Science.gov

Sample records for ray energy peak

  1. Energy peak: Back to the Galactic Center GeV gamma-ray excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel mechanism enabling us to have a continuum bump as a signature of gamma-ray excess in indirect detection experiments of dark matter (DM), postulating a generic dark sector having (at least) two DM candidates. With the assumption of non-zero mass gap between the two DM candidates, the heavier one directly communicates to the partner of the lighter one. Such a partner then decays into a lighter DM particle along with an "axion-like" particle (ALP) or dark "pion", which subsequently decays into a pair of photons, via a more-than-one step cascade decay process. Since the cascade is initiated by the dark partner obtaining a non-trivial fixed boost factor, a continuum γ-ray energy spectrum naturally arises even with a particle directly decaying into two photons. We apply the main idea to the energy spectrum of the GeV γ-rays from around the Galactic Center (GC), and find that the relevant observational data is well-reproduced by the theory expectation predicted by the proposed mechanism. Remarkably, the relevant energy spectrum has a robust peak at half the mass of the ALP or dark pion, as opposed to popular DM models directly annihilating to Standard Model particles where physical interpretations of the energy peak are not manifest. Our data analysis reports substantially improved fits, compared to those annihilating DM models, and ∼ 900 MeV mass of the ALP or dark pion.

  2. X-ray Emission of Low-Energy-Peaked BL Lacertae Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, Jill M.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2009-12-18

    Presented here is an analysis of X-ray observations of the following seven low-energy-peaked BL Lacertae objects: BL Lacertae, S5 0716+71, W Comae, 3C 66A, S4 0954+65, OJ 287, and AO 0235+16. The spectral data for these objects were taken from observations by the XMM-Newton and/or Chandra X-ray observatories. These objects are being analyzed in an effort to reanalyze all XMM-Newton and Chandra data of low-energy BL Lacs, similar to the efforts of Perlman et al.[4] for high energy BL Lacs. The objects were studied in an effort to understand the nature of the X-ray and multi-waveband emissions in these objects, study the shape of the spectra, and compare the observations of low-energy-peaked BL Lacs to previous observations of these objects and also to observations of high-energy-peaked BL Lacs. Light curves and spectra were analyzed to look for evidence of spectral variability in the objects and as a comparison to previous research on these objects. Most data shows both synchrotron and Inverse-Compton emission, though only little correlation was seen between the emission strength and the spectral slope. Our data is generally well-fitted to a broken power law model with distinct bimodality seen in the first spectral index (six observations with {Gamma}{sub 1{approx}}0.4 and four observations with {Gamma}{sub 1{approx}}3.0), a break in energy between 0.6 and 1.4 keV, and a second spectral index {Gamma}{sub 2{approx}}2.0. None of the observations showed spectral lines, which is consistent with past results. For S5 0716+71 the XMM-Newton X-ray and optical data, along with radio data obtained from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO), a spectral energy distribution was created and peak frequencies were estimated.

  3. ON THERMALIZATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS AND THE PEAK ENERGIES OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Vurm, Indrek; Piran, Tsvi; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2013-02-20

    The low-energy spectral slopes of the prompt emission of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are difficult to reconcile with radiatively efficient optically thin emission models irrespective of the radiation mechanism. An alternative is to ascribe the radiation around the spectral peak to a thermalization process occurring well inside the Thomson photosphere. This quasi-thermal spectrum can evolve into the observed non-thermal shape by additional energy release at moderate to small Thomson optical depths, which can readily give rise to the hard spectral tail. The position of the spectral peak is determined by the temperature and Lorentz factor of the flow in the thermalization zone, where the total number of photons carried by the jet is established. To reach thermalization, dissipation alone is not sufficient and photon generation requires an efficient emission/absorption process in addition to scattering. We perform a systematic study of all relevant photon production mechanisms searching for possible conditions in which thermalization can take place. We find that a significant fraction of the available energy should be dissipated at intermediate radii, {approx}10{sup 10} to a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm, and the flow there should be relatively slow: the bulk Lorentz factor could not exceed a few tens for all but the most luminous bursts with the highest E {sub pk} values. The least restrictive constraint for successful thermalization, {Gamma} {approx}< 20, is obtained if synchrotron emission acts as the photon source. This requires, however, a non-thermal acceleration deep below the Thomson photosphere transferring a significant fraction of the flow energy to relativistic electrons with Lorentz factors between 10 and 100. Other processes require bulk flow Lorentz factors of order of a few for typical bursts. We examine the implications of these results to different GRB photospheric emission models.

  4. GRPANL: a program for fitting complex peak groupings for gamma and x-ray energies and intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnink, R.; Ruhter, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    GRPANL is a general-purpose peak-fitting program that calculates gamma-ray and x-ray energies and intensities from a given spectral region. The program requires that the user supply input information such as the first and last channels of the region, the channels to be used as pre- and post-region background, the system gain and zero-intercept, and a list of approximate energy values at which peaks occur in the region. Because the peak position and peak-shape parameters enter nonlinearly into the peak-fitting algorithm, an iterative least-square procedure is used in the fitting process. The program iterates until either all convergence criteria are met or ten iterations have elapsed. The code described here allows for twenty free parameters and a region as large as 240 data channels. This code runs on an LSI-11 computer with 32K memory and disk-storage capability.

  5. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Amati, L.; Frontera, F.; Margutti, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. Aims: We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. Methods: We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long GRBs with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,i of the time-averaged ν Fν spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope α detected with Swift, Fermi and past spacecraft. The PDS were modelled with a power law either with or without a break adopting a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. Results: We find a highly significant Ep,i-α anti-correlation. The null hypothesis probability is ~10-9. Conclusions: In the framework of the internal shock synchrotron model, the Ep,i-α anti-correlation can hardly be reconciled with the predicted Ep,i ∝ Γ-2, unless either variable microphysical parameters of the shocks or continual electron acceleration are assumed. Alternatively, in the context of models based on magnetic reconnection, the PDS slope and Ep,i are linked to the ejecta magnetisation at the dissipation site, so that more magnetised outflows would produce more variable GRB light curves at short timescales (≲1 s), shallower PDS, and higher values of Ep,i. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  6. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Amati, L.; Frontera, F.; Margutti, R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. Aims: We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. Methods: We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long GRBs with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,i of the time-averaged ν Fν spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope α detected with Swift, Fermi and past spacecraft. The PDS were modelled with a power law either with or without a break adopting a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. Results: We find a highly significant Ep,i-α anti-correlation. The null hypothesis probability is ~10-9. Conclusions: In the framework of the internal shock synchrotron model, the Ep,i-α anti-correlation can hardly be reconciled with the predicted Ep,i ∝ Γ-2, unless either variable microphysical parameters of the shocks or continual electron acceleration are assumed. Alternatively, in the context of models based on magnetic reconnection, the PDS slope and Ep,i are linked to the ejecta magnetisation at the dissipation site, so that more magnetised outflows would produce more variable GRB light curves at short timescales (≲1 s), shallower PDS, and higher values of Ep,i. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  7. Computation of full energy peak efficiency for nuclear power plant radioactive plume using remote scintillation gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grozdov, D S; Kolotov, V P; Lavrukhin, Yu E

    2016-04-01

    A method of full energy peak efficiency estimation in the space around scintillation detector, including the presence of a collimator, has been developed. It is based on a mathematical convolution of the experimental results with the following data extrapolation. The efficiency data showed the average uncertainty less than 10%. Software to calculate integral efficiency for nuclear power plant plume was elaborated. The paper also provides results of nuclear power plant plume height estimation by analysis of the spectral data. PMID:26774388

  8. Fermi LAT detection of increasing GeV gamma-ray activity from the high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the very-high energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 (also known as TXS 1959+650 and 3FGL J2000.0+6509, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with radio coordinates (J2000) R.A.: 299.999384 deg, Dec.: 65.148514 deg (Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source has a redshift z=0.047 (Schachter et al. 1993, ApJ, 412, 541).

  9. The X-ray behaviour of the high-energy peaked BL Lacertae source PKS 2155-304 in the 0.3-10 keV band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, B.; Romano, P.; Vercellone, S.; Kapanadze, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of our monitoring of the high-energy peaked BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during 2005-2012. Our timing study shows that the source was highly variable both on longer (weeks-to-months) and intra-day time-scales, up to a factor of 7 in flux, and 30 per cent in fractional variability amplitudes, with no periodic variations. The X-ray spectra are mainly curved with broad ranges of photon index, curvature parameter, and hardness ratio which exhibit significant variability with the flux on different time-scales. Our study of multi-wavelength cross-correlations has revealed that the one-zone SSC scenario seems to be valid for the most optical-to-gamma-ray flares observed during 2006-2012. An `orphan' X-ray flare with no counterpart in other spectral bands suggests the existence of different electron populations. Based on the absence of a correlation between photon index and curvature parameter (expected from the energy-dependent acceleration probability scenario), the observed distribution of curvature parameter from the XRT spectra peaking at b = 0.37, and the observed anti-correlation between the curvature parameter and the 0.3-10 keV flux (i.e. lower curvatures in flaring states), we conclude that the most likely mechanism responsible for producing X-ray emission during the flares is the stochastic acceleration of the electrons.

  10. Experimental investigation of the multiple scatter peak of gamma rays in portland cement in the energy range 279-1332 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tejbir; Singh, Parjit S.

    2011-12-01

    The pulse height spectra for different thicknesses of portland cement in the reflected geometry has been recorded with the help of a NaI(Tl) scintillator detector and 2 K MCA card using different gamma-ray sources such as Hg203 (279 keV), Cs137 (662 keV) and Co60 (1173 and 1332 keV). It has been observed that the multiple scatter peak for portland cement appears at 110 (±7) keV in all the spectra irrespective of different incident photon energies in the range 279-1332 keV from different gamma-ray sources. Further, the variation in the intensity of the multiple scatter peak with the thickness of portland cement in the backward semi-cylinders has been investigated.

  11. Automatic Peak Identification in Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDS) Microanalysis: Can You Always Trust the Results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, D.

    2006-05-01

    The degree of sophistication of computer-aided scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) microanalysis has advanced to the point where it is possible with a single command to automatically perform sequential qualitative analysis (peak identification) and quantitative analysis and then create a report of analysis with full statistical support. Often the actual algorithms employed in commercial software for each stage of the analysis are not provided or tested in sufficient detail nor are any inherent limitations in applying such "black box" software described to enable the analyst to estimate the performance. The identification of the elements responsible for the characteristic peaks in the EDS spectrum is obviously the first critical step in performing a robust analysis. Can the software be trusted to always deliver the correct elemental identification for the easiest possible case: peaks with high intensity and high peak-to-background that arise from major constituents (i.e., concentration, C above 0.1 mass fraction = 10 weight percent) and which do not suffer peak interference from another constituent? Unfortunately, testing of automatic peak identification procedures in a series of commercial systems has revealed that serious mistakes occur approximately 3 to 5 percent of the time for this easiest case [1]. Moreover, these mistakes are not random but occur systematically for certain elements. The situation is even worse when minor (C from 0.01 to 0.1) and trace (C less than 0.01) constituents are of interest or when analysis is performed under "low voltage" conditions (beam energy 5 keV or less). The prudent analyst will always use manual peak identification procedures to provide confirmation of automatic peak identification results before proceeding to quantitative analysis [2]. [1] Newbury, D., Microscopy and Microanalysis, 11 (2005) 545. [2] Goldstein, J., Newbury, D., Joy, D., Lyman, C., Echlin, P., Lifshin, E., Sawyer, L

  12. Fermi-LAT, FACT, MAGIC and VERITAS detection of increasing gamma-ray activity from the high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.; Magill, J. D.; Dorner, D.; Biland, A.; Mirzoyan, R.; Mukherjee, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Fermi-LAT, FACT, MAGIC and VERITAS collaborations report the detection of enhanced gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the very-high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 (a.k.a 3FGL J2000.0+6509, in the 3rd LAT source catalog, 3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with radio coordinates (J2000) R.A.: 299.999384 deg, Dec.: 65.148514 deg (Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source has a redshift z=0.047 (Schachter et al. 1993, ApJ, 412, 541).

  13. Chemical Analysis of Reaction Rims on Olivine Crystals in Natural Samples of Black Dacite Using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Lassen Peak, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Lassen Volcanic Center is the southernmost volcanic region in the Cascade volcanic arc formed by the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Lassen Peak last erupted in 1915 in an arc related event producing a black dacite material containing xenocrystic olivine grains with apparent orthopyroxene reaction rims. The reaction rims on these olivine grains are believed to have formed by reactions that ensued from a mixing/mingling event that occurred prior to eruption between the admixed mafic andesitic magma and a silicic dacite host material. Natural samples of the 1915 black dacite from Lassen Peak, CA were prepared into 15 polished thin sections and carbon coated for analysis using a FEI Quanta 250 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to identify and measure mineral textures and disequilibrium reaction rims. Observed mineralogical textures related to magma mixing include biotite and amphibole grains with apparent dehydration/breakdown rims, pyroxene-rimmed quartz grains, high concentration of microlites in glass matrix, and pyroxene/amphibole reaction rims on olivine grains. Olivine dissolution is evidenced as increased iron concentration toward convolute edges of olivine grains as observed by Backscatter Electron (BSE) imagery and elemental mapping using NSS spectral imaging software. In an attempt to quantify the area of reaction rim growth on olivine grains within these samples, high-resolution BSE images of 30 different olivine grains were collected along with Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) of different phases. Olivine cores and rims were extracted from BSE images using Photoshop and saved as separate image files. ImageJ software was used to calculate the area (μm2) of the core and rim of these grains. Average pyroxene reaction rim width for 30 grains was determined to be 11.68+/-1.65 μm. Rim widths of all 30 grains were averaged together to produce an overall average rim width for the Lassen Peak black dacite. By quantifying the reaction rims on olivine grains

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peak assignment for perfluoropolyether oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, Shigeyuki; Morales, Wilfredo

    1990-01-01

    Perfluoroalkylpolyether (PFPE) oils are increasingly being used as vacuum pump oils and as lubricants for magnetic recording media and instrumentation for satellites. In this paper, the relative binding energies of three PFPE oils are determined. When sample oils are continuously irradiated during X-ray spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, the relative peak intensity of the spectra is altered significantly, indicating that gaseous products form from the oils during XPS measurements. Thus, attention should be paid to chemical changes when XPE is used to characterize fluorinated carbons such as PFPE oils.

  15. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  16. Calculation of the decision threshold in gamma-ray spectrometry using sum peaks.

    PubMed

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2016-03-01

    In the presence of radon daughters, gamma rays from (88)Y with energies at 898.0keV or 1836.1keV appear on a high, continuous background or overlap with other peaks. Therefore a calculation of the decision threshold from the sum peak at 2734.1keV represents a useful alternative, because here the continuous background is low. The decision threshold calculated from this peak can attain a value being comparable to the decision threshold calculated from the gamma-ray peak at 898.0keV. PMID:26625726

  17. A practical method for determining γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency considering coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections for the measurement of environmental samples after the Fukushima reactor accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Oba, Yurika; Takada, Momo

    2016-09-01

    A method for determining the γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency at positions close to three Ge detectors and at the well port of a well-type detector was developed for measuring environmental volume samples containing 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K. The efficiency was estimated by considering two correction factors: coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections. The coincidence-summing correction for a cascade transition nuclide was estimated by an experimental method involving measuring a sample at the far and close positions of a detector. The derived coincidence-summing correction factors were compared with those of analytical and Monte Carlo simulation methods and good agreements were obtained. Differences in the matrix of the calibration source and the environmental sample resulted in an increase or decrease of the full-energy peak counts due to the self-absorption of γ-rays in the sample. The correction factor was derived as a function of the densities of several matrix materials. The present method was applied to the measurement of environmental samples and also low-level radioactivity measurements of water samples using the well-type detector.

  18. 2009 Observations of X-rays at South Baldy Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, J.; Millan, R.

    2009-12-01

    Observations of x-rays were made using two scintillator detectors (a 3x3 in. NaI crystal and a 1.5x1.5 in. LaBr(Ce) crystal) atop South Baldy Peak, New Mexico from July until September in an attempt to observe x-ray emissions from lightning strikes. It has been observed previously that accelerated electrons in lightning produce Bremsstrahlung that can be seen with ground detectors. The output of the two detectors was digitized without the use of pre-amplification to preserve pulse shapes during high count rate events. Being presented is data from these observations as well as comparisons of analysis techniques that can be used to decompose simple output pulses from scintillator detectors.

  19. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 1054 erg of energy isotropically (Eiso) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ˜ 0.01 up to ˜ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (Ep,i) and the "intensity" is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the Ep,i - Eiso correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density ΩM being ˜ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of Ep,i with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of ΩM. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  20. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2015-12-17

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 10{sup 54} erg of energy isotropically (E{sub iso}) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ∼ 0.01 up to ∼ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (E{sub p,i}) and the “intensity” is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the E{sub p,i} – E{sub iso} correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density Ω{sub M} being ∼ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of E{sub p,i} with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of Ω{sub M}. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  1. Using computational modeling to compare X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda Cassiano, Deisemar; Arruda Correa, Samanda Cristine; de Souza, Edmilson Monteiro; da Silva, Ademir Xaxier; Pereira Peixoto, José Guilherme; Tadeu Lopes, Ricardo

    2014-02-01

    The Practical Peak Voltage-PPV has been adopted to measure the voltage applied to an X-ray tube. The PPV was recommended by the IEC document and accepted and published in the TRS no. 457 code of practice. The PPV is defined and applied to all forms of waves and is related to the spectral distribution of X-rays and to the properties of the image. The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. An X-ray tube for Dental Radiology (operated from a single phase power supply) and an X-ray tube used as a reference (supplied from a constant potential power supply) were used in simulations across the energy range of interest of 40 kV to 100 kV. Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the tubes involved.

  2. EFFECT OF SATELLITE LINES FROM X-RAY SOURCE ON X-RAY DIFFRACTION PEAKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses the development of a method for relating reactivity to crystallite size and strain parameters obtained by the Warren-Averbach technique. PA has been using crystallite size and strain data obtained from x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak profile analysis to predict...

  3. Energy rays tracking device

    SciTech Connect

    Monk, R.J.

    1981-05-12

    An energy rays tracking device includes a receiver for fixing a position relative to the direction of maximum energy rays, a prime mover for maintaining the alignment of the receiver and an energy rays user, an energy rays tracker for controlling the power to the prime mover in response to the receiver, a timed tracker for controlling the prime mover when the energy rays tracker is not functioning due to energy rays being too diffused, an energy sensitive element for detecting the presence or absence of energy rays, and a power controller responsive to the energy sensitive element for repositioning the receiver and the energy rays user for the following period of tracking is disclosed. The receiver includes an enclosure which only allows a selected pattern of direct rays to penetrate into the enclosure. A razor sharp edge at the opening of the enclosure maintains the outermost direct energy rays undiffused. A differential sensor sensitive to direct energy rays is installed inside the enclosure for determining the direction of the direct energy rays. In an application for tracking the sun, the time tracker uses a piecewise linear method of tracking. In the return cycle during the night, the return is interspersed with a wash cycle for cleaning the energy rays user.

  4. Peak fitting and identification software library for high resolution gamma-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Josef; Roach, Greg; Tickner, James

    2010-07-01

    A new gamma-ray spectral analysis software package is under development in our laboratory. It can be operated as a stand-alone program or called as a software library from Java, C, C++ and MATLAB TM environments. It provides an advanced graphical user interface for data acquisition, spectral analysis and radioisotope identification. The code uses a peak-fitting function that includes peak asymmetry, Compton continuum and flexible background terms. Peak fitting function parameters can be calibrated as functions of energy. Each parameter can be constrained to improve fitting of overlapping peaks. All of these features can be adjusted by the user. To assist with peak identification, the code can automatically measure half-lives of single or multiple overlapping peaks from a time series of spectra. It implements library-based peak identification, with options for restricting the search based on radioisotope half-lives and reaction types. The software also improves the reliability of isotope identification by utilizing Monte-Carlo simulation results.

  5. Time-Resolved Imaging of Cryogenic Target X-Ray Emission at Peak Compression on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Michel, D. T.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-10-01

    This talk will describe the measurements of cryogenic target region size and time history inferred from the combination of a high-speed x-ray framing camera and two time-integrating x-ray microscopes. The high-speed framing camera infers the time of peak stagnation from pinhole images taken at 30-ps time intervals with 30-ps frame times and with ~15 μm resolution. The two Kirkpatrick-Baez-type x-ray microscopes have spatial resolutions of ~5 μm and ~7 μm respectively, and are currently time integrating. The inferred x-ray core size and emission time interval will be compared to the measured neutron emission time and to simulations of the experiments. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  6. Calculation of the decision thresholds for radionuclides identified in gamma-ray spectra by post-processing peak analysis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korun, Matjaž; Vodenik, Branko; Zorko, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    A method for calculating the decision thresholds for gamma-ray emitters, identified in gamma-ray spectrometric analyses, is described. The method is suitable for application in computerized spectra-analyzing procedures. In the calculation, the number of counts and the uncertainty in the number of counts for the peaks associated with the emitter are used. The method makes possible to calculate decision thresholds from peaks on a curved background and overlapping peaks. The uncertainty in the number of counts used in the calculation was computed using Canberra's Standard Peak Search Program (Canberra, 1986, Peak Search Algorithm Manual 07-0064). For isolated peaks, the decision threshold exceeds the value calculated from the channel contents in an energy region that is 2.5 FWHM wide, covering the background in the immediate vicinity of the peak. The decision thresholds vary by approximately 20% over a dynamic range of peak areas of about 1000. In the case of overlapping peaks, the decision threshold increases considerably. For multi-gamma-ray emitters, a common decision threshold is calculated from the decision thresholds obtained from individual gamma-ray emissions, being smaller than the smallest of the individual decision thresholds.

  7. Off-peak electric energy for poultry feed processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Off-peak electric energy can be used for poultry feed processing, achieving substantial reduction in electric energy cost. In addition, high efficiency equipment and conservation measures add to energy cost savings. Careful planning and evaluation of time-of-use rates can maximize the savings for each type of enterprise.

  8. PLEIADES: High Peak Brightness, Subpicosecond Thomson Hard-X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuba, J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Harteman, F V; Le Sage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-12-15

    The Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) facility, is a unique, novel, tunable (10-200 keV), ultrafast (ps-fs), hard x-ray source that greatly extends the parameter range reached by existing 3rd generation sources, both in terms of x-ray energy range, pulse duration, and peak brightness at high energies. First light was observed at 70 keV early in 2003, and the experimental data agrees with 3D codes developed at LLNL. The x-rays are generated by the interaction of a 50 fs Fourier-transform-limited laser pulse produced by the TW-class FALCON CPA laser and a highly focused, relativistic (20-100 MeV), high brightness (1 nC, 0.3-5 ps, 5 mm.mrad, 0.2% energy spread) photo-electron bunch. The resulting x-ray brightness is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} ph/mm{sup 2}/s/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW. The beam is well-collimated (10 mrad divergence over the full spectrum, 1 mrad for a single color), and the source is a unique tool for time-resolved dynamic measurements in matter, including high-Z materials.

  9. Determination of the diagnostic x-ray tube practical peak voltage (PPV) from average or average peak voltage measurements.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, C J

    2011-04-01

    The practical peak voltage (PPV) has been adopted as the reference measuring quantity for the x-ray tube voltage. However, the majority of commercial kV-meter models measure the average peak, Ū(P), the average, Ū, the effective, U(eff) or the maximum peak, U(P) tube voltage. This work proposed a method for determination of the PPV from measurements with a kV-meter that measures the average Ū or the average peak, Ū(p) voltage. The kV-meter reading can be converted to the PPV by applying appropriate calibration coefficients and conversion factors. The average peak k(PPV,kVp) and the average k(PPV,Uav) conversion factors were calculated from virtual voltage waveforms for conventional diagnostic radiology (50-150 kV) and mammography (22-35 kV) tube voltages and for voltage ripples from 0% to 100%. Regression equation and coefficients provide the appropriate conversion factors at any given tube voltage and ripple. The influence of voltage waveform irregularities, like 'spikes' and pulse amplitude variations, on the conversion factors was investigated and discussed. The proposed method and the conversion factors were tested using six commercial kV-meters at several x-ray units. The deviations between the reference and the calculated-according to the proposed method-PPV values were less than 2%. Practical aspects on the voltage ripple measurement were addressed and discussed. The proposed method provides a rigorous base to determine the PPV with kV-meters from Ū(p) and Ū measurement. Users can benefit, since all kV-meters, irrespective of their measuring quantity, can be used to determine the PPV, complying with the IEC standard requirements. PMID:21403184

  10. Volume ray casting with peak finding and differential sampling.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Aaron; Hijazi, Younis; Westerteiger, Rolf; Schott, Mathias; Hansen, Charles; Hagen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Direct volume rendering and isosurfacing are ubiquitous rendering techniques in scientific visualization, commonly employed in imaging 3D data from simulation and scan sources. Conventionally, these methods have been treated as separate modalities, necessitating different sampling strategies and rendering algorithms. In reality, an isosurface is a special case of a transfer function, namely a Dirac impulse at a given isovalue. However, artifact-free rendering of discrete isosurfaces in a volume rendering framework is an elusive goal, requiring either infinite sampling or smoothing of the transfer function. While preintegration approaches solve the most obvious deficiencies in handling sharp transfer functions, artifacts can still result, limiting classification. In this paper, we introduce a method for rendering such features by explicitly solving for isovalues within the volume rendering integral. In addition, we present a sampling strategy inspired by ray differentials that automatically matches the frequency of the image plane, resulting in fewer artifacts near the eye and better overall performance. These techniques exhibit clear advantages over standard uniform ray casting with and without preintegration, and allow for high-quality interactive volume rendering with sharp C0 transfer functions. PMID:19834235

  11. Electron beam stability and beam peak to peak motion data for NSLS X-Ray storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.

    1993-07-01

    In the past two years, a significant reduction in electron beam motion has been achieved at the NSLS X-Ray storage ring. The implementation of global analog orbit feedbacks, based on a harmonics correction scheme, has reduced the beam motion globally. Implementation of six local analog feedback systems has reduced the beam motion even further at the corresponding beam line straight sections. This paper presents beam motion measurements, showing the improvement due to the feedback systems. Beam motion is measured using a spectrum analyzer and data is presented at various frequencies, where peaks were observed. Finally, some of the beam motion sources are discussed.

  12. Peak Oil and Energy Independence: Myth and Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, James W.; Hansen, Jim

    2013-07-01

    Despite the recent uptick in production of natural gas and liquid fuels in the United States, increasing energy resource scarcity and reliance on unconventional fossil fuel sources will make energy independence for the nation very unlikely. Rather, geologists, economists, environmentalists, and resource managers are looking with interest at when the use of fossil fuels is expected to peak—will that occurrence be driven by the market or by supply? What level will emissions reach before this peak is reached?

  13. Origins of sp(3)C peaks in C1s X-ray Photoelectron Spectra of Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ayaka; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Koinuma, Michio; Sato, Satoshi

    2016-06-21

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is among the most powerful techniques to analyze defective structures of carbon materials such as graphene and activated carbon. However, reported assignments of defects, especially sp(3)C and sp(2)C, are questionable. Most reports assign sp(3)C peaks to be higher than sp(2)C peaks, whereas a few reports assign sp(3)C peaks to be lower than sp(2)C peaks. Our group previously reported that calculated binding energies of sp(3)C were basically lower than those of sp(2)C. This work clarified that one of the reasons for the prevailing ambiguous assignments of sp(3)C peaks is charging effects of diamond. PMID:27264720

  14. Molten salt thermal energy storage for utility peaking loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, A.; Haslett, R.; Joyce, J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the use of thermal energy storage (TES) in molten salts to increase the capacity of power plants. Five existing fossil and nuclear electric utility plants were selected as representative of current technology. A review of system load diagrams indicated that TES to meet loads over 95% of peak was a reasonable goal. Alternate TES heat exchanger locations were evaluated, showing that the stored energy should be used either for feedwater heating or to generate steam for an auxiliary power cycle. Specific salts for each concept are recommended. Design layouts were prepared for one plant, and it was shown that a TES tube/shell heat exchanger system could provide about 7% peaking capability at lower cost than adding steam generation capacity. Promising alternate heat exchanger concepts were also identified.

  15. X-ray peak broadening studies of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite by Williamson-Hall analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswarlu, K.; Chandra Bose, A.; Rameshbabu, N.

    2010-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles were prepared by microwave synthesis method and the obtained powder is annealed at 800 °C for 2 h. The annealed HA particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods. The HA size and morphology were examined using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The XRD results reveal that the diffraction peaks of the annealed HA were of well crystalline and correspond to the hexagonal crystal structure. The XRD and FTIR results confirm the absence of secondary phases such as β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and calcium oxide in annealed HA particles. The TEM result confirms the hexagonal structure of annealed HA and the particles were observed to be of ellipsoid-like shaped morphology with less agglomeration. The lattice strain, crystallite size, lattice deformation stress and deformation energy density for annealed (800 °C) HA nanoparticles were estimated by Williamson-Hall-isotropic strain model ( W- H-ISM), W-H-anisotropic strain model ( W- H-ASM) and W-H-energy density model ( W- H-EDM) based on Williamson-Hall ( W- H) plot from powder X-ray diffraction data. The results of estimated average crystallite size of annealed HA by Scherrer and W- H plot methods were compared with TEM results. It is found that the average crystallite size measured by W- H plot methods is in good agreement with TEM results.

  16. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH A CONSTRAINED PEAK X-RAY FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Trevor A.; Testa, Paola; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2013-06-20

    We present an analysis of soft X-ray (SXR) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations of solar flares with an approximate C8 Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) class. Our constraint on peak GOES SXR flux allows for the investigation of correlations between various flare parameters. We show that the duration of the decay phase of a flare is proportional to the duration of its rise phase. Additionally, we show significant correlations between the radiation emitted in the flare rise and decay phases. These results suggest that the total radiated energy of a given flare is proportional to the energy radiated during the rise phase alone. This partitioning of radiated energy between the rise and decay phases is observed in both SXR and EUV wavelengths. Though observations from the EUV Variability Experiment show significant variation in the behavior of individual EUV spectral lines during different C8 events, this work suggests that broadband EUV emission is well constrained. Furthermore, GOES and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data allow us to determine several thermal parameters (e.g., temperature, volume, density, and emission measure) for the flares within our sample. Analysis of these parameters demonstrate that, within this constrained GOES class, the longer duration solar flares are cooler events with larger volumes capable of emitting vast amounts of radiation. The shortest C8 flares are typically the hottest events, smaller in physical size, and have lower associated total energies. These relationships are directly comparable with several scaling laws and flare loop models.

  17. High peak power diode stacks for high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, Viorel C.; Vethake, Thilo; Jiang, John; Roff, Robert; Shih, Ming; Duck, Richard; Bauer, Marc; Mite, Roberto; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2015-02-01

    High energy solid state lasers are being developed for fusion experiments and other research applications where high energy per pulse is required but the repetition rate is rather low, around 10Hz. We report our results on high peak power diode laser stacks used as optical pumps for these lasers. The stacks are based on 10 mm bars with 4 mm cavity length and 55% fill factor, with peak power exceeding 500 W per bar. These bars are stacked and mounted on a cooler which provides backside cooling and electrical insulation. Currently we mount 25 bars per cooler for a nominal peak power of 12.5 kW, but in principle the mounting scheme can be scaled to a different number of devices depending on the application. Pretesting of these bars before soldering on the cooler enables us to select devices with similar wavelength and thus we maintain tight control of the spectral width (FWHM less than 6 nm). Fine adjustments of the centroid wavelength can be done by means of temperature of the cooling fluid or bias current. The available wavelength range spans from 880 nm to 1000 nm, and the wavelength of the entire assembly of stacks can be controlled to within 0.5 nm of the target value, which makes these stacks suitable for pumping a variety of gain media. The devices are fast axis collimated, with over 95% power being collimated in 6 mrad (full angle). The slow axis divergence is 9° (full angle) for 95% power content.

  18. Using energy peaks to measure new particle masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin

    2014-11-01

    We discussed in arXiv:1209.0772 that the laboratory frame distribution of the energy of a massless particle from a two-body decay at a hadron collider has a peak whose location is identical to the value of this daughter's (fixed) energy in the rest frame of the corresponding mother particle. For that result to hold we assumed that the mother is unpolarized and has a generic boost distribution in the laboratory frame. In this work we discuss how this observation can be applied for determination of masses of new particles, with out requiring a full reconstruction of their decay chains or information about the rest of the event. We focus on a two-step cascade decay of a massive particle that has one invisible particle in the final state: C → Bb → Aab, where C, B and A are new particles of which A is invisible and a, b are visible particles. Combining the measurements of the peaks of energy distributions of a and b with that of the edge in their invariant mass distribution, we demonstrate that it is in principle possible to determine separately all three masses of the new particles, in particular, without using any measurement of missing transverse momentum. Furthermore, we show how the use of the peaks in an inclusive energy distribution is generically less affected (as compared to other mass measurement strategies) by combinatorial issues. For some simplified, yet interesting, scenarios we find that these combinatorial issues are absent altogether. As an example of this general strategy, we study SUSY models where gluino decays to an invisible lightest neutralino via an on-shell bottom squark. Taking into account the dominant backgrounds, we show how the mass of the bottom squark, the gluino and (for some class of spectra) that of the neutralino can be determined using this technique.

  19. High-speed Light Peak optical link for high energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F. X.; Chiang, F.; Deng, B.; Hou, J.; Hou, S.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Teng, P. K.; Wang, C. H.; Xu, T.; Ye, J.

    2014-11-01

    Optical links provide high speed data transmission with low mass fibers favorable for applications in high energy experiments. We report investigation of a compact Light Peak optical engine designed for data transmission at 4.8 Gbps. The module is assembled with bare die VCSEL, PIN diodes and a control IC aligned within a prism receptacle for light coupling to fiber ferrule. Radiation damage in the receptacle was examined with 60Co gamma ray. Radiation induced single event effects in the optical engine were studied with protons, neutrons and X-ray tests.

  20. GRB110721A: AN EXTREME PEAK ENERGY AND SIGNATURES OF THE PHOTOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caliandro, G. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; D'Ammando, F.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S. E-mail: moretti@particle.kth.se E-mail: josefin.larsson@astro.su.se; and others

    2012-10-01

    GRB110721A was observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope using its two instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The burst consisted of one major emission episode which lasted for {approx}24.5 s (in the GBM) and had a peak flux of (5.7 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The time-resolved emission spectrum is best modeled with a combination of a Band function and a blackbody spectrum. The peak energy of the Band component was initially 15 {+-} 2 MeV, which is the highest value ever detected in a GRB. This measurement was made possible by combining GBM/BGO data with LAT Low Energy events to achieve continuous 10-100 MeV coverage. The peak energy later decreased as a power law in time with an index of -1.89 {+-} 0.10. The temperature of the blackbody component also decreased, starting from {approx}80 keV, and the decay showed a significant break after {approx}2 s. The spectrum provides strong constraints on the standard synchrotron model, indicating that alternative mechanisms may give rise to the emission at these energies.

  1. GRB110721A: An Extreme Peak Energy and Signatures of the Photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Fishman, G.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2012-01-01

    GRB110721A was observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope using its two instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The burst consisted of one major emission episode which lasted for approximately 24.5 s (in the GBM) and had a peak flux of (5.7 +/- 0.2) 10(exp -5) erg s(exp -1) cm(exp -2). The time-resolved emission spectrum is best modeled with a combination of a Band function and a blackbody spectrum. The peak energy of the Band component was initially 15 +/- 2 MeV, which is the highest value ever detected in a GRB. This measurement was made possible by combining GBM/BGO data with LAT Low Energy events to achieve continuous 10-100 MeV coverage. The peak energy later decreased as a power law in time with an index of -1.89 +/- 0.10. The temperature of the blackbody component also decreased, starting from approximately 80 keV, and the decay showed a significant break after approximately 2s. The spectrum provides strong constraints on the standard synchrotron model, indicating that alternative mechanisms may give rise to the emission at these energies.

  2. EVIDENCE FOR POLAR X-RAY JETS AS SOURCES OF MICROSTREAM PEAKS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    2012-05-01

    It is proposed that the interplanetary manifestations of X-ray jets observed in solar polar coronal holes during periods of low solar activity are the peaks of the so-called microstreams observed in the fast polar solar wind. These microstreams exhibit velocity fluctuations of {+-}35 km s{sup -1}, higher kinetic temperatures, slightly higher proton fluxes, and slightly higher abundances of the low-first-ionization-potential element iron relative to oxygen ions than the average polar wind. Those properties can all be explained if the fast microstreams result from the magnetic reconnection of bright-point loops, which leads to X-ray jets which, in turn, result in solar polar plumes. Because most of the microstream peaks are bounded by discontinuities of solar origin, jets are favored over plumes for the majority of the microstream peaks.

  3. THE EFFECT OF SATELLITE LINES FROM THE X-RAY SOURCE ON X-RAY DIFFRACTION PEAKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses the development of a method for relating reactivity to crystallite size and strain parameters obtained by the Warren-Averbach technique. EPA has been using crystallite size and strain data obtained from x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak profile analysis to predic...

  4. Searching for hard X-ray directivity during the rise, peak, and decay phases of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Peng

    1994-01-01

    We have identified 72 large solar flares (peak counting rates more than 1000 counts/s) observed by Hard X-ray Burst Spectroscopy (HXRBS) on-board the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). Using a database of these flares, we have studied hard X-ray (50-850 keV) spectral center-to-limb variation and its evolution with time. The major results are the following: (1) During the rise phase, the center-to-limb spectral variation is small, with a hardness of delta delta = 0.02 +/- 0.25, and a statistical significance of 0.1 sigma. (2) During the peak phase, the center-to-limb variation is delta delta = 0.13 +/- 0.13, with a statistical significance of 1 sigma. (3) During the decay phase, the center-to-limb variation changes to softening. The softness is relatively large with delta delta = -0.25 +/- 0.21, and a statistical significance of 1.2 sigma. (4) The linear least-squares fits to the spectral center-to-limb variations do not have slopes significantly different from zero during all those three phases. (5) The center events and limb events spectral distributions are shown to be not different by using Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-samples test. (6) The fraction of events detected near the limb is marginally consistent with that expected from isotropically emitting flares. (7) On average, flares evolve as soft-hard-soft. These results suggest that there is no statistically significant evidence for hard X-ray directivity during the rise, peak, and decay phases of solar flares. The hard X-ray radiation pattern at those energies is almost isotropic during all those phases. This lack of directivity (or anisotropy) found in this study is not in agreement with the results discovered by Vestrand et al. (1987) in which they found energetic photon source is anisotropic, using SMM Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data at a much higher energy band of 0.3-1 MeV. If we want to interpret the results of Vestrand et al. (1987) and our present results in a self-consistent way, we must conclude that at

  5. Analysis of low-angle x-ray scattering peaks from lyophilized biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Elshemey, Wael M.; Selim, Nabila S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.

    2001-08-01

    Low-angle x-ray scattering (LAXS) from lyophilized blood and its constituents is characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are found to be sensitive to the variations in the molecular structure of a given sample. The present work aims to explore the nature of LAXS from a variety of lyophilized biological samples. It also aims to investigate the possibility that a certain biological macromolecule is responsible of the production of LAXS peaks. This is carried out through measurements of LAXS from complex biological samples and their basic constituents. Among the measured samples are haemoglobin (Hb), globin, haem, packed red blood cells, bovine albumin, egg albumin, milk, casein, glutamine, alanine, fat, muscle and DNA. A table containing some characteristic parameters of the LAXS profiles of these samples is also presented. Analysis of measured profiles shows that all lyophilized samples produce at least one relatively broad peak at a scattering angle around 10.35°. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak varies considerably among the measured samples. Except for milk and casein, one additional peak at a scattering angle around 4.65° is observed only in the LAXS profiles of proteins or protein-rich samples. This fact strongly suggests protein to be the biological macromolecule from which this characteristic peak originates. The same idea is further strengthened through discussion of some previous observations.

  6. Using energy peaks to count dark matter particles in decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; Wardlow, Kyle

    2013-06-01

    We study the determination of the symmetry that stabilizes a dark matter (DM) candidate produced at colliders. Our question is motivated per se, and by several alternative symmetries that appear in models that provide a DM particle. To this end, we devise a strategy to determine whether a heavy mother particle decays into one visible massless particle and one or two DM particles. The counting of DM particles in these decays is relevant to distinguish the minimal choice of Z2 from a Z3 stabilization symmetry, under which the heavy particle and the DM are charged and the visible particle is not. Our method is novel in that it chiefly uses the peak of the energy spectrum of the visible particle and only secondarily uses the MT2 endpoint of events in which the heavy mother particles are pair-produced. We present new theoretical results concerning the energy distribution of the decay products of a three-body decay, which are crucial for our method. To demonstrate the feasibility of our method in investigating the stabilization symmetry, we apply it in distinguishing the decay of a bottom quark partner into a b quark and one or two DM particles. The method can be applied generally to distinguish two- and three-body decays, irrespective of DM.

  7. A wavelet transform algorithm for peak detection and application to powder x-ray diffraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoire, John M.; Dale, Darren; van Dover, R. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Peak detection is ubiquitous in the analysis of spectral data. While many noise-filtering algorithms and peak identification algorithms have been developed, recent work [P. Du, W. Kibbe, and S. Lin, Bioinformatics 22, 2059 (2006); A. Wee, D. Grayden, Y. Zhu, K. Petkovic-Duran, and D. Smith, Electrophoresis 29, 4215 (2008)] has demonstrated that both of these tasks are efficiently performed through analysis of the wavelet transform of the data. In this paper, we present a wavelet-based peak detection algorithm with user-defined parameters that can be readily applied to the application of any spectral data. Particular attention is given to the algorithm's resolution of overlapping peaks. The algorithm is implemented for the analysis of powder diffraction data, and successful detection of Bragg peaks is demonstrated for both low signal-to-noise data from theta-theta diffraction of nanoparticles and combinatorial x-ray diffraction data from a composition spread thin film. These datasets have different types of background signals which are effectively removed in the wavelet-based method, and the results demonstrate that the algorithm provides a robust method for automated peak detection.

  8. Optical intraday variability studies of 10 low energy peaked blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Bindu; Gupta, Alok C.; Joshi, U. C.; Ganesh, S.; Wiita, Paul J.

    2011-05-01

    We have carried out optical (R band) intraday variability (IDV) monitoring of a sample of 10 bright low energy peaked blazars (LBLs). 40 photometric observations, of an average of ˜4 h each, were made between 2008 September and 2009 June using two telescopes in India. Measurements with good signal-to-noise ratios were typically obtained within 1-3 min, allowing the detection of weak, fast variations using N-star differential photometry. We employed both structure function and discrete correlation function analysis methods to estimate any dominant time-scales of variability and found that in most of the cases any such time-scales were longer than the duration of the observation. The calculated duty cycle of IDV in LBLs during our observing run is ˜52 per cent, which is low compared to many earlier studies; however, the relatively short periods for which each source was observed can probably explain this difference. We briefly discuss possible emission mechanisms for the observed variability.

  9. Search for two-{gamma} sum-energy peaks in the decay out of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, D.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays decaying out of the superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 192}Hg has a quasicontinuous distribution. Whereas methods to construct level schemes from discrete lines in coincidence spectra are well established, new techniques must still be developed to extract information from coincidences involving quasicontinuous {gamma}rays. From an experiment using Eurogam, we obtained impressively clean 1- and 2-dimensional {gamma} spectra from pairwise or single gates, respectively, on the transitions of the SD band in {sup 192}Hg. We investigated methods to exploit the 2-dimensional quasicontinuum spectra coincident with the SD band to determine the excitation energy of the SD band above the normal yrast line. No strong peaks were observed in the 2-{gamma} sum spectra; only candidates of peaks at a 2-3 {sigma} level were found. This suggests that 2-{gamma} decay is not the dominant decay branch out of SD bands, consistent with the observed multiplicity of 3.2. We shall next search for peaks in sum-spectra of 3 {gamma}s.

  10. Discovery of the correlation between peak episodic jet power and X-ray peak luminosity of the soft state in black hole transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Yu, W.

    2015-08-01

    Episodic jets are usually observed in the intermediate state of black hole transients during their X-ray outbursts. Here we report the discovery of a strong positive correlation between the peak radio power of the episodic jet Pjet and the corresponding peak X-ray luminosity Lx of the soft state (in Eddington units) in a complete sample of the outbursts of black hole transients observed during the RXTE era of which data are available, which follows the relation log Pjet = (2.2 ± 0.3) + (1.6 ± 0.2) × log Lx. The transient ultraluminous X-ray source in M31 and HLX-1 in EXO 243-49 fall on the relation if they contain stellar-mass black hole and either stellar-mass black hole or intermediate-mass black hole, respectively. Besides, a significant correlation between the peak power of the episodic jet and the rate of increase of the X-ray luminosity dLx/dt during the rising phase of those outbursts is also found, following log Pjet = (2.0 ± 0.4) + (0.7 ± 0.2) × log dLx/dt. In GX 339-4 and H 1743-322 in which data for two outbursts are available, measurements of the peak radio power of the episodic jet and the X-ray peak luminosity (and its rate of change) shows similar positive correlations between outbursts, which demonstrate the dominant role of accretion over black hole spin in generating episodic jet power. On the other hand, no significant difference is seen among the systems with different measured black hole spin in current sample. This implies that the power of the episodic jet is strongly affected by non-stationary accretion instead of black hole spin characterized primarily by the rate of change of the mass accretion rate.

  11. Origin of nondetectable x-ray diffraction peaks in nanocomposite CuTiZr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J. Z.; Kato, H.; Ohsuna, T.; Saida, J.; Inoue, A.; Saksl, K.; Franz, H.; Stâhl, K.

    2003-10-01

    Microscopic structures of Cu60Ti10+xZr30-x (x=0 and 10) alloys have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). In the Cu60Ti10Zr30 samples annealed at 708 K for times ranging from 0 to 130 min, where the enthalpy of the first exothermic peak decreases by 80%, the corresponding XRD patterns still look similar to that for the as-prepared sample. However, the simulated XRD patterns for the pure Cu51Zr14 phase, which is the crystalline phase formed during the first exothermic reaction, with small grain sizes and defects clearly show a broadened amorphous-like feature. This might be the reason that no diffraction peaks from the nanocrystalline component were detected in the XRD patterns recorded for the as-cast or as-spun Cu60Ti10+xZr30-x (x=0 and 10) alloys and for the alloys annealed at lower temperatures, in which the enthalpy of the first exothermic peak has a significant reduction. The second exothermic peak found in DSC curves is due to the formation of another hexagonal phase, spacing group P63/mmc (194) and lattice parameters a=5.105 Å and c=8.231 Å.

  12. Measuring the dynamical state of Planck SZ-selected clusters: X-ray peak - BCG offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, M.; Gastaldello, F.; Ferioli, G.; Bersanelli, M.; De Grandi, S.; Eckert, D.; Ghizzardi, S.; Maino, D.; Molendi, S.

    2016-04-01

    We want to characterize the dynamical state of galaxy clusters detected with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect by Planck and compare them with the dynamical state of clusters selected in X-rays survey. We analysed a representative subsample of the Planck SZ catalogue, containing the 132 clusters with the highest signal to noise ratio and characterize their dynamical state using as an indicator the projected offset between the peak of the X-ray emission and the position of the Brightest cluster galaxy. We compare the distribution of this indicator for the Planck SZ-selected sample and three X-ray-selected samples (HIFLUGCS, MACS and REXCESS). The distributions are significantly different and the fraction of relaxed objects is smaller in the Planck sample (52 ± 4 per cent) than in X-ray samples (≃74 per cent) We interpret this result as an indication of different selection effects affecting X-rays (e.g. `cool core bias') and SZ surveys of galaxy clusters.

  13. Automatic Energy Calibration of Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-09-19

    The software provides automatic method for calibrating the energy scale of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and scintillation gamma-ray spectrometers, using natural background radiation as the source of calibration gamma rays. In field gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive check sources may not be available; temperature changes can shift detector electronic gain and scintillator light output; and a user’s experience and training may not include gamma-ray energy calibration. Hence, an automated method of calibrating the spectrometer using natural background wouldmore » simplify its operation, especially by technician-level users, and by enhancing spectroscopic data quality, it would reduce false detections. Following a typically one-minute count of background gamma-rays, the measured spectrum is searched for gamma-ray peaks, producing a list of peak centroids, in channels1. Next, the ratio algorithm attempts to match the peak centroids found in the search to a user-supplied list of calibration gamma-ray energies. Finally, if three or more calibration energies have been matched to peaks, the energy equation parameters are determined by a least-squares fit2, and the spectrum has been energy-calibrated. The ratio algorithm rests on the repeatable but irregular spacing of the background gammaray energies—together they form a unique set of ratios, when normalized to the highest energy calibration gamma ray; so too, the corresponding peak centroids in the spectrum. The algorithm matches energy ratios to peak centroid ratios, to determine which peak matches a given calibration energy.« less

  14. Automatic Energy Calibration of Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-19

    The software provides automatic method for calibrating the energy scale of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and scintillation gamma-ray spectrometers, using natural background radiation as the source of calibration gamma rays. In field gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive check sources may not be available; temperature changes can shift detector electronic gain and scintillator light output; and a user’s experience and training may not include gamma-ray energy calibration. Hence, an automated method of calibrating the spectrometer using natural background would simplify its operation, especially by technician-level users, and by enhancing spectroscopic data quality, it would reduce false detections. Following a typically one-minute count of background gamma-rays, the measured spectrum is searched for gamma-ray peaks, producing a list of peak centroids, in channels1. Next, the ratio algorithm attempts to match the peak centroids found in the search to a user-supplied list of calibration gamma-ray energies. Finally, if three or more calibration energies have been matched to peaks, the energy equation parameters are determined by a least-squares fit2, and the spectrum has been energy-calibrated. The ratio algorithm rests on the repeatable but irregular spacing of the background gammaray energies—together they form a unique set of ratios, when normalized to the highest energy calibration gamma ray; so too, the corresponding peak centroids in the spectrum. The algorithm matches energy ratios to peak centroid ratios, to determine which peak matches a given calibration energy.

  15. Infrared peak in HZ Herculis prior to X-ray eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, IU.N.; Kirian, V.V.; Krat, A.V.; Pogodin, M.A.; Tarasov, A.E.

    1986-04-01

    In the summer and autumn of 1984, HZ Her (one of the stars in the Hercules X-1 binary system) was observed in the IR (J, H, and K bands) with the 125-cm AZT-11 telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. The observations of the star disclosed a sharp IR peak at orbital phase phi = 0.91, shortly before an X-ray eclipse, reaching a power greater than about 10 to the 36th erg/s. Although several hypotheses are suggested to provide an interpretation of this phenomenon, none of the proposed mechanisms can fully explain the peculiarities in the object's light curves close to eclipse. 16 references.

  16. 75 FR 15456 - Notice of Availability for the Signal Peak Energy, LLC, Federal Coal Lease Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability for the Signal Peak Energy, LLC, Federal Coal Lease... management regulations, the Signal Peak Energy Coal Lease by Application Environmental Assessment (EA) is... Market Value (FMV), and Maximum Economic Recovery (MER) of the coal resources for Signal Peak...

  17. X-Ray Emitting GHz-Peaked Spectrum Galaxies: Testing a Dynamical-Radiative Model with Broad-Band Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ostorero, L.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Diaferio, A.; Kowalska, I.; Cheung, C.C.; Kataoka, J.; Begelman, M.C.; Wagner, S.J.; /Heidelberg Observ.

    2010-06-07

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-Peaked-Spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the GPS spectral energy distribution (SED) with the source expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the {gamma}-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broad-band SEDs of a sample of eleven X-ray emitting GPS galaxies with Compact-Symmetric-Object (CSO) morphology, and show that: (i) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism; (ii) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N{sub H}) and radio (N{sub HI}) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  18. X-RAY-EMITTING GHz-PEAKED-SPECTRUM GALAXIES: TESTING A DYNAMICAL-RADIATIVE MODEL WITH BROADBAND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ostorero, L.; Diaferio, A.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Kowalska, I.; Cheung, C. C.; Kataoka, J.; Begelman, M. C.; Wagner, S. J.

    2010-06-01

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of GPS sources with their expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the {gamma}-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broadband SEDs of a sample of 11 X-ray-emitting GPS galaxies with compact-symmetric-object morphology, and show that (1) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism and (2) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk-dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N {sub H}) and radio (N {sub HI}) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  19. Reversal of asymmetry of x-ray peak profiles from individual grains during a strain path change.

    SciTech Connect

    Wejdemann, C.; Lienert, U.; Pantleon, W.

    2010-05-01

    X-ray peak profiles are measured from individual bulk grains during tensile deformation. Two differently oriented copper samples pre-deformed in tension show the expected peak profile asymmetry caused by intra-grain stresses. One of the samples is oriented to achieve a significant change of the intra-grain stresses during in situ tensile loading and this is observed as a reversal of the sign of the peak profile asymmetry.

  20. Dependence on neutron energy of neutron-induced peaks in Ge detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gete, E.; Measday, David F.; Moftah, B. A.; Saliba, M. A.; Stocki, Trevor J.

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the peak shapes at 596 and 691 KeV resulting from fast neutron interactions inside germanium detectors. We have used neutrons from a 252Cf source, as well as from the 28Si((mu) -, nv), and 209Bi((pi) -, xn) reactions to compare the peaks and to check for any dependence of peak shape on the incoming neutron energy. In our investigation, no dependence of these peak shapes on the neutron energy spectra has been observed. In a comparison of these peak shapes with other studies we found similar results to ours except for monoenergetic neutron irradiations from 1 to 8 MeV.

  1. Energy and peak power saved by passively cooled residences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Loxsom, F.; Doderer, E.; Vieira, R.; Fleischhacker, P.

    1983-11-01

    The energy displacement potential of roof pond cooling in humid climates is sensitive to the type of dehumidification equipment employed and the humidity levels allowed. The simulated energy requirements of roof pond residences assisted by two high efficiency dehumidifier options are described. One dehumidifier was a vapor compression air conditioner with sensible cooling recovery by an air-to-air heat exchanger (improved mechanical dehumidification or IMD). The second option was a solar regenerated desiccant dehumidifier (SRDD). An IMD assisted roof pond house had energy savings of 30 to 65% in humid climates compared to the conventional house; an SRDD assisted roof pond house had energy savings of 70 to 75% in humid climates.

  2. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  3. Multi-tens of GW peak power plasma-based soft x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, E.; Fajardo, M.; Li, L.; Le, T. T. T.; Ros, D.; Sebban, S.; Velarde, P.; Zeitoun, P.

    2013-09-01

    Ultra-intense X-ray sources have opened new avenues by creating new states of matter or probing and imaging living or inert matter. Free-electron lasers have a strong leadership by delivering pulses combining femtosecond duration and 10s of microJoules to milliJoule energy. However, these sources remain highly expensive limiting their number to a few worldwide. In parallel, laser-pumped soft X-ray lasers hold outstanding promises having demonstrated the most energetic monochromatic soft x-ray pulse and being intrinsically fully synchronized with any secondary source of the pump laser. Since the first successful demonstration of amplification of a high harmonic pulse in a plasma from gas in 2003 and from solid in 2008, we have developed an extensive numerical study. 2D hydrodynamic simulations showed that optimized Transient Collisional Excitation plasma amplifiers, may store up to 0.4 mJ in the population inversion. If carefully seeded, pulses of 80 fs and 20 μJ might be generated with table-top lasers (10J). As the energy extracted is far from the milliJoule requirements of most exciting applications, we studied the seminal experiment of Ditmire et al who seeded a plasma emitting milliJoules in the form of Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE).We retrieved and explained for the first time the experimental result (ASE 1,000 times stronger than amplified seed). We thus proposed and fully modeled the transposition of the so-called Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA) in the soft X-ray range, showing that 6 mJ, 200 fs, fully coherent soft X-ray pulse is accessible with compact pump lasers.

  4. Reaching the peak of the quasar spectral energy distribution - I. Observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, James S.; Ward, Martin J.; Done, Chris; Landt, Hermine; Elvis, Martin; McDowell, Jonathan C.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a spectral analysis of a sample of 11 medium redshift (1.5 ≲ z ≲ 2.2) quasars. Our sample all have optical spectra from the SDSS, infrared spectra from GNIRS and TripleSpec, and X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton. We first analyse the Balmer broad emission line profiles which are shifted into the IR spectra to constrain black hole masses. Then we fit an energy-conserving, three component accretion model of the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) to our multiwavelength data. 5 out of the 11 quasars show evidence of an SED peak, allowing us to constrain their bolometric luminosity from these models and estimate their mass accretion rates. Based on our limited sample, we suggest that estimating bolometric luminosities from L_{5100 A} and L2-10 keV may be unreliable, as has been also noted for a low-redshift, X-ray selected active galactic nucleus sample.

  5. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  6. The long-term Swift observations of the high-energy peaked BL Lacertae source 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, B.; Romano, P.; Vercellone, S.; Kapanadze, S.; Mdzinarishvili, T.; Kharshiladze, G.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results based on the monitoring of the high-energy peaked BL Lacertae object 1ES 1959+650 by the Swift satellite during 2005-2014. Our timing study shows that the source was highly variable on longer (weeks-to-months) time-scales with the 0.3-10 keV fluxes ranging by a factor of 8. It sometimes showed a significant intra-day variability in the course of ˜1 ks, detected mainly in the epochs of higher brightness states. The flux variability exhibited an erratic character and no signatures of periodic variations are revealed. The X-ray spectra were mainly curved with broad ranges of photon index, curvature parameter, hardness ratio, synchrotron spectral energy distribution (SED) peak location which exhibited a significant variability with the flux at different time-scales. Our study of multi-wavelength cross-correlations shows that the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton scenario was not always valid for 1ES 1959+650. The X-ray flares were sometimes not accompanied with an increasing activity in the γ-ray or lower-energy parts of the spectrum and vice versa. Similar to the prominent `orphan' TeV event in 2002, significant flares in the high-energy and very high energy bands in 2009 May and 2012 May were not accompanied by those in the synchrotron part of the spectrum. Similar to other TeV-detected high-energy peaked BLLs, the stochastic acceleration of the electrons from the magnetic turbulence close to the shock front may be more important for our target compared to other scenarios since it showed mainly broader synchrotron SEDs during the X-ray flares expected when the stochastic mechanism is more efficient.

  7. Ratio of germanium detector peak efficiencies at photon energies of 4.4 and 11.7 MeV: Experiment versus simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Spencer; Iliadis, Christian; Cesaratto, John; Champagne, Art; Downen, Lori; Ivanovic, Marija; Kelley, John; Longland, Richard; Newton, Joseph R.; Rusev, Gencho; Tonchev, Anton P.

    2010-06-01

    Full-energy peak efficiencies of germanium detectors are frequently investigated at γ-ray energies below 4 MeV using calibrated radioactive sources, while very accurate peak efficiencies for higher photon energies are essentially non-existent. Peak efficiencies in the energy range of Eγ=4-12 MeV are crucial for a number of applications, including nuclear astrophysics measurements of fusion reactions and resonance fluorescence experiments. We report on a novel method, using the 163 keV resonance in the B11(p,γ)C12 reaction, of measuring accurately the ratio of full-energy peak efficiencies at 4.44 and 11.66 MeV. We derive this ratio for three different detector-target distances (3, 12 and 26 cm) directly from measured peak intensities and demonstrate that corrections are small ( γ-ray branching ratios, angular correlations, coincidence summing). Our measured full-energy peak efficiency ratios have a precision of 1.4-1.6%. Another important goal of our study was to determine to what precision full-energy peak efficiencies at high γ-ray energies can be predicted using the simulation codes Geant3 and Geant4. We imaged our detector using computed tomography and radiographs in order to extract reliable detector crystal dimensions. Based on these results, extensive computer simulations are performed. We find that the simulation results agree with the measured peak efficiency ratios within an uncertainty of 1.6% for Geant4 and 2.6% for Geant3. Our results are useful for assigning uncertainties when peak efficiencies are extrapolated from low energy data to high energies based on simulations only.

  8. Test of the peak energy- luminosity correlations of GRBs for their application in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Disha

    In a few dozen seconds gamma ray bursts (GRBs) emit upto 10 (54) ergs in terms of an equivalent isotropical radiated energy "E _{iso}", so they can be observed with redshifts almost upto 10. Thus, these phenomena appear to be very promising tools to shed light on the expansion rate and the history of the universe. Here we review the use of the E _{p,i} - E _{iso} correlation of GRBs to measure the cosmological density parameter Omega _{M}. We show that the present data set of gamma ray bursts, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide independent evidence, from other probes, that Omega _{M} ˜ 0.3. As the first step, we consider verifying the correltion depending on several considerable criteria (e.g. E _{p,i} - E _{iso}, E _{p,i} - L _{iso}, E _{p,i} - L _{peak}, etc.). The results of the comparisons will lead us to verify the reliability of the correlations for cosmographical purpose. This will eventually be utilized to constrain GRBs as standard candles for studying cosmology.

  9. Origin of a Raman scattering peak generated in single-walled carbon nanotubes by X-ray irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Toshiya; Matsuda, Mitsuaki; Kisoda, Kenji; Itoh, Chihiro

    2016-08-01

    We have found that a Raman scattering (RS) peak around 1870 cm-1 was produced by the annealing of the X-ray irradiated film of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at 450 oC. The intensity of 1870-cm-1 peak showed a maximum at the probe energy of 2.3 eV for the RS spectroscopy with various probe lasers. Both the peak position and the probe-energy dependence were almost identical to those of the one-dimensional carbon chains previously reported in multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Consequently, we concluded that the 1870-cm-1 peak found in the present study is attributed to carbon chains. The formation of carbon chains by the annealing at temperature lower than 500 oC is firstly reported by the present study. The carbon chains would be formed by aggregation of the interstitial carbons, which are formed as a counterpart of carbon vacancies by X-ray irradiation diffused on SWNT walls. The result indicates that the combination of X-ray irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing is a feasible tool for generating new nanostructures in SWNT.

  10. A framework for understanding and generating integrated solutions for residential peak energy demand.

    PubMed

    Buys, Laurie; Vine, Desley; Ledwich, Gerard; Bell, John; Mengersen, Kerrie; Morris, Peter; Lewis, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Supplying peak energy demand in a cost effective, reliable manner is a critical focus for utilities internationally. Successfully addressing peak energy concerns requires understanding of all the factors that affect electricity demand especially at peak times. This paper is based on past attempts of proposing models designed to aid our understanding of the influences on residential peak energy demand in a systematic and comprehensive way. Our model has been developed through a group model building process as a systems framework of the problem situation to model the complexity within and between systems and indicate how changes in one element might flow on to others. It is comprised of themes (social, technical and change management options) networked together in a way that captures their influence and association with each other and also their influence, association and impact on appliance usage and residential peak energy demand. The real value of the model is in creating awareness, understanding and insight into the complexity of residential peak energy demand and in working with this complexity to identify and integrate the social, technical and change management option themes and their impact on appliance usage and residential energy demand at peak times. PMID:25807384

  11. A Framework for Understanding and Generating Integrated Solutions for Residential Peak Energy Demand

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Laurie; Vine, Desley; Ledwich, Gerard; Bell, John; Mengersen, Kerrie; Morris, Peter; Lewis, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Supplying peak energy demand in a cost effective, reliable manner is a critical focus for utilities internationally. Successfully addressing peak energy concerns requires understanding of all the factors that affect electricity demand especially at peak times. This paper is based on past attempts of proposing models designed to aid our understanding of the influences on residential peak energy demand in a systematic and comprehensive way. Our model has been developed through a group model building process as a systems framework of the problem situation to model the complexity within and between systems and indicate how changes in one element might flow on to others. It is comprised of themes (social, technical and change management options) networked together in a way that captures their influence and association with each other and also their influence, association and impact on appliance usage and residential peak energy demand. The real value of the model is in creating awareness, understanding and insight into the complexity of residential peak energy demand and in working with this complexity to identify and integrate the social, technical and change management option themes and their impact on appliance usage and residential energy demand at peak times. PMID:25807384

  12. Low-Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; ACE/CRIS Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic rays with energies below about 10 GeV/nucleon have been measured with high precision as a result of experiments on the HEAO, Ulysses, and ACE spacecrafts. The observations provide energy spectra, elemental abundances, and isotopic composition for elements up through Z=30. They include both stable and radioactive nuclides that are synthesized in stars or are produced by nuclear fragmentation during diffusion at high energies through interstellar medium. From these data one obtains a rather detailed picture of the origin of low-energy cosmic rays. For refractory species, the cosmic-ray source composition closely resembles that of the Sun, suggesting that cosmic rays are accelerated from a well-mixed sample of interstellar matter. A chemical fractionation process has depleted the abundances of volatile elements relative to refractories. Using various radioactive clock isotopes it has been shown that particle acceleration occurs at least 105 years after supernova nucleosynthesis and that the accelerated particles diffuse in the Galaxy for approximately 15 Myr after acceleration. Energy spectra and secondary-to-primary ratios are reasonably well accounted for by models in which particles gain the bulk of their energy in a single encounter with a strong shock. Among the large number of species that have been measured, 22Ne stands out as the only nuclide with an abundance that is clearly much different than solar. To test models proposed to account for this anomaly, the data are being analyzed for predicted smaller effects on abundances of other nuclides. In addition to providing a detailed understanding of the origin and acceleration of low-energy cosmic rays, these data are providing constraints on the chemical evolution of interstellar matter. This work was supported by NASA at Caltech (under grant NAG5-6912), JPL, NASA/GSFC, and Washington U.

  13. Measurements of Ion Stopping Around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies around the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te ) and electron number density (ne ) in the range of 0.5-4.0 keV and 3 ×1022 to 3 ×1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne . The importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of high-energy-density plasmas.

  14. Identification of B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure peaks of boron nitride thin films prepared by sputtering deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Niibe, Masahito; Miyamoto, Kazuyoshi; Mitamura, Tohru; Mochiji, Kozo

    2010-09-15

    Four {pi}{sup *} resonance peaks were observed in the B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of boron nitride thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering. In the past, these peaks have been explained as the K-absorption of boron atoms, which are present in environment containing nitrogen vacancies, the number of which is 1-3 corresponding to the three peaks at higher photon energy. However, the authors found that there was a strong correlation between the intensities of these three peaks and that of O-K absorption after wide range scanning and simultaneous measurement of nitrogen and oxygen K-absorptions of the BN films. Therefore, the authors conclude that these three peaks at the higher energy side correspond to boron atoms bound to one-to-three oxygen atoms instead of three nitrogen atoms surrounding the boron atom in the h-BN structure. The result of the first-principles calculation with a simple cluster model supported the validity of this explanation.

  15. A torque controlled high speed flywheel energy storage system for peak power transfer in electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Schaible, U.; Szabados, B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a design outline and implementation procedure for a flywheel energy storage system using a high speed interior permanent magnet synchronous machine, torque-controlled through the use of a vector control algorithm. The proposed flywheel energy storage system can be used to meet the peak energy requirements of an electric vehicle during both acceleration and regenerative braking. By supplying the peak energy requirements from a secondary source, the life cycle of the electric vehicle`s batteries may be extended considerably. A torque control algorithm is presented and preliminary implementation through a commercially available microcontroller is described. Preliminary testing of the proposed system has been very promising and has proven that bidirectional peak power transfer can be rapidly accomplished. 4 refs.

  16. Effect of shading devices on building energy use and peak demand in Minnesota. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, B.D.; Jones, J.W.; Grasso, M.M.; Hitzfelder, D.D.

    1990-12-01

    The report presents the results of an analytical study of the effect of shading devices on annual heating, cooling, and total energy use, on peak electric demand, and on energy cost savings in single-family residences, a small office, a school, and a high-rise office in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Using an hour-by-hour building energy analysis model, savings were simulated for interior and exterior shading devices. Energy cost savings were calculated using Northern States Power (NSP) Company utility rates; however, no analysis of the costs of installing and operating these devices was made. Results are presented in terms of annual energy cost savings and peak electric demand reductions, with each shading device in place, as compared to baseline reference cases for three prototypical residences and a prototypical small office, elementary school, and high-rise office building. The devices are ranked in terms of energy cost savings, as well as peak demand reduction. While the best-performing devices have annual cooling energy savings ranging up to over 30%, the annual energy cost savings (at NSP utility rates in effect in 1989) range up to only 4% for the residences and 10% for the office buildings, but less than 1% for the school. Summer peak electric demand reductions are more significant: up to 20% for the residences, 12% for the offices, and 3% for the school.

  17. Kiloelectronvolt X-rays Emitted from the Earth's Atmosphere During the Peak and Descending Phases of the 23rd Solar Activity Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spjeldvik, Walther; Gusev, Anatoly; Pugacheva, Galina; Martin, Inacio

    We have studied long-term observations of the low-energy, 3 to 8 keV, X-ray emission during the period July 2001 through December 2005. The data were obtained with CadmiumTelluride (CdTe) solid state detectors flown on the LEO CORONAS-F satellite and used to assess the dynamics of X-ray fluxes radiated by the Earth’s upper atmosphere during the peak and declining phases of the 23rd solar cycle as observed within the shadowed segments of the spacecraft trajectory. We present empirical maps of near-global distributions soft X-ray luminescence with data emphasis on northern hemisphere summer and winter conditions. These observations reveal some irregularities, and the maximum X-ray photon energy does not exceed about 8 keV. We found that the X-rays exhibit seasonal variations in addition to the expected dependence on solar activity levels, and there are definite latitudinal and longitudinal patterns. In year 2001, during the solar maximum activity, the 3 to 8 keV X-ray flux reached a maximum of 170 photons/(cm2 s sr) in the geographic northwestern part of the Earth. The luminosity of the brightest soft X-ray atmospheric emission spot was about 40 kW integrated over an upward atmospheric emission geographic area of 200º longitude and 20º latitude as seem at altitude of about 500 km. For comparison, typical auroral emissions in this soft X-ray band is around 10 to 30 MW. We argue that these X-ray fluxes cannot be scattered solar X-rays since solar X-rays are most often lower in photon energy (< 2 keV) and also lower in intensity -- except in short-lived events. We interpret our observations as being due to Bremsstrahlung X-rays resulting from magnetospheric electrons precipitating into the atmosphere from the radiation belts and depositing their kinetic energy there, an energetic electron precipitation flux that is modulated by electromagnetic disturbances such as magnetospheric ELF waves during and following magnetic storms and substorms, terrestrial lightning

  18. Comprehensive study of the surface peak in charge-integrated low-energy ion scattering spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, M.; Gruber, R.; Bauer, P.; Beikler, R.; Taglauer, E.; Schmid, K.; Ermolov, S. N.

    2003-08-01

    Low-energy ion scattering is very surface sensitive if scattered ions are analyzed. By time-of-flight (TOF) techniques, the neutral and the charge-integrated spectra (ions plus neutrals) are obtained, which yield information about deeper layers. It is well known that charge integrated spectra may exhibit a surface peak which is more pronounced for heavier projectiles, e.g., Ne ions. Aiming at a more profound physical understanding of this surface peak, we performed TOF experiments and computer simulations for H, He, and Ne projectiles scattered from a polycrystalline copper target. Measurements were done in the range of 1-9 keV for a scattering angle of 129 degree sign under UHV conditions. The simulations were performed using the MARLOWE code for the given experimental parameters and a polycrystalline target. In the experiments, a pronounced surface peak was observed at low energies, which fades away at higher energies. This peak is quantitatively reproduced by the simulation. Several atomic layers may contribute to the surface peak, depending on the energy. Analyzing the contributions of the individual outermost atomic layers, one finds that the binary collisions of the projectiles with atoms in the first and the second layer yield a narrow energy distribution, while the contribution from the deeper layers is dominated by multiple scattering and therefore exhibits a very broad energy spectrum. It is shown that the appearance of a more or less pronounced surface peak is due to the relative contributions of single scattering and multiple scattering and thus depends on the projectile energy and mass.

  19. The effect of added protein on the interchain x-ray peak profile in egg lecithin.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, G W; Fein, D B

    1979-01-01

    The effect of added protein on the phospholipid interchain peak profile has been measured. The results indicate that the basic organization of the bilayer is preserved, and that the added protein affects only the arrangement of the lipid hydrocarbon chains in the first few adjacent layers. PMID:263628

  20. High-energy gamma-rays from GRB X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. Y.; Li, Z.; Meszaros, P.

    2007-07-12

    The recent detection of X-ray flares during the afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) suggests an inner-engine origin, at radii inside the forward shock. There must be inverse Compton (IC) emission arising from such flare photons scattered by forward shock afterglow electrons when they are passing through the forward shock. We find that this IC emission produces high energy gamma-ray flares, which may be detected by AGILE, GLAST and ground-based TeV telescopes. The anisotropic IC scattering between flare photons and forward shock electrons does not affect the total IC component intensity, but cause a time delay of the IC component peak relative to the flare peak. We speculate that this IC component may already have been detected by EGRET from a very strong burst--GRB940217. Future observations by GLAST may help to distinguish whether X-ray flares originate from late central engine activity or from external shocks.

  1. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.

  2. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modelingmore » of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.« less

  3. Measurements of Ion Stopping Around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Frenje, J A; Grabowski, P E; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Zylstra, A B; Gatu Johnson, M; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C

    2015-11-13

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies around the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (T(e)) and electron number density (n(e)) in the range of 0.5-4.0 keV and 3×10(22) to 3×10(23) cm(-3) have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with T(e) with n(e). The importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of high-energy-density plasmas. PMID:26613448

  4. Dosimetric response of radiochromic films to protons of low energies in the Bragg peak region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, M. C.; Schardt, D.; Espino, J. M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Quesada, J. M.; Lallena, A. M.; Miras, H.; Guirado, D.

    2016-06-01

    One of the major advantages of proton or ion beams, applied in cancer treatment, is their excellent depth-dose profile exhibiting a low dose in the entrance channel and a distinct dose maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range in tissue. In the region of the Bragg peak, where the protons or ions are almost stopped, experimental studies with low-energy particle beams and thin biological samples may contribute valuable information on the biological effectiveness in the stopping region. Such experiments, however, require beam optimization and special dosimetry techniques for determining the absolute dose and dose homogeneity for very thin biological samples. At the National Centre of Accelerators in Seville, one of the beam lines at the 3 MV Tandem Accelerator was equipped with a scattering device, a special parallel-plate ionization chamber with very thin electrode foils and target holders for cell cultures. In this work, we present the calibration in absolute dose of EBT3 films [Gafchromic radiotherapy films, http://www.ashland.com/products/gafchromic-radiotherapy-films] for proton energies in the region of the Bragg peak, where the linear energy transfer increases and becomes more significant for radiobiology studies, as well as the response of the EBT3 films for different proton energy values. To irradiate the films in the Bragg peak region, the energy of the beam was degraded passively, by interposing Mylar foils of variable thickness to place the Bragg peak inside the active layer of the film. The results obtained for the beam degraded in Mylar foils are compared with the dose calculated by means of the measurement of the beam fluence with an ionization chamber and the energy loss predicted by srim2008 code.

  5. Push-pull converter with energy saving circuit for protecting switching transistors from peak power stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    In a push-pull converter, switching transistors are protected from peak power stresses by a separate snubber circuit in parallel with each comprising a capacitor and an inductor in series, and a diode in parallel with the inductor. The diode is connected to conduct current of the same polarity as the base-emitter juction of the transistor so that energy stored in the capacitor while the transistor is switched off, to protect it against peak power stress, discharges through the inductor when the transistor is turned on, and after the capacitor is discharges through the diode. To return this energy to the power supply, or to utilize this energy in some external circuit, the inductor may be replaced by a transformer having its secondary winding connected to the power supply or to the external circuit.

  6. On the anticorrelation of the electric field and peak electron energy within an auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.; Carlson, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an example of a strongly anticorrelated electric field and particle precipitation, taking into account an application of an extended version of the model of Evans et al. (1977) to the data. A striking feature of the data reported is the high degree of anticorrelation between electric field strength and peak precipitating electron energy. A simple model consisting of a constant current traversing a region in which the conductivities increase in proportion to ionospheric energy deposition provides a qualitative explanation of the observations. However, when the effects of neutral winds, ionization transport, Hall currents, and arc motion, and the nonlinearity of the relationship between peak precipitating electron energy and equilibrium are considered, the conclusions become less clear.

  7. Assessment of temperature peaks reached during a wildfire. An approach using X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-González, Marco A.; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Bárcenas-Moreno, Gema; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; Bellinfante, Nicolás

    2014-05-01

    1. INTRODUCTION Wildfires may induce important chemical and physical changes in soils, including changes in the soil composition, mineralogical changes, soil water repellency, aggregate stability or textural changes (Bodí et al., 2013; Granged et al., 2011a, 2011b, 2011c; Jordán et al., 2011, 2013; Mataix-Solera et al., 2011). As these changes usually occur after threshold temperature peaks, the assessment of these helps to explain many of the processes occurring during burning and in the postfire (Pereira et al., 2012, 2013; Shakesby, 2011). In July 2011, a wildfire burnt a pine forested area (50 ha) in Gorga (Alicante, SW Spain), approximately at 38° 44.3' N and 0° 20.7' W. Main soil type is Lithic Xerorthent developed from limestone. The study of mineralogical changes in soil after a wildfire should help to assess fire temperature peaks reached during burning. In order to study the impact of fire temperature on mineralogical changes and determine temperature peaks during burning, burnt soil plots under shrubland were randomly collected (0-5 cm deep). Control samples from adjacent unburnt areas were also collected for control. 2. METHODS Soil samples were ground using an agate mortar and then sieved (< 0.002mm) and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD was conducted on a Bruker (model D8 advance A25) powder θ:θ diffractometer, which uses a Cu anticathode (40KV, 30mA), Ni filter in the diffracted bean and lineal detector. Powder samples were scanned from 3 to 70° 2θ, using a step size of 0.015° 2θ and a scan speed of 0.15° 2θ s-1. Mineralogical phase identification and quantification of minerals was carried out with XPowder. In order to study other possible reaction in burnt soil, unburnt soil samples were exposed to temperatures of 300, 500 and 700 °C in a Mufla furnace during 20 minutes. Unburnt control and treated samples were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TG). 3. RESULTS Diffractograms show that

  8. Design method of planar vibration system for specified ratio of energy peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Woo; Lee, Sungon; Choi, Yong Je

    2015-05-01

    The magnitudes of the resonant peaks should be considered in the design stage of any bandwidth-relevant applications to widen the working bandwidth. This paper presents a new design method for a planar vibration system that satisfies any desired ratio of peak magnitudes at target resonant frequencies. An important geometric property of a modal triangle formed from three vibration centers representing vibration modes is found. Utilizing the property, the analytical expressions for the vibration energy generated by external forces are derived in terms of the geometrical data of vibration centers. When any desired ratio of peak magnitudes is specified, the locations of the vibration centers are found from their analytical relations. The corresponding stiffness matrix can be determined and realized accordingly. The systematic design methods for direct- and base-excitation systems are developed, and one numerical example is presented to illustrate the proposed design method.

  9. Analytical design of a superconducting magnetic energy storage for pulsed power peak

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1996-09-01

    A Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage can be used to produce very high pulsed power peak. A superconducting coil is magnetically coupled with another coil linked to the load. During the storage phase, the current is constant. In order to transfer the energy to the load, the authors cause the quench of the superconducting coil. It is very important to know the efficiency of the transfer and how much energy is discharged in the Helium vessel. In this paper, they propose an analytical method which enables to calculate very quickly the electrical parameters of such a device.

  10. Grain structure and dislocation density measurements in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy using x-ray peak profile analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Balogh, Levente; Ungar, Prof Tomas; Choo, Hahn; Feng, Zhili

    2008-01-01

    The dislocation density and grain structure of a friction stir welded 6061-T6 aluminum alloy was determined as a function of distance from the weld centerline using high-resolution micro-beam x-ray diffraction. The results of the x-ray peak profile analysis show that the dislocation density is about 1.2 x 10^14 m-2 inside and 4.8 x 10^14 m-2 outside of the weld region. The average subgrain size is about 180 nm in both regions. Compared to the base material, the dislocation density was significantly decreased in the dynamic recrystallized zone of the friction stir welds, which is a good correlation with the TEM observations. The influence of the dislocation density on the strain hardening behavior during tensile deformation is also discussed.

  11. Peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement with the superconducting flywheel energy storage in electric railway system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hansang; Jung, Seungmin; Cho, Yoonsung; Yoon, Donghee; Jang, Gilsoo

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes an application of the 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems to reduce the peak power of the electric railway system. The electric railway systems have high-power characteristics and large amount of regenerative energy during vehicles’ braking. The high-power characteristic makes operating cost high as the system should guarantee the secure capacity of electrical equipment and the low utilization rate of regenerative energy limits the significant energy efficiency improvement. In this paper, it had been proved that the peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement can be achieved by using 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems with the optimally controlled charging or discharging operations. Also, economic benefits had been assessed.

  12. Which Epeak? The Characteristic Energy of Gamma-ray Burst Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Robert; Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, Narayana; Stanbro, Matthew; Hakkila, Jon; Blalock, Dylan

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic energy of individual gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra can in most cases be determined from the peak energy of the energy density spectra (ν {{ F }}ν ), called “{E}{{peak}}.” Distributions of {E}{{peak}} have been compiled for time-resolved spectra from bright GRBs, as well as time-averaged spectra and peak flux spectra for nearly every burst observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst And Transient Source Experiment and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Even when determined by an instrument with a broad energy band, such as GBM (8 keV to 40 MeV), the distributions themselves peak at around 240 keV in the observer’s frame, with a spread of roughly a decade in energy. {E}{{peak}} can have considerable evolution (sometimes greater than one decade) within any given burst, as amply demonstrated by single pulses in GRB 110721A and GRB 130427A. Meanwhile, several luminosity or energy relations have been proposed to correlate with either the time-integrated or peak flux {E}{{peak}}. Thus, when discussing correlations with {E}{{peak}}, the question arises, “Which {E}{{peak}}?” A single burst may be characterized by any of a number of values for {E}{{peak}} that are associated with it. Using a single-pulse simulation model with spectral evolution as a proxy for the type of spectral evolution observed in many bursts, we investigate how the time-averaged {E}{{peak}} emerges from the spectral evolution within a single pulse, how this average naturally correlates with the peak flux derived {E}{{peak}} in a burst, and how the distribution in {E}{{peak}} values from many bursts derives its surprisingly narrow width.

  13. Constraining Viewing Geometries of Pulsars with Single-Peaked Gamma-ray Profiles Using a Multiwavelength Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seyffert, A. S.; Venter, C.; Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Since the launch of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi spacecraft in June 2008, the number of observed gamma-ray pulsars has increased dramatically. A large number of these are also observed at radio frequencies. Constraints on the viewing geometries of 5 of 6 gamma-ray pulsars exhibiting single-peaked gamma-ray profiles were derived using high-quality radio polarization data [1]. We obtain independent constraints on the viewing geometries of 6 by using a geometric emission code to model the Fermi LAT and radio light curves (LCs). We find fits for the magnetic inclination and observer angles by searching the solution space by eye. Our results are generally consistent with those previously obtained [1], although we do find small differences in some cases. We will indicate how the gamma-ray and radio pulse shapes as well as their relative phase lags lead to constraints in the solution space. Values for the flux correction factor (f(omega)) corresponding to the fits are also derived (with errors).

  14. Cosmology constraints from shear peak statistics in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Friedrich, O.; Amara, A.; Refregier, A.; Marian, L.; Dietrich, J. P.; Suchyta, E.; Aleksić, J.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Chang, C.; Eifler, T. F.; Hartley, W. G.; Huff, E. M.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Nicola, A.; Samuroff, S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Weller, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Smith, I. Sevilla-Noarbe R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Shear peak statistics has gained a lot of attention recently as a practical alternative to the two point statistics for constraining cosmological parameters. We perform a shear peak statistics analysis of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data, using weak gravitational lensing measurements from a 139 deg2 field. We measure the abundance of peaks identified in aperture mass maps, as a function of their signal-to-noise ratio, in the signal-to-noise range 0peak counts as a function of cosmological parameters we use a suite of N-body simulations spanning 158 models with varying Ωm and σ8, fixing w = -1, Ωb = 0.04, h = 0.7 and ns = 1, to which we have applied the DES SV mask and redshift distribution. In our fiducial analysis we measure σ8(Ωm/0.3)0.6 = 0.77 ± 0.07, after marginalising over the shear multiplicative bias and the error on the mean redshift of the galaxy sample. We introduce models of intrinsic alignments, blending, and source contamination by cluster members. These models indicate that peaks with mathcal {S} / mathcal {N}>4 would require significant corrections, which is why we do not include them in our analysis. We compare our results to the cosmological constraints from the two point analysis on the SV field and find them to be in good agreement in both the central value and its uncertainty. We discuss prospects for future peak statistics analysis with upcoming DES data.

  15. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  16. Design and analysis of vibration energy harvesters based on peak response statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Friswell, M. I.; Litak, G.; Haddad Khodaparast, H.

    2016-06-01

    Energy harvesting using cantilever piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters excited by Gaussian broadband random base excitation is considered. The optimal design and analysis of energy harvesters under random excitation is normally performed using the mean and standard deviation of a response quantity of interest, such as the voltage. An alternative approach based on the statistics of the peak voltage is developed in this paper. Three extreme response characteristics, namely (a) level crossing, (b) response peaks above certain level, and (c) fractional time spend above a certain level, have been employed. Two cases, namely the harvesting circuit with and without an inductor, have been considered. Exact closed-form expressions have been derived for number of level crossings, statistics of response peaks and fractional time spend above a certain level for the output voltage. It is shown that these quantities can be related to the standard deviation of the voltage and its derivative with respect to time. Direct numerical simulation has been used to validate the analytical expressions. Based on the analytical results, closed-form expressions for optimal system parameters have been proposed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the applicability of the analytical results.

  17. Measurements of Ion Stopping around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades, ion stopping in weakly- to strongly-coupled High-Energy-Density (HED) plasmas has been subject to extensive analytical and numerical studies, but only a limited set of experimental data exists to check the validity of these theories. Most of these experiments also did not probe the detailed characteristics of the Bragg peak (peak ion stopping) where the ion velocity is similar to the average thermal electron velocity. To the best of our knowledge, only one exploratory attempt to do this was conducted by Hicks et al., who were able to describe qualitatively the behavior of the Bragg peak for one plasma condition. The work described in this presentation makes significant advances over previous experimental efforts by quantitatively assessing the characteristics of the ion stopping, ranging from low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping for different HED plasma conditions. This was achieved by measuring the energy loss of DD-tritons, D3He-alphas, DD-protons and D3He-protons, with distinctly different velocities, and the results indicate that the stopping power varies strongly with Te and ne. This effort represents the first experimental test of state-of-art plasma-stopping-power theories around the Bragg peak, which is an important first step in our efforts of getting a fundamental understanding of DT-alpha stopping in HED plasmas, a prerequisite for understanding ignition margins in various implosion designs with varying hot spot areal density at the National Ignition Facility. The work described here was performed in part at the LLE National Laser User's Facility (NLUF), and was supported in part by US DOE (Grant No. DE-FG03- 03SF22691), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974) and LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G).

  18. High energy gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Michael Richard

    This thesis presents a design study into gamma ray collimation techniques for use in high energy radiation imaging devices for the nuclear industry. Such technology is required to provide information on the nature and location of isotopes within nuclear facilities that have reached the end of their useful life. The work has concentrated on the use of two different techniques, namely mechanical collimation using the Anger camera and electronic collimation using a Compton camera. The work has used computational models to evaluate the performance of such systems and thereby suggest optimal design parameters for use in prototype devices. Ray tracing models have been constructed to simulate both parallel hole and tapered bore diverging collimators. Investigations have been carried out to measure the effects on the spatial resolution of changing various design parameters of the collimators. The effects of varying the hole size, septal thickness and collimator length over a range of source to collimator distances likely to be encountered in an industrial scenario have been examined. Some new insight into the nature of the point spread function of mechanical collimators has been gained and the limitations of the conventional analytical approach to collimator evaluation have been highlighted. Modifications to the standard equations used in collimator design have subsequently been suggested. An analytical description of tapered bore collimators has been derived. Monte Carlo models have been developed to model a single scatter Compton camera. Germanium, silicon and sodium iodide have been investigated as candidates for the scattering detector in such a device. A model of a complete ring array Compton camera system has been used to evaluate performance. The data from the Monte Carlo model has been reconstructed to form images. The quality of the images generated have then been compared with images obtained from parallel hole and focusing mechanical collimators.

  19. SHORT-TIMESCALE MONITORING OF THE X-RAY, UV, AND BROAD DOUBLE-PEAK EMISSION LINE OF THE NUCLEUS OF NGC 1097

    SciTech Connect

    Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Grupe, Dirk; Eracleous, Michael; Peterson, Bradley M.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Winge, Cláudia

    2015-02-10

    Recent studies have suggested that the short-timescale (≲ 7 days) variability of the broad (∼10,000 km s{sup –1}) double-peaked Hα profile of the LINER nucleus of NGC 1097 could be driven by a variable X-ray emission from a central radiatively inefficient accretion flow. To test this scenario, we have monitored the NGC 1097 nucleus in X-ray and UV continuum with Swift and the Hα flux and profile in the optical spectrum using SOAR and Gemini-South from 2012 August to 2013 February. During the monitoring campaign, the Hα flux remained at a very low level—three times lower than the maximum flux observed in previous campaigns and showing only limited (∼20%) variability. The X-ray variations were small, only ∼13% throughout the campaign, while the UV did not show significant variations. We concluded that the timescale of the Hα profile variation is close to the sampling interval of the optical observations, which results in only a marginal correlation between the X-ray and Hα fluxes. We have caught the active galaxy nucleus in NGC 1097 in a very low activity state, in which the ionizing source was very weak and capable of ionizing just the innermost part of the gas in the disk. Nonetheless, the data presented here still support the picture in which the gas that emits the broad double-peaked Balmer lines is illuminated/ionized by a source of high-energy photons which is located interior to the inner radius of the line-emitting part of the disk.

  20. Short-timescale Monitoring of the X-Ray, UV, and Broad Double-peak Emission Line of the Nucleus of NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Grupe, Dirk; Eracleous, Michael; Peterson, Bradley M.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Winge, Cláudia

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the short-timescale (lsim 7 days) variability of the broad (~10,000 km s-1) double-peaked Hα profile of the LINER nucleus of NGC 1097 could be driven by a variable X-ray emission from a central radiatively inefficient accretion flow. To test this scenario, we have monitored the NGC 1097 nucleus in X-ray and UV continuum with Swift and the Hα flux and profile in the optical spectrum using SOAR and Gemini-South from 2012 August to 2013 February. During the monitoring campaign, the Hα flux remained at a very low level—three times lower than the maximum flux observed in previous campaigns and showing only limited (~20%) variability. The X-ray variations were small, only ~13% throughout the campaign, while the UV did not show significant variations. We concluded that the timescale of the Hα profile variation is close to the sampling interval of the optical observations, which results in only a marginal correlation between the X-ray and Hα fluxes. We have caught the active galaxy nucleus in NGC 1097 in a very low activity state, in which the ionizing source was very weak and capable of ionizing just the innermost part of the gas in the disk. Nonetheless, the data presented here still support the picture in which the gas that emits the broad double-peaked Balmer lines is illuminated/ionized by a source of high-energy photons which is located interior to the inner radius of the line-emitting part of the disk.

  1. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis. PMID:26979685

  2. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  3. Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to

  4. High Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos from Newborn Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Olinto, Angela

    2013-04-01

    Newborn pulsars offer favorable sites for cosmic ray acceleration and interaction. Particles could be striped off the star surface and accelerated in the pulsar wind up to PeV-100 EeV energies, depending on the pulsar's birth period and magnetic field strength. Once accelerated, the cosmic rays interact with the surrounding supernova ejecta until they escape the source. By assuming a normal distribution of pulsar birth periods centered at 300,ms, we find the combined contribution of extragalactic pulsars produce ultrahigh energy cosmic rays that agree with both the observed energy spectrum and composition trend reported by the Auger Observatory. Meanwhile, we point out their Galactic counterparts naturally give rise to a cosmic ray flux peaked at very high energies (VHE, between 10^16 and 10^18 ,eV), which can bridge the gap between predictions of cosmic rays produced by supernova remnants and the observed spectrum and composition just below the ankle. Young pulsars in the universe would also contribute to a diffuse neutrino background due to the photomeson interactions, whose detectability and typical neutrino energy are discussed. Lastly, we predict a neutrino emission level for the future birth of a nearby pulsar.

  5. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Liang; Xiang, Li; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian; Li, D. L.; Yuan, Z. H.; Feng, J. F. Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the low frequency (LF) noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlO{sub x}/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlO{sub x}-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectra in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN) is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.

  6. Confirmation of the E(sup src)(sub Peak)-E(sub iso) (Amati) relation from the x-ray flash XRF 050416A observed by the Swift burst alert telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoti, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.

    2006-01-01

    We report Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations of the X-ray flash (XRF) XRF 050416A. The fluence ratio between the 15-25 and 25-50 keV energy bands of this event is 1.5, thus making it the softest gamma-ray burst (GRB) observed by BAT so far. The spectrum is well fitted by a Band function with E(sup obs)(sub peak) of 15.0(sup +2.3)(sub -2.7) keV. Assuming the redshift of the host galaxy (z = 0.6535), the isotropic equivalent radiated energy E(sub iso) and the peak energy at the GRB rest frame (E(sup src)(sub peak)) of XRF 050416A are not only consistent with the correlation found by Amati et al. and extended to XRFs by Sakamoto et al. but also fill in the gap of this relation around the 30-80 keV range of E(sup src)(sub peak). This result tightens the validity of the E(sup src)(sub Peak)-E(sup src)(sub peak) relation from XRFs to GRBs. We also find that the jet break time estimated using the empirical relation between E(sup src)(sub peak) and the collimation corrected energy E(sub gamma), is inconsistent with the afterglow observation by the Swift X-Ray Telescope. This could be due to the extra external shock emission overlaid around the jet break time or to the nonexistence of a jet break feature for XRFs, which might be a further challenge for GRB jet emission models and XRF/GRB unification scenarios.

  7. A DISTINCT PEAK-FLUX DISTRIBUTION OF THE THIRD CLASS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: A POSSIBLE SIGNATURE OF X-RAY FLASHES?

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, P.; Bagoly, Z.; Meszaros, A.; Balazs, L. G.

    2010-12-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous events in the universe. Going beyond the short-long classification scheme, we work in the context of three burst populations with the third group of intermediate duration and softest spectrum. We are looking for physical properties which discriminate the intermediate duration bursts from the other two classes. We use maximum likelihood fits to establish group memberships in the duration-hardness plane. To confirm these results we also use k-means and hierarchical clustering. We use Monte Carlo simulations to test the significance of the existence of the intermediate group and we find it with 99.8% probability. The intermediate duration population has a significantly lower peak flux (with 99.94% significance). Also, long bursts with measured redshift have higher peak fluxes (with 98.6% significance) than long bursts without measured redshifts. As the third group is the softest, we argue that we have related them with X-ray flashes among the GRBs. We give a new, probabilistic definition for this class of events.

  8. SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE TIMING OBSERVATIONS OF THE BLACK HOLE BINARY SWIFT J1753.5-0127: DISK-DILUTED FLUCTUATIONS IN THE OUTBURST PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    Kalamkar, M.; Van der Klis, M.; Uttley, P.; Altamirano, Diego; Wijnands, Rudy

    2013-04-01

    After a careful analysis of the instrumental effects on the Poisson noise to demonstrate the feasibility of detailed stochastic variability studies with the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT), we analyze the variability of the black hole X-ray binary SWIFT J1753.5-0127 in all XRT observations during 2005-2010. We present the evolution of the power spectral components along the outburst in two energy bands: soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV), and in the hard band we find results consistent with those from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The advantage of the XRT is that we can also explore the soft band not covered by RXTE. The source has previously been suggested to host an accretion disk extending down to close to the black hole in the low hard state, and to show low-frequency variability in the soft-band intrinsic to this disk. Our results are consistent with this, with stronger low-frequency variability at low intensities in the soft than in the hard band. From our analysis, we are able to present the first measurements of the soft-band variability in the peak of the outburst. We find the soft band to be less variable than the hard band, especially at high frequencies, opposite to what is seen at low intensity. Both results can be explained within the framework of a simple two emission-region model where the hot flow is more variable in the peak of the outburst and the disk is more variable at low intensities.

  9. Charge-state dependence of binary-encounter-electron cross sections and peak energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidmi, H. I.; Richard, P.; Sanders, J. M.; Schöne, H.; Giese, J. P.; Lee, D. H.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Varghese, S. L.

    1993-12-01

    The charge-state dependence of the binary-encounter-electron (BEE) double-differential cross section (DDCS) at 0° with respect to the beam direction resulting from collisions of 1 MeV/amu H+, Cq+, Nq+, Oq+, Fq+, Siq+, and Clq+, and 0.5 MeV/amu Cuq+ with H2 is reported. The data show an enhancement in the BEE DDCS as the charge state of the projectile is decreased, in agreement with the data reported by Richard et al. [J. Phys. B 23, L213 (1990)]. The DDCS enhancement ratios observed for the three-electron isoelectronic sequence C3+:C6+, N4+:N7+, O5+:O8+, and F6+:F9+ are about 1.35, whereas a DDCS enhancement of 3.5 was observed for Cu4+. The BEE enhancement with increasing electrons on the projectile has been shown by several authors to be due to the non-Coulomb static potential of the projectile and additionally to the e-e exchange interaction. An impulse-approximation (IA) model fits the shape of the BEE DDCS and predicts a Z2p dependence for the bare-ion cross sections. The IA also predicts a binary peak energy that is independent of q and Zp and below the classical value of 4t, where t is the energy of electrons traveling with the projectile velocity. We observed a BEE energy shift ΔE (ΔE=4t-Epeak, where Epeak is the measured energy at the peak of the binary encounter electrons) that is approximately independent of q for the low-Zp ions, whereas the measured ΔE values for Si, Cl, and Cu were found to be q dependent.

  10. Galactic cosmic ray composition and energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Galactic cosmic ray nuclei represent a significant risk to long-duration spaceflight outside the magnetosphere. We review briefly existing measurements of the composition and energy spectra of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, pointing out which species and energy ranges are most critical to assessing cosmic ray risks for spaceflight. Key data sets are identified and a table of cosmic ray abundances is presented for elements from H to Ni (Z = 1 to 28). Because of the 22-year nature of the solar modulation cycle, data from the approaching 1998 solar minimum is especially important to reducing uncertainties in the cosmic ray radiation hazard. It is recommended that efforts to model this hazard take advantage of approaches that have been developed to model the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays.

  11. Energy loss measurement of cosmic ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Joseph

    1993-02-01

    Measurements of energy losses of high energy cosmic ray muons in an ionization chamber are presented. The chamber consists of 16 single gap layers, and the liquid tetra methyl silane (TMS) was used as active medium. The absolute energy loss and the relativistic rise were measured and compared with theoretical calculations. The importance of the measurements within the framework of the cosmic ray experiment KASCADE (German acronym for Karlsruhe Shower Core and Array Detector) are discussed, especially with respect to energy calibration of hadrons and high energy muons above 1 TeV.

  12. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-2) high-energy (in excess of 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope has detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks following the single radio peak by about 13 ms and 48 ms. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP 0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0002 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission, and the double peak structure, compared with the single pulse in the radio emission, suggest that the high-energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those at lower energies.

  13. MAGNETIC NON-POTENTIALITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS AND PEAK X-RAY FLUX OF THE ASSOCIATED FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay E-mail: sgosain@prl.res.i

    2010-09-20

    Predicting the severity of solar eruptive phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections remains a great challenge despite concerted efforts to do so over the past several decades. However, the advent of high-quality vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP) has increased the possibility of meeting this challenge. In particular, the spatially averaged signed shear angle (SASSA) seems to be a unique parameter for quantifying the non-potentiality of active regions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the SASSA for predicting flare severity. For this purpose, we present case studies of the evolution of magnetic non-potentiality using 115 vector magnetograms of four active regions, namely, ARs NOAA 10930, 10960, 10961, and 10963 during 2006 December 8-15, 2007 June 3-10, 2007 June 28-July 5, and 2007 July 10-17, respectively. The NOAA ARs 10930 and 10960 were very active and produced X and M class flares, respectively, along with many smaller X-ray flares. On the other hand, the NOAA ARs 10961 and 10963 were relatively less active and produced only very small (mostly A- and B-class) flares. For this study, we have used a large number of high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP). Our analysis shows that the peak X-ray flux of the most intense solar flare emanating from the active regions depends on the magnitude of the SASSA at the time of the flare. This finding of the existence of a lower limit of the SASSA for a given class of X-ray flares will be very useful for space weather forecasting. We have also studied another non-potentiality parameter called the mean weighted shear angle (MWSA) of the vector magnetograms along with the SASSA. We find that the MWSA does not show such distinction as the SASSA for upper limits of the GOES X-ray flux of solar flares; however, both the quantities show similar trends during the evolution of all active regions studied.

  14. An X-ray absorption method for the identification of calcium phosphate species using peak height ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.

    2013-11-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) studies on calcium phosphate species (Ca-P) deal with marginal differences among subtle spectral features despite a hitherto missing systematic breakdown of these differences. Related fingerprinting approaches depend therefore on spectral libraries that are not validated against each other, incomplete and scattered among publications. This study compiled a comprehensive spectral library from published reference compound libraries in order to establish more clear-cut criteria for Ca-P determination by distinctive phosphorus K-edge XANES features. A specifically developed normalization method identified diagnostic spectral features within the compiled library, e.g. by uniform calculation of ratios between white-line and secondary peak heights. Post-processing of the spectra (n = 81) verified distinguishability among most but not all phases, which included hydroxylapatite (HAP), poorly crystalline HAP, amorphous HAP, fluorapatite, carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP), carbonate hydroxylapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), brushite, monetite, monocalcium phosphate, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), anapaite, herderite, scholzite, messelite, whiteite and P on CaCO3. Particularly, peak height ratios significantly improved analyte specificity, e.g. by supplementary breakdown into OCP and ACP. The spectral analysis also revealed Ca-P standards that were rarely investigated or inappropriately synthesized, and thus provides a basis for standard selection and synthesis. The developed method and resulting breakdown by species were subsequently tested on Ca-P spectra from studies on bone and sediment. The test indicated that bone material likely comprises only poorly crystalline apatite, which implies direct nucleation of apatite in bone. This biological apatite formation is likely opposed to that of sedimentary apatite, which apparently forms by successive crystallization. Application of the method to

  15. Technical Note: An X-ray absorption method for the identification of calcium phosphate species using peak-height ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) studies on calcium phosphate species (Ca-P) deal with marginal differences among subtle spectral features despite a hitherto missing systematic breakdown of these differences. Related fingerprinting approaches depend, therefore, on spectral libraries that are not validated against each other, incomplete and scattered among publications. This study compiled a comprehensive spectral library from published reference compound libraries in order to establish more clear-cut criteria for Ca-P determination by distinctive phosphorus K-edge XANES features. A specifically developed normalization method identified diagnostic spectral features in the compiled library, e.g. by uniform calculation of ratios between white-line and secondary peak heights. Post-processing of the spectra (n = 81) verified distinguishability among most but not all phases, which included hydroxylapatite (HAP), poorly crystalline HAP, amorphous HAP, fluorapatite, carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP), carbonate hydroxylapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), brushite, monetite, monocalcium phosphate, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), anapaite, herderite, scholzite, messelite, whiteite and P on CaCO3. Particularly, peak-height ratios significantly improved analyte specificity, e.g. by supplementary breakdown into OCP and ACP. The spectral analysis also revealed Ca-P standards that were rarely investigated or inappropriately synthesized, and thus provides a basis for standard selection and synthesis. The method developed and resulting breakdown by species were subsequently tested on Ca-P spectra from studies on bone and sediment. The test indicated that bone material likely comprises only poorly crystalline apatite, which confirms direct nucleation of apatite in bone. This biological apatite formation is likely opposed to that of sedimentary apatite, which apparently forms by both direct nucleation and successive crystallization. Application of

  16. Origin of high energy Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    The flux of cosmic ray antiprotons and the chemical composition in the region of the 'knee' of the cosmic ray energy spectrum are discussed. The importance of a direct determination of the energy spectrum of each major component of cosmic radiation through the knee region is stressed, and the necessary kinds of experiments are described. It is emphasized that antiprotons are a unique probe of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles in the galaxy because of the high threshold for their production.

  17. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime

    PubMed Central

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates–sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity–have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics. PMID:27193700

  18. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-05-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates–sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity–have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics.

  19. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime.

    PubMed

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates-sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity-have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics. PMID:27193700

  20. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  1. MUDMASTER: A Program for Calculating Crystalline Size Distributions and Strain from the Shapes of X-Ray Diffraction Peaks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Drits, V.A.; Srodon, Jan; Nuesch, R.

    1996-01-01

    Particle size may strongly influence the physical and chemical properties of a substance (e.g. its rheology, surface area, cation exchange capacity, solubility, etc.), and its measurement in rocks may yield geological information about ancient environments (sediment provenance, degree of metamorphism, degree of weathering, current directions, distance to shore, etc.). Therefore mineralogists, geologists, chemists, soil scientists, and others who deal with clay-size material would like to have a convenient method for measuring particle size distributions. Nano-size crystals generally are too fine to be measured by light microscopy. Laser scattering methods give only average particle sizes; therefore particle size can not be measured in a particular crystallographic direction. Also, the particles measured by laser techniques may be composed of several different minerals, and may be agglomerations of individual crystals. Measurement by electron and atomic force microscopy is tedious, expensive, and time consuming. It is difficult to measure more than a few hundred particles per sample by these methods. This many measurements, often taking several days of intensive effort, may yield an accurate mean size for a sample, but may be too few to determine an accurate distribution of sizes. Measurement of size distributions by X-ray diffraction (XRD) solves these shortcomings. An X-ray scan of a sample occurs automatically, taking a few minutes to a few hours. The resulting XRD peaks average diffraction effects from billions of individual nano-size crystals. The size that is measured by XRD may be related to the size of the individual crystals of the mineral in the sample, rather than to the size of particles formed from the agglomeration of these crystals. Therefore one can determine the size of a particular mineral in a mixture of minerals, and the sizes in a particular crystallographic direction of that mineral.

  2. High energy physics in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Lawrence W.

    2013-02-07

    In the first half-century of cosmic ray physics, the primary research focus was on elementary particles; the positron, pi-mesons, mu-mesons, and hyperons were discovered in cosmic rays. Much of this research was carried out at mountain elevations; Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees, Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, and Mt. Evans/Echo Lake in Colorado, among other sites. In the 1960s, claims of the observation of free quarks, and satellite measurements of a significant rise in p-p cross sections, plus the delay in initiating accelerator construction programs for energies above 100 GeV, motivated the Michigan-Wisconsin group to undertake a serious cosmic ray program at Echo Lake. Subsequently, with the succession of higher energy accelerators and colliders at CERN and Fermilab, cosmic ray research has increasingly focused on cosmology and astrophysics, although some groups continue to study cosmic ray particle interactions in emulsion chambers.

  3. Unification of the low-energy excitation peaks in the heat capacity that appears in clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiazhen; Akagi, Kazuto; Xu, Jingtao; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Huynh, Khuong K.; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2016-03-01

    We report that anomalous low-energy excitation (ALE) peaks in the heat capacity emerging from single-crystal cage materials can be successfully rationalized in terms of a single unified exponential line for a variety of type-I clathrates by employing a parameter associated with the freedom of space and the modified radii of guest atoms estimated by band calculations. The origin of these low-energy excitations is interpreted in the framework of quasiharmonic van der Waals type guest-host interactions based on a unified picture with the help of first-principles calculations. It is shown that the influence of guest-host ionic and covalent bonding interactions on the phonon anharmonicity, which have so far been considered to play an important role, are not significant as long as high symmetry of the cage structure is preserved. The dominant van der Waals interactions explain the soft vibrational modes of the rattling, which suppress phonon transport and lead to the concept of "phonon-glass electron-crystal" (PGEC) for thermoelectric applications. A few exceptions existing in type-I clathrates, as indicated by deviations from the unified line, suggest that a quasiharmonic potential can become more asymmetric via lower symmetry of the cage structure, towards glasslike disordered states at even lower temperatures. Although the origin of the boson peaks appearing in disordered materials is still under debate due to incomplete information on the real structure, the understanding provided by the present paper for crystalline cage materials may provide information partly applicable to other disordered systems.

  4. Novel impact-based peak-energy locking piezoelectric generators for munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, J.; Murray, R.; Pereira, C.; Nguyen, H.-L.

    2007-04-01

    Presented here is an innovative class of piezoelectric-based generators for application in gun-fired munitions and other similar devices. The generators are designed to produce electrical energy as a result of the firing acceleration with enough output to power certain on-board electronic circuitry, such as lowpower fuzing. In this class of piezoelectric-based generators, a novel mechanism is provided with which the strain applied to the piezoelectric stack can be maintained at its in-firing peak value throughout the flight of the projectile. As a result, the generated charge can be harvested efficiently during a significantly longer period of time. In addition, in some munitions applications this can totally eliminate the need for storing the generated electrical energy in another storage medium. This class of impact-based piezoelectric generator devices is intrinsically robust in design which makes it suitable for high-G applications. Also, since the present devices produce energy due to the firing acceleration, a high degree of safety is guaranteed because the electronics are not powered until the projectile is fired. A basic proof-of-concept design and a deployable prototype concept are presented which will demonstrate the scalability of the present devices as well as their survivability in high-G environments.

  5. Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Scarsi, Livio

    1998-06-15

    Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray particles (EECR) with E>10{sup 20} eV arriving on Earth with very low flux ({approx}1 particle/Km{sup 2}-1000yr) require for their investigation very large detecting areas, exceeding values of 1000 km{sup 2} sr. Projects with these dimensions are now being proposed: Ground Arrays ('Auger' with 2x3500 km{sup 2} sr) or exploiting the Earth Atmosphere as seen from space ('AIR WATCH' and OWL,'' with effective area reaching 1 million km{sup 2} sr). In this last case, by using as a target the 10{sup 13} tons of air viewed, also the high energy neutrino flux can be investigated conveniently. Gamma Rays Bursts are suggested as a possible source for EECR and the associated High Energy neutrino flux.

  6. X-class Solar Flare Energy Partition into Radiative, Non-Thermal Acceleration of Electrons and Peak Thermal Plasma Components - Methodology and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hock, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic processes in the solar system. X-class flares are the largest and can convert up to 1033 ergs of magnetic energy into the acceleration of charged particles and the heating of plasma. They are often accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We discuss the methodology and results of the energy partition into three main components: (1) radiative energy, (2) non-thermal acceleration of electrons, and (3) the peak thermal energy content, for a subset of the largest eruptive events from Solar Cycle 23, as derived from satellite observations and empirical models. The bolometric energy content is on the order of 1031 - 1032 ergs and is extracted from Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). The Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) contribution of the total radiative output is obtained by implementing the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). Furthermore, we partition the radiative release into impulsive and gradual phases. X-ray spectra from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) are used to deduce the energy in the non-thermal accelerated electrons, generally found to be 1031 -1032 ergs, and the peak thermal energy content of around 1030 - 1031 ergs. Aside from the CME kinetic energy, these three components contain a substantial amount of the initial available magnetic energy.

  7. Low Energy X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Wayne R.

    1981-10-01

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d=9.95Å) crystal. To preclude higher order (n≳1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than ˜1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surfaced photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminum light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any UV generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral enegy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni Lα1,2 lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy X-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable.

  8. Formation and conversion of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical fiber induced by gamma rays irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J. X.; Luo, W. Y.; Xiao, Z. Y.; Wang, T. Y.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zeng, X. L.

    2010-02-15

    The formation and conversion processes of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical (LWPSM) fiber irradiated with gamma rays were investigated at room temperature using electron spin resonance. Germanium electron center (GEC) and self-trapped hole center (STH) occur when the fibers are irradiated with 1 and 5 kGy cumulative doses, respectively. With the increase in irradiation doses, the GEC defect centers disappear, and new defect centers such as E{sup '} centers (Si and Ge) and nonbridge oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) generate. The generation of GEC and STH is attributed to the electron transfer, which is completely balanced. This is the main reason that radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) of the LWPSM fiber is only 10 dB/km at communication window. The new defect centers come from the conversion of GEC and STH to E{sup '} centers and NBOHC, and the conversion processes cause bond cleavage, which is the root cause that the RIA of the LWPSM fiber significantly increases up to 180 dB/km at working window. Furthermore, the concentration of new defect centers is saturated easily even by increasing cumulative doses.

  9. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  10. Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M.; Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F.

    2013-05-13

    Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

  11. X-Ray Transition Energies Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 128 X-Ray Transition Energies Database (Web, free access)   This X-ray transition table provides the energies and wavelengths for the K and L transitions connecting energy levels having principal quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The elements covered include Z = 10, neon to Z = 100, fermium. There are two unique features of this data base: (1) a serious attempt to have all experimental values on a scale consistent with the International System of measurement (the SI) and (2) inclusion of accurate theoretical estimates for all transitions.

  12. GAMMA-RAY LOUDNESS, SYNCHROTRON PEAK FREQUENCY, AND PARSEC-SCALE PROPERTIES OF BLAZARS DETECTED BY THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Linford, J. D.; Taylor, G. B.; Schinzel, F. K.

    2012-09-20

    The parsec-scale radio properties of 232 active galactic nuclei, most of which are blazars, detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. Data from both the first 11 months (1FGL) and the first 2 years (2FGL) of the Fermi mission were used to investigate these sources' {gamma}-ray properties. We use the ratio of the {gamma}-ray-to-radio luminosity as a measure of {gamma}-ray loudness. We investigate the relationship of several radio properties to {gamma}-ray loudness and to the synchrotron peak frequency. There is a tentative correlation between {gamma}-ray loudness and synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects in both 1FGL and 2FGL, and for flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in 2FGL. We find that the apparent opening angle tentatively correlates with {gamma}-ray loudness for FSRQs, but only when we use the 2FGL data. We also find that the total VLBA flux density correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects and FSRQs. The core brightness temperature also correlates with synchrotron peak frequency, but only for the BL Lac objects. The low-synchrotron-peaked (LSP) BL Lac object sample shows indications of contamination by FSRQs which happen to have undetectable emission lines. There is evidence that the LSP BL Lac objects are more strongly beamed than the rest of the BL Lac object population.

  13. Searching for Dual AGNs in Galaxy Mergers: Understanding Double-Peaked [O III] and Ultra Hard X-rays as Selection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurk, Rosalie C.; Max, Claire E.; Medling, Anne; Shields, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    When galaxies merge, gas accretes onto both central supermassive black holes. Thus, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O III] or of ultra hard X-rays have been proposed as techniques to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O III] emitting AGNs from SDSS DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck 2 Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared (IR) camera NIRC2, we showed that 30% of double-peaked [O III] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3' radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up these spatially-double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and Gemini GMOS and with long-slit spectroscopy from Keck NIRSPEC and Shane Kast Double Spectrograph. We find double-peaked emitters are caused sometimes by dual AGN and sometimes by outflows or narrow line kinematics. We also performed Chandra X-ray ACIS-S observations on 12 double-peaked candidate dual AGNs. Using our observations and 8 archival observations, we compare the distribution of X-ray photons to our spatially double near-IR images, measure X-ray luminosities and hardness ratios, and estimate column densities. By assessing what fraction of double-peaked emission line SDSS AGNs are true dual AGNs, we can better determine whether double-peaked [O III] is an efficient dual AGN indicator and constrain the statistics of dual AGNs. A second technique to find dual AGN is the detection of ultra hard X-rays by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. We use CARMA observations to measure and map the CO(1-0) present in nearby ultra-hard X-ray Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) merging with either a quiescent companion

  14. Monopole annihilation and highest energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, P. Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Sarjapur Road, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 ); Sigl, G. NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 )

    1995-04-15

    Cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10[sup 20] eV have been detected. The origin of these highest energy cosmic rays remains unknown. Established astrophysical acceleration mechanisms encounter severe difficulties in accelerating particles to these energies. Alternative scenarios where these particles are created by the decay of cosmic topological defects have been suggested in the literature. In this paper we study the possibility of producing the highest energy cosmic rays through a process that involves the formation of metastable magnetic monopole-antimonopole bound states and their subsequent collapse. The annihilation of the heavy monopole-antimonopole pairs constituting the monopolonia can produce energetic nucleons, [gamma] rays, and neutrinos whose expected flux we estimate and discuss in relation to experimental data so far available. The monopoles we consider are the ones that could be produced in the early Universe during a phase transition at the grand unification energy scale. We find that observable cosmic ray fluxes can be produced with monopole abundances compatible with present bounds.

  15. X-ray peak broadening analysis of AA 6061{sub 100-x} - x wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite prepared by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Sivasankaran, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Narayanasamy, R.; Satyanarayana, P.V.

    2011-07-15

    Nanocrystalline AA 6061 alloy reinforced with alumina (0, 4, 8, and 12 wt.%) in amorphized state composite powder was synthesized by mechanical alloying and consolidated by conventional powder metallurgy route. The as-milled and as-sintered (573 K and 673 K) nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The peaks corresponding to fine alumina was not observed by XRD patterns due to amorphization. Using high-resolution transmission electron microscope, it is confirmed that the presence of amorphized alumina observed in Al lattice fringes. The crystallite size, lattice strain, deformation stress, and strain energy density of AA 6061 matrix were determined precisely from the first five most intensive reflection of XRD using simple Williamson-Hall models; uniform deformation model, uniform stress deformation model, and uniform energy density deformation model. Among the developed models, uniform energy density deformation model was observed to be the best fit and realistic model for mechanically alloyed powders. This model evidenced the more anisotropic nature of the ball milled powders. The XRD peaks of as-milled powder samples demonstrated a considerable broadening with percentage of reinforcement due to grain refinement and lattice distortions during same milling time (40 h). The as-sintered (673 K) unreinforced AA 6061 matrix crystallite size from well fitted uniform energy density deformation model was 98 nm. The as-milled and as-sintered (673 K) nanocrystallite matrix sizes for 12 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} well fitted by uniform energy density deformation model were 38 nm and 77 nm respectively, which indicate that the fine Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} pinned the matrix grain boundary and prevented the grain growth during sintering. Finally, the lattice parameter of Al matrix in as-milled and as-sintered conditions was also investigated in this paper. Research highlights: {yields} Integral breadth methods using various

  16. Short-term flux and colour variations in low-energy peaked blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Bindu; Gupta, Alok C.; Strigachev, A.; Bachev, R.; Wiita, Paul J.; Semkov, E.; Ovcharov, E.; Mihov, B.; Boeva, S.; Peneva, S.; Spassov, B.; Tsvetkova, S.; Stoyanov, K.; Valcheva, A.

    2010-06-01

    We have measured multiband optical flux and colour variations for a sample of 12 low-energy peaked blazars (LBLs) on short, day-to-month, time-scales. Our sample contains six BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) and six flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). These photometric observations, made during 2008 September to 2009 June, used five optical telescopes, one in India and four in Bulgaria. We detected short-term flux variations in 11 of these blazars and colour variability in eight of them. Our data indicate that six blazars (3C 66A, AO 0235+164, S50716+714, PKS 0735+178, OJ 287 and 3C 454.3) were observed in pre- or post-outburst states, five (PKS 0420-014, 4C 29.45, 3C 279, PKS 1510-089 and BL Lac) were in a low state, while one (3C 273) was in an essentially steady state. The duty cycles for flux and colour variations on short time-scales in these LBLs are ~92 and ~33 per cent, respectively. The colour versus magnitude correlations seen here support the hypothesis that BL Lac objects tend to become bluer with increase in brightness; however, FSRQs may show the opposite trend, and there are exceptions to these trends in both categories of blazar. We briefly discuss emission models for active galactic nuclei that might explain our results.

  17. Tentative study on high-photon-energy quasi-x-ray laser generator by forming plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Ichimaru, Toshio; Mori, Hidezo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Sakamaki, Kimio; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2001-04-01

    Tentative study on high-photon-energy quasi-x-ray-laser generator by forming plasma x-ray source is described. The generator employs a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line, a high-voltage condenser with a capacity of about 200 nF, a turbo-molecular pump, a thyristor pulse generator as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser is charged up to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to the turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As the electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to the copper target by the electric field in the tube, the plasma x- ray source, which consists of metal ions and electrons, forms by the target evaporating. Both the tube voltage and current displayed damped oscillations, and their peak values increased according to increases in the charging voltage. In the present work, the peak tube voltage was much higher than the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. When the charging voltage was increased, the plasma x-ray source formed, and the characteristic x-ray intensities of K-series lines increased. When the plate target was employed, we observed high-intensity characteristic x-rays from the axial direction of the linear plasma x-ray source. In the case where the rod target was employed, we detected higher-intensity characteristic x-rays.

  18. MULTICHANNEL ENERGY AND TIMING MEASUREMENTS WITH THE PEAK DETECTOR/DERANDOMIZER ASIC.

    SciTech Connect

    O'CONNOR,P.; DE GERONIMO,G.; GROSHOLZ,J.; KANDASAMY,A.; JUNNARKAR,S.; FRIED,J.

    2004-10-16

    The Peak Detector/Derandomizer ASIC (PDD) provides threshold discrimination, peak detection, time-to-amplitude conversion, analog memory, sparsification, and multiplexing for 32 channels of analog pulse data. In this work the spectroscopic capabilities of the chip (high resolution and high rate) are demonstrated along with correlated measurements of pulse risetime. Imaging and coincidence detection using the PDD chip will also be illustrated.

  19. Correlation of γ-ray and high-energy cosmic ray fluxes from the giant lobes of Centaurus A

    SciTech Connect

    Fraija, N.

    2014-03-01

    The spectral energy distribution of giant lobes shows one main peak detected by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe at the low energy of 10{sup –5} eV and a faint γ-ray flux imaged by the Fermi Large Area Telescope at an energy of ≥100 MeV. On the other hand, the Pierre Auger Observatory associated some ultra-high-energy cosmic rays with the direction of Centaurus A and IceCube reported 28 neutrino-induced events in a TeV-PeV energy range, although none of them related with this direction. In this work, we describe the spectra for each of the lobes, the main peak with synchrotron radiation, and the high-energy emission with p-p interactions. After obtaining a good description of the main peak, we deduce the magnetic fields, electron densities, and the age of the lobes. Successfully describing the γ-ray emission by p-p interactions and considering thermal particles in the lobes with density in the range 10{sup –10}-10{sup –4} cm{sup –3} as targets, we calculate the number of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. Although the γ-spectrum is well described with any density in the range, only when 10{sup –4} cm{sup –3} is considered are the expected number of events very similar to that observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory, otherwise we obtain an excessive luminosity. In addition, correlating the γ-ray and neutrino fluxes through p-p interactions, we calculate the number of high-energy neutrinos expected in IceCube. Our analysis indicates that neutrinos above 1 TeV cannot be produced in the lobes of Centaurus A, which is consistent with the results recently published by the IceCube Collaboration.

  20. Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the

  1. Evidence for Temporally-Extended, High-Energy Emission from Gamma Ray Burst 990104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, D. N.; Bertsch, D. L.; Ritz, S.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that high-energy emission (MeV - GeV) has been observed in several gamma ray bursts and temporally-extended emission from lower-energy gamma rays through radio wavelengths is well established. Observations of extended, high-energy emission are, however, scarce. Here we present evidence for a gamma ray burst emission that is both high-energy and extended, coincident with lower energy emissions. For the very bright and long burst, GRB 990104, we show light curves and spectra that confirm emission above 50 MeV, approximately 152 seconds after the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) trigger and initial burst emission. Between the initial output and the main peak, seen at both low and high energy, there was a period of approx. 100 s during which the burst was relatively quiet. This burst was found as part of an ongoing search for high-energy emission in gamma ray bursts.

  2. Active galactic nuclei at gamma-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles Dennison; Giebels, Berrie

    2016-06-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei can be copious extragalactic emitters of MeV-GeV-TeV γ rays, a phenomenon linked to the presence of relativistic jets powered by a super-massive black hole in the center of the host galaxy. Most of γ-ray emitting active galactic nuclei, with more than 1500 known at GeV energies, and more than 60 at TeV energies, are called "blazars". The standard blazar paradigm features a jet of relativistic magnetized plasma ejected from the neighborhood of a spinning and accreting super-massive black hole, close to the observer direction. Two classes of blazars are distinguished from observations: the flat-spectrum radio-quasar class (FSRQ) is characterized by strong external radiation fields, emission of broad optical lines, and dust tori. The BL Lac class (from the name of one of its members, BL Lacertae) corresponds to weaker advection-dominated flows with γ-ray spectra dominated by the inverse Compton effect on synchrotron photons. This paradigm has been very successful for modeling the broadband spectral energy distributions of blazars. However, many fundamental issues remain, including the role of hadronic processes and the rapid variability of a few FSRQs and several BL Lac objects whose synchrotron spectrum peaks at UV or X-ray frequencies. A class of γ-ray-emitting radio galaxies, which are thought to be the misaligned counterparts of blazars, has emerged from the results of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. Soft γ-ray emission has been detected from a few nearby Seyfert galaxies, though it is not clear whether those γ rays originate from the nucleus. Blazars and their misaligned counterparts make up most of the ≳100 MeV extragalactic γ-ray background (EGB), and are suspected of being the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The future "Cherenkov Telescope Array", in synergy with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and a wide range of telescopes in space and on the ground, will write the next chapter

  3. Testing the Gamma-Ray Burst Energy Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Preece, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    Building on Nakar & Piran's analysis of the Amati relation relating gamma-ray burst peak energies E(sub p) and isotropic energies E(sub iso ) we test the consistency of a large sample of BATSE bursts with the Amati and Ghirlanda (which relates peak energies and actual gamma-ray energies E(sub gamma)) relations. Each of these relations can be exp ressed as a ratio of the different energies that is a function of red shift (for both the Amati and Ghirlanda relations) and beaming fraction f(sub B) (for the Ghirlanda relation). The most rigorous test, whic h allows bursts to be at any redshift, corroborates Nakar & Piran's r esult - 88% of the BATSE bursts are inconsistent with the Amati relat ion - while only l.6% of the bursts are inconsistent with the Ghirlan da relation if f(sub B) = 1. Modelling the redshift distribution resu lts in an energy ratio distribution for the Amati relation that is sh ifted by an order of magnitude relative to the observed distributions; any sub-population satisfying the Amati relation can comprise at mos t approx. 18% of our burst sample. A similar analysis of the Ghirland a relation depends sensitively on the beaming fraction distribution f or small values of f(sub B); for reasonable estimates of this distrib ution about a third of the burst sample is inconsistent with the Ghir landa relation. Our results indicate that these relations are an artifact of the selection effects of the burst sample in which they were f ound; these selection effects may favor sub-populations for which the se relations are valid.

  4. Robust gain-scheduling energy-to-peak control of vehicle lateral dynamics stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xinjie; Wang, Junmin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the vehicle lateral dynamics stabilisation problem to enhance vehicle handling by considering time-varying longitudinal velocity. The longitudinal velocity is described by a polytope with finite vertices and a novel technique is proposed to reduce the number of vertices. Since the tyre dynamics is nonlinear, the cornering stiffness is represented via the norm-bounded uncertainty. Concerning the time-varying velocity and the nonlinear tyre model, a linear parameter-varying vehicle model is obtained. As the velocity and the states are measurable, a gain-scheduling state-feedback controller is introduced. In the lateral control, the sideslip angle is required to be as small as possible and the yaw rate is constrained to a certain level. Thus, the control objective is to minimise the sideslip angle while the yaw rate is under a prescribed level or constrain both the sideslip angle and the yaw rate to prescribed levels. To consider the transient response of the closed-loop system, the ?-stability is also employed in the energy-to-peak control. The optimal controller can be obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. A nonlinear vehicle model is utilised to illustrate the design procedure and the effectiveness of the proposed design method. Finally, simulations and comparisons are carried out to show the significant advantage of the designed controller. Compared to the open-loop system, the closed-loop system with the designed controller can achieve much smaller sideslip angle and the yaw rate is closer to the desired yaw rate from a reference model. Therefore, the vehicle safety and the handling are both improved in our simulation cases.

  5. Tube bundle system studies at Signal Peak Energy Bull Mountains #1 Mine

    PubMed Central

    Zipf, R.K.; Ochsner, R.; Krog, R.; Marchewka, W.; Valente, M.; Jensen, R.

    2015-01-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine for analysis and display on the surface. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), in collaboration with Signal Peak Energy (SPE), LLC, Bull Mountains No. 1 Mine, operated a TBS during mining of two bleederless, longwall panels. This paper describes the gas analysis data and its interpretation. As verified by the TBS, coal at the SPE mine tends to oxidize slowly. It was known that a reservoir of low-oxygen concentration atmosphere developed about 610 m (2,000 ft) behind the longwall face. A bleederless ventilation system facilitates formation of an inert atmosphere in this longwall gob and decreases the likelihood of spontaneous combustion. Connections of the mine atmosphere to the surface through subsidence cracks could allow airflow into the longwall gob, revive coal oxidation and increase spontaneous combustion risk. The atmospheric composition of the sealed areas was homogeneous, except in the immediate vicinity of suspected ingassing points. The TBS verified that gases within the partially sealed, bleederless longwall gob expanded into the longwall tailgate area when barometric pressure decreased. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the back return airflow at the longwall tailgate was observed to increase by a factor of three and possibly up to 10 times the typical background concentration of 0.5 to 1.0%, depending on the size of the longwall gob and the magnitude of barometric pressure decrease. TBS have the inherent disadvantage of slow response time due to travel time of the gas samples and sequential gas analyses. A TBS or similar continuous monitoring system could be beneficial in detecting and providing warning of potentially hazardous gas concentrations, if the slow response time of the system is always understood. PMID:26306075

  6. Magnetic Nature of the 500 meV peak in La2−xSrxCuO4 Observed with Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering at the Cu K-edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Ellis, D.S.; Kim, J.; Wakimoto, S.; Birgeneau, R.J.; Shvyd’ko, Y.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Ishii, K.; Ikeuchi, K.; Paramekanti, A.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2010-02-15

    We present a comprehensive study of the temperature and doping dependence of the 500 meV peak observed at q = ({pi},0) in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments on La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The intensity of this peak persists above the Neel temperature (T{sub N} = 320 K), but decreases gradually with increasing temperature, reaching zero at around T = 500 K. The peak energy decreases with temperature in close quantitative accord with the behavior of the two-magnon B{sub 1g} Raman peak in La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and, with suitable rescaling, agrees with the Raman peak shifts in EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}. The overall dispersion of this excitation in the Brillouin zone is found to be in agreement with theoretical calculations for a two-magnon excitation. Upon doping, the peak intensity decreases analogous to the Raman mode intensity and appears to track the doping dependence of the spin-correlation length. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that the 500 meV mode is magnetic in character and is likely a two-magnon excitation.

  7. Transient structure in the high-energy X-ray light curve of NP 0532

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryckman, S. G.; Ricker, G. R.; Scheepmaker, A.; Ballintine, J. E.; Doty, J. P.; Downey, P. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the observation of pulsed fractions in the primary and secondary peaks, as well as in the interpulse region, of the high-energy X-ray light curve of NP 0532. A statistical analysis of light-curve data is performed, and a similar analysis is carried out using simulated data. It is concluded that a previously reported third peak in the light curve was transient in nature.

  8. Validation Methodology to Allow Simulated Peak Reduction and Energy Performance Analysis of Residential Building Envelope with Phase Change Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.

    2012-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in residential buildings. This paper summarizes NREL efforts to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings: the overall methodology to verify and validate Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) and PCM algorithms in EnergyPlus is presented in this study. It also shows preliminary results of three residential building enclosure technologies containing PCM: PCM-enhanced insulation, PCM impregnated drywall and thin PCM layers. The results are compared based on predicted peak reduction and energy savings using two algorithms in EnergyPlus: the PCM and Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) algorithms.

  9. Radiative Energy Loss by Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahern, Sean C.; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between galactic cosmic rays and matter are a primary focus of the NASA radiation problem. The electromagnetic forces involved are for the most part well documented. Building on previous research, this study investigated the relative importance of the weak forces that occur when a cosmic ray impinges on different types of materials. For the familiar electromagnetic case, it is known that energy lost in the form of radiation is more significant than that lost via contact collisions the rate at which the energy is lost is also well understood. Similar results were derived for the weak force case. It was found that radiation is also the dominant mode of energy loss in weak force interactions and that weak force effects are indeed relatively weak compared to electromagnetic effects.

  10. Dynamical behavior and peak power reduction in a pair of energy storage oscillators coupled by delayed power price

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunaga, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Tomoaki; Ito, Akira; Sugitani, Yoshiki; Konishi, Keiji; Hara, Naoyuki

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates dynamics of a management system for controlling a pair of energy storages. The system involves the following two characteristics: each storage behaves in a manner that reduces the number of charge noncharge cycles and begins to be charged when the price of power is lower than a particular price threshold. The price is proportional to the past total power flow from a power grid to all storages. A peak of the total power flow occurs when these storages are charged simultaneously. From the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics, the energy storages can be considered as relaxation oscillators coupled by a delay connection. Our analytical results suggest that the peak can be reduced by inducing an antiphase synchronization in coupled oscillators. We confirm these analytical results through numerical simulations. In addition, we numerically investigate the dynamical behavior in 10 storages and find that time delay in the connection is important in reducing the peak.

  11. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  12. Ion acceleration to cosmic ray energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Martin A.

    1990-01-01

    The acceleration and transport environment of the outer heliosphere is described schematically. Acceleration occurs where the divergence of the solar-wind flow is negative, that is at shocks, and where second-order Fermi acceleration is possible in the solar-wind turbulence. Acceleration at the solar-wind termination shock is presented by reviewing the spherically-symmetric calculation of Webb et al. (1985). Reacceleration of galactic cosmic rays at the termination shock is not expected to be important in modifying the cosmic ray spectrum, but acceleration of ions injected at the shock up to energies not greater than 300 MeV/charge is expected to occur and to create the anomalous cosmic ray component. Acceleration of energetic particles by solar wind turbulence is expected to play almost no role in the outer heliosphere. The one exception is the energization of interstellar pickup ions beyond the threshold for acceleration at the quasi-perpendicular termination shock.

  13. Very high energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results in ground based very high energy gamma ray astronomy are reviewed. The various modes of the atmospheric Cerenkov technique are described, and the importance of cosmic ray rejection methods is stressed. The positive detections of the Crab pulsar that suggest a very flat spectrum and time-variable pulse phase are discussed. Observations of other pulsars (particularly Vela) suggest these features may be general. Evidence that a 4.8 hr modulated effect was detected from Cyg X-3 is strengthened in that the exact period originally proposed agrees well with a recent determination of the X-ray period. The southern sky observations are reviewed, and the significance of the detection of an active galaxy (NGC 5128) is considered for source models and future observations.

  14. Energy Scales in X-Ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillotson, W. A.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Cottam, J.; Figueroa, E.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Stahle, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Microcalorimeter pulse shape characteristics, such as pulse height, decay time and rise time, are dependent on the detector temperature and bias as well as the photon energy and flux. We examine the nature of the temperature dependency by illuminating the ASTRO-E2 X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) microcalorimeter array with X-rays generated by electron impact on a range of foil targets. The resulting pulses are collected for a range of detector temperatures. We observe and model the temperature dependence of the pulse shape characteristics by fitting the data with non-linear pulse models. Our aim is to determine a robust method for correcting the energy scale obtained in ground calibration for slight differences in the operating conditions while in orbit.

  15. Internal energy dissipation of gamma-ray bursts observed with Swift: Precursors, prompt gamma-rays, extended emission, and late X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, You-Dong; Liang, En-Wei; Xi, Shao-Qiang; Peng, Fang-Kun; Lu, Rui-Jing; Lü, Lian-Zhong; Zhang, Bing E-mail: Zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-07-10

    We jointly analyze the gamma-ray burst (GRB) data observed with Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and X-ray Telescope on board the Swift mission to present a global view on the internal energy dissipation processes in GRBs, including precursors, prompt gamma-ray emission, extended soft gamma-ray emission, and late X-ray flares. The Bayesian block method is utilized to analyze the BAT light curves to identify various emission episodes. Our results suggest that these emission components likely share the same physical origin, which is the repeated activation of the GRB central engine. What we observe in the gamma-ray band may be a small part of more extended underlying activities. The precursor emission, which is detected in about 10% of Swift GRBs, is preferably detected in those GRBs that have a massive star core-collapse origin. The soft extended emission tail, on the other hand, is preferably detected in those GRBs that have a compact star merger origin. Bright X-ray emission is detected during the BAT quiescent phases prior to subsequent gamma-ray peaks, implying that X-ray emission may be detectable prior the BAT trigger time. Future GRB alert instruments with soft X-ray capability are essential for revealing the early stages of GRB central engine activities, and shedding light on jet composition and the jet launching mechanism in GRBs.

  16. An Experiment to Demonstrate the Energy Broadening of Annihilation Gamma Rays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.; DuBard, James L.

    1978-01-01

    Shows that when positions annihilate in solid materials the energy distribution of the annihilation gamma rays is much broader than that of a 0.511-Mev gamma peak. This broadening is caused by the momentum distribution of the electrons in the material. (Author/GA)

  17. Modulation of low-energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sari, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The relation between the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays in the solar wind and the power spectrum of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, established in recent theories, is tested directly for low energy protons (below 80 MeV). In addition, an attempt is made to determine whether the particles are scattered by magnetic field discontinuities or by fluctuations between discontinuities. Predictions of a perturbation solution of the Fokker-Planck equation are compared with observations of the cosmic ray radial gradient. It is found that at energies between 40 and 80 MeV, galactic cosmic ray protons respond to changes in the predicted diffusion coefficients (i.e., the relationship under consideration holds at these low energies). The relation between changes in the proton flux and modulation parameters is best when the contribution of discontinuities is subtracted, which means that scattering is caused by fluctuations between discontinuities. There appears to be no distinct relation between changes in the modulation parameters and changes in the intensity of 20 to 40 MeV protons.

  18. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    SciTech Connect

    DeForest, Nicholas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

    2013-06-02

    In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity demand. In the developing world a steadily increasing utilization of air-conditioning places additional strain on already-congested grids. This common thread represents a large and growing threat to the reliable delivery of electricity around the world, requiring capital-intensive expansion of capacity and draining available investment resources. Thermal energy storage (TES), in the form of ice or chilled water, may be one of the few technologies currently capable of mitigating this problem cost effectively and at scale. The installation of TES capacity allows a building to meet its on-peak air conditioning load without interruption using electricity purchased off-peak and operating with improved thermodynamic efficiency. In this way, TES has the potential to fundamentally alter consumption dynamics and reduce impacts of air conditioning. This investigation presents a simulation study of a large office building in four distinct geographical contexts: Miami, Lisbon, Shanghai, and Mumbai. The optimization tool DER-CAM (Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model) is applied to optimally size TES systems for each location. Summer load profiles are investigated to assess the effectiveness and consistency in reducing peak electricity demand. Additionally, annual energy requirements are used to determine system cost feasibility, payback periods and customer savings under local utility tariffs.

  19. Significance of medium energy gamma ray astronomy in the study of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Cheung, C. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Medium energy (about 10 to 30 MeV) gamma ray astronomy provides information on the product of the galactic electron cosmic ray intensity and the galactic matter to which the electrons are dynamically coupled by the magnetic field. Because high energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma ray astronomy provides analogous information for the nucleonic cosmic rays and the relevant matter, a comparison between high energy and medium energy gamma ray intensities provides a direct ratio of the cosmic ray electrons and nucleons throughout the galaxy. A calculation of gamma ray production by electron bremsstrahlung shows that: bremsstrahlung energy loss is probably not negligible over the lifetime of the electrons in the galaxy; and the approximate bremsstrahlung calculation often used previously overestimates the gamma ray intensity by about a factor of two. As a specific example, expected medium energy gamma ray intensities are calculated for the speral arm model.

  20. The Performance of the Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking In-Beam Nuclear Array GRETINA

    SciTech Connect

    Paschalis, S.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Campbell, C. M.; Cromaz, M.; Gros, S.; Pavin, J.; Qian, J.; Clark, R. M.; Crawford, H. L.; Doering, D.; Fallon, P.; Lionberger, C.; Loew, T.; Petri, M.; Stezelberger, T.; Zimmerman, S.; Radford, David C; Lagergren, Karin B; Weisshaar, D.; Winkler, R.; Glasmacher, T.; Anderson, J. T,; Beausang, C. W.

    2013-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking In-beam Nuclear Array (GRETINA) is a new generation high-resolution -ray spectrometer consisting of electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. GRETINA is capable of reconstructing the energy and position of each -ray interaction point inside the crystal with high resolution. This enables -ray energy tracking which in turn provides an array with large photopeak efficiency, high resolution and good peak-to-total ratio. GRETINA is used for nuclear structure studies with demanding -ray detection requirements and it is suitable for experiments with radioactive-ion beams with high recoil velocities. The GRETINA array has a 1 solid angle coverage and constitutes the first stage towards the full 4 array GRETA. We present in this paper the main parts and the performance of the GRETINA system.

  1. Search of the energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope (EGRET) data for high-energy gamma-ray microsecond bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Esposito, J. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Hawking (1974) and Page & Hawking (1976) investigated theoretically the possibility of detecting high-energy gamma rays produced by the quantum-mechanical decay of a small black hole created in the early universe. They concluded that, at the very end of the life of the small black hole, it would radiate a burst of gamma rays peaked near 250 MeV with a total energy of about 10(exp 34) ergs in the order of a microsecond or less. The characteristics of a black hole are determined by laws of physics beyond the range of current particle accelerators; hence, the search for these short bursts of high-energy gamma rays provides at least the possibility of being the first test of this region of physics. The Compton Observatory Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) has the capability of detecting directly the gamma rays from such bursts at a much fainter level than SAS 2, and a search of the EGRET data has led to an upper limit of 5 x 10(exp -2) black hole decays per cu pc per yr, placing constraints on this and other theories predicting microsecond high-energy gamma-ray bursts.

  2. Terrestrial effects of high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atri, Dimitra

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere, initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles and photons. Increased ionization leads to changes in atmospheric chemistry, resulting in ozone depletion. This increases the flux of solar UVB radiation at the surface, which is potentially harmful to living organisms. Increased ionization affects the global electrical circuit, which could enhance the low-altitude cloud formation rate. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of hadronic interactions of the primary cosmic rays with the atmosphere are able to reach the ground, enhancing the biological radiation dose. The muon flux dominates the radiation dose from cosmic rays causing damage to DNA and an increase in mutation rates and cancer, which can have serious biological implications for surface and sub-surface life. Using CORSIKA, we perform massive computer simulations and construct lookup tables for 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries, which can be used to quantify these effects from enhanced cosmic ray exposure to any astrophysical source. These tables are freely available to the community and can be used for other studies. We use these tables to study the terrestrial implications of galactic shock generated by the infall of our galaxy toward the Virgo cluster. Increased radiation dose from muons could be a possible mechanism explaining the observed periodicity in biodiversity in paleobiology databases.

  3. Double-peak structures in transmission of H2+ ions through conical multicapillaries in a polymer: Projectile-energy dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. D.; Wang, Y. Y.; Zhao, Y. T.; Zhou, X. M.; Cheng, R.; Lei, Y.; Sun, Y. B.; Ren, J. R.; Duan, J. L.; Liu, J.; Xu, H. S.; Xiao, G. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission experiments of 7 -200 keV H2+ ions through conical multicapillaries with inlet or outlet diameters of 4/2 μ m and a length of 30 μ m etched in a PC polymer are reported. The yield of the transmitted particles as a function of the capillary tilt angle was measured. The results show that for 200 keV H2+ ions the guiding effect disappears but a focusing effect is obtained with a density enhancement factor of 3.5. For 7 -50 keV H2+ ions their transmitted particle curves exhibit a pair of shoulder peaks on the left- and right-hand side of the center angle 0∘. As the ion energy increases, the shoulder-peak structure is found to vanish leaving one peak at 0∘.

  4. Temporalization of peak electric generation particulate matter emissions during high energy demand days.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Caroline M; Moeller, Michael D; Felder, Frank A; Baker, Kirk R; Rodgers, Mark; Carlton, Annmarie G

    2015-04-01

    Underprediction of peak ambient pollution by air quality models hinders development of effective strategies to protect health and welfare. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's community multiscale air quality (CMAQ) model routinely underpredicts peak ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations. Temporal misallocation of electricity sector emissions contributes to this modeling deficiency. Hourly emissions are created for CMAQ by use of temporal profiles applied to annual emission totals unless a source is matched to a continuous emissions monitor (CEM) in the National Emissions Inventory (NEI). More than 53% of CEMs in the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) electricity market and 45% nationally are unmatched in the 2008 NEI. For July 2006, a United States heat wave with high electricity demand, peak electric sector emissions, and elevated ambient PM2.5 mass, we match hourly emissions for 267 CEM/NEI pairs in PJM (approximately 49% and 12% of unmatched CEMs in PJM and nationwide) using state permits, electricity dispatch modeling and CEMs. Hourly emissions for individual facilities can differ up to 154% during the simulation when measurement data is used rather than default temporalization values. Maximum CMAQ PM2.5 mass, sulfate, and elemental carbon predictions increase up to 83%, 103%, and 310%, at the surface and 51%, 75%, and 38% aloft (800 mb), respectively. PMID:25705922

  5. High-energy spectral breaks in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Model fits are presented for 18 gamma-ray burst spectra from 100 keV to 27 MeV made with the BATSE spectroscopy detectors on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Most of the bursts are well fitted as power laws with spectral indices between -1.36 and -2.29; however, five bursts show definite departures from a simple power-law fit at high energies. Three of these bursts are well fitted with broken power-law spectra and break energies of from 400 to 690 keV, such as might arise from photon-photon interactions. If so, then the source compactness and hence distance will be sharply constrained. Two of the bursts have spectra with sharply confined slope changes and are well fitted with broken power-law spectra with break energies of 1.2 and 1.6 MeV at peak, such as might arise from photon-magnetic field interactions. If so, then these spectral breaks provide strong evidence for the existence of high magnetic fields in the burst emission region.

  6. Active Galactic Nuclei:. Sources for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, P. L.; Becker, J. K.; Caramete, L.; Gergely, L.; Mariş, I. C.; Meli, A.; de Souza, V.; Stanev, T.

    Ultra high energy cosmic ray events presently show a spectrum, which we interpret here as galactic cosmic rays due to a starburst, in the radio galaxy Cen A which is pushed up in energy by the shock of a relativistic jet. The knee feature and the particles with energy immediately higher in galactic cosmic rays then turn into the bulk of ultra high energy cosmic rays. This entails that all ultra high energy cosmic rays are heavy nuclei. This picture is viable if the majority of the observed ultra high energy events come from the radio galaxy Cen A, and are scattered by intergalactic magnetic fields across much of the sky.

  7. Significance of medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy in the study of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Cheung, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the medium-energy (about 10-30 MeV) galactic gamma-ray radiation from primary and secondary electrons and calculates the expected gamma-ray distribution for the specific model of Bignami et al. (1975) on the assumption that the cosmic rays are correlated with the matter on the scale of galactic arms. The energy spectrum typical of regions near the galactic center indicates a dramatic shift from a predominantly cosmic-ray nucleonic mechanism at higher energies to a cosmic-ray electron mechanism at the lower energies. This provides a most important and direct means of probing the cosmic-ray electrons as a function of galactic position by making gamma-ray observations in the few to 40 MeV energy range. Medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy is shown to be a valuable tool in galactic research.

  8. Recent Results from Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Array GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.-Yang

    2012-10-01

    The gamma-ray energy tracking array GRETINA uses 28 Ge crystals, each with 36 segments, to cover .5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex4 of the 4π solid angle. The gamma ray tracking technique uses detailed pulse shape information from each of the segments. These pulses are analyzed to determine the energy, time, and three-dimensional positions of all gamma-ray interactions. This information is then utilized, together with the characteristics of Compton scattering and pair-production processes, to track the scattering sequences of the gamma rays. Tracking arrays will give higher efficiency, better peak-to-total ratio and much higher position resolution, and thus increases the detection sensitivity by factors of several hundred compared to current arrays used in nuclear physics research. Particularly, for fast beam experiments tracking will provide spectra quality comparable to that from a Compton suppressed array, such as Gammasphere, while having the position resolution needed for the accurate Doppler correction comparable to detectors designed for good position resolution such as SeGA. GRETINA construction at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL was completed in March 2011. Extensive engineering and commissioning runs were carried out using radioactive sources, and beams from the Cyclotron until March 2012. The data obtained have been used to debug and improve its performance. After the commissioning period, GRETINA was moved to NSCL MSU and installed at the target position of the S800 spectrograph. The experimental program with a total of twenty four experiments will start in July 2012 after successful commissioning runs. I will present preliminary results from these runs and discuss future research plans.

  9. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: the highest energy frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello Neto, João R. T.

    2016-04-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are the highest energy messengers of the present universe, with energies up to 1020 eV. Studies of astrophysical particles (nuclei, electrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. The primary particles interact in the atmosphere and generate extensive air showers. Analysis of those showers enables one not only to estimate the energy, direction and most probable mass of the primary cosmic particles, but also to obtain information about the properties of their hadronic interactions at an energy more than one order of magnitude above that accessible with the current highest energy human-made accelerator. In this contribution we will review the state-of-the-art in UHECRs detection. We will present the leading experiments Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array and discuss the cosmic ray energy spectrum, searches for directional anisotropy, studies of mass composition, the determination of the number of shower muons (which is sensitive to the shower hadronic interactions) and the proton-air cross section.

  10. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Rafael Antonio; Moncada, Roberto; Guerra, Juan; Anchordoqui, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The search for the origin(s) of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CR) remains one of the cornerstones of high energy astrophysics. The previously proposed sources of acceleration for these UHECRs were gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) due to their energetic activity and powerful jets. However, a problem arises between the acceleration method and the observed CR spectrum. The CRs from GRBs or AGN jets are assumed to undergo Fermi acceleration and a source injection spectrum proportional to E^-2 is expected. However, the most recent fits to the spectrum and nuclear composition suggest an injection spectrum proportional to E^-1. It is well known that such a hard spectrum is characteristic of unipolar induction of rotating compact objects. When this method is applied to the AGN cores, they prove to be much too luminous to accelerate CR nuclei without photodisintegrating, thus creating significant energy losses. Instead, here we re-examine the possibility of these particles being accelerated around the much less luminous quasar remnants, or dead quasars. We compare the interaction times of curvature radiation and photodisintegration, the two primary energy loss considerations with the acceleration time scale. We show that the energy losses at the source are not significant enough as to prevent these CRs from reaching the maximum observed energies. Using data from observatories in the northern and southern sky, the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory respectively, two hotspots have been discerned which have some associated quasar remnants that help to motivate our study.

  11. Low-Energy Peak Structure in Strong-Field Ionization by Mid-Infrared Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemell, C.; Dimitriou, K. I.; Arbó, D. G.; Tong, X.-M.; Kartashov, D.; Burgdörfer, J.; Gräfe, S.

    2013-03-01

    Using a quasiclassical approach, we demonstrate that the formation of the low-energy structure in above-threshold ionization spectra by intense, midinfrared laser pulses originates from a two-dimensional focusing of the strong-field dynamics in the energy-angular-momentum plane. We show that the low-energy structure is very sensitive to the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field.

  12. Analytical sensitivities and energies of thermal neutron capture gamma rays II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moore, H.D.; Leep, D.B.; El-Kady, A.; Duffey, D.

    1971-01-01

    A table of the analytical sensitivities of the principal lines in the thermal neutron capture gamma-ray spectrum from 0 to 3 MeV has been compiled for most of the elements. A tabulation of the full-energy, single-escape, and double-escape peaks has also been made according to energy. The tables are useful for spectral interpretation and calibration. ?? 1971.

  13. Analytical sensitivities and energies of thermal-neutron-capture gamma rays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffey, D.; El-Kady, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1970-01-01

    A table of the analytical sensitivities of the principal lines in the thermal-neutron-capture gamma ray spectrum has been compiled for most of the elements. In addition a second table of the full-energy, single-escape, and double-escape peaks has been compiled according to energy for all significant lines above 3 MeV. Lines that contrast well with adjacent lines are noted as prominent. The tables are useful for spectral interpretation and calibration. ?? 1970.

  14. The thermoluminescence glow curve and the deconvoluted glow peak characteristics of erbium doped silica fiber exposed to 70-130 kVp x-rays.

    PubMed

    Alawiah, A; Bauk, S; Marashdeh, M W; Nazura, M Z N; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Yusoff, Z; Gieszczyk, W; Noramaliza, M N; Adikan, F R Mahamd; Mahdiraji, G A; Tamchek, N; Muhd-Yassin, S Z; Mat-Sharif, K A; Zulkifli, M I; Omar, N; Wan Abdullah, W S; Bradley, D A

    2015-10-01

    In regard to thermoluminescence (TL) applied to dosimetry, in recent times a number of researchers have explored the role of optical fibers for radiation detection and measurement. Many of the studies have focused on the specific dopant concentration, the type of dopant and the fiber core diameter, all key dependencies in producing significant increase in the sensitivity of such fibers. At doses of less than 1 Gy none of these investigations have addressed the relationship between dose response and TL glow peak behavior of erbium (Er)-doped silica cylindrical fibers (CF). For x-rays obtained at accelerating potentials from 70 to 130 kVp, delivering doses of between 0.1 and 0.7 Gy, present study explores the issue of dose response, special attention being paid to determination of the kinetic parameters and dosimetric peak properties of Er-doped CF. The effect of dose response on the kinetic parameters of the glow peak has been compared against other fiber types, revealing previously misunderstood connections between kinetic parameters and radiation dose. Within the investigated dose range there was an absence of supralinearity of response of the Er-doped silica CF, instead sub-linear response being observed. Detailed examination of glow peak response and kinetic parameters has thus been shown to shed new light of the rarely acknowledged issue of the limitation of TL kinetic model and sub-linear dose response of Er-doped silica CF. PMID:26188687

  15. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    The second reflector (project GRANITE) is on schedule. At present (January 1992) it and the 10 m reflector are obtaining stereoscopic views of gamma-ray air showers from the Crab Nebula which verify the expected performance of the twin reflector telescopes. With the additional improvements of the upgrade (a pending DOE proposal) the twin reflectors should reach a limiting intensity of 1% that of the Crab. The astonishing early results from the EGRET detector aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory indicate that distant quasars (powered by supermassive black holes) are active at GeV energies. The Whipple instruments are poised to see if such behavior continues above 100 GeV, as well as perform sensitive observations of previously reported GeV (Geminga) and TeV (Hercules X-1, etc.) sources. In addition to observing sources and identifying their location in the sky to one arcminute, experiments are planned to search for WIMPS in the mass range 0.1 to 1 TeV, and to determine the abundance of anti-protons in the cosmic rays. The successful performance of the stereoscopic reflectors demonstrates the feasibility of the concept of arrays of Cherenkov receivers. Design studies for a much larger array (CASITA) are just beginning.

  16. Common origin of the high energy astronomical gamma rays, neutrinos and cosmic ray positrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2016-03-01

    We show that the observed fluxes, spectra and sky distributions of the high energy astronomical neutrinos, gamma rays and cosmic ray positrons satisfy the simple relations expected from their common production in hadronic collisions in/near source of high energy cosmic rays with diffuse matter.

  17. Cosmic ray anisotropies at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinic, N. J.; Alarcon, A.; Teran, F.

    1986-01-01

    The directional anisotropies of the energetic cosmic ray gas due to the relative motion between the observers frame and the one where the relativistic gas can be assumed isotropic is analyzed. The radiation fluxes formula in the former frame must follow as the Lorentz invariance of dp/E, where p, E are the 4-vector momentum-energy components; dp is the 3-volume element in the momentum space. The anisotropic flux shows in such a case an amplitude, in a rotating earth, smaller than the experimental measurements from say, EAS-arrays for primary particle energies larger than 1.E(14) eV. Further, it is shown that two consecutive Lorentz transformations among three inertial frames exhibit the violation of dp/E invariance between the first and the third systems of reference, due to the Wigner rotation. A discussion of this result in the context of the experimental anisotropic fluxes and its current interpretation is given.

  18. ENERGY SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY NUCLEI AT HIGH ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Malinine, A.; Allison, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Barbier, L.; Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Jeon, J. A.; Minnick, S.

    2009-12-10

    We present new measurements of the energy spectra of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei from the second flight of the balloon-borne experiment Cosmic-Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM). The instrument included different particle detectors to provide redundant charge identification and measure the energy of CRs up to several hundred TeV. The measured individual energy spectra of C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe are presented up to approx10{sup 14} eV. The spectral shape looks nearly the same for these primary elements and it can be fitted to an E {sup -2.66} {sup +}- {sup 0.04} power law in energy. Moreover, a new measurement of the absolute intensity of nitrogen in the 100-800 GeV/n energy range with smaller errors than previous observations, clearly indicates a hardening of the spectrum at high energy. The relative abundance of N/O at the top of the atmosphere is measured to be 0.080 +- 0.025 (stat.)+-0.025 (sys.) at approx800 GeV/n, in good agreement with a recent result from the first CREAM flight.

  19. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  20. Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Increased ionization could lead to changes in atmospheric chemistry, resulting in ozone depletion. This could increase the flux of solar UVB radiation at the surface, which is potentially harmful to living organisms. Increased ionization affects the global electrical circuit can could possibly enhance the low-altitude cloud formation rate. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the biological radiation dose. The muon flux dominates radiation dose from cosmic rays causing DNA damage and increase in the mutation rates, which can have serious biological implications for terrestrial and sub-terrestrial life. This radiation dose is an important constraint on the habitability of a planet. Using CORSIKA, we perform massive computer simulations and construct lookup tables from 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries (1 PeV - 0.1 ZeV in progress), which can be used to quantify these effects. These tables are freely available to the community and can be used for other studies, not necessarily relevant to Astrobiology. We use these tables to study the terrestrial implications of galactic shock generated by the infall of our galaxy toward the Virgo cluster. This could be a possible mechanism explaining the observed periodicity in biodiversity in paleobiology databases.

  1. Measurements of High-energy Excited States and γ-rays of Fission Products with a 4π Clover Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Y.; Kojima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Taniguchi, A.; Shibata, M.

    2014-06-15

    Gamma-rays in the β-decay of {sup 147}La and {sup 145}Ba were measured using a 4π clover detector to identify high-energy excited levels and γ-rays. In order to determine γ-ray intensities, an efficiency calibration was carried out using single and multiple γ-ray emitters. Applying appropriate coincidence summing corrections, the peak efficiency was experimentally determined from 50 to 3200 keV with 3% accuracy. Through analyses of sum peaks and cascade relations of γ-rays, we newly identified 170 levels between 924 and 3568 keV, and more than 930 γ-rays in the decay of {sup 147}La, and 70 levels between 973 and 3703 keV, and 250 γ-rays in the decay of {sup 145}Ba.

  2. X-Ray Lines Close to Kll Auger Electron Energies from Iron, Cobalt, Nickel, and Copper Monocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Yeon Deog

    1990-01-01

    By x-ray bombardment of metal monocrystals (Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu), x-rays of KLL radiative Auger electrons (KLL RAE) can be observed on the low energy side of the Kalpha lines. The energies of the x-rays of the KLL RAE of each monocrystal are the same for different lattice planes and when different kinds of x-ray tubes (Mo, W, and Cu) are used. Therefore, the peak energies detected within the KLL Auger electron energy limit are interpreted as KLL RAE x-rays. The measured intensity ratios of KLL/Kalpha are about 0.3%. Additionally, the ratio of I(Kbeta )/I(Kalpha) and I(Si escape peak)/I(Kalpha) are measured. All of these values agree well with theoretical values. The beam shapes of KLL RAE x-rays are studied by taking pictures of x-ray films. The intensity distribution for Ni and Cu are measured by changing the crystal angle with respect to the incident x-ray beam near the Bragg angles of KLL RAE x-rays. It is shown that the KLL RAE x-rays are very sharp and stimulated when the crystal is set at the Bragg angle of the KLL RAE with respect to the incident beam, which contains both the pumping radiation and Bremsstrahlung of the frequencies in the KLL RAE range in which the KLL x-rays stimulation is achieved.

  3. Quark-novae Occurring in Massive Binaries : A Universal Energy Source in Superluminous Supernovae with Double-peaked Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2016-02-01

    A quark-nova (QN; the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star), which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary, gives excellent fits to superluminous, hydrogen-poor, supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves, including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz, and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase, while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands of solar radii; this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion, explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of eight SLSNe Ic with double-humped light curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these, with a universal explosive energy of 2 × 1052 erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e., second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e., first) CE.

  4. Plasmid DNA damage by heavy ions at spread-out Bragg peak energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2010-10-01

    Interaction of ionizing radiation with plasmid DNA can lead to formation of single strand breaks, double strand breaks and clustered lesions. We have investigated the response of the synthetic plasmid pBR322 in aqueous solution upon irradiation with 12C ions under spread-out Bragg peak conditions (densely ionizing) and with 137Cs γ-photons (sparsely ionizing) as a function of dose. To evaluate the relevance of indirect effects, i.e. influences of diffusion limited radical induced DNA damage triggered by water radiolysis, the experiments were performed at various concentrations of the radical scavenger mannitol. Agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to quantify the DNA damage. At low scavenger concentration for a given dose DNA damage is higher for γ-photons than for 12C. For the latter, the microscopic dose distribution is inhomogeneous, with very high dose deposited along the few tracks through the solution. This is in agreement with the concept that scavengers efficiently reduce damage for γ-photons, implying that the underlying damage mechanism is single strand break induction by OH radicals. For 12C induced damage, the fraction of SSB and DSB that is unaffected by radical scavengers and thus due to direct effect is quantified.

  5. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. III. Simulated spectra of model core–shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Cedric J.; Chudzicki, Maksymilian; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2015-09-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis has been used to simulate Cu 2p photoelectron spectra for four types of spherical copper–gold nanoparticles (NPs). These simulations were made to extend the work of Tougaard [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 1415 (1996)] and of Powell et al. [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 31, 021402 (2013)] who performed similar simulations for four types of planar copper–gold films. The Cu 2p spectra for the NPs were compared and contrasted with analogous results for the planar films and the effects of elastic scattering were investigated. The new simulations were made for a monolayer of three types of Cu/Au core–shell NPs on a Si substrate: (1) an Au shell of variable thickness on a Cu core with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm; (2) a Cu shell of variable thickness on an Au core with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm; and (3) an Au shell of variable thickness on a 1 nm Cu shell on an Au core with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm. For these three morphologies, the outer-shell thickness was varied until the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} peak intensity was the same (within 2%) as that found in our previous work with planar Cu/Au morphologies. The authors also performed similar simulations for a monolayer of spherical NPs consisting of a CuAu{sub x} alloy (also on a Si substrate) with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm. In the latter simulations, the relative Au concentration (x) was varied to give the same Cu 2p{sub 3/2} peak intensity (within 2%) as that found previously. For each morphology, the authors performed simulations with elastic scattering switched on and off. The authors found that elastic-scattering effects were generally strong for the Cu-core/Au-shell and weak for the Au-core/Cu-shell NPs; intermediate elastic-scattering effects were found for the Au-core/Cu-shell/Au-shell NPs. The shell thicknesses required to give

  6. Offsets between the X-ray and the Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich-effect peaks in merging galaxy clusters and their cosmological implications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Congyao; Yu, Qingjuan; Lu, Youjun

    2014-12-01

    Observations reveal that the peaks of the X-ray map and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect map of some galaxy clusters are offset from each other. In this paper, we perform a set of hydrodynamical simulations of mergers of two galaxy clusters to investigate the spatial offset between the maxima of the X-ray and the SZ surface brightness of the merging clusters. We find that significantly large SZ-X-ray offsets (>100 kpc) can be produced during the major mergers of galaxy clusters (with mass > 1 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}). The significantly large offsets are mainly caused by a 'jump effect' that occurs between the primary and secondary pericentric passages of the two merging clusters, during which the X-ray peak may jump to the densest gas region located near the center of the small cluster, but the SZ peak remains near the center of the large one. Our simulations show that merging systems with higher masses and larger initial relative velocities may result in larger offset sizes and longer offset time durations; and only nearly head-on mergers are likely to produce significantly large offsets. We further investigate the statistical distribution of the SZ-X-ray offset sizes and find that (1) the number distribution of the offset sizes is bimodal with one peak located at low offsets ∼0 and the other at large offsets ∼350-450 h {sup –1} kpc, but the objects with intermediate offsets are scarce; and (2) the probabilities of the clusters in the mass range higher than 2 × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} that have offsets larger than 20, 50, 200, 300, and 500 h {sup –1} kpc are 34.0%, 11.1%, 8.0%, 6.5%, and 2.0%, respectively, at z = 0.7. The probability is sensitive to the underlying pairwise velocity distribution and the merger rate of clusters. We suggest that the SZ-X-ray offsets provide a probe to the cosmic velocity fields on the cluster scale and the cluster merger rate, and future observations on the SZ-X-ray offsets for a large number of clusters may

  7. Coolerado Cooler Helps to Save Cooling Energy and Dollars: New Cooling Technology Targets Peak Load Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.

    2007-06-01

    This document is about a new evaporative cooling technology that can deliver cooler supply air temperatures than either direct or indirect evaporative cooling systems, without increasing humidity. The Coolerado Cooler technology can help Federal agencies reach the energy-use reduction goals of EPAct 2005, particularly in the western United States.

  8. CdZnTe detector for hard x-ray and low energy gamma-ray focusing telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalucci, L.; Alvarez, J. M.; Barriere, N.; Caroli, E.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Del Sordo, S.; Di Cosimo, S.; Frutti, M.; Hernanz, M.; Lozano, M.; Quadrini, E.; Pellegrini, G.; Stephen, J. B.; Ubertini, P.; Uslenghi, M. C.; Zoglauer, A.

    2008-07-01

    The science drivers for a new generation soft gamma-ray mission are naturally focused on the detailed study of the acceleration mechanisms in a variety of cosmic sources. Through the development of high energy optics in the energy energy range 0.05-1 MeV it will be possible to achieve a sensitivity about two orders of magnitude better than the currently operating gamma-ray telescopes. This will open a window for deep studies of many classes of sources: from Galactic X-ray binaries to magnetars, from supernova remnants to Galaxy clusters, from AGNs (Seyfert, blazars, QSO) to the determination of the origin of the hard X-/gamma-ray cosmic background, from the study of antimatter to that of the dark matter. In order to achieve the needed performance, a detector with mm spatial resolution and very high peak efficiency is needed. The instrumental characteristics of this device could eventually allow to detect polarization in a number of objects including pulsars, GRBs and bright AGNs. In this work we focus on the characteristics of the focal plane detector, based on CZT or CdTe semiconductor sensors arranged in multiple planes and viewed by a side detector to enhance gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. We report the preliminary results of an optimization study based on simulations and laboratory tests, as prosecution of the former design studies of the GRI mission which constitute the heritage of this activity.

  9. NREL's Energy-Saving Technology for Air Conditioning Cuts Peak Power Loads Without Using Harmful Refrigerants (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This fact sheet describes how the DEVAP air conditioner was invented, explains how the technology works, and why it won an R&D 100 Award. Desiccant-enhanced evaporative (DEVAP) air-conditioning will provide superior comfort for commercial buildings in any climate at a small fraction of the electricity costs of conventional air-conditioning equipment, releasing far less carbon dioxide and cutting costly peak electrical demand by an estimated 80%. Air conditioning currently consumes about 15% of the electricity generated in the United States and is a major contributor to peak electrical demand on hot summer days, which can lead to escalating power costs, brownouts, and rolling blackouts. DEVAP employs an innovative combination of air-cooling technologies to reduce energy use by up to 81%. DEVAP also shifts most of the energy needs to thermal energy sources, reducing annual electricity use by up to 90%. In doing so, DEVAP is estimated to cut peak electrical demand by nearly 80% in all climates. Widespread use of this cooling cycle would dramatically cut peak electrical loads throughout the country, saving billions of dollars in investments and operating costs for our nation's electrical utilities. Water is already used as a refrigerant in evaporative coolers, a common and widely used energy-saving technology for arid regions. The technology cools incoming hot, dry air by evaporating water into it. The energy absorbed by the water as it evaporates, known as the latent heat of vaporization, cools the air while humidifying it. However, evaporative coolers only function when the air is dry, and they deliver humid air that can lower the comfort level for building occupants. And even many dry climates like Phoenix, Arizona, have a humid season when evaporative cooling won't work well. DEVAP extends the applicability of evaporative cooling by first using a liquid desiccant-a water-absorbing material-to dry the air. The dry air is then passed to an indirect evaporative

  10. Strain Measurements using High Energy White X-rays at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobu, T.; Kaneko, H.; Mizuki, J.; Konishi, H.; Shibano, J.; Hirata, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2007-01-01

    The strain in the bulk of a material was evaluated using high energy white X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8. The specimen, which was a 5 mm thick austenitic stainless steel sample (JIS-SUS304L), was subjected to bending. The internal strain was measured using white X-rays, which ranged in energy from 60 keV to 125 keV. Highly accurate internal strain measurements were accomplished by simultaneously using strain data from several lattice planes of α -Fe. Furthermore, utilizing diffracted beams with a high energy, a high peak count, and a profile similar to a Gaussian distribution decreased the error of the strain measurement The results indicated that high energy white X-rays can effectively measure the internal strain at a millimeter depth.

  11. SAS-2 High energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Oegelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The second Small Astronomy Satellite high-energy (35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks, one following the radio peak by about 13 msec, and the other 0.4 period after the first. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0004 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission and the double peak structure, compared to the single pulse in the radio emission, suggests that the high energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those found at lower energies.

  12. Variable energy, high peak power, passive Q-switching diode end-pumped Yb:LuAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskow, M.; Sulc, J.; Jabczynski, J. K.; Jelinkova, H.

    2014-12-01

    A new method to control the pulse energy in a passively Q-switched laser was proposed and experimentally verified for a diode-end-pumped Yb:LuAG laser. By changing the pumping area parameters it was possible to demonstrate generation of a wide range of output energies with a single laser configuration consisting of a gain medium, passive Q-switch and out-coupling mirror. The range of available energies 0.15-0.51 mJ with maximum peak power of 113 kW in simple Q-switching regime by means of a Cr:YAG saturable absorber and a Yb:LuAG gain medium pumped by a 20 W laser diode emitting at 968 nm was demonstrated.

  13. Using Plasmon Peaks in Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy to Determine the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, James M.

    2013-05-09

    In this program, we developed new theoretical and experimental insights into understanding the relationships among fundamental universality and scaling phenomena, the solid-state physical and mechanical properties of materials, and the volume plasmon energy as measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Particular achievements in these areas are summarized as follows: (i) Using a previously proposed physical model based on the universal binding-energy relation (UBER), we established close phenomenological connections regarding the influence of the valence electrons in materials on the longitudinal plasma oscillations (plasmons) and various solid-state properties such as the optical constants (including absorption and dispersion), elastic constants, cohesive energy, etc. (ii) We found that carbon materials, e.g., diamond, graphite, diamond-like carbons, hydrogenated and amorphous carbon films, exhibit strong correlations in density vs. Ep (or maximum of the volume plasmon peak) and density vs. hardness, both from available experimental data and ab initio DFT calculations. This allowed us to derive a three-dimensional relationship between hardness and the plasmon energy, that can be used to determine experimentally both hardness and density of carbon materials based on measurements of the plasmon peak position. (iii) As major experimental accomplishments, we demonstrated the possibility of in-situ monitoring of changes in the physical properties of materials with conditions, e.g., temperature, and we also applied a new plasmon ratio-imaging technique to map multiple physical properties of materials, such as the elastic moduli, cohesive energy and bonding electron density, with a sub-nanometer lateral resolution. This presents new capability for understanding material behavior. (iv) Lastly, we demonstrated a new physical phenomenon - electron-beam trapping, or electron tweezers - of a solid metal nanoparticle inside a liquid metal. This phenomenon is

  14. Examination of food waste co-digestion to manage the peak in energy demand at wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Lensch, D; Schaum, C; Cornel, P

    2016-01-01

    Many digesters in Germany are not operated at full capacity; this offers the opportunity for co-digestion. Within this research the potentials and limits of a flexible and adapted sludge treatment are examined with a focus on the digestion process with added food waste as co-substrate. In parallel, energy data from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) are analysed and lab-scale semi-continuous and batch digestion tests are conducted. Within the digestion tests, the ratio of sewage sludge to co-substrate was varied. The final methane yields show the high potential of food waste: the higher the amount of food waste the higher the final yield. However, the conversion rates directly after charging demonstrate better results by charging 10% food waste instead of 20%. Finally, these results are merged with the energy data from the WWTP. As an illustration, the load required to cover base loads as well as peak loads for typical daily variations of the plant's energy demand are calculated. It was found that 735 m³ raw sludge and 73 m³ of a mixture of raw sludge and food waste is required to cover 100% of the base load and 95% of the peak load. PMID:26877042

  15. Directional clustering in highest energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Haim; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2001-09-01

    An unexpected degree of small-scale clustering is observed in highest-energy cosmic ray events. Some directional clustering can be expected due to purely statistical fluctuations for sources distributed randomly in the sky. This creates a background for events originating in clustered sources. We derive analytic formulas to estimate the probability of random cluster configurations, and use these formulas to study the strong potential of the HiRes, Auger, Telescope Array and EUSO-OWL-AirWatch facilities for deciding whether any observed clustering is most likely due to nonrandom sources. For a detailed comparison to data, our analytical approach cannot compete with Monte Carlo simulations, including experimental systematics. However, our derived formulas do offer two advantages: (i) easy assessment of the significance of any observed clustering, and most importantly, (ii) an explicit dependence of cluster probabilities on the chosen angular bin size.

  16. On the Energy Shift between Near-Field and Far-Field Peak Intensities in Localized Plasmon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zuloaga, Jorge; Nordlander, Peter

    2011-03-09

    The localized plasmons of metallic nanoparticles and nanostructures are known to display an interesting and apparently universal phenomenon: upon optical excitation, the maximum near-field enhancements occur at lower energies than the maximum of the corresponding far-field spectrum. Here we present an explanation for this behavior, showing that it results directly from the physics of a driven and damped harmonic oscillator. We show that the magnitude of the shift between the near- and far-field peak intensities depends directly on the total damping of the system, whether it is intrinsic damping within the metal of the nanoparticle or radiative damping of the localized plasmon.

  17. Testing Lorentz Invariance with Neutrinos from Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Sean T.; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that a very small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (UV), which suppresses photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with cosmic background radiation (CBR) photons, can produce a spectrum of cosmic rays that is consistent with that currently observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) and HiRes experiments. Here, we calculate the corresponding flux of high energy neutrinos generated by the propagation of UHECR protons through the CBR in the presence of UV. We find that UV produces a reduction in the flux of the highest energy neutrinos and a reduction in the energy of the peak of the neutrino energy flux spectrum, both depending on the strength of the UV. Thus, observations of the UHE neutrino spectrum provide a clear test for the existence and amount of UV at the highest energies. We further discuss the ability of current and future proposed detectors make such observations.

  18. Peak Doctor v 1.0.0 Labview Version

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Scott

    2014-05-29

    PeakDoctor software works interactively with its user to analyze raw gamma-ray spectroscopic data. The goal of the software is to produce a list of energies and areas of all of the peaks in the spectrum, as accurately as possible. It starts by performing an energy calibration, creating a function that describes how energy can be related to channel number. Next, the software determines which channels in the raw histogram are in the Compton continuum and which channels are parts of a peak. Then the software fits the Compton continuum with cubic polynomials. The last step is to fit all of the peaks with Gaussian functions, thus producing the list.

  19. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis Short Course. Introduction to X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This course will cover practical applications of the energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered will include detector technology, advances in pulse processing, resolution and performance monitoring, detector modeling, peak deconvolution and fitting, qualitative and quantitative analysis, compositional mapping, and standards. An emphasis will be placed on use of the EDS for quantitative analysis, with discussion of typical problems encountered in the analysis of a wide range of materials and sample geometries.

  20. Tom Bonner Prize: Gamma-ray energy tracking array GRETINA and its early science results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-ray detector with good energy resolution has been one of the essential instruments for the study of nuclear structure. To push these studies toward the exotic nuclei near the particle stability line, we need detectors with higher peak efficiency and good peak-to-total ratio. In addition, radioactive ion beams needed for such studies are often produced by the projectile fragmentation method. They have high velocities, and detectors must provide adequate position resolution for accurate Doppler correction. To fulfill these requirements, the new concept of gamma ray energy tracking array was developed. GRETINA, with 1 π solid angle coverage, is the first implementation of this concept. It uses electrically segmented Ge crystals in a close packed geometry, fast digital electronics, and signal decomposition to determine the position and energy of the individual interaction points. Then the path of a gamma ray can be tracked using the angle-energy relation of the scattering process. GRETINA was completed at LBNL and started physics operation in 2012. It has been used at NSCL at MSU and ATLAS at ANL for a large number of experiments addressing diverse topics from nuclear structure to nuclear astrophysics. In this talk I will describe the concept of gamma-ray energy tracking and the technology developed for GRETINA. A few representative experiments showing the breadth of the science and the power of the instrument will be discussed. Finally the plan toward the full 4 π array GRETA will be presented.

  1. ENERGY-DEPENDENT LIGHT CURVES AND PHASE-RESOLVED SPECTRA OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2010-12-20

    Energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectra of high-energy {gamma}-ray emission from the Crab pulsar have been detected recently by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Within the framework of a two-pole, three-dimensional outer gap model, we calculate the energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectra in the inertial observer's frame. Our results show that (1) the observed {gamma}-ray properties from both Fermi LAT and MAGIC can be reproduced well in this model; (2) the first peak of the light curves in the energy region less than {approx}10 GeV comes from the sum of emissions from both the north and south poles, and the second peak comes only from the emission from the south pole; however, the relative contribution of the two poles to the first peak changes with increasing {gamma}-ray energy, and the light curve in the energy region greater than {approx}20 GeV comes completely from the emission of the south pole; and (3) {gamma}-rays in the energy region greater than 100 MeV are produced through inverse Compton scattering from secondary pairs and the survival curvature photons, where the latter dominate over {gamma}-ray emission in the energy region greater than several GeV.

  2. MOLE: A new high-energy gamma-ray diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, M. J.; Chang, B.

    1992-01-01

    Continued interest in high-energy gamma rays associated with fusion reactions has motivated an ongoing search for simple, effective measurement techniques. Past experiments have measured 16.7-MeV gamma rays with Compton-magnetic spectrometers. Some measurements have been performed with threshold Cherenkov detectors with enhanced sensitivity to high-energy (gamma) rays. The Compton spectrometers work quite well, but they require extensive calibrations and tend to be expensive and cumbersome. The threshold Cherenkov detectors are simpler to calibrate and physically compact, but have poor spectral definition and are vulnerable to background signals. This report describes a new type of (gamma)-ray detector, the MOLE, that may retain the simplicity of a threshold Cherenkov detector while still having sufficient energy discrimination to be effective for measuring high-energy (gamma)-rays in the presence of lower-energy (gamma)-ray fluxes.

  3. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized. PMID:17293337

  4. Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis at Low Beam Energy: Almost Always an Adventure!

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of various materials at low-incident beam energies, E 0≤5 keV, using peak fitting and following the measured standards/matrix corrections protocol embedded in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Desktop Spectrum Analyzer-II analytical software engine. Low beam energy analysis provides improved spatial resolution laterally and in-depth. The lower beam energy restricts the atomic shells that can be ionized, reducing the number of X-ray peak families available to the analyst. At E 0=5 keV, all elements of the periodic table except H and He can be measured. As the beam energy is reduced below 5 keV, elements become inaccessible due to lack of excitation of useful characteristic X-ray peaks. The shallow sampling depth of low beam energy microanalysis makes the technique more sensitive to surface compositional modification due to formation of oxides and other reaction layers. Accurate and precise analysis is possible with the use of appropriate standards and by accumulating high count spectra of unknowns and standards (>1 million counts integrated from 0.1 keV to E 0). PMID:27515566

  5. Investigation of a Peak-Like Feature Observed in the Triton Energy Spectra from the 152,154 Sm(p,t) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humby, P.; Wilson, E.; Beausang, C. W.; Simon, A.; Gell, K.; Tarlow, T.; Vyas, G.; Ross, T. J.; Hughes, R. O.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Koglin, J.; Ota, S.; Allmond, J. M.; McCleskey, M.; McCleskey, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Chyzh, R.; Dag, M.

    2015-04-01

    Isotopically enriched 152,154 Sm targets were bombarded with 25 MeV protons from the K-150 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University. The outgoing charged particles and γ rays were detected using the STARLiTeR array, which consists of a highly segmented ΔE-E silicon telescope and six BGO shielded HPGe clover detectors. A peak-like feature was observed in the triton energy spectra from the 152,154 Sm(p,t) reactions at excitation energies of approximately 3 MeV for the 152 Sm(p,t) reaction and 2.2 MeV for the 154 Sm(p,t) reaction. Discrete states with cross sections as large as approximately 9% of the ground state cross section were identified in this feature using particle- γ and particle- γ- γ coincidences. The range of spins populated appears to be unusually large. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy No. DE-FG02-05ER41379, DE-FG52-09NA29467 and DE-NA0001801, the National Science Foundation under PHY-130581, and by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Techniques of absolute low energy x-ray calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in pulsed plasma research, materials science, and astrophysics have required many new diagnostic instruments for use in the low energy x-ray regime. The characterization of these instruments has provided a challenge to instrument designers and provided the momentum to improve x-ray sources and dosimetry techniques. In this paper, the present state-of-the-art in low energy x-ray characterization techniques is reviewed. A summary is given of low energy x-ray generator technology and dosimetry techniques including a discussion of thin window proportional counters and ionization chambers. A review is included of the widely used x-ray data bases and a sample of ultrasoft x-ray measuring procedures, chopped x-ray source generators, phase sensitive detection of ultralow currents, and angular divergence measurements.

  7. Ultra high energy gamma rays, cosmic rays and neutrinos from accreting degenerate stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecher, K.; Chanmugam, G.

    1985-01-01

    Super-Eddington accretion for a recently proposed unipolar induction model of cosmic ray acceleration in accreting binary star systems containing magnetic white dwarfs or neutron stars is considered. For sufficiently high accretion rates and low magnetic fields, the model can account for: (1) acceleration of cosmic ray nuclei up to energies of 10 to the 19th power eV; (2) production of more or less normal solar cosmic ray composition; (3) the bulk of cosmic rays observed with energies above 1 TeV, and probably even down to somewhat lower energies as well; and (4) possibly the observed antiproton cosmic ray flux. It can also account for the high ultra high energy (UHE) gamma ray flux observed from several accreting binary systems (including Cygnus X-3), while allowing the possibility of an even higher neutrino flux from these sources, with L sub nu/L sub gamma is approximately 100.

  8. Laser-driven hard-x-ray generation based on ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of Ni compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Fang; Carter, Josh D.; Ng, Vicky; Guo Ting

    2005-02-01

    Three Ni compounds were studied by ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy using a laser-driven electron x-ray source with a tungsten target. The measured K edges of these Ni compounds using this self-referencing method were made identical to those measured with synchrotron x-ray sources. This enabled us to determine the absolute peak positions of tungsten L{alpha}{sub 1} and L{alpha}{sub 2} emitted from this source to be within 1 eV of those from the neutral tungsten atoms, which strongly suggested that the x rays were emitted from high energy electrons interacting with tungsten atoms in the solid target. This is the best evidence to date that directly supports the cold atom x-ray generation theory.

  9. Two facets of the x-ray microanalysis at low voltage: The secondary fluorescence x-rays emission and the microcalorimeter energy-dispersive spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Hendrix

    The best spatial resolution, for a microanalysis with a scanning electron microscope (SEND, is achieved by using a low voltage electron beam. But the x-ray microanalysis was developed for high electron beam energy (greater than 10 keV). Also, the specimen will often contain light and medium elements and the analyst will have to use a mixture of K, L, and sometime M x-ray peaks for the x-ray microanalysis. With a mixture of family lines, it will be common to have secondary fluorescence x-rays emission by K--L and L--K interactions. The accuracy of the fluorescence correction models presently used by the analyst are not well known for these interactions. This work shows that the modified secondary fluorescence x-rays emission correction models can improve the accuracy of the microanalysis for K--L and L--K interactions. The general equation derived in this work allows the identification of three factors which influence the secondary fluorescence x-rays emission. The fluorescence production factor epsilonƒ can be used to predict the importance of the secondary fluorescence x-rays emission. A large value of epsilonƒ indicates that a fluorescence correction is needed. Another disadvantage of using a low voltage is that there are more frequent occurrences of x-ray peaks overlap. A new microanalysis instruments that combines the high-spatial resolution and high-energy resolution for x-ray detection is needed. The microcalorimeter energy-dispersive spectrometer (muEDS) should improve the low voltage microanalysis, but the maturity of this technology has to be evaluated first. One of the first commercial muEDS for x-ray microanalysis in a SEM is studied and analyzed in this work. This commercial muEDS has an excellent energy resolution (˜ 15 eV) and can detect x-rays of low energy. This x-ray detector can be used as a high-spatial resolution and high-energy resolution microanalysis instrument. There are still hurdles that this technology must overcome before its

  10. Elemental composition and energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the major features of the elemental composition and energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays. The requirements for phenomenological models of cosmic ray composition and energy spectra are discussed, and possible improvements to an existing model are suggested.

  11. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  12. Intensities of high-energy cosmic rays at Mount Kanbala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of atmospheric cosmic rays at Mt. Kanbala (520 g/sq cm.) are measured with emulsion chambers. The power indexes of the spectra are values of about 2.0 for both gamma-rays and hadrons. Those fluxes are consistent with the ones expected from the model of primary cosmic rays with heavy nuclei of high content in the energy around 10 to the 15th power eV.

  13. Laboratory laser acceleration and high energy astrophysics: {gamma}-ray bursts and cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.

    1998-08-20

    Recent experimental progress in laser acceleration of charged particles (electrons) and its associated processes has shown that intense electromagnetic pulses can promptly accelerate charged particles to high energies and that their energy spectrum is quite hard. On the other hand some of the high energy astrophysical phenomena such as extremely high energy cosmic rays and energetic components of {gamma}-ray bursts cry for new physical mechanisms for promptly accelerating particles to high energies. The authors suggest that the basic physics involved in laser acceleration experiments sheds light on some of the underlying mechanisms and their energy spectral characteristics of the promptly accelerated particles in these high energy astrophysical phenomena.

  14. Graphical Environmental Tools for Application to Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, D.C.; Blair, M.; Pauly, S., Todd, R.

    2007-05-25

    In this CRADA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) assisted RIS Corporation of Knoxville, TN, in the development of graphical environment tools for the development and programming of high speed real-time algorithms to be implemented in a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The primary application was intended to be digital signal processing for gamma-ray spectroscopy, in particular for Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Arrays such as the GRETINA project. Key components of this work included assembling an evaluation platform to verify designs on actual hardware, and creating various types of Simulink functional blocks for peak-shaping and constant-fraction discrimination.

  15. On filtration for high-energy phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Christian; Mohamed, Ashraf; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    Phase-sensitive x-ray imaging promises unprecedented soft-tissue contrast and resolution. However, several practical challenges have to be overcome when using the setup in a clinical environment. The system design that is currently closest to clinical use is the grating-based Talbot-Lau interferometer (GBI).1-3 The requirements for patient imaging are low patient dose, fast imaging time, and high image quality. For GBI, these requirements can be met most successfully with a narrow energy width, high- ux spectrum. Additionally, to penetrate a human-sized object, the design energy of the system has to be well above 40 keV. To our knowledge, little research has been done so far to investigate optimal GBI filtration at such high x-ray energies. In this paper, we study different filtration strategies and their impact on high-energy GBI. Specifically, we compare copper filtration at low peak voltage with equal-absorption, equal-imaging time K-edge filtration of spectra with higher peak voltage under clinically realistic boundary conditions. We specifically focus on a design energy of 59 keV and investigate combinations of tube current, peak voltage, and filtration that lead to equal patient absorption. Theoretical considerations suggest that the K edge of tantalum might provide a transmission pocket at around 59 keV, yielding a well-shaped spectrum. Although one can observe a slight visibility benefit when using tungsten or tantalum filtration, experimental results indicate that visibility benefits most from a low x-ray tube peak voltage.

  16. Anuradha and low-energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Durgaprasad, N.; Mitra, Banashree; Dutta, A.

    1993-01-01

    After critically reviewing observational results obtained by astronomical spacecraft in the interplanetary medium for several aspects of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs), attention is given to spacecraft data gathered in the magnetosphere and a detailed description is given of the Anuradha cosmic-ray experiment carried by Spacelab-3. The Anuradha results discussed concern the orbit average flux and ionization state of ACRs, the origins of partially ionized galactic cosmic-ray sub-Fe and Fe ions, and the significance of enhanced abundance ratios of sub-Fe and Fe ions in GCRs inside the magnetosphere.

  17. Secondary gamma rays from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays produced in magnetized environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armengaud, Eric; Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco

    2006-04-01

    Nearby sources of cosmic rays up to a ZeV(=1021eV) could be observed with a multimessenger approach including secondary γ-rays and neutrinos. If cosmic rays above ˜1018eV are produced in magnetized environments such as galaxy clusters, the flux of secondary γ-rays can be enhanced by a factor ˜10 at Gev energies and by a factor of a few at TeV energies, compared to unmagnetized sources. Particularly enhanced are synchrotron and cascade photons from e+e- pairs produced by protons from sources with relatively steep injection spectra ∝E-2.6. Such sources should be visible at the same time in ultrahigh energy cosmic ray experiments and γ-ray telescopes.

  18. GRB 090313 AND THE ORIGIN OF OPTICAL PEAKS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES: IMPLICATIONS FOR LORENTZ FACTORS AND RADIO FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Melandri, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mundell, C. G.; Guidorzi, C.; Bersier, D.; Steele, I. A.; Smith, R. J.; De Ugarte Postigo, A.; Pooley, G.; Yoshida, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Kubanek, P.; Sota, A.; Gomboc, A.; Bremer, M.; Winters, J. M.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; GarcIa-Appadoo, D.

    2010-11-10

    We use a sample of 19 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that exhibit single-peaked optical light curves to test the standard fireball model by investigating the relationship between the time of the onset of the afterglow and the temporal rising index. Our sample includes GRBs and X-ray flashes for which we derive a wide range of initial Lorentz factors (40 < {Gamma} < 450). Using plausible model parameters, the typical frequency of the forward shock is expected to lie close to the optical band; within this low typical frequency framework, we use the optical data to constrain {epsilon}{sub e} and show that values derived from the early time light-curve properties are consistent with published typical values derived from other afterglow studies. We produce expected radio light curves by predicting the temporal evolution of the expected radio emission from forward and reverse shock components, including synchrotron self-absorption effects at early time. Although a number of GRBs in this sample do not have published radio measurements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in the case of Swift GRB 090313, for which millimetric and centimetric observations were available, and conclude that future detections of reverse-shock radio flares with new radio facilities such as the EVLA and ALMA will test the low-frequency model and provide constraints on magnetic models.

  19. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2015-03-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because (a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and (b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space - unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  20. Effect of particle size on activation energy and peak temperature of the thermoluminescence glow curve of undoped ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chandra, B P; Chandrakar, Raju Kumar; Chandra, V K; Baghel, R N

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the effect of particle size on the thermoluminescence (TL) of undoped ZnS nanoparticles. ZnS nanoparticles were prepared using a chemical precipitation method in which mercaptoethanol was used as the capping agent. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. When the concentrations of mercaptoethanol used are 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.025, 0.040 and 0.060 M, the sizes of the nanoparticles are 2.86, 2.81, 2.69, 2.40, 2.10, 1.90 and 1.80 nm, respectively. Initially, the TL intensity of UV-irradiated ZnS nanoparticles increases with temperature, attains a peak value Im for a particular temperature Tm, and then decreases with further increases in temperature. The values of both Im and Tm increase with decreasing nanoparticle size. Whereas the activation energy decreases slightly with decreasing nanoparticle size, the frequency factor decreases significantly as the nanoparticle size is reduced. The order of kinetics for the TL glow curve of ZnS nanoparticles is 2. Expressions are derived for the dependence of activation energy (Ea) and Tm on nanoparticle size, and good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical results. PMID:26332287

  1. Volumetric measurement of residual stress using high energy x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesell, R.; McKenna, A.; Wendt, S.; Gray, J.

    2016-02-01

    We present results and recent developments from our laboratory, bench-top high energy x-ray diffraction system (HEXRD), between diffraction energies 50 and 150 KeV, to measure internal strain of moderately sized objects. Traditional x-ray strain measurements are limited to a few microns depth due to the use of Cu Kα1 Mo Kα1 radiation. The use of high energy x-rays for volumetric measurements of strain is typically the domain of synchrotron sources. We discuss the use of industrial 320kVp tube sources to generate a brighter x-ray beam along with a method using the intrinsic 43 eV width of the Kα1 characteristic peak of tungsten to measure volumetric strains in a number of industrially relevant materials. We will present volumetric strain measurements from two examples, first, additive manufacturing (AM) parts with various build configurations and, secondly, residual strain depth profiles from shot peened surface treatments. The spatial resolution of these depth profiles is ˜75 microns. The development of a faster method as compared to energy dispersive or θ-2θ scans is based on the intensity variation measurement of the strain using the aforementioned 43 eV characteristic tungsten kα line. We will present recent results on the development of this new tool and on x-ray diffraction measurements at high energy.

  2. Voyager 1 observes low-energy galactic cosmic rays in a region depleted of heliospheric ions.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Cummings, A C; McDonald, F B; Heikkila, B C; Lal, N; Webber, W R

    2013-07-12

    On 25 August 2012, Voyager 1 was at 122 astronomical units when the steady intensity of low-energy ions it had observed for the previous 6 years suddenly dropped for a third time and soon completely disappeared as the ions streamed away into interstellar space. Although the magnetic field observations indicate that Voyager 1 remained inside the heliosphere, the intensity of cosmic ray nuclei from outside the heliosphere abruptly increased. We report the spectra of galactic cosmic rays down to ~3 × 10(6) electron volts per nucleon, revealing H and He energy spectra with broad peaks from 10 × 10(6) to 40 × 10(6) electron volts per nucleon and an increasing galactic cosmic-ray electron intensity down to ~10 × 10(6) electron volts. PMID:23811227

  3. The Effects of Low- and High-Energy Cutoffs on Solar Flare Microwave and Hard X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microwave and hard x-ray spectra provide crucial information about energetic electrons and their environment in solar flares. These spectra are becoming better determined with the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) and the recent launch of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The proposed Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) promises even greater advances in radio observations of solar flares. Both microwave and hard x-ray spectra are sensitive to cutoffs in the electron distribution function. The determination of the high-energy cutoff from these spectra establishes the highest electron energies produced by the acceleration mechanism, while determination of the low-energy cutoff is crucial to establishing the total energy in accelerated electrons. This paper will show computations of the effects of both high- and low-energy cutoffs on microwave and hard x-ray spectra. The optically thick portion of a microwave spectrum is enhanced and smoothed by a low-energy cutoff, while a hard x-ray spectrum is flattened below the cutoff energy. A high-energy cutoff steepens the microwave spectrum and increases the wavelength at which the spectrum peaks, while the hard x-ray spectrum begins to steepen at photon energies roughly an order of magnitude below the electron cutoff energy. This work discusses how flare microwave and hard x-ray spectra can be analyzed together to determine these electron cutoff energies. This work is supported in part by the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  4. Radiation processing with high-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Stichelbaut, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    The radiation processing of materials and commercial products with high-energy X-rays, which are also identified by the German term bremsstrahlung, can produce beneficial changes that are similar to those obtained by irradiation with nuclear gamma rays emitted by cobalt-60 sources. Both X-rays and gamma rays are electromagnetic radiations with short wavelengths and high photon energies that can stimulate chemical reactions by creating ions and free radicals in irradiated materials. Nevertheless, there are some physical differences in these energy sources that can influence the choice for practical applications. The English translation of bremsstrahlung is braking radiatiorn or deceleration radiation. It is produced when energetic electrons are deflected by the strong electric field near an atomic nucleus. The efficiency for producing this kind of electromagnetic energy increases with the kinetic energy of the electrons and the atomic number of the target material. The energy spectrum of the emitted X-ray photons is very broad and extends up to the maximum energy of the incident electrons. In contrast, a cobalt-60 nucleus emits two gamma rays simultaneously, which have well-defined energies. Another significant difference is the angular distribution of the radiation. Nuclear gamma rays are emitted in all directions, but high-energy bremsstrahlung photons are concentrated in the direction of the incident electrons when they strike the target material. This property enables an X-ray processing facility to be more compact than a gamma-ray processing facility with similar throughput capacity, and it increases the penetration and the efficiency for absorbing the emitted X-ray energy in the irradiated material. Recent increases in the electron energy and the electron beam power from modern industrial accelerators have increased the throughput rates in X-ray processing facilities, so that this irradiation method is now economically competitive with large cobalt-60

  5. Program Design Analysis using BEopt Building Energy Optimization Software: Defining a Technology Pathway Leading to New Homes with Zero Peak Cooling Demand; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

    2006-08-01

    An optimization method based on the evaluation of a broad range of different combinations of specific energy efficiency and renewable-energy options is used to determine the least-cost pathway to the development of new homes with zero peak cooling demand. The optimization approach conducts a sequential search of a large number of possible option combinations and uses the most cost-effective alternatives to generate a least-cost curve to achieve home-performance levels ranging from a Title 24-compliant home to a home that uses zero net source energy on an annual basis. By evaluating peak cooling load reductions on the least-cost curve, it is then possible to determine the most cost-effective combination of energy efficiency and renewable-energy options that both maximize annual energy savings and minimize peak-cooling demand.

  6. Peak Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of high-performance schools, which enhance the learning environment for students while saving energy, resources, and money. Describes initiatives of the Collaborative for High Performance Schools and the high-performance design of Carleton College in Minnesota. (EV)

  7. Deeply X-raying the high-energy sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacini, Eugenio; Ajello, Marco

    2016-05-01

    All-sky explorations by Fermi-LAT have revolutionized our view of the gamma-ray Universe. While its ongoing all-sky survey counts thousands of sources, essential issues related to the nature of unassociated sources call for more sensitive all-sky surveys at hard X-ray energies that allow for their identification. This latter energy band encodes the hard-tail of the thermal emission and the soft-tail of non-thermal emission thereby bridging the non-thermal and thermal emission mechanisms of gamma-ray sources. All-sky surveys at hard X-rays are best performed by current coded-mask telescopes Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL/IBIS. To boost the hard X-ray all-sky sensitivity, we have developed an ad hoc technique by combining photons from independent observations of BAT and IBIS. The resulting Swift-INTEGRAL X-ray (SIX) survey has an improved source-number density. This improvement is essential to enhance the positive hard X-ray - gamma-ray source matches. We present the results from the scientific link between the neighboring gamma-ray and hard X-ray bands in the context of galactic and extragalactic source classes of the second catalog Fermi Gamma-ray LAT (2FGL).

  8. High-energy gamma rays from the intense 1993 January 31 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommer, M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Hurley, K.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    The intense gamma-ray burst of 1993 January 31 was detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. Sixteen gamma rays above 30 MeV were imaged in the telescope when only 0.04 gamma rays were expected by chance. Two of these gamma rays have energies of approximately 1 GeV, and the five bin spectrum of the 16 events is fitted by a power law of photon spectral index -2.0 +/- 0.4. The high-energy emission extends for at least 25 s. The most probable direction for this burst is determined from the directions of the 16 gamma rays observed by Egret and also by requiring the position to lie on annulus derived by the Interplanetary Network.

  9. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. II. Estimation of detection limits for thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Cedric J.; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) can be used to determine detection limits for thin-film materials such as a thin film on a substrate or buried at varying depths in another material for common x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conditions. Illustrative simulations were made for a W film on or in a Ru matrix and for a Ru film on or in a W matrix. In the former case, the thickness of a W film at a given depth in the Ru matrix was varied so that the intensity of the W 4d{sub 5/2} peak was essentially the same as that for a homogeneous RuW{sub 0.001} alloy. Similarly, the thickness of a Ru film at a selected depth in the W matrix was varied so that the intensity of the Ru 3p{sub 3/2} peak matched that from a homogeneous WRu{sub 0.01} alloy. These film thicknesses correspond to the detection limits of each minor component for measurement conditions where the detection limits for a homogeneous sample varied between 0.1 at. % (for the RuW{sub 0.001} alloy) and 1 at. % (for the WRu{sub 0.01} alloy). SESSA can be similarly used to convert estimates of XPS detection limits for a minor species in a homogeneous solid to the corresponding XPS detection limits for that species as a thin film on or buried in the chosen solid.

  10. The high energy X-ray universe

    PubMed Central

    Giacconi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Since its beginning in the early 1960s, the field of X-ray astronomy has exploded, experiencing a ten-billion-fold increase in sensitivity, which brought it on par with the most advanced facilities at all wavelengths. I will briefly describe the revolutionary first discoveries prior to the launch of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories, present some of the current achievements, and offer some thoughts about the future of this field. PMID:20404148

  11. The Telescope Array Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Obsrevatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, John

    2016-07-01

    The Telescope Array measures the properties of ultra high energy cosmic ray induced extensive air showers. We do this using a variety of techniques including an array of scintillator detectors to sample the footprint of the air shower when it reaches the Earth's surface and telescopes to measure the fluorescence and Cerenkov light of the air shower. From this we determine the energy spectrum and chemical composition of the primary particles. We also search for sources of cosmic rays and anisotropy. We have found evidence of a possible source of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the northern sky. The experiment and its most recent measurements will be discussed.

  12. Flare onsets in hard and soft X-rays. [magnetic energy conversion in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, Marcos E.; Orwig, Larry E.; Antonucci, Ester

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the onset of solar flares, within about 2 min or less before the impulsive peaks, is characterized by an increase in high-energy emission at E less than 100 keV, and strong broadening of soft X-ray lines characteristic of the 10-million-K plasma already present at this stage. The observations are interpreted in terms of the early signature of energy release, during a phase preceding the instability that leads to strong particle acceleration.

  13. Measuring high-energy {gamma} rays with Ge detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lipoglavsek, M.; Likar, A.; Vencelj, M.; Vidmar, T.; Bark, R. A.; Gueorguieva, E.; Komati, F.; Lawrie, J. J.; Maliage, S. M.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Ramashidzha, T. M.

    2006-04-26

    Gamma rays with energies up to 21 MeV were measured with Ge detectors. Such {gamma} rays were produced in the 208Pb(p,{gamma})209Bi reaction. The position of the 2g9/2 single proton orbit in 209Bi has been determined indicating the size of the Z=126 shell gap.

  14. High energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Moncton, D.E.; Fujii

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is presented of various aspects of high energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering based on synchrotron sources. We show what kinematical advantages are provided by the photon probe and propose mirror and monochromator designs to achieve an optically efficient beam line for inelastic x-ray scattering.

  15. Comparison of X-ray techniques and energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John F.; Harris, Lowell D.

    1988-12-01

    Examples are given of objects scanned with a variety of X-ray techniques: digital radiography, laminography, backscatter imaging, and computed tomography. Several comparisons are made where an assembly or composite material is scanned at several energies or resolutions. An image made using an isotope source and photon counting is compared to an image using integrated signals from an X-ray source.

  16. [Influence of the Experiment Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Measurement of Uranium by Different Excitation Source].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chao; Ge, Liang-quan; Liu, Duan; Zhang, Qing-xian; Gu, Yi; Luo, Yao-yao; Zhao, Jian-kun

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at the self-excitation effect on the interference of measurements which exist in the process of Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for uranium measurement. To solve the problem of radioactive isotopes only used as excitation source in determination of uranium. Utilizing the micro X-ray tube to test Self-excitation effect to get a comparison of the results obtained by three different uranium ore samples--109 Cd, 241 Am and Mirco X-ray tube. The results showed that self-excitation effect produced the area measure of characteristic X-ray peak is less than 1% of active condition, also the interference of measurements can be negligible. Photoelectric effect cross-section excited by 109 Cd is higher, corresponding fluorescence yield is higher than excited by 241 Am as well due to characteristics X-ray energy of 109 Cd, 22.11 & 24.95 KeV adjacent to absorption edge energy of L(α), 21.75 KeV, based on the above, excitation efficiency by 109 Cd is higher than 241 Am; The fact that measurement error excited by 241 Am is significantly greater than by 109 Cd is mainly due to peak region overlap between L energy peaks of uranium and Scattering peak of 241 Am, 26.35 keV, These factors above caused the background of measured Spectrum higher; The error between the uranium content in ore samples which the X-ray tube as the excitation source and the chemical analysis results is within 10%. Conclusion: This paper come to the conclusion that the technical quality of uranium measurement used X-ray tube as excitation source is superior to that in radioactive source excitation mode. PMID:27400534

  17. Plans for Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray Observations from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic rays have been detected at energies beyond 10(exp 20) eV, where Universe is predicted to become opaque to protons. The acceleration of cosmic rays to such extreme energies in known astrophysical objects has also proven difficult to understand, leading to many suggestions that new physics may be required to explain their existence. This has prompted the construction of new experiments designed to detect cosmic rays with fluxes below 1 particle/km/century and follow their spectrum to even higher energies. To detect large numbers of these particles, the next generation of these experiments must be performed on space-based platforms that look on very large detection volumes in the Earth's atmosphere. The talk will review the experimental and theoretical investigations of extreme energy cosmic rays and discuss the present and planned experiments to extend measurements beyond 10(exp 21) eV.

  18. Gigavolt-Energy Electrons and Femtosecond-Duration Hard X-Rays Driven by Extreme Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald

    2012-06-01

    The interactions of high-peak power laser light focused to extremely high intensity, or ``extreme light,'' is at the core of high-energy laser-driven electron accelerators, and novel laser-synchrotron x-ray light sources. The hallmark of extreme light is its ability to cause the instantaneous electron quiver motion to become relativistic. We discuss recent progress in understanding the physics of extreme light, and the advanced electron and x-ray technologies that it drives. Through the mechanism of relativistic self-guiding, focused light from our 100-TW Diocles laser was propagated in plasma at relativistic intensity for distance of 1 cm [corresponding to over 15 vacuum diffraction (Rayleigh) ranges]. As a result of this extended propagation length, electrons were accelerated by a laser-wakefield to near GeV energy in a well-collimated beam. The electron beam was measured to be tunable over a wide energy range, 100 -- 800 MeV, with 5-- 25% energy spread, and 1-- 4-mrad divergence angle. The experimental results were found to be in reasonable agreement with the results of numerical simulation, which predict even higher electron energy (multi-GeV) with our recently upgraded peak laser power (>0.5 PW). These characteristics, along with their lack of any measurable amount of dark-current, make these electron beams good candidates for driving synchrotron x-ray sources. The development of one such x-ray source will also be discussed, one driven by inverse Compton scattering of laser light by laser-accelerated electrons. Its small radiation source size (˜ 10 microns) and low angular beam divergence (< 10 mrad) make it quite promising for applications in radiology. By virtue of its ultra-short pulse duration (< 10 fs) and wide energy tunability (10 keV -- 10 MeV), it can also be used to probe matter with atomic-scale spatial and temporal resolution---simultaneously.

  19. Constraints on energy release in solar flares from RHESSI and GOES X-ray observations. II. Energetics and energy partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, A.; Mann, G.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We derive constraints on energy release, transport and conversion processes in solar flares based on a detailed characterization of the physical parameters of both the thermal plasma and the accelerated nonthermal electrons based on X-ray observations. In particular, we address the questions of whether the energy required to heat the thermal plasma can be supplied by nonthermal particles, and how the energetics derived from X-rays compare to the total bolometric radiated energy. Methods: Time series of spectral fits and images for 24 flares ranging from GOES class C3.4 to X17.2 were obtained using RHESSI hard X-ray observations. This has been supplemented by GOES soft X-ray fluxes. In our companion Paper I, we have used this data set to obtain the basic physical parameters for the thermal plasma (using the isothermal approximation) and the injected energetic electrons (assuming the thick-target model). Here, we used this data set to derive the flare energetics, including thermal energy, radiative and conductive energy loss, gravitational and flow energy of the plasma, and kinetic energy of the injected electrons. We studied how the thermal energies compare to the energy in nonthermal electrons, and how the various energetics and energy partition depend on flare importance. Results: All flare energetics show a good to excellent correlation with the peak GOES flux. The gravitational energy of the evaporated plasma and the kinetic energy of plasma flows can be neglected in the discussion of flare energetics. The radiative energy losses are comparable to the maximum thermal energy, while the conductive losses are considerably higher than the maximum thermal energy, especially in weaker flares. The total heating requirement of the hot plasma amounts to ≈50% of the total bolometric energy loss, with the conductive losses as a major contribution. The nonthermal energy input by energetic electrons is not sufficient to account for the total heating requirements of

  20. Energy spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Dietrich; Swordy, Simon P.; Meyer, Peter; L'Heureux, Jacques; Grunsfeld, John M.

    1991-06-01

    New results are described on the energy spectra and relative abundances of primary cosmic ray nuclei from carbon to iron. The measurement was performed on the Spacelab-2 mission of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1985, and extends to energies beyond 1 TeV per amu. The data indicate that the cosmic ray flux arriving near earth becomes enriched with heavier nuclei, most notably iron, as energy increases. Extrapolating to the source, with a simple leaky box model of galactic propagation with rigidity-dependent containment time, relative abundances of the elements are obtained that are quite similar to those reported at lower energy. In particular, the depletion of elements with high first ionization potential relative to the local galactic abundances, seems to persist in the cosmic ray source well up to TeV energies. A single power-law energy spectrum about E exp -2.1 provides a good description of the observed spectra of most elemental species.

  1. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  2. ENERGY SPECTRUM AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ULTRAHIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS FROM SEMI-RELATIVISTIC HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu

    2012-02-10

    It has been suggested that hypernova remnants, with a substantial amount of energy in semi-relativistic ejecta, can accelerate intermediate mass or heavy nuclei to ultrahigh energies and provide a sufficient amount of energy in cosmic rays to account for the observed flux. We here calculate the expected energy spectrum and chemical composition of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from such semi-relativistic hypernovae. With a chemical composition equal to that of the hypernova ejecta and a flat or hard spectrum for cosmic rays at the sources, the spectrum and composition of the propagated cosmic rays observed at the Earth can be compatible with the measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  3. Low energy cosmic ray studies from a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of cosmic ray nuclei with energies less than about 7 GeV/nucleon in low earth orbit are hampered by the geomagnetic field. Even in high inclination orbits these effects can be significant. The lunar surface (or lunar orbit) provides an attractive site for carrying out low energy cosmic ray studies which require large detectors. The rationale and requirements for this type of experiment are described.

  4. DETECTION OF INTRA-DAY VARIABILITY TIMESCALES OF FOUR HIGH-ENERGY PEAKED BLAZARS WITH XMM-NEWTON

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Haritma; Gupta, Alok C.; Lachowicz, Pawel; Wiita, Paul J. E-mail: acgupta30@gmail.co E-mail: wiita@chara.gsu.ed

    2010-07-20

    We selected a sample of 24 XMM-Newton light curves (LCs) of four high energy peaked blazars, PKS 0548 - 322, ON 231, 1ES 1426+428, and PKS 2155 - 304. These data comprise continuous LCs of 7.67-18.97 hr in length. We searched for possible quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and intra-day variability (IDV) timescales in the LCs of these blazars. We found a likely QPO in one LC of PKS 2155 - 304 which was reported elsewhere. In the remaining 23 LCs we found hints of possible weak QPOs in one LC of each ON 231 and PKS 2155 - 304, but neither is statistically significant. We found IDV timescales that ranged from 15.7 to 46.8 ks in eight LCs. In 13 LCs any variability timescales were longer than the length of the data. Assuming that the possible weak QPO periods in the blazars PKS 2155 - 304 and ON 231 are real and are associated with the innermost portions of their accretion disk, we can estimate that their central black hole masses exceed 1.2 x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}. Emission models for radio-loud active galactic nuclei that could explain our results are briefly discussed.

  5. On the possibility of observing cosmic ray sources in high energy gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    If cosmic rays are accelerated by strong shocks, then cosmic ray sources should be characterized by spectra, dN/dE alpha E exp -(2.0-2.2), reflecting the strength of those shocks. This is expected from the 'standard leaky box' model of cosmic ray propagation in which the source spectra are harder than the observed spectra because higher energy particles have shorter residence times in the galactic magnetic fields. Furthermore, data on cosmic ray nucleons suggest that these sources might be surrounded by material. If the latter is true, such sources should be observable in gamma rays at energies beyond 1 GeV where the angular resolution of gamma-ray telescopes is optimized and the background is significantly reduced. For identified sources, the source location accuracy can be shown to improve with increasing energy in spite of the decreasing statistics, as long as the gamma-ray spectrum is harder than dN/dE alpha E exp -gamma. A Monte Carlo model is used to predict the photon spectra which would be expected from cosmic ray sources under varying assumptions about the strength of the shocks in the acceleration region.

  6. Gamma-ray lines produced by low-energy cosmic rays in SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Shibazaki, Noriaki

    1989-01-01

    The Fe-56 nuclei excited by the inelastic collision of protons with the energy of around 10 MeV emit gamma rays in the same nuclear gamma-ray lines as those from the radioactive decay of Co-56. Since a very young supernova remnant like SN 1987A is most likely to accelerate cosmic rays by the shock and a possible pulsar embedded in the ejecta, this process may account for the gamma-ray lines observed from SN 1987A. The conditions required to explain the observed flux of the gamma-ray lines were investigated. It was found that this jet having a large fraction of the total kinetic energy of the supernova explosion.

  7. High energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborra, Irene

    2016-05-01

    The diffuse high-energy neutrino emission from long and short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is studied within the fireball emission model. By requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions, we find that GRBs could contribute up to a few percents to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, if the latter has a diffuse origin. Our findings suggest that larger exposure is mandatory to detect neutrinos from GRBs in future stacking searches.

  8. The Radiation Dose at Commercial Aircraft Altitudes During the January 2005 High-Energy Solar Cosmic ray Event and the Effects of the Solar Cosmic ray Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.; Friedberg, W.; Copeland, K.; Sauer, H. H.

    2005-12-01

    The radiation dose to aircrews and passengers is a phenomenon of societal interest. There is a requirement to provide alerts whenever the radiation dose exceeds 20 micro-sieverts per hour at flight altitudes. The possibility that this might occur during a large high-energy solar cosmic ray event has resulted in much speculation. During the 20 January 2005 ground-level event the FAA Solar Radiation Alert System would have issued such an alert for aircraft at high latitudes for flight altitudes above 40,000 feet. Analysis of the GOES high-energy proton data results in a predicted dose rate of 23 micro Sv per hour at 60,000 feet for the first hour of the event. We also predict that the maximum peak dose rate would have been higher at the geographical position corresponding to the peak anisotropic flux intensity and would be correspondingly lower at geographical positions receiving a lower high energy solar cosmic ray flux. The solar high-energy flux anisotropy is extremely variable among the observed solar cosmic ray ground-level events. The 20 January 2005 event had one of the most extreme anisotropies yet observed by ground-level cosmic ray neutron monitors. We discuss the effects of this anisotropy with respect to aircraft radiation dose.

  9. A directional low energy gamma-ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G.; Pieper, G. F.

    1973-01-01

    The sensitivity of a directional gamma ray detector, which relies on blocking a source to determine its direction and energy spectrum, is calculated and compared to the more conventional well shaped shielded detectors. It is shown that such an anticollimator detection system provides a basis for measuring the celestial diffuse gamma ray background, gamma ray sources and bursts with good energy, angular, and time resolution, and that additionally the system is 20 to 50 times as sensitive as conventional detectors when compared on a per unit mass basis.

  10. A directional low energy gamma-ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G.; Pieper, G. F.

    1973-01-01

    The sensitivity of a directional gamma ray detector, which relies on blocking a source to determine its direction and energy spectrum, is calculated and compared to the more conventional well-shaped shielded detectors. It is shown that such an anticollimator detection system provides a basis for measuring the celestial diffuse gamma ray background, gamma ray sources and bursts with good energy, angular, and time resolution, and that additionally the system is 20 to 50 times as sensitive as conventional detectors when compared on a per unit mass basis.

  11. The intergalactic propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray nuclei (A = 1-56) from cosmologically distant sources through the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Various models for the injected composition and spectrum and of the cosmic infrared background are studied using updated photodisintegration cross-sections. The observational data on the spectrum and the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are jointly consistent with a model where all of the injected primary cosmic rays are iron nuclei (or a mixture of heavy and light nuclei).

  12. Diffuse Galactic low energy gamma ray continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, J. G.; Ramaty, R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the origin of diffuse low-energy Galactic gamma-ray continuum down to about 30 keV. We calculate gamma-ray emission via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering by propagating an unbroken electron power law injection spectrum and employing a Galactic emmissivity model derived from COSB observations. To maintain the low energy electron population capable of producing the observed continuum via bremsstrahlung, a total power input of 4 x 10 exp 41 erg/s is required. This exceeds the total power supplied to the nuclear cosmic rays by about an order of magnitude.

  13. X-ray characterization by energy-resolved powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, G.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    A method for single-shot, nondestructive characterization of broadband x-ray beams, based on energy-resolved powder diffraction, is described. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to simulate data for x-ray beams in the keV range with parameters similar to those generated by betatron oscillations in a laser-driven plasma accelerator. The retrieved x-ray spectra are found to be in excellent agreement with those of the input beams for realistic numbers of incident photons. It is demonstrated that the angular divergence of the x rays can be deduced from the deviation of the detected photons from the Debye-Scherrer rings which would be produced by a parallel beam. It is shown that the angular divergence can be measured as a function of the photon energy, yielding the angularly resolved spectrum of the input x-ray beam.

  14. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A. S.; Beers, E. W.

    2001-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper.

  15. Gamma-ray transfer and energy deposition in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Sutherland, Peter G.; Harkness, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to the energy-independent (gray) radiative transfer equations are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Ni-56 and Co-56 decay gamma-ray energy deposition in supernovae. The comparison shows that an effective, purely absorptive, gray opacity, kappa(sub gamma) approximately (0. 06 +/- 0.01)Y(sub e) sq cm/g, where Y is the total number of electrons per baryon, accurately describes the interaction of gamma-rays with the cool supernova gas and the local gamma-ray energy deposition within the gas. The nature of the gamma-ray interaction process (dominated by Compton scattering in the relativistic regime) creates a weak dependence of kappa(sub gamma) on the optical thickness of the (spherically symmetric) supernova atmosphere: The maximum value of kappa(sub gamma) applies during optically thick conditions when individual gamma-rays undergo multiple scattering encounters and the lower bound is reached at the phase characterized by a total Thomson optical depth to the center of the atmosphere tau(sub e) approximately less than 1. Gamma-ray deposition for Type Ia supernova models to within 10% for the epoch from maximum light to t = 1200 days. Our results quantitatively confirm that the quick and efficient solution to the gray transfer problem provides an accurate representation of gamma-ray energy deposition for a broad range of supernova conditions.

  16. Thermoluminescent response and relative efficiency of TLD-100 exposed to low-energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa-de Buen, I.; Buenfil, A. E.; Ruiz, C. G.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Flores, A.; Brandan, M. E.

    1998-08-01

    The dose-response of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) exposed to 15 and 35 kVp ( and keV effective energy respectively) x-rays and -rays has been measured in the dose interval from (1.2-5.4) Gy for x-rays, and from 0.14 to 850 Gy for -rays. In both cases the total TL signal and glow curve peaks 3 to 9 show supralinearity. The supralinearity function f(D) is similar for both x-ray beams, except for peak 8, where a 30% difference is observed. The maxima of f(D) for the total TL signal and peaks 5 to 8 are 2.1, 1.7, 6.4, 3.3 and 7.5 respectively for 8.1 keV x-rays and 3.7, 3.1, 13.6, 9.9 and 11.0 for -rays. The measured relative efficiencies for x-rays with respect to , for the total TL signal and peaks 5 and 7, were 1.04, 0.97 and 3.2 respectively.

  17. Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Reppin, C.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays from an early design study employing Monte Carlo calculations. The response to 50 to 600 MeV solar neutrons was estimated from a simple model which did not consider secondary charged particles escaping into the veto shields. In view of numerous detections by the GRS of solar flares emitting high energy gamma rays, including at least two emitting directly detectable neutrons, the calibration of the high energy mode in the flight model has been recalculated by the use of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer codes. New results presented show that the GRS response to gamma rays above 20 MeV and to neutrons above 100 MeV is significantly lower than the earlier estimates.

  18. Cosmic ray spectral deformation caused by energy determination errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Per; Wannemark, Conny

    2005-08-01

    Using simulation methods, distortion effects on energy spectra caused by errors in the energy determination have been investigated. For cosmic ray proton spectra falling steeply with kinetic energy E as E-2.7, significant effects appear. When magnetic spectrometers are used to determine the energy, the relative error increases linearly with the energy and distortions with a sinusoidal form appear starting at an energy that depends significantly on the error distribution but at an energy lower than that corresponding to the maximum detectable rigidity of the spectrometer. The effect should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different experiments, often having different error distributions.

  19. Cosmogenic neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic ray models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, R.; Boncioli, D.; di Matteo, A.; Grillo, A. F.; Petrera, S.; Salamida, F.

    2015-10-01

    We use an updated version of SimProp, a Monte Carlo simulation scheme for the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, to compute cosmogenic neutrino fluxes expected on Earth in various scenarios. These fluxes are compared with the newly detected IceCube events at PeV energies and with recent experimental limits at EeV energies of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This comparison allows us to draw some interesting conclusions about the source models for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We will show how the available experimental observations are almost at the level of constraining such models, mainly in terms of the injected chemical composition and cosmological evolution of sources. The results presented here will also be important in the evaluation of the discovery capabilities of the future planned ultra-high energy cosmic ray and neutrino observatories.

  20. Depth-selective X-ray absorption spectroscopy by detection of energy-loss Auger electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Soejima, Narumasa; Iwasaki, Shiro; Nomoto, Toyokazu; Murai, Takaaki; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2015-11-01

    A unique X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) method is proposed for depth profiling of chemical states in material surfaces. Partial electron yield mode detecting energy-loss Auger electrons, called the inelastic electron yield (IEY) mode, enables a variation in the probe depth. As an example, Si K-edge XAS spectra for a well-defined multilayer sample (Si3N4/SiO2/Si) have been investigated using this method at various kinetic energies. We found that the peaks assigned to the layers from the top layer to the substrate appeared in the spectra in the order of increasing energy loss relative to the Auger electrons. Thus, the probe depth can be changed by the selection of the kinetic energy of the energy loss electrons in IEY-XAS.

  1. Status of development of the Gamma Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, I.Y.; Schmid, G.J.; Vetter, K.

    1996-12-31

    The current generation of large gamma-ray detector arrays, Gammasphere, Eurogam and GASP, are based on modules of Compton suppressed Ge detectors. Due to the solid angle occupied by the Compton shields and to gamma rays escaping the detector, the total peak efficiency of such a design is limited to about 20% for a 1.3 MeV gamma ray. A shell consisting of closely packed Ge detectors has been suggested as the solution to the efficiency limitation. In this case, the entire solid angle is covered by Ge detectors, and by adding the signal from neighboring detectors, the escaped energy is recovered and much higher efficiency can be achieved (e.g. 60% for a 1.3 MeV gamma ray). However, for high multiplicity cascades, the summing of two gamma rays hitting neighboring detectors reduces the efficiency and increases the background. In order to reduce this summing, a large number of detectors is required. For example, with a multiplicity of 25, one needs about 1500 detectors to keep the probability of false summing below 10% and the cost of such a detector array will be prohibitive. Rather than such an approach, the authors are developing a new concept for a gamma-ray array; a shell of closely-packed Ge detectors consisting of 100-200 highly-segmented elements. The high granularity of the segmented Ge detector enables the authors to resolve each of the scattering interactions and determine its position and energy. A tracking algorithm, using the position and energy information, will then identify the interactions belonging to a particular gamma ray and its energy is obtained by summing only these interactions. Such an array can reach a total efficiency about 60%, with a resolving power 1000 times higher than that of current arrays.

  2. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MAXIMUM ENERGY OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, M.; Katayose, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, D.

    2010-06-20

    A model of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum is proposed that assumes various acceleration limits at multiple sources. The model describes the broken power-law energy spectrum of cosmic rays by superposition of multiple sources; a diffusive shock acceleration mechanism plays an essential role. The maximum energy of galactic cosmic rays is discussed based on a comparison of experimental data with calculations done using the proposed model. The model can describe the energy spectrum at very high energies of up to several times 10{sup 18} eV, but the observed highest-energy cosmic rays deviate from the model predictions, indicating a different origin, such as an extragalactic source. This model describes the steepening of the power index at the so-called knee. However, it was found that additional assumptions are needed to explain the sharpness of the knee. Two possible explanations for the structure of the knee are discussed in terms of nearby source(s) and the hard energy spectrum suggested by nonlinear effects of cosmic-ray acceleration mechanisms.

  3. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  4. Pointlike gamma ray sources as signatures of distant accelerators of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Gabici, Stefano; Aharonian, Felix A

    2005-12-16

    We discuss the possibility of observing distant accelerators of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in synchrotron gamma rays. Protons propagating away from their acceleration sites produce extremely energetic electrons during photopion interactions with cosmic microwave background photons. If the accelerator is embedded in a magnetized region, these electrons will emit high energy synchrotron radiation. The resulting synchrotron source is expected to be pointlike, steady, and detectable in the GeV-TeV energy range if the magnetic field is at the nanoGauss level. PMID:16384444

  5. Ionization states of low-energy cosmic rays - Results from Spacelab 3 cosmic-ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, A.; Goswami, J. N.; Biswas, S.; Durgaprasad, N.; Mitra, B.; Singh, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    The Indian cosmic ray experiment Anuradha, conducted onboard Spacelab 3 during April 29-May 6, 1985 was designed to obtain information on the ionization states of low-energy cosmic rays, using the geomagnetic field as a rigidity filter to place an upper limit on the ionization state of individual cosmic ray particles. This paper presents data confirming the presence of three distinct groups of energetic particles in the near-earth space: (1) low-energy (15-25 MeV/nucleon) anomalous cosmic rays that are either singly ionized or consistent with their being in singly ionized state, (2) fully ionized galactic cosmic ray ions, and (3) partially ionized iron and sub-iron group ions (which account for about 20 percent of all the iron and sub-iron group ions detected at the Spacelab 3 orbit within the magnetosphere in the energy interval 25-125 MeV/nucleon). It is argued that these partially ionized heavy ions are indeed a part of the low-energy galactic cosmic rays present in the interplanetary space.

  6. CONSTRAINING DARK ENERGY WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Samushia, Lado; Ratra, Bharat E-mail: ratra@phys.ksu.ed

    2010-05-10

    We use the measurement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) distances to constrain dark energy cosmological model parameters. We employ two methods for analyzing GRB data-fitting luminosity relation of GRBs in each cosmology and using distance measures computed from binned GRB data. Current GRB data alone cannot tightly constrain cosmological parameters and allow for a wide range of dark energy models.

  7. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  8. The ATLAS Hadronic Physics Program and High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfold, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    The various aspects of the current and future ATLAS programs to explore hadronic physics, including diffraction and forward physic are discussed The emphasis is p laced on those results and future plans that have particular relevance for high-energy, and ultra high-energy, cosmic ray physics. In closing the latest ATLAS resul ts on the search for the Higgs boson are summarized.

  9. Searching for ultra-high energy cosmic rays with smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteson, Daniel; Mulhearn, Michael; Shimmin, Chase; Cranmer, Kyle; Brodie, Kyle; Burns, Dustin

    2016-06-01

    We propose a novel approach for observing cosmic rays at ultra-high energy (>1018 eV) by repurposing the existing network of smartphones as a ground detector array. Extensive air showers generated by cosmic rays produce muons and high-energy photons, which can be detected by the CMOS sensors of smartphone cameras. The small size and low efficiency of each sensor is compensated by the large number of active phones. We show that if user adoption targets are met, such a network will have significant observing power at the highest energies.

  10. The very-high-energy gamma-ray sky.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy has emerged as a truly observational discipline, with many detected sources representing different galactic and extragalactic source populations-supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, giant molecular clouds, star formation regions, compact binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. It is expected that observations with the next generation of stereoscopic arrays of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes over a very broad energy range from 10(10) to 10(15) electron volts will dramatically increase the number of very-high-energy gamma-ray sources, thus having a huge impact on the development of astrophysics, cosmology, and particle astrophysics. PMID:17204642

  11. High Energy Electron and Gamma - Ray Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons, and at very high energies gamma-ray photons as well. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well. ATIC has had its first 16 day balloon flight at the turn of the year over Antarctica, and first results obtained using the analysis methods derived from simulations and calibrations will be reported.

  12. IONS (ANURADHA): Ionization states of low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Chakraborti, R.; Cowsik, R.; Durgaprasad, N.; Kajarekar, P. J.; Singh, R. K.; Vahia, M. N.; Yadav, J. S.; Dutt, N.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    IONS (ANURADHA), the experimental payload designed specifically to determine the ionization states, flux, composition, energy spectra and arrival directions of low energy (10 to 100 MeV/amu) anomalous cosmic ray ions of helium to iron in near-Earth space, had a highly successful flight and operation Spacelab-3 mission. The experiment combines the accuracy of a highly sensitive CR-39 nuclear track detector with active components included in the payload to achieve the experimental objectives. Post-flight analysis of detector calibration pieces placed within the payload indicated no measurable changes in detector response due to its exposure in spacelab environment. Nuclear tracks produced by alpha-particles, oxygen group and Fe ions in low energy anomalous cosmic rays were identified. It is calculated that the main detector has recorded high quality events of about 10,000 alpha-particles and similar number of oxygen group and heavier ions of low energy cosmic rays.

  13. On Measuring Cosmic Ray Energy Spectra with the Rapidity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    An important goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays up to 10(exp 16) eV. This goal cannot be achieved with an ionization calorimeter because the required instrument is too massive for space flight. An alternate method will be presented. This method is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11) -10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a conceptual design for a new instrument (KLEM) will be presented. Due to its light weight, this instrument can have a large aperture enabling the direct measurement of cosmic rays to 1016 eV.

  14. Assessment of the efficiency of hydrogen cycles on the basis of off-peak electric energy produced at a nuclear power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Bairamov, A. N.; Shatskova, O. V.

    2009-11-01

    The main factors influencing the efficiency of using off-peak electric energy to run hydrogen cycles at a nuclear power station are considered. Indicators characterizing the efficiency of using a hydrogen cycle at a nuclear power station during its operation with superheating live steam in a steam-hydrogen mode are presented. A comparison between the steam-turbine hydrogen cycle and a pumped-storage hydraulic power station in the efficiency of generating peak electric energy (power) and capital investments is given.

  15. ENERGY FEEDBACK FROM X-RAY BINARIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; Zezas, A.; Lehmer, B. D.; Naoz, S.; Basu-Zych, A.

    2013-10-20

    X-ray photons, because of their long mean-free paths, can easily escape the galactic environments where they are produced, and interact at long distances with the intergalactic medium, potentially having a significant contribution to the heating and reionization of the early universe. The two most important sources of X-ray photons in the universe are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and X-ray binaries (XRBs). In this Letter we use results from detailed, large scale population synthesis simulations to study the energy feedback of XRBs, from the first galaxies (z ∼ 20) until today. We estimate that X-ray emission from XRBs dominates over AGN at z ∼> 6-8. The shape of the spectral energy distribution of the emission from XRBs shows little change with redshift, in contrast to its normalization which evolves by ∼4 orders of magnitude, primarily due to the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate. However, the metallicity and the mean stellar age of a given XRB population affect significantly its X-ray output. Specifically, the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs per unit of star-formation rate varies an order of magnitude going from solar metallicity to less than 10% solar, and the X-ray luminosity from low-mass XRBs per unit of stellar mass peaks at an age of ∼300 Myr and then decreases gradually at later times, showing little variation for mean stellar ages ∼> 3 Gyr. Finally, we provide analytical and tabulated prescriptions for the energy output of XRBs, that can be directly incorporated in cosmological simulations.

  16. Energy Feedback from X-ray Binaries in the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragos, T.; Lehmer, B..; Naoz, S.; Zezas, A.; Basu-Zych, A.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray photons, because of their long mean-free paths, can easily escape the galactic environments where they are produced, and interact at long distances with the intergalactic medium, potentially having a significant contribution to the heating and reionization of the early universe. The two most important sources of X-ray photons in the universe are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and X-ray binaries (XRBs). In this Letter we use results from detailed, large scale population synthesis simulations to study the energy feedback of XRBs, from the first galaxies (z (redshift) approximately equal to 20) until today.We estimate that X-ray emission from XRBs dominates over AGN at z (redshift) greater than or approximately equal to 6-8. The shape of the spectral energy distribution of the emission from XRBs shows little change with redshift, in contrast to its normalization which evolves by approximately 4 orders of magnitude, primarily due to the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate. However, the metallicity and the mean stellar age of a given XRB population affect significantly its X-ray output. Specifically, the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs per unit of star-formation rate varies an order of magnitude going from solar metallicity to less than 10% solar, and the X-ray luminosity from low-mass XRBs per unit of stellar mass peaks at an age of approximately 300 Myr (million years) and then decreases gradually at later times, showing little variation for mean stellar ages 3 Gyr (Giga years, or billion years). Finally, we provide analytical and tabulated prescriptions for the energy output of XRBs, that can be directly incorporated in cosmological simulations.

  17. Energy Feedback from X-Ray Binaries in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragos, T.; Lehmer, B. D.; Naoz, S.; Zezas, A.; Basu-Zych, A.

    2013-10-01

    X-ray photons, because of their long mean-free paths, can easily escape the galactic environments where they are produced, and interact at long distances with the intergalactic medium, potentially having a significant contribution to the heating and reionization of the early universe. The two most important sources of X-ray photons in the universe are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and X-ray binaries (XRBs). In this Letter we use results from detailed, large scale population synthesis simulations to study the energy feedback of XRBs, from the first galaxies (z ~ 20) until today. We estimate that X-ray emission from XRBs dominates over AGN at z >~ 6-8. The shape of the spectral energy distribution of the emission from XRBs shows little change with redshift, in contrast to its normalization which evolves by ~4 orders of magnitude, primarily due to the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate. However, the metallicity and the mean stellar age of a given XRB population affect significantly its X-ray output. Specifically, the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs per unit of star-formation rate varies an order of magnitude going from solar metallicity to less than 10% solar, and the X-ray luminosity from low-mass XRBs per unit of stellar mass peaks at an age of ~300 Myr and then decreases gradually at later times, showing little variation for mean stellar ages >~ 3 Gyr. Finally, we provide analytical and tabulated prescriptions for the energy output of XRBs, that can be directly incorporated in cosmological simulations.

  18. Compton scattering for spectroscopic detection of ultra-fast, high flux, broad energy range X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Brunetti, E.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Montgomery, R.; Smith, G.; Hoek, M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Shea, V. O.; Issac, R. C.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Dias, J. M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Compton side-scattering has been used to simultaneously downshift the energy of keV to MeV energy range photons while attenuating their flux to enable single-shot, spectrally resolved, measurements of high flux X-ray sources to be undertaken. To demonstrate the technique a 1 mm thick pixelated cadmium telluride detector has been used to measure spectra of Compton side-scattered radiation from a Cobalt-60 laboratory source and a high flux, high peak brilliance X-ray source of betatron radiation from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator.

  19. THE {gamma}-RAY SPECTRUM OF GEMINGA AND THE INVERSE COMPTON MODEL OF PULSAR HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-09-20

    We reanalyze the Fermi spectra of the Geminga and Vela pulsars. We find that the spectrum of Geminga above the break is well approximated by a simple power law without the exponential cutoff, making Geminga's spectrum similar to that of Crab. Vela's broadband {gamma}-ray spectrum is equally well fit with both the exponential cutoff and the double power-law shapes. In the broadband double power-law fits, for a typical Fermi spectrum of a bright {gamma}-ray pulsar, most of the errors accumulate due to the arbitrary parameterization of the spectral roll-off. In addition, a power law with an exponential cutoff gives an acceptable fit for the underlying double power-law spectrum for a very broad range of parameters, making such fitting procedures insensitive to the underlying Fermi photon spectrum. Our results have important implications for the mechanism of pulsar high-energy emission. A number of observed properties of {gamma}-ray pulsars-i.e., the broken power-law spectra without exponential cutoffs and stretching in the case of Crab beyond the maximal curvature limit, spectral breaks close to or exceeding the maximal breaks due to curvature emission, patterns of the relative intensities of the leading and trailing pulses in the Crab repeated in the X-ray and {gamma}-ray regions, presence of profile peaks at lower energies aligned with {gamma}-ray peaks-all point to the inverse Compton origin of the high-energy emission from majority of pulsars.

  20. A comparison between fine grain and epitaxial superconducting tunneling junctions for use as high energy resolution x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulnier, Gregory Gerard

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting tunneling junctions (STJ) show great promise in high energy resolution x-ray spectroscopy for use in x-ray astrophysics. An STJ is a sandwich of an insulator between two superconductors (S-I-S). Such a device has an intrinsic energy resolution an order of magnitude better than any existing semiconductor device, including the charge coupled device (CCD). The potential impact on x-ray astrophysics is enormous, with possible future use on sounding rockets and other as yet undefined satellite missions. This thesis compares two STJ's that have been fabricated using Nb/Al/Al2O3/Nb in the same ultra-high vacuum chamber with the same layer thicknesses with the only difference being that the base layers are either fine grain (polycrystalline) or epitaxial. The testing was done at temperatures between 0.4 K and 4.2 K. The comparison included subgap spectra from an Fe-55 x-ray source. The findings showed that the fine grain junction had a tunnel barrier of much higher quality and yielded higher energy resolution. It was determined that the epitaxial junction was much more sensitive to substrate events. Two peaks were found in the x-ray spectra. Each peak was attributed to x-ray interactions within one or the other superconducting films of the junction.

  1. Experimental Summary: Very High Energy Cosmic Rays and their Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz

    2013-06-01

    The XVII International Symposium on Very High Energy Cosmic Ray Interactions, held in August of 2012 in Berlin, was the first one in the history of the Symposium,where a plethora of high precision LHC data with relevance for cosmic ray physics was presented. This report aims at giving a brief summary of those measurements andit discusses their relevance for observations of high energy cosmic rays. Enormous progress has been made also in air shower observations and in direct measurements of cosmic rays, exhibiting many more structure in the cosmic ray energy spectrum than just a simple power law with a knee and an ankle. At the highest energy, the flux suppression may not be dominated by the GZK-effect but by the limiting energy of a nearby source or source population. New projects and application of new technologies promise further advances also in the near future. We shall discuss the experimental and theoretical progress in the field and its prospects for coming years.

  2. The High Energy Astronomy Observatory X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.; Austin, G.; Koch, D.; Jagoda, N.; Kirchner, T.; Dias, R.

    1978-01-01

    The High Energy Astronomy Observatory-Mission B (HEAO-B) is a satellite observatory for the purpose of performing a detailed X-ray survey of the celestial sphere. Measurements will be made of stellar radiation in the range 0.2 through 20 keV. The primary viewing requirement is to provide final aspect solution and internal alignment information to correlate an observed X-ray image with the celestial sphere to within one-and-one-half arc seconds. The Observatory consists of the HEAO Spacecraft together with the X-ray Telescope. The Spacecraft provides the required attitude control and determination system, data telemetry system, space solar power system, and interface with the launch vehicle. The X-ray Telescope includes a high resolution mirror assembly, optical bench metering structure, X-ray detectors, detector positioning system, detector electronics and aspect sensing system.

  3. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  4. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  5. Elemental abundances in the local cosmic rays at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swordy, Simon P.; L'Heureux, Jacques; Meyer, Peter; Muller, Dietrich

    1993-01-01

    The heavy-nuclei energy spectra measured aboard the Space Shuttle and on HEAO 3 are presently discussed in the framework of a leaky-box model; the source energy spectrum required for a fit, at E exp -2.2 for all nuclear species, is slightly steeper than a previous estimate. These data are presented in terms of total energy/particle, in order to allow direct comparison with the observed all-particle spectrum of cosmic rays.

  6. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays: Old Physics or New Physics?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the advantages of and the problems associated with hypotheses to explain the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR: E greater than 10 EeV) and the "trans-GZK" cosmic rays (TGZK: E greater than 100 EeV) both through "old physics" (acceleration in cosmic sources) and "new physics" (new particles, topological defects, fat neutrino cross sections, Lorentz invariance violation).

  7. A low-energy gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    We describe a hard-X-ray/soft-gamma-ray imaging detector, incorporating a microchannel-plate (MCP) electron multiplier for possible use in future telescopes. In contrast to previous attempts using MCP's this approach promises to achieve high quantum detection efficiencies in addition to high spatial and temporal resolution. Preliminary results indicate not only the capability of simultaneous imaging and single-photon counting, but also coarse energy resolution.

  8. Dual-energy flash x-ray generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Takahashi, Kei; Shikoda, Arimitsu; Oizumi, Teiji; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru; Fujiwara, Akihiro; Mitoya, Kanji

    1995-05-01

    The fundamental studies on a dual-energy flash x-ray generator for performing the energy-selective two-direction radiography are described. This generator consisted of the following components: a negative high- voltage power supply, a polarity-inversion-type high-voltage pulser having a 5 nF combined ceramic condenser, a turbo molecular pump, and two flash x-ray tubes. The condenser in the pulser was charged from -60 to -80 kV, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to two x-ray tubes. The maximum output voltage from the pulser was about -1.5 times the charged voltage because the cable transmission line was employed. Using a tube, the maximum tube voltage was about 110 kV. The maximum tube current and the x-ray intensity were less than 3 kA and 5 (mu) C/kg at 0.5 m per pulse, respectively. In contrast, the tube current and the intensity has approximately half the above values when two tubes were employed. The pulse widths were less than 200 ns, and two shots of flash x rays were obtained simultaneously. Each photon energy of flash x rays can be changed by controlling the space between the anode and cathode electrodes.

  9. X-ray and Optical follow-up of the mid-2014 Outburst of Aql X-1 at peak and at low activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Poshak; Dhillon, Vik S.; Tomsick, John A.; Butterley, Tim; Littlefair, Stuart M.; Wilson, Richard W.; Kennea, Jamie A.

    2014-09-01

    Following reports of optical and X-ray brightening of the soft X-ray transient Aql X-1 (ATel #6280, #6286), we obtained monitoring observations of the source with the Swift X-ray mission, and with the 0.5 m Durham/Sheffield robotic optical telescope located on La Palma.

  10. Measurement of the energy of horizontal cosmic ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettert, Michael

    1993-03-01

    An experiment in which the energy of cosmic ray muons is determined by measuring the electron positron pairs that they radiate off when passing through matter is described. The detector is a stack of lead converters interspersed with ionization chambers for particle detection. The chambers use as active medium the liquid tetra methyl silane (TMS). The radiated quanta initiate electromagnetic cascades in the lead and are recognized due to the characteristic shower development. The energy spectrum of horizontal muons is presented and from this the primary cosmic ray spectrum is deduced.

  11. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Chang, Wen-Kuei; Lin, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-01

    Buildings consume more than one third of the world?s total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small

  12. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

  13. Neutrino diagnostics of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Markus; Sarkar, Subir; Anchordoqui, Luis A.

    2009-04-15

    The energy at which cosmic rays from extra-galactic sources begin to dominate over those from galactic sources is an important open question in astroparticle physics. A natural candidate is the energy at the 'ankle' in the approximately power-law energy spectrum which is indicative of a crossover from a falling galactic component to a flatter extra-galactic component. The transition can occur without such flattening but this requires some degree of conspiracy of the spectral shapes and normalizations of the two components. Nevertheless, it has been argued that extra-galactic sources of cosmic ray protons that undergo interactions on the CMB can reproduce the energy spectrum below the ankle if the crossover energy is as low as the 'second knee' in the spectrum. This low crossover model is constrained by direct measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory, which indicate a heavier composition at these energies. We demonstrate that upper limits on the cosmic diffuse neutrino flux provide a complementary constraint on the proton fraction in ultra-high energy extra-galactic cosmic rays and forthcoming data from IceCube will provide a definitive test of this model.

  14. Characteristics of the low photon energy plasma x-ray generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Toriyabe, Hiroyuki; Sagae, Michiaki; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Ido, Hideaki; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2001-12-01

    The tentative experiment for production low photon energy characteristic x-rays using a capillary is described. The capillary of this flash x-ray tube was improved in order to increase the x-ray intensity and to generate high-intensity characteristic x-rays by forming the linear plasma x-ray source. The generator consists of a high-voltage power supply, a polarity-inversion ignitron pulse generator, a turbo-molecular pump, and a radiation tube with a capillary. A high-voltage condenser of 0.2(mu) F in the pulse generator is charged up to 20 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the capillary in the tube after closing the ignitron. In the present work, the pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of about 1 mPa, and the aluminum anode and cathode electrodes are employed to produce characteristic x-rays. The diameter and the length of the capillary are 2.0 and 29 mm, respectively, and both the cathode voltage and the discharge current displayed almost the damped oscillations. The peak values of the voltage and current increased when the charging voltage was increase, and their maximum values were -9.2 kV and 4.6 kA, respectively. The x-ray durations detected by a 1.6 micrometers aluminum filter were less than 10microsecond(s) , and we observe the intensity of aluminum characteristic x-rays.

  15. High Energy Neutrino Flash From Far-UV/X-Ray Flares of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-25

    The recent observations of bright optical and X-ray flares by the Swift satellite suggest these are produced by the late activities of the central engine. We study the neutrino emission from far-UV/X-ray flares under the late internal shock model. Since the efficiency of pion production in the highest energy is higher than that of the prompt bursts, such neutrino flashes from flares can give comparable or larger contributions to a diffuse very high energy neutrino background if the total energy input into flares is comparable to the radiated energy of the prompt bursts. These signals are very important because they have possibility to probe the nature of flares (baryonic or magnetic, the photon field, the magnetic field, and so on).

  16. A first look at the distant high energy X-ray population with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, Francesca M.; the NuSTAR Team

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), launched in June 2012, is opening the high energy X-ray sky for sensitive study for the first time. NuSTAR focusing X-ray optics are resolving the sources contributing to the peak of the X-ray background at >10 keV. To provide a sensitive census of this population, NuSTAR is performing an extragalactic survey, using a 3 tier approach: a very deep 200 ks, pencil-beam survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS), a moderate depth 50 ks survey of the COSMOS field, and a shallow survey suing serendipitous sources detected in target local bright sources. In this talk, I will report on the first results from this survey, including now about 200 sources in the three fields combined. The NuSTAR sources are approximately 100 times fainter than those previously detected at >10 keV by Swift/BAT and have a very broad range in redshift and luminosity (z=0.02-3). The sources are characterized on the basis of their X-ray properties (hardness ratio and luminosity), optical spectroscopy and optical to mid -infrared spectral energy distributions.

  17. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission toward the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Harding, A. K.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Karwin, C.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Malyshev, D.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-03-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has provided the most detailed view to date of the emission toward the Galactic center (GC) in high-energy γ-rays. This paper describes the analysis of data taken during the first 62 months of the mission in the energy range 1-100 GeV from a 15° × 15° region about the direction of the GC. Specialized interstellar emission models (IEMs) are constructed to enable the separation of the γ-ray emissions produced by cosmic ray particles interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation fields in the Milky Way into that from the inner ˜1 kpc surrounding the GC, and that from the rest of the Galaxy. A catalog of point sources for the 15° × 15° region is self-consistently constructed using these IEMs: the First Fermi-LAT Inner Galaxy Point Source Catalog (1FIG). The spatial locations, fluxes, and spectral properties of the 1FIG sources are presented, and compared with γ-ray point sources over the same region taken from existing catalogs. After subtracting the interstellar emission and point-source contributions a residual is found. If templates that peak toward the GC are used to model the positive residual the agreement with the data improves, but none of the additional templates tried account for all of its spatial structure. The spectrum of the positive residual modeled with these templates has a strong dependence on the choice of IEM.

  18. Recent high energy gamma-ray results from SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Ogelman, H. B.; Ozel, M. E.; Tumer, T.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy due to the results from SAS-2 have focused on two areas. First, the emission from the plane of the Galaxy is the dominant feature in the gamma-ray sky. The galactic latitude and longitude distributions are consistent with the concept that the high-energy radiation originates from cosmic rays interacting with interstellar matter, and the measurements support a galactic origin for cosmic rays. Second, searches of the SAS-2 data for emission from localized sources have shown three strong discrete gamma-ray sources: the Crab nebula and PSR 0531 + 21, the Vela supernova remnant and PSR 0833-45, and a source near galactic coordinates 193 deg longitude, +3 deg latitude, which does not appear to be associated with other known celestial objects. Evidence has also been found for pulsed gamma-ray emission from two other radio pulsars, PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46. A localized source near longitudes 76-80 deg may be associated with the X-ray source Cyg X-3.

  19. Very high energy gamma ray extension of GRO observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1992-01-01

    This has been an exiciting year for high energy gamma-ray astronomy, both from space and from ground-based observatories. It has been a particularly active period for the Whipple Observatory gamma-ray group. In phase 1 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), there has not been too much opportunity for overlapping observations with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and the other GRO telescopes; however, significant progress was made in the development of data analysis techniques and in improving the sensitivity of the technique which will have direct application in correlative observations in phase 2. Progress made during the period 1 Jul. 1991 - 31 Dec. 1991 is presented.

  20. Comprehensive x-ray spectral code for high energy astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D A; Fournier, K B; Mauche, C W

    2000-08-18

    The aim of this project has been to develop a spectral analysis tool with a level of quality and completeness commensurate to that expected in data from the current generation of X-ray observatories. The code is called LXSS (Livermore X-Ray Spectral Synthesizer). X-ray-emitting astrophysical plasmas are rarely, if ever, in LTE, so they have adopted the detailed level accounting approach, in which rates for processes that populate or depopulate atomic energy levels are treated explicitly. This entails the generation of a large quantity of atomic data, most of which is calculated using ''in-house'' computer codes. Calculations are benchmarked against laboratory data, and spectral models have been used to provide first-time interpretations of astrophysical X-ray spectra. The design of a versatile graphical user interface that allows access to and manipulation of the atomic database comprises the second major part of the project.

  1. Low-energy cosmic ray protons from nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    The intensity of low-energy (less than 100 MeV) protons from nuclear interactions of higher-energy (above 100 MeV) cosmic rays with the interstellar medium is calculated. The resultant intensity in the 10- to 100-MeV range is larger by a factor of 3-5 than the observed proton intensity near earth. The calculated intensity from nuclear interactions constitutes a lower limit on the actual proton intensity in interstellar space.

  2. Ultrahigh-energy Cosmic Rays and Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, Kumiko; Silk, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The recent detection of the gravitational-wave source GW150914 by the LIGO collaboration motivates a speculative source for the origin of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays as a possible byproduct of the immense energies achieved in black hole (BH) mergers, provided that the BHs have spin, as seems inevitable, and there are relic magnetic fields and disk debris remaining from the formation of the BHs or from their accretion history. We argue that given the modest efficiency \\lt 0.01 required per event per unit of gravitational-wave energy release, merging BHs potentially provide an environment for accelerating cosmic rays to ultrahigh energies. The presence of tidally disrupted planetary or asteroidal debris could lead to associated fast radio bursts.

  3. High-Energy Cosmic Ray Event Data from the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory in Mendoza, Argentina is the result of an international collaboration funded by 15 countries and many different organizations. Its mission is to capture high-energy cosmic ray events or air showers for research into their origin and nature. The Pierre Auger Collaboration agreed to make 1% of its data available to the public. The Public Event Explorer is a search tool that allows users to browse or search for and display figures and data plots of events collected since 2004. The repository is updated daily, and, as of June, 2014, makes more than 35,000 events publicly available. The energy of a cosmic ray is measured in Exa electron volts or EeV. These event displays can be browsed in order of their energy level from 0.1 to 41.1 EeV. Each event has an individual identification number.

    The event displays provide station data, cosmic ray incoming direction, various energy measurements, plots, vector-based images, and an ASCII data file.

  4. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T; Colgate, S; Li, H

    2009-07-01

    Turbulence-driven plasma accelerators produced by magnetized accretion disks around black holes are proposed as the mechanism mainly responsible for observed cosmic ray protons with ultra high energies 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} eV. The magnetized disk produces a voltage comparable to these cosmic ray energies. Here we present a Poynting model in which this voltage provides all of the energy to create the jet-like structures observed to be ejected from accretion disks, and this voltage also accelerates ions to high energies at the top of the expanding structure. Since the inductive electric field E = -v x B driving expansion has no component parallel to the magnetic field B, ion acceleration requires plasma wave generation - either a coherent wave accelerator as recently proposed, or instability-driven turbulence. We find that turbulence can tap the full inductive voltage as a quasi-steady accelerator, and even higher energies are produced by transient events on this structure. We find that both MHD modes due to the current and ion diffusion due to kinetic instability caused by the non-Maxwellian ion distribution contribute to acceleration. We apply our results to extragalactic giant radiolobes, whose synchrotron emissions serve to calibrate the model, and we discuss extrapolating to other astrophysical structures. Approximate calculations of the cosmic ray intensity and energy spectrum are in rough agreement with data and serve to motivate more extensive MHD and kinetic simulations of turbulence that could provide more accurate cosmic ray and synchrotron spectra to be compared with observations. A distinctive difference from previous models is that the cosmic ray and synchrotron emissions arise from different parts of the magnetic structure, thus providing a signature for the model.

  5. A large detector for cosmic ray abundance and energy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, C.

    A large aperture, balloon borne cosmic ray detector was designed to measure the energy spectra of individual cosmic ray species with Z greater than 8 in the energy range 0.3GeV/N to 400GeV/N. The energy dependence of the abundance spectrum extending up to such high energies will provide valuable data for determining the nature of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The properties of cosmic ray nuclei and the interpretation of the energy dependence of the abundance spectrum are discussed. The design and response of the BUGS IV cosmic ray detector are described. The measurement techniques used are gas scintillation, gas proportional scintillation and Cerenkov radiation from both gases and solids. The light collection properties of the detector and several experimental investigations of the light collection efficiency of the drift chamber region are described. The expected signals from the gas scintillation and gas Cerenkov emissions are predicted and the choice of a suitable scintillating gas mixture for minimizing the uncertainty in the charge and energy measurements is considered. The theoretical aspects of electron drift and diffusion in gases and several experimental investigations on the electron drift in the BUGS IV drift chamber are given. Also some preliminary results from a uniform field drift chamber are included which demonstrate the sensitivity of the electron drift velocity in inert gas mixtures to water vapor contamination. The expected overall performance of BUGS IV and the results of an experimental simulation of the parachute landing of the detector are given.

  6. Gamma-ray burst high energy emission from internal shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Guetta, D.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:In this paper we study synchrotron and synchrotron self Compton (SSC) emission from internal shocks (IS) during the prompt and X-ray flare phases of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The aim is to test the IS model for the flare emission and for whether GRBs can be GeV sources. Methods: We determine the parameters for which the IS model can account for the observed prompt and X-ray flares emission, and study the detectability of the high energy SSC emission by the AGILE and GLAST satellites. Results: We find that the detectability of the SSC emission during the prompt phase of GRBs improves for higher values of the fireball Lorentz factor Γ and of the temporal variability t_v. If IS is the mechanism responsible for the flare emission, and the Lorentz factor of the shells producing the flare is Γ 100, the flare light curves are expected to present some substructures with temporal variability tv = 10-100 ms which are much smaller than the average duration of flares, and similar to those observed during the prompt phase of GRBs. If one assumes lower Lorentz factors, such as Γ 10 div 25, then a larger temporal variability tv 40 s can also account for the observed flare properties. However in this case we predict that X-ray flares do not have a counterpart at very high energies (MeV-GeV). Conclusions: An investigation on the substructures of the X-ray flare light curves, and simultaneous X-ray and high energy observations, will allow us to corroborate the hypothesis that late IS are responsible for the X-ray flares.

  7. Simultaneous dual-energy X-ray stereo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mokso, Rajmund; Oberta, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy or K-edge imaging is used to enhance contrast between two or more materials in an object and is routinely realised by acquiring two separate X-ray images each at different X-ray wavelength. On a broadband synchrotron source an imaging system to acquire the two images simultaneously was realised. The single-shot approach allows dual-energy and stereo imaging to be applied to dynamic systems. Using a Laue–Bragg crystal splitting scheme, the X-ray beam was split into two and the two beam branches could be easily tuned to either the same or to two different wavelengths. Due to the crystals’ mutual position, the two beam branches intercept each other under a non-zero angle and create a stereoscopic setup. PMID:26134814

  8. Gamma rays made on Earth have unexpectedly high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Johanna

    2011-01-15

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are the source of the highest-energy nonanthropogenic photons produced on Earth. Associated with thunder-storms - and in fact, with individual lightning discharges - they are presumed to be the bremsstrahlung produced when relativistic electrons, accelerated by the storms' strong electric fields, collide with air molecules some 10-20 km above sea level. The TGFs last up to a few milliseconds and contain photons with energies on the order of MeV.

  9. High energy gamma-rays and hadrons at Mount Fuji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Konishi, E.; Hotta, N.; Mizutani, K.; Kasahara, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Mikumo, E.; Sato, K.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of high energy gamma-rays and hadrons were obtained by the emulsion chamber with 40 c.u. thickness at Mt. Fuji (3750 m). These results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculation based on the same model which is used in a family analysis. Our data are compatible with the model of heavy-enriched primary and scaling in the fragmentation region.

  10. Lifetime effects for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies and their implications for the RISING spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornenbal, P.; Reiter, P.; Grawe, H.; Saito, T.; Al-Khatib, A.; Banu, A.; Beck, T.; Becker, F.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Bürger, A.; Caceres, L.; Camera, F.; Chmel, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Górska, M.; Grebosz, J.; Hübel, H.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kmiecik, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lozeva, R.; Maj, A.; Mandal, S.; Meczynski, W.; Million, B.; Podolyák, Zs.; Richard, A.; Saito, N.; Schaffner, H.; Seidlitz, M.; Striepling, T.; Walker, J.; Warr, N.; Weick, H.; Wieland, O.; Winkler, M.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    2010-02-01

    The lineshapes and peak position of Doppler corrected γ-ray spectra from in-beam experiments at relativistic energies are investigated with respect to the intrinsic energy resolution of the employed detectors, the particles' velocities, and the photons' emission angle uncertainties at the moment of γ-ray emission. The uncertainties in velocity and photon emission angle are dependent on the lifetime of the excited state. The impact of these two observables on the lineshape and energy resolution are studied for the RISING γ-spectrometer by means of simulations and experimental results from a two-step fragmentation experiment at ≈200 MeV/u. Potential use of the distinct lineshape for lifetime determination is demonstrated for measured γ-ray transitions.

  11. 5kW High peak power, 0.2 mJ high pulse energy, linearly-polarized pulsed laser from a single all-fiber oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chen; Huang, Long; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu

    2015-12-01

    We report a high peak power ytterbium-doped fiber laser that emitted linearly-polarized laser at 1064 nm. An intracavity polarization-maintaining (PM) acousto-optic modulator (AOM) was used as a Q-switch to generate pulsed laser output. The whole system was constructed with all-fiber structure. The power of the polarized laser reached 4.21 W and a polarization purity of greater than 97.6% under the repetition rate of 20 kHz. The pulse width was 37 ns, which implied a 5 kW peak power and 0.2 mJ pulse energy. It is the highest peak power output from a linearly-polarized, Q-switched fiber laser oscillator to the best of our knowledge.

  12. (Very)-high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics: The future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Several projects planned or proposed can significantly expand our knowledge of the high-energy Universe in gamma rays. Construction of the Cherenkov telescope array CTA is started, and other detectors are planned which will use the reconstruction of extensive air showers. This report explores the near future, and possible evolutions in a longer term.

  13. Mesoscale Science with High Energy X-ray Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Spatially resolved diffraction of monochromatic high energy (> 50 keV) x-rays is used to map microstructural quantities inside of bulk polycrystalline materials. The non-destructive nature of High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) measurements allows tracking of responses as samples undergo thermo-mechanical or other treatments. Volumes of the order of a cubic millimeter are probed with micron scale spatial resolution. Data sets allow direct comparisons to computational models of responses that frequently involve long-ranged, multi-grain interactions; such direct comparisons have only become possible with the development of HEDM and other high energy x-ray methods. Near-field measurements map the crystallographic orientation field within and between grains using a computational reconstruction method that simulates the experimental geometry and matches orientations in micron sized volume elements to experimental data containing projected grain images in large numbers of Bragg peaks. Far-field measurements yield elastic strain tensors through indexing schemes that sort observed diffraction peaks into sets associated with individual crystals and detect small radial motions in large numbers of such peaks. Combined measurements, facilitated by a new end station hutch at Advanced Photon Source beamline 1-ID, are mutually beneficial and result in accelerated data reduction. Further, absorption tomography yields density contrast that locates secondary phases, void clusters, and cracks, and tracks sample shape during deformation. A collaboration led by the Air Force Research Laboratory and including the Advanced Photon Source, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Carnegie Mellon University, Petra-III, and Cornell University and CHESS is developing software and hardware for combined measurements. Examples of these capabilities include tracking of grain boundary migrations during thermal annealing, tensile deformation of zirconium, and combined measurements of nickel

  14. Ultrahigh-Energy Cosmic Rays: Results and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz

    2013-12-01

    Observations of cosmic rays have been improved at all energies, both in terms of higher statistics and reduced systematics. As a result, the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum starts to exhibit more structures than could be seen previously. Most importantly, a second knee in the cosmic ray spectrum—dominated by heavy primaries—is reported just below 1017 eV. The light component, on the other hand, exhibits an ankle-like feature above 1017 eV and starts to dominate the flux at the ankle. The key question at the highest energies is about the origin of the flux suppression observed at energies above 5 · 1019 eV. Is this the long-awaited Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect or the exhaustion of sources? The key to answering this question is again given by the still largely unknown mass composition at the highest energies. Data from different observatories do not quite agree, and common efforts have been started to settle that question. The high level of isotropy observed even at the highest energies starts to challenge a proton-dominated composition if extragalactic magnetic fields are on the order of a few nanogauss or more. We shall discuss the experimental and theoretical progress in the field and the prospects for the next decade.

  15. Energy spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D.; Swordy, S.P.; Meyer, P.; L'heureux, J.; Grunsfeld, J.M. )

    1991-06-01

    New results are described on the energy spectra and relative abundances of primary cosmic ray nuclei from carbon to iron. The measurement was performed on the Spacelab-2 mission of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1985, and extends to energies beyond 1 TeV per amu. The data indicate that the cosmic ray flux arriving near earth becomes enriched with heavier nuclei, most notably iron, as energy increases. Extrapolating to the source, with a simple leaky box model of galactic propagation with rigidity-dependent containment time, relative abundances of the elements are obtained that are quite similar to those reported at lower energy. In particular, the depletion of elements with high first ionization potential relative to the local galactic abundances, seems to persist in the cosmic ray source well up to TeV energies. A single power-law energy spectrum about E exp {minus}2.1 provides a good description of the observed spectra of most elemental species. 33 refs.

  16. Multiwavelength observations of unidentified high energy gamma ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1993-01-01

    As was the case for COS B, the majority of high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument on GRO are not immediately identifiable with cataloged objects at other wavelengths. These persistent gamma-ray sources are, next to the gamma-ray bursts, the least understood objects in the universe. Even a rudimentary understanding of their nature awaits identifications and follow-up work at other wavelengths to tell us what they are. The as yet unidentified sources are potentially the most interesting, since they may represent unrecognized new classes of astronomical objects, such as radio-quiet pulsars or new types of active galactic nuclei (AGN's). This two-year investigation is intended to support the analysis, correlation, and theoretical interpretation of data that we are obtaining at x ray, optical, and radio wavelengths in order to render the gamma-ray data interpretable. According to plan, in the first year concentration was on the identification and study of Geminga. The second year will be devoted to studies of similar unidentified gamma-ray sources which will become available in the first EGRET catalogs. The results obtained so far are presented in the two papers which are reproduced in the Appendix. In these papers, we discuss the pulse profiles of Geminga, the geometry and efficiency of the magnetospheric accelerator, the distance to Geminga, the implications for theories of polar cap heating, the effect of the magnetic field on the surface emission and environment of the neutron star, and possible interpretations of a radio-quiet Geminga. The implications of the other gamma-ray pulsars which were discovered to have high gamma-ray efficiency are also discussed, and the remaining unidentified COS B sources are attributed to a population of efficient gamma-ray sources, some of which may be radio quiet.

  17. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  18. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  19. The energy relation between hard X-ray and O V emission in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, A. I.; Orwig, L. E.; Mariska, J. T.; Auer, L. H.; Nakatsuka, R.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between energy emitted in hard X-rays and the ultraviolet during the impulsive phase of solar flares provides an important diagnostic for understanding the energy flow from nonthermal to thermal. Many flares were observed from the Solar Maximum Mission satellite simultaneously in hard X-rays and the O V line at 1371 A formed at 250,000 K, providing information relevant to this problem. Previous work has shown that short time scale peaks in emission of these two types of radiation coincide in time to within 1 s. In this work the energy relation between the two types of emission is investigated and it is found that for any given flare there is a definite relation between hard X-ray and O V emissions throughout the flare, but from one flare to the next this relation varies markedly. These differences are attributed to the initial conditions in the flaring loops and some exploratory model calculations are presented to support this hypothesis.

  20. High Energy Neutrinos and Cosmic-Rays From Low-Luminosity Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Ioka, Kunihito; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Nakamura, Takashi; /Kyoto U.

    2006-07-10

    The recently discovered gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060218/SN 2006aj is classified as an X-ray Flash with very long duration driven possibly by a neutron star. Since GRB 060218 is very near {approx} 140 Mpc and very dim, one-year observation by Swift suggests that the true rate of GRB 060218-like events might be very high so that such low luminosity GRBs (LL-GRBs) might form a different population of GRBs from the cosmological high luminosity GRBs (HL-GRBs). We found that the high energy neutrino background from such LL-GRBs could be comparable with or larger than that from HL-GRBs. If each neutrino event is detected by IceCube, later optical-infrared follow-up observations such as by Subaru could identify a Type Ibc supernova associated with LL-GRBs, even if gamma- and X-rays are not observed by Swift. This is in a sense a new window from neutrino astronomy, which might enable us to confirm the existence of LL-GRBs and to obtain information about their rate and origin. We also argue LL-GRBs as high energy gamma-ray and cosmic-ray sources.

  1. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays II

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K; Colgate, S; Li, H; Bulmer, R H; Pino, J

    2011-03-08

    We show that accretion disks around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) could account for the enormous power in observed ultra high energy cosmic rays {approx}10{sup 20} eV (UHEs). In our model, cosmic rays are produced by quasi-steady acceleration of ions in magnetic structures previously proposed to explain jets around Active Galactic Nuclei with supermassive black holes. Steady acceleration requires that an AGN accretion disk act as a dynamo, which we show to follow from a modified Standard Model in which the magnetic torque of the dynamo replaces viscosity as the dominant mechanism accounting for angular momentum conservation during accretion. A black hole of mass M{sub BH} produces a steady dynamo voltage V {proportional_to} {radical}M{sub BH} giving V {approx} 10{sup 20} volts for M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} solar masses. The voltage V reappears as an inductive electric field at the advancing nose of a dynamo-driven jet, where plasma instability inherent in collisionless runaway acceleration allows ions to be steadily accelerated to energies {approx} V, finally ejected as cosmic rays. Transient events can produce much higher energies. The predicted disk radiation is similar to the Standard Model. Unique predictions concern the remarkable collimation of jets and emissions from the jet/radiolobe structure. Given MBH and the accretion rate, the model makes 7 predictions roughly consistent with data: (1) the jet length; (2) the jet radius; (3) the steady-state cosmic ray energy spectrum; (4) the maximum energy in this spectrum; (5) the UHE cosmic ray intensity on Earth; (6) electron synchrotron wavelengths; and (7) the power in synchrotron radiation. These qualitative successes motivate new computer simulations, experiments and data analysis to provide a quantitative verification of the model.

  2. Characteristics of the telescope for high energy gamma-ray astronomy selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Rolfe, J.; Johansson, A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray telescope selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

  3. Characteristics of the Telescope for High Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy Selected for Definition Studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Johansson, A.; Rolfe, J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

  4. MW peak-power, mJ pulse energy, multi-kHz repetition rate pulses from Yb-doped fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Teodoro, Fabio; Brooks, Christopher D.

    2006-02-01

    We report on pulsed fiber-based sources generating high peak and average powers in beams of excellent spectral/spatial quality. In the first setup, a ~10-kHz pulse repetition rate (PRR), 1ns-pulse, Q-switched microlaser seeded a dual-stage amplifier featuring a 40-μm-core Yb-doped photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) as the power amplifier. From this amplifier, we obtained diffraction-limited (M2 = 1.05), ~1ns pulses of 1.1mJ energy, ~1.1MW peak power, ~10.2W average-power, spectral linewidth ~9GHz, negligible nonlinearities, and slope efficiency >73%. In the second setup, we replaced the seed source with a shorter-pulse (<500ps) microchip laser of PRR ~13.4 kHz and obtained diffraction-limited (M2=1.05), ~450ps pulses of energy >0.7mJ, peak power in excess of 1.5 MW, average power ~9.5W, spectral linewidth <35 GHz. To show further power scaling, these pulses were amplified in a 140-μmcore Yb-doped fiber, which yielded multimode (M2 ~ 9), 2.2mJ-energy, 30-W average-power pulses of peak power in excess of 4.5MW, the highest ever obtained in a fiber source, to our knowledge. In the third setup, an Yb-doped, 70μmcore, intrinsically single-mode photonic-crystal rod was used to generate diffraction-limited (M2 ~ 1.1), ~10kHz PRR, ~1ns pulses of 2.05mJ energy, >2 MW peak-power (the highest ever reported in a diffraction-limited fiber source), ~20W average-power, ~13 GHz spectral linewidth, and spectral signal-to-noise ratio >50 dB. Finally, a single polarization large-core Yb-doped PCF was used to demonstrate high-peak-power harmonic generation. We obtained ~1ns pulses of peak powers >410 kW in the green (531nm) and >190kW in the UV (265.5 nm).

  5. Generation of ultrahigh-energy gamma rays in accreting x ray pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnedin, Yu. N.; Ikhsanov, N. R.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic protons producing ultrahigh energy gamma rays as a result of nuclear collisions ought to be generated in close proximity to the surface of a neutron star due to accretion. The main features of the mechanism in question are a high efficiency of conversion of the gravitational energy of the accreting matter into acceleration energy and a high efficiency of the acceleration itself. It is shown that in accretion to a neutron star with a strong magnetic field, a loss cone type distribution of accreting protons is formed, which due to instability effectively generates small scale Alfven and proton cyclotron waves, as well as nonlinear waves (magneto-acoustic and Alfven solitons). The electric field of the moving solitons may accelerate the protons to energies of greater than 10(exp 15) eV. The region of acceleration is not locally isolated, but extends from its surface. New possible sources of ultrahigh energy gamma rays are predicted. They may be binary x ray systems containing neutron stars with magnetic fields of about 10(exp 9) gauss.

  6. Peak Doctor v 1.0.0 Labview Version

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-05-29

    PeakDoctor software works interactively with its user to analyze raw gamma-ray spectroscopic data. The goal of the software is to produce a list of energies and areas of all of the peaks in the spectrum, as accurately as possible. It starts by performing an energy calibration, creating a function that describes how energy can be related to channel number. Next, the software determines which channels in the raw histogram are in the Compton continuum andmore » which channels are parts of a peak. Then the software fits the Compton continuum with cubic polynomials. The last step is to fit all of the peaks with Gaussian functions, thus producing the list.« less

  7. High-energy gamma-ray and hard X-ray observations of Cyg X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermsen, W.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Jansen, F. A.; Bennett, K.; Buccheri, R.; Mastichiadis, A.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Strong, A. W.; Oezel, M. E.; Pollock, A. M. T.

    1987-01-01

    COS-B viewed the Cyg X-3 region seven times between November, 1975, and February, 1982; a search for steady gamma-ray emission pulsed at the characteristic 4.8-hour period did not reveal its source. Leiden-MIT balloon experiment observations of Cyg X-3 in May, 1979 show the 4.8-hour modulation with sinusoidal light curve and modulation depth of 0.30, for energies of up to about 140 keV. The strong variability of Cyg X-3 over more than one order of magnitude at energies below 20 keV does not emerge in the data collected at hard X-ray energies.

  8. High Energy Observations of X-Ray Binaries and Gamma-Ray Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The report discusses the CGRO observation of X-ray binary systems and studies of gamma-ray blasars. Numerous authors have suggested mechanisms for particle acceleration within X-Ray Binary (XRB) systems. Among the acceleration mechanisms that have been applied are pulsar acceleration, shock acceleration at an accretion shock front, shock acceleration at a pulsar wind termination shock, plasma turbulence excited by the accretion flow, and a number of electrodynamic mechanisms. There are therefore many mechanisms which are capable of generating very energetic particles in the XRB environment. If the reports of TeV/PeV gamma-ray generation in XRBs are correct, then one can show that the accelerated particles must be hadrons and that the most likely gamma-ray production mechanism is the decay of collisionally-produced (or photoproduced) neutral pions. At these ultra-high energies, the emission is so strongly beamed that the target conditions are constrained by the requirement that the column depth be large enough to efficiently generate gamma-rays, but not so large that the gamma-rays are absorbed. These constraints naturally lead to models that explain the periodic, narrow duty-cycle pulses observed at TeV/PeV energies as arising from interactions with, either, the atmosphere of the binary companion, an accretion column, or an accretion disk. The production of these TeV/PeV gamma-rays by the decay of pions from "leading isobars" must also be accompanied by a more isotropic emission component in the EGRET energy band from the decay of slower pions (i.e. the "pionization" component). Since the attenuation of 35 MeV-1 GeV photons by photon-photon pair production is not likely to be significant in most XRBs, the TeV/PeV reports therefore strongly suggest sporadic emission in the EGRET energy band. One of the key unresolved issues for understanding AGN is the relationship between XBLs and RBLs.To test the "reunification" hypothesis, authors conducted a multiwavelength

  9. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J.L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-26

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, 'novel' x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic 'structure' of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR)

  10. Z-pinches as intense x-ray sources for high energy density physics application

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, M.K.

    1997-02-01

    Fast z-pinch implosions can convert more than 10% of the stored electrical energy in a pulsed-power accelerator into x rays. These x rays are produced when an imploding cylindrical plasma, driven by the magnetic field pressure associated with very large axial currents, stagnates upon the cylindrical axis of symmetry. On the Saturn pulsed-power accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories, for example, currents of 6 to 8 MA with a risetime of less than 50 ns are driven through cylindrically-symmetric loads, producing implosions velocities as high as 100 cm/{mu}s and x-ray energies as high as 500 kJ. The keV component of the resulting x-ray spectrum has been used for many years 8 a radiation source for material response studies. Alternatively, the x-ray output can be thermalized into a near-Planckian x-ray source by containing it within a large cylindrical radiation case. These large volume, long-lived radiation sources have recently been used for ICF-relevant ablator physics experiments as well as astrophysical opacity and radiation-material interaction experiments. Hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and cylindrical load symmetry are critical, limiting factors in determining the assembled plasma densities and temperatures, and thus in the x-ray pulse widths that can be produced on these accelerators. In recent experiments on the Saturn accelerator, these implosion nonuniformities have been minimized by using uniform-fill gas puff loads or by using wire arrays with as many a 192 wires. These techniques produced significant improvements in the pinched plasma quality, Zn reproducibility, and x-ray output power. X-ray pulse widths of less than 5 ns and peak powers of 75{+-}10 TW have been achieved with arrays of 120 tungsten wires. These powers represent greater than a factor of three in power amplification over the electrical power of the Saturn n accelerator, and are a record for x-ray powers in the laboratory.

  11. High-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos from semirelativistic hypernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiangyu; Razzaque, Soebur; Meszaros, Peter; Dai Zigao

    2007-10-15

    The origin of the ultrahigh-energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) from the second knee ({approx}6x10{sup 17} eV) above in the CR spectrum is still unknown. Recently, there has been growing evidence that a peculiar type of supernovae, called hypernovae, are associated with subenergetic gamma-ray bursts, such as SN1998bw/GRB980425 and SN2003lw/GRB031203. Such hypernovae appear to have high (up to mildly relativistic) velocity ejecta, which may be linked to the subenergetic gamma-ray bursts. Assuming a continuous distribution of the kinetic energy of the hypernova ejecta as a function of its velocity E{sub k}{proportional_to}({gamma}{beta}){sup -{alpha}} with {alpha}{approx}2, we find that (1) the external shock wave produced by the high-velocity ejecta of a hypernova can accelerate protons up to energies as high as 10{sup 19} eV; (2) the cosmological hypernova rate is sufficient to account for the energy flux above the second knee; and (3) the steeper spectrum of CRs at these energies can arise in these sources. In addition, hypernovae would also give rise to a faint diffuse UHE neutrino flux, due to p{gamma} interactions of the UHE CRs with hypernova optical-UV photons.

  12. The composition of cosmic rays at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Dietrich

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the composition of the cosmic rays at high energies, and of the energy spectra of the individual components provide the basis for the understanding of the sources, of the acceleration mechanism, and of the galactic containment of these particles. A brief review of the presently available information and a recent measurement performed on the Space Shuttle to substantially extend the range of energies in which the elemental composition is known are described. Results, and recent data on the electron component of cosmic rays are discussed and summarized. The body of data now available contains several features that are difficult to explain within current models of galactic shock acceleration and 'leakly box' containment. The need for further measurements is emphasized and possible opportunities for future work are briefly discussed.

  13. A simulation of high energy cosmic ray propagation 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Kifune, T.; Matsubara, Y.; Mori, M.; Nishijima, K.; Teshima, M.

    1985-01-01

    High energy cosmic ray propagation of the energy region 10 to the 14.5 power - 10 to the 18th power eV is simulated in the inter steller circumstances. In conclusion, the diffusion process by turbulent magnetic fields is classified into several regions by ratio of the gyro-radius and the scale of turbulence. When the ratio becomes larger then 10 to the minus 0.5 power, the analysis with the assumption of point scattering can be applied with the mean free path E sup 2. However, when the ratio is smaller than 10 to the minus 0.5 power, we need a more complicated analysis or simulation. Assuming the turbulence scale of magnetic fields of the Galaxy is 10-30pc and the mean magnetic field strength is 3 micro gauss, the energy of cosmic ray with that gyro-radius is about 10 to the 16.5 power eV.

  14. TESTING THE ORIGIN OF HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimirov, A. E.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Porter, T. A.; Johannesson, G.

    2012-06-10

    Recent accurate measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) protons and nuclei by ATIC-2, CREAM, and PAMELA reveal (1) unexpected spectral hardening in the spectra of CR species above a few hundred GeV per nucleon, (2) a harder spectrum of He compared to protons, and (3) softening of the CR spectra just below the break energy. These newly discovered features may offer a clue to the origin of the observed high-energy Galactic CRs. We discuss possible interpretations of these spectral features and make predictions for the secondary CR fluxes and secondary-to-primary ratios, anisotropy of CRs, and diffuse Galactic {gamma}-ray emission in different phenomenological scenarios. Our predictions can be tested by currently running or near-future high-energy astrophysics experiments.

  15. Tentative experiment for generating low-photon-energy quasi-x-ray lasers using a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Toriyabe, Hiroyuki; Awaji, Wataru; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Ichimaru, Toshio; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2001-04-01

    The tentative experiment for producing low-photon-energy quasi-x-ray laser using a capillary is described. This flash x-ray generator was improved in order to increase the x-ray intensity and to produce high-intensity characteristic x-rays by forming the linear plasma x-ray source. The generator consists of a high-voltage power supply, a polarity-inversion ignitron pulse generator, a turbo-molecular pump, and a radiation tube with a capillary. A high-voltage condenser of 0.2 (mu) F in the pulse generator is charged up to 20 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the capillary in the tube after closing the ignitron. In the present work, the chamber is evacuated by the pump with a pressure of about 1 mPa, and the carbon anode and cathode electrodes are employed to produce K(alpha) characteristic x-rays. The diameter and the length of the ferrite capillary are 2.0 and 29 mm, respectively, and both the cathode voltage and the discharge current displayed damped oscillations. The peak values of the voltage and current increased when the charging voltage was increased, and their maximum values were -9.9 kV and 4.4 kA, respectively. The pulse durations of the x-rays were nearly equivalent to those of the damped oscillations in the voltage and current, and their values were less than 20 microseconds. In the spectrum measurement, we observed the carbon K(alpha) line.

  16. Studies of dark energy with X-ray observatories.

    PubMed

    Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2010-04-20

    I review the contribution of Chandra X-ray Observatory to studies of dark energy. There are two broad classes of observable effects of dark energy: evolution of the expansion rate of the Universe, and slow down in the rate of growth of cosmic structures. Chandra has detected and measured both of these effects through observations of galaxy clusters. A combination of the Chandra results with other cosmological datasets leads to 5% constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, and limits possible deviations of gravity on large scales from general relativity. PMID:20404207

  17. Studies of dark energy with x-ray observatories

    PubMed Central

    Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    I review the contribution of Chandra X-ray Observatory to studies of dark energy. There are two broad classes of observable effects of dark energy: evolution of the expansion rate of the Universe, and slow down in the rate of growth of cosmic structures. Chandra has detected and measured both of these effects through observations of galaxy clusters. A combination of the Chandra results with other cosmological datasets leads to 5% constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, and limits possible deviations of gravity on large scales from general relativity. PMID:20404207

  18. Medium energy gamma ray astronomy with transpacific balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zych, A. D.; Jennings, M. C.; White, R. S.; Dayton, B.

    1981-01-01

    Transpacific balloon flights with the University of California, Riverside (UCR) double scatter telescope are discussed. With flight durations from 5 days up to perhaps 15 days the long observation times necessary for medium energy (1-30 MeV) gamma ray astronomy can be obtained. These flights would be made under the auspices of the Joint U.S.-Japan Balloon Flight Program at NASA. It is proposed that flights can provide at least 30 hours of observation time per flight for many discrete source candidates and 120 hours for detecting low intensity cosmic gamma ray bursts.

  19. Search for the end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Linsley, John

    1998-06-15

    The title I was asked to speak about expresses an idea that occurred rather recently in the history of cosmic ray studies. I argue that the idea of a possible end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum came into being after a sequence of three rapid advances in knowledge which I describe, calling them 'breakthroughs'. I suggest that the present workshop be regarded as a step toward a fourth breakthrough. I argue that this may occur through application of the Space Airwatch concept--the earth atmosphere as target and signal generator--as embodied in the NASA OWL project.

  20. Misidentification of major constituents by automatic qualitative energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis: a problem that threatens the credibility of the analytical community.

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E

    2005-12-01

    Automatic qualitative analysis for peak identification is a standard feature of virtually all modern computer-aided analysis software for energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry with electron excitation. Testing of recently installed systems from four different manufacturers has revealed the occasional occurrence of misidentification of peaks of major constituents whose concentrations exceeded 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%). Test materials where peak identification failures were observed included ZnS, KBr, FeS2, tantalum-niobium alloy, NIST Standard Reference Material 482 (copper-gold alloy), Bi2Te3, uranium-rhodium alloys, platinum-chromium alloy, GaAs, and GaP. These misidentifications of major constituents were exacerbated when the incident beam energy was 10 keV or lower, which restricted or excluded the excitation of the high photon energy K- and L-shell X-rays where multiple peaks, for example, Kalpha (K-L2,3)-Kbeta (K-M2,3); Lalpha (L3-M4,5)-Lbeta (L2-M4)-Lgamma (L2-N4), are well resolved and amenable to identification with high confidence. These misidentifications are so severe as to properly qualify as blunders that present a serious challenge to the credibility of this critical analytical technique. Systematic testing of a peak identification system with a suite of diverse materials can reveal the specific elements and X-ray peaks where failures are likely to occur. PMID:17481333

  1. Misidentification of Major Constituents by Automatic Qualitative Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis: A Problem that Threatens the Credibility of the Analytical Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury*, Dale E.

    2005-12-01

    Automatic qualitative analysis for peak identification is a standard feature of virtually all modern computer-aided analysis software for energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry with electron excitation. Testing of recently installed systems from four different manufacturers has revealed the occasional occurrence of misidentification of peaks of major constituents whose concentrations exceeded 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%). Test materials where peak identification failures were observed included ZnS, KBr, FeS2, tantalum-niobium alloy, NIST Standard Reference Material 482 (copper gold alloy), Bi2Te3, uranium rhodium alloys, platinum chromium alloy, GaAs, and GaP. These misidentifications of major constituents were exacerbated when the incident beam energy was 10 keV or lower, which restricted or excluded the excitation of the high photon energy K- and L-shell X-rays where multiple peaks, for example, K[alpha] (K-L2,3) K[beta] (K-M2,3); L[alpha] (L3-M4,5) L[beta] (L2-M4) L[gamma] (L2-N4), are well resolved and amenable to identification with high confidence. These misidentifications are so severe as to properly qualify as blunders that present a serious challenge to the credibility of this critical analytical technique. Systematic testing of a peak identification system with a suite of diverse materials can reveal the specific elements and X-ray peaks where failures are likely to occur.

  2. CAN ULTRAHIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS COME FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS? COSMIC RAYS BELOW THE ANKLE AND GALACTIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David; Pohl, Martin

    2011-09-10

    The maximum cosmic-ray energy achievable by acceleration by a relativistic blast wave is derived. It is shown that forward shocks from long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the interstellar medium accelerate protons to large enough energies, and have a sufficient energy budget, to produce the Galactic cosmic-ray component just below the ankle at 4 x 10{sup 18} eV, as per an earlier suggestion. It is further argued that, were extragalactic long GRBs responsible for the component above the ankle as well, the occasional Galactic GRB within the solar circle would contribute more than the observational limits on the outward flux from the solar circle, unless an avoidance scenario, such as intermittency and/or beaming, allows the present-day local flux to be less than 10{sup -3} of the average. Difficulties with these avoidance scenarios are noted.

  3. CALET: High energy cosmic ray observatory on International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Masaki; CALET Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The CALorimeteric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a Japanese-led international mission being developed as part of the utilization plan for the International Space Station (ISS). CALET will be launched by an H-II B rocket utilizing the Japanese developed HTV (H-II Transfer Vehicle) in 2014. The instrument will be robotically emplaced upon the Exposed Facility attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM-EF). CALET is a calorimeter based instrument which will have superior energy resolution and excellent separation between hadrons and electrons and between charged particles and gamma rays in the GeV to trans-TeV energy range. CALET will address many questions in high energy astrophysics, including (1) the nature of the sources of high energy particles and photons, through the high energy electron spectrum, (2) signatures of dark matter, in either the high energy electron or gamma ray spectrum, (3) the details of particle propagation in the Galaxy, by a combination of energy spectrum measurements of electrons, protons and highercharged nuclei. In this paper the outline and current status of CALET are summarized.

  4. Low dose, limited energy spectroscopic x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson Weker, Johanna; Li, Yiyang; Chueh, William C.

    2015-09-01

    In order to achieve high quality in situ spectroscopic X-ray microscopy of complex systems far from equilibrium, such as lithium ion batteries under standard electrochemical cycling, careful consideration of the total number of energy points is required. Enough energy points are need to accurately determine the per pixel chemical information; however, total radiation dose needs to be limited to avoid damaging the system which would produce misleading results. Here we consider the number of energy points need to accurately reproduce the state of charge maps of a LiFePO2 electrode recorded during electrochemical cycling. We observe very good per pixel agreement using only 13 energy points. Additionally, we find the quality of the agreement is heavily dependent on the number of energy points used in the post edge fit during normalization of the spectra rather than the total number of energies used. Finally, we suggest a straightforward protocol for determining the minimum number of energy points needed prior to initiating any in situ spectroscopic X-ray microscopy experiment.

  5. High energy irradiations simulating cosmic-ray-induced planetary gamma ray production. I - Fe target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Yellin, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two thick Fe targets were bombarded by a series of 6 GeV proton irradiations for the purpose of simulating the cosmic ray bombardment of planetary objects in space. Gamma ray energy spectra were obtained with a germanium solid state detector during the bombardment, and 46 of the gamma ray lines were ascribed to the Fe targets. A comparison between observed and predicted values showed good agreement for Fe lines from neutron inelastic scattering and spallation reactions, and less satisfactory agreement for neutron capture reactions, the latter attributed to the difference in composition between the Fe target and the mean lunar abundance used in the modeling. Through an analysis of the irradiation results together with continuum data obtained in lunar orbit, it was found that 100 hours of measurement with a current instrument should generate a spectrum containing approximately 20 lines due to Fe alone, with a 2-sigma sensitivity for detection of about 0.2 percent.

  6. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  7. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  8. Energy and angular differential probabilities for photoionization of He using chirped attosecond soft-x-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Pindzola, M. S.; Robicheaux, F.

    2009-05-01

    Based on the time-dependent close-coupling method, energy and angular differential probabilities for various ionization processes of He atoms subjected to intense attosecond soft-x-ray pulses with a photon energy of 91.6 eV and a peak intensity of 1015W/cm2 are calculated to explore their dependence on the duration and the chirp of the pulse. It is found that the single and the double electron energy distributions for two-photon double ionization are rather sensitive to chirps. That is, both the magnitudes and locations of the sequential peaks in the single electron energy distributions vary strongly with chirps and the two-electron energy distributions being broadened and stretched along the equal energy sharing direction as opposed to the usual total excess energy direction for the case of zero chirp. In addition, our calculation also reveals an unexpected structure formed between the two sequential peaks. In order to better understand the chirp effects on both independent-electron and correlated electron emissions and their relations to the origin of the structure, we analyzed the corresponding probability differential in energy and angle.

  9. Energy and angular differential probabilities for photoionization of He using chirped attosecond soft-x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Pindzola, M. S.; Robicheaux, F.

    2009-05-15

    Based on the time-dependent close-coupling method, energy and angular differential probabilities for various ionization processes of He atoms subjected to intense attosecond soft-x-ray pulses with a photon energy of 91.6 eV and a peak intensity of 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} are calculated to explore their dependence on the duration and the chirp of the pulse. It is found that the single and the double electron energy distributions for two-photon double ionization are rather sensitive to chirps. That is, both the magnitudes and locations of the sequential peaks in the single electron energy distributions vary strongly with chirps and the two-electron energy distributions being broadened and stretched along the equal energy sharing direction as opposed to the usual total excess energy direction for the case of zero chirp. In addition, our calculation also reveals an unexpected structure formed between the two sequential peaks. In order to better understand the chirp effects on both independent-electron and correlated electron emissions and their relations to the origin of the structure, we analyzed the corresponding probability differential in energy and angle.

  10. High resolution, low energy avalanche photodiode X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R.; Vanderpuye, K.; Entine, G.; Squillante, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes have been fabricated, and their performance as X-ray detectors has been measured. Photon sensitivity and energy resolution were measured as a function of size and operating parameters. Noise thresholds as low as 212 eV were obtained at room temperature, and backscatter X-ray fluorescence data were obtained for aluminum and other light elements. It is concluded that the results with the X-ray detector are extremely encouraging, and the performance is challenging the best available proportional counters. While not at the performance level of either cryogenic silicon or HgI2, these device operate at room temperature and can be reproduced in large numbers and with much larger areas than typically achieved with HgI2. In addition, they are rugged and appear to be indefinitely stable.

  11. Energy-selective filtration of dental x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gelskey, D.E.; Baker, C.G.

    1981-11-01

    Samarium is known for its ability to filter simultaneously low- and high-energy x-ray photons from an x-ray beam that are not useful in producing a diagnostic radiograph. This study was undertaken to determine the optimum thickness of samarium required to minimize patient exposure and exposure time. The results indicate that use of a filter thickness of 0.16 mm. minimized patient radiation exposure and permitted the use of an exposure time sufficiently short to minimize motion unsharpness. The incorporation of a 0.16 mm. samarium filter in the x-ray beam reduced exposure by about 40 percent as compared to a 2.5 mm. aluminum filter; the exposure time must be increased approximately twice to obtain optical densities equivalent to those produced with aluminum filtration.

  12. High-energy gamma-ray sources of cosmological origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Pierre; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2016-06-01

    The current generation of instruments in gamma-ray astrophysics launched a new era in the search for a dark matter signal in the high-energy sky. Such searches are said indirect, in the sense that the presence of a dark matter particle is inferred from the detection of products of its pair-annihilation or decay. They have recently started to probe the natural domain of existence for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), the favorite dark matter candidates today. In this article, we review the basic framework for indirect searches and we present a status of current limits obtained with gamma-ray observations. We also devote a section to another possible class of cosmological gamma-ray sources, primordial black holes, also considered as a potential constituent of dark matter. xml:lang="fr"

  13. Cosmic ray transport and anisotropies to high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, P. L.; Caramete, L. I.; Meli, A.; Nath, B. N.; Seo, E.-S.; de Souza, V.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2015-10-01

    A model is introduced, in which the irregularity spectrum of the Galactic magnetic field beyond the dissipation length scale is first a Kolmogorov spectrum k-5/3 at small scales λ = 2 π/k with k the wave-number, then a saturation spectrum k-1, and finally a shock-dominated spectrum k-2 mostly in the halo/wind outside the Cosmic Ray disk. In an isotropic approximation such a model is consistent with the Interstellar Medium (ISM) data. With this model we discuss the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) spectrum, as well as the extragalactic Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs), their chemical abundances and anisotropies. UHECRs may include a proton component from many radio galaxies integrated over vast distances, visible already below 3 EeV.

  14. Energy determination in industrial X-ray processing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Gregoire, O.; Stichelbaut, F.; Gomola, I.; Galloway, R. A.; Schlecht, J.

    2005-12-01

    In industrial irradiation facilities, the determination of maximum photon or electron energy is important for regulated processes, such as food irradiation, and for assurance of treatment reproducibility. With electron beam irradiators, this has been done by measuring the depth-dose distribution in a homogeneous material. For X-ray irradiators, an analogous method has not yet been recommended. This paper describes a procedure suitable for typical industrial irradiation processes, which is based on common practice in the field of therapeutic X-ray treatment. It utilizes a measurement of the slope of the exponential attenuation curve of X-rays in a thick stack of polyethylene plates. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental tests have been performed to verify the suitability and accuracy of the method between 3 MeV and 8 MeV.

  15. EXTRAGALACTIC VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D. V.

    2012-09-20

    We study the origin of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background using the data from the Fermi telescope. To estimate the background level, we count photons at high Galactic latitudes |b| > 60 Degree-Sign . Subtracting photons associated with known sources and the residual cosmic-ray and Galactic diffuse backgrounds, we estimate the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) flux. We find that the spectrum of EGB in the very high energy band above 30 GeV follows the stacked spectrum of BL Lac objects. Large Area Telescope data reveal the positive (1 + z) {sup k}, 1 < k < 4 cosmological evolution of the BL Lac source population consistent with that of their parent population, Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies. We show that EGB at E > 30 GeV could be completely explained by emission from unresolved BL Lac objects if k {approx_equal} 3.

  16. Fermi γ-ray Pulsars: Towards the Understanding of the Pulsed High-Energy Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Brambilla, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    Based on the Fermi observational data we reveal meaningful constraints for the dependence of the macroscopic parameters of dissipative pulsar magnetosphere models on the corresponding spin-down rate. Our models are specifications of the FIDO (Force-Free Inside, Dissipative Outside) model where the dissipative regions are outside the light-cylinder near the equatorial current sheet. These models provide not only the field geometry but also the necessary particle accelerating electric fields. Assuming emission due to curvature radiation, the FIDO models reproduce the observed light-curve phenomenology as depicted in the radio-lag vs peak-separation diagram obtained by Fermi. A direct and detailed comparison of the model spectral properties (cutoff energies and total γ-ray luminosities) with those observed by Fermi reveals the dependence of the macroscopic conductivity parameter on the spin-down rate providing a unique insight for the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the high-energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres.

  17. CREAM: High Energy Frontier of Cosmic Ray Elemental Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment was flown for 161 days in six flights over Antarctica. High energy cosmic-ray data were collected over a wide energy range from 10 (10) to 10 (15) eV at an average altitude of 38.5 km with 3.9 g/cm (2) atmospheric overburden. Cosmic-ray elements from protons (Z = 1) to iron nuclei (Z = 26) are separated with excellent charge resolution. Building on success of the balloon flights, the payload is being reconfigured for exposure on the International Space Station (ISS). This ISS-CREAM instrument is configured with the CREAM calorimeter for energy measurements, and four finely segmented Silicon Charge Detector layers for precise charge measurements. In addition, the Top and Bottom Counting Detectors (TCD and BCD) and Boronated Scintillator Detector (BSD) have been newly developed. The TCD and BCD are scintillator based segmented detectors to separate electrons from nuclei using the shower profile differences, while BSD distinguishes electrons from nuclei by detecting thermal neutrons that are dominant in nuclei induced showers. An order of magnitude increase in data collecting power is possible by utilizing the ISS to reach the highest energies practical with direct measurements. The project status including results from on-going analysis of existing data and future plans will be discussed.

  18. Assessing the Effect of Tree Canopy Stocking on Home Energy Use Savings during Peak Cooling Months in West Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Jared

    This study estimated the direct energy savings for homes as well as identified specific site differences using actual electric usage for homes. Four sites, ranging between thirty and forty houses per site, were selected at various canopy cover levels (15, 25, 39, and 54 percent). Tree characteristics were measured for each house at the parcel level. This included tree height, height to live crown, species, crown width, distance from house, tree direction, and percent shrub surrounding the house. Energy use for cooling months (June-September) was obtained for sample homes from Allegheny Power. Data indicate a declining energy use with increasing canopy cover per home. Sample comparisons within and across sites yielded no statistically significant differences between sites. Stepwise regression analysis was used to identify important variables contributing to energy use in homes, and energy use savings were predicted at increasing levels of canopy cover. Significant factors affecting the results were sample size, occupant behavior, site homogeneity, missing variables, and seasonal variation.

  19. Use of ITS to develop a methodology for determining mammographic X-ray spectrum end-point energies

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, M.E.; Hertel, N.E.; Trueblood, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    Quality control of mammography is very important. The kilovoltage across the X-ray tube affects low-level contrast and image quality, which are important in detecting masses and calcifications in mammography. Creating an easily reproducible method to determine the end-point energy, or peak kilovoltage, of the X-ray beam is important to provide consistent, high standards for all mammography units. Currently, the end-point energy is routinely measured at all mammography sites, but different measuring devices and methods are used. Use of a phantom, or test object, which records the results on film for centralized analysis of the end-point energy would be useful. A phantom with foils of different elements and various thicknesses embedded in acrylic is proposed for use with the film as a detector to determine the end-point energy.

  20. The UCSD high energy X-ray timing experiment cosmic ray particle anticoincidence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hink, P. L.; Rothschild, R. E.; Pelling, M. R.; Macdonald, D. R.; Gruber, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The HEXTE, part of the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), is designed to make high sensitivity temporal and spectral measurements of X-rays with energies between 15 and 250 keV using NaI/CsI phoswich scintillation counters. To achieve the required sensitivity it is necessary to provide anticoincidence of charged cosmic ray particles incident upon the instrument, some of which interact to produce background X-rays. The proposed cosmic ray particle anticoincidence shield detector for HEXTE uses a novel design based on plastic scintillators and wavelength-shifter bars. It consists of five segments, each with a 7 mm thick plastic scintillator, roughly 50 cm x 50 cm in size, coupled to two wavelength-shifter bars viewed by 1/2 inch photomultiplier tubes. These segments are configured into a five-sided, box-like structure around the main detector system. Results of laboratory testing of a model segment, and calculations of the expected performance of the flight segments and particle anticoincidence detector system are presented to demonstrate that the above anticoincidence detector system satisfies its scientific requirements.

  1. Measurement of the D-D fusion neutron energy spectrum and variation of the peak width with plasma ion temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. A.; Chen, S. H.; Gwinn, D.; Parker, R. R.

    1983-11-01

    We report a set of neutron spectrum measurements made at the Alcator-C tokamak under Ohmic-heating conditions. It has been found that the width of the D-D fusion neutron peak increases with the plasma ion temperature consistent with the theoretical prediction. In particular, the neutron spectra resulting from the sum of many plasma discharges with ion temperatures of 780 and 1050 eV have been obtained. The width for the 780-eV case is 64+ 9-11 keV and that of the 1050-eV case, 81+10-14 keV (full width at half maximum), corresponding to ion temperatures of 740 and 1190 eV, respectively.

  2. A BAYESIAN APPROACH TO COMPARING COSMIC RAY ENERGY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    BenZvi, S. Y.; Pfendner, C. G.; Westerhoff, S.; Connolly, B. M.

    2011-09-01

    A common problem in ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics is the comparison of energy spectra. The question is whether the spectra from two experiments or two regions of the sky agree within their statistical and systematic uncertainties. We develop a method to directly compare energy spectra for ultra-high energy cosmic rays from two different regions of the sky in the same experiment without reliance on agreement with a theoretical model of the energy spectra. The consistency between the two spectra is expressed in terms of a Bayes factor, defined here as the ratio of the likelihood of the two-parent source hypothesis to the likelihood of the one-parent source hypothesis. Unlike other methods, for example {chi}{sup 2} tests, the Bayes factor allows for the calculation of the posterior odds ratio and correctly accounts for non-Gaussian uncertainties. The latter is particularly important at the highest energies, where the number of events is very small.

  3. Energy Spectrum of Cosmic-Ray Electrons at TeV Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Sahakian, V.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Chadwick, P. M.; Cheesebrough, A.; Dickinson, H. J.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Keogh, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Nolan, S. J.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Rayner, S. M.; Rulten, C. B.; Spangler, D.; Ward, M.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Borrel, V.; Olive, J-F.

    2008-12-31

    The very large collection area of ground-based {gamma}-ray telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon or satellite based instruments in the detection of very-high-energy (>600 GeV) cosmic-ray electrons. Here we present the electron spectrum derived from data taken with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. In this measurement, the first of this type, we are able to extend the measurement of the electron spectrum beyond the range accessible to direct measurements. We find evidence for a substantial steepening in the energy spectrum above 600 GeV compared to lower energies.

  4. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  5. High-energy gamma-ray observations of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1994-01-01

    During the period from 1992 May to early 1992 November, the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory obtained high-energy gamma-ray data for most of the sky. A total of 18 active galaxies have been seen with high certainty, and it is expected that more will be found in the data when a more thorough analysis is complete. All of those that have been seen are radio-loud quasars or BL Lacertae objects; most have already been identified as blazars. No Seyfert galaxies have been found thus far. If the spectra are represented as a power law in energy, spectral slopes ranging from approximately -1.7 to -2.4 are found. A wide range of z-values exits in the observed sample, eight having values in excess of 1.0. Time variations have been seen, with the timescale for a significant change being as short as days in at least one case. These results imply the existence of very large numbers of relativistic particles, probably close to the central object. Although a large extrapolation is required, their existence also suggests that these active galactic nuclei may be the source of the extragalactic cosmic rays.

  6. Searching for new phenomena in high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholis, Ilias

    2010-12-01

    The focus of my work has been attempting to study how cosmic rays may help us understand the nature of dark matter. This question is at the intersection of particle physics and astrophysics, and involves questions of particle physics model building, production and propagation of cosmic rays, and connections to collider physics. My interest has been the properties of various DM candidates that would annihilate into Standard Model particles producing eventually high energy e+ and e - as well as p and p¯ that could influence their locally measured ratios at high energies. I have focused on models that produce significant amounts of hard positrons, and have considered the propagation of the resulting cosmic rays in the galaxy, namely electrons positrons and antiprotons as well as some heavier nuclei. Among the experiments whose data I have studied are HEAT, PAMELA, ATIC and Fermi. An other interesting aspect has been the possible explanation of the "microwave WMAP Haze" that Finkbeiner has calculated from CMB data at the central part of the galaxy, and its inverse Compton scattering counterpart the Fermi gamma-ray haze. The connection to synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering from high energy e- and e+ of annihilating DM origin has also been part of my work. Moreover the connection of those results to the results from PAMELA and ATIC/Fermi within the same DM framework has been one of the goals of my studies. As an alternative to DM, Pulsars could be used to explain the recent results from the PAMELA Collaboration. As Pulsars spin down their energy high numbers of electron and positron pairs are produced via pair creation from X-rays emitted by high energy electrons at the poles of the Pulsars. The implications of the resulting injected into the ISM e+/- to the local spectra has also been part of my work. Also the significance of millisecond pulsars in the bulge and their implications to both the microwave and the gamma-ray Haze, in combination with

  7. Calcium measurements with electron probe X-ray and electron energy loss analysis.

    PubMed Central

    LeFurgey, A; Ingram, P

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a broad survey of the rationale for electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA) and the various methods for obtaining qualitative and quantitative information on the distribution and amount of elements, particularly calcium, in cryopreserved cells and tissues. Essential in an introductory consideration of microanalysis in biological cryosections is the physical basis for the instrumentation, fundamentals of X-ray spectrometry, and various analytical modes such as static probing and X-ray imaging. Some common artifacts are beam damage and contamination. Inherent pitfalls of energy dispersive X-ray systems include Si escape peaks, doublets, background, and detector calibration shifts. Quantitative calcium analysis of thin cryosections is carried out in real time using a multiple least squares fitting program on filtered X-ray spectra and normalizing the calcium peak to a portion of the continuum. Recent work includes the development of an X-ray imaging system where quantitative data can be retrieved off-line. The minimum detectable concentration of calcium in biological cryosections is approximately 300 mumole kg dry weight with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 A. The application of electron energy loss (EELS) techniques to the detection of calcium offers the potential for greater sensitivity and spatial resolution in measurement and imaging. Determination of mass thickness with EELS can facilitate accurate calculation of wet weight concentrations from frozen hydrated and freeze-dried specimens. Calcium has multiple effects on cell metabolism, membrane transport and permeability and, thus, on overall cell physiology or pathophysiology. Cells can be rapidly frozen for EPXMA during basal or altered functional conditions to delineate the location and amount of calcium within cells and the changes in location and concentration of cations or anions accompanying calcium redistribution. Recent experiments in our laboratory document that EPXMA in

  8. High-energy x-ray diffraction study of pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Laaziri, K.; Kycia, S.; Roorda, S.; Chicoine, M.; Robertson, J.L.; Wang, J.; Moss, S.C.

    1999-11-01

    Medium and high-energy x-ray diffraction has been used to study the atomic structure of pure amorphous Si prepared by MeV Si implantation into crystalline silicon. Both as-implanted and annealed samples were studied. The inelastically scattered x rays were removed by fitting the energy spectrum for the scattered x rays. The atomic scattering factor of silicon, previously known reliably up to 20 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}, has been extended to 55 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}. The radial distribution function of amorphous Si, before and after annealing, has been determined through an unbiased Fourier transformation of the normalized scattering data. Gaussian fits to the first neighbor peak in these functions shows that scattering data out to at least 40 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1} is required to reliably determine the radial distribution function. The first-shell coordination number increases from 3.79 to 3.88 upon thermal annealing at 600{degree}C, whereas that of crystalline Si determined from similar measurements on a Si powder analyzed using the same technique is 4.0. Amorphous Si is therefore under coordinated relative to crystalline Si. Noise in the distribution function, caused by statistical variations in the scattering data at high-momentum transfer, has been reduced without affecting the experimental resolution through filtering of the interference function after subtracting the contribution of the first-neighbor peak. The difference induced by thermal annealing in the remainder of the radial distribution functions, thus revealed, is much smaller than previously believed. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  10. Anomalous Transport of High Energy Cosmic Rays in Galactic Superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Nasser F.

    2014-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays may exhibit anomalous transport as they traverse and are accelerated by a collection of supernovae explosions in a galactic superbubble. Signatures of this anomalous transport can show up in the particles' evolution and their spectra. In a continuous-time-random- walk (CTRW) model assuming standard diffusive shock acceleration theory (DSA) for each shock encounter, and where the superbubble (an OB stars association) is idealized as a heterogeneous region of particle sources and sinks, acceleration and transport in the superbubble can be shown to be sub-diffusive. While the sub-diffusive transport can be attributed to the stochastic nature of the acceleration time according to DSA theory, the spectral break appears to be an artifact of transport in a finite medium. These CTRW simulations point to a new and intriguing phenomenon associated with the statistical nature of collective acceleration of high energy cosmic rays in galactic superbubbles.

  11. High energy X-ray observations of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Knight, F. K.; Nolan, P. L.; Scheepmaker, A.; Wheaton, W. A.; Hofman, J. A.; Primini, F. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported for scanning observations of the active galaxy NGC 5128 (Cen A) and the Type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 with the low-energy detectors of the HEAO-1 A-4 hard X-ray instrument. The X-ray spectra in the energy range from 15 to 100 keV are shown to be consistent with previous observations of these galaxies. It is noted that NGC 5128 rose in intensity from 1972 to 1975, that spectral softening occurred after early 1973, and that the source has since decreased in intensity while maintaining an E to the -1.7 photon power law. The results for NGC 4151 indicate variable absorption below 10 keV and a power-law slope of about E to the -1.4 in the range from 10 keV to 10 MeV.

  12. Constraint on electromagnetic acceleration of highest energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2003-04-01

    The energetics of electromagnetic acceleration of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is constrained both by confinement of a particle within an acceleration site and by radiative energy losses of the particle in the confining magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the detection of approximately 3 x 10(20) eV events is inconsistent with the hypothesis that compact cosmic accelerators with high magnetic fields can be the sources of UHECRs. This rules out the most popular candidates, namely spinning neutron stars, active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Galaxy clusters and, perhaps, AGN radio lobes and gamma-ray burst blast waves remain the only possible (although not very strong) candidates for UHECR acceleration sites. Our analysis places no limit on linear accelerators. With the data from the future Auger experiment one should be able to answer whether a conventional theory works or some new physics is required to explain the origin of UHECRs. PMID:12786427

  13. Intensities of high-energy cosmic rays at Mount Kanbala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    General features of family events with Summary E sub gamma 200 TeV, observed by the emulsion chambers at Mt. Kanbala, are presented in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation. The lateral and cluster structure, and the energy spectra of constituent gamma-rays and hadrons are shown to be consistent with the Monte Carlo results calculated under the assumption of heavy-enriched primary, scaling, QCD jets and increasing cross-section.

  14. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays: Setting the stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolsky, P.

    2013-06-01

    The history of ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics is reviewed from the post-war era of arrays such as Volcano Ranch, Haverah Park and Akeno to the development of air-fluorescence and current hybrid arrays. The aim of this paper is to present the background information needed for a better understanding of the current issues in this field that are discussed in much greater depth in the rest of this conference.

  15. Electron calibration of a high energy cosmic ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simnett, G. M.; Silverberg, R. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Gearhart, R. A.; Hagen, F. A.; Jones, W. V.; Kurz, R. J.; Ormes, J. F.; Price, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons above 10 GeV was studied extensively. The spectrum is predicted to steepen at an energy which is related to the lifetime of electrons in the interstellar medium against losses due to inverse Compton collisions with photons and to synchrotron radiation in galactic magnetic fields. The experimental results diverge widely; the lack of agreement between the various measurements is due to a variety of experimental problems.

  16. High energy resolution x-ray spectrometer for high count rate XRF applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rossington, C.S.; Madden, N.W.; Chapman, K.

    1993-08-01

    A new x-ray spectrometer has been constructed which incorporates a novel large area, low capacitance Si(Li) detector and a low noise JFET (junction field effect transistor) pr- eamplifier. The spectrometer operates at high count rates without the conventional compromise in energy resolution. For example, at an amplifier peaking time of 1 {mu}sec and a throughput count rate of 145,000 counts sec{sup {minus}1}, the energy resolution at 5.9 key is 220 eV FWHM. Commercially available spectrometers utilizing conventional geometry Si(Li) detectors with areas equivalent to the new detector have resolutions on the order of 540 eV under the same conditions. Conventional x-ray spectrometers offering high energy resolution must employ detectors with areas one-tenth the size of the new LBL detector (20 mm{sup 2} compared with 200 mm{sup 2}). However, even with the use of the smaller area detectors, the energy resolution of a commercial system is typically limited to approximately 300 eV (again, at 1 {mu}sec and 5.9 keV) due to the noise of the commercially available JFET`S. The new large area detector is useful in high count rate applications, but is also useful in the detection of weak photon signals, in which it is desirable to subtend as large an angle of the available photon flux as possible, while still maintaining excellent energy resolution. X-ray fluorescence data from the new spectrometer is shown in comparison to a commercially available system in the analysis of a dilute multi-element material, and also in conjunction with high count rate synchrotron EXAMS applications.

  17. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  18. Steps towards a Medium-Energy Gamma-ray Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnery, Julie

    We propose to develop, fabricate, and test a small-scale medium-energy (0.2 - 500 MeV) gamma-ray telescope, optimized for photon detection in both the Compton-scattering and pair-production regimes. The instrument will consist of a double-sided Si-strip tracking detector with energy deposition readout, a composite CdZnTe-strip (CZT) and CsI(Tl)-log calorimeter with high spatial and good energy resolution, and a highly efficient anti-coincidence detector (ACD). This instrument will be a prototype for a potential future MIDEX-scale mission (ComPair) designed to provide a more than order of magnitude increase in sensitivity to the MeV gamma-ray Universe compared to past missions. ComPair will provide a significant improvement in both angular and energy resolution over previous instruments operating in the 0.2-100 MeV range, offering a truly new window on this poorly explored energy range. In this proposal, the team proposes to develop and test the key detection elements for ComPair, integrate these elements in a prototype telescope, perform a series of beam tests to demonstrate the performance, and perform a balloon test flight to study the background rejection capability of the prototype instrument. As a result, we will establish the proof of concept for a Si-CZT Compton-Pair space telescope and elevate the TRL for the ComPair technology to 6-7.

  19. Exploring biases in the measurement of Isotropic Equivalent Energies of Gamma-ray Bursts with the Fermi Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoldak, Kimberly; Racusin, Judith L.; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    This study is being performed to determine if isotropic equivalent energies, Eiso, measured for gamma-ray bursts are significantly biased by lack of high-energy gamma-ray photon data, leading to inconsistent best-fit spectral models which diverge at high energies. Isotropic equivalent energies are often measured between energies of 10 keV to 10 MeV and prior to the 2008 launch of Fermi, the BATSE gamma-ray burst telescope was limited to observable energies below 700 keV, missing ~90% of the integrated energy band. The brightest bursts often peak at energies exceeding previous detector thresholds, therefore missing large portions of a burst's fluence and leading to incorrect modeling of the spectral shape. Despite these limitations on accurately measuring the full energy output, correlations have emerged, treating Eiso as an intrinsic property with physical application to gamma-ray burst physics rather than an observational quantity. We explore the impact of detector truncation on Eiso by performing time-integrated analysis both with and without spectra from Fermi's high-energy Large Area Telescope (LAT). Preliminary results show that multiple models, providing good statistics, measure inconsistent isotropic equivalent energies for the same burst, and consistently underestimate the energy output when LAT data is excluded from the analysis. Exclusion of the LAT data leads to unconstrained high-energy spectral slopes of the Band function allowing for observer influence on the choice of how to constrain the slope or to accept a cutoff power-law as the better fit. This proves that correlations involving Eiso are currently biased by detector limitations and the true meaning of Eiso has yet to be determined.

  20. Percolation effects in very-high-energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Dias de Deus, J; Santo, M C Espírito; Pimenta, M; Pajares, C

    2006-04-28

    Cosmic ray data at high energies present a number of well-known puzzles. At very high energies (E approximately 10(20) eV) there are indications of a discrepancy between ground array experiments and fluorescence detectors. On the other hand, the dependence of the depth of the shower maximum Xmax with the primary energy shows a change in slope (E approximately 10(17) eV) which is usually explained assuming a composition change. Both effects could be accounted for in models predicting that above a certain energy showers would develop deeper in the atmosphere. In this Letter we argue that this can be done naturally by including percolation effects in the description of the shower development, which cause a change in the behavior of the inelasticity K above E approximately 10(17) eV. PMID:16712214

  1. Percolation Effects in Very-High-Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dias de Deus, J.; Santo, M.C. Espirito; Pimenta, M.; Pajares, C.

    2006-04-28

    Cosmic ray data at high energies present a number of well-known puzzles. At very high energies (E{approx}10{sup 20} eV) there are indications of a discrepancy between ground array experiments and fluorescence detectors. On the other hand, the dependence of the depth of the shower maximum X{sub max} with the primary energy shows a change in slope (E{approx}10{sup 17} eV) which is usually explained assuming a composition change. Both effects could be accounted for in models predicting that above a certain energy showers would develop deeper in the atmosphere. In this Letter we argue that this can be done naturally by including percolation effects in the description of the shower development, which cause a change in the behavior of the inelasticity K above E{approx_equal}10{sup 17} eV.

  2. High Energy Galactic Cosmic Rays Observed by RUNJOB Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, Makoto; RUNJOB Collaboration

    2006-03-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) from proton to iron with the energy of 1013 - 1015 eV were observed by RUssia-Nippon JOint Balloon (RUNJOB) experiments. Each energy spectrum of the primary nuclear components except for helium is in agreement with the results obtained by other observations in the same energy region as the RUNJOB observation within statistical errors, while the intensity of the helium component is nearly half that obtained by the JACEE and the SOKOL observations. The spectrum slopes seem to be almost parallel or become gradually harder as mass becomes heavier. The power indices of the spectra are nearly -2.75 in the energy range of 20 - 500 TeV/nucleous. These our results support the acceleration mechanism and the propagation process in Galaxy of GCRs depend on its rigidity.

  3. Low energy particle composition. [cosmic rays produced in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of current knowledge of low-energy cosmic ray particles produced in the solar system. It is argued that the notion that the sun alone can accelerate particles in the solar system must be abandoned in light of evidence that Jupiter and earth may be sources of observed low-energy particles. Measurements of the composition and energy spectra of low-energy particles during quiet times are examined, emphasizing the abundance of protons and helium and of anomalous N, O, and Ne. The abundance of heavy particles (B, C, N, O, Ne, Ca and Fe) of unknown origin in the earth magnetosphere is examined. Reported observations of Jovian electrons are discussed and solar particle events with anomalous compositions (He-3 rich events and Fe rich events) are treated in detail. Nuclear abundances of solar particles, emphasizing their temporal and spatial variations are considered together with the nature of nuclear reaction products in solar flares.

  4. Using Hydrated Salt Phase Change Materials for Residential Air Conditioning Peak Demand Reduction and Energy Conservation in Coastal and Transitional Climates in the State of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung Ok

    The recent rapid economic and population growth in the State of California have led to a significant increase in air conditioning use, especially in areas of the State with coastal and transitional climates. This fact makes that the electric peak demand be dominated by air conditioning use of residential buildings in the summer time. This extra peak demand caused by the use of air conditioning equipment lasts only a few days out of the year. As a result, unavoidable power outages have occurred when electric supply could not keep up with such electric demand. This thesis proposed a possible solution to this problem by using building thermal mass via phase change materials to reduce peak air conditioning demand loads. This proposed solution was tested via a new wall called Phase Change Frame Wall (PCFW). The PCFW is a typical residential frame wall in which Phase Change Materials (PCMs) were integrated to add thermal mass. The thermal performance of the PCFWs was first evaluated, experimentally, in two test houses, built for this purpose, located in Lawrence, KS and then via computer simulations of residential buildings located in coastal and transitional climates in California. In this thesis, a hydrated salt PCM was used, which was added in concentrations of 10% and 20% by weight of the interior sheathing of the walls. Based on the experimental results, under Lawrence, KS weather, the PCFWs at 10% and 20% of PCM concentrations reduced the peak heat transfer rates by 27.0% and 27.3%, on average, of all four walls, respectively. Simulated results using California climate data indicated that PCFWs would reduce peak heat transfer rates by 8% and 19% at 10% PCM concentration and 12.2% and 27% at 20% PCM concentration for the coastal and transitional climates, respectively. Furthermore, the PCFWs, at 10% PCM concentration, would reduce the space cooling load and the annual energy consumption by 10.4% and 7.2%, on average in both climates, respectively.

  5. On Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays and Their Resultant Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavish, Eyal; Eichler, David

    2016-05-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope collaboration has recently reported on 50 months of measurements of the isotropic extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB) spectrum between 100 MeV and 820 GeV. Ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) protons interact with the cosmic microwave background photons and produce cascade photons of energies 10 MeV–1 TeV that contribute to the EGRB flux. We examine seven possible evolution models for UHECRs and find that UHECR sources that evolve as the star formation rate (SFR), medium low luminosity active galactic nuclei type-1 (L = 1043.5 erg s‑1 in the [0.5–2] KeV band), and BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) are the most acceptable given the constraints imposed by the observed EGRB. Other possibilities produce too much secondary γ-radiation. In all cases, the decaying dark matter (DM) contribution improves the fit at high energy, but the contribution of still unresolved blazars, which would leave the smallest role for decaying DM, may yet provide an alternative improvement. The possibility that the entire EGRB can be fitted with resolvable but not-yet-resolved blazars, as recently claimed by Ajello et al., would leave little room in the EGRB to accommodate γ-rays from extragalactic UHECR production, even for many source evolution rates that would otherwise be acceptable. We find that under the assumption of UHECRs being mostly protons, there is not enough room for producing extragalactic UHECRs with active galactic nucleus, gamma-ray burst, or even SFR source evolution. Sources that evolve as BL Lacs, on the other hand, would produce much less secondary γ-radiation and would remain a viable source of UHECRs, provided that they dominate.

  6. Combination of electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to determine indium concentration in InGaN thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Walther, T.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a method to determine the indium concentration, x, of In x Ga1-x N thin films by combining plasmon excitation studies in electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) with a novel way of quantification of the intensity of x-ray lines in energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The plasmon peak in EELS of InGaN is relatively broad. We fitted a Lorentz function to the main plasmon peak to suppress noise and the influence from the neighboring Ga 3d transition in the spectrum, which improves the precision in the evaluation of the plasmon peak position. As the indium concentration of InGaN is difficult to control during high temperature growth due to partial In desorption, the nominal indium concentrations provided by the growers were not considered reliable. The indium concentration obtained from EDXS quantification using Oxford Instrument ISIS 300 x-ray standard quantification software often did not agree with the nominal indium concentration, and quantification using K and L lines was inconsistent. We therefore developed a self-consistent iterative procedure to determine the In content from thickness-dependent k-factors, as described in recent work submitted to Journal of Microscopy. When the plasmon peak position is plotted versus the indium concentration from EDXS we obtain a linear relationship over the whole compositional range, and the standard error from linear least-squares fitting shows that the indium concentration can be determined from the plasmon peak position to within Δx = ± 0.037 standard deviation.

  7. Superconducting High Energy Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, D T

    2002-02-22

    We have demonstrated that a bulk absorber coupled to a TES can serve as a good gamma-ray spectrometer. Our measured energy resolution of 70 eV at 60 keV is among the best measurements in this field. We have also shown excellent agreement between the noise predictions and measured noise. Despite this good result, we noted that our detector design has shortcomings with a low count rate and vulnerabilities with the linearity of energy response. We addressed these issues by implementation of an active negative feedback bias. We demonstrated the effects of active bias such as additional pulse shortening, reduction of TES change in temperature during a pulse, and linearization of energy response at low energy. Linearization at higher energy is possible with optimized heat capacities and thermal conductivities of the microcalorimeter. However, the current fabrication process has low control and repeatability over the thermal properties. Thus, optimization of the detector performance is difficult until the fabrication process is improved. Currently, several efforts are underway to better control the fabrication of our gamma-ray spectrometers. We are developing a full-wafer process to produce TES films. We are investigating the thermal conductivity and surface roughness of thicker SiN membranes. We are exploring alternative methods to couple the absorber to the TES film for reproducibility. We are also optimizing the thermal conductivities within the detector to minimize two-element phonon noise. We are experimenting with different absorber materials to optimize absorption efficiency and heat capacity. We are also working on minimizing Johnson noise from the E S shunt and SQUID amplifier noise. We have shown that our performance, noise, and active bias models agree very well with measured data from several microcalorimeters. Once the fabrication improvements have been implemented, we have no doubt that our gamma-ray spectrometer will achieve even more spectacular results.

  8. Sharp knee phenomenon of primary cosmic ray energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Antonyan, Samvel

    2014-06-01

    Primary energy spectral models are tested in the energy range of 1-200 PeV using standardized extensive air shower responses from BASJE-MAS, Tibet, GAMMA and KASCADE scintillation shower arrays. Results point toward the two-component origin of observed cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region consisting of a pulsar component superimposed upon rigidity-dependent power law diffuse Galactic flux. The two-component energy spectral model accounts for both the sharp knee shower spectral phenomenon and observed irregularity of all-particle energy spectrum in the region of 50-100 PeV. Alternatively, tested multipopulation primary energy spectra predicted by nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration models describe observed shower spectra in the knee region provided that the cutoff magnetic rigidities of accelerating particles are 6±0.3 and 45±2 PV for the first two populations, respectively. Both tested spectral models confirm the predominant H-He primary nuclei origin of observed shower spectral knee. The parameters of tested energy spectra are evaluated using solutions of the inverse problem on the basis of the corresponding parameterizations of energy spectra for primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei, standardized shower size spectral responses in the 550-1085 g/cm2 atmospheric slant depth range and near vertical muon truncated size spectra detected by the GAMMA array.

  9. Parametric study of a variable-magnetic-field-based energy-selection system for generating a spread-out Bragg peak with a laser-accelerated proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kang, Young Nam; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Pae, Ki-Hong; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based proton beam acceleration, which produces broad energy spectra, is unsuitable for direct clinical use. Thus, employing an energy selection system is necessary. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a method whereby a variable magnetic field could be employed with an energy selection system to generate a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). For energy selection, particle transport and dosimetric property measurements, the Geant4 toolkit was implemented. The energy spectrum of the laser-accelerated proton beam was acquired using a particle-in-cell simulation. The hole size and the position of the energy selection collimator were varied in order to determine the effects of those parameters on the dosimetric properties. To generate an SOBP, we changed the magnetic field in the energy selection system for each beam weighting factor during beam irradiation. The overall results of this study suggest that the use of an energy selection system with a variable magnetic field can effectively generate an SOBP suitable for proton radiation therapy applications.

  10. Spectacular X-ray Jet Points Toward Cosmic Energy Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spectacular luminous spike of X rays that emanates from the vicinity of a giant black hole in the center of the radio galaxy Pictor A. The spike, or jet, is due to a beam of particles that streaks across hundreds of thousands of light years of intergalactic space toward a brilliant X-ray hot spot that marks its end point. Pictor A Image Press Image and Caption The hot spot is at least 800 thousand light years (8 times the diameter of our Milky Way galaxy) away from where the jet originates. It is thought to represent the advancing head of the jet, which brightens conspicuously where it plows into the tenuous gas of intergalactic space. The jet, powered by the giant black hole, originates from a region of space no bigger than the solar system. "Both the brightness and the spectrum of the X rays are very different from what theory predicts," Professor Andrew Wilson reported today at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, New York. Wilson, of the University of Maryland, College Park, along with Dr. Patrick Shopbell and Dr. Andrew Young, also of the University of Maryland, are submitting an article on this research to the Astrophysical Journal. "The Chandra observations are telling us that something out there is producing many more high-energy particles than we expected," said Wilson. One possible explanation for the X rays is that shock waves along the side and head of the X-ray jet are accelerating electrons and possibly protons to speeds close to that of light. In the process the electrons are boosted to energies as high as 100 million times their own rest mass energy. These electrons lose their energy rapidly as they produce X rays, so this could be the first direct evidence of this process so far outside a galaxy. The hot spot has been seen with optical and radio telescopes. Radio telescopes have also observed a faint jet. Jets are thought to be produced by the extreme

  11. A method for establishing absolute full-energy peak efficiency and its confidence interval for HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan, U.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Starosta, K.; Williams, J.; Voss, P.

    2015-12-01

    A method is proposed for establishing the absolute efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector including the confidence interval in the energy range of 79.6-3451.2 keV. The calibrations were accomplished with the 133Ba, 60Co, 56Co and 152Eu point-like radioactive sources with only the 60Co source being activity calibrated to an accuracy of 2% at the 90% confidence level. All data sets measured from activity calibrated and uncalibrated sources were fit simultaneously using the linearized least squares method. The proposed fit function accounts for scaling of the data taken with activity uncalibrated sources to the data taken with the high accuracy activity calibrated source. The confidence interval for the fit was found analytically using the covariance matrix. Accuracy of the fit was below 3.5% at the 90% confidence level in the 79.6-3451.2 keV energy range.

  12. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  13. High energy, high resolution X-ray optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Joy, Marshall; Kahn, Steven

    1990-01-01

    The scientific goals of X-ray astronomy are considered to evaluate the relative advantages of using classical Wolter-1 optics or using a different approach. The portion of the X-ray band over 10 keV is unexploited in the present X-ray optics technology, and focussing in this portion of the band is crucial because nonfocussed experiments are background limited. The basic design of 'hard' X-ray optics is described theoretically emphasizing the very small angles of incidence in the grazing-incidence optics. Optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio is found to occur at a finite angular resolution. In real applications, the effective area reduced by the efficiency of the two reflections is 80 percent at energies up to 40 keV, and the quality of the reflecting surface can be monitored to minimize scattering. Focussing optics are found to offer improvements in signal-to-noise as well as more effective scientific return because microelectronic focal-plane technology is employed.

  14. Energy dependence of the band-limited noise in black hole X-ray binaries★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiele, H.; Yu, W.

    2015-10-01

    Black hole low-mass X-ray binaries show a variety of variability features, which manifest as narrow peak-like structures superposed on broad noise components in power density spectra in the hard X-ray emission. In this work, we study variability properties of the band-limited noise component during the low-hard state for a sample of black hole X-ray binaries. We investigate the characteristic frequency and amplitude of the band-limited noise component and study covariance spectra. For observations that show a noise component with a characteristic frequency above 1 Hz in the hard energy band (4-8 keV), we found this very same component at a lower frequency in the soft band (1-2 keV). This difference in characteristic frequency is an indication that while both the soft and the hard band photons contribute to the same band-limited noise component, which likely represents the modulation of the mass accretion rate, the origin of the soft photons is actually further away from the black hole than the hard photons. Thus, the soft photons are characterized by larger radii, lower frequencies and softer energies, and are probably associated with a smaller optical depth for Comptonization up-scattering from the outer layer of the corona, or suggest a temperature gradient of the corona. We interpret this energy dependence within the picture of energy-dependent power density states as a hint that the contribution of the up-scattered photons originating in the outskirts of the Comptonizing corona to the overall emission in the soft band is becoming significant.

  15. The high-energy γ-ray emission of AP Librae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; Finke, J.; Fortin, P.; Horan, D.

    2015-01-01

    The γ-ray spectrum of the low-frequency-peaked BL Lac (LBL) object AP Librae is studied, following the discovery of very-high-energy (VHE; E> 100 GeV) γ-ray emission up to the TeV range by the H.E.S.S. experiment. This makes AP Librae one of the few VHE emitters of the LBL type. The measured spectrum yields a flux of (8.8 ± 1.5stat ± 1.8sys) × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 above 130 GeV and a spectral index of Γ = 2.65 ± 0.19stat ± 0.20sys. This study also makes use of Fermi-LAT observations in the high energy (HE, E> 100 MeV) range, providing the longest continuous light curve (5 years) ever published on this source. The source underwent a flaring event between MJD 56 306-56 376 in the HE range, with a flux increase of a factor of 3.5 in the 14 day bin light curve and no significant variation in spectral shape with respect to the low-flux state. While the H.E.S.S. and (low state) Fermi-LAT fluxes are in good agreement where they overlap, a spectral curvature between the steep VHE spectrum and the Fermi-LAT spectrum is observed. The maximum of the γ-ray emission in the spectral energy distribution is located below the GeV energy range.

  16. Photodisintegration of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays: A New Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Salamon, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of a new calculation of the photodisintegration of ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray (UHCR) nuclei in intergalactic space. The critical interactions for energy loss and photodisintegration of UHCR nuclei occur with photons of the 2.73 K cosmic background radiation (CBR) and with photons of the infrared background radiation (IBR). We have reexamined this problem making use of a new determination of the IBR based on empirical data, primarily from IRAS galaxies, consistent with direct measurements and upper limits from TeV gamma-ray observations. We have also improved the calculation by including the specific threshold energies for the various photodisintegration interactions in our Monte Carlo calculation. With the new smaller IBR flux, the steepness of the Wien side of the now relatively more important CBR makes their inclusion essential for more accurate results. Our results indicate a significant increase in the propagation time of UHCR nuclei of a given energy over previous results. We discuss the possible significance of this for UHCR origin theory.

  17. Electron-excited energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry at high speed and at high resolution: silicon drift detectors and microcalorimeters.

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E

    2006-12-01

    Two recent developments in X-ray spectrometer technology provide dramatic improvements in analytical capabilities that impact the frontiers of electron microscopy. Silicon drift detectors (SDD) use the same physics as silicon (lithium) energy dispersive spectrometers [Si(Li) EDS] but differ in design: only 10% of the thickness of the Si(Li) EDS with an anode area below 0.1 mm2 and a complex rear surface electrode pattern that creates a lateral internal charge collection field. The SDD equals or betters the Si(Li) EDS in most measures of performance. For output versus input count rate, the SDD exceeds the Si(Li) EDS by a factor of 5 to 10 for the same resolution. This high throughput can benefit analytical measurements that are count limited, such as X-ray mapping and trace measurements. The microcalorimeter EDS determines the X-ray energy by measuring the temperature rise in a metal absorber. Operating at 100 mK, the microcalorimeter EDS achieves resolution of 2-5 eV over a photon energy range of 200 eV to 10 keV in energy dispersive operation, eliminating most peak interference situations and providing high peak-to-background to detect low fluorescence yield peaks. Chemical bonding effects on low energy (< 2 keV) peak shapes can be measured. PMID:19830945

  18. The estimation of background production by cosmic rays in high-energy gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, H. L.; Nolan, P. L.; Lin, Y. C.; Koch, D. G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hughes, E. B.

    1991-01-01

    A calculational method of estimating instrumental background in high-energy gamma-ray telescopes, using the hadronic Monte Carlo code FLUKA87, is presented. The method is applied to the SAS-2 and EGRET telescope designs and is also used to explore the level of background to be expected for alternative configurations of the proposed GRITS telescope, which adapts the external fuel tank of a Space Shuttle as a gamma-ray telescope with a very large collecting area. The background produced in proton-beam tests of EGRET is much less than the predicted level. This discrepancy appears to be due to the FLUKA87 inability to transport evaporation nucleons. It is predicted that the background in EGRET will be no more than 4-10 percent of the extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation.

  19. Cosmic strings and ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani

    1989-01-01

    The flux is calculated of ultrahigh energy protons due to the process of cusp evaporation from cosmic string loops. For the standard value of the dimensionless cosmic string parameter epsilon is identical to G(sub mu) approx. = 10(exp -6), the flux is several orders of magnitude below the observed cosmic ray flux of ultrahigh energy protons. However, the flux at any energy initially increases as the value of epsilon is decreased. This at first suggests that there may be a lower limit on the value of epsilon, which would imply a lower limit on the temperature of a cosmic string forming phase transition in the early universe. However, the calculation shows that this is not the case -- the particle flux at any energy reaches its highest value at epsilon approx. = 10(exp -15) and it then decreases for further decrease of the value of epsilon. This is due to the fact that for too small values of epsilon (less than 10(exp -15)), the energy loss of the loops through the cusp evaporation process itself (rather than gravitational energy loss of the loops) becomes the dominant factor that controls the behavior of the number density of the loops at the relevant times of emission of the particles. The highest flux at any energy remains at least four orders of magnitude below the observed flux. There is thus no lower limit on epsilon.

  20. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  1. The Prompt and High Energy Emission of Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, P.

    2009-05-25

    I discuss some recent developments concerning the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts, in particular the jet properties and radiation mechanisms, as exemplified by the naked-eye burst GRB 080319b, and the prompt X-ray emission of XRB080109/SN2008d, where the progenitor has, for the first time, been shown to contribute to the prompt emission. I discuss then some recent theoretical calculations of the GeV/TeV spectrum of GRB in the context of both leptonic SSC models and hadronic models. The recent observations by the Fermi satellite of GRB 080916C are then reviewed, and their implications for such models are discussed, together with its interesting determination of a bulk Lorentz factor, and the highest lower limit on the quantum gravity energy scale so far.

  2. Repetitive flash x-ray generator utilizing a simple diode with a new type of energy-selective function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, E.; Kimura, S.; Kawasaki, S.; Isobe, H.; Takahashi, K.; Tamakawa, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

    1990-09-01

    The construction and the fundamental studies of a repetitive flash x-ray generator having a simple diode with an energy-selective function are described. This generator consisted of the following components: a constant high-voltage power supply, a high-voltage pulser, a repetitive high-energy impulse switching system, a turbo molecular pump, and a flash x-ray tube. The circuit of this pulser employed a modified two-stage surge Marx generator with a capacity during main discharge of 425pF. The x-ray tube was of the demountable-diode type which was connected to the turbo molecular pump and consisted of the following major devices: a rod-shaped anode tip made of tungsten, a disk cathode made of graphite, an aluminum filter, and a tube body made of glass. Two condensers inside of the pulser were charged from 40 to 60 kV, and the output voltage was about 1.9 times the charging voltage. The peak tube voltage was primarily determined by the anode-cathode (A-C) space, and the peak tube current was less than 0.6 kA. The peak tube voltage slightly increased when the charging voltage was increased, but the amount of change rate was small. Thus, the maximum photon energy could be easily controlled by varying the A-C space. The pulse width ranged from 40 to 100 ns, and the x-ray intensity was less than 1.0 μC/kg at 0.3 m per pulse. The repetitive frequency was less than 50 Hz, and the effective focal spot size was determined by the diameter of the anode tip and ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 mm in diameter.

  3. Noontime Latitudinal Behavior of the Ionospheric Peak Parameters (foF2 and hmF2) to the Variation of Solar Energy Input for the American Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabassa-Miranda, E.; Garnett Marques Brum, C.

    2013-12-01

    We are presenting a statistical study of the behavior of the noontime F2 peak parameters (foF2 and hmF2) to the variation of solar energy input based on digisonde data and EUV-UV solar emissions registered by SOHO satellite for geomagnetic quiet-to-normal condition. For this, we selected digisonde data from fourteen different stations spread along the American sector (ten of them located above and four below the equator). These registers were collected from 2000 to 2012 and encompass the last unusual super minimum period.

  4. Feasibility of kilovoltage x-ray energy modulation by gaseous media and its application in contrast-enhanced radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Facundo-Flores, E. L.; Garnica-Garza, H. M.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To present a method to modulate the energy contents of a kilovoltage x-ray beam that makes use of a gas as the modulating medium. The method is capable of producing arbitrary x-ray spectra by varying the pressure of the modulating gas and the peak kilovoltage (kVp) of the x-ray beams whose energy is being modulated.Methods: An aluminum chamber was machined with a 0.5 cm wall thickness, designed to withstand pressures of more than 80 atm. A pressure sensor and electrovalves were used to monitor and regulate the gas pressure. Argon was used as the modulating gas. A CdTe spectrometer was used to measure x-ray spectra for different combinations of kVp and gas pressure, thus obtaining a set of basis x-ray functions. An arbitrary x-ray spectrum can then be formed by the linear combination of such basis functions. In order to show one possible application of the modulation method, a contrast-enhanced radiotherapy prostate treatment was optimized with respect to the x-ray beam energy, without restrictions on the possible shape of the resultant x-ray spectra.Results: The x-ray spectra basis functions obtained display a smooth and gradual variation of their average energy as a function of the gas pressure for a given kVp, sometimes in the order of 1 or 2 keV. This gradual variation would be difficult to obtain with a conventional aluminum or copper filters, as the change in thickness necessary to reproduce the data presented would be in the order of micrometers, making necessary the use of a large number of such filters. Using the modulation method presented here, the authors were able to reconstruct the optimized x-ray spectra from the measured basis functions, for different optimization objectives.Conclusions: A method has been developed that allows for the controlled modulation of the energy contents of kilovoltage x-ray spectra. The method has been shown to be able to reproduce spectra of arbitrary shape, such as those obtained from the optimization of contrast

  5. TU-F-18A-05: An X-Ray Fluorescence Technique for Energy Calibration of Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S; Barber, W; Iwanczyk, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration of a Si strip photon-counting detector by using the x-ray fluorescence technique. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si strips. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing Ag, I, Ba, and Gd, were placed in small plastic aliquots with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known energies for materials. The energy resolution was derived from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the fluorescence peaks. In addition, the angular dependence of the recorded fluorescence spectra was studied at 30°, 60°, and 120°. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The recorded pulse height was calibrated with respect to photon energy and the gain and offset values were calculated to be 7.0 mV/keV and −69.3 mV, respectively. Negligible variation in energy calibration was observed among the four energy thresholds. The variation among different pixels was estimated to be approximately 1 keV. The energy resolution of the detector was estimated to be 7.9% within the investigated energy range. Conclusion: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the detector. The proposed x-ray fluorescence technique provides an accurate and efficient way to calibrate the energy response of a photon-counting detector.

  6. Microcalorimeter-type energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Keiichi; Maehata, Keisuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ohsaki, Mitsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Yu, Xiuzhen; Ito, Takuji; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A new energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) with a microcalorimeter detector equipped with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for high- accuracy compositional analysis in the nanoscale. A superconducting transition-edge-sensor-type microcalorimeter is applied as the detector. A cryogen-free cooling system, which consists of a mechanical and a dilution refrigerator, is selected to achieve long-term temperature stability. In order to mount these detector and refrigerators on a TEM, the cooling system is specially designed such that these two refrigerators are separated. Also, the detector position and arrangement are carefully designed to avoid adverse affects between the superconductor detector and the TEM lens system. Using the developed EDS system, at present, an energy resolution of 21.92 eV full-width-at-half maximum has been achieved at the Cr K alpha line. This value is about seven times better than that of the current typical commercial Si(Li) detector, which is usually around 140 eV. The developed microcalorimeter EDS system can measure a wide energy range, 1-20 keV, at one time with this high energy resolution that can resolve peaks from most of the elements. Although several further developments will be needed to enable practical use, highly accurate compositional analysis with high energy resolution will be realized by this microcalorimeter EDS system. PMID:19717388

  7. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, W. Rick; Forster, Karl; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Craig, William W.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, William W.; Boggs, Steven E.; Stern, Daniel; Kim, Yunjin; Giommi, Paolo; Perri, Matteo; and others

    2013-06-20

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the {approx}10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Using its unprecedented combination of sensitivity and spatial and spectral resolution, NuSTAR will pursue five primary scientific objectives: (1) probe obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity out to the peak epoch of galaxy assembly in the universe (at z {approx}< 2) by surveying selected regions of the sky; (2) study the population of hard X-ray-emitting compact objects in the Galaxy by mapping the central regions of the Milky Way; (3) study the non-thermal radiation in young supernova remnants, both the hard X-ray continuum and the emission from the radioactive element {sup 44}Ti; (4) observe blazars contemporaneously with ground-based radio, optical, and TeV telescopes, as well as with Fermi and Swift, to constrain the structure of AGN jets; and (5) observe line and continuum emission from core-collapse supernovae in the Local Group, and from nearby Type Ia events, to constrain explosion models. During its baseline two-year mission, NuSTAR will also undertake a broad program of targeted observations. The observatory consists of two co-aligned grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes pointed at celestial targets by a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Deployed into a 600 km, near-circular, 6 Degree-Sign inclination orbit, the observatory has now completed commissioning, and is performing consistent with pre-launch expectations. NuSTAR is now executing its primary science mission, and with an

  8. The energy dependence of lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters for medium energy x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Waldeland, Einar; Hole, Eli Olaug; Sagstuen, Einar; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a systematic investigation of the energy dependence of alanine and lilthium formate EPR dosimeters for medium energy x rays. Methods: Lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters were exposed to eight different x-ray beam qualities, with nominal potentials ranging from 50 to 200 kV. Following ionometry based on standards of absorbed dose to water, the dosimeters were given two different doses of approximately 3 and 6 Gy for each radiation quality, with three dosimeters for each dose. A reference series was also irradiated to three different dose levels at a {sup 60}Co unit. The dose to water energy response, that is, the dosimeter reading per absorbed dose to water relative to that for {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays, was estimated for each beam quality. In addition, the energy response was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations and compared to the experimental energy response. Results: The experimental energy response estimates ranged from 0.89 to 0.94 and from 0.68 to 0.90 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. The uncertainties in the experimental energy response estimates were typically 3%. The relative effectiveness, that is, the ratio of the experimental energy response to that following Monte Carlo simulations was, on average, 0.96 and 0.94 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. Conclusions: This work shows that lithium formate dosimeters are less dependent on x-ray energy than alanine. Furthermore, as the relative effectiveness for both lithium formate and alanine were systematically less than unity, the yield of radiation-induced radicals is decreased following x-irradiation compared to irradiation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays.

  9. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of charge density waves via chemical filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Yejun; Somayazulu, M. S.; Jaramillo, R.; Rosenbaum, T.F.; Isaacs, E.D.; Hu Jingzhu; Mao Hokwang

    2005-06-15

    Pressure tuning of phase transitions is a powerful tool in condensed matter physics, permitting high-resolution studies while preserving fundamental symmetries. At the highest pressures, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) has been a critical method for geometrically confined diamond anvil cell experiments. We develop a chemical filter technique complementary to EDXD that permits the study of satellite peaks as weak as 10{sup -4} of the crystal Bragg diffraction. In particular, we map out the temperature dependence of the incommensurate charge density wave diffraction from single-crystal, elemental chromium. This technique provides the potential for future GPa pressure studies of many-body effects in a broad range of solid state systems.

  10. Note: Characterization of a high-photon-energy X-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, M.; Schiebel, P.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. U.; Eichman, B.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Fiksel, G.; Zhong, Z.; Stephens, R. B.

    2013-10-15

    The Bragg angle, rocking curve, and reflection efficiency of a quartz crystal x-ray imager (Miller indices 234) were measured at photon energy of 15.6909 keV, corresponding to the K{sub α2} line of Zr, using the X15A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. One flat and three spherically curved samples were tested. The peak reflectivity of the best-performing crystal was determined to be (3.6 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −4} with a rocking-curve full width at half maximum of 0.09°. The Zr K{sub α2} emission was imaged from a hot Zr plasma generated by a 10-J multiterawatt laser.

  11. The Highest-Energy Photons Seen by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bertsch, D. L.; ONeal, R. H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    During its nine-year lifetime, the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGBET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) detected 1506 cosmic photons with measured energy E>10 GeV. Of this number, 187 are found within a 1 deg of sources that are listed in the Third EGRET Catalog and were included in determining the detection likelihood, flux, and spectra of those sources. In particular, five detected EGRET pulsars are found to have events above 10 GeV, and together they account for 37 events. A pulsar not included in the Third EGRET Catalog has 2 events, both with the same phase and in one peak of the lower-energy gamma-ray light-curve. Most of the remaining 1319 events appear to be diffuse Galactic and extragalactic radiation based on the similarity of the their spatial and energy distributions with the diffuse model and in the E>100, MeV emission. No significant time clustering which would suggest a burst was detected.

  12. THE LATE PEAKING AFTERGLOW OF GRB 100418A

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F. E.; Holland, S. T.; Sakamoto, T.; Antonelli, L. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Siegel, M. H.; Covino, S.; Fugazza, D.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.; Evans, P. A.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Liang, E. W.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.

    2011-02-01

    GRB 100418A is a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) at redshift z = 0.6235 discovered with the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer with unusual optical and X-ray light curves. After an initial short-lived, rapid decline in X-rays, the optical and X-ray light curves observed with Swift are approximately flat or rising slightly out to at least {approx}7 x 10{sup 3} s after the trigger, peak at {approx}5 x 10{sup 4} s, and then follow an approximately power-law decay. Such a long optical plateau and late peaking is rarely seen in GRB afterglows. Observations with Rapid Eye Mount during a gap in the Swift coverage indicate a bright optical flare at {approx}2.5 x 10{sup 4} s. The long plateau phase of the afterglow is interpreted using either a model with continuous injection of energy into the forward shock of the burst or a model in which the jet of the burst is viewed off-axis. In both models the isotropic kinetic energy in the late afterglow after the plateau phase is {>=}10{sup 2} times the 10{sup 51} erg of the prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy release. The energy injection model is favored because the off-axis jet model would require the intrinsic T{sub 90} for the GRB jet viewed on-axis to be very short, {approx}10 ms, and the intrinsic isotropic gamma-ray energy release and the true jet energy to be much higher than the typical values of known short GRBs. The non-detection of a jet break up to t {approx} 2 x 10{sup 6} s indicates a jet half-opening angle of at least {approx}14{sup 0}, and a relatively high-collimation-corrected jet energy of E{sub jet} {>=} 10{sup 52} erg.

  13. The Late Peaking Afterglow of GR8 100418A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Frank; Antonelli, L. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Covino, S.; dePasquale, M.; Evans, P. A.; Fugazza, D.; Holland, S. T.; Liang, E. W.; OBrien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Sakamoto, T.; Siegel, M. H.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.

    2010-01-01

    GRB 100418A is a long Gamma-Ray Burst at redshift z=0.6235 discovered with the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer with unusual optical and X-ray light curves ' After an initial short-lived, rapid decline in X-rays, the optical and X-ray light curves observed with Swift are approximately flat or rising slightly out to at least approx.7 ks after the trigger, peak at approx.50 ks, and then follow an approximately power-law decay. Such a long optical plateau and late peaking is rarely seen in 6R8 afterglows. Observations with REM during a gap in the Swift coverage indicate a bright optical flare at approx.25 ks, The long plateau phase of the afterglow is interpreted using either a model with continuous injection of energy into the forward shock of the burst or a model in which the 'et of the burst is viewed off-axis. In both models the isotropic kinetic energy in the late afterglow after the plateau phase is >100 times the 10(exp 51) erg of the prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy release. The energy injection model is favored because the off-axis 'et model would require the intrinsic $T f801$ for the GR8 'et viewed on-axis to be very short, approx.10 ms, and the intrinsic isotropic gamma-ray energy release and the true jet energy to be much higher than the typical values of known short GRBs^ The non-detection of a 'et break up to approx.2 Ms indicates a jet half-opening angle of at least 14 degrees, and a relatively high collimation-corrected 'et energy of at least 10(exp 52) erg.

  14. Revisiting the hardening of the cosmic ray energy spectrum at TeV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoudam, Satyendra; Hörandel, Jörg R.

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of cosmic rays by experiments such as ATIC, CREAM and PAMELA indicate a hardening of the cosmic ray energy spectrum at TeV energies. In our recent work, we showed that the hardening can be due to the effect of nearby supernova remnants. We showed it for the case of protons and helium nuclei. In this paper, we present an improved and more detailed version of our previous work, and extend our study to heavier cosmic ray species such as boron, carbon, oxygen and iron nuclei. Unlike our previous study, the present work involves a detailed calculation of the background cosmic rays and follows a consistent treatment of cosmic ray source parameters between the background and the nearby components. Moreover, we also present a detailed comparison of our results on the secondary-to-primary ratios, secondary spectra and the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum with the results expected from other existing models, which can be checked by future measurements at high energies.

  15. De-excitation Nuclear Gamma-Ray Line Emission from Low-energy Cosmic Rays in the Inner Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.; Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Strong, A. W.

    2013-02-01

    Recent observations of high ionization rates of molecular hydrogen in diffuse interstellar clouds point to a distinct low-energy cosmic-ray component. Supposing that this component is made of nuclei, two models for the origin of such particles are explored and low-energy cosmic-ray spectra are calculated, which, added to the standard cosmic-ray spectra, produce the observed ionization rates. The clearest evidence of the presence of such low-energy nuclei between a few MeV nucleon-1 and several hundred MeV nucleon-1 in the interstellar medium would be a detection of nuclear γ-ray line emission in the range E γ ~ 0.1-10 MeV, which is strongly produced in their collisions with the interstellar gas and dust. Using a recent γ-ray cross section compilation for nuclear collisions, γ-ray line emission spectra are calculated alongside the high-energy γ-ray emission due to π0 decay, the latter providing normalization of the absolute fluxes by comparison with Fermi-LAT observations of the diffuse emission above E γ = 0.1 GeV. Our predicted fluxes of strong nuclear γ-ray lines from the inner Galaxy are well below the detection sensitivities of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, but a detection, especially of the 4.4 MeV line, seems possible with new-generation γ-ray telescopes based on available technology. We also predict strong γ-ray continuum emission in the 1-8 MeV range, which, in a large part of our model space for low-energy cosmic rays, considerably exceeds the estimated instrument sensitivities of future telescopes.

  16. DE-EXCITATION NUCLEAR GAMMA-RAY LINE EMISSION FROM LOW-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS IN THE INNER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.; Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Strong, A. W.

    2013-02-15

    Recent observations of high ionization rates of molecular hydrogen in diffuse interstellar clouds point to a distinct low-energy cosmic-ray component. Supposing that this component is made of nuclei, two models for the origin of such particles are explored and low-energy cosmic-ray spectra are calculated, which, added to the standard cosmic-ray spectra, produce the observed ionization rates. The clearest evidence of the presence of such low-energy nuclei between a few MeV nucleon{sup -1} and several hundred MeV nucleon{sup -1} in the interstellar medium would be a detection of nuclear {gamma}-ray line emission in the range E {sub {gamma}} {approx} 0.1-10 MeV, which is strongly produced in their collisions with the interstellar gas and dust. Using a recent {gamma}-ray cross section compilation for nuclear collisions, {gamma}-ray line emission spectra are calculated alongside the high-energy {gamma}-ray emission due to {pi}{sup 0} decay, the latter providing normalization of the absolute fluxes by comparison with Fermi-LAT observations of the diffuse emission above E {sub {gamma}} = 0.1 GeV. Our predicted fluxes of strong nuclear {gamma}-ray lines from the inner Galaxy are well below the detection sensitivities of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, but a detection, especially of the 4.4 MeV line, seems possible with new-generation {gamma}-ray telescopes based on available technology. We also predict strong {gamma}-ray continuum emission in the 1-8 MeV range, which, in a large part of our model space for low-energy cosmic rays, considerably exceeds the estimated instrument sensitivities of future telescopes.

  17. The Iron PROJECT/RmaX Network: Atomic Calculations for the Iron-Peak Elements and for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoxin; Delahaye, Franck; Nahar, Sultana; Oelgetz, Justin; Pradhan, Anil; Zhang, Honglin; Bautista, Manuel

    2001-05-01

    We report the latest results from the Iron Project (IP) obtained by the Ohio State Atomic Astrophysics group. The IP is devoted to the study of collisional and radiative atomic processes primarily for the iron-group elements for various applications in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The RmaX network is a part of IP focused on inner-shell transitions and X-ray spectroscopy. The processes of interest are: electron impact excitation, photoionization, transition probabilities and electron-ion recombination. The large-scale atomic calculations for the heavy atomic systems are carried out with the close coupling R-matrix method, including relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli approximation. Selected results, and new physical features, are reported from recent work on collision strengths, radiative transition probabilities, photoionization cross sections, and unified electron-ion recombination rates for Fe XVII, Fe XXIV, Fe XXV, and Ni II. For example, extensive and dense resonance structures are found in electron excitation collision strengths for Ne-like Fe XVII that differ considerably from those in the Distorted Wave approximation, and should significantly affect X-ray plasma diagnostics. (Partial support from the NSF and NASA is acknowledged.)

  18. Studying the energy dependence of intrinsic conversion efficiency of single crystal scintillators under X-ray excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyvas, N.; Valais, I.; David, S.; Michail, Ch.; Fountos, G.; Liaparinos, P.; Kandarakis, I.

    2014-05-01

    Single crystal scintilators are used in various radiation detectors applications. The efficiency of the crystal can be determined by the Detector Optical Gain (DOG) defined as the ratio of the emitted optical photon flux over the incident radiation photons flux. A parameter affecting DOG is the intrinsic conversion efficiency ( n C ) giving the percentage of the X-ray photon power converted to optical photon power. n C is considered a constant value for X-ray energies in the order of keV although a non-proportional behavior has been reported. In this work an analytical model, has been utilized to single crystals scintillators GSO:Ce, LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce to examine whether the intrinsic conversion efficiency shows non proportional behavior under X-ray excitation. DOG was theoretically calculated as a function of the incident X-ray spectrum, the X-ray absorption efficiency, the energy of the produced optical photons and the light transmission efficiency. The theoretical DOG values were compared with experimental data obtained by irradiating the crystals with X-rays at tube voltages from 50 to 140 kV and by measuring the light energy flux emitted from the irradiated screen. An initial value for n C (calculated from literature data) was assumed for the X-ray tube voltage of 50 kV. For higher X-ray tube voltages the optical photon propagation phenomena was assumed constant and any deviations between experimental and theoretical data were associated with changes in the intrinsic conversion efficiency. The experimental errors were below 7% for each experimental setup. The behavior of n C values for LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce were found very similar, i.e., ranging with values from 0.089 at 50 kV to 0.015 at 140 kV, while for GSO:Ce, n C demonstrated a peak at 80 kV.

  19. Origin of the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.; Hill, C.T.

    1983-04-01

    The nature of the cosmic-ray spectrum above 10/sup 19/ eV discriminates between possible primary source models in a limited way. The shape of the spectrum, apart from normalization, is universal after a few photomeson interaction lengths. Fundamental processes, those sensitive to physics at e.g. the grand unification scale, are energy efficient and may be necessary to account for the normalization of the spectrum at the GZ cut-off. Very distant cosmological sources of this kind can generate significant structure above 10/sup 19/ eV. Local sources are not required and may even be problematic.

  20. Full - sky search for ultrahigh - energy cosmic ray anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Luis A. Anchordoqui et al.

    2003-07-02

    Using data from the SUGAR and the AGASA experiments taken during a 10 yr period with nearly uniform exposure to the entire sky, we search for anisotropy patterns in the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energies > 10{sup 19.6} eV. We determine the angular power spectrum from an expansion in spherical harmonics for modes out to {ell} = 5. Based on available statistics, we find no significant deviation from isotropy. We compare the rather modest results which can be extracted from existing data samples with the results that should be forthcoming as new full-sky observatories begin operation.

  1. Improved energy coupling into the gain region of the Ni-like Pd transient collisional x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Dunn, J; Filevich, J; Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Rocca, J; Hunter, J; Shepherd, R; Booth, R; Marconi, M

    2004-10-05

    We present within this paper a series of experiments, which yield new observations to further our understanding of the transient collisional x-ray laser medium. We use the recently developed technique of picosecond x-ray laser interferometry to probe the plasma conditions in which the x-ray laser is generated and propagates. This yields two dimensional electron density maps of the plasma taken at different times relative to the peak of the 600ps plasma-forming beam. In another experimental campaign, the output of the x-ray laser plasma column is imaged with a spherical multilayer mirror onto a CCD camera to give a two-dimensional intensity map of the x-ray laser output. Near-field imaging gives insights into refraction, output intensity and spatial mode structure. Combining these images with the density maps gives an indication of the electron density at which the x-ray laser is being emitted at (yielding insights into the effect of density gradients on beam propagation). Experimental observations coupled with simulations predict that most effective coupling of laser pump energy occurs when the duration of the main heating pulse is comparable to the gain lifetime ({approx}10ps for Ni-like schemes). This can increase the output intensity by more than an order of magnitude relative to the case were the same pumping energy is delivered within a shorter heating pulse duration (< 3ps). We have also conducted an experiment in which the output of the x-ray laser was imaged onto the entrance slit of a high temporal resolution streak camera. This effectively takes a one-dimensional slice of the x-ray laser spatial profile and sweeps it in time. Under some conditions we observe rapid movement of the x-ray laser ({approx} 3 {micro}m/ps) towards the target surface.

  2. Low-energy x-ray response of photographic films. II. Experimental characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, B.L.; Fujiwara, F.G.; Tester, M.A.; Dittmore, C.H.; Palmer, M.A.

    1984-12-01

    Optical density versus exposure data have been obtained at nine photon energies in the 100--2000-eV x-ray region for five spectroscopic films (Kodak films 101-07, SB-392, RAR 2492, RAR 2495, and RAR 2497). These data were determined operationally by a direct comparison of the peak absolute intensities of spectral lines, which were measured with a calibrated proportional counter, with the microdensitometer tracings of the corresponding photographically recorded spectral lines. Film-resolution limits were deduced from an analysis of contact microradiograms of linear zone plates constructed of gold bars. The relationship between the specular densities as measured here and the diffuse densities have been experimentally determined for the five films. Finally, experimental measurements of the optical density versus the angle of incidence of exposing radiation of constant intensity were obtained. These data, relating density to the x-ray intensity, its photon energy, and its angle of incidence, are shown to be fitted satisfactorily in the 100--10 000-eV region by the semiempirical mathematical model relations that were derived in Part I of this research (J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 1, 818--827 (1984)).

  3. X-ray coherent scattering form factors of tissues, water and plastics using energy dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. W.; Landheer, K. A.; Johns, P. C.

    2011-07-01

    A key requirement for the development of the field of medical x-ray scatter imaging is accurate characterization of the differential scattering cross sections of tissues and phantom materials. The coherent x-ray scattering form factors of five tissues (fat, muscle, liver, kidney, and bone) obtained from butcher shops, four plastics (polyethylene, polystyrene, lexan (polycarbonate), nylon), and water have been measured using an energy-dispersive technique. The energy-dispersive technique has several improvements over traditional diffractometer measurements. Most notably, the form factor is measured on an absolute scale with no need for scaling factors. Form factors are reported in terms of the quantity x = λ-1sin (θ/2) over the range 0.363-9.25 nm-1. The coherent form factors of muscle, liver, and kidney resemble those of water, while fat has a narrower peak at lower x, and bone is more structured. The linear attenuation coefficients of the ten materials have also been measured over the range 30-110 keV and parameterized using the dual-material approach with the basis functions being the linear attenuation coefficients of polymethylmethacrylate and aluminum.

  4. Evidence for variability of the hard X-ray feature in the Hercules X-1 energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, J.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Boclet, D.; Durochoux, P.; Hameury, J. M.; Prantzos, N.; Haymes, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The hard X-ray spectrum of HER X-1 was measured for the first time with a high resolution (1.4 keV FWHM) germanium spectrometer. The observation was performed near the peak of the on-state in the 35 day cycle and the 1.24 pulsations were observed between the energies of 20 keV and 70 keV. The feature corresponds to an excess of 7.5 sigma over the low energy continuum. Smooth continuum models are poor fits to the entire energy range (chance probabilities of 2 percent or less). The best fit energies are 35 keV for an absorption line and 39 keV for an emission line. These are significantly lower energies than those derived from previous experiments. A direct comparison of our data with the results of the MPI/AIT group shows statistically significant variations which strongly suggest variability in the source.

  5. Comprehensive Study of the X-Ray Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts Observed by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Xi, Shao-Qiang; Yu, Hai; Wang, F. Y.; Mu, Hui-Jun; Lü, Lian-Zhong; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-06-01

    X-ray flares are generally supposed to be produced by later activities of the central engine, and may share a similar physical origin with the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, we have analyzed all significant X-ray flares from the GRBs observed by Swift from 2005 April to 2015 March. The catalog contains 468 bright X-ray flares, including 200 flares with redshifts. We obtain the fitting results of X-ray flares, such as start time, peak time, duration, peak flux, fluence, peak luminosity, and mean luminosity. The peak luminosity decreases with peak time, following a power-law behavior {L}{{p}}\\propto {T}{peak,z}-1.27. The flare duration increases with peak time. The 0.3–10 keV isotropic energy of the distribution of X-ray flares is a log-normal peaked at {10}51.2 erg. We also study the frequency distributions of flare parameters, including energies, durations, peak fluxes, rise times, decay times, and waiting times. Power-law distributions of energies, durations, peak fluxes, and waiting times are found in GRB X-ray flares and solar flares. These distributions could be well explained by a fractal-diffusive, self-organized criticality model. Some theoretical models based on magnetic reconnection have been proposed to explain X-ray flares. Our result shows that the relativistic jets of GRBs may be dominated by Poynting flux.

  6. The Prospects for Constraining Dark Energy withFuture X-ray Cluster Gas Mass Fraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.

    2007-10-15

    We examine the ability of a future X-ray observatory, with capabilities similar to those planned for the Constellation-X mission, to constrain dark energy via measurements of the cluster X-ray gas mass fraction, fgas. We find that fgas measurements for a sample of {approx}500 hot (kT{approx}> 5keV), X-ray bright, dynamically relaxed clusters, to a precision of {approx}5 percent, can be used to constrain dark energy with a Dark Energy Task Force (DETF; Albrecht et al. 2006) figure of merit of 20-50. Such constraints are comparable to those predicted by the DETF for other leading, planned 'Stage IV' dark energy experiments. A future fgas experiment will be preceded by a large X-ray or SZ survey that will find hot, X-ray luminous clusters out to high redshifts. Short 'snapshot' observations with the new X-ray observatory should then be able to identify a sample of {approx}500 suitably relaxed systems. The redshift, temperature and X-ray luminosity range of interest has already been partially probed by existing X-ray cluster surveys which allow reasonable estimates of the fraction of clusters that will be suitably relaxed for fgas work to be made; these surveys also show that X-ray flux contamination from point sources is likely to be small for the majority of the targets of interest. Our analysis uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method which fully captures the relevant degeneracies between parameters and facilities the incorporation of priors and systematic uncertainties in the analysis. We explore the effects of such uncertainties, for scenarios ranging from optimistic to pessimistic. We conclude that the fgas experiment offers a competitive and complementary approach to the best other large, planned dark energy experiments. In particular, the fgas experiment will provide tight constraints on the mean matter and dark energy densities, with a peak sensitivity for dark energy work at redshifts midway between those of supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillation

  7. Energy spectrum of medium energy gamma-rays from the galactic center region. [experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeira, R. A. R.; Ramanujarao, K.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Kniffen, D. A.; Morris, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A balloon-borne magnetic core digitized spark chamber with two assemblies of spark-chambers above and below the scintillation counters was used to measure the medium energy gamma ray flux from the galactic center region. Gamma ray calculations are based on the multiple scattering of the pair electrons in 15 aluminum plates interleaved in the spark chamber modules. Counting rates determined during ascent and at ceiling indicate the presence of diffuse component in this energy range. Preliminary results give an integral flux between 15 and 70 MeV compared to the differential points in other results.

  8. Refractive optical elements and optical system for high energy x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Altapova, V.; Baumbach, T.; Kluge, M.; Last, A.; Marschall, F.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Vogt, H.

    2012-05-17

    In material science, X-ray radiation with photon energies above 25 keV is used because of its penetration into high density materials. Research of the inner structure of novel materials, such as electrodes in high power batteries for engines, require X-ray microscopes operating in the hard X-ray energy range. A flexible X-ray microscope for hard X-rays with photon energies higher than 25 keV will be realized at the synchrotron source ANKA in Karlsruhe, Germany. The device will use refractive X-ray lenses as condenser as well as objective lenses.

  9. Energy-to-peak state estimation for Markov jump RNNs with time-varying delays via nonsynchronous filter with nonstationary mode transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixian; Zhu, Yanzheng; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of energy-to-peak state estimation for a class of discrete-time Markov jump recurrent neural networks (RNNs) with randomly occurring nonlinearities (RONs) and time-varying delays is investigated. A practical phenomenon of nonsynchronous jumps between RNNs modes and desired mode-dependent filters is considered, and a nonstationary mode transition among the filters is used to model the nonsynchronous jumps to different degrees that are also mode dependent. The RONs are used to model a class of sector-like nonlinearities that occur in a probabilistic way according to a Bernoulli sequence. The time-varying delays are supposed to be mode dependent and unknown, but with known lower and upper bounds a priori. Sufficient conditions on the existence of the nonsynchronous filters are obtained such that the filtering error system is stochastically stable and achieves a prescribed energy-to-peak performance index. Further to the recent study on the class of nonsynchronous estimation problem, a monotonicity is observed in obtaining filtering performance index, while changing the degree of nonsynchronous jumps. A numerical example is presented to verify the theoretical findings. PMID:25576580

  10. Earth Occultation Monitoring of the Hard X-ray/Low-Energy Gamma Ray Sky with GBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Michael L.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G. L.; Chaplin, V.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P. A.; Rodi, J. C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; GBM Earth Occultation Team

    2012-01-01

    By utilizing the Earth occultation technique (EOT), the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) instrument aboard Fermi has been used to make nearly continuous full-sky observations in the 8-1000 keV energy range. The GBM EOT analysis program currently monitors an input catalog containing 235 sources. We will present the GBM catalog of sources observed in the first 3 years of the EOT monitoring program, with special emphasis on the high energy (>100 keV) and time-variable sources, in particular the Crab, Cyg X-1, and A0535+26. We will also describe the initial results of an all-sky imaging analysis of the EOT data, with comparisons to the Swift, INTEGRAL, and Fermi LAT catalogs. This work is supported by the NASA Fermi Guest Investigator program, NASA/Louisiana Board of Regents, and Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia de Innovacion.

  11. High Energy Cosmic Electrons: Messengers from Nearby Cosmic Ray Sources or Dark Matter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the recent discoveries by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope in reference to high energy cosmic electrons, and whether their source is cosmic rays or dark matter. Specific interest is devoted to Cosmic Ray electrons anisotropy,

  12. Dimensionality and noise in energy selective x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test a method to quantify the effect of dimensionality on the noise in energy selective x-ray imaging.Methods: The Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB), a universal lower limit of the covariance of any unbiased estimator, is used to quantify the noise. It is shown that increasing dimensionality always increases, or at best leaves the same, the variance. An analytic formula for the increase in variance in an energy selective x-ray system is derived. The formula is used to gain insight into the dependence of the increase in variance on the properties of the additional basis functions, the measurement noise covariance, and the source spectrum. The formula is also used with computer simulations to quantify the dependence of the additional variance on these factors. Simulated images of an object with three materials are used to demonstrate the trade-off of increased information with dimensionality and noise. The images are computed from energy selective data with a maximum likelihood estimator.Results: The increase in variance depends most importantly on the dimension and on the properties of the additional basis functions. With the attenuation coefficients of cortical bone, soft tissue, and adipose tissue as the basis functions, the increase in variance of the bone component from two to three dimensions is 1.4 × 10{sup 3}. With the soft tissue component, it is 2.7 × 10{sup 4}. If the attenuation coefficient of a high atomic number contrast agent is used as the third basis function, there is only a slight increase in the variance from two to three basis functions, 1.03 and 7.4 for the bone and soft tissue components, respectively. The changes in spectrum shape with beam hardening also have a substantial effect. They increase the variance by a factor of approximately 200 for the bone component and 220 for the soft tissue component as the soft tissue object thickness increases from 1 to 30 cm. Decreasing the energy resolution of the detectors increases

  13. Low energy secondary cosmic ray flux (gamma rays) monitoring and its constrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghav, Anil; Bhaskar, Ankush; Yadav, Virendra; Bijewar, Nitinkumar

    2015-02-01

    Temporal variation of secondary cosmic rays (SCR) flux was measured during the full and new moon and days close to them at Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Mumbai (Geomagnetic latitude: 10.6 °N), India. The measurements were done by using NaI (Tl) scintillation detector with energy threshold of 200 keV. The SCR flux showed sudden enhancement for approximately about 2 hour during few days out of all observations. The maximum enhancement in SCR flux is about 200 % as compared to the diurnal trend of SCR temporal variations. Weather parameters (temperature and relative humidity) were continuously monitored during all observations. The influences of geomagnetic field, interplanetary parameters and tidal effect on SCR flux have been considered. Summed spectra corresponding to enhancement duration indicates appearance of atmospheric radioactivity which shows single gamma ray line. Detail investigation revealed the presence of radioactive Ar41. Present study indicates origin of Ar41 could be due to anthropogenic source or due to gravitational tidal forces. This measurements point out limitations on low energy SCR flux monitoring. This study will help many researchers in measurements of SCR flux during eclipses and to find unknown mechanism behind decrease/increase in SCR flux during solar/lunar eclipse.

  14. The High Energy X-ray Imager Technology (HEXITEC) for Solar Hard X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For current high resolution X-ray mirrors, the HPD is about 25 arcsec. Over a 6-m focal length this converts to 750 µm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 µm. Annother requirement are that the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage. For solar observations, the ability to handle high counting rates is also extremely desirable. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK has been developing the electronics for such a detector. Dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology, this Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), to create a fine (250 µm pitch) HXR detector. The NASA Marshall Space Flight CenterMSFC and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working with RAL over the past few years to develop these detectors to be used with HXR focusing telescopes. We present on recent results and capabilities as applied to solar observations.

  15. Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration for ultrahigh energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard

    2009-03-20

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{21} eV) is possible. PMID:19392185

  16. 30-Lens interferometer for high-energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Lyubomirskiy, Mikhail; Snigireva, Irina; Kohn, Victor; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Yunkin, Vyacheslav; Vaughan, Gavin; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-09-01

    A novel high-energy multi-lens interferometer consisting of 30 arrays of planar compound refractive lenses is reported. Under coherent illumination each lens array creates a diffraction-limited secondary source. Overlapping such coherent beams produces an interference pattern demonstrating strong longitudinal functional dependence. The proposed multi-lens interferometer was tested experimentally at the 100 m-long ID11 ESRF beamline in the X-ray energy range from 30 to 65 keV. The interference pattern generated by the interferometer was recorded at fundamental and fractional Talbot distances. An effective source size (FWHM) of the order of 15 µm was determined from the first Talbot image, proving the concept that the multi-lens interferometer can be used as a high-resolution tool for beam diagnostics. PMID:27577763

  17. Stochastic shock response spectrum decomposition method based on probabilistic definitions of temporal peak acceleration, spectral energy, and phase lag distributions of mechanical impact pyrotechnic shock test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Duran, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Most of the times pyrotechnic shock design and test requirements for space systems are provided in Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) without the input time history. Since the SRS does not describe the input or the environment, a decomposition method is used to obtain the source time history. The main objective of this paper is to develop a decomposition method producing input time histories that can satisfy the SRS requirement based on the pyrotechnic shock test data measured from a mechanical impact test apparatus. At the heart of this decomposition method is the statistical representation of the pyrotechnic shock test data measured from the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (LL) designed Universal Pyrotechnic Shock Simulator (UPSS). Each pyrotechnic shock test data measured at the interface of a test unit has been analyzed to produce the temporal peak acceleration, Root Mean Square (RMS) acceleration, and the phase lag at each band center frequency. Maximum SRS of each filtered time history has been calculated to produce a relationship between the input and the response. Two new definitions are proposed as a result. The Peak Ratio (PR) is defined as the ratio between the maximum SRS and the temporal peak acceleration at each band center frequency. The ratio between the maximum SRS and the RMS acceleration is defined as the Energy Ratio (ER) at each band center frequency. Phase lag is estimated based on the time delay between the temporal peak acceleration at each band center frequency and the peak acceleration at the lowest band center frequency. This stochastic process has been applied to more than one hundred pyrotechnic shock test data to produce probabilistic definitions of the PR, ER, and the phase lag. The SRS is decomposed at each band center frequency using damped sinusoids with the PR and the decays obtained by matching the ER of the damped sinusoids to the ER of the test data. The final step in this stochastic SRS decomposition process is the Monte Carlo (MC

  18. Energy dependence of photon-induced Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections for some elements with 42≤Z≤68 in the energy range 38-80 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seven, Sabriye; Erdoğan, Hasan

    2015-12-01

    The energy dependence of photon-induced Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections for Mo, Ru, Pd, In, Sb, Cs, La, Pr, Sm, Tb and Er elements has been studied in the energy range of 38-80 keV with secondary excitation method. K x-ray intensities were measured using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometry. The measurements have been made by observing the x-ray emissions, with the help of HPGe detector coupled with a multichannel analyzer. The areas of the Kα and Kβ spectral peaks, as well as the net peak areas, have been determined by a fitting process. The measured Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections have been compared with calculated theoretical values in this energy regime. The results have been plotted versus excitation energy. The present experimental Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-section values for all the elements were in general agreement with the theoretical values calculated using photoionization cross-sections, fluorescence yields and fractional rates based on Hartree-Slater potentials.

  19. Newly-born Pulsars as Sources of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Olinto, Angela

    2012-03-01

    Newly-born pulsars are good candidate sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHECR). Young pulsars can strip heavy nuclei from the star surface, and further accelerate them to ultrahigh energies by unipolar induction in the pulsar wind. Once accelerated, nuclei have to escape from the dense supernova envelope surrounding the pulsar. We examine this escape analytically and numerically. Our results show that, protons with energy above 10^20,eV can hardly survive from interactions with the young supernova shell. In contrast, as a result of their higher charge, iron-peaked nuclei at the highest observed energies are able to escape newly-born pulsars with millisecond periods and dipole magnetic fields of ˜10^12-13,Gauss, embedded in core-collapse supernova. The escaped spectrum presents a transition of composition from light to heavy elements at a few EeV as observed by the Auger Observatory, due to the production of secondary nucleons. The interactions also help to soften the spectral slope, which allows a good fit to the observation. We conclude that the acceleration of heavy nuclei in a reasonably small fraction (<=0.01%) of extragalactic young pulsars would reproduce consistently the current UHECR data.

  20. Searching for New Physics with Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Scully, Sean T.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays that produce giant extensive showers of charged particles and photons when they interact in the Earth's atmosphere provide a unique tool to search for new physics. Of particular interest is the possibility of detecting a very small violation of Lorentz invariance such as may be related to the structure of space-time near the Planck scale of approximately 10 (exp -35) m. We discuss here the possible signature of Lorentz invariance violation on the spectrum of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays as compared with present observations of giant air showers. We also discuss the possibilities of using more sensitive detection techniques to improve searches for Lorentz invariance violation in the future. Using the latest data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, we derive a best fit to the LIV parameter of 3 .0 + 1.5 - 3:0 x 10 (exp -23) ,corresponding to an upper limit of 4.5 x 10-23 at a proton Lorentz factor of approximately 2 x 10(exp 11) . This result has fundamental implications for quantum gravity models.

  1. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  2. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew D.

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high-energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  3. Intergalactic Extinction of High Energy Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the determination of the intergalactic pair-production absorption coefficient as derived by Stecker and De Jager by making use of a new empirically based calculation of the spectral energy distribution of the intergalactic infrared radiation field as given by Malkan and Stecker. We show that the results of the Malkan and Stecker calculation agree well with recent data on the infrared background. We then show that Whipple observations of the flaring gamma-ray spectrum of Mrk 421 hint at extragalactic absorption and that the HEGRA observations of the flaring spectrum of Mrk 501 appear to strongly indicate extragalactic absorption. We also discuss the determination of the y-ray opacity at higher redshifts, following the treatment of Salamon and Stecker. We give a predicted spectrum, with absorption included for PKS 2155-304. This XBL lies at a redshift of 0.12, the highest redshift source yet observed at an energy above 0.3 TeV. This source should have its spectrum steepened by approx. 1 in its spectral index between approx. 0.3 and approx. 3 TeV and should show an absorption cutoff above approx. 6 TeV.

  4. Measuring Performance of Energy-Dispersive X-ray Systems.

    PubMed

    Statham

    1998-11-01

    : As Si(Li) detector technology has matured, many of the fundamental problems have been addressed in the competition among manufacturers and there is now an expectation, implied by many textbooks, that all energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) detectors are made and will perform in the same way. Although there has been some convergence in Si(Li) systems and these are still the most common, manufacturing recipes still differ and there are many alternative EDX devices, such as microcalorimeters and room temperature detectors, that have both advantages and disadvantages over Si(Li). Rather than emphasizing differences in technologies, performance measures should reveal benefits relevant to the intended application. The instrument is inevitably going to be a "black box" of integrated components; this article reviews some of the methods that have been applied and introduces some new techniques that can be used to assess performance without resorting to complex software or sophisticated mathematical algorithms. Sensitivity, resolution, artefacts, and stability are discussed with particular application to compositional analysis using electron beam excitation of X-rays in the 100-eV to 10-keV energy region. PMID:10087283

  5. Detection of the BL Lacertae Object H1426+428 at TeV Gamma-Ray Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, D.; Badran, H. M.; Bond, I. H.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Carson, M. J.; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Catanese, M.; Cui, W.; Dunlea, S.; Das, D.; de la Calle Perez, I.; D'Vali, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Gaidos, J. A.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Hall, T. A.; Hillas, A. M.; Holder, J.; Jordan, M.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Kildea, J.; Knapp, J.; Kosack, K.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Lessard, R.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; McKernan, B.; Moriarty, P.; Muller, D.; Ong, R.; Pallassini, R.; Petry, D.; Quinn, J.; Reay, N. W.; Reynolds, P. T.; Rose, H. J.; Sembroski, G. H.; Sidwell, R.; Stanton, N.; Swordy, S. P.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.

    2002-06-01

    A very high energy γ-ray signal has been detected at the 5.5 σ level from H1426+428, an X-ray-selected BL Lacertae object at a redshift of 0.129. The object was monitored from 1995 to 1998 with the Whipple 10 m imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescope as part of a general blazar survey; the results of these observations, although not statistically significant, were consistently positive. X-ray observations of H1426+428 during 1999 with the BeppoSAX instrument revealed that the peak of its synchrotron spectrum occurs at greater than 100 keV, leading to the prediction of observable TeV emission from this object. H1426+428 was monitored extensively at the Whipple Observatory during the 1999, 2000, and 2001 observing seasons. The strongest TeV signals were detected in 2000 and 2001. During 2001, an integral flux of 2.04+/-0.35×10-11 cm-2 s-1 above 280 GeV was recorded from H1426+428. The detection of H1426+428 supports the idea that, as also seen in Mrk 501 and 1ES 2344+514, BL Lacertae objects with extremely high synchrotron peak frequencies produce γ-rays in the TeV range.

  6. Effects of supplemental chromium propionate and rumen-protected amino acids on productivity, diet digestibility, and energy balance of peak-lactation dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Rodriguez, C F; Yuan, K; Titgemeyer, E C; Mamedova, L K; Griswold, K E; Bradford, B J

    2014-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) feeding in early lactation increased milk production in some studies, but responses to dietary Cr during peak lactation have not been evaluated. Furthermore, interactions of essential amino acids (AA) and Cr have not been explored. Our objective was to evaluate responses to CrPr (KemTRACE chromium propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries Inc., Des Moines, IA) and rumen-protected Lys (LysiPEARL, Kemin Industries Inc.) and Met (MetiPEARL, Kemin Industries Inc.) and their interaction in peak-lactation cows. Forty-eight individually fed Holstein cows (21 primiparous, 27 multiparous, 38 ± 15 d in milk) were stratified by calving date in 12 blocks and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments within block. Treatments were control, CrPr (8 mg/d of Cr), RPLM (10 g/d of Lys and 5 g/d of Met, intestinally available), or CrPr plus RPLM. Treatments were premixed with ground corn and top-dressed at 200 g/d for 35 d. Diets consisted of corn silage, alfalfa hay, and concentrates, providing approximately 17% crude protein, 31% neutral detergent fiber, and 40% nonfiber carbohydrates. Dry matter intake (DMI) significantly increased with the inclusion of CrPr (22.2 vs. 20.8 ± 0.67 kg/d), and energy-corrected milk (ECM) yield tended to increase. In addition, CrPr increased milk protein yield and tended to increase DMI in primiparous cows but not in multiparous cows. A CrPr×week interaction was detected for milk lactose content, which was increased by CrPr during wk 1 only (4.99 vs. 4.88 ± 0.036%). As a proportion of plasma AA, lysine increased and methionine tended to increase in response to RPLM, but the inclusion of RPLM decreased N efficiency (milk protein N:N intake). Digestible energy intake, gross energy digestibility, and energy balance were not affected by treatments. We observed no treatment effects on feed efficiency or changes in body weight or body condition score. In summary, feeding CrPr increased DMI and tended to increase ECM in cows fed for 5 wk near peak

  7. Position-Sensitive CZT Detectors for High Energy X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J.; Coburn, W.; Heindl, W.; Peterson, L.; Pelling, M.; Rothschild, R.; Skelton, R.; Hink, P.; Slavis, K.

    1998-05-01

    We report recent progress on CZT (Cadmium Zinc Telluride) detectors by the UCSD/WU collaboration. CZT, a room- temperature semiconductor, is a very promising detector material for high energy X-ray astronomy. It can operate from <10 keV to >200 keV, and give sub-keV energy resolution and sub-mm spatial resolution. We have developed an advanced CZT detector that uses two innovations to improve spectral response, give it 3-D localization of energy loss events, and reduce background at high altitudes and in space. The detector measures 12 x 12 x 2 mm(3) and was manufactured by eV Products. Each face has a strip readouts with 500 micron pitch electrodes. The 2 faces' strips are orthogonal, which provides x-y localization into 500 micron pixels. One innovation is "steering electrodes", which are located between the anode strips. They improve the anode charge collection and energy resolution, and tailing due to hole trapping is nearly totally eliminated. The energy resolution at 60 keV is 4 keV and the peak to valley ratio is 50. The other innovation is 3-D localization of energy losses. This is done by comparing the signals from the anode strips, cathode strips, and steering electrodes. There is a strong depth of interaction signature, which can be used to accept events which interact close to the cathode strips (where X-rays of interest are incident) and reject deeper interactions (which are likely to be background). The detector was tested in a balloon flight at 108,000 feet in October 1997. Background was reduced by passive shielding, consisting of lead graded with tin and copper. The lead thickness was changed by command during the flight, and was 7, 2, and 0 mm thick. With the 2 mm thickness the 20 - 40 keV background for the central 30 pixels was 8x10(-4) c/cm(2) -s-keV when the depth of interaction signature was used to reject background, and 7 times greater when this information was not used. The lower background is 12 times less than other workers have obtained

  8. On the role of secondary extinction in the measurement of the integrated intensity of X-ray diffraction peaks and in the determination of the thickness of damaged epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutt, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    The integrated intensity of X-ray diffraction reflections has been measured for a series of epitaxial layers of AIII nitrides (GaN, AlN, AlGaN) grown on different substrates (sapphire, SiC) and characterized by different degrees of structural perfection. It has been shown that, despite a high density of dislocations and a significant broadening of the diffraction peaks, the obtained values are not described by the kinematic theory of X-ray diffraction and suggest the existence of extinction. The results have been analyzed on the basis of the Darwin and Zachariasen extinction models. The secondary extinction coefficients and the thicknesses of epitaxial layers have been determined using two orders of reflection both in the Bragg geometry (0002 and 0004) and in the Laue geometry (10bar 10) and 10bar 20). It has been demonstrated that the secondary extinction coefficient is the greater, the smaller is the broadening of the diffraction peaks and, consequently, the dislocation density. It has been found that, for epitaxial layers with a regular system of threading dislocations, the secondary extinction coefficient for the Laue reflections is substantially greater than that for the Bragg reflections.

  9. Peak flow meter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  10. On The Origin Of High Energy Correlations in Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2012-04-03

    I investigate the origin of the observed correlation between a gamma-ray burst's {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectral peak E{sub pk} and its isotropic equivalent energy E{sub iso} through the use of a population synthesis code to model the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs. By using prescriptions for the distribution of prompt spectral parameters as well as the population's luminosity function and co-moving rate density, I generate a simulated population of GRBs and examine how bursts of varying spectral properties and redshift would appear to a gamma-ray detector here on Earth. I find that a strong observed correlation can be produced between the source frame Epk and Eiso for the detected population despite the existence of only a weak and broad correlation in the original simulated population. The energy dependance of a gamma-ray detector's flux-limited detection threshold acts to produce a correlation between the source frame E{sub pk} and E{sub iso} for low luminosity GRBs, producing the left boundary of the observed correlation. Conversely, very luminous GRBs are found at higher redshifts than their low luminosity counterparts due to the standard Malquest bias, causing bursts in the low E{sub pk}, high E{sub iso} regime to go undetected because their E{sub pk} values would be redshifted to energies at which most gamma-ray detectors become less sensitive. I argue that it is this previously unexamined effect which produces the right boundary of the observed correlation. Therefore, the origin of the observed correlation is a complex combination of the instrument's detection threshold, the intrinsic cutoff in the GRB luminosity function, and the broad range of redshifts over which GRBs are detected. Although the GRB model presented here is a very simplified representation of the complex nature of GRBs, these simulations serve to demonstrate how selection effects caused by a combination of instrumental sensitivity and the cosmological nature of an astrophysical population

  11. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  12. Measurement of low energy cosmic rays aboard Spacelab-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.; Oschlies, K.; Enge, W.

    1985-01-01

    In December 1983 the first Spacelab mission was launched for a duration of 10 days. Aboard was the Kiel experiment Isotopic Stack designed for measurement of heavy cosmic ray nuclei with nuclear charge equal to or greater than 3 and energies up to some 100MeV/nuc. One part of the stack was rotated in well defined steps registered by an angle encoder to receive information on impact times of the nuclei. Using this time resolving system geomagnetically forbidden particles can be detected. The chemical composition and energy spectra of mainly CNO particles are examined using a rotated 300 microns m thick CR-39 foil beneath a fixed 100 microns m thick Kodak-Cellulose Nitrate foil. About 600 sq cm have been scanned yielding nearly 100 nuclear tracks within an energy range of approximately 8 to 30 MeV/nuc. The calibration is done by means of a postflight irradiation with 410 MeV/nuc Fe-56 at Berkeley Laboratory, California, USA. Relative abundances and energy spectra are presented.

  13. High-energy cosmic ray muons in the Earth's atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, A. A.; Sinegovskaya, T. S.; Sinegovsky, S. I.

    2013-03-15

    We present the calculations of the atmospheric muon fluxes at energies 10-10{sup 7} GeV based on a numerical-analytical method for solving the hadron-nucleus cascade equations. It allows the non-power-law behavior of the primary cosmic ray (PCR) spectrum, the violation of Feynman scaling, and the growth of the total inelastic cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions with increasing energy to be taken into account. The calculations have been performed for a wide class of hadron-nucleus interaction models using directly the PCR measurements made in the ATIC-2 and GAMMA experiments and the parameterizations of the primary spectrum based on a set of experiments. We study the dependence of atmospheric muon flux characteristics on the hadronic interaction model and the influence of uncertainties in the PCR spectrum and composition on the muon flux at sea level. Comparison of the calculated muon energy spectra at sea level with the data from a large number of experiments shows that the cross sections for hadron-nucleus interactions introduce the greatest uncertainty in the energy region that does not include the knee in the primary spectrum.

  14. Dual energy iodine contrast CT with monochromatic x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Wu, X.Y.; Kress, J.

    1995-12-31

    Computed tomography (CT) with monochromatic x-ray beams was used to image phantoms and a live rabbit using the preclinical Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT) system at the National Synchrotron Light Source. MECT has a horizontal fan beam with a subject apparatus rotating about a vertical axis. Images were obtained at 43 keV for single-energy studies, and at energies immediately below and above the 33.17 keV iodine K-edge for dual-energy subtraction CT. Two CdWO{sub 4}-photodiode array detectors were used. The high-resolution detector (0.5 mm pitch, uncollimated) provided 14 line pair/cm in-plane spatial resolution, with lower image noise than conventional CT. Images with the low-resolution detector (1.844-mm pitch, collimated to 0.922 mm detector elements) had a sensitivity for iodine of {approx} 60 {micro}g/cc in 11-mm channels inside a 135 mm-diameter acrylic cylindrical phantom for a slice height of 2.5 mm and a surface does of {approx} 4 cGy. The image noise was {approx} 1 Hounsfield Unit (HU); it was {approx} 3 HU for the same phantom imaged with conventional CT at approximately the same dose, slice height, and spatial resolution ({approx} 7 lp/cm). These results show the potential advantage of MECT, despite present technical limitations.

  15. "Espresso" Acceleration of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2015-10-01

    We propose that ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) above 1018 eV are produced in relativistic jets of powerful active galactic nuclei via an original mechanism, which we dub “espresso” acceleration: “seed” galactic CRs with energies ≲1017 eV that penetrate the jet sideways receive a “one-shot” boost of a factor of ∼Γ2 in energy, where Γ is the Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow. For typical jet parameters, a few percent of the CRs in the host galaxy can undergo this process, and powerful blazars with Γ ≳ 30 may accelerate UHECRs up to more than 1020 eV. The chemical composition of espresso-accelerated UHECRs is determined by that at the Galactic CR knee and is expected to be proton-dominated at 1018 eV and increasingly heavy at higher energies, in agreement with recent observations made at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  16. A measurement of the energy spectra of cosmic rays from 20 to 1000 GeV per amu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Thoburn, C.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, John W., Jr.; Fowler, P. H.; Masheder, M. R. W.; Derrickson, James H.

    1991-01-01

    A group collaboration was made in the development of the Bristol University Gas Spectrometer number 4 (BUGS 4). The BUGS 4 detector is designed to measure the charge spectrum for species between oxygen and the iron peak as a function of energy per nucleon, between 20 and 1000 GeV/amu. It is particularly concerned with energies above 50 GeV/amu. The high energy component is considerably less affected by propagation through the interstellar medium than the lower energy component and is expected to approach the original charge spectrum of the source more closely. This information allows one to unravel the effects of cosmic ray production, acceleration, and propagation. The detector is described in total detail. The method of estimating the charge and energy of a cosmic ray depends on the energy of the particle. Calculations and experiments lead to the expectation of a nearly constant charge resolution of about 0.2 charge units over the whole energy range except 4.5 less than gamma less than 20. In this band, the experiment is insensitive to energy. A balloon flight is planned in 1993.

  17. CONSTRAINING THE HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH FERMI

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A. E-mail: kocevski@slac.stanford.edu E-mail: connauv@uah.edu E-mail: michael.briggs@nasa.gov; Collaboration: Fermi Large Area Telescope Team; Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor Team; and others

    2012-08-01

    We examine 288 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field of view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectra (E{sub pk}). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E{sub pk} than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cutoff in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to {gamma}{gamma} attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

  18. Constraining the High-energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi Large Area Telescope Team; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J.; McGlynn, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Ryde, F.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stawarz, Łukasz; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Uehara, T.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor Team; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Guirec, S.; Goldstein, A.; Burgess, J. M.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Fishman, J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; Tierney, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Xiong, S.

    2012-08-01

    We examine 288 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field of view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the νF ν spectra (E pk). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E pk than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cutoff in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to γγ attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

  19. A New View of the High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with the Ferrni Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have opened a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and the origin of cosmic rays, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as super symmetric dark matter annihilations. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from the first year of observations.

  20. Lowering the Gamma Ray Energy Threshold at Thaemis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David A.; Fleury, Patrick; Parae, Eric; Quebert, Jean

    1994-12-01

    The power-law spectra of the 0.1 < E_gamma < 30 GeV point sources detected by EGRET on the Compton GRO have softened at the energies of the atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (E_gamma > 300 GeV), to the point that only one AGN and two pulsars are visible with current ground-based instruments. Measurement of the spectra in the roll-over range probes details of pulsar and AGN acceleration models, and probes extragalactic infrared photon densities through the absorption of gamma rays. Measurement requires lowering the ground-based energy thresholds to the Egret energy range, and several groups are studying the design of a very large area mirror or mirror array (few thousand M(2) ). Solar power plants built in the 1980's to focus sunlight on boilers in central receiver towers may provide the basic instrument at low cost. This talk describes efforts to use the solar farm at Th\\a'emis in the French Pyrenees for a proof-of-principle prototype for a large area Cherenkov telescope. (Similar feasibility studies are underway at the Solar One site in southern California.) Simulations show that cosmic ray backgrounds mostly vanish below 50 GeV. Electron backgrounds can be reduced by optimizing angular resolution. Excellent flux sensitivity should be obtainable. Secondary optics and electronic timing corrections have been studied and tests to measure Cherenkov pulses will be made this winter. The tests will complement data from the ASGAT and THEMISTOCLE experiments and from the CAT imaging telescope now under construction at Th\\a'emis.

  1. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and body composition.

    PubMed

    Laskey, M A

    1996-01-01

    This review describes the advantages and limitations of dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA), a technique that is widely used clinically to assess a patient's risk of osteoporosis and to monitor the effects of therapy. DXA is also increasingly used to measure body composition in terms of fat and fat-free mass. There are three commercial manufacturers of DXA instruments: Lunar, Hologic, and Norland. All systems generate X-rays at two different energies and make use of the differential attenuation of the X-ray beam at these two energies to calculate the bone mineral content and soft tissue composition in the scanned region. Most DXA instruments measure bone mineral in the clinically important sites of the spine, hip, and forearm. More specialized systems also perform whole-body scans and can be used to determine the bone and soft tissue composition of the whole body and subregions such as arms, legs, and trunk. The effective dose incurred during DXA scanning is very small, and, consequently, DXA is a simple and safe technique that can be used for children and the old and frail. Precision of all DXA measurements is excellent but varies with the region under investigation. Precision is best for young healthy subjects (coefficient of variation is about 1% for the spine and whole body bone measurements) but is less good for osteoporotic and obese subjects. The accuracy of DXA measurements, however, can be problematic. Marked systematic differences in bone and soft tissue values are found between the three commercial systems due to differences in calibration, bone edge detection, and other factors. In addition, differences in reference data provided by each manufacturer can lead to an individual appearing normal on one machine but at risk of osteoporosis on another. At present, DXA cannot be regarded as a "gold standard" for body composition. However, the continuing development of DXA and the introduction of new software is greatly improving the performance of this

  2. Analysis of energy dispersive x-ray diffraction profiles for material identification, imaging and system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Emily Jane

    2008-12-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of low angle X-ray scatter measurements taken with an energy dispersive system for substance identification, imaging and system control. Diffraction measurements were made on illicit drugs, which have pseudo- crystalline structures and thus produce diffraction patterns comprising a se ries of sharp peaks. Though the diffraction profiles of each drug are visually characteristic, automated detection systems require a substance identification algorithm, and multivariate analysis was selected as suitable. The software was trained with measured diffraction data from 60 samples covering 7 illicit drugs and 5 common cutting agents, collected with a range of statistical qual ities and used to predict the content of 7 unknown samples. In all cases the constituents were identified correctly and the contents predicted to within 15%. Soft tissues exhibit broad peaks in their diffraction patterns. Diffraction data were collected from formalin fixed breast tissue samples and used to gen erate images. Maximum contrast between healthy and suspicious regions was achieved using momentum transfer windows 1.04-1.10 and 1.84-1.90 nm_1. The resulting images had an average contrast of 24.6% and 38.9% compared to the corresponding transmission X-ray images (18.3%). The data was used to simulate the feedback for an adaptive imaging system and the ratio of the aforementioned momentum transfer regions found to be an excellent pa rameter. Investigation into the effects of formalin fixation on human breast tissue and animal tissue equivalents indicated that fixation in standard 10% buffered formalin does not alter the diffraction profiles of tissue in the mo mentum transfer regions examined, though 100% unbuffered formalin affects the profile of porcine muscle tissue (a substitute for glandular and tumourous tissue), though fat is unaffected.

  3. Portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction and radiography system for archaeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Cuevas, Ariadna; Perez Gravie, Homero

    2011-03-01

    Starting on a laboratory developed portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer; three different analytical results can be performed: analysis of chemical elements, analysis of major chemical crystalline phase and structural analysis, which represents a contribution to a new, low cost development of portable X-ray analyzer; since these results are respectively obtained with independent equipments for X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and radiography. Detection limits of PXRF were characterized using standard reference materials for ceramics, glass, bronze and bones, which are the main materials requiring quantitative analysis in art and archeological objects. A setup for simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and diffraction (ED (XRF-XRD)) in the reflection mode has been tested for in situ and non-destructive analysis according to the requirements of art objects inspection. The system uses a single low power X-ray tube and an X-ray energy dispersive detector to measure X-ray diffraction spectrum at a fixed angle. Application to the identification of jadeite-jade mineral in archeological objects by XRD is presented. A local high resolution radiography image obtained with the same low power X-ray tube allows for studies in painting and archeological bones.

  4. Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra

    SciTech Connect

    Carraminana, Alberto; Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

    2013-06-12

    Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

  5. Variable Energy 2-MeV S-Band Linac for X-ray and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    H. Bender; D. Schwellenbach; R. Sturges; R. Trainham

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a compact, 2-MeV, S-band linear accelerator (linac) with variable energy tuning and short-pulse operation down to 15 ps with 100-A peak current. The design consists of a buncher cavity for short-pulse operation and two coupled resonator sections for acceleration. Single-pulse operation is accomplished through a fast injector system with a 219-MHz subharmonic buncher. The machine is intended to support a variety of applications, such as x-ray and electron beam diagnostic development, and recently, electron diffraction studies of phase transitions in shocked materials.

  6. Variable Energy 2-MeV S-Band Linac for X-ray and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Bender, Dave Schwellenbach, Ron Sturges, Rusty Trainham

    2008-03-01

    We will describe the design and operation of a compact, 2-MeV, S-band linear accelerator (linac) with variable energy tuning and short-pulse operation down to 15 ps with 100-A peak current. The design consists of a buncher cavity for short-pulse operation and two coupled resonator sections for acceleration. Single-pulse operation is accomplished through a fast injector system with a 219-MHz subharmonic buncher. The machine is intended to support a variety of applications, such as X-ray and electron beam diagnostic development and, recently, electron diffraction studies of phase transitions in shocked materials.

  7. X-ray production cross sections at incident photon energies across the M{sub i} (i=1-5) edges of {sub 90}Th

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Rajnish; Shehla,; Kumar, Anil; Puri, Sanjiv

    2015-08-28

    The X-ray production cross sections for the M{sub k} (k= ξ, δ, α, β, ζ, γ, m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}) groups of X-rays have been evaluated at incident photon energies across the M{sub i} (i =1-5) edges of {sub 90}Th using the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater model based photoionisation cross sections and recently reported values of the M-shell X-ray emission rates, fluorescence and Coster Kronig yields. Further, the energies of the prominent (M{sub i}-S{sub j}) (S{sub j}=N{sub j}, O{sub j} and i =1-3, j =1-7) resonant Raman scattered (RRS) peaks at different incident photon energies have also been evaluated using the neutral-atom electron binding energies (E{sub sj}) based on the relaxed orbital relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater model.

  8. On astrophysical solution to ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Berezinsky, Veniamin; Gazizov, Askhat; Grigorieva, Svetlana

    2006-08-15

    We argue that an astrophysical solution to the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHECR) problem is viable. The detailed study of UHECR energy spectra is performed. The spectral features of extragalactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are calculated in a model-independent way. Using the power-law generation spectrum {proportional_to}E{sup -{gamma}{sub g}} as the only assumption, we analyze four features of the proton spectrum: the GZK cutoff, dip, bump, and the second dip. We found the dip, induced by electron-positron production on the CMB, to be the most robust feature, existing in energy range 1x10{sup 18}-4x10{sup 19} eV. Its shape is stable relative to various phenomena included in calculations: discreteness of the source distribution, different modes of UHE proton propagation (from rectilinear to diffusive), local overdensity or deficit of the sources, large-scale inhomogeneities in the universe, and interaction fluctuations. The dip is well confirmed by observations of the AGASA, HiRes, Fly's Eye, and Yakutsk detectors. With two free parameters ({gamma}{sub g} and flux normalization constant) the dip describes about 20 energy bins with {chi}{sup 2}/d.o.f.{approx_equal}1 for each experiment. The best fit is reached at {gamma}{sub g}=2.7, with the allowed range 2.55-2.75. The dip is used for energy calibration of the detectors. For each detector independently, the energy is shifted by factor {lambda} to reach the minimum {chi}{sup 2}. We found {lambda}{sub Ag}=0.9, {lambda}{sub Hi}=1.2, and {lambda}{sub Ya}=0.75 for the AGASA, HiRes, and Yakutsk detectors, respectively. Remarkably, after this energy shift the fluxes and spectra of all three detectors agree perfectly, with discrepancy between AGASA and HiRes at E>1x10{sup 20} eV being not statistically significant. The excellent agreement of the dip with observations should be considered as confirmation of UHE proton interaction with the CMB. The dip has two flattenings. The high

  9. On astrophysical solution to ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, Veniamin; Gazizov, Askhat; Grigorieva, Svetlana

    2006-08-01

    We argue that an astrophysical solution to the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHECR) problem is viable. The detailed study of UHECR energy spectra is performed. The spectral features of extragalactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are calculated in a model-independent way. Using the power-law generation spectrum ∝E-γg as the only assumption, we analyze four features of the proton spectrum: the GZK cutoff, dip, bump, and the second dip. We found the dip, induced by electron-positron production on the CMB, to be the most robust feature, existing in energy range 1×1018 4×1019eV. Its shape is stable relative to various phenomena included in calculations: discreteness of the source distribution, different modes of UHE proton propagation (from rectilinear to diffusive), local overdensity or deficit of the sources, large-scale inhomogeneities in the universe, and interaction fluctuations. The dip is well confirmed by observations of the AGASA, HiRes, Fly’s Eye, and Yakutsk detectors. With two free parameters (γg and flux normalization constant) the dip describes about 20 energy bins with χ2/d.o.f.≈1 for each experiment. The best fit is reached at γg=2.7, with the allowed range 2.55 2.75. The dip is used for energy calibration of the detectors. For each detector independently, the energy is shifted by factor λ to reach the minimum χ2. We found λAg=0.9, λHi=1.2, and λYa=0.75 for the AGASA, HiRes, and Yakutsk detectors, respectively. Remarkably, after this energy shift the fluxes and spectra of all three detectors agree perfectly, with discrepancy between AGASA and HiRes at E>1×1020eV being not statistically significant. The excellent agreement of the dip with observations should be considered as confirmation of UHE proton interaction with the CMB. The dip has two flattenings. The high energy flattening at E≈1×1019eV automatically explains ankle, the feature observed in all experiments starting from the 1980s. The low-energy

  10. X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy of uranium ore using a TES microcalorimeter mounted on a field-emission scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehata, Keisuke; Idemitsu, Kazuya; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2011-08-01

    Energy dispersive spectroscopic measurements of uranium ore were conducted using a superconducting phase transition-edge-thermosensor (TES) microcalorimeter mounted on a field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) to demonstrate its potential for high-precision microanalysis. The effective solid angle for X-ray detection is found to be larger than 2 msr by precise adjustments in the X-ray polycapillary alignment. The observed detection signal pulses with decay time constant of 50 μs enable maximum count rates larger than 300 counts per second. The energy resolution was determined to be 14.6 eV FWHM at Al Kα X-ray energies of 1487 eV. Distinct peaks appear in the resulting X-ra y energy spectrum associated with U-Mα, U-Mβ and U-Mγ X-rays emitted by the uranium ore specimens. This spectrum includes weaker peaks corresponding to C-Kα, Fe-Lα, Cu-L and Sr L α1 X rays.

  11. Solar flares X-ray polarimetry in a wide energy band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani, Sergio; Campana, Riccardo; Costa, Enrico; Muleri, Fabio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Soffitta, Paolo; Del Monte, Ettore; Rubini, Alda

    2012-07-01

    Polarimetry of solar flares X-ray emission is an additional tool for investigating particles dynamics within the solar atmosphere. Accelerated electrons by magnetic reconnection in the corona produce bremsstrahlung radiation as primary emission in the footpoints of a solar flare which has moreover the possibility to be Compton backscattered resulting in albedo emission. Non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission is expected to be a significant above 15 keV and highly polarized. The albedo component peaks between 20 and 50 keV, its polarization properties depend on the Compton scattering angle. Such a diffusion modifies the spectrum and the polarization of the primary bremsstrahlung emission. Hard X-ray polarimetry, spectroscopy and imaging are therefore necessary to disentangle and modeling the different components in a solar flare. We present a non imaging Compton polarimeter sensitive from 20 keV designed as a single scattering unit surrounded by absorbers of high atomic number. A photelectric polarimeter based on the Gas Pixel Detector technology sensitive in the 15-35 keV energy band can be coupled for imaging.

  12. Superiority of Low Energy 160 KV X-Rays Compared to High Energy 6 MV X-Rays in Heavy Element Radiosensitization for Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Palmer, Alycia; Turro, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    High energy X-rays in the MeV range are generally employed in conventional radiation therapy from linear accelerators (LINAC) to ensure sufficient penetration depths. However, lower energy X-rays in the keV range may be more effective when coupled with heavy element (high-Z or HZ) radiosensitizers. Numerical simulations of X-ray energy deposition for tumor phantoms sensitized with HZ radiosensitizers were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The results showed enhancement in energy deposition to radiosensitized phantoms relative to unsensitized phantoms for low energy X-rays in the keV range. In contrast, minimal enhancement was seen using high energy X-rays in the MeV range. Dose enhancement factors (DEFs) were computed and showed radiosensitization only in the low energy range < 200 keV, far lower than the energy of the majority of photons in the LINAC energy range. In vitro studies were carried to demonstrate the tumoricidal effects of HZ sensitized F98 rat glioma cells following irradiation with both low energy 160 kV and high energy 6 MV X-ray sources. The platinum compound, pyridine terpyridine Pt(II) nitrate, was initially used because it was 7x less toxic that an equivalent amount of carboplatin in vitro studies. This would allow us to separate the radiotoxic and the chemotoxic effects of HZ sensitizers. Results from this study showed a 10-fold dose dependent reduction in surviving fractions (SF) of radiosensitized cells treated with low energy 160 kV X-rays compared to those treated with 6 MV X-rays. This is in agreement with our simulations that show an increase in dose deposition in radiosensitized tumors for low energy X-rays. Due to unforeen in vivo toxicity, however, another in vitro study was performed using the commonly used, Pt-based chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin which confirmed earlier results. This lays the ground work for a planned in vivo study using F98 glioma bearing rats. This study demonstrates that while high energy X-rays are

  13. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H.; Bos, W.

    1992-12-01

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  14. Low-energy gamma ray attenuation characteristics of aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Ping; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1990-01-01

    Am241 (59.5 keV) gamma ray attenuation characteristics were investigated in 270 aviation fuel (Jet A and Jet A-1) samples from 76 airports around the world as a part of world wide study to measure the variability of aviation fuel properties as a function of season and geographical origin. All measurements were made at room temperature which varied from 20 to 27 C. Fuel densities (rho) were measured concurrently with their linear attenuation coefficients (mu), thus providing a measure of mass attenuation coefficient (mu/rho) for the test samples. In 43 fuel samples, rho and mu values were measured at more than one room temperature, thus providing mu/rho values for them at several temperatures. The results were found to be independent of the temperature at which mu and rho values were measured. It is noted that whereas the individual mu and rho values vary considerably from airport to airport as well as season to season, the mu/rho values for all samples are constant at 0.1843 + or - 0.0013 cu cm/gm. This constancy of mu/rho value for aviation fuels is significant since a nuclear fuel quantity gauging system based on low energy gamma ray attenuation will be viable throughout the world.

  15. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Goodman, Claude A.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  16. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  17. Using aeroelastic structures with nonlinear switching electronics to increase potential energy yield in airflow: investigating analog control circuitry for automated peak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalca, Alexander G.; Drosinos, Jonathan G.; Grayson, Malika; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2015-03-01

    Bending piezoelectric transducers have the ability to harvest energy from aeroelastic vibrations induced by the ambient airflow. Such harvesters can have useful applications in the operation of low power devices, and their relatively small size makes them ideal for use in urban environments over civil infrastructure. One of the areas of focus regarding piezoelectric energy harvesting is the circuit topology used to store the harvested power. This study aims to further investigate the increase in potential energy yield from the piezoelectric harvester by optimizing the circuitry connecting the piezoelectric transducer and the power storage interface. When compared to an optimal resistive load case, it has been shown that certain circuit topologies, specifically synchronized switching and discharging to a storage capacitor through an inductor (SSDCI), can increase the charging power by as much as 400% if the circuit is completely lossless. This paper proposes a strategy for making a self-sufficient SSDCI circuit capable of peak detection for the synchronized switching using analog components. Using circuit simulation software, the performance of this proposed self-sufficient circuit is compared to an ideal case, and the effectiveness of the self-sufficient circuit strategy is discussed based on these simulation results. Further investigation of a physical working model of the new circuit proposal will be developed and experimental results of the circuit's performance obtained and compared to the estimated performance from the model.

  18. Measurement of Trace Constituents by Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis with Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-06-01

    Electron-excited X-ray microanalysis performed with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) has been used to measure trace elemental constituents of complex multielement materials, where "trace" refers to constituents present at concentrations below 0.01 (mass fraction). High count spectra measured with silicon drift detector EDS were quantified using the standards/matrix correction protocol embedded in the NIST DTSA-II software engine. Robust quantitative analytical results for trace constituents were obtained from concentrations as low as 0.000500 (mass fraction), even in the presence of significant peak interferences from minor (concentration 0.01≤C≤0.1) and major (C>0.1) constituents. Limits of detection as low as 0.000200 were achieved in the absence of peak interference. PMID:27329308

  19. Investigation of TLD-700 energy response to low energy x-ray encountered in diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrati, Ammar; Bourouina, Mourad; Khalal-Kouache, Karima

    2016-05-01

    The aim of thiswork is to study the energy dependence of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-700) for low energy X-ray beams encountered in conventional diagnostic radiology. In the first step, we studied some characteristics (reproducibility and linearity) of TLD-700 chips using a 137Cs source, and selected TLD chips with reproducibility better than 2.5%. Then we determined TLD-700 energy response for diagnostic radiology X-ray qualities, and investigated its influence on air kerma estimate. A maximum deviation of 60% can be obtained if TLDs are calibrated for 137Cs radiation source and used in diagnostic radiology fields. However, this deviation became less than 20% if TLDs chips are calibrated for the reference x-ray radiation quality RQR5 (recommended by the IEC 61267 standard). Consequently, we recommend calibrating this kind of TLDdetector with RQR5 diagnostic radiology X-ray quality. This method permits to obtain a good accuracy when assessing the entrance dose in diagnostic radiology procedures.

  20. High-Energy X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-11-29

    The functionality of heRXD includes the following: distance and angular calibration and viewing flat-panel detector images used for X-ray diffraction; image (polar) rebinning or "caking"; line position fitting in powder diffraction images; image segmentation or "blob finding"; crystal orentation indesing; and lattice vector refinement. These functionalities encompass a critical set analyzing teh data for high-energy diffraction measurements that are currently performed at synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The software design modularmore » and open source under LGPL. The intent is to provide a common framework and graphical user interface that has the ability to utillize internal as well as external subroutines to provide various optins for performing the fuctionalities listed above. The software will initially be deployed at several national user facilities--including APS, ALS, and CHESS--and then made available for download using a hosting service such as sourceforge.« less

  1. Simulations of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashev, O. E.; Kido, E.

    2015-05-15

    We compare two techniques for simulation of the propagation of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in intergalactic space: the Monte Carlo approach and a method based on solving transport equations in one dimension. For the former, we adopt the publicly available tool CRPropa and for the latter, we use the code TransportCR, which has been developed by the first author and used in a number of applications, and is made available online with publishing this paper. While the CRPropa code is more universal, the transport equation solver has the advantage of a roughly 100 times higher calculation speed. We conclude that the methods give practically identical results for proton or neutron primaries if some accuracy improvements are introduced to the CRPropa code.

  2. The low energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Lamb, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of observed gamma-ray burst spectra for the physical conditions and geometries of the sources are examined. It is noted that an explanation of the continua in terms of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung requires a relatively large area but a fairly shallow depth. On the other hand, a spectrum similar to that observed could be produced by rapid flickering of sources with less extreme geometries if each flicker emits a Comptonized thermal spectrum. Either field inhomogeneities or plasma motions are required to interpret the low energy features as cyclotron extinction. An alternative explanation is photoelectric absorption by heavy atoms; this requires a field strength high enough to make one-photon electron positron annihilation possible. Observational tests of these possibilities are proposed

  3. High-Energy X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-29

    The functionality of heRXD includes the following: distance and angular calibration and viewing flat-panel detector images used for X-ray diffraction; image (polar) rebinning or "caking"; line position fitting in powder diffraction images; image segmentation or "blob finding"; crystal orentation indesing; and lattice vector refinement. These functionalities encompass a critical set analyzing teh data for high-energy diffraction measurements that are currently performed at synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The software design modular and open source under LGPL. The intent is to provide a common framework and graphical user interface that has the ability to utillize internal as well as external subroutines to provide various optins for performing the fuctionalities listed above. The software will initially be deployed at several national user facilities--including APS, ALS, and CHESS--and then made available for download using a hosting service such as sourceforge.

  4. Application of the MST clustering to the high energy γ-ray sky. II—Possible detection of γ-ray emission from blazar candidates in the 1WHSP sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, R.; Massaro, E.; Bernieri, E.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a photon cluster search in the 7-years Fermi-Large Area Telescope extragalactic Pass 8 γ-ray sky by means of the Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) algorithm, at energies higher than 10 GeV. We found 16 clusters of photons, corresponding to candidate γ-ray sources, located very close to infrared-selected sources in the 1WHSP (WISE High Synchrotron Peaked) sample, and therein classified as either "new" or "candidate" blazars. In this paper some properties of the MST clusters and of the associated sources are presented.

  5. Isotropy Constraints on Powerful Sources of Ultrahigh-energy Cosmic Rays at 1019 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Hajime; Murase, Kohta; Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) produced by powerful sources is numerically evaluated. We show that nondetection of significant anisotropy at ≈ {10}19 eV at present and in future experiments imposes general upper limits on UHECR proton luminosity of steady sources as a function of source redshifts. The upper limits constrain the existence of typical steady {10}19 eV UHECR sources in the local universe and limit their local density to ≳ {10}-3 Mpc {}-3, assuming average intergalactic magnetic fields less than {10}-9 G. This isotropy, being stronger than that measured at the highest energies, may indicate the transient generation of UHECRs. Our calculations are applied for extreme high-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae objects 1ES 0229+200, 1ES 1101-232, and 1ES 0347-121, to test the UHECR-induced cascade model, in which beamed UHECR protons generate TeV radiation in transit from sources. While the magnetic-field structure surrounding the sources affects the required absolute cosmic-ray luminosity of the blazars, the magnetic-field structure surrounding the Milky Way directly affects the observed anisotropy. If these magnetic fields are weak enough, significant UHECR anisotropy from these blazars is detectable by the Pierre Auger Observatory unless the maximum energy of UHECR protons is below 1019 eV. Furthermore, if these are the sources of UHECRs above 1019 eV, a local magnetic structure surrounding the Milky Way is needed to explain the observed isotropy at ˜ {10}19 eV, which may be incompatible with large magnetic structures around all galaxies for the UHECR-induced cascade model to work with reasonable jet powers.

  6. Atmospheric gamma-ray lines at low latitudes in the energy range : 0.3-8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcarate, I. N.

    2003-12-01

    An experiment carried out with a collimated gamma-ray detector is described. The detector system was transported by an stratospheric balloon, that was launched from Parana, Provincia de Entre Rios, Argentina, on 18 November 1992 ( geomagnetic cut-off 11.1 GV). The presence of a peak was observed, as a characteristic feature of the energy-loss spectrum in the detector. That peak corresponds to the 511 keV line produced by positron annihilation in both the atmopsphere and the lead collimator. The contribution to the counting rate ``below" the peak due to the 511 keV photons produced in the lead is computed. The resulting flux for the atmospheric 511 keV line, at an atmospheric depth of 4.5 g.cm-2, is (9 ± 0.07) x 10-2 phot. cm-2.s-1, which is compatible with measurements performed at other geomagnetic latitudes. Upper limits for other atmospheric gamma-ray lines fluxes are obtained. Acknowledgements : This research was partially supported by grant PIP 0430/98 from CONICET, from Argentina. I.N. Azcarate is a member of the Carrera del Investigador Cientifico y Tecnologico from CONICET, Argentina.

  7. Method of incident low-energy gamma-ray direction reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Zverev, V. G.; Galper, A. M.; Arkhangelskaya, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Dalkarov, O. D.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space-based telescope has as its main goals to measure cosmic γ-ray fluxes and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component produced, theoretically, in dark-matter-particles decay or annihilation processes, to search for discrete γ-ray sources and study them in detail, to examine the energy spectra of diffuse γ-rays — both galactic and extragalactic — and to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and γ-rays from the active Sun. Scientific goals of GAMMA-400 telescope require fine angular resolution. The telescope is of a pair-production type. In the converter-tracker, the incident gamma-ray photon converts into electron-positron pair in the tungsten layer and then the tracks are detected by silicon- strip position-sensitive detectors. Multiple scattering processes become a significant obstacle in the incident-gamma direction reconstruction for energies below several gigaelectronvolts. The method of utilising this process to improve the resolution is proposed in the presented work.

  8. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M.; Bruel, P.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Granot, J.; Longo, F.; Razzaque, S.; Zimmer, S. E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  9. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  10. Ray-tracing simulations of coupled dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Francesco; Baldi, Marco; Moscardini, Lauro; Bacon, David; Crittenden, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Dark matter and dark energy are usually assumed to couple only gravitationally. An extension to this picture is to model dark energy as a scalar field coupled directly to cold dark matter. This coupling leads to new physical effects, such as a fifth force and a time-dependent dark matter particle mass. In this work we examine the impact that coupling has on weak lensing statistics by constructing realistic simulated weak lensing maps using ray-tracing techniques through N-body cosmological simulations. We construct maps for different lensing quantities, covering a range of scales from a few arcminutes to several degrees. The concordance Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model is compared to different coupled dark energy models, described either by an exponential scalar field potential (standard coupled dark energy scenario) or by a SUGRA potential (bouncing model). We analyse several statistical quantities and our results, with sources at low redshifts are largely consistent with previous work on cosmic microwave background lensing by Carbone et al. The most significant differences from the ΛCDM model are due to the enhanced growth of the perturbations and to the effective friction term in non-linear dynamics. For the most extreme models, we see differences in the power spectra up to 40 per cent compared to the ΛCDM model. The different time evolution of the linear matter overdensity can account for most of the differences, but when controlling for this using a ΛCDM model having the same normalization, the overall signal is smaller due to the effect of the friction term appearing in the equation of motion for dark matter particles.

  11. Pulsed high-energy γ-rays from thermal populations in the current sheets of pulsar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arka, I.; Dubus, G.

    2013-02-01

    Context. More than one hundred pulsars have been detected up to now at GeV energies by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi gamma-ray observatory. Current modelling proposes that the high-energy emission comes from outer magnetospheric gaps, but radiation from the equatorial current sheet that separates the two magnetic hemispheres outside the light cylinder has also been investigated. Aims: We discuss the region outside the light cylinder, the "near wind" zone. We investigate the possibility that synchrotron radiation emitted by thermal populations in the equatorial current sheet of the pulsar wind in this region can explain the lightcurves and spectra observed by Fermi/LAT. Methods: We used analytical estimates as well as detailed numerical computation to calculate the γ-ray luminosities, lightcurves, and spectra of γ-ray pulsars. Results: Many of the characteristics of the γ-ray pulsars observed by Fermi/LAT can be reproduced by our model, most notably the position of these objects in the P - Ṗ diagram, and the range of γ-ray luminosities. A testable result is a sub-exponential cutoff with an index b = 0.35. We also predict the existence of a population of pulsars with cutoff energies in the MeV range. These have systematically lower spindown luminosities than the Fermi/LAT-detected pulsars. Conclusions: It is possible for relativistic populations of electrons and positrons in the current sheet of a pulsar's wind immediately outside the light cylinder to emit synchrotron radiation that peaks in the sub-GeV to GeV regime, with γ-ray efficiencies similar to those observed for the Fermi/LAT pulsars.

  12. On collisional energy transfer in recombination and dissociation reactions: A Wiener-Hopf problem and the effect of a near elastic peak.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaoyan; Marcus, R A

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the large impact parameter near-elastic peak of collisional energy transfer for unimolecular dissociation/bimolecular recombination reactions is studied. To this end, the conventional single exponential model, a biexponential model that fits the literature classical trajectory data better, a model with a singularity at zero energy transfer, and the most realistic model, a model with a near-singularity, are fitted to the trajectory data in the literature. The typical effect of the energy transfer on the recombination rate constant is maximal at low pressures and this region is the one studied here. The distribution function for the limiting dissociation rate constant k(0) at low pressures is shown to obey a Wiener-Hopf integral equation and is solved analytically for the first two models and perturbatively for the other two. For the single exponential model, this method yields the trial solution of Troe. The results are applied to the dissociation of O(3) in the presence of argon, for which classical mechanical trajectory data are available. The k(0)'s for various models are calculated and compared, the value for the near-singularity model being about ten times larger than that for the first two models. This trend reflects the contribution to the cross section from collisions with larger impact parameter. In the present study of the near-singularity model, it is found that k(0) is not sensitive to reasonable values for the lower bound. Energy transfer values DeltaE's are also calculated and compared and can be similarly understood. However, unlike the k(0) values, they are sensitive to the lower bound, and so any comparison of a classical trajectory analysis for DeltaE's with the kinetic experimental data needs particular care. PMID:19063543

  13. A Comprehensive Statistical Description of Radio-through-Gamma-Ray Spectral Energy Distributions of All Known Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Peiyuan; Urry, C. Megan; Massaro, Francesco; Paggi, Alessandro; Cauteruccio, Joe; Künzel, Soren R.

    2016-06-01

    We combined multi-wavelength data for blazars from the Roma-BZCAT catalog and analyzed hundreds of X-ray spectra. We present the fluxes and spectral energy distributions (SEDs), in 12 frequency bands from radio to γ-rays, for a final sample of 2214 blazars. Using a model-independent statistical approach, we looked for systematic trends in the SEDs; the most significant trends involved the radio luminosities and X-ray spectral indices of the blazars. We used a principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the basis vectors of the blazar SEDs and, in order to maximize the size of the sample, imputed missing fluxes using the K-nearest neighbors method. Using more than an order of magnitude more data than was available when Fossati et al. first reported trends of SED shape with blazar luminosity, we confirmed the anti-correlation between radio luminosity and synchrotron peak frequency, although with greater scatter than was seen in the smaller sample. The same trend can be seen between bolometric luminosity and synchrotron peak frequency. Finally, we used all of the available blazar data to determine an empirical SED description that depends only on the radio luminosity at 1.4 GHz and the redshift. We verified that this statistically significant relation was not a result of the luminosity–luminosity correlations that are natural in flux-limited samples (i.e., where the correlation is actually caused by the redshift rather than the luminosity).

  14. Measurements of γ-ray Energy and Multiplicity from 235U(nthermal) using STEFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitt, A. J.; Smith, A. G.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Dare, J. A.; Murray, L.

    2015-05-01

    The amount of energy carried by γ-rays during the fission process is an important consideration when developing new reactor designs. Many studies of γ-ray energy and multiplicity, from a multitude of fissioning systems, were measured during the 1970s. However the data from such experiments largely underestimates the heating effect caused by γ-rays in the structure of a reactor. It is therefore essential to obtain more accurate measurements of the energy carried during γ-ray emission. As such, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has put out a high priority request [1] for measurements of the mean γ-ray energy and multiplicity to an accuracy better than 7.5 percent from several fissioning systems; including 235U(nthermal). Measurements of the rays from these fissioning nuclei were performed with the SpecTrometer for Exotic Fission Fagments (STEFF).

  15. A possible energy mechanism for cosmological γ-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Lu, Y.

    2001-01-01

    We suggest that an extreme Kerr black hole with a mass ~106Msolar, a dimensionless angular momentum A~1 and a marginally stable orbital radius rms~3rs~1012M6cm located in a normal galaxy may produce a γ-ray burst (GRB) by capturing and disrupting a star. During the capture period, a transient accretion disc is formed and a strong transient magnetic field ~ 2.4×109M6-1/2G, lasting for rmsc~30M6s, may be produced at the inner boundary of the accretion disc. A large amount of rotational energy of the black hole is extracted and released in an ultrarelativistic jet with a bulk Lorentz factor Γ larger than 103 via the Blandford-Znajek process. The relativistic jet energy can be converted into γ-radiation via an internal shock mechanism. The GRB duration should be the same as the lifetime of the strong transient magnetic field. The maximum number of sub-bursts is estimated to be rmsh~(10-102) because the disc material is likely to break into pieces with a size about the thickness of the disc h at the cusp (2rs<=r<=3rs). The shortest risetime of the burst estimated from this model is ~ h/Γc~3×10-4Γ3-1(hr)- 2M6s. The model GRB density rate is also estimated.

  16. The extended jet of AP Librae: Origin of the very high-energy γ-ray emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Michael; Wagner, Stefan J.

    2016-04-01

    The low-frequency peaked BL Lac object (LBL) AP Librae exhibits very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission and hosts an extended jet, which has been detected in radio and X-rays. The jet X-ray spectral index implies an inverse Compton origin. These observations are unusual for LBLs calling for a consistent explanation of this extraordinary source. The observationally constrained parameters necessary to describe the core emission within the standard one-zone model are unable to explain the broad-band spectrum, even if observationally unconstrained external photon fields are taken into account. We demonstrate that the addition of the extended jet emission successfully reproduces the total spectral energy distribution. In particular, the VHE radiation is produced in the >100 kpc long extended jet via inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons by highly relativistic electrons. We present several ways to test this theory. The extended jet is weakly magnetized (B0 = 2.5 μG), while its minimum and maximum electron Lorentz factors are γmin = 60 and γmax = 5 × 106, respectively. The electron spectral index is s = 2.6. These parameters are comparable to parameters of other blazars with extended X-ray jets dominated by inverse Compton scattering.

  17. A figure of merit for blazar-like source identification in the gamma-ray energy band

    SciTech Connect

    Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Pittori, Carlotta; Giommi, Paolo; Colafrancesco, Sergio

    2007-07-12

    The microwave to gamma-ray slope {alpha}{mu}{gamma} can be used as a viable figure of merit for blazar-like source identification in gamma-rays. Taking into account the constraints from the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background, one can estimate the maximum duty cycle allowed for a selected sample of low energy peaked (LBL) blazars, in order to be detectable for the nominal sensitivity values of AGILE and GLAST gamma-ray experiments. This work is based on the results of a recently derived blazar radio LogN-LogS obtained by combining several multi-frequency surveys. We present our estimates of duty cycle constraints applied on a sample composed by 146 high latitude and 74 medium latitude LBL blazars from the new WMAP3 yr catalog. Our results can be used as an indicator to identify good gamma-ray blazar candidates: sources with high values of duty cycle can in principle be detectable also in a ''steady'' state by AGILE and GLAST without over-predicting the extragalactic background.

  18. Solar investigation at Terskol Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlov-Vasiljev, K. A.; Vasiljeva, I. E.

    2003-04-01

    During 1980--1990 regular observations of the solar disk spectrum and active solar structures were carried out with SEF-1 and ATsU-26 telescopes at Terskol Peak in the framework of the program ``Energy distribution in the solar spectrum in absolute energy units''. In order to refine the fine structure of telluric lines, observations with ATsU-26 telescope were carried out in parallel. This telescope was also used for the investigation of the solar active structures. In this paper the observational technique is described. The obtained results and energy distribution in the solar disk center in absolute energy units are presented.

  19. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  20. Separation of intact proteins on γ-ray-induced polymethacrylate monolithic columns: A highly permeable stationary phase with high peak capacity for capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Simone, Patrizia; Pierri, Giuseppe; Foglia, Patrizia; Gasparrini, Francesca; Mazzoccanti, Giulia; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Ursini, Ornella; Ciogli, Alessia; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Polymethacrylate-based monolithic capillary columns, prepared by γ-radiation-induced polymerization, were used to optimize the experimental conditions (nature of the organic modifiers, the content of trifluoroacetic acid and the column temperature) in the separation of nine standard proteins with different hydrophobicities and a wide range of molecular weights. Because of the excellent permeability of the monolithic columns, an ion-pair reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry method has been developed by coupling the column directly to the mass spectrometer without a flow-split and using a standard electrospray interface. Additionally, the high working flow and concomitant high efficiency of these columns allowed us to employ a longer column (up to 50 cm) and achieve a peak capacity value superior to 1000. This work is motivated by the need to develop new materials for high-resolution chromatographic separation that combine chemical stability at elevated temperatures (up to 75°C) and a broad pH range, with a high peak capacity value. The advantage of the γ-ray-induced monolithic column lies in the batch-to-batch reproducibility and long-term high-temperature stability. Their proven high loading capacity, recovery, good selectivity and high permeability, moreover, compared well with that of a commercially available poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monolithic column, which confirms that such monolithic supports might facilitate analysis in proteomics. PMID:26530449