations indicate that rR1, rR1R2, rLTBR1 and rLTBR1R2 with IMS 1113 might represent a promising subunit vaccine strategy against porcine enzootic pneumonia in pigs. PMID:24461070

  19. New Insights into the Roles of Xin Repeat-Containing Proteins in Cardiac Development, Function, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinchuan; Lin, Jenny Li-Chun; Erives, Albert J.; Lin, Cheng-I; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of Xin repeat-containing proteins in 1996, the importance of Xin proteins in muscle development, function, regeneration, and disease has been continuously implicated. Most Xin proteins are localized to myotendinous junctions of the skeletal muscle and also to intercalated discs (ICDs) of the heart. The Xin gene is only found in vertebrates, which are characterized by a true chambered heart. This suggests that the evolutionary origin of the Xin gene may have played a key role in vertebrate origins. Diverse vertebrates including mammals possess two paralogous genes, Xinα (or Xirp1) and Xinβ (or Xirp2), and this review focuses on the role of their encoded proteins in cardiac muscles. Complete loss of mouse Xinβ (mXinβ) results in the failure of forming ICD, severe growth retardation, and early postnatal lethality. Deletion of mouse Xinα (mXinα) leads to late-onset cardiomyopathy with conduction defects. Molecular studies have identified three classes of mXinα-interacting proteins: catenins, actin regulators/modulators, and ion-channel subunits. Thus, mXinα acts as a scaffolding protein modulating the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion and ion-channel surface expression. Xin expression is significantly upregulated in early stages of stressed hearts, whereas Xin expression is downregulated in failing hearts from various human cardiomyopathies. Thus, mutations in these Xin loci may lead to diverse cardiomyopathies and heart failure. PMID:24725425

  20. aPPRove: An HMM-Based Method for Accurate Prediction of RNA-Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Binding Events

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Thomas; Ruiz, Jaime; Sloan, Daniel B.; Ben-Hur, Asa; Boucher, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat containing proteins (PPRs) bind to RNA transcripts originating from mitochondria and plastids. There are two classes of PPR proteins. The P class contains tandem P-type motif sequences, and the PLS class contains alternating P, L and S type sequences. In this paper, we describe a novel tool that predicts PPR-RNA interaction; specifically, our method, which we call aPPRove, determines where and how a PLS-class PPR protein will bind to RNA when given a PPR and one or more RNA transcripts by using a combinatorial binding code for site specificity proposed by Barkan et al. Our results demonstrate that aPPRove successfully locates how and where a PPR protein belonging to the PLS class can bind to RNA. For each binding event it outputs the binding site, the amino-acid-nucleotide interaction, and its statistical significance. Furthermore, we show that our method can be used to predict binding events for PLS-class proteins using a known edit site and the statistical significance of aligning the PPR protein to that site. In particular, we use our method to make a conjecture regarding an interaction between CLB19 and the second intronic region of ycf3. The aPPRove web server can be found at www.cs.colostate.edu/~approve. PMID:27560805

  1. Isolation, characterization, and bioinformatic analysis of calmodulin-binding protein cmbB reveals a novel tandem IP22 repeat common to many Dictyostelium and Mimivirus proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Suhre, Karsten; Myre, Michael A; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Chavez, Sara E

    2006-08-01

    A novel calmodulin-binding protein cmbB from Dictyostelium discoideum is encoded in a single gene. Northern analysis reveals two cmbB transcripts first detectable at 4 h during multicellular development. Western blotting detects an approximately 46.6 kDa protein. Sequence analysis and calmodulin-agarose binding studies identified a "classic" calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding domain (179IPKSLRSLFLGKGYNQPLEF198) but structural analyses suggest binding may not involve classic alpha-helical calmodulin-binding. The cmbB protein is comprised of tandem repeats of a newly identified IP22 motif ([I,L]Pxxhxxhxhxxxhxxxhxxxx; where h = any hydrophobic amino acid) that is highly conserved and a more precise representation of the FNIP repeat. At least eight Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus proteins and over 100 Dictyostelium proteins contain tandem arrays of the IP22 motif and its variants. cmbB also shares structural homology to YopM, from the plague bacterium Yersenia pestis. PMID:16777069

  2. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Blanié, Sophie; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the nucleus of TNFalpha-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein. PMID:20211013

  3. Repeated exposures to roadside particulate matter extracts suppresses pulmonary defense mechanisms, resulting in lipid and protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Michal; Porat, Ziv; Rudich, Assaf; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities and urban canyons can be harmful to the exposed population. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to health effects are not yet elucidated. It is postulated that exposure to repeated, small, environmentally relevant concentrations can affect lung homeostasis. This study examines the impact of repeated exposures to urban PM on mouse lungs with focus on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. Aqueous extracts from collected urban PM were administered to mice by 5 repeated intra-tracheal instillations (IT). Multiple exposures, led to an increase in cytokine levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in the blood serum, indicating a systemic reaction. Lung mRNA levels of antioxidant/phase II detoxifying enzymes decreased by exposure to the PM extract, but not when metals were removed by chelation. Finally, disruption of lung tissue oxidant-inflammatory/defense balance was evidenced by increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation. Unlike response to a single IT exposure to the same dose and source of extract, multiple exposures result in lung oxidative damage and a systemic inflammatory reaction. These could be attributed to compromised capacity to activate the protective Nrf2 tissue defense system. It is suggested that water-soluble metals present in urban PM, potentially from break and tire wear, may constitute major drivers of the pulmonary and systemic responses to multiple exposure to urban PM. PMID:26735168

  4. A redundant nuclear protein binding site contributes to negative regulation of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Bramblett, D; Hsu, C L; Lozano, M; Earnest, K; Fabritius, C; Dudley, J

    1995-01-01

    The tissue specificity of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) expression is controlled by regulatory elements in the MMTV long terminal repeat (LTR). These regulatory elements include the hormone response element, located approximately between -200 and -75, as well as binding sites for NF-1, Oct-1 (OTF-1), and mammary gland enhancer factors. Naturally occurring MMTV deletion variants isolated from T-cell and kidney tumors, transgenic-mouse experiments with MMTV LTR deletions, and transient transfection assays with LTR constructs indicate that there are additional transcription regulatory elements, including a negative regulatory element (NRE), located upstream of the hormone response element. To further define this regulatory region, we have constructed a series of BAL 31 deletion mutants in the MMTV LTR for use in transient transfection assays. These assays indicated that deletion of two regions (referred to as promoter-distal and -proximal NREs) between -637 and -201 elevated basal MMTV promoter activity in the absence of glucocorticoids. The region between -637 and -264 was surveyed for the presence of nuclear protein binding sites by gel retardation assays. Only one type of protein complex (referred to as NRE-binding protein or NBP) bound exclusively to sites that mapped to the promoter-distal and -proximal NREs identified by BAL 31 mutations. The promoter-proximal binding site was mapped further by linker substitution mutations and transfection assays. Mutations that mapped to a region containing an inverted repeat beginning at -287 relative to the start of transcription elevated basal expression of a reporter gene driven by the MMTV LTR. A 59-bp DNA fragment from the distal NRE also bound the NBP complex. Gel retardation assays showed that mutations within both inverted repeats of the proximal NRE eliminated NBP binding and mutations within single repeats altered NBP binding. Intriguingly, the NBP complex was detected in extracts from T cells and lung cells but

  5. Requirement of the Cytosolic Interaction between PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEIN10 and LEUCINE-RICH REPEAT PROTEIN1 for Cell Death and Defense Signaling in Pepper[W

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2012-01-01

    Plants recruit innate immune receptors such as leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins to recognize pathogen attack and activate defense genes. Here, we identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) pathogenesis-related protein10 (PR10) as a leucine-rich repeat protein1 (LRR1)–interacting partner. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the specific interaction between LRR1 and PR10 in planta. Avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria infection induces PR10 expression associated with the hypersensitive cell death response. Transient expression of PR10 triggers hypersensitive cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, which is amplified by LRR1 coexpression as a positive regulator. LRR1 promotes the ribonuclease activity and phosphorylation of PR10, leading to enhanced cell death signaling. The LRR1-PR10 complex is formed in the cytoplasm, resulting in its secretion into the apoplastic space. Engineered nuclear confinement of both proteins revealed that the cytoplasmic localization of the PR10-LRR1 complex is essential for cell death–mediated defense signaling. PR10/LRR1 silencing in pepper compromises resistance to avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria infection. By contrast, PR10/LRR1 overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana confers enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Together, these results suggest that the cytosolic LRR-PR10 complex is responsible for cell death–mediated defense signaling. PMID:22492811

  6. Diabetes-Related Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARP/Ankrd23) Modifies Glucose Homeostasis by Modulating AMPK Activity in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Yoshiaki; Matsuo, Kiyonari; Kitamura, Youhei; Ono, Kazunori; Ueyama, Tomomi; Matoba, Satoaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Wu, Tongbin; Chen, Ju; Emoto, Noriaki; Ikeda, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major site for glucose disposal, the impairment of which closely associates with the glucose intolerance in diabetic patients. Diabetes-related ankyrin repeat protein (DARP/Ankrd23) is a member of muscle ankyrin repeat proteins, whose expression is enhanced in the skeletal muscle under diabetic conditions; however, its role in energy metabolism remains poorly understood. Here we report a novel role of DARP in the regulation of glucose homeostasis through modulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. DARP is highly preferentially expressed in skeletal muscle, and its expression was substantially upregulated during myotube differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. Interestingly, DARP-/- mice demonstrated better glucose tolerance despite similar body weight, while their insulin sensitivity did not differ from that in wildtype mice. We found that phosphorylation of AMPK, which mediates insulin-independent glucose uptake, in skeletal muscle was significantly enhanced in DARP-/- mice compared to that in wildtype mice. Gene silencing of DARP in C2C12 myotubes enhanced AMPK phosphorylation, whereas overexpression of DARP in C2C12 myoblasts reduced it. Moreover, DARP-silencing increased glucose uptake and oxidation in myotubes, which was abrogated by the treatment with AICAR, an AMPK activator. Of note, improved glucose tolerance in DARP-/- mice was abolished when mice were treated with AICAR. Mechanistically, gene silencing of DARP enhanced protein expression of LKB1 that is a major upstream kinase for AMPK in myotubes in vitro and the skeletal muscle in vivo. Together with the altered expression under diabetic conditions, our data strongly suggest that DARP plays an important role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions, and thus DARP is a new therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26398569

  7. Programmable RNA-binding protein composed of repeats of a single modular unit.

    PubMed

    Adamala, Katarzyna P; Martin-Alarcon, Daniel A; Boyden, Edward S

    2016-05-10

    The ability to monitor and perturb RNAs in living cells would benefit greatly from a modular protein architecture that targets unmodified RNA sequences in a programmable way. We report that the RNA-binding protein PumHD (Pumilio homology domain), which has been widely used in native and modified form for targeting RNA, can be engineered to yield a set of four canonical protein modules, each of which targets one RNA base. These modules (which we call Pumby, for Pumilio-based assembly) can be concatenated in chains of varying composition and length, to bind desired target RNAs. The specificity of such Pumby-RNA interactions was high, with undetectable binding of a Pumby chain to RNA sequences that bear three or more mismatches from the target sequence. We validate that the Pumby architecture can perform RNA-directed protein assembly and enhancement of translation of RNAs. We further demonstrate a new use of such RNA-binding proteins, measurement of RNA translation in living cells. Pumby may prove useful for many applications in the measurement, manipulation, and biotechnological utilization of unmodified RNAs in intact cells and systems. PMID:27118836

  8. Fibronectin Binding to the Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium ShdA Autotransporter Protein Is Inhibited by a Monoclonal Antibody Recognizing the A3 Repeat

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Robert A.; Abi Ghanem, Daad; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Keestra, A. Marijke; Berghman, Luc; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2004-01-01

    ShdA is a large outer membrane protein of the autotransporter family whose passenger domain binds the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen I, possibly by mimicking the host ligand heparin. The ShdA passenger domain consists of ∼1,500 amino acid residues that can be divided into two regions based on features of the primary amino acid sequence: an N-terminal nonrepeat region followed by a repeat region composed of two types of imperfect direct amino acid repeats, called type A and type B. The repeat region bound bovine fibronectin with an affinity similar to that for the complete ShdA passenger domain, while the nonrepeat region exhibited comparatively low fibronectin-binding activity. A number of fusion proteins containing truncated fragments of the repeat region did not bind bovine fibronectin. However, binding of the passenger domain to fibronectin was inhibited in the presence of immune serum raised to one truncated fragment of the repeat region that contained repeats A2, B8, A3, and B9. Furthermore, a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognized an epitope in a recombinant protein containing the A3 repeat inhibited binding of ShdA to fibronectin. PMID:15262930

  9. Fibronectin binding to the Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ShdA autotransporter protein is inhibited by a monoclonal antibody recognizing the A3 repeat.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Robert A; Abi Ghanem, Daad; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Keestra, A Marijke; Berghman, Luc; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2004-08-01

    ShdA is a large outer membrane protein of the autotransporter family whose passenger domain binds the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen I, possibly by mimicking the host ligand heparin. The ShdA passenger domain consists of approximately 1,500 amino acid residues that can be divided into two regions based on features of the primary amino acid sequence: an N-terminal nonrepeat region followed by a repeat region composed of two types of imperfect direct amino acid repeats, called type A and type B. The repeat region bound bovine fibronectin with an affinity similar to that for the complete ShdA passenger domain, while the nonrepeat region exhibited comparatively low fibronectin-binding activity. A number of fusion proteins containing truncated fragments of the repeat region did not bind bovine fibronectin. However, binding of the passenger domain to fibronectin was inhibited in the presence of immune serum raised to one truncated fragment of the repeat region that contained repeats A2, B8, A3, and B9. Furthermore, a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognized an epitope in a recombinant protein containing the A3 repeat inhibited binding of ShdA to fibronectin. PMID:15262930

  10. Protective effects of Se-containing protein hydrolysates from Se-enriched rice against Pb(2+)-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 and RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zi; Fang, Yong; Chen, Yue; Yang, Wenjian; Ma, Ning; Pei, Fei; Kimatu, Benard Muinde; Hu, Qiuhui; Qiu, Weifen

    2016-07-01

    The protective capacity of Se-containing protein hydrolysates with molecular weight below 1kDa (SPHs-3), against Pb(2+)-induced damage in PC12 and RAW264.7 cells, was investigated in this study. The cell viability, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) in cell were analyzed. Results showed that 100μg/ml of SPHs-3 pretreatment could significantly increase cell viability by 24.9% and 23.0% in Pb(2+)-treated PC12 and RAW264.7 cells, respectively (P<0.01). The levels of ROS, NO, LDH and MDA were reduced by 32.2%, 68.2%, 79.7% and 73.7% in 100μg/ml SPHs-3 pretreated PC12 cells, respectively (P<0.01). SPHs-3 pretreatment was also associated with increases of SOD activity and GSH content in cells. In conclusion, SPHs-3 could protect cells against Pb(2+)-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting that Se-enriched rice may be a feasible candidate to improve health standard of the Pb(2+)-pollution population. PMID:26920310

  11. Glutathione S-transferase P1 suppresses iNOS protein stability in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells after LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiang; Kong, Xiuqin; Zhou, Yi; Lan, Lei; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) is a ubiquitous expressed protein which plays an important role in the detoxification and xenobiotics metabolism. Previous studies showed that GSTP1 was upregulated by the LPS stimulation in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells and GSTP1 overexpression downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Here we show that GSTP1 physically associates with the oxygenase domain of iNOS by the G-site domain and decreases the protein level of iNOS dimer. Both overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) experiments indicate that GSTP1 downregulates iNOS protein level and increases S-nitrosylation and ubiquitination of iNOS. The Y7F mutant type of GSTP1 physically associates with iNOS, but shows no effect on iNOS protein content, iNOS S-nitrosylation, and changes in iNOS from dimer to monomer, suggesting the importance of enzyme activity of GSTP1 in regulating iNOS S-nitrosylation and stability. GSTM1, another member of GSTs shows no significant effect on regulation of iNOS. In conclusion, our study reveals the novel role of GSTP1 in regulation of iNOS by affecting S-nitrosylation, dimerization, and stability, which provides a new insight for analyzing the regulation of iNOS and the anti-inflammatory effects of GSTP1. PMID:26361746

  12. An extracellular matrix, calmodulin-binding protein from Dictyostelium with EGF-like repeats that enhance cell motility.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Andres; Huber, Robert J; Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2011-07-01

    CyrA is a novel cysteine-rich protein with four EGFL repeats that was isolated using the calmodulin (CaM) binding overlay technique (CaMBOT), suggesting it is a CaM-binding protein (CaMBP). The full-length 63kDa cyrA is cleaved into two major C-terminal fragments, cyrA-C45 and cyrA-C40. A putative CaM-binding domain was detected and both CaM-agarose binding and CaM immunoprecipitation verified that cyrA-C45 and cyrA-C40 each bind to CaM in both a Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent manner. cyrA-C45 was present continuously throughout growth and development but was secreted at high levels during the multicellular slug stage of Dictyostelium development. At this time, cyrA localizes to the extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM purification verified the presence of cyrA-C45. An 18 amino acid peptide (DdEGFL1) from the first EGFL repeat sequence of cyrA (EGFL1) that is present in both cyrA-C45 and -C40 enhances both random cell motility and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis. Here we reveal that the dose-dependent enhancement of motility by DdEGFL1 is related to the time of cell starvation. Addition of DdEGFL1 also inhibits cyrA proteolysis. The status of cyrA as an extracellular CaMBP was further clarified by the demonstration that CaM is secreted during development. Antagonism of CaM with W7 resulted in enhanced cyrA proteolysis suggesting a functional role for extracellular CaM in protecting CaMBPs from proteolysis. cyrA is the first extracellular CaMBP identified in Dictyostelium and since it is an ECM protein with EGF-like repeats that enhance cell motility and it likely also represents the first matricellular protein identified in a lower eukaryote. PMID:21402150

  13. The rapid determination of fat and protein content in fresh raw milk using the laser light scattering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qi; Zhi Ling, Hou; Jian Long, Tian; Zhu, Yu

    2006-08-01

    The aim was to develop a simple and rapid method for determination of fat and protein content in milk. Based on the laser light scattering theory, the ratio of the scattered light (at 90±0.05° scattering angles) intensity to the transmitted light intensity, which is called scattered-transmitted-ratio method, is adopted as the optical parameter representing the milk fat content and the protein content. In this way, the influence of the fluctuation of the power of the light source is eliminated and the accuracy of determination is improved accordingly. The system we use is real-time and can satisfy the challenging requirements of dairy farming. Results of this study indicate the feasibility of using this technology for fresh milk fat and protein analysis. The fat contents and protein contents of 50 milk samples determined by this method were consistent with the values obtained by the reference methods based on Rose-Gottlieb method and Kjeldahl determination of N method. In this paper, the operating principle of the instrument is introduced and the influence of the environmental conditions, such as the homogenization pressure and homogenization temperature, etc. on the result of the test is analyzed. Through data analysis, the concrete schemes for testing the fat using the curve fitting and testing the protein using the surface fitting technique are determined. Finally, the difference from the reference values of the test is discussed.

  14. Crucial roles of the pentatricopeptide repeat protein SOAR1 in Arabidopsis response to drought, salt and cold stresses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shang-Chuan; Mei, Chao; Liang, Shan; Yu, Yong-Tao; Lu, Kai; Wu, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2015-07-01

    Whereas several mitochondrial/chloroplast pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins have been reported to regulate plant responses to abiotic stresses, no nucleus-localized PPR protein has been found to play role in these processes. In the present experiment, we provide evidence that a cytosol-nucleus dual-localized PPR protein SOAR1, functioning to negatively regulate abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in seed germination and postgermination growth, is a crucial, positive regulator of plant response to abiotic stresses. Downregulation of SOAR1 expression reduces, but upregulation of SOAR1 expression enhances, ABA sensitivity in ABA-induced promotion of stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening, and plant tolerance to multiple, major abiotic stresses including drought, high salinity and low temperature. Interestingly and importantly, the SOAR1-overexpression lines display strong abilities to tolerate drought, salt and cold stresses, with surprisingly high resistance to salt stress in germination and postgermination growth of seeds that are able to potentially germinate in seawater, while no negative effect on plant growth and development was observed. So, the SOAR1 gene is likely useful for improvement of crops by transgenic manipulation to enhance crop productivity in stressful conditions. Further experimental data suggest that SOAR1 likely regulates plant stress responses at least partly by integrating ABA-dependent and independent signaling pathways, which is different from the ABI2/ABI1 type 2C protein phosphatase-mediated ABA signaling. These findings help to understand highly complicated stress and ABA signalling network. PMID:26093896

  15. Organellar RNA editing and plant-specific extensions of pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in jungermanniid but not in marchantiid liverworts.

    PubMed

    Rüdinger, Mareike; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker

    2008-07-01

    The pyrimidine exchange type of RNA editing in land plant (embryophyte) organelles has largely remained an enigma with respect to its biochemical mechanisms, the underlying specificities, and its raison d'être. Apparently arising with the earliest embryophytes, RNA editing is conspicuously absent in one clade of liverworts, the complex thalloid Marchantiidae. Several lines of evidence suggest that the large gene family of organelle-targeted RNA-binding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins plays a fundamental role in the sequence-specific editing of organelle transcripts. We here describe the identification of PPR protein genes with plant-specific carboxyterminal (C-terminal) sequence signatures (E, E+, and DYW domains) in ferns, lycopodiophytes, mosses, hornworts, and jungermanniid liverworts, one subclass of the basal most clade of embryophytes, on DNA and cDNA level. In contrast, we were unable to identify these genes in a wide sampling of marchantiid liverworts (including the phylogenetic basal genus Blasia)--taxa for which no RNA editing is observed in the organelle transcripts. On the other hand, we found significant diversity of this type of PPR proteins also in Haplomitrium, a genus with an extremely high rate of RNA editing and a phylogenetic placement basal to all other liverworts. Although the presence of modularly extended PPR proteins correlates well with organelle RNA editing, the now apparent complete loss of an entire gene family from one clade of embryophytes, the marchantiid liverworts, remains puzzling. PMID:18400790

  16. Characterization of a novel anther-specific gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat protein in petunia.

    PubMed

    Yue, Y Z; Sun, J; Huang, X; Peng, H; Liu, G F; Hu, H R

    2014-01-01

    In Petunia x hybrida 'Fantasy Red', a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene referred to as PhLRR, was identified in a flower bud cDNA library. The open reading frame sequence of PhLRR was 1251 bp, encoding a putative 46.2-kDa protein of 416 amino acids. The PhLRR protein showed high similarity to members of polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins (PGIPs), contained 11 conserved LRR domains, and was an extracellular localization protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PhLRR belonged to the same PGIPs subfamily as SHY, indicating that PhLRR may be involved in the development of pollen-like SHY. Expression analysis revealed that PhLRR was abundantly expressed during early stages of flower bud and anther development, while it was not detected in any other examined organs, such as sepals, petals, pistils, roots, stems, leaves, or open flowers. Furthermore, many cis-acting elements (such as AGAAA and GTGA) related to anther-specific gene expression were identified in the PhLRR gene promoter region, indicating that the promoter is also anther-specific. These results suggested that PhLRR is a novel anther-specific gene that may be essential for the early development of anthers. PMID:25501199

  17. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein ARMADILLO-REPEAT KINESIN1 Promotes Microtubule Catastrophe in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Ryan Christopher; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics are critically important for plant cell development. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana ARMADILLO-REPEAT KINESIN1 (ARK1) plays a key role in root hair tip growth by promoting microtubule catastrophe events. This destabilizing activity appears to maintain adequate free tubulin concentrations in order to permit rapid microtubule growth, which in turn is correlated with uniform tip growth. Microtubules in ark1-1 root hairs exhibited reduced catastrophe frequency and slower growth velocities, both of which were restored by low concentrations of the microtubule-destabilizing drug oryzalin. An ARK1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein expressed under its endogenous promoter localized to growing microtubule plus ends and rescued the ark1-1 root hair phenotype. Transient overexpression of ARK1-RFP (red fluorescent protein) increased microtubule catastrophe frequency. ARK1-fusion protein constructs lacking the N-terminal motor domain still labeled microtubules, suggesting the existence of a second microtubule binding domain at the C terminus of ARK1. ARK1-GFP was broadly expressed in seedlings, but mutant phenotypes were restricted to root hairs, indicating that ARK1’s function is redundant in cells other than those forming root hairs. PMID:25159991

  18. The Armadillo Repeat-containing Protein, ARMCX3, Physically and Functionally Interacts with the Developmental Regulatory Factor Sox10*

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Zhongming; Tapper, Andrew R.; Gardner, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Sox10 is a member of the group E Sox transcription factor family and plays key roles in neural crest development and subsequent cellular differentiation. Sox10 binds to regulatory sequences in target genes via its conserved high mobility group domain. In most cases, Sox10 exerts its transcriptional effects in concert with other DNA-binding factors, adaptor proteins, and nuclear import proteins. These interactions can lead to synergistic gene activation and can be cell type-specific. In earlier work, we demonstrated that Sox10 transactivates the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α3 and β4 subunit genes and does so only in neuronal-like cell lines, raising the possibility that Sox10 mediates its effects via interactions with co-regulatory factors. Here we describe the identification of the armadillo repeat-containing protein, ARMCX3, as a Sox10-interacting protein. Biochemical analyses indicate that ARMCX3 is an integral membrane protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Others have shown that Sox10 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein. We extend this observation and demonstrate that, in the cytoplasm, Sox10 is peripherally associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane. Both Sox10 and ARMCX3 are expressed in mouse brain and spinal cord as well as several cell lines. Overexpression of ARMCX3 increased the amount of mitochondrially associated Sox10. In addition, although ARMCX3 does not possess intrinsic transcriptional activity, it does enhance transactivation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α3 and β4 subunit gene promoters by Sox10. These results suggest that Sox10 is a membrane-associated factor whose transcriptional function is increased by direct interactions with ARMCX3 and raise the possibility of a signal transduction cascade between the nucleus and mitochondria through Sox10/ARMCX3 interactions. PMID:19304657

  19. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jianjie; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3′ untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  20. Redefining the structural motifs that determine RNA binding and RNA editing by pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in land plants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shifeng; Gutmann, Bernard; Zhong, Xiao; Ye, Yongtao; Fisher, Mark F; Bai, Fengqi; Castleden, Ian; Song, Yue; Song, Bo; Huang, Jiaying; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xun; Lim, Boon L; Bond, Charles S; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Small, Ian

    2016-02-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins form one of the largest protein families in land plants. They are characterised by tandem 30-40 amino acid motifs that form an extended binding surface capable of sequence-specific recognition of RNA strands. Almost all of them are post-translationally targeted to plastids and mitochondria, where they play important roles in post-transcriptional processes including splicing, RNA editing and the initiation of translation. A code describing how PPR proteins recognise their RNA targets promises to accelerate research on these proteins, but making use of this code requires accurate definition and annotation of all of the various nucleotide-binding motifs in each protein. We have used a structural modelling approach to define 10 different variants of the PPR motif found in plant proteins, in addition to the putative deaminase motif that is found at the C-terminus of many RNA-editing factors. We show that the super-helical RNA-binding surface of RNA-editing factors is potentially longer than previously recognised. We used the redefined motifs to develop accurate and consistent annotations of PPR sequences from 109 genomes. We report a high error rate in PPR gene models in many public plant proteomes, due to gene fusions and insertions of spurious introns. These consistently annotated datasets across a wide range of species are valuable resources for future comparative genomics studies, and an essential pre-requisite for accurate large-scale computational predictions of PPR targets. We have created a web portal (http://www.plantppr.com) that provides open access to these resources for the community. PMID:26764122

  1. Expression of a gibberellin-induced leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase in deepwater rice and its interaction with kinase-associated protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Knaap, E. van der; Sauter, M.; Kende, H. . DOE Plant Research Lab.); Song, W.Y.; Ruan, D.L.; Ronald, P.C. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1999-06-01

    The authors identified in deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like transmembrane protein kinase, OsTMK (O. sativa transmembrane kinase). The transcript levels of OsTMK increased in the rice internode in response to gibberellin. Expression of OsTMK was especially high in regions undergoing cell division and elongation. The kinase domain of OsTMK was enzymatically active autophosphorylating on serine and threonine residues. A cDNA encoding a rice ortholog of a kinase-associated type 2C protein phosphatase (OsKAPP) was cloned. KAPPs are putative downstream components in kinase-mediated signal transduction pathways. The kinase interaction domain of OsKAPP was phosphorylated in vitro by the kinase domain of OsTMK. RNA gel-blot analysis indicated that the expression of OsTMK and OsKAPP was similar in different tissues of the rice plant. In protein-binding assays, OsKAPP interacted with a receptor-like protein kinase, RLK5 of Arabidopsis, but not with the protein kinase domains of the rice and maize receptor-like protein kinases Xa21 and ZmPK1, respectively.

  2. The WD40-repeat protein Han11 functions as a scaffold protein to control HIPK2 and MEKK1 kinase functions

    PubMed Central

    Ritterhoff, Stefanie; Farah, Carla M; Grabitzki, Julia; Lochnit, Günter; Skurat, Alexander V; Schmitz, Michael Lienhard

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases are organized in hierarchical networks that are assembled and regulated by scaffold proteins. Here, we identify the evolutionary conserved WD40-repeat protein Han11 as an interactor of the kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2). In vitro experiments showed the direct binding of Han11 to HIPK2, but also to the kinases DYRK1a, DYRK1b and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1). Han11 was required to allow coupling of MEKK1 to DYRK1 and HIPK2. Knockdown experiments in Caenorhabditis elegans showed the relevance of the Han11 orthologs Swan-1 and Swan-2 for the osmotic stress response. Downregulation of Han11 in human cells lowered the threshold and amplitude of HIPK2- and MEKK1-triggered signalling events and changed the kinetics of kinase induction. Han11 knockdown changed the amplitude and time dependence of HIPK2-driven transcription in response to DNA damage and also interfered with MEKK1-triggered gene expression and stress signalling. Impaired signal transmission also occurred upon interference with stoichiometrically assembled signalling complexes by Han11 overexpression. Collectively, these experiments identify Han11 as a novel scaffold protein regulating kinase signalling by HIPK2 and MEKK1. PMID:20940704

  3. Drosha Inclusions Are New Components of Dipeptide-Repeat Protein Aggregates in FTLD-TDP and ALS C9orf72 Expansion Cases

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Sílvia; Kwong, Linda K.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are 2 neurodegenerative disorders that share clinical, genetic, and neuropathologic features. The presence of abnormal expansions of GGGGCC repeats (G4C2 repeats) in a noncoding region of the Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene is the major genetic cause of both FTLD and ALS. Transcribed G4C2 repeats can form nuclear RNA foci and recruit RNA-binding proteins, thereby inhibiting their normal function. Moreover, through a repeat-associated non-ATG translation mechanism, G4C2 repeats translation leads to dipeptide-repeat protein aggregation in the cytoplasm of neurons. Here, we identify Drosha protein as a new component of these dipeptide-repeat aggregates. In C9orf72 mutation cases of FTLD-TDP (c9FTLD-TDP) and ALS (c9ALS), but not in FTLD or ALS cases without C9orf72 mutation, Drosha is mislocalized to form neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum. Further characterization of Drosha-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum revealed colocalization with p62 and ubiquilin-2, 2 pathognomonic signatures of c9FTLD-TDP and c9ALS cases; however, Drosha inclusions rarely colocalized with TDP-43 pathology. We conclude that Drosha may play a unique pathogenic role in the onset or progression of FTLD-TDP/ALS in patients with the C9orf72 mutation. PMID:25756586

  4. Wound induced Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein genes encode a longer leucine-rich repeat domain and inhibit fungal polygalacturonases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defense. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes, BvPGIP1, BvPGIP2 and BvPGIP3, were isolated from two breeding lines, F1016 and F1010. Full-length cDNA sequences of the three BvPGIP genes encod...

  5. An evolutionary comparison of leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors reveals a novel LGR subtype.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Van Loy, Tom; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2012-03-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors or LGRs are receptors with important functions in development and reproduction. Belonging to this evolutionarily conserved group of receptors are the well-studied glycoprotein hormone receptors and relaxin receptors in mammals, as well as the bursicon receptor, which triggers cuticle hardening and tanning in freshly enclosed insects. In this study, the numerous LGR sequences in different animal phyla are analyzed and compared. Based on these data a phylogenetic tree was generated. This information sheds new light on structural and evolutionary aspects regarding this receptor group. Apart from vertebrates and insects, LGRs are also present in early chordates (Urochordata, Cephalochordata and Hyperoartia) and other arthropods (Arachnida and Branchiopoda) as well as in Mollusca, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Nematoda, and even in ancient animal life forms, such as Cnidaria and Placozoa. Three distinct types of LGR exist, distinguishable by their number of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), their type-specific hinge region and the presence or absence of an LDLa motif. Type C LGRs containing only one LDLa (C1 subtype) appear to be present in nearly all animal phyla. We here describe a second subtype, C2, containing multiple LDLa motifs, which was discovered in echinoderms, mollusks and in one insect species (Pediculus humanis corporis). In addition, eight putative LGRs can be predicted from the genome data of the placozoan species Trichoplax adhaerens. They may represent an ancient form of the LGRs, however, more genomic data will be required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:22100731

  6. Pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatases set the amplitude of receptor tyrosine kinase output

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Gloria; Niederst, Matt; Cohen-Katsenelson, Ksenya; Stender, Joshua D.; Kunkel, Maya T.; Chen, Muhan; Brognard, John; Sierecki, Emma; Gao, Tianyan; Nowak, Dawid G.; Trotman, Lloyd C.; Glass, Christopher K.; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2014-01-01

    Growth factor receptor levels are aberrantly high in diverse cancers, driving the proliferation and survival of tumor cells. Understanding the molecular basis for this aberrant elevation has profound clinical implications. Here we show that the pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP) suppresses receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling output by a previously unidentified epigenetic mechanism unrelated to its previously described function as the hydrophobic motif phosphatase for the protein kinase AKT, protein kinase C, and S6 kinase. Specifically, we show that nuclear-localized PHLPP suppresses histone phosphorylation and acetylation, in turn suppressing the transcription of diverse growth factor receptors, including the EGF receptor. These data uncover a much broader role for PHLPP in regulation of growth factor signaling beyond its direct inactivation of AKT: By suppressing RTK levels, PHLPP dampens the downstream signaling output of two major oncogenic pathways, the PI3 kinase/AKT and the Rat sarcoma (RAS)/ERK pathways. Our data are consistent with a model in which PHLPP modifies the histone code to control the transcription of RTKs. PMID:25201979

  7. Cross Protection against Influenza A Virus by Yeast-Expressed Heterologous Tandem Repeat M2 Extracellular Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Jongsang; Kim, Cheol; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    The influenza M2 ectodomain (M2e) is well conserved across human influenza A subtypes, but there are few residue changes among avian and swine origin influenza A viruses. We expressed a tandem repeat construct of heterologous M2e sequences (M2e5x) derived from human, swine, and avian origin influenza A viruses using the yeast expression system. Intramuscular immunization of mice with AS04-adjuvanted M2e5x protein vaccines was effective in inducing M2e-specific antibodies reactive to M2e peptide and native M2 proteins on the infected cells with human, swine, or avian influenza virus, mucosal and systemic memory cellular immune responses, and cross-protection against H3N2 virus. Importantly, M2e5x immune sera were found to confer protection against different subtypes of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A viruses in naïve mice. Also, M2e5x-immune complexes of virus-infected cells stimulated macrophages to secrete cytokines via Fc receptors, indicating a possible mechanism of protection. The present study provides evidence that M2e5x proteins produced in yeast cells could be developed as a potential universal influenza vaccine. PMID:26366729

  8. Cross Protection against Influenza A Virus by Yeast-Expressed Heterologous Tandem Repeat M2 Extracellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Jongsang; Kim, Cheol; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    The influenza M2 ectodomain (M2e) is well conserved across human influenza A subtypes, but there are few residue changes among avian and swine origin influenza A viruses. We expressed a tandem repeat construct of heterologous M2e sequences (M2e5x) derived from human, swine, and avian origin influenza A viruses using the yeast expression system. Intramuscular immunization of mice with AS04-adjuvanted M2e5x protein vaccines was effective in inducing M2e-specific antibodies reactive to M2e peptide and native M2 proteins on the infected cells with human, swine, or avian influenza virus, mucosal and systemic memory cellular immune responses, and cross-protection against H3N2 virus. Importantly, M2e5x immune sera were found to confer protection against different subtypes of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A viruses in naïve mice. Also, M2e5x-immune complexes of virus-infected cells stimulated macrophages to secrete cytokines via Fc receptors, indicating a possible mechanism of protection. The present study provides evidence that M2e5x proteins produced in yeast cells could be developed as a potential universal influenza vaccine. PMID:26366729

  9. Structural features of helical secondary structures and leucine-rich repeat superhelix in proteins as revealed by HELFIT analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Norio; Enkhbayar, Purevjav

    2012-09-01

    The HELFIT program determines the helical parameters - pitch, residues per turn (n), radius, and handedness - and p = rmsd / (N - 1)1/2 estimating helical regularity, where "rmsd" is the root mean square deviation from the best fit helix or superhelix and "N" is helix/superhelix length. Helical secondary structures - α-helix and 310-helix - and solenoid structures of leucine rich repeats (LRRs) in The Protein Data Bank (PDB) were analyzed by the HELFIT program. The results indicate that the definition of 310-helices in terms of average, uniform dihedral angles is not appropriate and that it is inherently unstable for a polypeptide to form an extended, regular 310-helix. The 310-helices observed in proteins are better referred to parahelices. A modification of the α-helix, termed the ω-helix, that has four residues in one turn of a helix, has been identified only in synthetic polypeptides. The results also demonstrate that the right-handed ω-helix occur really in proteins. The solenoid structures of LRR domains in brasinosteroid insensitive 1 (BRI1), internalin J (InlJ), and internalin A (InlA) are well represented by a superhelix rather than by a circular arc.

  10. The WD40 repeat protein NEDD1 functions in microtubule organization during cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zeng, C J Tracy; Lee, Y-R Julie; Liu, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Although cells of flowering plants lack a structurally defined microtubule-organizing center like the centrosome, organization of the spindles and phragmoplasts in mitosis is known to involve the evolutionarily conserved gamma-tubulin complex. We have investigated the function of Arabidopsis thaliana NEDD1, a WD40 repeat protein related to the animal NEDD1/GCP-WD protein, which interacts with the gamma-tubulin complex. The NEDD1 protein decorates spindle microtubules (MTs) preferentially toward spindle poles and phragmoplast MTs toward their minus ends. A T-DNA insertional allele of the single NEDD1 gene was isolated and maintained in heterozygous sporophytes, and NEDD1's function in cell division was analyzed in haploid microspores produced by the heterozygote. In approximately half of the dividing microspores exhibiting aberrant MT organization, spindles were no longer restricted to the cell periphery and became abnormally elongated. After mitosis, MTs aggregated between reforming nuclei but failed to appear in a bipolar configuration. Consequently, defective microspores did not form a continuous cell plate, and two identical nuclei were produced with no differentiation into generative and vegetative cells. Our results support the notion that the plant NEDD1 homolog plays a critical role in MT organization during mitosis, and its function is likely linked to that of the gamma-tubulin complex. PMID:19383896

  11. Characterization of Microsporidia-Induced Developmental Arrest and a Transmembrane Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Luallen, Robert J.; Bakowski, Malina A.; Troemel, Emily R.

    2015-01-01

    Microsporidia comprise a highly diverged phylum of intracellular, eukaryotic pathogens, with some species able to cause life-threatening illnesses in immunocompromised patients. To better understand microsporidian infection in animals, we study infection of the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and a species of microsporidia, Nematocida parisii, which infects Caenorhabditis nematodes in the wild. We conducted a targeted RNAi screen for host C. elegans genes important for infection and growth of N. parisii, using nematode larval arrest as an assay for infection. Here, we present the results of this RNAi screen, and our analyses on one of the RNAi hits from the screen that was ultimately not corroborated by loss of function mutants. This hit was an RNAi clone against F56A8.3, a conserved gene that encodes a transmembrane protein containing leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), a domain found in numerous pathogen receptors from other systems. This RNAi clone caused C. elegans to be resistant to infection by N. parisii, leading to reduced larval arrest and lower pathogen load. Characterization of the endogenous F56A8.3 protein revealed that it is expressed in the intestine, localized to the membrane around lysosome-related organelles (LROs), and exists in two different protein isoforms in C. elegans. We used the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the F56A8.3 locus and created both a frameshift mutant resulting in a truncated protein and a complete knockout mutant. Neither of these mutants was able to recapitulate the infection phenotypes of the RNAi clone, indicating that the RNAi-mediated phenotypes are due to an off-target effect of the RNAi clone. Nevertheless, this study describes microsporidia-induced developmental arrest in C. elegans, presents results from an RNAi screen for host genes important for microsporidian infection, and characterizes aspects of the conserved F56A8.3 gene and its protein product. PMID:25874557

  12. Characterization of microsporidia-induced developmental arrest and a transmembrane leucine-rich repeat protein in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Luallen, Robert J; Bakowski, Malina A; Troemel, Emily R

    2015-01-01

    Microsporidia comprise a highly diverged phylum of intracellular, eukaryotic pathogens, with some species able to cause life-threatening illnesses in immunocompromised patients. To better understand microsporidian infection in animals, we study infection of the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and a species of microsporidia, Nematocida parisii, which infects Caenorhabditis nematodes in the wild. We conducted a targeted RNAi screen for host C. elegans genes important for infection and growth of N. parisii, using nematode larval arrest as an assay for infection. Here, we present the results of this RNAi screen, and our analyses on one of the RNAi hits from the screen that was ultimately not corroborated by loss of function mutants. This hit was an RNAi clone against F56A8.3, a conserved gene that encodes a transmembrane protein containing leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), a domain found in numerous pathogen receptors from other systems. This RNAi clone caused C. elegans to be resistant to infection by N. parisii, leading to reduced larval arrest and lower pathogen load. Characterization of the endogenous F56A8.3 protein revealed that it is expressed in the intestine, localized to the membrane around lysosome-related organelles (LROs), and exists in two different protein isoforms in C. elegans. We used the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the F56A8.3 locus and created both a frameshift mutant resulting in a truncated protein and a complete knockout mutant. Neither of these mutants was able to recapitulate the infection phenotypes of the RNAi clone, indicating that the RNAi-mediated phenotypes are due to an off-target effect of the RNAi clone. Nevertheless, this study describes microsporidia-induced developmental arrest in C. elegans, presents results from an RNAi screen for host genes important for microsporidian infection, and characterizes aspects of the conserved F56A8.3 gene and its protein product. PMID:25874557

  13. Nucleotide sequence and organization of the human S-protein gene: repeating peptide motifs in the pexin family and a model for their evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, D.; Stanley, K.K.

    1987-10-20

    The S-protein/vitronectin gene was isolated from a human genomic DNA library, and its sequence of about 5.3 kilobases including the adjacent 5' and 3' flanking regions was established. Alignment of the genomic DNA nucleotide sequence and the cDNA sequence indicated that the gene consisted of eight exons and seven introns. The intron positions in the S-protein gene and their phase type were compared to those in the hemopexin gene which shares amino acid sequence homologies with transin and the S-protein. Three introns have been found at equivalent positions; two other introns are very close to these positions and are interpreted as cases of intron sliding. Introns 3-7 occur at a conserved glycine residue within repeating peptide segments, whereas introns 1 and 2 are at the boundaries of the Somatomedin B domain of S-protein. The analysis of the exon structure in relations to repeating peptide motifs within the S-protein strongly suggest that it contains only seven repeats, one less than the hemopexin molecule. A very similar repeat pattern like that in hemopexin is shown to be present also in two other related proteins, transin and interstitial collagenase. An evolutionary model for the generation of the repeat pattern in the S-protein and the other members of this novel pexin gene family is proposed, and the sequence modifications for some of the repeats during divergent evolution are discussed in relation to know unique functional properties of hemopexin and S-protein.

  14. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 is associated with invasion, metastasis, and could be a potential therapeutic target in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xi, H Q; Cai, A Z; Wu, X S; Cui, J X; Shen, W S; Bian, S B; Wang, N; Li, J Y; Lu, C R; Song, Z; Wei, B; Chen, L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5), which is identified as a novel intestinal stem cell marker, is overexpressed in various tumours. In this study, we explore Lgr5 expression in gastric carcinoma and analyse its role in invasion, metastasis, and prognosis in carcinoma. Methods: A combination of immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction were used to detect mRNA and protein expression levels of Lgr5 and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Small interfering RNA against Lgr5 was designed, synthesised, and transfected into AGS cells. The effects of Lgr5 siRNA on cell invasion were detected by transwell invasion chamber assay and wound healing assay. Results: Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 expression was significantly higher in gastric carcinomas than in normal mucosa. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 expression positively correlated with the depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, distance of metastasis, and MMP2 expression levels. Multivariate analysis showed that Lgr5 had an independent effect on survival, and that it positively correlated with MMP2. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 siRNAs inhibited Lgr5 mRNA and protein expression. Transwell assays indicated that these siRNAs resulted in significantly fewer cells migrating through the polycarbonate membrane, and wound healing assay also indicated that siRNAs decreased the migration of cells. Inhibition of Lgr5 resulted in a significant decrease in MMP2 and β-catenin levels compared with those in controls. Conclusions: Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 was correlated with invasion and metastasis. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 inhibition could serve as a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:24594994

  15. Structures and Polymorphic Interactions of Two Heptad-Repeat Regions of the SARS Virus S2 Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,Y.; Liu, J.; Zheng, Q.; Yong, W.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Entry of SARS coronavirus into its target cell requires large-scale structural transitions in the viral spike (S) glycoprotein in order to induce fusion of the virus and cell membranes. Here we describe the identification and crystal structures of four distinct a-helical domains derived from the highly conserved heptad-repeat (HR) regions of the S2 fusion subunit. The four domains are an antiparallel four-stranded coiled coil, a parallel trimeric coiled coil, a four-helix bundle, and a six-helix bundle that is likely the final fusogenic form of the protein. When considered together, the structural and thermodynamic features of the four domains suggest a possible mechanism whereby the HR regions, initially sequestered in the native S glycoprotein spike, are released and refold sequentially to promote membrane fusion. Our results provide a structural framework for understanding the control of membrane fusion and should guide efforts to intervene in the SARS coronavirus entry process.

  16. The Role of Slr0151, a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II Assembly and Repair.

    PubMed

    Rast, Anna; Rengstl, Birgit; Heinz, Steffen; Klingl, Andreas; Nickelsen, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII) is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014). Here, we show that inactivation of slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells. PMID:27200072

  17. The Role of Slr0151, a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II Assembly and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rast, Anna; Rengstl, Birgit; Heinz, Steffen; Klingl, Andreas; Nickelsen, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII) is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014). Here, we show that inactivation of slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells. PMID:27200072

  18. F-box/LRR-repeat protein 7 is genetically associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tosto, Giuseppe; Fu, Hongjun; Vardarajan, Badri N; Lee, Joseph H; Cheng, Rong; Reyes-Dumeyer, Dolly; Lantigua, Rafael; Medrano, Martin; Jimenez-Velazquez, Ivonne Z; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Wright, Clinton B; Sacco, Ralph L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Farrer, Lindsay; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Reitz, Christiane; Mayeux, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the context of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) over 20 genes have been identified but, aside APOE, all show small effect sizes, leaving a large part of the genetic component unexplained. Admixed populations, such as Caribbean Hispanics, can provide a valuable contribution because of their unique genetic profile and higher incidence of the disease. We aimed to identify novel loci associated with LOAD. Methods About 4514 unrelated Caribbean Hispanics (2451 cases and 2063 controls) were selected for genome-wide association analysis. Significant loci were further tested in the expanded cohort that also included related family members (n = 5300). Two AD-like transgenic mice models (J20 and rTg4510) were used to study gene expression. Independent data sets of non-Hispanic Whites and African Americans were used to further validate findings, along with publicly available brain expression data sets. Results A novel locus, rs75002042 in FBXL7 (5p15.1), was found genome-wide significant in the case–control cohort (odd ratio [OR] = 0.61, P = 6.19E-09) and confirmed in the related members cohorts (OR = 0.63, P = 4.7E-08). Fbxl7 protein was overexpressed in both AD-like transgenic mice compared to wild-type littermates. Publicly available microarray studies also showed significant overexpression of Fbxl7 in LOAD brains compared to nondemented controls. single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs75002042 was in complete linkage disequilibrium with other variants in two independent non-Hispanic White and African American data sets (0.0005 < P < 0.02) used for replication. Interpretation FBXL7, encodes a subcellular protein involved in phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination processes and displays proapoptotic activity. F-box proteins also modulate inflammation and innate immunity, which may be important in LOAD pathogenesis. Further investigations are needed to validate and understand its role in this and other populations. PMID:26339675

  19. Regulation of the nucleosome repeat length in vivo by the DNA sequence, protein concentrations and long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Beshnova, Daria A; Cherstvy, Andrey G; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Teif, Vladimir B

    2014-07-01

    The nucleosome repeat length (NRL) is an integral chromatin property important for its biological functions. Recent experiments revealed several conflicting trends of the NRL dependence on the concentrations of histones and other architectural chromatin proteins, both in vitro and in vivo, but a systematic theoretical description of NRL as a function of DNA sequence and epigenetic determinants is currently lacking. To address this problem, we have performed an integrative biophysical and bioinformatics analysis in species ranging from yeast to frog to mouse where NRL was studied as a function of various parameters. We show that in simple eukaryotes such as yeast, a lower limit for the NRL value exists, determined by internucleosome interactions and remodeler action. For higher eukaryotes, also the upper limit exists since NRL is an increasing but saturating function of the linker histone concentration. Counterintuitively, smaller H1 variants or non-histone architectural proteins can initiate larger effects on the NRL due to entropic reasons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different regimes of the NRL dependence on histone concentrations exist depending on whether DNA sequence-specific effects dominate over boundary effects or vice versa. We consider several classes of genomic regions with apparently different regimes of the NRL variation. As one extreme, our analysis reveals that the period of oscillations of the nucleosome density around bound RNA polymerase coincides with the period of oscillations of positioning sites of the corresponding DNA sequence. At another extreme, we show that although mouse major satellite repeats intrinsically encode well-defined nucleosome preferences, they have no unique nucleosome arrangement and can undergo a switch between two distinct types of nucleosome positioning. PMID:24992723

  20. Regulation of the Nucleosome Repeat Length In Vivo by the DNA Sequence, Protein Concentrations and Long-Range Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Beshnova, Daria A.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Teif, Vladimir B.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleosome repeat length (NRL) is an integral chromatin property important for its biological functions. Recent experiments revealed several conflicting trends of the NRL dependence on the concentrations of histones and other architectural chromatin proteins, both in vitro and in vivo, but a systematic theoretical description of NRL as a function of DNA sequence and epigenetic determinants is currently lacking. To address this problem, we have performed an integrative biophysical and bioinformatics analysis in species ranging from yeast to frog to mouse where NRL was studied as a function of various parameters. We show that in simple eukaryotes such as yeast, a lower limit for the NRL value exists, determined by internucleosome interactions and remodeler action. For higher eukaryotes, also the upper limit exists since NRL is an increasing but saturating function of the linker histone concentration. Counterintuitively, smaller H1 variants or non-histone architectural proteins can initiate larger effects on the NRL due to entropic reasons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different regimes of the NRL dependence on histone concentrations exist depending on whether DNA sequence-specific effects dominate over boundary effects or vice versa. We consider several classes of genomic regions with apparently different regimes of the NRL variation. As one extreme, our analysis reveals that the period of oscillations of the nucleosome density around bound RNA polymerase coincides with the period of oscillations of positioning sites of the corresponding DNA sequence. At another extreme, we show that although mouse major satellite repeats intrinsically encode well-defined nucleosome preferences, they have no unique nucleosome arrangement and can undergo a switch between two distinct types of nucleosome positioning. PMID:24992723

  1. Novel SLC7A7 large rearrangements in lysinuric protein intolerance patients involving the same AluY repeat

    PubMed Central

    Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Espino, Meritxell; Sillué, Ruth; Mañas, Sandra; Gómez, Laia; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Palacín, Manuel; Nunes, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is a rare autosomal inherited disease caused by defective cationic aminoacid transport 4F2hc/y+LAT-1 at the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the intestine and kidney. LPI is a multisystemic disease with a variety of clinical symptoms such as hepatosplenomegaly, osteoporosis, hypotonia, developmental delay, pulmonary insufficiency or end-stage renal disease. The SLC7A7 gene, which encodes the y+LAT-1 protein, is mutated in LPI patients. Mutation analysis of the promoter localized in intron 1 and all exons of the SLC7A7 gene was performed in 11 patients from 9 unrelated LPI families. Point mutation screening was performed by exon direct sequencing and a new multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) assay was set up for large rearrangement analysis. Eleven SLC7A7-specific mutations were identified, seven of them were novel: p.L124P, p.C425R, p.R468X, p.Y274fsX21, c.625+1G>C, DelE4-E11 and DelE6-E11. The novel large deletions originated by the recombination of Alu repeats at introns 3 and 5, respectively, with the same AluY sequence localized at the SLC7A7 3′ region. The novel MLPA assay is robust and valuable for LPI molecular diagnosis. Our results suggest that genomic rearrangements of SLC7A7 play a more important role in LPI than has been reported, increasing the detection rate from 5.1 to 21.4%. Moreover, the 3′ region AluY repeat could be a recombination hot spot as it is involved in 38% of all SLC7A7 rearranged chromosomes described so far. PMID:18716612

  2. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum's intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  3. Cerebellar c9RAN proteins associate with clinical and neuropathological characteristics of C9ORF72 repeat expansion carriers.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Tania F; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Bieniek, Kevin F; Daughrity, Lillian M; Jiang, Jie; Rush, Beth K; Pedraza, Otto; Lucas, John A; Murray, Melissa E; Desaro, Pamela; Robertson, Amelia; Overstreet, Karen; Thomas, Colleen S; Crook, Julia E; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Rousseau, Linda; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Rademakers, Rosa; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Edbauer, Dieter; Cleveland, Don W; Dickson, Dennis W; Petrucelli, Leonard; Boylan, Kevin B

    2015-10-01

    Clinical and neuropathological characteristics associated with G4C2 repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia, are highly variable. To gain insight on the molecular basis for the heterogeneity among C9ORF72 mutation carriers, we evaluated associations between features of disease and levels of two abundantly expressed "c9RAN proteins" produced by repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation of the expanded repeat. For these studies, we took a departure from traditional immunohistochemical approaches and instead employed immunoassays to quantitatively measure poly(GP) and poly(GA) levels in cerebellum, frontal cortex, motor cortex, and/or hippocampus from 55 C9ORF72 mutation carriers [12 patients with ALS, 24 with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and 19 with FTLD with motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND)]. We additionally investigated associations between levels of poly(GP) or poly(GA) and cognitive impairment in 15 C9ORF72 ALS patients for whom neuropsychological data were available. Among the neuroanatomical regions investigated, poly(GP) levels were highest in the cerebellum. In this same region, associations between poly(GP) and both neuropathological and clinical features were detected. Specifically, cerebellar poly(GP) levels were significantly lower in patients with ALS compared to patients with FTLD or FTLD-MND. Furthermore, cerebellar poly(GP) associated with cognitive score in our cohort of 15 patients. In the cerebellum, poly(GA) levels similarly trended lower in the ALS subgroup compared to FTLD or FTLD-MND subgroups, but no association between cerebellar poly(GA) and cognitive score was detected. Both cerebellar poly(GP) and poly(GA) associated with C9ORF72 variant 3 mRNA expression, but not variant 1 expression, repeat size, disease onset, or survival after onset. Overall, these data indicate that cerebellar abnormalities, as

  4. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum’s intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  5. Statistical characterization of the GxxxG glycine repeats in the flagellar biosynthesis protein FliH and its Type III secretion homologue YscL

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background FliH is a protein involved in the export of components of the bacterial flagellum and we herein describe the presence of glycine-rich repeats in FliH of the form AxxxG(xxxG)mxxxA, where the value of m varies considerably in FliH proteins from different bacteria. While GxxxG and AxxxA patterns have previously been described, the long glycine repeat segments in FliH proteins have yet to be characterized. The Type III secretion system homologue to FliH (YscL, AscL, PscL, etc.) also contains a similar GxxxG repeat, and hence the presence of the repeat is evolutionarily conserved in these proteins, suggesting an important structural role or biological function. Results A set of FliH and YscL protein sequences was downloaded from GenBank, and then filtered to reduce redundancy, to ensure the soundness of the sequences, and to eliminate, as much as possible, confounding phylogenetic signal between individual sequences by implementing a pairwise 25% sequence identity cut-off. The general features of the glycine-rich repeats in these proteins were examined, and it was found that the length of these repeat segments varied substantially among FliH proteins but was fairly consistent for the Type III (YscL) homologue sequences, with values of m ranging from 0 to 12 for FliH and 0 to 2 for YscL. The amino acid sequence distribution of each of the three positions in the GxxxG repeats was found to differ significantly from the overall amino acid composition of the FliH/YscL proteins. The high frequency of Glu, Gln, Lys and Ala residues in the repeat positions, which is not likely indicative of any contaminating phylogenetic signal, suggests an α-helical structure for this motif. In addition, we sought to determine whether certain pairs of amino acids, in certain pairs of positions, were found together significantly more often than would be predicted by chance. Several statistically significant correlations were uncovered, which may be important for maintaining helical

  6. Distribution of dipeptide repeat proteins in cellular models and C9orf72 mutation cases suggests link to transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Schludi, Martin H; May, Stephanie; Grässer, Friedrich A; Rentzsch, Kristin; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Küpper, Clemens; Klopstock, Thomas; Arzberger, Thomas; Edbauer, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    A massive expansion of a GGGGCC repeat upstream of the C9orf72 coding region is the most common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Despite its intronic localization and lack of a canonical start codon, both strands are translated into aggregating dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins: poly-GA, poly-GP, poly-GR, poly-PR and poly-PA. To address conflicting findings on the predominant toxicity of the different DPR species in model systems, we compared the expression pattern of the DPR proteins in rat primary neurons and postmortem brain and spinal cord of C9orf72 mutation patients. Only poly-GA overexpression closely mimicked the p62-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions commonly observed for all DPR proteins in patients. In contrast, overexpressed poly-GR and poly-PR formed nucleolar p62-negative inclusions. In patients, most of the less common neuronal intranuclear DPR inclusions were para-nucleolar and p62 positive. Neuronal nucleoli in C9orf72 cases showed normal size and morphology regardless of the presence of poly-GR and poly-PR inclusions arguing against widespread nucleolar stress, reported in cellular models. Colocalization of para-nucleolar DPR inclusions with heterochromatin and a marker of transcriptional repression (H3K9me2) indicates a link to gene transcription. In contrast, we detected numerous intranuclear DPR inclusions not associated with nucleolar structures in ependymal and subependymal cells. In patients, neuronal inclusions of poly-GR, poly-GP and the poly-GA interacting protein Unc119 were less abundant than poly-GA inclusions, but showed similar regional and subcellular distribution. Regardless of neurodegeneration, all inclusions were most abundant in neocortex, hippocampus and thalamus, with few inclusions in brain stem and spinal cord. In the granular cell layer of the cerebellum, poly-GA and Unc119 inclusions were significantly more abundant in cases with FTLD than in cases with MND and FTLD/MND. Poly

  7. Participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in thapsigargin- and TPA-induced histamine production in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Muneshige; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Oikawa, Shinji; Murakami, Akira; Ohuchi, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Stimulation of the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with thapsigargin, an endomembrane Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor, induced histamine production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The protein kinase C activator, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), also enhanced histamine production. α-Fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide substrate of L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), suppressed the thapsigargin (30 nM)- and TPA (30 nM)-induced histamine production. Both thapsigargin (30 nM) and TPA (30 nM) induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase and p38 MAP kinase. PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK-1 which phosphorylates p44/p42 MAP kinase, strongly suppressed both the thapsigargin (30 nM)- and TPA (30 nM)-induced histamine production, whereas SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, inhibited them only partially. The other MEK-1 inhibitor, U-0126, also inhibited both the thapsigargin- and TPA-induced histamine production in a concentration-dependent manner. Thapsigargin (30 nM) and TPA (30 nM) increased the levels of HDC mRNA at 4 h, but PD98059 suppressed both the thapsigargin- and TPA-induced increases in the HDC mRNA level. These findings indicate that thapsigargin and TPA induce histamine production in RAW 264.7 cells by increasing the level of HDC mRNA, and that both the thapsigargin- and TPA-induced histamine production are regulated largely by p44/p42 MAP kinase and partially by p38 MAP kinase.. PMID:10711350

  8. In vitro genetic selection analysis of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein binding to 3'-terminal AUGC repeats in the viral RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Houser-Scott, F; Ansel-McKinney, P; Cai, J M; Gehrke, L

    1997-01-01

    The coat proteins of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the related ilarviruses bind specifically to the 3' untranslated regions of the viral RNAs, which contain conserved repeats of the tetranucleotide sequence AUGC. The purpose of this study was to develop a more detailed understanding of RNA sequence and/or structural determinants required for coat protein binding by characterizing the role of the AUGC repeats. Starting with a complex pool of 39-nucleotide RNA molecules containing random substitutions in the AUGC repeats, in vitro genetic selection was used to identify RNAs that bound coat protein. After six iterative rounds of selection, amplification, and reselection, 25% of the RNAs selected from the randomized pool were wild type; that is, they contained all four AUGC sequences. Among the 31 clones analyzed, AUGC was clearly the preferred selected sequence at the four repeats, but some nucleotide sequence variability was observed at AUGC(865-868) if the other three AUGC repeats were present. Variant RNAs that bound coat protein with affinities equal to or greater than that of the wild-type molecule were not selected. To extend the in vitro selection results, RNAs containing specific nucleotide substitutions were transcribed in vitro and tested in coat protein and peptide binding assays. The data strongly suggest that the AUGC repeats provide sequence-specific determinants and contribute to a structural platform for specific coat protein binding. Coat protein may function in maintaining the 3' ends of the genomic RNAs during replication by stabilizing an RNA structure that defines the 3' terminus as the initiation site for minus-strand synthesis. PMID:9032367

  9. Reliability of plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) from repeated measures in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Citronberg, Jessica S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Lim, Unhee; Hullar, Meredith A J; White, Emily; Newcomb, Polly A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lampe, Johanna W

    2016-09-01

    Plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), a measure of internal exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, has been associated with several chronic conditions and may be a marker of chronic inflammation; however, no studies have examined the reliability of this biomarker in a healthy population. We examined the temporal reliability of LBP measured in archived samples from participants in two studies. In Study one, 60 healthy participants had blood drawn at two time points: baseline and follow-up (either three, six, or nine months). In Study two, 24 individuals had blood drawn three to four times over a seven-month period. We measured LBP in archived plasma by ELISA. Test-retest reliability was estimated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Plasma LBP concentrations showed moderate reliability in Study one (ICC 0.60, 95 % CI 0.43-0.75) and Study two (ICC 0.46, 95 % CI 0.26-0.69). Restricting the follow-up period improved reliability. In Study one, the reliability of LBP over a three-month period was 0.68 (95 % CI: 0.41-0.87). In Study two, the ICC of samples taken ≤seven days apart was 0.61 (95 % CI 0.29-0.86). Plasma LBP concentrations demonstrated moderate test-retest reliability in healthy individuals with reliability improving over a shorter follow-up period. PMID:27392432

  10. Nuclear localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonucleotide reductase small subunit requires a karyopherin and a WD40 repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; An, Xiuxiang; Yang, Kui; Perlstein, Deborah L.; Hicks, Leslie; Kelleher, Neil; Stubbe, JoAnne; Huang, Mingxia

    2006-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides and is an essential enzyme for DNA replication and repair. Cells have evolved intricate mechanisms to regulate RNR activity to ensure high fidelity of DNA replication during normal cell-cycle progression and of DNA repair upon genotoxic stress. The RNR holoenzyme is composed of a large subunit R1 (α, oligomeric state unknown) and a small subunit R2 (β2). R1 binds substrates and allosteric effectors; R2 contains a diferric-tyrosyl radical [(Fe)2-Y·] cofactor that is required for catalysis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, R1 is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, whereas R2, which is a heterodimer (ββ′), is predominantly in the nucleus. When cells encounter DNA damage or stress during replication, ββ′ is redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in a checkpoint-dependent manner, resulting in the colocalization of R1 and R2. We have identified two proteins that have an important role in ββ′ nuclear localization: the importin β homolog Kap122 and the WD40 repeat protein Wtm1. Deletion of either WTM1 or KAP122 leads to loss of ββ′ nuclear localization. Wtm1 and its paralog Wtm2 are both nuclear proteins that are in the same protein complex with ββ′. Wtm1 also interacts with Kap122 in vivo and requires Kap122 for its nuclear localization. Our results suggest that Wtm1 acts either as an adaptor to facilitate nuclear import of ββ′ by Kap122 or as an anchor to retain ββ′ in the nucleus. PMID:16432237

  11. Characterization of Protective Epitopes in a Highly Conserved Plasmodium falciparum Antigenic Protein Containing Repeats of Acidic and Basic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Kumar, Anil; Singh, Balwan; Bharadwaj, Ashima; Sailaja, V. Naga; Adak, T.; Kushwaha, Ashima; Malhotra, Pawan; Chauhan, V. S.

    1998-01-01

    The delineation of putatively protective and immunogenic epitopes in vaccine candidate proteins constitutes a major research effort towards the development of an effective malaria vaccine. By virtue of its role in the formation of the immune clusters of merozoites, its location on the surface of merozoites, and its highly conserved nature both at the nucleotide sequence level and the amino acid sequence level, the antigen which contains repeats of acidic and basic residues (ABRA) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum represents such an antigen. Based upon the predicted amino acid sequence of ABRA, we synthesized eight peptides, with six of these (AB-1 to AB-6) ranging from 12 to 18 residues covering the most hydrophilic regions of the protein, and two more peptides (AB-7 and AB-8) representing its repetitive sequences. We found that all eight constructs bound an appreciable amount of antibody in sera from a large proportion of P. falciparum malaria patients; two of these peptides (AB-1 and AB-3) also elicited a strong proliferation response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all 11 human subjects recovering from malaria. When used as carrier-free immunogens, six peptides induced a strong, boostable, immunoglobulin G-type antibody response in rabbits, indicating the presence of both B-cell determinants and T-helper-cell epitopes in these six constructs. These antibodies specifically cross-reacted with the parasite protein(s) in an immunoblot and in an immunofluorescence assay. In another immunoblot, rabbit antipeptide sera also recognized recombinant fragments of ABRA expressed in bacteria. More significantly, rabbit antibodies against two constructs (AB-1 and AB-5) inhibited the merozoite reinvasion of human erythrocytes in vitro up to ∼90%. These results favor further studies so as to determine possible inclusion of these two constructs in a multicomponent subunit vaccine against asexual blood stages of P. falciparum. PMID:9596765

  12. Merozoite Surface Antigen 2 Proteins of Babesia bovis Vaccine Breakthrough Isolates Contain a Unique Hypervariable Region Composed of Degenerate Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Berens, Shawn J.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Molloy, John B.; Bock, Russell E.; Lew, Ala E.; McElwain, Terry F.

    2005-01-01

    The merozoite surface antigen 2 (MSA-2) proteins of Babesia bovis are members of the variable merozoite surface antigen (VMSA) family that have been implicated in erythrocyte invasion and are important targets for antibody-mediated blocking of invasion. Extensive sequence variation in another VMSA member, MSA-1, has been shown in all vaccine breakthrough isolates. To test the hypothesis that the msa-2 genes of vaccine breakthrough isolates would also encode a diverse set of proteins, the complete msa-2 locus was characterized from 12 Australian B. bovis strains and isolates, including two vaccine strains and eight vaccine breakthrough isolates, and compared to the loci in previously and newly characterized American strains. In contrast to American strains, the msa-2 loci of all Australian strains and isolates examined contain, in addition to msa-2c, only a solitary gene (designated msa-2a/b) closely related to American strain msa-2a and msa-2b. Nevertheless, the proteins encoded by these genes are quite diverse both between and within geographic regions and harbor evidence of genetic exchange among other VMSA family members, including msa-1. Moreover, all but one of the Australian breakthrough isolate MSA-2a/b proteins is markedly different from the vaccine strain from which immune escape occurred, consistent with their role in strain-specific protective immunity. The densest distribution of polymorphisms occurs in a hypervariable region (HVR) within the carboxy third of the molecule that is highly proline rich. Variation in length and content of the HVR is primarily attributable to differences in the order and number of degenerate nucleotide repeats encoding three motifs of unknown function. PMID:16239512

  13. Building global models for fat and total protein content in raw milk based on historical spectroscopic data in the visible and short-wave near infrared range.

    PubMed

    Melenteva, Anastasiia; Galyanin, Vladislav; Savenkova, Elena; Bogomolov, Andrey

    2016-07-15

    A large set of fresh cow milk samples collected from many suppliers over a large geographical area in Russia during a year has been analyzed by optical spectroscopy in the range 400-1100 nm in accordance with previously developed scatter-based technique. The global (i.e. resistant to seasonal, genetic, regional and other variations of the milk composition) models for fat and total protein content, which were built using partial least-squares (PLS) regression, exhibit satisfactory prediction performances enabling their practical application in the dairy. The root mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) were 0.09 and 0.10 for fat and total protein content, respectively. The issues of raw milk analysis and multivariate modelling based on the historical spectroscopic data have been considered and approaches to the creation of global models and their transfer between the instruments have been proposed. Availability of global models should significantly facilitate the dissemination of optical spectroscopic methods for the laboratory and in-line quantitative milk analysis. PMID:26948605

  14. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase N2 Is a Positive Regulator of Lipopolysaccharide Signaling in Raw264.7 Cell through Derepression of Src Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Ha Thi, Huyen Trang; Choi, Seo-Won; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Hye-Youn; Hong, Suntaek

    2016-01-01

    T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is a phosphotyrosine-specific nonreceptor phosphatase and is ubiquitously expressed in tissues. Although PTPN2 functions as an important regulator in different signaling pathways, it is still unclear what is specific target protein of PTPN2 and how is regulated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory signaling pathway. Here, we found that PTPN2 deficiency downregulated the expression of LPS-mediated pro-inflammtory cytokine genes. Conversely, overexpression of PTPN2 in Raw264.7 cells enhanced the expression and secretion of those cytokines. The activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways by LPS was reduced in PTPN2-knockdowned cells and ectopic expression of PTPN2 reversed these effects. Furthermore, we found that PTNP2 directly interacted with Src and removed the inhibitory Tyr527 phosphorylation of Src to enhance the activatory phosphorylation of Tyr416 residue. These results suggested that PTPN2 is a positive regulator of LPS-induced inflammatory response by enhancing the activity of Src through targeting the inhibitory phosphor-tyrosine527 of Src. PMID:27611995

  15. The N-terminal repeat and the ligand binding domain A of SdrI protein is involved in hydrophobicity of S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Britta; Ali, Liaqat; Wobser, Dominique; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection, and its cell surface hydrophobicity may contribute to virulence by facilitating adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. S. saprophyticus expresses the surface protein SdrI, a member of the serine-aspartate repeat (SD) protein family, which has multifunctional properties. The SdrI knock out mutant has a reduced hydrophobicity index (HPI) of 25%, and expressed in the non-hydrophobic Staphylococcus carnosus strain TM300 causes hydrophobicity. Using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), we confined the hydrophobic site of SdrI to the N-terminal repeat region. S. saprophyticus strains carrying different plasmid constructs lacking either the N-terminal repeats, both B or SD-repeats were less hydrophobic than wild type and fully complemented SdrI mutant (HPI: 51%). The surface hydrophobicity and HPI of both wild type and the complemented strain were also influenced by calcium (Ca(2+)) and were reduced from 81.3% and 82.4% to 10.9% and 12.3%, respectively. This study confirms that the SdrI protein of S. saprophyticus is a crucial factor for surface hydrophobicity and also gives a first significant functional description of the N-terminal repeats, which in conjunction with the B-repeats form an optimal hydrophobic conformation. PMID:25497915

  16. Effect of repeated locoweed feeding on peripheral lymphocytic function and plasma proteins in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R P; James, L F; Molyneux, R J

    1984-10-01

    Seven healthy, adult, crossbred yearling ewes were given (orally) 340 g of locoweed (Astragalus lentiginosus) every day for 10 weeks. Another 7 ewes were not fed the plant, but were housed similarly (controls). Blood samples were obtained once a week to evaluate the mitogen-induced lymphocytic responsiveness. For the locoweed-exposed ewes, there was decreased activity in the presence of phytohemagglutinin (a T-cell mitogen). This effect, although not statistically significant at all times, was consistent and became significant after 7 weeks. A similar response was observed in the blood cell cultures in the presence of pokeweed mitogen, but the differences were not statistically significant at most time points. For the locoweed-exposed ewes there also were gradual numerical decreases in total leukocyte and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Peripheral leukocytes had cytoplasmic vacuolation. The results indicated that a selective effect may occur on cell-mediated immune responses. Serum proteins and gamma-globulins were not affected by locoweed treatment. Locoweed, certain species of Astragalus and Oxytropis, causes considerable economic loss to the livestock industry of western United States. Locoweed consumption by livestock can result in neurologic problems, emaciation, habituation, and reproductive alterations. The reproductive alterations include abortions, birth defects, and some interference with spermatogenesis and oogenesis. Signs of poisoning are CNS depression, rough dry coat, dull eyes, irregular gait, and excitement when stressed. The microscopic lesions are neurovisceral cytoplasmic vacuolations. Microscopic lesions are also observed in the fetuses and newborns of dams which were fed locoweed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6208824

  17. Distinct role of Arabidopsis mitochondrial P-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein-modulating editing protein, PPME, in nad1 RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Kuan-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Huei-Jing; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mitochondrion is an important power generator in most eukaryotic cells. To preserve its function, many essential nuclear-encoded factors play specific roles in mitochondrial RNA metabolic processes, including RNA editing. RNA editing consists of post-transcriptional deamination, which alters specific nucleotides in transcripts to mediate gene expression. In plant cells, many pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs) participate in diverse organellar RNA metabolic processes, but only PLS-type PPRs are involved in RNA editing. Here, we report a P-type PPR protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, P-type PPR-Modulating Editing (PPME), which has a distinct role in mitochondrial nad1 RNA editing via RNA binding activity. In the homozygous ppme mutant, cytosine (C)-to-uracil (U) conversions at both the nad1-898 and 937 sites were abolished, disrupting Arg300-to-Trp300 and Pro313-to-Ser313 amino acid changes in the mitochondrial NAD1 protein. NAD1 is a critical component of mitochondrial respiration complex I; its activity is severely reduced in the homozygous ppme mutant, resulting in significantly altered growth and development. Both abolished RNA editing and defective complex I activity were completely rescued by CaMV 35S promoter- and PPME native promoter-driven PPME genomic fragments tagged with GFP in a homozygous ppme background. Our experimental results demonstrate a distinct role of a P-type PPR protein, PPME, in RNA editing in plant organelles. PMID:27149614

  18. Distinct role of Arabidopsis mitochondrial P-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein-modulating editing protein, PPME, in nad1 RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Leu, Kuan-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Huei-Jing; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondrion is an important power generator in most eukaryotic cells. To preserve its function, many essential nuclear-encoded factors play specific roles in mitochondrial RNA metabolic processes, including RNA editing. RNA editing consists of post-transcriptional deamination, which alters specific nucleotides in transcripts to mediate gene expression. In plant cells, many pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs) participate in diverse organellar RNA metabolic processes, but only PLS-type PPRs are involved in RNA editing. Here, we report a P-type PPR protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, P-type PPR-Modulating Editing (PPME), which has a distinct role in mitochondrial nad1 RNA editing via RNA binding activity. In the homozygous ppme mutant, cytosine (C)-to-uracil (U) conversions at both the nad1-898 and 937 sites were abolished, disrupting Arg(300)-to-Trp(300) and Pro(313)-to-Ser(313) amino acid changes in the mitochondrial NAD1 protein. NAD1 is a critical component of mitochondrial respiration complex I; its activity is severely reduced in the homozygous ppme mutant, resulting in significantly altered growth and development. Both abolished RNA editing and defective complex I activity were completely rescued by CaMV 35S promoter- and PPME native promoter-driven PPME genomic fragments tagged with GFP in a homozygous ppme background. Our experimental results demonstrate a distinct role of a P-type PPR protein, PPME, in RNA editing in plant organelles. PMID:27149614

  19. TRIP: a novel double stranded RNA binding protein which interacts with the leucine rich repeat of flightless I.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S A; Brown, E C; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1998-01-01

    A northwestern screen of a CHO-K1 cell line cDNA library with radiolabelled HIV-1 TAR RNA identified a novel TAR RNA interacting protein, TRIP. The human trip cDNA was also cloned and its expression is induced by phorbol esters. The N-terminus of TRIP shows high homology to the coiled coil domain of FLAP, a protein which binds the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) of Flightless I (FLI) and the interaction of TRIP with the FLI LRR has been confirmed in vitro . TRIP does not bind single stranded DNA or RNA significantly and binds double stranded DNA weakly. In contrast, TRIP binds double stranded RNA with high affinity and two molecules of TRIP bind the TAR stem. The RNA binding domain has been identified and encompasses a lysine-rich motif. A TRIP-GFP fusion is localised in the cytoplasm and excluded from the nucleus. FLI has a C-terminal gelsolin-like domain which binds actin and therefore the association of TRIP with the FLI LRR may provide a link between the actin cytoskeleton and RNA in mammalian cells. PMID:9671805

  20. TRIP: a novel double stranded RNA binding protein which interacts with the leucine rich repeat of flightless I.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S A; Brown, E C; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1998-08-01

    A northwestern screen of a CHO-K1 cell line cDNA library with radiolabelled HIV-1 TAR RNA identified a novel TAR RNA interacting protein, TRIP. The human trip cDNA was also cloned and its expression is induced by phorbol esters. The N-terminus of TRIP shows high homology to the coiled coil domain of FLAP, a protein which binds the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) of Flightless I (FLI) and the interaction of TRIP with the FLI LRR has been confirmed in vitro . TRIP does not bind single stranded DNA or RNA significantly and binds double stranded DNA weakly. In contrast, TRIP binds double stranded RNA with high affinity and two molecules of TRIP bind the TAR stem. The RNA binding domain has been identified and encompasses a lysine-rich motif. A TRIP-GFP fusion is localised in the cytoplasm and excluded from the nucleus. FLI has a C-terminal gelsolin-like domain which binds actin and therefore the association of TRIP with the FLI LRR may provide a link between the actin cytoskeleton and RNA in mammalian cells. PMID:9671805

  1. Small Glutamine-Rich Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Protein Alpha (SGTA) Ablation Limits Offspring Viability and Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Philp, Lisa K.; Day, Tanya K.; Butler, Miriam S.; Laven-Law, Geraldine; Jindal, Shalini; Hickey, Theresa E.; Scher, Howard I.; Butler, Lisa M.; Tilley, Wayne D.

    2016-01-01

    Small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA) has been implicated as a co-chaperone and regulator of androgen and growth hormone receptor (AR, GHR) signalling. We investigated the functional consequences of partial and full Sgta ablation in vivo using Cre-lox Sgta-null mice. Sgta+/− breeders generated viable Sgta−/− offspring, but at less than Mendelian expectancy. Sgta−/− breeders were subfertile with small litters and higher neonatal death (P < 0.02). Body size was significantly and proportionately smaller in male and female Sgta−/− (vs WT, Sgta+/− P < 0.001) from d19. Serum IGF-1 levels were genotype- and sex-dependent. Food intake, muscle and bone mass and adiposity were unchanged in Sgta−/−. Vital and sex organs had normal relative weight, morphology and histology, although certain androgen-sensitive measures such as penis and preputial size, and testis descent, were greater in Sgta−/−. Expression of AR and its targets remained largely unchanged, although AR localisation was genotype- and tissue-dependent. Generally expression of other TPR-containing proteins was unchanged. In conclusion, this thorough investigation of SGTA-null mutation reports a mild phenotype of reduced body size. The model’s full potential likely will be realised by genetic crosses with other models to interrogate the role of SGTA in the many diseases in which it has been implicated. PMID:27358191

  2. Small Glutamine-Rich Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Protein Alpha (SGTA) Ablation Limits Offspring Viability and Growth in Mice.

    PubMed

    Philp, Lisa K; Day, Tanya K; Butler, Miriam S; Laven-Law, Geraldine; Jindal, Shalini; Hickey, Theresa E; Scher, Howard I; Butler, Lisa M; Tilley, Wayne D

    2016-01-01

    Small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA) has been implicated as a co-chaperone and regulator of androgen and growth hormone receptor (AR, GHR) signalling. We investigated the functional consequences of partial and full Sgta ablation in vivo using Cre-lox Sgta-null mice. Sgta(+/-) breeders generated viable Sgta(-/-) offspring, but at less than Mendelian expectancy. Sgta(-/-) breeders were subfertile with small litters and higher neonatal death (P < 0.02). Body size was significantly and proportionately smaller in male and female Sgta(-/-) (vs WT, Sgta(+/-) P < 0.001) from d19. Serum IGF-1 levels were genotype- and sex-dependent. Food intake, muscle and bone mass and adiposity were unchanged in Sgta(-/-). Vital and sex organs had normal relative weight, morphology and histology, although certain androgen-sensitive measures such as penis and preputial size, and testis descent, were greater in Sgta(-/-). Expression of AR and its targets remained largely unchanged, although AR localisation was genotype- and tissue-dependent. Generally expression of other TPR-containing proteins was unchanged. In conclusion, this thorough investigation of SGTA-null mutation reports a mild phenotype of reduced body size. The model's full potential likely will be realised by genetic crosses with other models to interrogate the role of SGTA in the many diseases in which it has been implicated. PMID:27358191

  3. F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5): sensing intracellular iron and oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Julio C.; Bruick, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Though essential for many vital biological processes, excess iron results in the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, iron metabolism must be tightly regulated. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, regulates cellular and systemic iron homeostasis by facilitating iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) degradation. FBXL5 possesses an N-terminal hemerythrin (Hr)-like domain that mediates its own differential stability by switching between two different conformations to communicate cellular iron availability. In addition, the FBXL5-Hr domain also senses O2 availability, albeit by a distinct mechanism. Mice lacking FBXL5 fail to sense intracellular iron levels and die in utero due to iron overload and exposure to damaging levels of oxidative stress. By closely monitoring intracellular levels of iron and oxygen, FBLX5 prevents the formation of conditions that favor ROS formation. These findings suggest that FBXL5 is essential for the maintenance of iron homeostasis and is a key sensor of bioavailable iron. Here, we describe the iron and oxygen sensing mechanisms of the FBXL5 Hr-like domain and its role in mediating ROS biology. PMID:24508277

  4. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5): sensing intracellular iron and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Julio C; Bruick, Richard K

    2014-04-01

    Though essential for many vital biological processes, excess iron results in the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, iron metabolism must be tightly regulated. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, regulates cellular and systemic iron homeostasis by facilitating iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) degradation. FBXL5 possesses an N-terminal hemerythrin (Hr)-like domain that mediates its own differential stability by switching between two different conformations to communicate cellular iron availability. In addition, the FBXL5-Hr domain also senses O2 availability, albeit by a distinct mechanism. Mice lacking FBXL5 fail to sense intracellular iron levels and die in utero due to iron overload and exposure to damaging levels of oxidative stress. By closely monitoring intracellular levels of iron and oxygen, FBLX5 prevents the formation of conditions that favor ROS formation. These findings suggest that FBXL5 is essential for the maintenance of iron homeostasis and is a key sensor of bioavailable iron. Here, we describe the iron and oxygen sensing mechanisms of the FBXL5 Hr-like domain and its role in mediating ROS biology. PMID:24508277

  5. A novel DNA binding motif for yeast zinc cluster proteins: the Leu3p and Pdr3p transcriptional activators recognize everted repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Hellauer, K; Rochon, M H; Turcotte, B

    1996-01-01

    The Gal4, Put3, and Ppr1 yeast zinc cluster proteins bind as homodimers to DNA sequences composed of palindromic CGG triplets. Spacing between the triplets specifies the target site for a given zinc cluster protein. In addition, Hap1p, another zinc cluster protein, also recognizes CGG triplets but only when oriented as a direct repeat. Unexpectedly, our results show that Leu3p, another member of this family, also recognizes CGG triplets but oriented in opposite directions and spaced by 4 nucleotides (an everted repeat or inverted palindrome: CCG-N4-CGG). This constitutes a novel DNA motif for zinc cluster proteins. Moreover, the presence of this motif was shown to be essential for in vivo activation by Leu3p of a minimal reporter containing one copy of a target site for this activator. We also provide evidence that another member of this family, Pdr3p, binds to an everted repeat spaced by 0 nucleotides (CCGCGG). Thus, our results show that three CGG motifs are used by members of the zinc cluster family: palindromes, direct repeats, and everted repeats. PMID:8887639

  6. Reduced C9orf72 protein levels in frontal cortex of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal degeneration brain with the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion☆

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Adrian J.; Bäumer, Dirk; East, Simon; Neal, James; Morris, Huw R.; Ansorge, Olaf; Blake, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    An intronic G4C2 hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Several mechanisms including RNA toxicity, repeat-associated non-AUG translation mediated dipeptide protein aggregates, and haploinsufficiency of C9orf72 have been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of this disorder. The aims of this study were to compare the use of two different Southern blot probes for detection of repeat expansions in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathological cohort and to determine the levels of C9orf72 transcript variants and protein isoforms in patients versus control subjects. Our Southern blot studies identified smaller repeat expansions (250–1800 bp) that were only detectable with the flanking probe highlighting the potential for divergent results using different Southern blotting protocols that could complicate genotype–phenotype correlation studies. Further, we characterize a new C9orf72 antibody and show for the first time decreased C9orf72 protein levels in the frontal cortex from patients with a pathological hexanucleotide repeat expansion. These data suggest that a reduction in C9orf72 protein may be a consequence of the disease. PMID:24559645

  7. Association of the small latent transforming growth factor-beta with an eight cysteine repeat of its binding protein LTBP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Saharinen, J; Taipale, J; Keski-Oja, J

    1996-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-betas) are produced by most cells in large latent complexes of TGF-beta and its propeptide (LAP) associated with a binding protein. The latent TGF-beta binding proteins (LTBPs-1, -2 and -3) mediate the secretion and, subsequently, the association of latent TGF-beta complexes with the extracellular matrix (ECM). The association of beta1-LAP with LTBP-1 was characterized at the molecular level with an expression system in mammalian cells, where TGF-beta1 and various fragments of LTBP-1 were co-expressed and secreted with the aid of a signal peptide synthesized to the LTBP-1 constructs. Immunoblotting of the fusion protein complexes indicated that the third 8-Cys repeat of LTBP-1 bound covalently to the LAP region of TGF-beta1. The cysteine required for the association between LTBP-1 and beta1-LAP was mapped to Cys33 of beta1-LAP. The N-terminal region of LTBP-1 consisting of the first 400 amino acids was found to associate covalently with the ECM. The data indicate that an 8-Cys repeat of LTBP is capable of covalent and specific protein-protein interactions. These interactions are mediated by exchanging cysteine disulfide bonds between the core 8-Cys repeat and an optionally associated protein during the secretion. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of an extracellular protein module that is able to exchange cysteine disulfide bonds with heterologous ligand proteins. Images PMID:8617200

  8. Head-to-Head Comparison of Soluble vs. Qβ VLP Circumsporozoite Protein Vaccines Reveals Selective Enhancement of NANP Repeat Responses

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Robert; DeBot, Margot; Saudan, Philippe; Dutta, Sheetij

    2015-01-01

    Circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum is a promising malaria vaccine target. RTS,S, the most advanced malaria vaccine candidate consists of the central NANP repeat and carboxy-terminal region of CSP displayed on a hepatitis B virus-like particle (VLP). To build upon the success of RTS,S, we produced a near full-length Plasmodium falciparum CSP that also includes the conserved amino-terminal region of CSP. We recently showed that this soluble CSP, combined with a synthetic Toll-like-receptor-4 (TLR4) agonist in stable oil-in-water emulsion (GLA/SE), induces a potent and protective immune response in mice against transgenic parasite challenge. Here we have investigated whether the immunogenicity of soluble CSP could be further augmented by presentation on a VLP. Bacteriophage Qβ VLPs can be readily produced in E.coli, they have a diameter of 25 nm and contain packaged E. coli RNA which serves as a built in adjuvant through the activation of TLR7/8. CSP was chemically conjugated to Qβ and the CSP-Qβ vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy were compared to adjuvanted soluble CSP in the C57Bl/6 mouse model. When formulated with adjuvants lacking a TLR4 agonist (Alum, SE and Montanide) the Qβ-CSP induced higher anti-NANP repeat titers, higher levels of cytophilic IgG2b/c antibodies and a trend towards higher protection against transgenic parasite challenge as compared to soluble CSP formulated in the same adjuvant. The VLP and soluble CSP immunogenicity difference was most pronounced at low antigen dose, and within the CSP molecule, the titers against the NANP repeats were preferentially enhanced by Qβ presentation. While a TLR4 agonist enhanced the immunogenicity of soluble CSP to levels comparable to the VLP vaccine, the TLR4 agonist did not further improve the immunogenicity of the Qβ-CSP vaccine. The data presented here pave the way for further improvement in the Qβ conjugation chemistry and evaluation of both the Qβ-CSP and soluble CSP vaccines

  9. Effects of Glycated Whey Protein Concentrate on Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Expression and Phagocytic Activity in RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chun, Su-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Ah; Lee, Keon Bong; Kim, Sae Hun; Park, Kun-Young; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the stimulatory effects of Maillard reaction, a non-enzymatic browning reaction on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and phagocytic activity induced by whey protein concentrate (WPC). Glycated WPC (G-WPC) was prepared by a reaction between WPC and the lactose it contained. The fluorescence intensity of G-WPC dramatically increased after one day, and high molecular weight complexes formed via the Maillard reaction were also observed in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles. G-WPC demonstrated immunomodulatory effects, including stimulation of increased nitric oxide production and cytokine expressions (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), compared to WPC. Furthermore, the phagocytic activity of RAW264.7 cells was significantly increased upon treatment with G-WPC, compared to WPC. Therefore, we suggest that G-WPC can be utilized as an improved dietary source for providing immune modulating activity. PMID:26830480

  10. Molecular characterization of rice OsBIANK1, encoding a plasma membrane-anchored ankyrin repeat protein, and its inducible expression in defense responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinchun; Li, Dayong; Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Xiaoe; Zheng, Zhong; Song, Fengming

    2010-02-01

    A rice gene, OsBIANK1, encoding a protein containing a typical ankyrin repeat domain, was cloned and identified. The OsBIANK1 protein, consisting of 329 amino acids, contains a conserved ankyrin repeat domain with two ankyrin repeats organized in tandem and was showed to be localized on cytoplasmic membrane during transient expression in onion epidermal cells. Expression of OsBIANK1 was induced by treatment with benzothiadiazole (BTH), a chemical inducer capable of inducing disease resistance response in rice. In BTH-treated rice seedlings, expression of OsBIANK1 was further induced by infection with Magnaporthe grisea, the rice blast fungus, as compared with those in water-treated seedlings. Our preliminary results confirm previous evidences that OsBIANK1 may be involved in regulation of disease resistance response in rice. PMID:19288292

  11. The usefulness of cytogenetic parameters, level of p53 protein and endogenous glutathione as intermediate end-points in raw betel-nut genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kumpawat, K; Chatterjee, A

    2003-07-01

    Betel-nut (BN) chewing related oral mucosal lesions are potential hazards to a large population worldwide. Genotoxicity of betel alkaloids, polyphenol and tannin fractions have been reported. It has been shown earlier that BN ingredients altered the level of endogenous glutathione (GSH) which could modulate the host susceptibility to the action of other chemical carcinogens. The north-east Indian variety of BN, locally known as 'kwai', is raw, wet and consumed unprocessed with betel-leaf and slaked lime and contains higher alkaloids, polyphenol and tannins as compared to the dried one. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the extent of DNA damage, pattern of cell kinetics, the level of p53-protein and endogenous GSH in kwai chewers in the tribal population of Meghalaya state in the northeastern region of India with an aim to see whether these end-points could serve as biomarkers of genetic damage of relevance for genotoxic/carcinogenic process. The present data show higher DNA damage, delay in cell kinetics, p53 expression and lower GSH-level in heavy chewers (HC) than nonchewers (NC). The influence of bleomycin (BLM) on chromatid break induction in G2-phase of peripheral blood lymphocytes in NC and HC has been analysed to determine individual susceptibility to carcinogenic assaults. HC showed higher induction of chromatid breaks than NC. Risk assessment in this study suggests an interaction between carcinogen exposure and mutagen sensitivity measures, risk estimates being higher in those individuals who both consume kwai and express sensitivity to free radical oxygen damage in vitro. From this study it seems that besides cytogenetical parameters, the level of endogenous GSH and the level of p53 protein could act as effective biomarkers for kwai chewers. PMID:12929726

  12. Complementary Activities of TELOMERE REPEAT BINDING Proteins and Polycomb Group Complexes in Transcriptional Regulation of Target Genes[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Benjamin; James, Geo Velikkakam

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) and PRC2 repress target genes through histone modification and chromatin compaction. Arabidopsis thaliana mutants strongly compromised in the pathway cannot develop differentiated organs. LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1) is so far the only known plant PRC1 component that directly binds to H3K27me3, the histone modification set by PRC2, and also associates genome-wide with trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3). Surprisingly, lhp1 mutants show relatively mild phenotypic alterations. To explain this paradox, we screened for genetic enhancers of lhp1 mutants to identify novel components repressing target genes together with, or in parallel to, LHP1. Two enhancing mutations were mapped to TELOMERE REPEAT BINDING PROTEIN1 (TRB1) and its paralog TRB3. We show that TRB1 binds to thousands of genomic sites containing telobox or related cis-elements with a significant increase of sites and strength of binding in the lhp1 background. Furthermore, in combination with lhp1, but not alone, trb1 mutants show increased transcription of LHP1 targets, such as floral meristem identity genes, which are more likely to be bound by TRB1 in the lhp1 background. By contrast, expression of a subset of LHP1-independent TRB1 target genes, many involved in primary metabolism, is decreased in the absence of TRB1 alone. Thus, TRB1 is a bivalent transcriptional modulator that maintains downregulation of Polycomb Group (PcG) target genes in lhp1 mutants, while it sustains high expression of targets that are regulated independently of PcG. PMID:26721861

  13. A prefoldin-associated WD-repeat protein (WDR92) is required for the correct architectural assembly of motile cilia.

    PubMed

    Patel-King, Ramila S; King, Stephen M

    2016-04-15

    WDR92 is a highly conserved WD-repeat protein that has been proposed to be involved in apoptosis and also to be part of a prefoldin-like cochaperone complex. We found that WDR92 has a phylogenetic signature that is generally compatible with it playing a role in the assembly or function of specifically motile cilia. To test this hypothesis, we performed an RNAi-based knockdown of WDR92 gene expression in the planarianSchmidtea mediterraneaand were able to achieve a robust reduction in mRNA expression to levels undetectable under our standard RT-PCR conditions. We found that this treatment resulted in a dramatic reduction in the rate of organismal movement that was caused by a switch in the mode of locomotion from smooth, cilia-driven gliding to muscle-based, peristaltic contractions. Although the knockdown animals still assembled cilia of normal length and in similar numbers to controls, these structures had reduced beat frequency and did not maintain hydrodynamic coupling. By transmission electron microscopy we observed that many cilia had pleiomorphic defects in their architecture, including partial loss of dynein arms, incomplete closure of the B-tubule, and occlusion or replacement of the central pair complex by accumulated electron-dense material. These observations suggest that WDR92 is part of a previously unrecognized cytoplasmic chaperone system that is specifically required to fold key components necessary to build motile ciliary axonemes. PMID:26912790

  14. Repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 alleles of the TATA-box binding protein gene: an evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Tomiuk, Jürgen; Bachmann, Lutz; Bauer, Claudia; Rolfs, Arndt; Schöls, Ludger; Roos, Christian; Zischler, Hans; Schuler, Mathias M; Bruntner, Silke; Riess, Olaf; Bauer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The variability and mutational changes of the CAG microsatellite in the TATA-box binding protein gene (TBP) were studied. We sequenced the microsatellite of the TBP gene of 25 unrelated individuals from northern Germany (10 SCA17 patients and 15 unaffected control individuals). In addition, the microsatellites were sequenced from individuals of 10 northern German families with at least one family member affected by SCA17. To study also the evolutionary history of this CAG/CAA microsatellite in nonhuman primates, the homologous regions were analysed from Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, P. abellii, Hylobates lar, Nomascus leucogenys, Symphalangus syndactylus, Macaca mulatta, Papio hamadryas, Colobus polykomos and Callithrix jacchus. Three major conclusions were drawn: (i) Patterns of synonymous CAA interruptions in the microsatellite are characteristic and likely to result from selection for stabilizing the repetitive region; (ii) Interspecific comparisons indicate that SCA17 is likely to be a human trait. The most common allele in humans (37 repeats) is close to the threshold value upon which neurodegenerative changes can occur and may act as a repository for expanded, pathogenic alleles; (iii) The cassette-like structure of five out of 17 expanded alleles can be attributed to unequal crossing over. This can explain the rare and sporadic de novo generation of SCA17 alleles. PMID:17033685

  15. Pentatricopeptide-repeat family protein RF6 functions with hexokinase 6 to rescue rice cytoplasmic male sterility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenchao; Yu, Changchun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Lili; Dan, Zhiwu; Zhou, Wei; He, Chunlan; Zeng, Yafei; Yao, Guoxin; Qi, Jianzhao; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhu, Renshan; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhu, Yingguo

    2015-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been extensively used for hybrid seed production in many major crops. Honglian CMS (HL-CMS) is one of the three major types of CMS in rice and has contributed greatly to food security worldwide. The HL-CMS trait is associated with an aberrant chimeric mitochondrial transcript, atp6-orfH79, which causes pollen sterility and can be rescued by two nonallelic restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes, Rf5 or Rf6. Here, we report the identification of Rf6, which encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family protein with a characteristic duplication of PPR motifs 3-5. RF6 is targeted to mitochondria, where it physically associates with hexokinase 6 (OsHXK6) and promotes the processing of the aberrant CMS-associated transcript atp6-orfH79 at nucleotide 1238, which ensures normal pollen development and restores fertility. The duplicated motif 3 of RF6 is essential for RF6-OsHXK6 interactions, processing of the aberrant transcript, and restoration of fertility. Furthermore, reductions in the level of OsHXK6 result in atp6-orfH79 transcript accumulation and male sterility. Together these results reveal a novel mechanism for CMS restoration by which RF6 functions with OsHXK6 to restore HL-CMS fertility. The present study also provides insight into the function of hexokinase 6 in regulating mitochondrial RNA metabolism and may facilitate further exploitation of heterosis in rice. PMID:26578814

  16. ANK6, a mitochondrial ankyrin repeat protein, is required for male-female gamete recognition in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feng; Shi, Jia; Zhou, Jiye; Gu, Jianing; Chen, Qihui; Li, Jian; Cheng, Wei; Mao, Dandan; Tian, Lianfu; Buchanan, Bob B.; Li, Legong; Chen, Liangbi; Li, Dongping; Luan, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Double fertilization in angiosperms involves several successive steps, including guidance and reception of the pollen tube and male-female gamete recognition. Each step entails extensive communication and interaction between two different reproductive cell or tissue types. Extensive research has focused on the pollen tube, namely, its interaction with the stigma and reception by maternal cells. Little is known, however, about the mechanism by which the gametes recognize each other and interact to form a zygote. We report that an ankyrin repeat protein (ANK6) is essential for fertilization, specifically for gamete recognition. ANK6 (At5g61230) was highly expressed in the male and female gametophytes before and during but not after fertilization. Genetic analysis of a T-DNA insertional mutant suggested that loss of function of ANK6 results in embryonic lethality. Moreover, male-female gamete recognition was found to be impaired only when an ank6 male gamete reached an ank6 female gamete, thereby preventing formation of homozygous zygotes. ANK6 was localized to the mitochondria, where it interacted with SIG5, a transcription initiation factor previously found to be essential for fertility. These results show that ANK6 plays a central role in male-female gamete recognition, possibly by regulating mitochondrial gene expression. PMID:21123745

  17. A prefoldin-associated WD-repeat protein (WDR92) is required for the correct architectural assembly of motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; King, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    WDR92 is a highly conserved WD-repeat protein that has been proposed to be involved in apoptosis and also to be part of a prefoldin-like cochaperone complex. We found that WDR92 has a phylogenetic signature that is generally compatible with it playing a role in the assembly or function of specifically motile cilia. To test this hypothesis, we performed an RNAi-based knockdown of WDR92 gene expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and were able to achieve a robust reduction in mRNA expression to levels undetectable under our standard RT-PCR conditions. We found that this treatment resulted in a dramatic reduction in the rate of organismal movement that was caused by a switch in the mode of locomotion from smooth, cilia-driven gliding to muscle-based, peristaltic contractions. Although the knockdown animals still assembled cilia of normal length and in similar numbers to controls, these structures had reduced beat frequency and did not maintain hydrodynamic coupling. By transmission electron microscopy we observed that many cilia had pleiomorphic defects in their architecture, including partial loss of dynein arms, incomplete closure of the B-tubule, and occlusion or replacement of the central pair complex by accumulated electron-dense material. These observations suggest that WDR92 is part of a previously unrecognized cytoplasmic chaperone system that is specifically required to fold key components necessary to build motile ciliary axonemes. PMID:26912790

  18. Role of leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat motif-containing protein (LRPPRC) for anti-apoptosis and tumourigenesis in cancers.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Ikeda, Jun-ichiro; Wang, Yi; Mamat, Suhana; Luo, Wenjuan; Aozasa, Katsuyuki; Morii, Eiichi

    2012-10-01

    Due to accelerated energy consumption, enhanced function of mitochondria in tumour cells compared to normal cells is prerequisite for tumour development. Leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat motif-containing protein (LRPPRC) regulates the expression of all mitochondrial DNA-encoded mRNAs, thus plays an important role in the mitochondrial function. LRPPRC is abundantly expressed in the side population of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, where cancer stem cells are enriched. However, the role of LRPPRC in tumour development remained to be clarified in detail. Here, the expression of LRPPRC was examined in various types of tumours, such as lung adenocarcinoma, oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, stomach, colon, mammary and endometrial adenocarcinoma, and lymphoma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that all kinds of examined tumours abundantly expressed LRPPRC. In contrast, surrounding non-neoplastic cells hardly expressed LRPPRC. The knocked-down expression of LRPPRC in lung adenocarcinoma cells did not affect amount of side population and activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, known to be highly expressed in cancer stem cells of the lung. However, the knocked-down expression of LRPPRC reduced the abilities for anti-apoptosis, invasion and in vitro colony formation in lung adenocarcinoma, as well as Hodgkin lymphoma cells. Double staining of LRPPRC with active caspase-3 in clinical samples of lung adenocarcinoma revealed that apoptotic cells were hardly observed in LRPPRC-expressing tumours. These findings indicate that LRPPRC played an important role in tumourigenesis through the resistance to apoptosis and high invasive activity. PMID:22326293

  19. Pentatricopeptide-repeat family protein RF6 functions with hexokinase 6 to rescue rice cytoplasmic male sterility

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenchao; Yu, Changchun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Lili; Dan, Zhiwu; Zhou, Wei; He, Chunlan; Zeng, Yafei; Yao, Guoxin; Qi, Jianzhao; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhu, Renshan; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhu, Yingguo

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been extensively used for hybrid seed production in many major crops. Honglian CMS (HL-CMS) is one of the three major types of CMS in rice and has contributed greatly to food security worldwide. The HL-CMS trait is associated with an aberrant chimeric mitochondrial transcript, atp6-orfH79, which causes pollen sterility and can be rescued by two nonallelic restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes, Rf5 or Rf6. Here, we report the identification of Rf6, which encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family protein with a characteristic duplication of PPR motifs 3–5. RF6 is targeted to mitochondria, where it physically associates with hexokinase 6 (OsHXK6) and promotes the processing of the aberrant CMS-associated transcript atp6-orfH79 at nucleotide 1238, which ensures normal pollen development and restores fertility. The duplicated motif 3 of RF6 is essential for RF6-OsHXK6 interactions, processing of the aberrant transcript, and restoration of fertility. Furthermore, reductions in the level of OsHXK6 result in atp6-orfH79 transcript accumulation and male sterility. Together these results reveal a novel mechanism for CMS restoration by which RF6 functions with OsHXK6 to restore HL-CMS fertility. The present study also provides insight into the function of hexokinase 6 in regulating mitochondrial RNA metabolism and may facilitate further exploitation of heterosis in rice. PMID:26578814

  20. Protection against syphilis correlates with specificity of antibodies to the variable regions of Treponema pallidum repeat protein K.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Cecilia A; Lukehart, Sheila A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2003-10-01

    Syphilis has been recognized as a disease since the late 1400s, yet there is no practical vaccine available. One impediment to the development of a vaccine is the lack of understanding of multiple reinfections in humans despite the development of robust immune responses during the first episode. It has been shown that the Treponema pallidum repeat protein K (TprK) differs in seven discrete variable (V) regions in isolates and that the antibody response during infection is directed to these V regions. Immunization with TprK confers significant protection against infection with the homologous strain. We hypothesize that the antigenic diversity of TprK is involved in immune evasion, which contributes to the lack of heterologous protection. Here, using the rabbit model, we show a correlation between limited heterologous protection and tprK diversity in the challenge inoculum. We demonstrate that antibody responses to the V regions of one TprK molecule show limited cross-reactivity with heterologous TprK V regions. PMID:14500480

  1. Liat1, an arginyltransferase-binding protein whose evolution among primates involved changes in the numbers of its 10-residue repeats.

    PubMed

    Brower, Christopher S; Rosen, Connor E; Jones, Richard H; Wadas, Brandon C; Piatkov, Konstantin I; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2014-11-18

    The arginyltransferase Ate1 is a component of the N-end rule pathway, which recognizes proteins containing N-terminal degradation signals called N-degrons, polyubiquitylates these proteins, and thereby causes their degradation by the proteasome. At least six isoforms of mouse Ate1 are produced through alternative splicing of Ate1 pre-mRNA. We identified a previously uncharacterized mouse protein, termed Liat1 (ligand of Ate1), that interacts with Ate1 but does not appear to be its arginylation substrate. Liat1 has a higher affinity for the isoforms Ate1(1A7A) and Ate1(1B7A). Liat1 stimulated the in vitro N-terminal arginylation of a model substrate by Ate1. All examined vertebrate and some invertebrate genomes encode proteins sequelogous (similar in sequence) to mouse Liat1. Sequelogs of Liat1 share a highly conserved ∼30-residue region that is shown here to be required for the binding of Liat1 to Ate1. We also identified non-Ate1 proteins that interact with Liat1. In contrast to Liat1 genes of nonprimate mammals, Liat1 genes of primates are subtelomeric, a location that tends to confer evolutionary instability on a gene. Remarkably, Liat1 proteins of some primates, from macaques to humans, contain tandem repeats of a 10-residue sequence, whereas Liat1 proteins of other mammals contain a single copy of this motif. Quantities of these repeats are, in general, different in Liat1 of different primates. For example, there are 1, 4, 13, 13, 17, and 17 repeats in the gibbon, gorilla, orangutan, bonobo, neanderthal, and human Liat1, respectively, suggesting that repeat number changes in this previously uncharacterized protein may contribute to evolution of primates. PMID:25369936

  2. Enhanced immunogenicity of peptide P277 by heat shock protein HSP65 vector carrying tandem repeats of P277 to prevent type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, J; Aihua, Z; Yu, W; Jingjing, L

    2008-10-01

    The peptide P277 contains a target epitope for diabetogenic T cells and it has been used as an ideal target antigen to develop vaccines against type 1 diabetes. A major problem in developing P277 vaccine is its low immunogenicity. Recent applications involving multiple copies of self-peptide in linear alignment and conjugation with carrier proteins appear to increase the immune response. In this study, we designed a method based on isocaudamer technique to repeat tandemly the 24-residue sequence P277, then 6 tandemly repeated copies of the peptide P277 were fused to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 to construct a fusion protein HSP65-6xP277 as an immunogen. We examined the effect of the tandem repeats of the peptide P277 in eliciting an immune response by comparing the immunogenicity of the three immunogens: P277, HSP65-P277 and HSP65-6xP277. Immunization of mice with the fusion protein HSP65-6xP277 elicited much higher levels of specific anti-P277 antibodies than with P277 and HSP65-P277, which should suggest that multiple tandem repeats of a certain epitope is an efficient method to overcome the low immunogenicity of self-peptide antigens and the immunogen HSP65-6xP277 might be further developed to a vaccine against type 1 diabetes. PMID:18473288

  3. WD40-repeat protein 62 is a JNK-phosphorylated spindle pole protein required for spindle maintenance and timely mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Yeap, Yvonne Y. C.; Qu, Zhengdong; Ngoei, Kevin R.; Yip, Yan Y.; Zhao, Teresa T.; Heng, Julian I.; Ng, Dominic C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The impact of aberrant centrosomes and/or spindles on asymmetric cell division in embryonic development indicates the tight regulation of bipolar spindle formation and positioning that is required for mitotic progression and cell fate determination. WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62) was recently identified as a spindle pole protein linked to the neurodevelopmental defect of microcephaly but its roles in mitosis have not been defined. We report here that the in utero electroporation of neuroprogenitor cells with WDR62 siRNAs induced their cell cycle exit and reduced their proliferative capacity. In cultured cells, we demonstrated cell-cycle-dependent accumulation of WDR62 at the spindle pole during mitotic entry that persisted until metaphase–anaphase transition. Utilizing siRNA depletion, we revealed WDR62 function in stabilizing the mitotic spindle specifically during metaphase. WDR62 loss resulted in spindle orientation defects, decreased the integrity of centrosomes displaced from the spindle pole and delayed mitotic progression. Additionally, we revealed JNK phosphorylation of WDR62 is required for maintaining metaphase spindle organization during mitosis. Our study provides the first functional characterization of WDR62 and has revealed requirements for JNK/WDR62 signaling in mitotic spindle regulation that may be involved in coordinating neurogenesis. PMID:22899712

  4. Cloning, Expression, Crystallization and Preliminary Crystallographic Analysis of a Pentapeptide-repeat Protein (Rfr23) from the Bacterium Cyanothece 51142l

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko,G.; Robinson, H.; Ni, S.; Pakrasi, H.; Kennedy, M.

    2006-01-01

    A unique feature of cyanobacteria genomes is the abundance of genes that code for hypothetical proteins containing tandem pentapeptide repeats approximately described by the consensus motif A(N/D)LXX. To date, the structures of two pentapeptide-repeat proteins (PRPs) have been determined, with the tandem pentapeptide-repeat sequences observed to adopt a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix, or Rfr-fold, in both structures. One structure, Mycobacterium tuberculosis MfpA, is a 183-residue protein that contains 30 consecutive pentapeptide repeats and appears to offer antibiotic resistance by acting as a DNA mimic. The other structure, Cyanothece 51142 Rfr32, is a 167-residue protein that contains 21 consecutive pentapeptide repeats. The function of Rfr32, like the other 35 hypothetical PRPs identified in the genome of Cyanothece, is unknown. In an effort to understand the role of PRPs in cyanobacteria and to better characterize the structural properties of Rfr-folds with different amino-acid sequences, a second PRP from Cyanothece 51142, Rfr23, has been cloned, expressed and purified. Selenomethione-substituted protein was crystallized by vapor diffusion in hanging drops. Nearly complete SAD and native diffraction data sets were collected from these crystals to 2.5 and 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to space group I4{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.61, c = 53.37 {angstrom}, and one molecule per asymmetric unit. Preliminary analysis of the electron-density map from the SAD data shows that Rfr23 contains an Rfr-fold.

  5. Plasmodium Cysteine Repeat Modular Proteins 3 and 4 are essential for malaria parasite transmission from the mosquito to the host

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Plasmodium Cysteine Repeat Modular Proteins (PCRMP) are a family of four conserved proteins of malaria parasites, that contain a number of motifs implicated in host-parasite interactions. Analysis of mutants of the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei lacking expression of PCRMP1 or 2 showed that these proteins are essential for targeting of P. berghei sporozoites to the mosquito salivary gland and, hence, for transmission from the mosquito to the mouse. Methods In this work, the role of the remaining PCRMP family members, PCRMP3 and 4, has been investigated throughout the Plasmodium life cycle by generation and analysis of P. berghei gene deletion mutants, Δpcrmp3 and Δpcrmp4. The role of PCRMP members during the transmission and hepatic stages of the Plasmodium lifecycle has been evaluated by light- and electron microscopy and by analysis of liver stage development in HEPG2 cells in vitro and by infecting mice with mutant sporozoites. In addition, mice were immunized with live Δpcrmp3 and Δpcrmp4 sporozoites to evaluate their immunization potential as a genetically-attenuated parasite-based vaccine. Results Disruption of pcrmp3 and pcrmp4 in P. berghei revealed that they are also essential for transmission of the parasite through the mosquito vector, although acting in a distinct way to pbcrmp1 and 2. Mutants lacking expression of PCRMP3 or PCRMP4 show normal blood stage development and oocyst formation in the mosquito and develop into morphologically normal sporozoites, but these have a defect in egress from oocysts and do not enter the salivary glands. Sporozoites extracted from oocysts perform gliding motility and invade and infect hepatocytes but do not undergo further development and proliferation. Furthermore, the study shows that immunization with Δcrmp3 and Δcrmp4 sporozoites does not confer protective immunity upon subsequent challenge. Conclusions PCRMP3 and 4 play multiple roles during the Plasmodium life cycle; they are essential

  6. C9orf72 FTLD/ALS-associated Gly-Ala dipeptide repeat proteins cause neuronal toxicity and Unc119 sequestration.

    PubMed

    May, Stephanie; Hornburg, Daniel; Schludi, Martin H; Arzberger, Thomas; Rentzsch, Kristin; Schwenk, Benjamin M; Grässer, Friedrich A; Mori, Kohji; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Banzhaf-Strathmann, Julia; Mann, Matthias; Meissner, Felix; Edbauer, Dieter

    2014-10-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 is the most common pathogenic mutation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Despite the lack of an ATG start codon, the repeat expansion is translated in all reading frames into dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins, which form insoluble, ubiquitinated, p62-positive aggregates that are most abundant in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. To specifically analyze DPR toxicity and aggregation, we expressed DPR proteins from synthetic genes containing a start codon but lacking extensive GGGGCC repeats. Poly-Gly-Ala (GA) formed p62-positive cytoplasmic aggregates, inhibited dendritic arborization and induced apoptosis in primary neurons. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis to identify poly-GA co-aggregating proteins revealed a significant enrichment of proteins of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Among the other interacting proteins, we identified the transport factor Unc119, which has been previously linked to neuromuscular and axonal function, as a poly-GA co-aggregating protein. Strikingly, the levels of soluble Unc119 are strongly reduced upon poly-GA expression in neurons, suggesting a loss of function mechanism. Similar to poly-GA expression, Unc119 knockdown inhibits dendritic branching and causes neurotoxicity. Unc119 overexpression partially rescues poly-GA toxicity suggesting that poly-GA expression causes Unc119 loss of function. In C9orf72 patients, Unc119 is detectable in 9.5 % of GA inclusions in the frontal cortex, but only in 1.6 % of GA inclusions in the cerebellum, an area largely spared of neurodegeneration. A fraction of neurons with Unc119 inclusions shows loss of cytosolic staining. Poly-GA-induced Unc119 loss of function may thereby contribute to selective vulnerability of neurons with DPR protein inclusions in the pathogenesis of C9orf72 FTLD/ALS. PMID:25120191

  7. Dopamine D4 receptors linked to protein kinase G are required for changes in dopamine release followed by locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Dong Kun; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Ryu, In Soo; Seo, Su Yeon; Kim, Jieun; Yang, Ju Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Wook; Choe, Eun Sang

    2015-05-01

    We previously found that the dopamine D2-type receptors (D2 and D3 receptors), coupled to protein kinase G (PKG), upregulate locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. In this study, D4 receptors, another type of D2 receptor also coupled to PKG, were examined to determine their requirement in the regulation of locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. The results demonstrated that repeated injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg), given once a day for seven consecutive days, significantly increased extracellular dopamine concentrations. Intra-caudate infusion of the D4 receptor agonist, PD168077 (10 nmol), and the PKG inhibitor, KT5823 (2 nmol), significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine levels and locomotor activity. However, intra-caudate infusion of KT5823, but not PD168077, decreased ∆FosB immunoreactivity elevated by repeated cocaine administration. These findings suggest that D4 receptors linked to PKG could be a key modulator for dopamine release required for changes in locomotor activity caused by repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:25702161

  8. The chicken FMR1 gene is highly conserved with a CCT 5{prime} - untranslated repeat and encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.K.; Zhang, F.; Ashley, C.T. Jr.; Warren, S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The transcriptional silencing of the human gene, fragile X metal retardation 1 (FMR1), is due to abnormal methylation in response to an expanded 5{prime}-untranslated CGG trinucleotide repeat and accounts for most cases of fragile X syndrome, a frequent inherited form of metal retardation. Although the encoded fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is known to have properties of a RNA-binding protein, the precise function of FMRP remains to be elucidated. We report the cloning of the chicken homolog of FMR1 and show strong evolutionary conservation, with nucleotide and amino acid identities of 85 and 92%, respectively, between chicken and human. In place of the mammalian CGG trinucleotide repeat, a 99-nt tripartite repetitive element containing a CCT trinucleotide repeat flanked on both sides by dinucleotide repeats was identified. Blocks of highly conserved 3{prime}-untranslated sequence were also found. Within the coding region, two copies each of the highly conserved K homology motif and the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) box motif, both ribonucleotide particle family domains implicated in RNA binding, were identified. Chicken FMRP was found to bind RNA in vitro, and this activity correlated with the presence of the carboxy-terminal portion of the protein that includes the RGG motifs. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Residue-specific analysis of frustration in the folding landscape of repeat beta/alpha protein apoflavodoxin.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Loren; Samiotakis, Antonios; Homouz, Dirar; Cheung, Margaret S; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2010-02-12

    Flavodoxin adopts the common repeat beta/alpha topology and folds in a complex kinetic reaction with intermediates. To better understand this reaction, we analyzed a set of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans apoflavodoxin variants with point mutations in most secondary structure elements by in vitro and in silico methods. By equilibrium unfolding experiments, we first revealed how different secondary structure elements contribute to overall protein resistance to heat and urea. Next, using stopped-flow mixing coupled with far-UV circular dichroism, we probed how individual residues affect the amount of structure formed in the experimentally detected burst-phase intermediate. Together with in silico folding route analysis of the same point-mutated variants and computation of growth in nucleation size during early folding, computer simulations suggested the presence of two competing folding nuclei at opposite sides of the central beta-strand 3 (i.e., at beta-strands 1 and 4), which cause early topological frustration (i.e., misfolding) in the folding landscape. Particularly, the extent of heterogeneity in folding nuclei growth correlates with the in vitro burst-phase circular dichroism amplitude. In addition, phi-value analysis (in vitro and in silico) of the overall folding barrier to apoflavodoxin's native state revealed that native-like interactions in most of the beta-strands must form in transition state. Our study reveals that an imbalanced competition between the two sides of apoflavodoxin's central beta-sheet directs initial misfolding, while proper alignment on both sides of beta-strand 3 is necessary for productive folding. PMID:19913555

  10. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein (LRPPRC) does not activate transcription in mammalian mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Harmel, Julia; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Terzioglu, Mügen; Spåhr, Henrik; Falkenberg, Maria; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2013-05-31

    Regulation of mtDNA expression is critical for controlling oxidative phosphorylation capacity and has been reported to occur at several different levels in mammalian mitochondria. LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein) has a key role in this regulation and acts at the post-transcriptional level to stabilize mitochondrial mRNAs, to promote mitochondrial mRNA polyadenylation, and to coordinate mitochondrial translation. However, recent studies have suggested that LRPPRC may have an additional intramitochondrial role by directly interacting with the mitochondrial RNA polymerase POLRMT to stimulate mtDNA transcription. In this study, we have further examined the intramitochondrial roles for LRPPRC by creating bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice with moderately increased LRPPRC expression and heterozygous Lrpprc knock-out mice with moderately decreased LRPPRC expression. Variation of LRPPRC levels in mice in vivo, occurring within a predicted normal physiological range, strongly affected the levels of an unprocessed mitochondrial precursor transcript (ND5-cytochrome b) but had no effect on steady-state levels of mitochondrial transcripts or de novo transcription of mtDNA. We further assessed the role of LRPPRC in mitochondrial transcription by performing size exclusion chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments in human cell lines and mice, but we found no interaction between LRPPRC and POLRMT. Furthermore, addition of purified LRPPRC to a recombinant human in vitro transcription system did not activate mtDNA transcription. On the basis of these data, we conclude that LRPPRC does not directly regulate mtDNA transcription but rather acts as a post-transcriptional regulator of mammalian mtDNA expression. PMID:23599432

  11. The Leucine-rich Pentatricopeptide Repeat-containing Protein (LRPPRC) Does Not Activate Transcription in Mammalian Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Harmel, Julia; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Terzioglu, Mügen; Spåhr, Henrik; Falkenberg, Maria; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of mtDNA expression is critical for controlling oxidative phosphorylation capacity and has been reported to occur at several different levels in mammalian mitochondria. LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein) has a key role in this regulation and acts at the post-transcriptional level to stabilize mitochondrial mRNAs, to promote mitochondrial mRNA polyadenylation, and to coordinate mitochondrial translation. However, recent studies have suggested that LRPPRC may have an additional intramitochondrial role by directly interacting with the mitochondrial RNA polymerase POLRMT to stimulate mtDNA transcription. In this study, we have further examined the intramitochondrial roles for LRPPRC by creating bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice with moderately increased LRPPRC expression and heterozygous Lrpprc knock-out mice with moderately decreased LRPPRC expression. Variation of LRPPRC levels in mice in vivo, occurring within a predicted normal physiological range, strongly affected the levels of an unprocessed mitochondrial precursor transcript (ND5-cytochrome b) but had no effect on steady-state levels of mitochondrial transcripts or de novo transcription of mtDNA. We further assessed the role of LRPPRC in mitochondrial transcription by performing size exclusion chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments in human cell lines and mice, but we found no interaction between LRPPRC and POLRMT. Furthermore, addition of purified LRPPRC to a recombinant human in vitro transcription system did not activate mtDNA transcription. On the basis of these data, we conclude that LRPPRC does not directly regulate mtDNA transcription but rather acts as a post-transcriptional regulator of mammalian mtDNA expression. PMID:23599432

  12. Increased Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 is associated with progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, K L; Wu, J; Zhou, Y; Fan, J H

    2015-04-01

    Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 (SRPX2) is a novel chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancer. Its role in tumor biology remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SRPX2 in colorectal cancer and its potential association with cancer progression. The expression of SRPX2 and its clinicopathological significance was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray including 88 colon cancer and pairing normal tissues. The impact of SRPX2 on behavior of colorectal cancer cells and possible mechanism was explored using gene transfection and silencing. Strong staining of SRPX2 was noted in 71 (80.7 %) of 88 colon cancer specimen and 30 (34.1 %) of 88 adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.001). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly correlated with histological differentiation grade (P = 0.003), infiltration depth (P = 0.003), and clinical stage (P = 0.006). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly higher in HCT116 than in HT29 and SW480 cells. Suppression of endogenous SRPX2 expression by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) in HCT116 cells resulted in significant reduction in the ability of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion. Up-regulation of endogenous SRPX2 in SW480 cells significantly promoted the migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In addition, inhibition of SRPX2 by siRNA led to notable down-regulation of β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. These findings indicate that overexpressed SRPX2 exerts an oncogenic role in colorectal cancer. SRPX2 may promote the invasion of colorectal cancer through MMP-2 and MMP-9 modulated by Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:25737434

  13. The EDGE Hypothesis: Epigenetically Directed Genetic Errors in Repeat-Containing Proteins (RCPs) Involved in Evolution, Neuroendocrine Signaling, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ruden, Douglas M.; Jamison, D. Curtis; Zeeberg, Barry R.; Garfinkel, Mark D.; Weinstein, John N.; Rasouli, Parsa; Lu, Xiangyi

    2009-01-01

    Trans-generational epigenetic phenomena, such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that decrease fertility and the global methylation status of DNA in the offspring, are of great concern because they may affect the health of our children. However, of even greater concern is the possibility that trans-generational changes in the methylation status of the DNA might lead to permanent changes in the DNA sequence itself. By contaminating the environment with EDCs, mankind might be permanently affecting the health of future generations. In this chapter, we present evidence from our laboratory and others that trans-generational epigenetic changes in DNA might lead to mutations directed to genes encoding amino acid repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that are important for adaptive evolution or cancer progression. Such epigenetic changes can be induced “naturally” by hormones or “unnaturally” by EDCs or environmental stress. To illustrate the phenomenon, we present new bioinformatic evidence that the only RCP ontological categories conserved from Drosophila to humans are “regulation of splicing,” “regulation of transcription,” and “regulation of synaptogenesis,” which are precisely the classes of genes that are important for evolutionary processes. Based on that and other evidence, we propose a model for evolution that we call the EDGE (Epigenetically Directed Genetic Errors) hypothesis for the mechanism by which mutations are targeted at epigenetically-modified “contingency genes” encoding RCPs. In the model, “epigenetic assimilation” of metastable epialleles of RCPs over many generations can lead to mutations directed to those genes, thereby permanently stabilizing the adaptive phenotype. PMID:18295320

  14. The Candidate Phylum Poribacteria by Single-Cell Genomics: New Insights into Phylogeny, Cell-Compartmentation, Eukaryote-Like Repeat Proteins, and Other Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Kamke, Janine; Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Mavromatis, Kostas; Ivanova, Natalia; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The candidate phylum Poribacteria is one of the most dominant and widespread members of the microbial communities residing within marine sponges. Cell compartmentalization had been postulated along with their discovery about a decade ago and their phylogenetic association to the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae superphylum was proposed soon thereafter. In the present study we revised these features based on genomic data obtained from six poribacterial single cells. We propose that Poribacteria form a distinct monophyletic phylum contiguous to the PVC superphylum together with other candidate phyla. Our genomic analyses supported the possibility of cell compartmentalization in form of bacterial microcompartments. Further analyses of eukaryote-like protein domains stressed the importance of such proteins with features including tetratricopeptide repeats, leucin rich repeats as well as low density lipoproteins receptor repeats, the latter of which are reported here for the first time from a sponge symbiont. Finally, examining the most abundant protein domain family on poribacterial genomes revealed diverse phyH family proteins, some of which may be related to dissolved organic posphorus uptake. PMID:24498082

  15. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  16. Raw Milk Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, John A.

    2015-01-01

    There continues to be considerable public debate on the possible benefits regarding the growing popularity of the consumption of raw milk. However, there are significant concerns by regulatory, or public health, organizations like the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because of risk of contracting milkborne illnesses if the raw milk is contaminated with human pathogens. This review describes why pasteurization of milk was introduced more than 100 years ago, how pasteurization helped to reduce the incidence of illnesses associated with raw milk consumption, and the prevalence of pathogens in raw milk. In some studies, up to a third of all raw milk samples contained pathogens, even when sourced from clinically healthy animals or from milk that appeared to be of good quality. This review critically evaluates some of the popularly suggested benefits of raw milk. Claims related to improved nutrition, prevention of lactose intolerance, or provision of “good” bacteria from the consumption of raw milk have no scientific basis and are myths. There are some epidemiological data that indicate that children growing up in a farming environment are associated with a decreased risk of allergy and asthma; a variety of environmental factors may be involved and there is no direct evidence that raw milk consumption is involved in any “protective” effect. PMID:27340300

  17. The Yeast Hrs1 Gene Encodes a Polyglutamine-Rich Nuclear Protein Required for Spontaneous and Hpr1-Induced Deletions between Direct Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Rosa, H.; Clever, B.; Heyer, W. D.; Aguilera, A.

    1996-01-01

    The hrs1-1 mutation was isolated as an extragenic suppressor of the hyperrecombination phenotype of hpr1Δ cells. We have cloned, sequenced and deleted from the genome the HRS1 gene. The DNA sequence of the HRS1 gene reveals that it is identical to PGD1, a gene with no reported function, and that the Hrs1p protein contains polyglutamine stretches typically found in transcription factors. We have purified a His(6) tagged version of Hrs1p protein from E. coli and have obtained specific anti-Hrs1p polyclonal antibodies. We show that Hrs1p is a 49-kD nuclear protein, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. The hrs1Δ null mutation reduces the frequency of deletions in wild-type and hpr1Δ backgrounds sevenfold below wild-type and rad52 levels. Furthermore, hrs1Δ cells show reduced induction of the GAL1,10 promoter relative to wild-type cells. Our results suggest that Hrs1p is required for the formation of deletions between direct repeats and that it may function in gene expression. This suggests a connection between gene expression and direct repeat recombination. In this context, we discuss the possible roles of Hrs1p and Hpr1p in initiation of direct-repeat recombination. PMID:8849881

  18. Difference in fibril core stability between two tau four-repeat domain proteins: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayathri; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2013-12-10

    One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies is fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The purpose of this study was to compare the high-resolution structure of fibrils formed by two different tau four-repeat domain constructs, tau4RD and tauK18, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry as a tool. While the two fibrils are found to be constructed on similar structural principles, the tauK18 fibril has a slightly more stable core. This difference in fibril core stability appears to be reflective of the mechanistic differences in the aggregation pathways of the two proteins. PMID:24256615

  19. Improvement of LysM-Mediated Surface Display of Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins) in Recombinant and Nonrecombinant Strains of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut

    2015-01-01

    Safety and probiotic properties make lactic acid bacteria (LAB) attractive hosts for surface display of heterologous proteins. Protein display on nonrecombinant microorganisms is preferred for therapeutic and food applications due to regulatory requirements. We displayed two designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), each possessing affinity for the Fc region of human IgG, on the surface of Lactococcus lactis by fusing them to the Usp45 secretion signal and to the peptidoglycan-binding C terminus of AcmA, containing lysine motif (LysM) repeats. Growth medium containing a secreted fusion protein was used to test its heterologous binding to 10 strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus, using flow cytometry, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fluorescence microscopy. The fusion proteins bound to the surfaces of all lactobacilli; however, binding to the majority of bacteria was only 2- to 5-fold stronger than that of the control. Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 demonstrated exceptionally strong binding (32- to 55-fold higher than that of the control) and may therefore be an attractive host for nonrecombinant surface display. Genomic comparison of the species indicated the exopolysaccharides of Lb. salivarius as a possible reason for the difference. Additionally, a 15-fold concentration-dependent increase in nonrecombinant surface display on L. lactis was demonstrated by growing bacteria with sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics chloramphenicol and erythromycin. Nonrecombinant surface display on LAB, based on LysM repeats, was optimized by selecting Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 as the optimal host and by introducing antibiotics as additives for increasing surface display on L. lactis. Additionally, effective display of DARPins on the surfaces of nonrecombinant LAB has opened up several new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:25576617

  20. A novel pro-inflammatory protein of Streptococcus suis 2 induces the Toll-like receptor 2-dependent expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW 264.7 macrophages via activation of ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Yujie; Yan, Shuxian; Liu, Jiantao; Xu, Zhongmin; Yu, Junping; Song, Yajing; Zhang, Anding; Jin, Meilin

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis 2 is an important swine pathogen and an emergent zoonotic pathogen. Excessive inflammation caused by S. suis is responsible for the high levels of early mortality observed in septic shock-like syndrome cases. However, the mechanisms through which S. suis 2 (SS2) causes excessive inflammation remain unclear. Thus, this study aimed to identify novel pro-inflammatory mediators that play important roles in the development of therapies against SS2 infection. In this study, the novel pro-inflammatory protein HP0459, which was encoded by the SSUSC84_0459 gene, was discovered. The stimulation of RAW 264.7 macrophages with recombinant HP0459 protein induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, MCP-1 and TNF-α). Compared with the wild-type (WT) strain, the isogenic knockout of HP0459 in SS2 led to reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW264.7 macrophages and in vivo. The pro-inflammatory activity of HP0459 was significantly reduced by an antibody against Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in RAW264.7 macrophages and was lower in TLR2-deficient (TLR2-/-) macrophages than in WT macrophages. Furthermore, specific inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways significantly decreased the HP0459-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and a western blot assay showed that HP0459 stimulation induced the activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that HP0459 is a novel pro-inflammatory mediator of SS2 and induces TLR2-dependent pro-inflammatory activity in RAW264.7 macrophages through the ERK1/2 pathway. PMID:25806027

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolated from RAW 264.7 Macrophages: identification of a novel protein that contributes to the replication of serovar Typhimurium inside macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Adkins, Joshua N.; Coleman, James R.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Manes, Nathan P.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Wang, Haixing H.; Forbes, John; Gros, Philippe; Uzzau, Sergio; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-09-01

    ABSTRACT: To evade host resistance mechanisms, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM), a facultative intracellular pathogen, must alter its proteome following macrophage infection. To identify new colonization and virulence factors that mediate STM pathogenesis, we have isolated STM cells from RAW 264.7 macrophages at various time-points following infection and used a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomic approach to detect the changes in STM protein abundances. Because host resistance to STM infection is strongly modulated by the expression of a functional host resistant regulator, i.e., natural resistance associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1, also called Slc11a1), we have also examined the effects of Nramp1 activity on the changes of STM protein abundances. A total of 315 STM proteins have been identified from isolated STM cells, which are largely house-keeping proteins whose abundances remain relatively constant during the time-course of infection. However, 39 STM proteins are strongly induced after infection, suggesting their involvement in modulating colonization and infection. Of the 39 induced proteins, 6 proteins are specifically modulated by Nramp1 activity, including STM3117, as well as STM3118-3119 whose time-dependent abundance changes were confirmed using Western blot analysis. Deletion of the gene encoding STM3117 resulted in a dramatic reduction in the ability of STM to colonize wild-type RAW 264.7 macrophages, demonstrating a critical involvement of STM3117 in promoting the replication of STM inside macrophages. The predicted function common for STM3117-3119 is biosynthesis and modification of the peptidoglycan layer of STM cell wall, emphasizing their important roles in the colonization of macrophages by Salmonella.

  2. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity. PMID:24622844

  3. Protective Efficacy of a Plasmodium vivax Circumsporozoite Protein-Based Vaccine in Aotus nancymaae Is Associated with Antibodies to the Repeat Region

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Anjali; Hall, Cysha E.; Sullivan, JoAnn S.; Nace, Douglas; Williams, Tyrone; Collins, William E.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Barnwell, John W.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that Vivax Malaria Protein 001 (VMP001), a vaccine candidate based on the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax, is immunogenic in mice and rhesus monkeys in the presence of various adjuvants. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of VMP001 formulated with a TLR9 agonist in a water-in-oil emulsion. Following immunization, the vaccine efficacy was assessed by challenging Aotus nancymaae monkeys with P. vivax sporozoites. Monkeys from both the low- and high-dose vaccine groups generated strong humoral immune responses to the vaccine (peak median titers of 291,622), and its subunits (peak median titers to the N-term, central repeat and C-term regions of 22,188; 66,120 and 179,947, respectively). 66.7% of vaccinated monkeys demonstrated sterile protection following challenge. Protection was associated with antibodies directed against the central repeat region. The protected monkeys had a median anti-repeat titer of 97,841 compared to 14,822 in the non-protected monkeys. This is the first report demonstrating P. vivax CSP vaccine-induced protection of Aotus monkeys challenged with P. vivax sporozoites. PMID:25329054

  4. Identification and purification of a Drosophila protein that binds to the terminal 31-base-pair inverted repeats of the P transposable element

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, D.C.; Rubin, G.M.

    1988-12-01

    We have used DNase I footprinting and partially fractionated nuclear extracts from Drosophila Kc tissue culture cells to identify DNA-binding proteins that interact with the terminal repeats of P transposable elements. We have identified a binding activity that interacts specifically with a region of the 31-base-pair terminal inverted repeats that is directly adjacent to the duplication of target site DNA. Binding occurs to both the 5' and 3' inverted terminal repeats irrespective of the sequence of the duplicated target DNA. UV photochemical crosslinking studies suggest that the binding activity resides in a polypeptide of 65-70 kDa. Biochemical fractionation and oligonucleotide affinity chromatography have been used to purify the binding activity to near homogeneity and identify a polypeptide of 66 kDa in the highly purified preparations. The site to which binding occurs is included in a region absolutely required for P element transposition, suggesting that this binding protein may be a cellular factor involved in P element transposition.

  5. U-box protein carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) mediates poly-ubiquitylation preferentially on four-repeat Tau and is involved in neurodegeneration of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Matsumoto, Masaki; Kamura, Takumi; Murayama, Miyuki; Chui, Du-Hua; Planel, Emmanuel; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Takashima, Akihiko

    2004-10-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which are composed of hyperphosphorylated and ubiquitylated tau, are exhibited at regions where neuronal loss occurs in neurodegenerative diseases; however, the mechanisms of NFT formation remain unknown. Molecular studies of frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 demonstrated that increasing the ratio of tau with exon 10 insertion induced fibrillar tau accumulation. Here, we show that carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), a U-box protein, recognizes the microtubule-binding repeat region of tau and preferentially ubiquitylates four-repeat tau compared with three-repeat tau. Overexpression of CHIP induced the prompt degradation of tau, reduced the formation of detergent-insoluble tau and inhibited proteasome inhibitor-induced cell death. NFT bearing neurons in progressive supranuclear palsy, in which four-repeat tau is a component, showed the accumulation of CHIP. Thus, CHIP is a ubiquitin ligase for four-repeat tau and maintains neuronal survival by regulating the quality control of tau in neurons. PMID:15447663

  6. Genome-wide analyses and functional classification of proline repeat-rich proteins: potential role of eIF5A in eukaryotic evolution.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Ajeet; Mandal, Swati; Park, Myung Hee

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation factor, eIF5A has been recently reported as a sequence-specific elongation factor that facilitates peptide bond formation at consecutive prolines in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as its ortholog elongation factor P (EF-P) does in bacteria. We have searched the genome databases of 35 representative organisms from six kingdoms of life for PPP (Pro-Pro-Pro) and/or PPG (Pro-Pro-Gly)-encoding genes whose expression is expected to depend on eIF5A. We have made detailed analyses of proteome data of 5 selected species, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. The PPP and PPG motifs are low in the prokaryotic proteomes. However, their frequencies markedly increase with the biological complexity of eukaryotic organisms, and are higher in newly derived proteins than in those orthologous proteins commonly shared in all species. Ontology classifications of S. cerevisiae and human genes encoding the highest level of polyprolines reveal their strong association with several specific biological processes, including actin/cytoskeletal associated functions, RNA splicing/turnover, DNA binding/transcription and cell signaling. Previously reported phenotypic defects in actin polarity and mRNA decay of eIF5A mutant strains are consistent with the proposed role for eIF5A in the translation of the polyproline-containing proteins. Of all the amino acid tandem repeats (≥3 amino acids), only the proline repeat frequency correlates with functional complexity of the five organisms examined. Taken together, these findings suggest the importance of proline repeat-rich proteins and a potential role for eIF5A and its hypusine modification pathway in the course of eukaryotic evolution. PMID:25364902

  7. Genome-Wide Analyses and Functional Classification of Proline Repeat-Rich Proteins: Potential Role of eIF5A in Eukaryotic Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ajeet; Mandal, Swati; Park, Myung Hee

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation factor, eIF5A has been recently reported as a sequence-specific elongation factor that facilitates peptide bond formation at consecutive prolines in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as its ortholog elongation factor P (EF-P) does in bacteria. We have searched the genome databases of 35 representative organisms from six kingdoms of life for PPP (Pro-Pro-Pro) and/or PPG (Pro-Pro-Gly)-encoding genes whose expression is expected to depend on eIF5A. We have made detailed analyses of proteome data of 5 selected species, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. The PPP and PPG motifs are low in the prokaryotic proteomes. However, their frequencies markedly increase with the biological complexity of eukaryotic organisms, and are higher in newly derived proteins than in those orthologous proteins commonly shared in all species. Ontology classifications of S. cerevisiae and human genes encoding the highest level of polyprolines reveal their strong association with several specific biological processes, including actin/cytoskeletal associated functions, RNA splicing/turnover, DNA binding/transcription and cell signaling. Previously reported phenotypic defects in actin polarity and mRNA decay of eIF5A mutant strains are consistent with the proposed role for eIF5A in the translation of the polyproline-containing proteins. Of all the amino acid tandem repeats (≥3 amino acids), only the proline repeat frequency correlates with functional complexity of the five organisms examined. Taken together, these findings suggest the importance of proline repeat-rich proteins and a potential role for eIF5A and its hypusine modification pathway in the course of eukaryotic evolution. PMID:25364902

  8. Application of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for screening of raw materials used in the cell culture medium for the production of a recombinant therapeutic protein.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, Alime Ozlem; Chen, Guoxiang; Weidner, James; Rathore, Anurag S

    2010-01-01

    Control of raw materials based on an understanding of their impact on product attributes has been identified as a key aspect of developing a control strategy in the Quality by Design (QbD) paradigm. This article presents a case study involving use of a combined approach of Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis (MVDA) for screening of lots of basal medium powders based on their impact on process performance and product attributes. These lots had identical composition as per the supplier and were manufactured at different scales using an identical process. The NIR/MVDA analysis, combined with further investigation at the supplier site, concluded that grouping of medium components during the milling and blending process varied with the scale of production and media type. As a result, uniformity of blending, impurity levels, chemical compatibility, and/or heat sensitivity during the milling process for batches of large-scale media powder were deemed to be the source of variation as detected by NIR spectra. This variability in the raw materials was enough to cause unacceptably large variability in the performance of the cell culture step and impact the attributes of the resulting product. A combined NIR/MVDA approach made it possible to finger print the raw materials and distinguish between good and poor performing media lots. PMID:19938040

  9. A mitotic function for the high-mobility group protein HMG20b regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of the BRCA2 tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Daniels, M J; Garnett, M J; Venkitaraman, A R

    2011-07-28

    The inactivation of BRCA2, a suppressor of breast, ovarian and other epithelial cancers, triggers instability in chromosome structure and number, which are thought to arise from defects in DNA recombination and mitotic cell division, respectively. Human BRCA2 controls DNA recombination via eight BRC repeats, evolutionarily conserved motifs of ∼35 residues, that interact directly with the recombinase RAD51. How BRCA2 controls mitotic cell division is debated. Several studies by different groups report that BRCA2 deficiency affects cytokinesis. Moreover, its interaction with HMG20b, a protein of uncertain function containing a promiscuous DNA-binding domain and kinesin-like coiled coils, has been implicated in the G2-M transition. We show here that HMG20b depletion by RNA interference disturbs the completion of cell division, suggesting a novel function for HMG20b. In vitro, HMG20b binds directly to the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and exhibits the highest affinity for BRC5, a motif that binds poorly to RAD51. Conversely, the BRC4 repeat binds strongly to RAD51, but not to HMG20b. In vivo, BRC5 overexpression inhibits the BRCA2-HMG20b interaction, recapitulating defects in the completion of cell division provoked by HMG20b depletion. In contrast, BRC4 inhibits the BRCA2-RAD51 interaction and the assembly of RAD51 at sites of DNA damage, but not the completion of cell division. Our findings suggest that a novel function for HMG20b in cytokinesis is regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and separate this unexpected function for the BRC repeats from their known activity in DNA recombination. We propose that divergent tumor-suppressive pathways regulating chromosome segregation as well as chromosome structure may be governed by the conserved BRC motifs in BRCA2. PMID:21399666

  10. Food Safety and Raw Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Modernization Act Food Safety and Raw Milk Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir RAW MILK ... THIS: Real Stories About the Dangers of Raw Milk “My daughter turned into a completely different person ...

  11. The 1.7 Å resolution structure of At2g44920, a pentapeptide-repeat protein in the thylakoid lumen of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shuisong; McGookey, Michael E; Tinch, Stuart L; Jones, Alisha N; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Tong, Liang; Kennedy, Michael A

    2011-12-01

    At2g44920 belongs to a diverse family (Pfam PF00805) of pentapeptide-repeat proteins (PRPs) that are present in all known organisms except yeast. PRPs contain at least eight tandem-repeating sequences of five amino acids with an approximate consensus sequence (STAV)(D/N)(L/F)(S/T/R)(X). Recent crystal structures show that PRPs adopt a highly regular four-sided right-handed β-helical structure consisting mainly of type II and type IV β-turns, sometimes referred to as a repeated five-residue (or Rfr) fold. Among sequenced genomes, PRP genes are most abundant in cyanobacteria, leading to speculation that PRPs play an important role in the unique lifestyle of photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Despite the recent structural characterization of several cyanobacterial PRPs, most of their functions remain unknown. Plants, whose chloroplasts are of cyanobacterial origin, have only four PRP genes in their genomes. At2g44920 is one of three PRPs located in the thylakoid lumen. Here, the crystal structure of a double methionine mutant of residues 81-224 of At2g44920, the naturally processed fragment of one of its full-length isoforms, is reported at 1.7 Å resolution. The structure of At2g44920 consists of the characteristic Rfr fold with five uninterrupted coils made up of 25 pentapeptide repeats and α-helical elements capping both termini. A disulfide bridge links the two α-helices with a conserved loop between the helical elements at its C-terminus. This structure represents the first structure of a PRP protein whose subcellular location has been experimentally confirmed to be the thylakoid lumen in a plant species. PMID:22139148

  12. The 1.7 Å resolution structure of At2g44920, a pentapeptide-repeat protein in the thylakoid lumen of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Shuisong; McGookey, Michael E.; Tinch, Stuart L.; Jones, Alisha N.; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Tong, Liang; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-01-09

    At2g44920 belongs to a diverse family (Pfam PF00805) of pentapeptide-repeat proteins (PRPs) that are present in all known organisms except yeast. PRPs contain at least eight tandem-repeating sequences of five amino acids with an approximate consensus sequence (STAV)(D/N)(L/F)(S/T/R)(X). Recent crystal structures show that PRPs adopt a highly regular four-sided right-handed {beta}-helical structure consisting mainly of type II and type IV {beta}-turns, sometimes referred to as a repeated five-residue (or Rfr) fold. Among sequenced genomes, PRP genes are most abundant in cyanobacteria, leading to speculation that PRPs play an important role in the unique lifestyle of photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Despite the recent structural characterization of several cyanobacterial PRPs, most of their functions remain unknown. Plants, whose chloroplasts are of cyanobacterial origin, have only four PRP genes in their genomes. At2g44920 is one of three PRPs located in the thylakoid lumen. Here, the crystal structure of a double methionine mutant of residues 81-224 of At2g44920, the naturally processed fragment of one of its full-length isoforms, is reported at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of At2g44920 consists of the characteristic Rfr fold with five uninterrupted coils made up of 25 pentapeptide repeats and {alpha}-helical elements capping both termini. A disulfide bridge links the two {alpha}-helices with a conserved loop between the helical elements at its C-terminus. This structure represents the first structure of a PRP protein whose subcellular location has been experimentally confirmed to be the thylakoid lumen in a plant species.

  13. The cpc-2 gene of Neurospora crassa encodes a protein entirely composed of WD-repeat segments that is involved in general amino acid control and female fertility.

    PubMed

    Müller, F; Krüger, D; Sattlegger, E; Hoffmann, B; Ballario, P; Kanaan, M; Barthelmess, I B

    1995-07-28

    Phenotypic and molecular studies of the mutation U142 indicate that the cpc-2+ gene is required to activate general amino acid control under conditions of amino acid limitation in the vegetative growth phase, and for formation of protoperithecia in preparation for the sexual phase of the life cycle of Neurospora crassa. The cpc-2 gene was cloned by complementation of the cpc-2 mutation in a his-2ts bradytrophic background. Genomic and cDNA sequence analysis indicated a 1636 bp long open reading frame interrupted by four introns. The deduced 316 amino acid polypeptide reveals 70% positional identity over its full length with G-protein beta-subunit-related polypeptides found in humans, rat (RACK1), chicken, tobacco and Chlamydomonas. With the exception of RACK1 the function of these proteins is obscure. All are entirely made up of seven WD-repeats. Expression studies of cpc-2 revealed one abundant transcript in the wild type; in the mutant its level is drastically reduced. In mutant cells transformed with the complementing sequence, the transcript level, enzyme regulation and female fertility are restored. In the wild type the cpc-2 transcript is down-regulated under conditions of amino acid limitation. With cpc-2 a new element involved in general amino acid control has been identified, indicating a function for a WD-repeat protein that belongs to a class that is conserved throughout the evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:7651339

  14. F-Actin Organization and Pollen Tube Tip Growth in Arabidopsis Are Dependent on the Gametophyte-Specific Armadillo Repeat Protein ARO1[W

    PubMed Central

    Gebert, Marina; Dresselhaus, Thomas; Sprunck, Stefanie

    2008-01-01

    The signal-mediated and spatially controlled assembly and dynamics of actin are crucial for maintaining shape, motility, and tip growth of eukaryotic cells. We report that a novel Armadillo repeat protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, ARMADILLO REPEAT ONLY1 (ARO1), is of fundamental importance for polar growth and F-actin organization in tip-growing pollen tubes. ARO1 is specifically expressed in the vegetative cell of pollen as well as in the egg cell. ARO1-GFP (for green fluorescent protein) fusion proteins accumulate most notably in pollen tube tips and partially colocalize with F-actin in the shank of pollen tubes. ARO1 knockout results in a highly disorganized actin cytoskeleton, growth depolarization, and ultimately tube growth arrest. Tip-localized ARO1-GFP is spatially shifted toward the future site of tip growth, indicating a role of ARO1 in the signaling network controlling tip growth and regulating actin organization. After the pollen tube discharges its contents into the receptive synergid, ARO1-GFP colocalizes with emerging F-actin structures near the site of sperm cell fusion, suggesting additional participation in the mechanism of sperm cell tracking toward the female gametes. The variable localization of ARO1 in the cytoplasm, the nucleus, and at the plasma membrane, however, indicates a multifunctional role like that of β-catenin/Armadillo and the p120 catenins. PMID:18931021

  15. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 binds to neuronal vesicles through protein interactions mediated by its C-terminal WD40 domain.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giovanni; Onofri, Franco; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Kaiser, Christoph J O; Jagtap, Pravinkumar; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Pischedda, Francesca; Marte, Antonella; von Zweydorf, Felix; Vogt, Andreas; Giesert, Florian; Pan, Lifeng; Antonucci, Flavia; Kiel, Christina; Zhang, Mingjie; Weinkauf, Sevil; Sattler, Michael; Sala, Carlo; Matteoli, Michela; Ueffing, Marius; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains, including predicted C-terminal WD40 repeats. In this study, we analyzed functional and molecular features conferred by the WD40 domain. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified LRRK2 C-terminal domain revealed doughnut-shaped particles, providing experimental evidence for its WD40 fold. We demonstrate that LRRK2 WD40 binds and sequesters synaptic vesicles via interaction with vesicle-associated proteins. In fact, a domain-based pulldown approach combined with mass spectrometric analysis identified LRRK2 as being part of a highly specific protein network involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking. In addition, we found that a C-terminal sequence variant associated with an increased risk of developing PD, G2385R, correlates with a reduced binding affinity of LRRK2 WD40 to synaptic vesicles. Our data demonstrate a critical role of the WD40 domain within LRRK2 function. PMID:24687852

  16. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5′TOP sequence

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Héroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cécile; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-01-01

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5′TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5′ UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5′TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. A putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. These studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26206669

  17. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Binds to Neuronal Vesicles through Protein Interactions Mediated by Its C-Terminal WD40 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Giovanni; Onofri, Franco; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Kaiser, Christoph J. O.; Jagtap, Pravinkumar; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Pischedda, Francesca; Marte, Antonella; von Zweydorf, Felix; Vogt, Andreas; Giesert, Florian; Pan, Lifeng; Antonucci, Flavia; Kiel, Christina; Zhang, Mingjie; Weinkauf, Sevil; Sattler, Michael; Sala, Carlo; Matteoli, Michela; Ueffing, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains, including predicted C-terminal WD40 repeats. In this study, we analyzed functional and molecular features conferred by the WD40 domain. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified LRRK2 C-terminal domain revealed doughnut-shaped particles, providing experimental evidence for its WD40 fold. We demonstrate that LRRK2 WD40 binds and sequesters synaptic vesicles via interaction with vesicle-associated proteins. In fact, a domain-based pulldown approach combined with mass spectrometric analysis identified LRRK2 as being part of a highly specific protein network involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking. In addition, we found that a C-terminal sequence variant associated with an increased risk of developing PD, G2385R, correlates with a reduced binding affinity of LRRK2 WD40 to synaptic vesicles. Our data demonstrate a critical role of the WD40 domain within LRRK2 function. PMID:24687852

  18. Single-chain protein mimetics of the N-terminal heptad-repeat region of gp41 with potential as anti-HIV-1 drugs.

    PubMed

    Crespillo, Sara; Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Casares, Salvador; Morel, Bertrand; Cobos, Eva S; Mateo, Pedro L; Mouz, Nicolas; Martin, Christophe E; Roger, Marie G; El Habib, Raphaelle; Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2014-12-23

    During HIV-1 fusion to the host cell membrane, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of the envelope subunit gp41 become transiently exposed and accessible to fusion inhibitors or Abs. In this process, the NHR region adopts a trimeric coiled-coil conformation that can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an approach to rationally design single-chain protein constructs that mimic the NHR coiled-coil surface. The proteins were built by connecting with short loops two parallel NHR helices and an antiparallel one with the inverse sequence followed by engineering of stabilizing interactions. The constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified with high yield, and folded as highly stable helical coiled coils. The crystal structure of one of the constructs confirmed the predicted fold and its ability to accurately mimic an exposed gp41 NHR surface. These single-chain proteins bound to synthetic CHR peptides with very high affinity, and furthermore, they showed broad inhibitory activity of HIV-1 fusion on various pseudoviruses and primary isolates. PMID:25489108

  19. Single-chain protein mimetics of the N-terminal heptad-repeat region of gp41 with potential as anti–HIV-1 drugs

    PubMed Central

    Crespillo, Sara; Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Casares, Salvador; Morel, Bertrand; Cobos, Eva S.; Mateo, Pedro L.; Mouz, Nicolas; Martin, Christophe E.; Roger, Marie G.; El Habib, Raphaelle; Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    During HIV-1 fusion to the host cell membrane, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of the envelope subunit gp41 become transiently exposed and accessible to fusion inhibitors or Abs. In this process, the NHR region adopts a trimeric coiled-coil conformation that can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an approach to rationally design single-chain protein constructs that mimic the NHR coiled-coil surface. The proteins were built by connecting with short loops two parallel NHR helices and an antiparallel one with the inverse sequence followed by engineering of stabilizing interactions. The constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified with high yield, and folded as highly stable helical coiled coils. The crystal structure of one of the constructs confirmed the predicted fold and its ability to accurately mimic an exposed gp41 NHR surface. These single-chain proteins bound to synthetic CHR peptides with very high affinity, and furthermore, they showed broad inhibitory activity of HIV-1 fusion on various pseudoviruses and primary isolates. PMID:25489108

  20. Evaluation of novel Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine candidates incorporating multiple conserved sequences from the C-repeat region of the M-protein.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michelle J; Georgousakis, Melina M; Vu, Therese; Henningham, Anna; Hofmann, Andreas; Rettel, Mandy; Hafner, Louise M; Sriprakash, Kadaba S; McMillan, David J

    2012-03-01

    A major challenge for Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine development is the identification of epitopes that confer protection from infection by multiple S. pyogenes M-types. Here we have identified and characterised the distribution of common variant sequences from individual repeat units of the C-repeat region (CRR) of M-proteins representing 77 different M-types. Three polyvalent fusion vaccine candidates (SV1, SV2 and SV3) incorporating the most common variants were subsequently expressed and purified, and demonstrated to be alpha-helical by Circular Dichroism (CD), a secondary conformational characteristic of the CRR in the M-protein. Antibodies raised against each of these constructs recognise M-proteins that vary in their CRR, and bind to the surface of multiple S. pyogenes isolates. Antibodies raised against SV1, containing five variant sequences, also kill heterologous S. pyogenes isolates in in vitro bactericidal assays. Further structural characterisation of this construct demonstrated the conformation of SV1 was stable at different pHs, and thermal unfolding of SV1 is a reversible process. Our findings demonstrate that linkage of multiple variant sequences into a single recombinant construct overcomes the need to embed the variant sequences in foreign helix promoting flanking sequences for conformational stability, and demonstrates the viability of the polyvalent candidates as global S. pyogenes vaccine candidates. PMID:22265945

  1. The leucine-rich repeats of LINGO-1 are not required for self-interaction or interaction with the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thomas; Walmsley, Adrian Robert

    2012-02-10

    LINGO-1 (leucine rich repeat and Ig domain containing Nogo receptor interacting protein-1) is a central nervous system transmembrane protein which simultaneously interacts with the Nogo-66 receptor and p75(NTR) or TROY on neurons to form a receptor complex responsible for myelin-mediated neurite outgrowth inhibition. On oligodendroglial cells, LINGO-1 interacts with p75(NTR) to constitutively inhibit multiple aspects of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Recently, LINGO-1 was identified as an in vivo interacting partner of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and, correspondingly, cellular LINGO-1 expression was found to augment the release of the Abeta peptide, the potential causative agent of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the recombinant LINGO-1 ectodomain has been shown to self-interact in solution and after crystallisation. Here, we have used deletional mutagenesis to identify the regions on LINGO-1 that are involved in homo- and heterotypic interactions. We have found that the N-terminal region containing the leucine-rich repeats along with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of LINGO-1 are not required for self-interaction or interaction with APP. PMID:22133804

  2. Characterization of a novel spore wall protein NbSWP16 with proline-rich tandem repeats from Nosema bombycis (microsporidia).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Dang, Xiaoqun; Ma, Qiang; Liu, Fangyan; Pan, Guoqing; Li, Tian; Zhou, Zeyang

    2015-04-01

    Nosema bombycis, a pathogen of silkworm pebrine, is an obligate unicellular eukaryotic parasite. It is reported that the spore wall proteins have essential functions in the adherence and infection process of microsporidia. To date, the information related to spore wall proteins from microsporidia is still limited. Here, a 44 kDa spore wall protein NbSWP16 was characterized in N. bombycis. In NbSWP16, a 25 amino acids signal peptide and 3 heparin binding motifs were predicted. Interestingly, a region that contains 3 proline-rich tandem repeats lacking homology to any known protein was also present in this protein. The immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) demonstrated that distinct fluorescent signals were detected both on the surface of mature spores and the germinated spore coats. Immunolocation by electron microscopy revealed that NbSWP16 localized on the exospore regions. Finally, spore adherence analysis indicated that spore adherence to host cell was decreased more than 20% by anti-NbSWP16 blocking compared with the negative control in vitro. In contrast with anti-NbSWP16, no remarkable decrement inhibition was detected when antibodies of NbSWP16 and NbSWP5 were used simultaneously. Collectively, these results suggest that NbSWP16 is a new exospore protein and probably be involved in spore adherence of N. bombycis. PMID:25363531

  3. Repeated transient mRNA bursts precede increases in transcriptional and mitochondrial proteins during training in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Christopher G R; Lally, James; Holloway, Graham P; Heigenhauser, George J F; Bonen, Arend; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2010-01-01

    Exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis, but the time course of molecular sequelae that accompany repetitive training stimuli remains to be determined in human skeletal muscle. Therefore, throughout a seven-session, high-intensity interval training period that increased (12%), we examined the time course of responses of (a) mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion and fission proteins, and (b) selected transcriptional and mitochondrial mRNAs and proteins in human muscle. Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 and 24 h after the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th training session. PGC-1α mRNA was increased >10-fold 4 h after the 1st session and returned to control within 24 h. This ‘saw-tooth’ pattern continued until the 7th bout, with smaller increases after each bout. In contrast, PGC-1α protein was increased 24 h after the 1st bout (23%) and plateaued at +30–40% between the 3rd and 7th bout. Increases in PGC-1β mRNA and protein were more delayed and smaller, and did not persist. Distinct patterns of increases were observed in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ protein (1 session), PPAR β/δ mRNA and protein (5 sessions) and nuclear respiratory factor-2 protein (3 sessions) while no changes occurred in mitochondrial transcription factor A protein. Citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD mRNA were rapidly increased (1 session), followed 2 sessions later (session 3) by increases in CS and β-HAD activities, and mitochondrial DNA. Changes in COX-IV mRNA (session 3) and protein (session 5) were more delayed. Training also increased mitochondrial fission proteins (fission protein-1, >2-fold; dynamin-related protein-1, 47%) and the fusion protein mitofusin-1 (35%) but not mitofusin-2. This study has provided the following novel information: (a) the training-induced increases in transcriptional and mitochondrial proteins appear to result from the cumulative effects of transient bursts in their mRNAs, (b) training-induced mitochondrial biogenesis appears to

  4. Human G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1) gene (KCNJ3): Localization to chromosome 2 and identification of a simple tandem repeat polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Powell, K.L.; Espinosa, R. III; Philipson, L.H.; Le Beau, M.M.; Bell, G.I. )

    1994-05-01

    The gene encoding the human G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel designated GIRK1 (gene symbol, KCNJ3) was mapped to chromosome 2 by analyzing its segregation in a panel of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. This assignment was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes, and the gene was further localized to band 2q24.1. A highly informative simple tandem repeat DNA polymorphism of the form (CA)[sub n] was identified and used to localize KCNJ3 within the genetic map of the long arm of chromosome 2. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Imperfect DNA mirror repeats in the gag gene of HIV-1 (HXB2) identify key functional domains and coincide with protein structural elements in each of the mature proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Dorothy M

    2007-01-01

    Background A DNA mirror repeat is a sequence segment delimited on the basis of its containing a center of symmetry on a single strand, e.g. 5'-GCATGGTACG-3'. It is most frequently described in association with a functionally significant site in a genomic sequence, and its occurrence is regarded as noteworthy, if not unusual. However, imperfect mirror repeats (IMRs) having ≥ 50% symmetry are common in the protein coding DNA of monomeric proteins and their distribution has been found to coincide with protein structural elements – helices, β sheets and turns. In this study, the distribution of IMRs is evaluated in a polyprotein – to determine whether IMRs may be related to the position or order of protein cleavage or other hierarchal aspects of protein function. The gag gene of HIV-1 [GenBank:K03455] was selected for the study because its protein motifs and structural components are well documented. Results There is a highly specific relationship between IMRs and structural and functional aspects of the Gag polyprotein. The five longest IMRs in the polyprotein translate a key functional segment in each of the five cleavage products. Throughout the protein, IMRs coincide with functionally significant segments of the protein. A detailed annotation of the protein, which combines structural, functional and IMR data illustrates these associations. There is a significant statistical correlation between the ends of IMRs and the ends of PSEs in each of the mature proteins. Weakly symmetric IMRs (≥ 33%) are related to cleavage positions and processes. Conclusion The frequency and distribution of IMRs in HIV-1 Gag indicates that DNA symmetry is a fundamental property of protein coding DNA and that different levels of symmetry are associated with different functional aspects of the gene and its protein. The interaction between IMRs and protein structure and function is precise and interwoven over the entire length of the polyprotein. The distribution of IMRs and their

  6. P-class pentatricopeptide repeat protein PTSF1 is required for splicing of the plastid pre-tRNA(I) (le) in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Goto, Seiya; Kawaguchi, Yasuhiro; Sugita, Chieko; Ichinose, Mizuho; Sugita, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are widely distributed in eukaryotes and are mostly localized in mitochondria or plastids. PPR proteins play essential roles in various RNA processing steps in organelles; however, the function of the majority of PPR proteins remains unknown. To examine the function of plastid PPR proteins, PpPPR_4 gene knock-out mutants were characterized in Physcomitrella patens. The knock-out mosses displayed severe growth retardation and reduced effective quantum yield of photosystem II. Immunoblot analysis showed that knock-out of PpPPR_4 resulted in a strongly reduced level of plastid-encoded proteins, such as photosystem II reaction center protein D1, the β subunit of ATP synthase, and the stromal enzyme, Rubisco. To further investigate whether knock-out of the PpPPR_4 gene affects plastid gene expression, we analyzed steady-state transcript levels of protein- and rRNA-coding genes by quantitative RT-PCR. This analysis showed that the level of many protein-coding transcripts increased in the mutants. In contrast, splicing of a spacer tRNA(I) (le) precursor encoded by the rrn operon was specifically impaired in the mutants, whereas the accumulation of other plastid tRNAs and rRNAs was not largely affected. Thus, the defect in tRNA(I) (le) splicing leads to a considerable reduction of mature tRNA(I) (le) , which may be accountable for the reduced protein level. An RNA mobility shift assay showed that the recombinant PpPPR_4 bound preferentially to domain III of the tRNA(I) (le) group-II intron. These results provide evidence that PpPPR_4 functions in RNA splicing of the tRNA(I) (le) intron, and hence PpPPR_4 was named plastid tRNA splicing factor 1 (PTSF1). PMID:27117879

  7. Human C9ORF72 Hexanucleotide Expansion Reproduces RNA Foci and Dipeptide Repeat Proteins but Not Neurodegeneration in BAC Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Owen M; Cabrera, Gabriela Toro; Tran, Helene; Gendron, Tania F; McKeon, Jeanne E; Metterville, Jake; Weiss, Alexandra; Wightman, Nicholas; Salameh, Johnny; Kim, Juhyun; Sun, Huaming; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis; Kennedy, Zachary; Lin, Ziqiang; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Daughrity, Lillian; Jung, Chris; Gao, Fen-Biao; Sapp, Peter C; Horvitz, H Robert; Bosco, Daryl A; Brown, Solange P; de Jong, Pieter; Petrucelli, Leonard; Mueller, Christian; Brown, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    A non-coding hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is the most common mutation associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). To investigate the pathological role of C9ORF72 in these diseases, we generated a line of mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome containing exons 1 to 6 of the human C9ORF72 gene with approximately 500 repeats of the GGGGCC motif. The mice showed no overt behavioral phenotype but recapitulated distinctive histopathological features of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD, including sense and antisense intranuclear RNA foci and poly(glycine-proline) dipeptide repeat proteins. Finally, using an artificial microRNA that targets human C9ORF72 in cultures of primary cortical neurons from the C9BAC mice, we have attenuated expression of the C9BAC transgene and the poly(GP) dipeptides. The C9ORF72 BAC transgenic mice will be a valuable tool in the study of ALS/FTD pathobiology and therapy. PMID:26637797

  8. Argonaute quenching and global changes in Dicer homeostasis caused by a pathogen-encoded GW repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Jacinthe; Garcia, Damien; Pontier, Dominique; Ohnesorge, Stephanie; Yu, Agnes; Garcia, Shahinez; Braun, Laurence; Bergdoll, Marc; Hakimi, Mohamed Ali; Lagrange, Thierry; Voinnet, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In plants and invertebrates, viral-derived siRNAs processed by the RNaseIII Dicer guide Argonaute (AGO) proteins as part of antiviral RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC). As a counterdefense, viruses produce suppressor proteins (VSRs) that inhibit the host silencing machinery, but their mechanisms of action and cellular targets remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the Turnip crinckle virus (TCV) capsid, the P38 protein, acts as a homodimer, or multiples thereof, to mimic host-encoded glycine/tryptophane (GW)-containing proteins normally required for RISC assembly/function in diverse organisms. The P38 GW residues bind directly and specifically to Arabidopsis AGO1, which, in addition to its role in endogenous microRNA-mediated silencing, is identified as a major effector of TCV-derived siRNAs. Point mutations in the P38 GW residues are sufficient to abolish TCV virulence, which is restored in Arabidopsis ago1 hypomorphic mutants, uncovering both physical and genetic interactions between the two proteins. We further show how AGO1 quenching by P38 profoundly impacts the cellular availability of the four Arabidopsis Dicers, uncovering an AGO1-dependent, homeostatic network that functionally connects these factors together. The likely widespread occurrence and expected consequences of GW protein mimicry on host silencing pathways are discussed in the context of innate and adaptive immunity in plants and metazoans. PMID:20439431

  9. Argonaute quenching and global changes in Dicer homeostasis caused by a pathogen-encoded GW repeat protein.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Jacinthe; Garcia, Damien; Pontier, Dominique; Ohnesorge, Stephanie; Yu, Agnes; Garcia, Shahinez; Braun, Laurence; Bergdoll, Marc; Hakimi, Mohamed Ali; Lagrange, Thierry; Voinnet, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    In plants and invertebrates, viral-derived siRNAs processed by the RNaseIII Dicer guide Argonaute (AGO) proteins as part of antiviral RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC). As a counterdefense, viruses produce suppressor proteins (VSRs) that inhibit the host silencing machinery, but their mechanisms of action and cellular targets remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the Turnip crinckle virus (TCV) capsid, the P38 protein, acts as a homodimer, or multiples thereof, to mimic host-encoded glycine/tryptophane (GW)-containing proteins normally required for RISC assembly/function in diverse organisms. The P38 GW residues bind directly and specifically to Arabidopsis AGO1, which, in addition to its role in endogenous microRNA-mediated silencing, is identified as a major effector of TCV-derived siRNAs. Point mutations in the P38 GW residues are sufficient to abolish TCV virulence, which is restored in Arabidopsis ago1 hypomorphic mutants, uncovering both physical and genetic interactions between the two proteins. We further show how AGO1 quenching by P38 profoundly impacts the cellular availability of the four Arabidopsis Dicers, uncovering an AGO1-dependent, homeostatic network that functionally connects these factors together. The likely widespread occurrence and expected consequences of GW protein mimicry on host silencing pathways are discussed in the context of innate and adaptive immunity in plants and metazoans. PMID:20439431

  10. Functional characterization of a complex protein-DNA-binding domain located within the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat leader region.

    PubMed Central

    Malim, M H; Fenrick, R; Ballard, D W; Hauber, J; Böhnlein, E; Cullen, B R

    1989-01-01

    Transcriptional trans activation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) by the viral tat trans activator is mediated by an LTR-specific sequence located immediately 3' to the start of transcription initiation. We have used a range of molecular techniques to examine DNA-protein interactions that occur in the vicinity of this cis-acting sequence. Our results demonstrate the existence of a sequence-specific DNA-protein interaction involving the HIV-1 leader DNA and map this binding event to between -2 and +21 base pairs relative to the HIV-1 LTR transcription start site. Evidence suggesting that this interaction involves three distinct protein-DNA contact sites extending along one side of the DNA helix is presented. Mutation of these sites was found to ablate protein-DNA binding yet was observed to have no effect on either the basal or tat trans-activated level of HIV-1 LTR-specific gene expression. We therefore conclude that this DNA-protein interaction has a function distinct from the regulation of HIV-1 LTR-specific gene expression. Images PMID:2545899

  11. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  12. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. In conclusion, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose. PMID:26528314

  13. The rice DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein is required for the assembly of the restoration of fertility complex.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojian; Huang, Qi; Xiao, Haijun; Zhang, Qiannan; Ni, Chenzi; Xu, Yanghong; Liu, Gai; Yang, Daichang; Zhu, Yingguo; Hu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and restoration of fertility (Rf) are widely distributed in plant species utilized by humans. RF5 and GRP162 are subunits of the restoration of fertility complex (RFC) in Hong-Lian rice. Despite the fact that the RFC is 400-500 kDa in size, the other proteins or factors in the complex still remain unknown. Here, we identified RFC subunit 3, which encodes a DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein (RFC3) that is present in all tissues but highly expressed in leaves. We established that RFC3 interacts with both RF5 and GRP162 in vitro and in vivo, and is transported into the mitochondria as a membrane protein. Furthermore, CMS RNA (atp6-orfH79) and CMS cytotoxic protein (ORFH79) accumulate when RFC3 is silenced in restorer lines. We presented the analysis with blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that RFC is disrupted in the RNAi line. We concluded that RCF3 is indispensable as a scaffold protein for the assembly of the RFC complex. We unveil a new molecular player of the RFC in the Rf pathway in rice and propose the model of RFC based on these data. PMID:26781807

  14. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  15. The Restorer-of-fertility-like 2 pentatricopeptide repeat protein and RNase P are required for the processing of mitochondrial orf291 RNA in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Sota; Suzuki, Takamasa; Giegé, Philippe; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Koizuka, Nobuya; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotes harbor mitochondria obtained via ancient symbiosis events. The successful evolution of energy production in mitochondria has been dependent on the control of mitochondrial gene expression by the nucleus. In flowering plants, the nuclear-encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) superfamily proteins are widely involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis nuclear-encoded RNA-binding protein, Restorer-of-fertility-like PPR protein 2 (RFL2), is required for RNA degradation of the mitochondrial orf291 transcript via endonucleolytic cleavage of the transcript in the middle of its reading frame. Both in vivo and in vitro, this RNA cleavage requires the activity of mitochondrial proteinaceous RNase P, which is possibly recruited to the site by RFL2. The site of RNase P cleavage likely forms a tRNA-like structure in the orf291 transcript. This study presents an example of functional collaboration between a PPR protein and an endonuclease in RNA cleavage. Furthermore, we show that the RFL2-binding region within the orf291 gene is hypervariable in the family Brassicaceae, possibly correlated with the rapid evolution of the RNA-recognition interfaces of the RFL proteins. PMID:27122350

  16. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jian -Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-10-13

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. Lastly, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose.

  17. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Jian -Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-10-13

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1more » in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. Lastly, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose.« less

  18. Overexpression of a homopeptide repeat-containing bHLH protein gene (OrbHLH001) from Dongxiang Wild Rice confers freezing and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Guo, Siyi; Zhao, Yuan; Chen, Dazhou; Chong, Kang; Xu, Yunyuan

    2010-09-01

    Dongxiang Wild Rice (Oryza rufipogon) is the northernmost wild rice in the world known to date and has extremely high cold tolerance and many other adversity-resistant properties. To identify the genes responsible for the high stress tolerance, we isolated and characterized a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein gene OrbHLH001 from Dongxiang Wild Rice. The gene encodes an ICE1-like protein containing multiple homopeptide repeats. Expression of OrbHLH001 is induced by salt stress and is predominant in the shoots of wild rice seedlings. Overexpression of OrbHLH001 enhanced the tolerance to freezing and salt stresses in transgenic Arabidopsis. Examination of the expression of cold-responsive genes in transgenic Arabidopsis showed that the function of OrbHLH001 differs from that of ICE1 and is independent of a CBF/DREB1 cold-response pathway. PMID:20559833

  19. Characterization of DNA sequences that mediate nuclear protein binding to the regulatory region of the Pisum sativum (pea) chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80: identification of a repeated heptamer motif.

    PubMed

    Argüello, G; García-Hernández, E; Sánchez, M; Gariglio, P; Herrera-Estrella, L; Simpson, J

    1992-05-01

    Two protein factors binding to the regulatory region of the pea chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80 have been identified. One of these factors is found only in green tissue but not in etiolated or root tissue. The second factor (denominated ABF-2) binds to a DNA sequence element that contains a direct heptamer repeat TCTCAAA. It was found that presence of both of the repeats is essential for binding. ABF-2 is present in both green and etiolated tissue and in roots and factors analogous to ABF-2 are present in several plant species. Computer analysis showed that the TCTCAAA motif is present in the regulatory region of several plant genes. PMID:1303797

  20. Repeating thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, R. A.

    1985-06-04

    Disclosed herein is a repeating use thermocouple assembly and method of making the same in which a cavity adjacent the tip of the thermocouple is filled with a thermosetting foundry sand and baked in place to provide support for the thermocouple tube without causing stresses during use which could cause breakage of the thermocouple tube.

  1. Expression of Anaplasma marginale Ankyrin Repeat-Containing Proteins during Infection of the Mammalian Host and Tick Vector ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ramabu, Solomon S.; Schneider, David A.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Ueti, Massaro W.; Graça, Telmo; Futse, James E.; Noh, Susan M.; Baszler, Timothy V.; Palmer, Guy H.

    2011-01-01

    Transmission of tick-borne pathogens requires transition between distinct host environments with infection and replication in host-specific cell types. Anaplasma marginale illustrates this transition: in the mammalian host, the bacterium infects and replicates in mature (nonnucleated) erythrocytes, while in the tick vector, replication occurs in nucleated epithelial cells. We hypothesized that proteins containing ankyrin motifs would be expressed by A. marginale only in tick cells and would traffic to the infected host cell nucleus. A. marginale encodes three proteins containing ankyrin motifs, an AnkA orthologue (the AM705 protein), AnkB (the AM926 protein), and AnkC (the AM638 protein). All three A. marginale Anks were confirmed to be expressed during intracellular infection: AnkA is expressed at significantly higher levels in erythrocytes, AnkB is expressed equally by both infected erythrocytes and tick cells, and AnkC is expressed exclusively in tick cells. There was no evidence of any of the Ank proteins trafficking to the nucleus. Thus, the hypothesis that ankyrin-containing motifs were predictive of cell type expression and nuclear localization was rejected. In contrast, AnkA orthologues in the closely related A. phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis have been shown to localize to the host cell nucleus. This difference, together with the lack of a nuclear localization signal in any of the AnkA orthologues, suggests that trafficking may be mediated by a separate transporter rather than by endogenous signals. Selection for divergence in Ank function among Anaplasma and Ehrlichia spp. is supported by both locus and allelic analyses of genes encoding orthologous proteins and their ankyrin motif compositions. PMID:21576345

  2. Expression of Anaplasma marginale ankyrin repeat-containing proteins during infection of the mammalian host and tick vector.

    PubMed

    Ramabu, Solomon S; Schneider, David A; Brayton, Kelly A; Ueti, Massaro W; Graça, Telmo; Futse, James E; Noh, Susan M; Baszler, Timothy V; Palmer, Guy H

    2011-07-01

    Transmission of tick-borne pathogens requires transition between distinct host environments with infection and replication in host-specific cell types. Anaplasma marginale illustrates this transition: in the mammalian host, the bacterium infects and replicates in mature (nonnucleated) erythrocytes, while in the tick vector, replication occurs in nucleated epithelial cells. We hypothesized that proteins containing ankyrin motifs would be expressed by A. marginale only in tick cells and would traffic to the infected host cell nucleus. A. marginale encodes three proteins containing ankyrin motifs, an AnkA orthologue (the AM705 protein), AnkB (the AM926 protein), and AnkC (the AM638 protein). All three A. marginale Anks were confirmed to be expressed during intracellular infection: AnkA is expressed at significantly higher levels in erythrocytes, AnkB is expressed equally by both infected erythrocytes and tick cells, and AnkC is expressed exclusively in tick cells. There was no evidence of any of the Ank proteins trafficking to the nucleus. Thus, the hypothesis that ankyrin-containing motifs were predictive of cell type expression and nuclear localization was rejected. In contrast, AnkA orthologues in the closely related A. phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis have been shown to localize to the host cell nucleus. This difference, together with the lack of a nuclear localization signal in any of the AnkA orthologues, suggests that trafficking may be mediated by a separate transporter rather than by endogenous signals. Selection for divergence in Ank function among Anaplasma and Ehrlichia spp. is supported by both locus and allelic analyses of genes encoding orthologous proteins and their ankyrin motif compositions. PMID:21576345

  3. Binding of the Three-Repeat Domain of Tau to Phospholipid Membranes induces an Aggregated-Like State of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Künze, Georg; Barré, Patrick; Scheidt, Holger A.; Thomas, Lars; Eliezer, David; Huster, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In patients with Alzheimer’s disease, the microtubule-associated protein tau is found aggregated into paired helical filaments (PHFs) in neurofibrillary deposits. In solution, tau is intrinsically unstructured. However, the tubulin binding domain consisting of three or four 31–32 amino acid repeat regions exhibits both helical and β-structure propensity and makes up the proteolysis resistant core of PHFs. Here, we studied the structure and dynamics of the three-repeat domain of tau (i.e. K19) when bound to membranes consisting of a phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine mixture or phosphatidylserine alone. Tau K19 binds to phospholipid vesicles with submicromolar affinity as measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. The interaction is driven by electrostatic forces between the positively charged protein and the phospholipid head groups. The structure of the membrane-bound state of K19 was studied using CD spectroscopy and solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. To this end, the protein was selectively 13C-labeled at all valine and leucine residues. Isotropic chemical shift values of tau K19 were consistent with a β-structure. In addition, motionally averaged 1H-13C dipolar couplings indicated a high rigidity of the protein backbone. The structure formation of K19 was also shown to depend on the charge density of the membrane. Phosphatidylserine membranes induced a gain in the α-helix structure along with an immersion of K19 into the phospholipid bilayer as indicated by a reduction of the lipid chain 2H NMR order parameter. Our results provide structural insights into the membrane-bound state of tau K19 and support a potential role of phospholipid membranes in mediating the physiological and pathological functions of tau. PMID:22521809

  4. PM2, a group 3 LEA protein from soybean, and its 22-mer repeating region confer salt tolerance in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yun Liu; Zheng Yizhi . E-mail: yzzheng@szu.edu.cn

    2005-05-27

    To have knowledge of the effect of soybean PM2 protein in protecting dehydrated cells and its functional region, PM2 cDNA was isolated from soybean immature seeds. The recombinants expressing full-length PM2, truncated polypeptides of PM2A (aa 1-262) or PM2B (aa 129-262, 22-mer repeating region), or artificial polypeptide PM2C (duplication of 22-mer repeating region) were constructed. By using SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry approaches, these fusion polypeptides were identified and proved to be hydrophilic and heat-stable. Spot assays of BL/PM2 and BL/pET28 (as control) showed that protein PM2 increased salt tolerance (500 mM NaCl or 500 mM KCl) of Escherichia coli, rather than osmotic tolerance (1100 mM sorbitol). In addition, comparing the survival ratios of the transformants under 500 mM NaCl or 500 mM KCl stresses, the results showed that: (1) the survival ratios of BL/PM2 and BL/PM2B were quite similar, both showing much higher values than those of BL/pET28. (2) The survival ratios of BL/PM2C were much higher than those of BL/PM2, BL/PM2A, and BL/PM2B. This provides the first experimental evidence that PM2 polypeptide enhances salt tolerance of E. coli cells, and the 22-mer repeat region is an important functional region.

  5. A WD40 Repeat Protein from Medicago truncatula Is Necessary for Tissue-Specific Anthocyanin and Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis But Not for Trichome Development1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yongzhen; Wenger, Jonathan P.; Saathoff, Katie; Peel, Gregory J.; Wen, Jiangqi; Huhman, David; Allen, Stacy N.; Tang, Yuhong; Cheng, Xiaofei; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Marks, M. David; Dixon, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    WD40 repeat proteins regulate biosynthesis of anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins (PAs), and mucilage in the seed and the development of trichomes and root hairs. We have cloned and characterized a WD40 repeat protein gene from Medicago truncatula (MtWD40-1) via a retrotransposon-tagging approach. Deficiency of MtWD40-1 expression blocks accumulation of mucilage and a range of phenolic compounds, including PAs, epicatechin, other flavonoids, and benzoic acids, in the seed, reduces epicatechin levels without corresponding effects on other flavonoids in flowers, reduces isoflavone levels in roots, but does not impair trichome or root hair development. MtWD40-1 is expressed constitutively, with highest expression in the seed coat, where its transcript profile temporally parallels those of PA biosynthetic genes. Transcript profile analysis revealed that many genes of flavonoid biosynthesis were down-regulated in a tissue-specific manner in M. truncatula lines harboring retrotransposon insertions in the MtWD40-1 gene. MtWD40-1 complemented the anthocyanin, PA, and trichome phenotypes of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transparent testa glabrous1 mutant. We discuss the function of MtWD40-1 in natural product formation in M. truncatula and the potential use of the gene for engineering PAs in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa). PMID:19710231

  6. A WD40 repeat protein from Medicago truncatula is necessary for tissue-specific anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthesis but not for trichome development.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yongzhen; Wenger, Jonathan P; Saathoff, Katie; Peel, Gregory J; Wen, Jiangqi; Huhman, David; Allen, Stacy N; Tang, Yuhong; Cheng, Xiaofei; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Sumner, Lloyd W; Marks, M David; Dixon, Richard A

    2009-11-01

    WD40 repeat proteins regulate biosynthesis of anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins (PAs), and mucilage in the seed and the development of trichomes and root hairs. We have cloned and characterized a WD40 repeat protein gene from Medicago truncatula (MtWD40-1) via a retrotransposon-tagging approach. Deficiency of MtWD40-1 expression blocks accumulation of mucilage and a range of phenolic compounds, including PAs, epicatechin, other flavonoids, and benzoic acids, in the seed, reduces epicatechin levels without corresponding effects on other flavonoids in flowers, reduces isoflavone levels in roots, but does not impair trichome or root hair development. MtWD40-1 is expressed constitutively, with highest expression in the seed coat, where its transcript profile temporally parallels those of PA biosynthetic genes. Transcript profile analysis revealed that many genes of flavonoid biosynthesis were down-regulated in a tissue-specific manner in M. truncatula lines harboring retrotransposon insertions in the MtWD40-1 gene. MtWD40-1 complemented the anthocyanin, PA, and trichome phenotypes of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transparent testa glabrous1 mutant. We discuss the function of MtWD40-1 in natural product formation in M. truncatula and the potential use of the gene for engineering PAs in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa). PMID:19710231

  7. Association study between CAG trinucleotide repeats in the PCQAP gene (PC2 glutamine/Q-rich-associated protein) and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Alessandro; Conti, Emanuela; Grifone, Nicoletta; Amati, Francesca; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bonaviri, Giuseppina; Pasini, Augusto; Gennarelli, Massimo; Stefano, Bignotti; Berti, Lucia; Mittler, Gerhard; Meisterernst, Michael; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders are quite common features in patients with DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome (DGS/VCFS) as a result of hemizygosity of chromosome 22q11.2. We evaluated the PCQAP gene, which maps within the DGS/VCFS interval, as a potential candidate for schizophrenia susceptibility. PCQAP encodes for a subunit of the large multiprotein complex PC2, which exhibits a coactivator function in RNA polymerase II mediated transcription. Using a case-control study, we searched association between schizophrenia and the intragenic coding trinucleotide polymorphism. The distribution of the CAG repeat alleles was significantly different between patients and controls with the Mann-Whitney test (z = -2.5694, P = 0.0051; schizophrenics: n = 378, W = 161,002.5, Mean rank = 425.9325; controls: n = 444, W = 177,250.5, Mean rank = 399.2128). This result may indicate a possible involvement of the multiprotein complex PC2 in schizophrenia susceptibility. PMID:12497610

  8. Thrombospondin Type-1 Repeat Domain-Containing Proteins Are Strongly Expressed in the Head Region of Hydra.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi-Hamada, Kayoko; Kurumata-Shigeto, Mami; Minobe, Sumiko; Fukuoka, Nozomi; Sato, Manami; Matsufuji, Miyuki; Koizumi, Osamu; Hamada, Shun

    2016-01-01

    The head region of Hydra, the hypostome, is a key body part for developmental control and the nervous system. We herein examined genes specifically expressed in the head region of Hydra oligactis using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cloning. A total of 1414 subtracted clones were sequenced and found to be derived from at least 540 different genes by BLASTN analyses. Approximately 25% of the subtracted clones had sequences encoding thrombospondin type-1 repeat (TSR) domains, and were derived from 17 genes. We identified 11 TSR domain-containing genes among the top 36 genes that were the most frequently detected in our SSH library. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses confirmed that at least 13 out of 17 TSR domain-containing genes were expressed in the hypostome of Hydra oligactis. The prominent expression of TSR domain-containing genes suggests that these genes play significant roles in the hypostome of Hydra oligactis. PMID:27043211

  9. Thrombospondin Type-1 Repeat Domain-Containing Proteins Are Strongly Expressed in the Head Region of Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Hamaguchi-Hamada, Kayoko; Kurumata-Shigeto, Mami; Minobe, Sumiko; Fukuoka, Nozomi; Sato, Manami; Matsufuji, Miyuki; Koizumi, Osamu; Hamada, Shun

    2016-01-01

    The head region of Hydra, the hypostome, is a key body part for developmental control and the nervous system. We herein examined genes specifically expressed in the head region of Hydra oligactis using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cloning. A total of 1414 subtracted clones were sequenced and found to be derived from at least 540 different genes by BLASTN analyses. Approximately 25% of the subtracted clones had sequences encoding thrombospondin type-1 repeat (TSR) domains, and were derived from 17 genes. We identified 11 TSR domain-containing genes among the top 36 genes that were the most frequently detected in our SSH library. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses confirmed that at least 13 out of 17 TSR domain-containing genes were expressed in the hypostome of Hydra oligactis. The prominent expression of TSR domain-containing genes suggests that these genes play significant roles in the hypostome of Hydra oligactis. PMID:27043211

  10. PPR8522 encodes a chloroplast-targeted pentatricopeptide repeat protein necessary for maize embryogenesis and vegetative development

    PubMed Central

    M. Rogowsky, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) domain is an RNA binding domain allowing members of the PPR superfamily to participate in post-transcriptional processing of organellar RNA. Loss of PPR8522 from maize (Zea mays) confers an embryo-specific (emb) phenotype. The emb8522 mutation was isolated in an active Mutator (Mu) population and co-segregation analysis revealed that it was tightly linked to a MuDR insertion in the first exon of PPR8522. Independent evidence that disruption of PPR8522 caused the emb phenotype was provided by fine mapping to a region of 116kb containing no other gene than PPR8522 and complementation of the emb8522 mutant by a PPR8522 cDNA. The deduced PPR8522 amino acid sequence of 832 amino acids contains 10 PPR repeats and a chloroplast target peptide, the function of which was experimentally demonstrated by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Whereas mutant endosperm is apparently normal, mutant embryos deviate from normal development as early as 3 days after pollination, are reduced in size, exhibit more or less severe morphological aberrations depending on the genetic background, and generally do not germinate. The emb8522 mutation is the first to associate the loss of a PPR gene with an embryo-lethal phenotype in maize. Analyses of mutant plantlets generated by embryo-rescue experiments indicate that emb8522 also affects vegetative plant growth and chloroplast development. The loss of chloroplast transcription dependent on plastid-encoded RNA polymerase is the likely cause for the lack of an organized thylakoid network and an albino, seedling-lethal phenotype. PMID:22945943

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of cordycepin in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages through Toll-like receptor 4-mediated suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young; Lee, Hye Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    Cordycepin is the main functional component of the Cordyceps species, which has been widely used in traditional Oriental medicine. This compound possesses many pharmacological properties, such as an ability to enhance immune function, as well as antioxidant, antiaging, and anticancer effects. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of cordycepin using a murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cell model. Our data demonstrated that cordycepin suppressed production of proinflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 by inhibiting inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression. Cordycepin also inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-beta, through downregulation of respective mRNA expression. In addition, pretreatment with cordycepin significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activating protein kinases and attenuated nuclear translocation of NF-κB by LPS, which was associated with abrogation of inhibitor kappa B-alpha degradation. Furthermore, cordycepin potently inhibited the binding of LPS to macrophages and LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the inhibitory effects of cordycepin on LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages are associated with suppression of mitogen-activating protein kinases and activation of NF-κB by inhibition of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. PMID:25342887

  12. SdrX, a serine-aspartate repeat protein expressed by Staphylococcus capitis with collagen VI binding activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yule; Ames, Brenda; Gorovits, Elena; Prater, Bradley D; Syribeys, Peter; Vernachio, John H; Patti, Joseph M

    2004-11-01

    Staphylococcus capitis (S. capitis) has been implicated in a large proportion of coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections in very-low-birth-weight infants. To identify potential therapeutic targets, the S. capitis genome was probed for the presence of genes encoding microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMM). By using Southern blot analysis, an S. capitis gene, designated sdrX, that contained sequence motifs consistent with the Sdr family of MSCRAMM proteins was identified. By using monospecific antisera in Western blot and flow cytometry, SdrX was demonstrated to be expressed on the surface of S. capitis. Human collagen type VI was found to bind both the recombinant A domain of SdrX and viable S. capitis expressing SdrX. SdrX is the first collagen-binding Sdr protein described and is the first MSCRAMM protein identified in S. capitis. PMID:15501749

  13. Orientia tsutsugamushi Strain Ikeda Ankyrin Repeat-Containing Proteins Recruit SCF1 Ubiquitin Ligase Machinery via Poxvirus-Like F-Box Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Andrea R.; VieBrock, Lauren; Rodino, Kyle G.; Miller, Daniel P.; Tegels, Brittney K.; Marconi, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A rising theme among intracellular microbes is the delivery of ankyrin repeat-containing effectors (Anks) that interact with target proteins to co-opt host cell functions. Orientia tsutsugamushi, an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiologic agent of scrub typhus, encodes one of the largest Ank repertoires of any sequenced microorganism. They have been previously identified as type 1 secretion system substrates. Here, in silico and manual sequence analyses revealed that a large proportion of O. tsutsugamushi strain Ikeda Anks bear a eukaryotic/poxvirus-like F-box motif, which is known to recruit host cell SCF1 ubiquitin ligase machinery. We assessed the Anks for the ability to serve as F-box proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that F-box-containing Anks interact with overexpressed and/or endogenous SCF1 components. When coexpressed with FLAG-Ank4_01 or FLAG-Ank9, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged version of the SCF1 component SKP1 localized to subcellular sites of FLAG-Ank accumulation. The abilities of recombinant Anks to interact and colocalize with SKP1 were F-box dependent. GST-SKP1 precipitated O. tsutsugamushi-derived Ank9 from infected host cells, verifying both that the pathogen expresses Ank9 during infection and the protein's capability to bind SKP1. Aligning O. tsutsugamushi, poxviral, and eukaryotic F-box sequences delineated three F-box residues that are highly conserved and likely to be functionally important. Substitution of these residues ablated the ability of GFP-Ank9 to interact with GST-SKP1. These results demonstrate that O. tsutsugamushi strain Ikeda Anks can co-opt host cell polyubiquitination machinery, provide the first evidence that an O. tsutsugamushi Ank does so during infection, and advance overall understanding of microbial F-box proteins. IMPORTANCE Ankyrin repeat-containing proteins (Anks) are important virulence factors of intracellular bacteria that mediate protein-protein interactions with

  14. Empty pericarp7 encodes a mitochondrial E-subgroup pentatricopeptide repeat protein that is required for ccmFN editing, mitochondrial function and seed development in maize.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng; Wang, Xiaomin; Bonnard, Géraldine; Shen, Yun; Xiu, Zhihui; Li, Xiaojie; Gao, Dahai; Zhang, Zhonghang; Tan, Bao-Cai

    2015-10-01

    RNA editing, converting cytidines (C) to uridines (U) at specific sites in the transcripts of mitochondria and plastids, plays a critical role in organelle gene expression in land plants. Recently pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins were identified as site-specific recognition factors for RNA editing. In this study, we characterized an empty pericarp7 mutant (emp7) in Zea mays (maize), which confers an embryo-lethal phenotype. In emp7 mutants, mitochondrial functions are seriously perturbed, resulting in a strikingly reduced respiration rate. Emp7 encodes an E-subgroup PPR protein that is localized exclusively in the mitochondrion. Null mutation of Emp7 abolishes the C → U editing of ccmF(N) transcript solely at position 1553. CcmF(N) is coding for a subunit of heme lyase complex in the cytochrome c maturation pathway. The resulting Phe → Ser substitution in CcmF(N) leads to the loss of CcmF(N) protein and a strikingly reduced c-type cytochrome. Consequently, the mitochondrial cytochrome-linked respiratory chain is impaired as a result of the disassembly of complex III in the emp7 mutant. These results indicate that the PPR-E subgroup protein EMP7 is required for C → U editing of ccmF(N) -1553 at a position essential for cytochrome c maturation and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and hence is essential to embryo and endosperm development in maize. PMID:26303363

  15. An Essential Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Facilitates 5′ Maturation and Translation Initiation of rps3 mRNA in Maize Mitochondria[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Manavski, Nikolay; Guyon, Virginie; Meurer, Jörg; Wienand, Udo; Brettschneider, Reinhold

    2012-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are members of one of the largest nucleus-encoded protein families in plants. Here, we describe the previously uncharacterized maize (Zea mays) PPR gene, MPPR6, which was isolated from a Mutator-induced collection of maize kernel mutants by a cDNA-based forward genetic approach. Identification of a second mutant allele and cosegregation analysis confirmed correlation with the mutant phenotype. Histological investigations revealed that the mutation coincides with abnormities in the transfer cell layer, retardation of embryo development, and a considerable reduction of starch level. The function of MPPR6 is conserved across a wide phylogenetic distance as revealed by heterologous complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant in the orthologous APPR6 gene. MPPR6 appeared to be exclusively present in mitochondria. RNA coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding studies revealed a specific physical interaction of MPPR6 with the 5′ untranslated region of ribosomal protein S3 (rps3) mRNA. Mapping of transcript termini showed specifically extended rps3 5′ ends in the mppr6 mutant. Considerable reduction of mitochondrial translation was observed, indicating loss of RPS3 function. This is consistent with the appearance of truncated RPS3 protein lacking the N terminus in mppr6. Our results suggest that MPPR6 is directly involved in 5′ maturation and translation initiation of rps3 mRNA. PMID:22773745

  16. A Proline/Arginine-Rich End Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein (PRELP) Variant Is Uniquely Expressed in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mikaelsson, Eva; Österborg, Anders; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Kokhaei, Parviz; Ostadkarampour, Mahyar; Hadavi, Reza; Gholamin, Mehran; Akhondi, Mehdi; Shokri, Fazel; Rabbani, Hodjattallah; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP) belongs to the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family, normally expressed in extracellular matrix of collagen-rich tissues. We have previously reported on another SLRP, fibromodulin (FMOD) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). PRELP is structurally similar to FMOD with adjacent localization on chromosome 1 (1q32.1). As cluster-upregulation of genes may occur in malignancies, the aim of our study was to analyze PRELP expression in CLL. PRELP was expressed (RT-PCR) in all CLL patients (30/30), as well as in some patients with mantle cell lymphoma (3/5), but not in healthy donor leukocytes (0/20) or tumor samples from other hematological malignancies (0/35). PRELP was also detected in CLL cell-lines (4/4) but not in cell-lines from other hematological tumors (0/9). PRELP protein was detected in all CLL samples but not in normal leukocytes. Deglycosylation experiments revealed a CLL-unique 38 kDa core protein, with an intact signal peptide. This 38 kDa protein was, in contrast to the normal 55 kDa size, not detected in serum which, in combination with the uncleaved signal peptide, suggests cellular retention. The unique expression of a 38 kDa PRELP in CLL cells may suggest involvement in the pathobiology of CLL and merits further studies. PMID:23826326

  17. A proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP) variant is uniquely expressed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Mikaelsson, Eva; Österborg, Anders; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Kokhaei, Parviz; Ostadkarampour, Mahyar; Hadavi, Reza; Gholamin, Mehran; Akhondi, Mehdi; Shokri, Fazel; Rabbani, Hodjattallah; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP) belongs to the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family, normally expressed in extracellular matrix of collagen-rich tissues. We have previously reported on another SLRP, fibromodulin (FMOD) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). PRELP is structurally similar to FMOD with adjacent localization on chromosome 1 (1q32.1). As cluster-upregulation of genes may occur in malignancies, the aim of our study was to analyze PRELP expression in CLL. PRELP was expressed (RT-PCR) in all CLL patients (30/30), as well as in some patients with mantle cell lymphoma (3/5), but not in healthy donor leukocytes (0/20) or tumor samples from other hematological malignancies (0/35). PRELP was also detected in CLL cell-lines (4/4) but not in cell-lines from other hematological tumors (0/9). PRELP protein was detected in all CLL samples but not in normal leukocytes. Deglycosylation experiments revealed a CLL-unique 38 kDa core protein, with an intact signal peptide. This 38 kDa protein was, in contrast to the normal 55 kDa size, not detected in serum which, in combination with the uncleaved signal peptide, suggests cellular retention. The unique expression of a 38 kDa PRELP in CLL cells may suggest involvement in the pathobiology of CLL and merits further studies. PMID:23826326

  18. Modification of epidermal growth factor-like repeats with O-fucose. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel GDP-fucose protein O-fucosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Shao, L; Shi, S; Harris, R J; Spellman, M W; Stanley, P; Haltiwanger, R S

    2001-10-26

    The O-fucose modification is found on epidermal growth factor-like repeats of a number of cell surface and secreted proteins. O-Fucose glycans play important roles in ligand-induced receptor signaling. For example, elongation of O-fucose on Notch by the beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase Fringe modulates the ability of Notch to respond to its ligands. The enzyme that adds O-fucose to epidermal growth factor-like repeats, GDP-fucose protein O-fucosyltransferase (O-FucT-1), was purified previously from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Here we report the isolation of a cDNA that encodes human O-FucT-1. A probe deduced from N-terminal sequence analysis of purified CHO O-FucT-1 was used to screen a human heart cDNA library and expressed sequence tag and genomic data bases. The cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a protein of 388 amino acids with a predicted N-terminal transmembrane sequence typical of a type II membrane orientation. Likewise, the mouse homolog obtained from an expressed sequence tag and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends of a mouse liver cDNA library encodes a type II transmembrane protein of 393 amino acids with 90.4% identity to human O-FucT-1. Homologs were also found in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans with 41.2 and 29.4% identity to human O-FucT-1, respectively. The human gene (POFUT1) is on chromosome 20 between PLAGL2 and KIF3B, near the centromere at 20p11. The mouse gene (Pofut1) maps near Plagl2 on a homologous region of mouse chromosome 2. POFUT1 gene transcripts were expressed in all tissues examined, consistent with the widespread localization of the modification. Expression of a soluble form of human O-FucT-1 in insect cells yielded a protein of the predicted molecular weight with O-FucT-1 kinetic and enzymatic properties similar to those of O-FucT-1 purified from CHO cells. The identification of the gene encoding protein O-fucosyltransferase I now makes possible mutational strategies to examine the functions of the

  19. Cdc48p interacts with Ufd3p, a WD repeat protein required for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ghislain, M; Dohmen, R J; Levy, F; Varshavsky, A

    1996-01-01

    A library of random 10 residue peptides fused to the N-terminus of a reporter protein was screened in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for sequences that can target the reporter for degradation by the N-end rule pathway, a ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent proteolytic system that recognizes potential substrates through binding to their destabilizing N-terminal residues. One of the N-terminal sequences identified by this screen was used in a second screen for mutants incapable of degrading the corresponding reporter fusion. A mutant thus identified had an abnormally low content of free Ub. This mutant was found to be allelic to a previously isolated mutant in a Ub-dependent proteolytic system distinct from the N-end rule pathway. We isolated the gene involved, termed UFD3, which encodes an 80 kDa protein containing tandem repeats of a motif that is present in many eukaryotic proteins and called the WD repeat. Both co-immunoprecipitation and two-hybrid assays demonstrated that Ufd3p is an in vivo ligand of Cdc48p, an essential ATPase required for the cell cycle progression and the fusion of endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Further, we showed that, similarly to Ufd3p, Cdc48p is also required for the Ub-dependent proteolysis of test substrates. The discovery of the Ufd3p--Cdc48p complex and the finding that this complex is a part of the Ub system open up a new direction for studies of the function of Ub in the cell cycle and membrane dynamics. Images PMID:8890162

  20. A New Family of HEAT-Like Repeat Proteins Lacking a Critical Substrate Recognition Motif Present in Related DNA Glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Shi, Rongxin; Kotsch, Lyle A; Eichman, Brandt F

    2015-01-01

    DNA glycosylases are important repair enzymes that eliminate a diverse array of aberrant nucleobases from the genomes of all organisms. Individual bacterial species often contain multiple paralogs of a particular glycosylase, yet the molecular and functional distinctions between these paralogs are not well understood. The recently discovered HEAT-like repeat (HLR) DNA glycosylases are distributed across all domains of life and are distinct in their specificity for cationic alkylpurines and mechanism of damage recognition. Here, we describe a number of phylogenetically diverse bacterial species with two orthologs of the HLR DNA glycosylase AlkD. One ortholog, which we designate AlkD2, is substantially less conserved. The crystal structure of Streptococcus mutans AlkD2 is remarkably similar to AlkD but lacks the only helix present in AlkD that penetrates the DNA minor groove. We show that AlkD2 possesses only weak DNA binding affinity and lacks alkylpurine excision activity. Mutational analysis of residues along this DNA binding helix in AlkD substantially reduced binding affinity for damaged DNA, for the first time revealing the importance of this structural motif for damage recognition by HLR glycosylases. PMID:25978435

  1. Molecular crowding stabilizes both the intrinsically disordered calcium-free state and the folded calcium-bound state of a repeat in toxin (RTX) protein.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Subrini, Orso; Hessel, Audrey; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2013-08-14

    Macromolecular crowding affects most chemical equilibria in living cells, as the presence of high concentrations of macromolecules sterically restricts the available space. Here, we characterized the influence of crowding on a prototypical RTX protein, RC(L). RTX (Repeat in ToXin) motifs are calcium-binding nonapeptide sequences that are found in many virulence factors produced by Gram-negative bacteria and secreted by dedicated type 1 secretion systems. RC(L) is an attractive model to investigate the effect of molecular crowding on ligand-induced protein folding, as it shifts from intrinsically disordered conformations (apo-form) to a stable structure upon calcium binding (holo-form). It thus offers the rare opportunity to characterize the crowding effects on the same polypeptide chain under two drastically distinct folding states. We showed that the crowding agent Ficoll70 did not affect the structural content of the apo-state and holo-state of RC(L) but increased the protein affinity for calcium. Moreover, Ficoll70 strongly stabilized both states of RC(L), increasing their half-melting temperature, without affecting enthalpy changes. The power law dependence of the melting temperature increase (ΔT(m)) on the volume fraction (φ) followed theoretical excluded volume predictions and allowed the estimation of the Flory exponent (ν) of the thermally unfolded polypeptide chain in both states. Altogether, our data suggest that, in the apo-state as found in the crowded bacterial cytosol, RTX proteins adopt extended unfolded conformations that may facilitate protein export by the type I secretion machinery. Subsequently, crowding also enhances the calcium-dependent folding and stability of RTX proteins once secreted in the extracellular milieu. PMID:23941183

  2. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. PMID:25805501

  3. Enhancement of the basal-level activity of HIV-1 long terminal repeat by HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J L; Sharma, P L; Crumpacker, C S

    2000-03-15

    Two HIV-1 proteins, Tat and NCp7 (NC), have zinc finger-like structures. NC is a virion protein and has been shown to accumulate in the nucleus 8 h postinfection. Since transcription factors with zinc fingers assist the transcriptional activity of both RNA polymerases II and III, we examined the effect of NC on HIV-1 LTR-directed gene expression. The HIV-1 NC binds to the HIV-1 LTR and results in a mobility shift in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Competition assays with cold probes revealed that the binding of NC and formation of a DNA-protein complex could be prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled LTR self-probe, but not the HIV-1 V3 envelope gene. The DNase I footprint analysis showed that NC binds to six regions within HIV-1 LTR, four of which are near the transcription start site. The NC alone enhances LTR basal-level activity in RNA runoff experiments. When the general transcription factors (GTFs) were added in the assay, NC enhances NF-kappaB, Sp1, and TFIIB-induced HIV-1 LTR-directed RNA transcription. RNA transcription directed by the adenovirus major late promoter, however, is not significantly affected by NC in the cell-free system. Transient transfection of human T lymphocytes with the plasmids containing HIV-1 nc or gag showed enhancement of LTR-CAT activity. Moreover, transfection of HIV-1 provirus containing mutations in NC zinc-finger domains dramatically decreases the enhancement activity in human T cells, in which HIV-1 LTR is stably integrated into the cellular genome. These observations show that NC binds to HIV-1 LTR and cooperatively enhances GTFs and NF-kappaB induced HIV-1 LTR basal-level activity. NC may play the role of a nucleation protein, which binds to LTR and enhances basal-level transcription by recruiting cellular transcription factors to the HIV-1 promoter in competition with cellular promoters. PMID:10704334

  4. Staphylococcus epidermidis serine--aspartate repeat protein G (SdrG) binds to osteoblast integrin alpha V beta 3.

    PubMed

    Claro, T; Kavanagh, N; Foster, T J; O'Brien, F J; Kerrigan, S W

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is the leading etiologic agent of orthopaedic implant infection. Contamination of the implanted device during insertion allows bacteria gain entry into the sterile bone environment leading to condition known as osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis is characterised by weakened bones associated with progressive bone loss. The mechanism through which S. epidermidis interacts with bone cells to cause osteomyelitis is poorly understood. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis can bind to osteoblasts in the absence of matrix proteins. S. epidermidis strains lacking the cell wall protein SdrG had a significantly reduced ability to bind to osteoblasts. Consistent with this, expression of SdrG in Lactococcus lactis resulted in significantly increased binding to the osteoblasts. Protein analysis identified that SdrG contains a potential integrin recognition motif. αVβ3 is a major integrin expressed on osteoblasts and typically recognises RGD motifs in its ligands. Our results demonstrate that S. epidermidis binds to recombinant purified αVβ3, and that a mutant lacking SdrG failed to bind. Blocking αVβ3 on osteoblasts significantly reduced binding to S. epidermidis. These studies are the first to identify a mechanism through which S. epidermidis binds to osteoblasts and potentially offers a mechanism through which implant infection caused by S. epidermidis leads to osteomyelitis. PMID:25749709

  5. RNAe: an effective method for targeted protein translation enhancement by artificial non-coding RNA with SINEB2 repeat

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yi; Jin, Shouhong; Long, Haizhou; Yu, Yingting; Zhang, Zhenming; Cheng, Ge; Xu, Chengwei; Ding, Yan; Guan, Qian; Li, Ning; Fu, Suneng; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Hanshuo; Tong, Pei; Tan, Yue; Yu, Yang; Fu, Shushu; Li, Juan; He, Guang-Jun; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a universal protein expression enhancement RNA tool, termed RNAe, was developed by modifying a recently discovered natural long non-coding RNA. At the moment, RNAe is the only technology for gene expression enhancement, as opposed to silencing, at the post-transcriptional level. With this technology, an expression enhancement of 50–1000% is achievable, with more than 200% enhancement achieved in most cases. This work identified the sufficient and necessary element for RNAe function, which was found to be merely 300 nucleotides long and was named minRNAe. It contains a 72-nt 5' pairing sequence which determines the specificity, a 167-nt short non-pairing interspersed nuclear element (SINE) B2 sequence which enhances ribosome recruitment to the target mRNA, and a poly(A) tail, provided together on a plasmid bearing the appropriate sequences. Cellular delivery of RNAe was achieved using routine transfection. The RNAe platform was validated in several widely-used mammalian cell lines. It was proven to be efficient and flexible in specifically enhancing the expression of various endogenous and exogenous proteins of diverse functions in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the expression-inhibitory tool RNAi, the RNAe tool has a comparable effect size, with an enhancing as opposed to inhibitory effect. One may predict that this brand new technology for enhancing the production of proteins will find wide applications in both research and biopharmaceutical production. PMID:25722369

  6. Repeated, Intermittent Exposures to diisopropylfluorophosphate in Rats: Protracted Effects on Cholinergic Markers, Nerve Growth Factor-Related Proteins, and Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Alvin V.; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Gearhart, Debra A.; Beck, Wayne D.; Middlemore-Risher, Mary-Louise; Truan, Jacob N.; Schwarz, Gary M.; Xu, Meng; Bartlett, Michael G.; Kutiyanawala, Ammar; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) pose a constant threat to human health due to their widespread use as pesticides and their potential employment in military and terrorist attacks. The acute toxicity of OPs has been extensively studied; however, the consequences of prolonged or repeated exposure to levels of OPs that produce no overt signs of acute toxicity (i.e., subthreshold levels) are poorly understood. Further, there is clinical evidence that such repeated exposures to OPs lead to prolonged deficits in cognition, although the mechanism for this effect is unknown. In this study, the behavioral and neurochemical effects of repeated, intermittent, and subthreshold exposures to the alkyl OP, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were investigated. Rats were injected with DFP subcutaneously (dose range, 0.25-1.0 mg/kg) every other day over the course of 30 days, and then given a two week, DFP-free washout period. In behavioral experiments conducted at various times during the washout period, dose dependent decrements in a water maze hidden platform task and a spontaneous novel object recognition (NOR) procedure were observed, while prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response was unaffected. There were modest decreases in open field locomotor activity and grip strength (particularly during the DFP exposure period); however, rotarod performance and water maze swim speeds were not affected. After washout, DFP concentrations were minimal in plasma and brain, however, cholinesterase inhibition was still detectable in the brain. Moreover, the 1.0 mg/kg dose of DFP was associated with (brain region-dependent) alterations in nerve growth factor-related proteins and cholinergic markers. The results of this prospective animal study thus provide evidence to support two novel hypotheses: 1) that intermittent, subthreshold exposures to alkyl OPs can lead to protracted deficits in specific domains of cognition and 2) that such cognitive deficits may be related to persistent functional

  7. Molecular modeling of the elastomeric properties of repeating units and building blocks of resilin, a disordered elastic protein.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Md Shahriar K; Dudek, Daniel M; Beers, Eric P; Dillard, David A; Bevan, David R

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the properties of disordered elastomeric proteins are not well known. To better understand the relationship between elastomeric behavior and amino acid sequence, we investigated resilin, a disordered rubber-like protein, found in specialized regions of the cuticle of insects. Resilin of Drosophila melanogaster contains Gly-rich repetitive motifs comprised of the amino acids, PSSSYGAPGGGNGGR, which confer elastic properties to resilin. The repetitive motifs of insect resilin can be divided into smaller partially conserved building blocks: PSS, SYGAP, GGGN and GGR. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the relative roles of SYGAP, and its less common variants SYSAP and TYGAP, on the elastomeric properties of resilin. Results showed that SYGAP adopts a bent structure that is one-half to one-third the end-to-end length of the other motifs having an equal number of amino acids but containing SYSAP or TYGAP substituted for SYGAP. The bent structure of SYGAP forms due to conformational freedom of glycine, and hydrogen bonding within the motif apparently plays a role in maintaining this conformation. These structural features of SYGAP result in higher extensibility compared to other motifs, which may contribute to elastic properties at the macroscopic level. Overall, the results are consistent with a role for the SYGAP building block in the elastomeric properties of these disordered proteins. What we learned from simulating the repetitive motifs of resilin may be applicable to the biology and mechanics of other elastomeric biomaterials, and may provide us the deeper understanding of their unique properties. PMID:26851528

  8. Rhoptry-associated protein (rap-1) genes in the sheep pathogen Babesia sp. Xinjiang: Multiple transcribed copies differing by 3' end repeated sequences.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Marchand, Jordan; Yang, Congshan; Bonsergent, Claire; Guan, Guiquan; Yin, Hong; Malandrin, Laurence

    2015-07-30

    Sheep babesiosis occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical areas. The sheep parasite Babesia sp. Xinjiang is widespread in China, and our goal is to characterize rap-1 (rhoptry-associated protein 1) gene diversity and expression as a first step of a long term goal aiming at developing a recombinant subunit vaccine. Seven different rap-1a genes were amplified in Babesia sp. Xinjiang, using degenerate primers designed from conserved motifs. Rap-1b and rap-1c gene types could not be identified. In all seven rap-1a genes, the 5' regions exhibited identical sequences over 936 nt, and the 3' regions differed at 28 positions over 147 nt, defining two types of genes designated α and β. The remaining 3' part varied from 72 to 360 nt in length, depending on the gene. This region consists of a succession of two to ten 36 nt repeats, which explains the size differences. Even if the nucleotide sequences varied, 6 repeats encoded the same stretch of amino acids. Transcription of at least four α and two β genes was demonstrated by standard RT-PCR. PMID:26026806

  9. Analysis of polyglutamine-coding repeats in the TATA-binding protein in different human populations and in patients with schizophrenia an bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Crow, T.J.

    1996-09-20

    A new class of disease (including Huntington disease, Kennedy disease, and spinocerebellar ataxias types 1 and 3) results from abnormal expansions of CAG trinucleotides in the coding regions of genes. In all of these diseases the CAG repeats are thought to be translated into polyglutamine tracts. There is accumulating evidence arguing for CAG trinucleotide expansions as one of the causative disease mutations in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. We and others believe that the TATA-binding protein (TBP) is an important candidate to investigate in these diseases as it contains a highly polymorphic stretch of glutamine codons, which are close to the threshold length where the polyglutamine tracts start to be associated with disease. Thus, we examined the lengths of this polyglutamine repeat in normal unrelated East Anglians, South African Blacks, sub-Saharan Africans mainly from Nigeria, and Asian Indians. We also examined 43 bipolar affective disorder patients and 65 schizophrenic patients. The range of polyglutamine tract-lengths that we found in humans was from 26-42 codons. No patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia had abnormal expansions at this locus. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  10. β-Glucan from Lentinus edodes Inhibits Nitric Oxide and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production and Phosphorylation of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinases in Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated Murine RAW 264.7 Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojuan; Yasuda, Michiko; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Mizuno, Masashi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Lentinan (LNT), a β-glucan from the fruiting bodies of Lentinus edodes, is well known to have immunomodulatory activity. NO and TNF-α are associated with many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of LNT extracted by sonication (LNT-S) on the NO and TNF-α production in LPS-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results suggested that treatment with LNT-S not only resulted in the striking inhibition of TNF-α and NO production in LPS-activated macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, but also the protein expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) and the gene expression of iNOS mRNA and TNF-α mRNA. It is surprising that LNT-S enhanced LPS-induced NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and NF-κB luciferase activity, but severely inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2. The neutralizing antibodies of anti-Dectin-1 and anti-TLR2 hardly affected the inhibition of NO production. All of these results suggested that the suppression of LPS-induced NO and TNF-α production was at least partially attributable to the inhibition of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation. This work discovered a promising molecule to control the diseases associated with overproduction of NO and TNF-α. PMID:22102286

  11. The Cochaperone SGTA (Small Glutamine-rich Tetratricopeptide Repeat-containing Protein Alpha) Demonstrates Regulatory Specificity for the Androgen, Glucocorticoid, and Progesterone Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Atanu; Garcia, Yenni A.; Zierer, Bettina; Patwardhan, Chaitanya; Gutierrez, Omar; Hildenbrand, Zacariah; Harris, Diondra C.; Balsiger, Heather A.; Sivils, Jeffrey C.; Johnson, Jill L.; Buchner, Johannes; Chadli, Ahmed; Cox, Marc B.

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are ligand-dependent transcription factors that require the ordered assembly of multichaperone complexes for transcriptional activity. Although heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 and Hsp70 are key players in this process, multiple Hsp70- and Hsp90-associated cochaperones associate with receptor-chaperone complexes to regulate receptor folding and activation. Small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha (SGTA) was recently characterized as an Hsp70 and Hsp90-associated cochaperone that specifically regulates androgen receptor activity. However, the specificity of SGTA for additional members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily and the mechanism by which SGTA regulates receptor activity remain unclear. Here we report that SGTA associates with and specifically regulates the androgen, glucocorticoid, and progesterone receptors and has no effect on the mineralocorticoid and estrogen receptors in both yeast and mammalian cell-based reporter assays. In both systems, SGTA knockdown/deletion enhances receptor activity, whereas SGTA overexpression suppresses receptor activity. We demonstrate that SGTA binds directly to Hsp70 and Hsp90 in vitro with similar affinities yet predominately precipitates with Hsp70 from cell lysates, suggesting a role for SGTA in early, Hsp70-mediated folding. Furthermore, SGTA expression completely abrogates the regulation of receptor function by FKBP52 (52-kDa FK506-binding protein), which acts at a later stage of the chaperone cycle. Taken together, our data suggest a role for SGTA at distinct steps in the chaperone-dependent modulation of androgen, glucocorticoid, and progesterone receptor activity. PMID:24753260

  12. A Novel Ankyrin-Repeat Membrane Protein, IGN1, Is Required for Persistence of Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiosis in Root Nodules of Lotus japonicus1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Hirotaka; Hakoyama, Tsuneo; Umehara, Yosuke; Sato, Shusei; Kaneko, Takakazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Kouchi, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing symbiosis of legume plants with Rhizobium bacteria is established through complex interactions between two symbiotic partners. Similar to the mutual recognition and interactions at the initial stages of symbiosis, nitrogen fixation activity of rhizobia inside root nodules of the host legume is also controlled by specific interactions during later stages of nodule development. We isolated a novel Fix− mutant, ineffective greenish nodules 1 (ign1), of Lotus japonicus, which forms apparently normal nodules containing endosymbiotic bacteria, but does not develop nitrogen fixation activity. Map-based cloning of the mutated gene allowed us to identify the IGN1 gene, which encodes a novel ankyrin-repeat protein with transmembrane regions. IGN1 expression was detected in all organs of L. japonicus and not enhanced in the nodulation process. Immunoanalysis, together with expression analysis of a green fluorescent protein-IGN1 fusion construct, demonstrated localization of the IGN1 protein in the plasma membrane. The ign1 nodules showed extremely rapid premature senescence. Irregularly enlarged symbiosomes with multiple bacteroids were observed at early stages (8–9 d post inoculation) of nodule formation, followed by disruption of the symbiosomes and disintegration of nodule infected cell cytoplasm with aggregation of the bacteroids. Although the exact biochemical functions of the IGN1 gene are still to be elucidated, these results indicate that IGN1 is required for differentiation and/or persistence of bacteroids and symbiosomes, thus being essential for functional symbiosis. PMID:17277093

  13. Protein Interactions Involved in tRNA Gene-Specific Integration of Dictyostelium discoideum Non-Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon TRE5-A▿

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Thanh; Siol, Oliver; Dingermann, Theodor; Winckler, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements that reside in gene-dense genomes face the problem of avoiding devastating insertional mutagenesis of genes in their host cell genomes. To meet this challenge, some Saccharomyces cerevisiae long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons have evolved targeted integration at safe sites in the immediate vicinity of tRNA genes. Integration of yeast Ty3 is mediated by interactions of retrotransposon protein with the tRNA gene-specific transcription factor IIIB (TFIIIB). In the genome of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, the non-LTR retrotransposon TRE5-A integrates ∼48 bp upstream of tRNA genes, yet little is known about how the retrotransposon identifies integration sites. Here, we show direct protein interactions of the TRE5-A ORF1 protein with subunits of TFIIIB, suggesting that ORF1p is a component of the TRE5-A preintegration complex that determines integration sites. Our results demonstrate that evolution has put forth similar solutions to prevent damage of diverse, compact genomes by different classes of mobile elements. PMID:17923679

  14. Repression in vitro, by human adenovirus E1A protein domains, of basal or Tat-activated transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Song, C Z; Loewenstein, P M; Green, M

    1995-01-01

    Human adenovirus E1A proteins can repress the expression of several viral and cellular genes. By using a cell-free transcription system, we demonstrated that the gene product of the E1A 12S mRNA, the 243-residue protein E1A243R, inhibits basal transcription from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR). The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat greatly stimulates transcription from the viral promoter in vitro. However, E1A243R can repress Tat-activated transcription in vitro. Strong repression of both basal and Tat-activated transcriptions requires only E1A N-terminal amino acid residues 1 to 80. Deletion analysis showed that E1A N-terminal amino acids 4 to 25 are essential for repression, whereas amino acid residues 30 to 49 and 70 to 80 are dispensable. Transcriptional repression by E1A in the cell-free transcription system is promoter specific, since under identical conditions, transcription of the adenovirus major late promoter and the Rous sarcoma virus LTR promoter was unaffected. The repression of transcription by small E1A peptides in vitro provides an assay for investigation of molecular mechanisms governing E1A-mediated repression of both basal and Tat-activated transcriptions of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. PMID:7707515

  15. The Essential WD Repeat Protein Swd2 Has Dual Functions in RNA Polymerase II Transcription Termination and Lysine 4 Methylation of Histone H3

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hailing; He, Xiaoyuan; Moore, Claire

    2004-01-01

    Swd2, an essential WD repeat protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a component of two very different complexes: the cleavage and polyadenylation factor CPF and the Set1 methylase, which modifies lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3-K4). It was not known if Swd2 is important for the function of either of these entities. We show here that, in extract from cells depleted of Swd2, cleavage and polyadenylation of the mRNA precursor in vitro are completely normal. However, temperature-sensitive mutations or depletion of Swd2 causes termination defects in some genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Overexpression of Ref2, a protein previously implicated in snoRNA 3′ end formation and Swd2 recruitment to CPF, can rescue the growth and termination defects, indicating a functional interaction between the two proteins. Some swd2 mutations also significantly decrease global H3-K4 methylation and cause other phenotypes associated with loss of this chromatin modification, such as loss of telomere silencing, hydroxyurea sensitivity, and alterations in repression of INO1 transcription. Even though the two Swd2-containing complexes are both localized to actively transcribed genes, the allele specificities of swd2 defects suggest that the functions of Swd2 in mediating RNA polymerase II termination and H3-K4 methylation are not tightly coupled. PMID:15024081

  16. Conserved charged residues in the leucine-rich repeat domain of the Ran GTPase activating protein are required for Ran binding and GTPase activation.

    PubMed Central

    Haberland, J; Gerke, V

    1999-01-01

    GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for Ran, a Ras-related GTPase participating in nucleocytoplasmic transport, have been identified in different species ranging from yeast to man. All RanGAPs are characterized by a conserved domain consisting of eight leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) interrupted at two positions by so-called separating regions, the latter being unique for RanGAPs within the family of LRR proteins. The cytosolic RanGAP activity is essential for the Ran GTPase cycle which in turn provides directionality in nucleocytoplasmic transport, but the structural basis for the interaction between Ran and its GAP has not been elucidated. In order to gain a better understanding of this interaction we generated a number of mutant RanGAPs carrying amino acid substitutions in the LRR domain and analysed their complex formation with Ran as well as their ability to stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of the G protein. We show that conserved charged residues present in the separating regions of the LRR domain are indispensable for efficient Ran binding and GAP activity. These separating regions contain three conserved arginines which could possibly serve as catalytic residues similar to the arginine fingers identified in GAPs for other small GTPases. However, mutations in two of these arginines do not affect the GAP activity and replacement of the third conserved arginine (Arg91 in human RanGAP) severely interferes not only with GAP activity but also with Ran binding. This indicates that RanGAP-stimulated GTP hydrolysis on Ran does not involve a catalytic arginine residue but requires certain charged residues of the LRR domain of the GAP for mediating the protein-protein interaction. PMID:10527945

  17. Interaction of Prevotella intermedia Strain 17 Leucine-Rich Repeat Domain Protein AdpF with Eukaryotic Cells Promotes Bacterial Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Dipanwita; Kang, Dae-Joong; Anaya-Bergman, Cecilia; Wyant, Tiana; Ghosh, Arnab K.; Miyazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an oral bacterium implicated in a variety of oral diseases. Although internalization of this bacterium by nonphagocytic host cells is well established, the molecular players mediating the process are not well known. Here, the properties of a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain protein, designated AdpF, are described. This protein contains a leucine-rich region composed of 663 amino acid residues, and molecular modeling shows that it folds into a classical curved solenoid structure. The cell surface localization of recombinant AdpF (rAdpF) was confirmed by electron and confocal microscopy analyses. The recombinant form of this protein bound fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the protein was internalized by host cells, with the majority of the process accomplished within 30 min. The internalization of rAdpF was inhibited by nystatin, cytochalasin, latrunculin, nocodazole, and wortmannin, indicating that microtubules, microfilaments, and signal transduction are required for the invasion. It is noteworthy that preincubation of eukaryotic cells with AdpF increased P. intermedia 17 internalization by 5- and 10-fold for HeLa and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines, respectively. The addition of the rAdpF protein was also very effective in inducing bacterial internalization into the oral epithelial cell line HN4, as well as into primary cells, including human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Finally, cells exposed to P. intermedia 17 internalized the bacteria more readily upon reinfection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that rAdpF plays a role in the internalization of P. intermedia 17 by a variety of host cells. PMID:24711565

  18. Repeated preconditioning with hyperbaric oxygen induces neuroprotection against forebrain ischemia via suppression of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Hirata, Takao; Mizukami, Yoichi; Cui, Ying Jun; Fukuda, Shiro; Ishida, Kazuyoshi; Matsumoto, Mishiya; Sakabe, Takefumi

    2009-12-01

    We previously reported in rats that preconditioning with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO; 100% O(2) 3.5-atomsphere absolute (ATA), 1 h/day for 5 days) provided neuroprotection against transient (8 min) forebrain ischemia possibly through protein synthesis relevant to neurotrophin receptor and inflammatory-immune system. A recent report suggested that HBO-induced neuroprotection is relevant to brain derived neurotrophic factor and its downstream event involving suppression of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38) activation. In the present study, we first performed a dose comparison (1, 2, and 3.5 ATA) of HBO-induced neuroprotection and then investigated pharmacological modification by 10 mg/kg anisomycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor and potent activator for p38) and 200 microg/kg SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor), which were given intraperitoneally 60 and 30 min before every 3.5 ATA-HBO treatment, respectively. Most prominent protective effect on hippocampal CA1 neurons was observed with 3.5 ATA-HBO (survived neurons: 69% [62-73%] vs. untreated: 3.9% [2-8%], 1 ATA: 8.8% [0-26%], 2 ATA-HBO: 46% [22-62%] (median [range]) (7 days after ischemia). Anisomycin abolished a neuroprotective effect (survived neuron: 1.2% [0-7%]). SB203580, when given between administration of anisomycin and HBO treatment, resumed a neuroprotective effect (survived neuron: 52% [37-62%]). The level of phosphorylated p38 at 10-min reperfusion was significantly decreased in 3.5 ATA-HBO group (32% [12-53%] of sham). Single pretreatment with 100 and 200 microg/kg of SB203580 exerted a similar neuroprotective effect (39% [25-51%] and 59% [50-72%]) to 2 and 3.5 ATA-HBO preconditioning, respectively. It is concluded that suppression of p38 phosphorylation plays a key role in HBO-induced neuroprotection and that pretreatment with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) can provide similar neuroprotection. PMID:19747454

  19. The Arabidopsis Mitochondria-Localized Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein PGN Functions in Defense against Necrotrophic Fungi and Abiotic Stress Tolerance1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Laluk, Kristin; AbuQamar, Synan; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2011-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins (PPRPs) are encoded by a large gene family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and their functions are largely unknown. The few studied PPRPs are implicated in different developmental processes through their function in RNA metabolism and posttranscriptional regulation in plant organelles. Here, we studied the functions of Arabidopsis PENTATRICOPEPTIDE REPEAT PROTEIN FOR GERMINATION ON NaCl (PGN) in plant defense and abiotic stress responses. Inactivation of PGN results in susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens as well as hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA), glucose, and salinity. Interestingly, ectopic expression of PGN results in the same phenotypes as the pgn null allele, indicating that a tight regulation of the PGN transcript is required for normal function. Loss of PGN function dramatically enhanced reactive oxygen species accumulation in seedlings in response to salt stress. Inhibition of ABA synthesis and signaling partially alleviates the glucose sensitivity of pgn, suggesting that the mutant accumulates high endogenous ABA. Accordingly, induction of NCED3, encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in stress-induced ABA biosynthesis, is significantly higher in pgn, and the mutant has higher basal ABA levels, which may underlie its phenotypes. The pgn mutant has altered expression of other ABA-related genes as well as mitochondria-associated transcripts, most notably elevated levels of ABI4 and ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a, which are known for their roles in retrograde signaling induced by changes in or inhibition of mitochondrial function. These data, coupled with its mitochondrial localization, suggest that PGN functions in regulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in mitochondria during abiotic and biotic stress responses, likely through involvement in retrograde signaling. PMID:21653783

  20. A Disorder-Induced Domino-Like Destabilization Mechanism Governs the Folding and Functional Dynamics of the Repeat Protein IκBα

    PubMed Central

    Sivanandan, Srinivasan; Naganathan, Athi N.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of the repeat protein IκBα, a transcriptional inhibitor in mammalian cells, is critical in the functioning of the NF-κB signaling module implicated in an array of cellular processes, including cell growth, disease, immunity and apoptosis. Structurally, IκBα is complex, with both ordered and disordered regions, thus posing a challenge to the available computational protocols to model its conformational behavior. Here, we introduce a simple procedure to model disorder in systems that undergo binding-induced folding that involves modulation of the contact map guided by equilibrium experimental observables in combination with an Ising-like Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton model. This one-step procedure alone is able to reproduce a variety of experimental observables, including ensemble thermodynamics (scanning calorimetry, pre-transitions, m-values) and kinetics (roll-over in chevron plot, intermediates and their identity), and is consistent with hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements. We further capture the intricate distance-dynamics between the domains as measured by single-molecule FRET by combining the model predictions with simple polymer physics arguments. Our results reveal a unique mechanism at work in IκBα folding, wherein disorder in one domain initiates a domino-like effect partially destabilizing neighboring domains, thus highlighting the effect of symmetry-breaking at the level of primary sequences. The offshoot is a multi-state and a dynamic conformational landscape that is populated by increasingly partially folded ensembles upon destabilization. Our results provide, in a straightforward fashion, a rationale to the promiscuous binding and short intracellular half-life of IκBα evolutionarily engineered into it through repeats with variable stabilities and expand the functional repertoire of disordered regions in proteins. PMID:24367251

  1. Methylsulfonylmethane modulates apoptosis of LPS/IFN-γ-activated RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells by targeting p53, Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c and PARP proteins.

    PubMed

    Karabay, Arzu Z; Aktan, Fugen; Sunguroğlu, Asuman; Buyukbingol, Zeliha

    2014-12-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a non-toxic, natural organosulfur compound, which is known to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In recent years, MSM has been widely used as a dietary supplement for its beneficial effects against various diseases, especially arthritis. Despite being a popular supplement product, the mechanism of action of MSM is not well known. This study was designed to investigate the effects of MSM on cytotoxic signals induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. The results showed that MSM reversed apoptosis of RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells at non-cytotoxic concentrations probably through the modulation of apoptotic proteins. After pre-treatment of cells with non-toxic doses of MSM; caspase-3 activation, p53 accumulation, cytochrome c release and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were significantly decreased and full length poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) was significantly increased. In addition, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased with MSM pretreatment in activated macrophages. Since excess nitric oxide production causes apoptosis of macrophages, anti-apoptotic effects of MSM are thought to be mediated by its inhibitor effects on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein and nitric oxide levels. More interestingly, higher doses of MSM exhibited biphasic effects, inhibited cell viability, induced apoptosis of macrophages, increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage. Thus, our results reveal the molecular mechanism of of MSM indicating that MSM supplementation may be beneficial for complications related to nitric oxide-dependent apoptosis in inflammatory conditions. However, the optimum concentration of MSM must be chosen carefully to elicit the desired effect. PMID:25211405

  2. Recombinant protein of heptad-repeat HR212, a stable fusion inhibitor with potent anti-HIV action in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Wei; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Liu Changmei; Tien Po Zheng Yongtang

    2008-07-20

    HR212, a recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli, has been previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 membrane fusion at low nanomolar level. Here we report that HR212 is effective in blocking laboratory strain HIV-1{sub IIIB} entry and replication with EC{sub 50} values of 3.92 {+-} 0.62 and 6.59 {+-} 1.74 nM, respectively, and inhibiting infection by clinic isolate HIV-1{sub KM018} with EC{sub 50} values of 44.44 {+-} 10.20 nM, as well as suppressing HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect with an EC{sub 50} value of 3.04 {+-} 1.20 nM. It also inhibited HIV-2{sub ROD} and HIV-2{sub CBL-20} entry and replication in the {mu}M range. Notably, HR212 was highly effective against T20-resistant strains with EC{sub 50} values ranging from 5.09 to 7.75 nM. Unlike T20, HR212 showed stability sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation in a time-of-addition assay, and was insensitive to proteinase K digestion. These results suggest that HR212 has great potential to be further developed as novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients, particularly for those infected by T20-resistant variants.

  3. The Coxiella burnetii Ankyrin Repeat Domain-Containing Protein Family Is Heterogeneous, with C-Terminal Truncations That Influence Dot/Icm-Mediated Secretion ▿

    PubMed Central

    Voth, Daniel E.; Howe, Dale; Beare, Paul A.; Vogel, Joseph P.; Unsworth, Nathan; Samuel, James E.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterium that directs biogenesis of a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) for replication. Effectors of PV maturation are likely translocated into the host cytosol by a type IV secretion system (T4SS) with homology to the Dot/Icm apparatus of Legionella pneumophila. Since secreted bacterial virulence factors often functionally mimic the activities of host proteins, prokaryotic proteins with eukaryotic features are considered candidate T4SS substrates. Genes encoding proteins with eukaryotic-type ankyrin repeat domains (Anks) were identified upon genome sequencing of the C. burnetii Nine Mile reference isolate, which is associated with a case of human acute Q fever. Interestingly, recent genome sequencing of the G and K isolates, derived from human chronic endocarditis patients, and of the Dugway rodent isolate revealed remarkable heterogeneity in the Ank gene family, with the Dugway isolate harboring the largest number of full-length Ank genes. Using L. pneumophila as a surrogate host, we identified 10 Dugway Anks and 1 Ank specific to the G and K endocarditis isolates translocated into the host cytosol in a Dot/Icm-dependent fashion. A 10-amino-acid C-terminal region appeared to be necessary for translocation, with some Anks also requiring the chaperone IcmS for secretion. Ectopically expressed Anks localized to a variety of subcellular regions in mammalian cells, including microtubules, mitochondria, and the PV membrane. Collectively, these data suggest that C. burnetii isolates translocate distinct subsets of the Ank protein family into the host cytosol, where they modulate diverse functions, some of which may be unique to C. burnetii pathotypes. PMID:19411324

  4. The MTL1 Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Required for Both Translation and Splicing of the Mitochondrial NADH DEHYDROGENASE SUBUNIT7 mRNA in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Haïli, Nawel; Planchard, Noelya; Arnal, Nadège; Quadrado, Martine; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Dahan, Jennifer; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Mireau, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial translation involves a complex interplay of ancient bacteria-like features and host-derived functionalities. Although the basic components of the mitochondrial translation apparatus have been recognized, very few protein factors aiding in recruiting ribosomes on mitochondria-encoded messenger RNA (mRNAs) have been identified in higher plants. In this study, we describe the identification of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MITOCHONDRIAL TRANSLATION FACTOR1 (MTL1) protein, a new member of the Pentatricopeptide Repeat family, and show that it is essential for the translation of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit7 (nad7) mRNA. We demonstrate that mtl1 mutant plants fail to accumulate the Nad7 protein, even though the nad7 mature mRNA is produced and bears the same 5' and 3' extremities as in wild-type plants. We next observed that polysome association of nad7 mature mRNA is specifically disrupted in mtl1 mutants, indicating that the absence of Nad7 results from a lack of translation of nad7 mRNA. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial translation requires the intervention of gene-specific nucleus-encoded PPR trans-factors and that their action does not necessarily involve the 5' processing of their target mRNA, as observed previously. Interestingly, a partial decrease in nad7 intron 2 splicing was also detected in mtl1 mutants, suggesting that MTL1 is also involved in group II intron splicing. However, this second function appears to be less essential for nad7 expression than its role in translation. MTL1 will be instrumental to understand the multifunctionality of PPR proteins and the mechanisms governing mRNA translation and intron splicing in plant mitochondria. PMID:26537562

  5. Allelic Variation in a Simple Sequence Repeat Element of Neisserial pglB2 and Its Consequences for Protein Expression and Protein Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Viburiene, Raimonda; Vik, Åshild; Koomey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria species express an O-linked glycosylation system in which functionally distinct proteins are elaborated with variable glycans. A major source of glycan diversity in N. meningitidis results from two distinct pglB alleles responsible for the synthesis of either N,N′-diacetylbacillosamine or glyceramido-acetamido trideoxyhexose that occupy the reducing end of the oligosaccharides. Alternative modifications at C-4 of the precursor UDP-4-amino are attributable to distinct C-terminal domains that dictate either acetyltransferase or glyceramidotransferase activity, encoded by pglB and pglB2, respectively. Naturally occurring alleles of pglB2 have homopolymeric tracts of either 7 or 8 adenosines (As) bridging the C-terminal open reading frame (ORF) and the ORF encompassing the conserved N-terminal domain associated with phosphoglycosyltransferase activity. In the work presented here, we explored the consequences of such pglB2 allele variation and found that, although both alleles are functional vis-à-vis glycosylation, the 7A form results in the expression of a single, multidomain protein, while the 8A variant elicits two single-domain proteins. We also found that the glyceramidotransferase activity-encoding domain is essential to protein glycosylation, showing the critical role of the C-4 modification of the precursor UDP-4-amino in the pathway. These findings were further extended and confirmed by examining the phenotypic consequences of extended poly(A) tract length variation. Although ORFs related to those of pglB2 are broadly distributed in eubacteria, they are primarily found as two distinct, juxtaposed ORFs. Thus, the neisserial pglB2 system provides novel insights into the potential influence of hypermutability on modular evolution of proteins by providing a unique snapshot of the progression of ongoing gene fusion. PMID:23729645

  6. Allelic variation in a simple sequence repeat element of neisserial pglB2 and its consequences for protein expression and protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Viburiene, Raimonda; Vik, Åshild; Koomey, Michael; Børud, Bente

    2013-08-01

    Neisseria species express an O-linked glycosylation system in which functionally distinct proteins are elaborated with variable glycans. A major source of glycan diversity in N. meningitidis results from two distinct pglB alleles responsible for the synthesis of either N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine or glyceramido-acetamido trideoxyhexose that occupy the reducing end of the oligosaccharides. Alternative modifications at C-4 of the precursor UDP-4-amino are attributable to distinct C-terminal domains that dictate either acetyltransferase or glyceramidotransferase activity, encoded by pglB and pglB2, respectively. Naturally occurring alleles of pglB2 have homopolymeric tracts of either 7 or 8 adenosines (As) bridging the C-terminal open reading frame (ORF) and the ORF encompassing the conserved N-terminal domain associated with phosphoglycosyltransferase activity. In the work presented here, we explored the consequences of such pglB2 allele variation and found that, although both alleles are functional vis-à-vis glycosylation, the 7A form results in the expression of a single, multidomain protein, while the 8A variant elicits two single-domain proteins. We also found that the glyceramidotransferase activity-encoding domain is essential to protein glycosylation, showing the critical role of the C-4 modification of the precursor UDP-4-amino in the pathway. These findings were further extended and confirmed by examining the phenotypic consequences of extended poly(A) tract length variation. Although ORFs related to those of pglB2 are broadly distributed in eubacteria, they are primarily found as two distinct, juxtaposed ORFs. Thus, the neisserial pglB2 system provides novel insights into the potential influence of hypermutability on modular evolution of proteins by providing a unique snapshot of the progression of ongoing gene fusion. PMID:23729645

  7. Anionic Phospholipid Interactions of the Prion Protein N Terminus Are Minimally Perturbing and Not Driven Solely by the Octapeptide Repeat Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Martin P.; Hatty, Claire R.; Separovic, Frances; Hill, Andrew F.; Tew, Deborah J.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; James, Michael; Masters, Colin L.; Collins, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Although the N terminus of the prion protein (PrPC) has been shown to directly associate with lipid membranes, the precise determinants, biophysical basis, and functional implications of such binding, particularly in relation to endogenously occurring fragments, are unresolved. To better understand these issues, we studied a range of synthetic peptides: specifically those equating to the N1 (residues 23–110) and N2 (23–89) fragments derived from constitutive processing of PrPC and including those representing arbitrarily defined component domains of the N terminus of mouse prion protein. Utilizing more physiologically relevant large unilamellar vesicles, fluorescence studies at synaptosomal pH (7.4) showed absent binding of all peptides to lipids containing the zwitterionic headgroup phosphatidylcholine and mixtures containing the anionic headgroups phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidylserine. At pH 5, typical of early endosomes, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation showed the highest affinity binding occurred with N1 and N2, selective for anionic lipid species. Of particular note, the absence of binding by individual peptides representing component domains underscored the importance of the combination of the octapeptide repeat and the N-terminal polybasic regions for effective membrane interaction. In addition, using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and solid-state NMR, we characterized for the first time that both N1 and N2 deeply insert into the lipid bilayer with minimal disruption. Potential functional implications related to cellular stress responses are discussed. PMID:20679345

  8. Recombinant myxoma virus lacking all poxvirus ankyrin-repeat proteins stimulates multiple cellular anti-viral pathways and exhibits a severe decrease in virulence.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Stephanie A; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2014-09-01

    Although the production of single gene knockout viruses is a useful strategy to study viral gene functions, the redundancy of many host interactive genes within a complex viral genome can obscure their collective functions. In this study, a rabbit-specific poxvirus, myxoma virus (MYXV), was genetically altered to disrupt multiple members of the poxviral ankyrin-repeat (ANK-R) protein superfamily, M-T5, M148, M149 and M150. A particularly robust activation of the NF-κB pathway was observed in A549 cells following infection with the complete ANK-R knockout (vMyx-ANKsKO). Also, an increased release of IL-6 was only observed upon infection with vMyx-ANKsKO. In virus-infected rabbit studies, vMyx-ANKsKO was the most extensively attenuated and produced the smallest primary lesion of all ANK-R mutant constructs. This study provides the first insights into the shared functions of the poxviral ANK-R protein superfamily in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25068401

  9. Recombinant myxoma virus lacking all poxvirus ankyrin-repeat proteins stimulates multiple cellular anti-viral pathways and exhibits a severe decrease in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Stephanie A.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Although the production of single gene knockout viruses is a useful strategy to study viral gene functions, the redundancy of many host interactive genes within a complex viral genome can obscure their collective functions. In this study, a rabbit-specific poxvirus, myxoma virus (MYXV), was genetically altered to disrupt multiple members of the poxviral ankyrin-repeat (ANK-R) protein superfamily, M-T5, M148, M149 and M150. A particularly robust activation of the NF-κB pathway was observed in A549 cells following infection with the complete ANK-R knockout (vMyx-ANKsKO). Also, an increased release of IL-6 was only observed upon infection with vMyx-ANKsKO. In virus-infected rabbit studies, vMyx-ANKsKO was the most extensively attenuated and produced the smallest primary lesion of all ANK-R mutant constructs. This study provides the first insights into the shared functions of the poxviral ANK-R protein superfamily in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25068401

  10. Crystal structure of Ski8p, a WD-repeat protein with dual roles in mRNA metabolism and meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhihong; Liu, Yuying; Wang, Chernhoe; Parker, Roy; Song, Haiwei

    2004-10-01

    Ski8p is a WD-repeat protein with an essential role for the Ski complex assembly in an exosome-dependent 3'-to-5' mRNA decay. In addition, Ski8p is involved in meiotic recombination by interacting with Spo11p protein. We have determined the crystal structure of Ski8p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 2.2 A resolution. The structure reveals that Ski8p folds into a seven-bladed beta propeller. Mapping sequence conservation and hydrophobicities of amino acids on the molecular surface of Ski8p reveals a prominent site on the top surface of the beta propeller, which is most likely involved in mediating interactions of Ski8p with Ski3p and Spo11p. Mutagenesis combined with yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays identified the top surface of the beta propeller as being required for Ski8p binding to Ski3p and Spo11p. The functional implications for Ski8p function in both mRNA decay and meiotic recombination are discussed. PMID:15340168

  11. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5) is required for maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Julio C; Walker, Scott D; Anderson, Sheila A; Eisenstein, Richard S; Bruick, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis requires post-transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism genes by iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2). The hemerythrin-like domain of F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, senses iron and oxygen availability and facilitates IRP2 degradation in iron replete cells. Disruption of the ubiquitously expressed murine Fbxl5 gene results in a failure to sense increased cellular iron availability, accompanied by constitutive IRP2 accumulation and misexpression of IRP2 target genes. FBXL5-null mice die during embryogenesis, although viability is restored by simultaneous deletion of the IRP2, but not IRP1, gene. Mice containing a single functional Fbxl5 allele behave like their wild type littermates when fed an iron-sufficient diet. However, unlike wild type mice that manifest decreased hematocrit and hemoglobin levels when fed a low-iron diet, Fbxl5 heterozygotes maintain normal hematologic values due to increased iron absorption. The responsiveness of IRP2 to low iron is specifically enhanced in the duodena of the heterozygotes and is accompanied by increased expression of the divalent metal transporter-1. These results confirm the role of FBXL5 in the in vivo maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis and reveal a privileged role for the intestine in their regulation by virtue of its unique FBXL5 iron sensitivity. PMID:23135277

  12. F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5) Is Required for Maintenance of Cellular and Systemic Iron Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Julio C.; Walker, Scott D.; Anderson, Sheila A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Bruick, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis requires post-transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism genes by iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2). The hemerythrin-like domain of F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, senses iron and oxygen availability and facilitates IRP2 degradation in iron replete cells. Disruption of the ubiquitously expressed murine Fbxl5 gene results in a failure to sense increased cellular iron availability, accompanied by constitutive IRP2 accumulation and misexpression of IRP2 target genes. FBXL5-null mice die during embryogenesis, although viability is restored by simultaneous deletion of the IRP2, but not IRP1, gene. Mice containing a single functional Fbxl5 allele behave like their wild type littermates when fed an iron-sufficient diet. However, unlike wild type mice that manifest decreased hematocrit and hemoglobin levels when fed a low-iron diet, Fbxl5 heterozygotes maintain normal hematologic values due to increased iron absorption. The responsiveness of IRP2 to low iron is specifically enhanced in the duodena of the heterozygotes and is accompanied by increased expression of the divalent metal transporter-1. These results confirm the role of FBXL5 in the in vivo maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis and reveal a privileged role for the intestine in their regulation by virtue of its unique FBXL5 iron sensitivity. PMID:23135277

  13. Motifs within the CA-repeat-rich region of Surfactant Protein B (SFTPB) intron 4 differentially affect mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjun; Ni, Lan; Silveyra, Patricia; Wang, Guirong; Noutsios, Georgios T; Singh, Anamika; DiAngelo, Susan L; Sanusi, Olabisi; Raval, Manmeet; Floros, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    The first half of the surfactant protein B (SP-B) gene intron 4 is a CA-repeat-rich region that contains 11 motifs. To study the role of this region on SP-B mRNA splicing, minigenes were generated by systematic removal of motifs from either the 5′ or 3′ end. These were transfected in CHO cells to study their splicing efficiency. The latter was determined as the ratio of completely to incompletely spliced SP-B RNA. Our results indicate that SP-B intron 4 motifs differentially affect splicing. Motifs 8 and 9 significantly enhanced and reduced splicing of intron 4, respectively. RNA mobility shift assays performed with a Motif 8 sequence that contains a CAUC cis-element and cell extracts resulted in a RNA:protein shift that was lost upon mutation of the element. Furthermore, in silico analysis of mRNA secondary structure stability for minigenes with and without motif 8 indicated a correlation between mRNA stability and splicing ratio. We conclude that differential loss of specific intron 4 motifs results in one or more of the following: a) altered splicing, b) differences in RNA stability and c) changes in secondary structure. These, in turn, may affect SP-B content in lung health or disease. PMID:23687636

  14. LMOh7858_0369, a gene encoding a putative leucine-rich repeat-containing protein, is required for virulence of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul; Wang, Chinling

    2016-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes possesses the highest number of leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing proteins among all Gram-positive bacteria; these LRR-containing molecules are known as the 'internalin' family. To understand the functions of largely uncharacterized LRR-containing molecules, we constructed seven deletion mutants in the L. monocytogenes H7858 strain targeting genes in this family and tested their virulence. Among the seven mutants, the ΔLMOh7858_0369 strain and the ΔLMOh7858_2546 strain showed significantly impaired invasiveness of HepG2 cells. We further tested the virulence of these two strains in the intravascular sepsis model using BALB/c mice. Interestingly, the ΔLMOh7858_0369 strain showed significant reduction in organ colonization, bacteremia and invasion of the brain compared with the parental wild-type strain. Host immune responses to listerial intravascular infection were measured at 24 and 72 h post-infection. Transcript levels of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were significantly lower when induced by the ΔlmOh7858_0369 strain than when induced by the wild type. These results suggest that the putative LRR-containing protein encoded by LMOh7858_0369 might be a novel virulence factor of the L. monocytogenes H7858 strain. PMID:26976852

  15. Identification of amino acid residues of a designed ankyrin repeat protein potentially involved in intermolecular interactions with CD4: analysis by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Khampa, Chalermpon; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nangola, Sawitree; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2011-11-01

    We applied molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the binding properties of a designed ankyrin repeat protein, the DARPin-CD4 complex. DARPin 23.2 has been reported to disturb the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral entry process by Schweizer et al. The protein docking simulation was analysed by comparing the specific ankyrin binder (DARPin 23.2) to an irrelevant control (2JAB) in forming a composite with CD4. To determine the binding free energy of both ankyrins, the MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA protocols were used. The free energy decomposition of both complexes were analysed to explore the role of certain amino acid residues in complex configuration. Interestingly, the molecular docking analysis of DARPin 23.2 revealed a similar CD4 interaction regarding the gp120 theoretical anchoring motif. In contrast, the binding of control ankyrin to CD4 occurred at a different location. This observation suggests that there is an advantage to the molecular modification of DARPin 23.2, an enhanced affinity for CD4. PMID:21962990

  16. Repeated administration of propofol upregulated the expression of c-Fos and cleaved-caspase-3 proteins in the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yin; Ling-Shan, Gou; Yi, Liu; Xing-Qi, Wang; Xue-Mei, Zhuang; Xiao-Xing, Yin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives and Aim: This study was designed to analyze the relationship between the expression of c-Fos protein and apoptosis in the hippocampus following propofol administration in infant mice. There are reports that certain drugs, including the general anesthetics applied in pediatrics and obstetrics, could block N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors and activate γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors. Furthermore, some anesthetics could trigger neuroapoptosis and the expression of c-Fos in the developing rodent brain. Propofol is a general anesthetic increasingly used in pediatrics and obstetrics, and is reported to be able to interact with both γ-aminobutyric acid type A and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. No adequate evaluations have been available as to whether the dosage of propofol to maintain anaesthesia could trigger the expression of c-Fos and apoptosis. Materials and Methods: Intraperitoneal injections of propofol (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) or vehicle were administered every 90 minutes (4 times) in infant mice (5–7 days old). 30 minutes after the final administration, the protein expressions of c-Fos and cleaved-caspase-3 in the hippocampus were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results: It was demonstrated that the expressions of cleaved-caspase-3 and c-Fos were upregulated in the hippocampal CA3 region in this study. Conclusions: The upregulated c-Fos expression induced by repeated injections of propofol might evoke neuroapoptosis. PMID:22144767

  17. Expression of fluorescent proteins within the repeat long region of the Marek's disease virus genome allows direct identification of infected cells while retaining full pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Jarosinski, Keith W; Donovan, Kathleen M; Du, Guixin

    2015-04-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a lymphotropic alphaherpesvirus and causes Marek's disease (MD) in chickens. RLORF4 is an MDV-specific gene located in the repeat long (RL) regions of the genome and is directly involved in attenuation. In this report, we generated recombinant (r)MDVs in which eGFP or mRFP was inserted in-frame of the 3' end of the RLORF4 gene. In vitro growth was unaffected and infected cells could be identified by using fluorescent microscopy. Interestingly, though inserted in-frame with RLORF4, eGFP and mRFP were expressed alone, confirming mRNA expression and splicing within the RL of MDV is complex. In vivo, rMDVs expressing mRFP or eGFP caused tumors similar to wild-type MDV. Fluorescent protein expression could be seen in spleen, tumor, and feather follicle epithelial cells. These results show that expression of fluorescent proteins within the RL region results in fluorescent rMDVs that still maintains full pathogenicity in the chicken. PMID:25725150

  18. Sum1, a highly conserved WD-repeat protein, suppresses S-M checkpoint mutants and inhibits the osmotic stress cell cycle response in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, T; Enoch, T

    1998-01-01

    The S-M checkpoint ensures that entry into mitosis is dependent on completion of DNA replication. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the SM checkpoint mutant cdc2-3w is thought to be defective in receiving the checkpoint signal. To isolate genes that function in the checkpoint pathway, we screened an S. pombe cDNA library for genes that, when overexpressed, could suppress the checkpoint defect of cdc2-3w. Using this approach, we have identified a novel gene, sum1+ (suppressor of uncontrolled mitosis). sum1+ encodes a highly conserved WD-transducin repeat protein with striking sequence similarity to the human transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta-receptor interacting protein TRIP-1 and to the translation initiation factor 3 subunit eIF3-p39, encoded by the TIF34 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. pombe sum1+ is an essential gene, required for normal cell growth and division. In addition to restoring checkpoint control, overexpression of sum1+ inhibits the normal cell cycle response to osmotic stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that inactivation of the stress-activated MAP kinase pathway, required for cell cycle stress response, restores the S-M checkpoint in cdc2-3w cells. These results suggest that Suml interacts with the stress-activated MAP kinase pathway and raise the possibility that environmental conditions may influence the checkpoint response in fission yeast. PMID:9560390

  19. HLB1 Is a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain-Containing Protein That Operates at the Intersection of the Exocytic and Endocytic Pathways at the TGN/EE in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sparks, J Alan; Kwon, Taegun; Renna, Luciana; Liao, Fuqi; Brandizzi, Federica; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2016-03-01

    The endomembrane system plays essential roles in plant development, but the proteome responsible for its function and organization remains largely uncharacterized in plants. Here, we identified and characterized the HYPERSENSITIVE TO LATRUNCULIN B1 (HLB1) protein isolated through a forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana for mutants with heightened sensitivity to actin-disrupting drugs. HLB1 is a plant-specific tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein of unknown function encoded by a single Arabidopsis gene. HLB1 associated with the trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosome (EE) and tracked along filamentous actin, indicating that it could link post-Golgi traffic with the actin cytoskeleton in plants. HLB1 was found to interact with the ADP-ribosylation-factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor, MIN7/BEN1 (HOPM INTERACTOR7/BREFELDIN A-VISUALIZED ENDOCYTIC TRAFFICKING DEFECTIVE1) by coimmunoprecipitation. The min7/ben1 mutant phenocopied the mild root developmental defects and latrunculin B hypersensitivity of hlb1, and analyses of ahlb1/ min7/ben1 double mutant showed that hlb1 and min7/ben1 operate in common genetic pathways. Based on these data, we propose that HLB1 together with MIN7/BEN1 form a complex with actin to modulate the function of the TGN/EE at the intersection of the exocytic and endocytic pathways in plants. PMID:26941089

  20. The WD-Repeat Protein CsTTG1 Regulates Fruit Wart Formation through Interaction with the Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper I Protein Mict.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhua; Yin, Shuai; Liu, Xingwang; Liu, Bin; Yang, Sen; Xue, Shudan; Cai, Yanling; Black, Kezia; Liu, Huiling; Dong, Mingming; Zhang, Yaqi; Zhao, Binyu; Ren, Huazhong

    2016-06-01

    The cucumber (Cucumis sativus) fruit is covered with bloom trichomes and warts (composed of spines and tubercules), which have an important impact on the commercial value of the crop. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism underlying their formation. Here, we reported that the cucumber WD-repeat homolog CsTTG1, which is localized in the nucleus and cytomembrane, plays an important role in the formation of cucumber fruit bloom trichomes and warts. Functional characterization of CsTTG1 revealed that it is mainly expressed in the epidermis of cucumber ovary and that its overexpression in cucumber alters the density of fruit bloom trichomes and spines, thereby promoting the warty fruit trait. Conversely, silencing CsTTG1 expression inhibits the initiation of fruit spines. Molecular and genetic analyses showed that CsTTG1 acts in parallel to Mict/CsGL1, a key trichome formation factor, to regulate the initiation of fruit trichomes, including fruit bloom trichomes and spines, and that the further differentiation of fruit spines and formation of tubercules regulated by CsTTG1 is dependent on Mict Using yeast two-hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, we determined that CsTTG1 directly interacts with Mict. Collectively, our results indicate that CsTTG1 is an important component of the molecular network that regulates fruit bloom trichome and wart formation in cucumber. PMID:27208299

  1. DR1769, a Protein with N-Terminal Beta Propeller Repeats and a Low-Complexity Hydrophilic Tail, Plays a Role in Desiccation Tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S.

    2013-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m−2. These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions. PMID:23794625

  2. Strategy To Characterize the Number and Type of Repeating EPIYA Phosphorylation Motifs in the Carboxyl Terminus of CagA Protein in Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Panayotopoulou, Effrosini G.; Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Papadakos, Konstantinos; Kalliaropoulos, Antonios; Papatheodoridis, George; Mentis, Andreas F.; Archimandritis, Athanasios J.

    2007-01-01

    Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) diversity with regard to EPIYA-A, -B, -C, or -D phosphorylation motifs may play an important role in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis, and therefore determination of these motifs in H. pylori clinical isolates can become a useful prognostic tool. We propose a strategy for the accurate determination of CagA EPIYA motifs in clinical strains, based upon one-step PCR amplification using primers that flank the EPIYA coding region. We thus analyzed 135 H. pylori isolates derived from 75 adults and 60 children Greek patients. A total of 34 cases were found to be EPIYA PCR negative and were consequently verified as cagA negative by cagA-specific PCR, empty-site cagA PCR, and Western blotting. Sequencing of the remaining 101 PCR-positive amplicons confirmed that an accurate prediction of the number of EPIYA motifs on the basis of size distribution of the PCR products was feasible in all cases. Furthermore, our assay could identify closely related H. pylori subclones within the same patient, harboring different numbers of EPIYA repeats. The prevalence of CagA proteins with three EPIYA motifs (ABC) or four EPIYA motifs (ABCC) was the same within the adult and children groups. However, CagA species with more than four EPIYA motifs were observed exclusively within adults (8.6%), suggesting that CagA-positive strains may acquire additional EPIYA-C motifs throughout adulthood. Our strategy requires no initial cagA screening of the clinical isolates and can accurately predict the number of EPIYA repeats in single or multiple closely related subclones bearing different numbers of EPIYA motifs in their CagA, which may coexist within the same patient. PMID:17151214

  3. Genetic screen of a mutant poxvirus library identifies an ankyrin repeat protein involved in blocking induction of avian type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, Stephen M; Robey, Rebecca; Davies, Marc; Giotis, Efstathios S; Ross, Craig; Buttigieg, Karen; Goodbourn, Stephen; Skinner, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Mammalian poxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VACV), have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade the host type I interferon (IFN) responses at different levels, with viral proteins targeting IFN induction, signaling, and antiviral effector functions. Avian poxviruses (avipoxviruses), which have been developed as recombinant vaccine vectors for permissive (i.e., poultry) and nonpermissive (i.e., mammals, including humans) species, encode no obvious equivalents of any of these proteins. We show that fowlpox virus (FWPV) fails to induce chicken beta IFN (ChIFN2) and is able to block its induction by transfected poly(I·C), an analog of cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). A broad-scale loss-of-function genetic screen was used to find FWPV-encoded modulators of poly(I·C)-mediated ChIFN2 induction. It identified fpv012, a member of a family of poxvirus genes highly expanded in the avipoxviruses (31 in FWPV; 51 in canarypox virus [CNPV], representing 15% of the total gene complement), encoding proteins containing N-terminal ankyrin repeats (ANKs) and C-terminal F-box-like motifs. Under ectopic expression, the first ANK of fpv012 is dispensable for inhibitory activity and the CNPV ortholog is also able to inhibit induction of ChIFN2. FWPV defective in fpv012 replicates well in culture and barely induces ChIFN2 during infection, suggesting that other factors are involved in blocking IFN induction and resisting the antiviral effectors. Nevertheless, unlike parental and revertant viruses, the mutants induce moderate levels of expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), suggesting either that there is sufficient ChIFN2 expression to partially induce the ISGs or the involvement of alternative, IFN-independent pathways that are also normally blocked by fpv012. PMID:23427153

  4. Genetic screen of a library of chimeric poxviruses identifies an ankyrin repeat protein involved in resistance to the avian type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Buttigieg, Karen; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Ross, Craig; Davies, Marc; Goodbourn, Stephen; Skinner, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Viruses must be able to resist host innate responses, especially the type I interferon (IFN) response. They do so by preventing the induction or activity of IFN and/or by resisting the antiviral effectors that it induces. Poxviruses are no exception, with many mechanisms identified whereby mammalian poxviruses, notably, vaccinia virus (VACV), but also cowpox and myxoma viruses, are able to evade host IFN responses. Similar mechanisms have not been described for avian poxviruses (avipoxviruses). Restricted for permissive replication to avian hosts, they have received less attention; moreover, the avian host responses are less well characterized. We show that the prototypic avipoxvirus, fowlpox virus (FWPV), is highly resistant to the antiviral effects of avian IFN. A gain-of-function genetic screen identified fpv014 to contribute to increased resistance to exogenous recombinant chicken alpha IFN (ChIFN1). fpv014 is a member of the large family of poxvirus (especially avipoxvirus) genes that encode proteins containing N-terminal ankyrin repeats (ANKs) and C-terminal F-box-like motifs. By binding the Skp1/cullin-1 complex, the F box in such proteins appears to target ligands bound by the ANKs for ubiquitination. Mass spectrometry and immunoblotting demonstrated that tandem affinity-purified, tagged fpv014 was complexed with chicken cullin-1 and Skp1. Prior infection with an fpv014-knockout mutant of FWPV still blocked transfected poly(I·C)-mediated induction of the beta IFN (ChIFN2) promoter as effectively as parental FWPV, but the mutant was more sensitive to exogenous ChIFN1. Therefore, unlike the related protein fpv012, fpv014 does not contribute to the FWPV block to induction of ChIFN2 but does confer resistance to an established antiviral state. PMID:23427151

  5. Genetic Screen of a Mutant Poxvirus Library Identifies an Ankyrin Repeat Protein Involved in Blocking Induction of Avian Type I Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Robey, Rebecca; Davies, Marc; Giotis, Efstathios S.; Ross, Craig; Buttigieg, Karen; Goodbourn, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian poxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VACV), have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade the host type I interferon (IFN) responses at different levels, with viral proteins targeting IFN induction, signaling, and antiviral effector functions. Avian poxviruses (avipoxviruses), which have been developed as recombinant vaccine vectors for permissive (i.e., poultry) and nonpermissive (i.e., mammals, including humans) species, encode no obvious equivalents of any of these proteins. We show that fowlpox virus (FWPV) fails to induce chicken beta IFN (ChIFN2) and is able to block its induction by transfected poly(I·C), an analog of cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). A broad-scale loss-of-function genetic screen was used to find FWPV-encoded modulators of poly(I·C)-mediated ChIFN2 induction. It identified fpv012, a member of a family of poxvirus genes highly expanded in the avipoxviruses (31 in FWPV; 51 in canarypox virus [CNPV], representing 15% of the total gene complement), encoding proteins containing N-terminal ankyrin repeats (ANKs) and C-terminal F-box-like motifs. Under ectopic expression, the first ANK of fpv012 is dispensable for inhibitory activity and the CNPV ortholog is also able to inhibit induction of ChIFN2. FWPV defective in fpv012 replicates well in culture and barely induces ChIFN2 during infection, suggesting that other factors are involved in blocking IFN induction and resisting the antiviral effectors. Nevertheless, unlike parental and revertant viruses, the mutants induce moderate levels of expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), suggesting either that there is sufficient ChIFN2 expression to partially induce the ISGs or the involvement of alternative, IFN-independent pathways that are also normally blocked by fpv012. PMID:23427153

  6. Genetic Screen of a Library of Chimeric Poxviruses Identifies an Ankyrin Repeat Protein Involved in Resistance to the Avian Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Buttigieg, Karen; Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Ross, Craig; Davies, Marc; Goodbourn, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Viruses must be able to resist host innate responses, especially the type I interferon (IFN) response. They do so by preventing the induction or activity of IFN and/or by resisting the antiviral effectors that it induces. Poxviruses are no exception, with many mechanisms identified whereby mammalian poxviruses, notably, vaccinia virus (VACV), but also cowpox and myxoma viruses, are able to evade host IFN responses. Similar mechanisms have not been described for avian poxviruses (avipoxviruses). Restricted for permissive replication to avian hosts, they have received less attention; moreover, the avian host responses are less well characterized. We show that the prototypic avipoxvirus, fowlpox virus (FWPV), is highly resistant to the antiviral effects of avian IFN. A gain-of-function genetic screen identified fpv014 to contribute to increased resistance to exogenous recombinant chicken alpha IFN (ChIFN1). fpv014 is a member of the large family of poxvirus (especially avipoxvirus) genes that encode proteins containing N-terminal ankyrin repeats (ANKs) and C-terminal F-box-like motifs. By binding the Skp1/cullin-1 complex, the F box in such proteins appears to target ligands bound by the ANKs for ubiquitination. Mass spectrometry and immunoblotting demonstrated that tandem affinity-purified, tagged fpv014 was complexed with chicken cullin-1 and Skp1. Prior infection with an fpv014-knockout mutant of FWPV still blocked transfected poly(I·C)-mediated induction of the beta IFN (ChIFN2) promoter as effectively as parental FWPV, but the mutant was more sensitive to exogenous ChIFN1. Therefore, unlike the related protein fpv012, fpv014 does not contribute to the FWPV block to induction of ChIFN2 but does confer resistance to an established antiviral state. PMID:23427151

  7. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-03-16

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex. We report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. Our results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens.

  8. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-03-16

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex.more » We report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. Our results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens.« less

  9. Identification of Interacting Motifs Between Armadillo Repeat Containing 1 (ARC1) and Exocyst 70 A1 (Exo70A1) Proteins in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Hecui; Lian, Xiaoping; Converse, Richard; Zhu, Liquan

    2016-02-01

    In order to identify the functional domains which regulate the interaction between the self-incompatibility proteins armadillo repeat containing 1 (ARC1) and exocyst 70 A1 (Exo70A1) in Brassica oleracea, fragments containing selected motifs of ARC1 (ARC1210, ARC1246, ARC1279, ARC1354) and site-specific mutants with substitutions at possible interaction sites (ARC1354m, ARC1664m) were PCR amplified and inserted into pGADT7, while coding sequences from Exo70A1 (Exo70A185, Exo70A1) were subcloned into pGBKT7. The interactions between the protein products produced by these constructs were then analyzed utilizing a yeast two-hybrid system. Our data indicate that both ARC1210 and ARC1246 interact strongly with Exo70A185 and Exo70A1, while ARC1279, ARC1354, ARC1354m and ARC1664m exhibited a weak interaction, indicating that the recognition sites are located within the 210 N-terminal amino acids of ARC1 and the 85 N-terminal amino acids of Exo70A1. This was further verified by GST pull-down analysis. This supports a model in which the N-terminal leucine zipper of ARC1 and the first 85 N-terminal amino acids of Exo70A1 mediate the interaction between these two proteins. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these motifs were highly conserved across different species, indicating that the interaction characterized in B. oleracea may operate in a wide array of cultivars. PMID:26696546

  10. A conserved glutamate residue in the C-terminal deaminase domain of pentatricopeptide repeat proteins is required for RNA editing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael L; Dang, Kim N; Diaz, Michael F; Mulligan, R Michael

    2015-04-17

    Many transcripts expressed from plant organelle genomes are modified by C-to-U RNA editing. Nuclear encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins include an RNA binding domain that provides site specificity. In addition, many PPR proteins include a C-terminal DYW deaminase domain with characteristic zinc binding motifs (CXXC, HXE) and has recently been shown to bind zinc ions. The glutamate residue of the HXE motif is catalytically required in the reaction catalyzed by cytidine deaminase. In this work, we examine the activity of the DYW deaminase domain through truncation or mutagenesis of the HXE motif. OTP84 is required for editing three chloroplast sites, and transgenes expressing OTP84 with C-terminal truncations were capable of editing only one of the three cognate sites at high efficiency. These results suggest that the deaminase domain of OTP84 is required for editing two of the sites, but another deaminase is able to supply the deamination activity for the third site. OTP84 and CREF7 transgenes were mutagenized to replace the glutamate residue of the HXE motif, and transgenic plants expressing OTP84-E824A and CREF7-E554A were unable to efficiently edit the cognate editing sites for these genes. In addition, plants expressing CREF7-E554A exhibited substantially reduced capacity to edit a non-cognate site, rpoA C200. These results indicate that the DYW deaminase domains of PPR proteins are involved in editing their cognate editing sites, and in some cases may participate in editing additional sites in the chloroplast. PMID:25739442

  11. The Ancestral Gene for Transcribed, Low-Copy Repeats in the Prader-Willi/Angleman Region Encodes a Large Protein Implicated in Protein Trafficking that is Deficient in Mice with Neuromuscular and

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Transcribed, low-copy repeat elements are associated with the breakpoint regions of common deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. We report here the identification of the ancestral gene ( HERC2 ) and a family of duplicated, truncated copies that comprise these low-copy repeats. This gene encodes a highly conserved giant protein, HERC2, that is distantly related to p532 (HERC1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) implicated in vesicular trafficking. The mouse genome contains a single Herc2 locus, located in the jdf2 (juvenile development and fertility-2) interval of chromosome 7C. We have identified single nucleotide splice junction mutations in Herc2 in three independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced jdf2 mutant alleles, each leading to exon skipping with premature termination of translation and/or deletion of conserved amino acids. Therefore, mutations in Herc2 lead to the neuromuscular secretory vesicle and sperm acrosome defects, other developmental abnormalities and juvenile lethality of jdf2 mice. Combined, these findings suggest that HERC2 is an important gene encoding a GEF involved in protein trafficking and degradation pathways in the cell.

  12. A Single B-repeat of Staphylococcus epidermidis accumulation-associated protein induces protective immune responses in an experimental biomaterial-associated infection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Hongyan; Chiu, David; Bryers, James D

    2014-09-01

    Nosocomial infections are the fourth leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, resulting in 2 million infections and ∼100,000 deaths each year. More than 60% of these infections are associated with some type of biomedical device. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal bacterium of the human skin and is the most common nosocomial pathogen infecting implanted medical devices, especially those in the cardiovasculature. S. epidermidis antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation on inert surfaces make these infections hard to treat. Accumulation-associated protein (Aap), a cell wall-anchored protein of S. epidermidis, is considered one of the most important proteins involved in the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm. A small recombinant protein vaccine comprising a single B-repeat domain (Brpt1.0) of S. epidermidis RP62A Aap was developed, and the vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in vitro with a biofilm inhibition assay and in vivo in a murine model of biomaterial-associated infection. A high IgG antibody response against S. epidermidis RP62A was detected in the sera of the mice after two subcutaneous immunizations with Brpt1.0 coadministered with Freund's adjuvant. Sera from Brpt1.0-immunized mice inhibited in vitro S. epidermidis RP62A biofilm formation in a dose-dependent pattern. After receiving two immunizations, each mouse was surgically implanted with a porous scaffold disk containing 5 × 10(6) CFU of S. epidermidis RP62A. Weight changes, inflammatory markers, and histological assay results after challenge with S. epidermidis indicated that the mice immunized with Brpt1.0 exhibited significantly higher resistance to S. epidermidis RP62A implant infection than the control mice. Day 8 postchallenge, there was a significantly lower number of bacteria in scaffold sections and surrounding tissues and a lower residual inflammatory response to the infected scaffold disks for the Brpt1.0-immunized mice than for of the ovalbumin (Ova

  13. Orientia tsutsugamushi ankyrin repeat-containing protein family members are Type 1 secretion system substrates that traffic to the host cell endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    VieBrock, Lauren; Evans, Sean M.; Beyer, Andrea R.; Larson, Charles L.; Beare, Paul A.; Ge, Hong; Singh, Smita; Rodino, Kyle G.; Heinzen, Robert A.; Richards, Allen L.; Carlyon, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an understudied, potentially fatal infection that threatens one billion persons in the Asia-Pacific region. How the causative obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi, facilitates its intracellular survival and pathogenesis is poorly understood. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens utilize the Type 1 (T1SS) or Type 4 secretion system (T4SS) to translocate ankyrin repeat-containing proteins (Anks) that traffic to distinct subcellular locations and modulate host cell processes. The O. tsutsugamushi genome encodes one of the largest known bacterial Ank repertoires plus T1SS and T4SS components. Whether these potential virulence factors are expressed during infection, how the Anks are potentially secreted, and to where they localize in the host cell are not known. We determined that O. tsutsugamushi transcriptionally expresses 20 unique ank genes as well as genes for both T1SS and T4SS during infection of mammalian host cells. Examination of the Anks' C-termini revealed that the majority of them resemble T1SS substrates. Escherichia coli expressing a functional T1SS was able to secrete chimeric hemolysin proteins bearing the C-termini of 19 of 20 O. tsutsugamushi Anks in an HlyBD-dependent manner. Thus, O. tsutsugamushi Anks C-termini are T1SS-compatible. Conversely, Coxiella burnetii could not secrete heterologously expressed Anks in a T4SS-dependent manner. Analysis of the subcellular distribution patterns of 20 ectopically expressed Anks revealed that, while 6 remained cytosolic or trafficked to the nucleus, 14 localized to, and in some cases, altered the morphology of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study identifies O. tsutsugamushi Anks as T1SS substrates and indicates that many display a tropism for the host cell secretory pathway. PMID:25692099

  14. Identification and developmental expression of leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 6 (lgr6) in the medaka fish, Oryzias latipes.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Tomonori; Kawasaki, Takashi; Ohnishi, Hiroe; Yuba, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Toshio

    2012-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are critical regulators of diverse developmental processes such as oocyte maturation, fertilization, gastrulation, and organogenesis. To further study the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, we cloned and characterized the orphan leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 6 (LGR6), a stem cell marker in mammalian hair follicles, in medaka fish, Oryzias latipes. To examine the expression pattern of lgr6, we performed whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) during embryogenesis. The expression of lgr6 was first detected as a band in the anterior part of the posterior brain vesicle in 0.5-1 day post fertilization (dpf) embryos. This band disappeared by 2 dpf, but new signals appeared in the otic vesicles bordering the original band and also detected in the nasal placode and posterior lateral line primordia. At later stages (3-5 dpf), lgr6 was widely expressed in the brain, otic vesicle, neuromasts, root of the pectoral fin, cranial cartilage, and gut. Then, we conducted more detailed expression analysis of lgr6 in adult gut using WISH and immunohistochemical staining. Lgr6-positive cells were detected in the crypt-like proliferative zone and in parts of the villus. We also performed RT-PCR of mRNAs from different tissues. The lgr6 mRNA was found highest in the kidney and gill. The transcript was also present in the brain, heart, liver, spleen, intestine, skeletal muscle, testis, and ovary, similar to that of mammalian LGR6. These results suggest that medaka lgr6 plays an important role in organ development during embryogenesis and serves as a good molecular marker for future studies of postembryonic organ-specific development in mammals. PMID:22576653

  15. The LuWD40-1 gene encoding WD repeat protein regulates growth and pollen viability in flax (Linum Usitatissimum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Jordan, Mark C; Datla, Raju; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    As a crop, flax holds significant commercial value for its omega-3 rich oilseeds and stem fibres. Canada is the largest producer of linseed but there exists scope for significant yield improvements. Implementation of mechanisms such as male sterility can permit the development of hybrids to assist in achieving this goal. Temperature sensitive male sterility has been reported in flax but the leakiness of this system in field conditions limits the production of quality hybrid seeds. Here, we characterized a 2,588 bp transcript differentially expressed in male sterile lines of flax. The twelve intron gene predicted to encode a 368 amino acid protein has five WD40 repeats which, in silico, form a propeller structure with putative nucleic acid and histone binding capabilities. The LuWD40-1 protein localized to the nucleus and its expression increased during the transition and continued through the vegetative stages (seed, etiolated seedling, stem) while the transcript levels declined during reproductive development (ovary, anthers) and embryonic morphogenesis of male fertile plants. Knockout lines for LuWD40-1 in flax failed to develop shoots while overexpression lines showed delayed growth phenotype and were male sterile. The non-viable flowers failed to open and the pollen grains from these flowers were empty. Three independent transgenic lines overexpressing the LuWD40-1 gene had ∼80% non-viable pollen, reduced branching, delayed flowering and maturity compared to male fertile genotypes. The present study provides new insights into a male sterility mechanism present in flax. PMID:23935935

  16. Small kernel 1 encodes a pentatricopeptide repeat protein required for mitochondrial nad7 transcript editing and seed development in maize (Zea mays) and rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jie; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Hou, Mingming; Sun, Feng; Shen, Yun; Xiu, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Xiaomin; Chen, Zong-Liang; Sun, Samuel S M; Small, Ian; Tan, Bao-Cai

    2014-09-01

    RNA editing modifies cytidines (C) to uridines (U) at specific sites in the transcripts of mitochondria and plastids, altering the amino acid specified by the DNA sequence. Here we report the identification of a critical editing factor of mitochondrial nad7 transcript via molecular characterization of a small kernel 1 (smk1) mutant in Zea mays (maize). Mutations in Smk1 arrest both the embryo and endosperm development. Cloning of Smk1 indicates that it encodes an E-subclass pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein that is targeted to mitochondria. Loss of SMK1 function abolishes the C → U editing at the nad7-836 site, leading to the retention of a proline codon that is edited to encode leucine in the wild type. The smk1 mutant showed dramatically reduced complex-I assembly and NADH dehydrogenase activity, and abnormal biogenesis of the mitochondria. Analysis of the ortholog in Oryza sativa (rice) reveals that rice SMK1 has a conserved function in C → U editing of the mitochondrial nad7-836 site. T-DNA knock-out mutants showed abnormal embryo and endosperm development, resulting in embryo or seedling lethality. The leucine at NAD7-279 is highly conserved from bacteria to flowering plants, and analysis of genome sequences from many plants revealed a molecular coevolution between the requirement for C → U editing at this site and the existence of an SMK1 homolog. These results demonstrate that Smk1 encodes a PPR-E protein that is required for nad7-836 editing, and this editing is critical to NAD7 function in complex-I assembly in mitochondria, and hence to embryo and endosperm development in maize and rice. PMID:24923534

  17. Molecular Analysis of Alternative Transcripts of the Equine Cordon-Bleu WH2 Repeat Protein-Like 1 (COBLL1) Gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Woong; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Shin, Sangsu; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Nam-Young; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Do, Kyong-Tak; Song, Ki-Duk; Cho, Byung-Wook

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the alternative splicing in equine cordon-bleu WH2 repeat protein-like 1 (COBLL1) gene that was identified in horse muscle and blood leukocytes, and to predict functional consequences of alternative splicing by bioinformatics analysis. In a previous study, RNA-seq analysis predicted the presence of alternative spliced isoforms of equine COBLL1, namely COBLL1a as a long form and COBLL1b as a short form. In this study, we validated two isoforms of COBLL1 transcripts in horse tissues by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, and cloned them for Sanger sequencing. The sequencing results showed that the alternative splicing occurs at exon 9. Prediction of protein structure of these isoforms revealed three putative phosphorylation sites at the amino acid sequences encoded in exon 9, which is deleted in COBLL1b. In expression analysis, it was found that COBLL1b was expressed ubiquitously and equivalently in all the analyzed tissues, whereas COBLL1a showed strong expression in kidney, spinal cord and lung, moderate expression in heart and skeletal muscle, and low expression in thyroid and colon. In muscle, both COBLL1a and COBLL1b expression decreased after exercise. It is assumed that the regulation of COBLL1 expression may be important for regulating glucose level or switching of energy source, possibly through an insulin signaling pathway, in muscle after exercise. Further study is warranted to reveal the functional importance of COBLL1 on athletic performance in race horses. PMID:25925064

  18. Lower expression of PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) association with poor prognosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yachao; Deng, Jingyu; Zhang, Li; Xie, Xingming; Guo, Xiaofan; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Rupeng; Liang, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) in gastric cancer (GC), and its potential influence on the prognosis of GC patients. Methods: At present study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of PHLPP1 on tissue microarrays (TMAs) containing 135 gastric adenocarcinoma tissues and 135 matched adjacent non-tumor tissues. In addition, both semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting analysis (WB) were adopted to detect of the expression of PHLPP1 in the GC cell lines (AGS, SUN-1, KATO-III, BGC-823, MGC-803, SGC-7901, and HGC-27) and the normal gastric cell line GES-1. Survival analysis was used to investigate the efficiency of the prognostic evaluation of PHLPP1 expression in GC patients. Results: Positive expression rate of PHLPP1 in the primary GC tissues was significantly lower than that in adjacent non-tumor tissues (55.6% vs. 87.4%, P<0.001). Both gene transcription (mRNA) and Protein expression of PHLPP1 in the GC cell lines were significantly lower than those in the GES-1 cell line, respectively. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients presented PHLPP1 negative expression in the GC tissues had significantly lower overall survival rate than those presented PHLPP1 positive expression in the GC tissues (P=0.008). With the multivariate survival analysis (Cox regression), PHLPP1 expression in the GC tissue was identified as an independent predictor of the survival of patients. Conclusions: This study indicated that aberrant PHLPP1 expression was observed in GC tissues, which was significantly associated with the poor prognostic outcomes of GC patients. PMID:26884964

  19. Molecular Analysis of Alternative Transcripts of the Equine Cordon-Bleu WH2 Repeat Protein-Like 1 (COBLL1) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Woong; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Shin, Sangsu; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Nam-Young; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Do, Kyong-Tak; Song, Ki-Duk; Cho, Byung-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the alternative splicing in equine cordon-bleu WH2 repeat protein-like 1 (COBLL1) gene that was identified in horse muscle and blood leukocytes, and to predict functional consequences of alternative splicing by bioinformatics analysis. In a previous study, RNA-seq analysis predicted the presence of alternative spliced isoforms of equine COBLL1, namely COBLL1a as a long form and COBLL1b as a short form. In this study, we validated two isoforms of COBLL1 transcripts in horse tissues by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, and cloned them for Sanger sequencing. The sequencing results showed that the alternative splicing occurs at exon 9. Prediction of protein structure of these isoforms revealed three putative phosphorylation sites at the amino acid sequences encoded in exon 9, which is deleted in COBLL1b. In expression analysis, it was found that COBLL1b was expressed ubiquitously and equivalently in all the analyzed tissues, whereas COBLL1a showed strong expression in kidney, spinal cord and lung, moderate expression in heart and skeletal muscle, and low expression in thyroid and colon. In muscle, both COBLL1a and COBLL1b expression decreased after exercise. It is assumed that the regulation of COBLL1 expression may be important for regulating glucose level or switching of energy source, possibly through an insulin signaling pathway, in muscle after exercise. Further study is warranted to reveal the functional importance of COBLL1 on athletic performance in race horses. PMID:25925064

  20. CERBERUS, a novel U-box protein containing WD-40 repeats, is required for formation of the infection thread and nodule development in the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Yano, Koji; Shibata, Satoshi; Chen, Wen-Li; Sato, Shusei; Kaneko, Takakazu; Jurkiewicz, Anna; Sandal, Niels; Banba, Mari; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Kojima, Tomoko; Ohtomo, Ryo; Szczyglowski, Krzysztof; Stougaard, Jens; Tabata, Satoshi; Hayashi, Makoto; Kouchi, Hiroshi; Umehara, Yosuke

    2009-10-01

    Endosymbiotic infection of legume plants by Rhizobium bacteria is initiated through infection threads (ITs) which are initiated within and penetrate from root hairs and deliver the endosymbionts into nodule cells. Despite recent progress in understanding the mutual recognition and early symbiotic signaling cascades in host legumes, the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection processes and successive nodule organogenesis are still poorly understood. We isolated a novel symbiotic mutant of Lotus japonicus, cerberus, which shows defects in IT formation and nodule organogenesis. Map-based cloning of the causal gene allowed us to identify the CERBERUS gene, which encodes a novel protein containing a U-box domain and WD-40 repeats. CERBERUS expression was detected in the roots and nodules, and was enhanced after inoculation of Mesorhizobium loti. Strong expression was detected in developing nodule primordia and the infected zone of mature nodules. In cerberus mutants, Rhizobium colonized curled root hair tips, but hardly penetrated into root hair cells. The occasional ITs that were formed inside the root hair cells were mostly arrested within the epidermal cell layer. Nodule organogenesis was aborted prematurely, resulting in the formation of a large number of small bumps which contained no endosymbiotic bacteria. These phenotypic and genetic analyses, together with comparisons with other legume mutants with defects in IT formation, indicate that CERBERUS plays a critical role in the very early steps of IT formation as well as in growth and differentiation of nodules. PMID:19508425