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Sample records for ray heavy nuclei

  1. Propagation of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letaw, J. R.; Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for modeling the propagation of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei, and the required atomic and nuclear data, are assembled in this paper. Emphasis is on understanding nuclear composition in the charge range Z = 3-83. Details of the application of 'matrix methods' above a few hundred MeV/nucleon, a new treatment of electron capture decay, and a new table of cosmic ray-stable isotopes are presented. Computation of nuclear fragmentation cross sections, stopping power, and electron stripping and attachment are briefly reviewed.

  2. The survival of heavy nuclei in cosmic ray source environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1972-01-01

    Results from the Goddard balloon spectrometer and the results reported by Soviet scientists using the Proton series of satellites are summarized. The important experimental results from the balloon spectrometer experiment are as follows: (1) On a total-energy scale, protons constitute only a minor proportion of the cosmic rays, only 20 percent. The rest of the cosmic rays are complex nuclei. (2) All the nuclei have the same power low spectrum in total energy and so the composition seems to be independent of energy.

  3. Measurement of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei on LDEF (M0002-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.; Enge, W.; Siegmon, G.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to measure the elemental and isotopic abundamces of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei with nuclear charge Z equal to or greater than 3. The chemical and energy spectra will be measured for particles that have energies in the range from 20 to 1000 MeV per atomic mass unit. Two points of great interest are geomagneticaly forbidden cosmic-ray particles and heavy ions of the trapped radiation.

  4. A high-resolution study of ultra-heavy cosmic-ray nuclei (A0178)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osullivan, D.; Thompson, A.; Oceallaigh, C.; Domingo, V.; Wenzel, K. P.

    1984-01-01

    The main objective of the experiment is a detailed study of the charge spectra of ultraheavy cosmic-ray nuclei from zinc (Z = 30) to uranium (Z = 92) and beyond using solid-state track detectors. Special emphasis will be placed on the relative abundances in the region Z or - 65, which is thought to be dominated by r-process nucleosynthesis. Subsidiary objectives include the study of the cosmic-ray transiron spectrum a search for the postulated long-lived superheavy (SH) nuclei (Z or = 110), such as (110) SH294, in the contemporary cosmic radiation. The motivation behind the search for super-heavy nuclei is based on predicted half-lives that are short compared to the age of the Earth but long compared to the age of cosmic rays. The detection of such nuclei would have far-reaching consequences for nuclear structure theory. The sample of ultraheavy nuclei obtained in this experiment will provide unique opportunities for many tests concerning element nucleosynthesis, cosmic-ray acceleration, and cosmic-ray propagation.

  5. Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays as heavy nuclei from cluster accretion shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Susumu; Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco; et al.

    Large-scale accretion shocks around massive clusters of galaxies, generically expected in hierarchical scenarios of cosmological structure formation, are shown to be plausible sources of the observed ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) by accelerating a mixture of heavy nuclei including the iron group elements. Current observations can be explained if the source composition at injection for the heavier nuclei is somewhat enhanced from simple expectations for the accreting gas. The proposed picture should be clearly testable by current and upcoming facilities in the near future through characteristic features in the UHECR spectrum, composition and anisotropy, in particular the rapid increase of the average mass composition with energy from 1019 to 1020 eV. The associated X-ray and gamma-ray signatures are also briefly discussed.

  6. Studies of the ionization states of solar and galactic cosmic ray heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.

    1982-01-01

    Enhancement of abundances of heavy nuclei (e.g., Mg, Si, and Fe) at low energies relative to solar photospheric abundances and anomalously high abundances of iron relative to oxygen nuclei at low energies were recently discovered in solar energetic particles studied at low energy. These phenomena are not understood at present. The proposed experiment is designed to study the recently discovered anomalous component of low energy galactic cosmic ray ions of C, N, O, Ne, and Ca to Fe of energy 5- to 10-million electron volts per atomic mass unit in regard to their ionization states, composition, and intensity, and to study the ionization states of heavy elements from oxygen to iron in energetic solar particles emitted during flare events. The same detector system will serve for both studies, with the second objective being given priority if there are any solar particle events during the mission.

  7. Frequency of light-flashes induced by Cerenkov radiation from heavy cosmic-ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, R.; Mcnulty, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The expected frequency was calculated for light flashes induced in the dark-adapted eye by Cerenkov radiation from the flux of heavy nuclei that exists in space beyond the geomagnetic field. The expected frequency of light flashes depends on the threshold number of photons that must be absorbed in a rod cluster. The results of the calculation are presented as a curve of the mean frequency of light flashes versus the threshold number of absorbed photons. The results are not sensitive to variations in the path length from 5 to 15 grams per square centimeter of water-equivalent before the nucleus reaches the retina. Calculations were based on the fluxes and energy spectra of galactic cosmic ray nuclei of helium to iron, measured at a time of minimum solar modulation. The expected light flash frequencies induced by Cerenkov radiation are consistent with the frequencies reported by the astronauts on Apollo missions 11 through 14.

  8. Super-heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Sigurd

    2015-11-01

    Scientifically based searches for elements beyond uranium started after the discovery of the neutron. Neutrons captured by uranium nuclei and subsequent {β }- decay, similarly as most of the elements were produced in nature, was the successful method applied. However, as a first result, Hahn and Strassmann discovered nuclear fission indicating a limit for the existence of nuclei at an increasing number of protons. Eventually, the nuclear shell model allowed for a more accurate calculation of binding energies, half-lives and decay modes of the heaviest nuclei. Theoreticians predicted a region of increased stability at proton number Z = 126, later shifted to 114, and neutron number N = 184. These nuclei receive their stability from closed shells for the protons and neutrons. Later, increased stability was also predicted for deformed nuclei at Z = 108 and N = 162. In this review I will report on experimental work performed on research to produce and identify these super-heavy nuclei (SHN). Intensive heavy ion beams, sophisticated target technology, efficient electromagnetic ion separators, and sensitive detector arrays were the prerequisites for discovery of 12 new elements during the last 40 years. The results are described and compared with theoretical predictions and interpretations. An outlook is given on further improvement of experimental facilities which will be needed for exploration of the extension and structure of the island of SHN, in particular for searching for isotopes with longer half-lives predicted to be located in the south east of the island, for new elements, and last not least, for surprises which, naturally, emerge unexpectedly.

  9. Photodisintegrated gamma rays and neutrinos from heavy nuclei in the gamma-ray burst jet of GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Razzaque, Soebur; Moharana, Reetanjali

    2016-05-01

    Detection of ˜0.1-70 GeV prompt γ-ray emission from the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope provides an opportunity to explore the physical processes of GeV γ-ray emission from the GRB jets. In this work, we discuss interactions of Iron and Oxygen nuclei with observed keV-MeV photons in the jet of GRB 130427A in order to explain an additional, hard spectral component observed during 11.5-33 s after trigger. The photodisintegration time-scale for Iron nuclei is comparable to or shorter than this duration. We find that γ rays resulting from the Iron nuclei disintegration can account for the hard power-law component of the spectra in the ˜1-70 GeV range, before the γγ → e± pair production with low-energy photons severely attenuates emission of higher energy photons. Electron antineutrinos from the secondary neutron decay, on the other hand, can be emitted with energies up to ˜2 TeV. The flux of these neutrinos is low and consistent with non-detection of GRB 130427A by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. The required total energy in the Iron nuclei for this hadronic model for GeV emission is ≲10 times the observed total energy released in the prompt keV-MeV emission.

  10. Detection of the isotopes of heavy cosmic ray nuclei. [by particle counter telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, C. M.; Waddington, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    A counter telescope designed to detect and resolve the isotopic composition of cosmic ray nuclei heavier than neon is being prepared. The telescope consists of a rather conventional charge measuring array using two scintillator elements and two solid Cerenkov radiators of differing refractive index. The mass measurement is obtained by combining the velocity information from one or both of the Cerenkov radiators operating near their threshold with residual range measured in a block of nuclear emulsion. Path length corrections and particle location in the emulsions is provided by a spark chamber fired in coincidence with potentially suitable particles. The telescope has a geometry factor of 530 sq cm sr roughly. It should be able to resolve the isotopes of iron over the energy range of 300 to 720 Mev/n and those of neon over 300 to 400 MeV/n. The expected response and characteristics of the telescope are described in detail and the sensitivity to rare isotopes discussed.

  11. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 EL-1994-00089 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be discolored by a dark brown stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal cover appears to be specular and

  12. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 EL-1994-00088 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays lower flange appears to be discolored by a dark brown stain. The tray flanges also appear to be discolored but with a lighter stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF

  13. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 EL-1994-00391 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The paint dots on the experiment tray clamp blocks, originally white, appearsDE:to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at leastDE:one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The

  14. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 EL-1994-00311 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are clearly visible on the upper and lower tray flanges. The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the

  15. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08 EL-1994-00661 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays upper flange and the right end of the experiment trays lower flange appear to be slightly discolored. The tray flanges appear to be discolored by a light brown stain and the ground strap located in the center of the lower flange appears intact but a much darker copper color than in the prelaunch photograph. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored

  16. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02 EL-1994-00385 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The white paint dot on the experiment tray clamp blocks located at the center of the trays lower and left flanges and at the right end of the trays upper flange appear to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an

  17. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 EL-1994-00272 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after the experiment tray was removed from the LDEF and the silvered TEFLON® thermal cover removed. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. A copper coated pressure sensitive tape was used to provide an electrical ground strap between the thermal cover and the LDEF structure. All experiment hardware appears to be in prelaunch condition and securely in place. The three cylindrical pressure vessels containing the experiment detectors are shown mounted in the experiment tray with the frame for mounting the

  18. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 EL-1994-00184 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The paint dots on the experiment tray clamp blocks, originally white, appears to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE

  19. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C06 EL-1994-00206 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C06 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a light brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are clearly visible on the lower tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments

  20. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A02 EL-1994-00387 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A02 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The white paint dot on the experiment tray clamp blocks located at the center of the trays upper and right flanges and at the left end of the trays lower flange appear to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar with a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an

  1. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02 EL-1994-00131 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be slightly discolored. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal cover appears to be intact with out visible

  2. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C05 EL-1994-00205 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C05 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a brown stain that provides outlines of the experiment tray clamp blocks that are clearly visible on the upper and lower tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground

  3. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10 EL-1994-00122 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) at KSC during removal of the LDEF from the Orbiters cargo bay. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal covers surface appears to have changed from specular to opaque (glossy white) with many black dots of various sizes that appear to be impact craters. An impact

  4. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 EL-1994-00019 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be slightly discolored. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal covers surface appears to have changed from

  5. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 EL-1994-00162 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility during removal of the LDEF from the Orbiter's payload bay. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal covers surface appears to have changed from specular to opaque with numerous black dots of various sizes that appear to be impact craters. Many of the craters appear to have

  6. Cosmic-ray slowing down in molecular clouds: Effects of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabot, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Context. A cosmic ray (CR) spectrum propagated through ISM contains very few low-energy (<100 MeV) particles. Recently, a local CR spectrum, with strong low energy components, has been proposed to be responsible for the over production of H3+ molecule in some molecular clouds. Aims: We aim to explore the effects of the chemical composition of low-energy cosmic rays (CRs) when they slow down in dense molecular clouds without magnetic fields. We considered both ionization and solid material processing rates. Methods: We used galatic CR chemical composition from proton to iron. We propagated two types of CR spectra through a cloud made of H2: those CR spectra with different contents of low energy CRs and those assumed to be initially identical for all CR species. The stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) package provided the necessary stopping powers. The ionization rates were computed with cross sections from recent semi-empirical laws, while effective cross sections were parametrized for solid processing rates using a power law of the stopping power (power 1 to 2). Results: The relative contribution to the cloud ionization of proton and heavy CRs was found identical everywhere in the irradiated cloud, no matter which CR spectrum we used. As compared to classical calculations, using protons and high-energy behaviour of ionization processes (Z2 scaling), we reduced absolute values of ionization rates by few a tens of percents but only in the case of spectrum with a high content of low-energy CRs. We found, using the same CR spectrum, the solid material processing rates to be reduced between the outer and inner part of thick cloud by a factor 10 (as in case of the ionization rates) or by a factor 100, depending on the type of process.

  7. Proton Distribution in Heavy Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Johnson, M. H; Teller, E.

    1953-11-13

    It is reasoned that, from considerations connected with beta-decay stability and Coulomb repulsion forces, a neutron excess is developed on the surface of heavy nuclei. Several consequences of this qualitative analysis in nucleon interactions are briefly noted. (K.S.)

  8. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 EL-1994-00312 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The outline of the experiment tray clamp blocks is clearly visible on the upper tray flange and to a lesser extent on the lower flange. The holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The prelaunch photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the experiment tray on the LDEF. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the

  9. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray F04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray F04 EL-1994-00171 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray F04 The postflight photograph was taken in the SAEF II at KSC after the experiment was removed from the LDEF. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal cover appears to be specular and intact. The circular damaged locations that appeared to to be impact points in the flight photograph are not as apparent in the reflections and is less taut cover. The wrinkled spots on the thermal cover are areas

  10. The Heavy Nuclei Explorer (HNX) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.

    2001-01-01

    The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) mission was recently selected by NASA for a Small Explorer (SMEX) Mission Concept Study to begin in 2001. The primary scientific objectives of HNX are to measure the age of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since nucleosynthesis, determine the injection mechanism for the GCR accelerator (Volatility or FIP), and study the mix of nucleosynthetic processes that contribute to the source of GCRs. The experimental goal of HNX is to measure the elemental abundances of all individual stable nuclei from neon through the actinides and possibly beyond. HNX is composed of two instruments: ECCO, which measures elemental abundances of nuclei with Z(sup 3)72, and ENTICE, which measures elemental abundances of nuclei with 10(f)Z(f)82. We will discuss the mission and the science that can be addressed by HNX.

  11. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10 EL-1994-00018 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the clamp blocks located at the center of the experiment trays upper and right flanges appear to be in prelaunch condition while the one located at the left end of the trays lower flange appears slightly discolored. Note the dark brown stain on the LDEF structure adjacent to the edge of the black thermal cover. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays right flange is

  12. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 EL-1994-00087 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be slightly discolored but the paint dot on the clamp block located at the right end of the upper flange appears to be stained less. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the

  13. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 EL-1994-00134 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The paint dot , originally white, on the experiment tray clamp block located at the center of the trays lower flange appears to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment trays lower flange also appears to be coated but with a much lighter stain. The paint dots on clamp blocks at each end of the trays upper flange appear to be discolored very little. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the

  14. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 EL-1994-00062 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dot on the center clamp block of the experiment trays upper flange appears to be in prelaunch condition but the paint dot on the clamp block located at the right end of the lower flange appears to be slightly discolored. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments

  15. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 EL-1994-00038 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays upper flange and on the tray clamp blocks at each end of the trays lower flange appear to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be discolored by the stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical

  16. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 EL-1994-00207 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear to be discolored by a light brown stain. An outline of experiment tray clamp block locations is clearly visible on the experiment trays upper flange and to a lesser extent on its lower flange. The holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to

  17. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 EL-1994-00188 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The white paint dot on the experiment tray clamp block located at the center of the trays lower flange appears to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment trays lower flange also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The white paint dots on clamp blocks at each end of the trays upper flange appear to be discolored very little. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is

  18. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 EL-1994-00010 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays left flange and on the clamp blocks located at the upper and lower ends of the experiment trays right flange appear to be in near prelaunch condition. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover

  19. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08 EL-1994-00212 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are clearly visible on the upper and lower experiment tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the

  20. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 EL-1994-00299 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a light brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are faint but visible on the upper and lower experiment tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground

  1. Ultra heavy nuclei in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. Robert

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the measurements of the ultraheavy cosmic ray abundances obtained by the Heavy Nuclei Experiment aboard the NASA High Energy Astronomy Observatory-3. It is found that the cosmic ray abundances are in broad agreement with solar system abundances with a step-FIP fractionation model applied although in detail there are some differences. In particular, Ge and Pb appear to be underabundant in the cosmic radiation. Although the platinum/lead ratio and the actinides are consistent with some r-process enhancement, the cosmic ray source is not dominated by the r-process up through the 50s as evidenced by the Sr/Rb ratio and by the abundance of Sn and Ba. The actinides are not greatly enhanced, ruling out freshly synthesized r-process production as the primary source of the heavy cosmic rays.

  2. Fusion probability in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Pal, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    Background: Fusion between two massive nuclei is a very complex process and is characterized by three stages: (a) capture inside the potential barrier, (b) formation of an equilibrated compound nucleus (CN), and (c) statistical decay of the CN leading to a cold evaporation residue (ER) or fission. The second stage is the least understood of the three and is the most crucial in predicting yield of superheavy elements (SHE) formed in complete fusion reactions. Purpose: A systematic study of average fusion probability, , is undertaken to obtain a better understanding of its dependence on various reaction parameters. The study may also help to clearly demarcate onset of non-CN fission (NCNF), which causes fusion probability, PCN, to deviate from unity. Method: ER excitation functions for 52 reactions leading to CN in the mass region 170-220, which are available in the literature, have been compared with statistical model (SM) calculations. Capture cross sections have been obtained from a coupled-channels code. In the SM, shell corrections in both the level density and the fission barrier have been included. for these reactions has been extracted by comparing experimental and theoretical ER excitation functions in the energy range ˜5 %-35% above the potential barrier, where known effects of nuclear structure are insignificant. Results: has been shown to vary with entrance channel mass asymmetry, η (or charge product, ZpZt ), as well as with fissility of the CN, χCN. No parameter has been found to be adequate as a single scaling variable to determine . Approximate boundaries have been obtained from where starts deviating from unity. Conclusions: This study quite clearly reveals the limits of applicability of the SM in interpreting experimental observables from fusion reactions involving two massive nuclei. Deviation of from unity marks the beginning of the domain of dynamical models of fusion. Availability of precise ER cross

  3. Clusterization and Deformation in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Algora, A.; Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Hess, P.O.; Antonenko, N.V.; Jolos, R.V.; Scheid, W.

    2005-11-21

    The deformation-dependence of clusterization in heavy nuclei is investigated. In particular, allowed and forbidden cluster-configurations are determined for the ground, superdeformed, and hyperdeformed states of some nuclei, based on a microscopic (effective SU(3)) selection rule. The stability of the different cluster configurations from the viewpoint of the binding energy and the dinuclear system model (DNS) is also investigated.

  4. Investigation of the relative abundance of heavy versus light nuclei in primary cosmic rays using underground muon bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaralingam, N.

    1993-06-08

    We study multiple muon events (muon bundles) recorded underground at a depth of 2090 mwe. To penetrate to this depth, the muons must have energies above 0.8 TeV at the Earth`s surface; the primary cosmic ray nuclei which give rise to the observed muon bundles have energies at incidence upon the upper atmosphere of 10 to 10{sup 5}TeV. The events are detected using the Soudan 2 experiment`s fine grained tracking calorimeter which is surrounded by a 14 m {times}10 m {times} 31 m proportional tube array (the ``active shield``). Muon bundles which have at least one muon traversing the calorimeter, are reconstructed using tracks in the calorimeter together with hit patterns in the proportional tube shield. All ionization pulses are required to be coincident within 3 microseconds. A goal of this study is to investigate the relative nuclear abundances in the primary cosmic radiation around the ``knee`` region (10{sup 3} {minus} 10{sup 4} TeV) of the incident energy spectrum. Four models for the nuclear composition of cosmic rays are considered: The Linsley model, the Constant Mass Composition model (CMC), the Maryland model and the Proton-poor model. A Monte Carlo which incorporates one model at a time is used to simulate events which are then reconstructed using the same computer algorithms that are used for the data. Identical cuts and selections are applied to the data and to the simulated events.

  5. Review of metastable states in heavy nuclei.

    PubMed

    Dracoulis, G D; Walker, P M; Kondev, F G

    2016-07-01

    The structure of nuclear isomeric states is reviewed in the context of their role in contemporary nuclear physics research. Emphasis is given to high-spin isomers in heavy nuclei, with [Formula: see text]. The possibility to exploit isomers to study some of the most exotic nuclei is a recurring theme. In spherical nuclei, the role of octupole collectivity is discussed in detail, while in deformed nuclei the limitations of the K quantum number are addressed. Isomer targets and isomer beams are considered, along with applications related to energy storage, astrophysics, medicine, and experimental advances. PMID:27243336

  6. Review of metastable states in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Walker, P. M.; Kondev, F. G.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of nuclear isomeric states is reviewed in the context of their role in contemporary nuclear physics research. Emphasis is given to high-spin isomers in heavy nuclei, with A≳ 150 . The possibility to exploit isomers to study some of the most exotic nuclei is a recurring theme. In spherical nuclei, the role of octupole collectivity is discussed in detail, while in deformed nuclei the limitations of the K quantum number are addressed. Isomer targets and isomer beams are considered, along with applications related to energy storage, astrophysics, medicine, and experimental advances.

  7. Octupole shapes in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    1994-08-01

    Theoretical calculations and measurements show the presence of strong octupole correlations in thecyround states and low-lying states of odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei in the RaPa region. Evidence for octupole correlations is provided by the observation of parity doublets and reductions in M1 matrix elements, decoupling parameters, and Coriolis matrix elements Involving high-j states. Enhancement of E1 transition rates has also been observed for some of the octupole deformed nuclei. The most convincing argument for octupole deformation is provided by the similarities of the reduced alpha decay rates to the two members of parity doublets.

  8. The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) Small Explorer Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, John; Binns, W. Robert; Hams, Thomas; Israel, Martin; Krizmanic, John; Link, Jason; Rauch, Brian; Sakai, Kenichi; Sasaki, Makoto; Westphal, Andrew; Wiedenbeck, Mark; Heavy Nuclei eXplorer Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) will investigate the nature of the reservoirs of nuclei at the cosmic-ray sources, the mechanisms by which nuclei are removed from the reservoirs and injected into the cosmic accelerators, and the acceleration mechanism. HNX will use two large high-precision instruments, the Extremely-heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer (ECCO) and the Cosmic-ray Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (CosmicTIGER), flying in the SpaceX DragonLab, to measure, for the first time, the abundance of every individual element in the periodic table from carbon through the actinides, providing the first measurement of many of these elements. HNX will measure several thousand ultra-heavy galactic cosmic ray (UHGCR) nuclei Z >= 30, including about 50 actinides, and will: determine whether GCRs are accelerated from new or old material, and find their age; measure the mix of nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the UHGCRs; determine how UHGCR elements are selected for acceleration, and measure the mean integrated pathlength traversed by UHGCRs before observation. The scientific motivation and instrument complement of HNX will be discussed.

  9. The acceleration of heavy nuclei in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The overabundance of heavy nuclei in solar cosmic rays of energy approximately 5 Mev/nucleon is explained by taking into account the pre-flare ionization states of these nuclei in the region where they are accelerated. A model is proposed which considers two-step accelerations associated with the initial development of solar flares. The first step is closely related to the triggering process of flares, while the second one starts with the development of the explosive phase. Further ionization of medium and heavy nuclei occurs through their interaction with Kev electrons accelerated by the first-step acceleration. It is suggested that the role of these electrons is important in producing fully ionized atoms in the acceleration regions.

  10. The acceleration of heavy nuclei in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1975-01-01

    The overabundance of heavy nuclei in solar cosmic rays of energy below about 10 MeV/nucleon is explained by taking into account the pre-flare ionization states of these nuclei in the region where they are accelerated. A model is proposed which considers two-step accelerations associated with the initial development of solar flares. The first step is closely related to the triggering process of flares, while the second one starts with the development of the explosive phase. Further ionization of medium and heavy nuclei occurs through their interaction with keV electrons accelerated by the first-step acceleration. It is suggested that the role of these electrons is important in producing fully ionized atoms in the acceleration regions.

  11. Measurements of the fragmentation cross sections of relativistic heavy nuclei and their application to cosmic-ray propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Kertzman, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    The fragmentation cross sections of relativistic krypton, xenon, holmium and gold nuclei in targets of aluminium, carbon and polyethylene were measured. The beams were accelerated to maximum rigidity at the LBL Bevalac, corresponding to energies per nucleon of 1.5, 1.2, 1.1, and 1.0 Gev/amu for Kr, Xe, Ho, and Au respectively. The total and partial charge changing cross sections were determined for each beam and target combination, and cross sections in hydrogen were derived from the polyethylene (CH/sub 2/) and carbon data. The total cross sections were found to be 10% to 15% smaller than the predictions of a formula derived from measurements made with lower charge nuclei, and a new representation of the dependence of the total charge changing cross sections on beam and target charge was determined.

  12. Charge composition of high energy heavy primary cosmic ray nuclei. Ph.D. Thesis - Catholic Univ. of Am.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed study of the charge composition of primary cosmic radiation for about 5000 charged nuclei from neon to iron with energies greater than 1.16 GeV/nucleon is presented. Values are obtained after corrections were made for detector dependences, atmospheric attenuation, and solar modulation. New values of 38.5, 32.4, 23.7, and 16.8 g/sq cm for the attenuation mean free paths in air for the same charge groups are presented.

  13. The intergalactic propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray nuclei (A = 1-56) from cosmologically distant sources through the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Various models for the injected composition and spectrum and of the cosmic infrared background are studied using updated photodisintegration cross-sections. The observational data on the spectrum and the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are jointly consistent with a model where all of the injected primary cosmic rays are iron nuclei (or a mixture of heavy and light nuclei).

  14. Exotic nuclei with open heavy flavor mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Shigehiro; Sudoh, Kazutaka

    2009-08-01

    We propose stable exotic nuclei bound with D and B mesons with respect to heavy quark symmetry. We indicate that an approximate degeneracy of D(B) and D*(B*) mesons plays an important role, and discuss the stability of DN and BN bound states. We find the binding energies 1.4 MeV and 9.4 MeV for each state in the J{sup P}=1/2{sup -} with the I=0 channel. We discuss also possible existence of exotic nuclei DNN and BNN.

  15. The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizmanic, John; Mitchell, John; Binns, W. Robert; Hams, Thomas; Israel, Martin; Link, Jason; Rauch, Brian; Sakai, Kenichi; Sasaki, Makoto; Westphal, Andrew; Wiedenbeck, Mark; Heavy Nuclei eXplorer Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) will use two large high-precision instruments, the Extremely-heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer (ECCO) and the Cosmic-ray Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (CosmicTIGER), designed to fly in a SpaceX DragonLab Capsule, to measure the cosmic-ray abundance of every individual element in the periodic table from carbon through curium, providing the first measurement of many of these elements. These measurements provide an investigation on the nature of the source material of cosmic rays, the processes that inject them into cosmic accelerators, and the acceleration mechanisms. HNX will measure several thousand ultra-heavy galactic cosmic ray (UHGCR) nuclei with Z >= 30 , including about 50 actinides (Z >= 79). These data allow for a measurement of the mix of new and old material that is accelerated to GCRs, determine their age, measure the mix of nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the UHGCRs, determine how UHGCR elements are selected for acceleration, and measure the mean integrated pathlength traversed by UHGCRs before observation. The scientific motivation and instrumentation of HNX will be discussed as well as recent beam test results.

  16. Comparison of Muon Capture in Light and in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Measday, David F.; Stocki, Trevor J.

    2007-10-26

    We have recently completed an experimental study at TRIUMF of muon capture in the following elements, N, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ni, I, Au, and Bi. We detected the nuclear gamma rays emitted by the product nuclei after muon capture. The energy of the gamma ray identifies the source nuclide, and thus the reaction which has occurred. Our data are of better quality, and more comprehensive than any other data set in the literature. The ({mu}{sup -},{nu}n) reaction is always dominant. In light nuclei, reactions such as ({mu}{sup -},{nu}p) and ({mu}{sup -},{nu}pn) can occur, but not for heavy nuclei. However the reverse is true for reactions such as ({mu}{sup -},{nu}3n) and ({mu}{sup -},{nu}4n), which are very rare in light nuclei, but easily detected in heavy elements. We shall discuss how such information can be useful in calculations of neutrino-nucleus interactions, and of electron-capture in supernovae.

  17. Formation of Slow Heavy Mesons in Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirenzaki, Satoru

    2009-10-01

    Meson - nucleus systems such as mesic atoms and mesic nuclei have been studied systematically for a long time. The binding energies and widths of these bound states provide us unique and valuable information on the meson-nucleus interactions. In addition, the measurements of light vector meson spectra in nucleus as the invariant mass of lepton pairs have also provided interesting information. So far, the properties of relatively light mesons have been studied well both theoretically and experimentally. In this contribution, to extend our studies to a domain of heavier mesons, we would like to report recent research activities on the formation of heavy mesons in nuclei with small momenta. We think it is very interesting to consider the in-medium properties of heavier mesons including heavy quark contents. As a first step to heavier mesons, we will report our studies on formation of slow phi meson in nuclei. In-medium properties of phi meson have been studied theoretically, which have close relation to K and K-bar meson properties in medium because of the strong coupling of phi to K and K-bar. The study of QCD sum rule and the data taken at KEK suggested 3 percent mass reduction of phi at the normal nuclear density, while the phi meson selfenergy calculated in some effective models indicated a significantly smaller attractive potential for phi. We will show the calculated spectra for some reactions.

  18. Relativistic heavy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Fernandez, J. I.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Binns, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    During three balloon flights of a 1 sq m sr ionization chamber/Cerenkov counter detector system, measurements were made of the atmospheric attenuation, flux, and charge composition of cosmic ray nuclei with 16 is less than or = Z is less than or = 30 and rigidity greater than 4.5 GV. The attenuation mean free path in air of VH (20 less than or = Z less than or = 30) nuclei is found to be 19.7 + or - 1.6 g/sq cm, a value somewhat greater than the best previous measurement. The attenuation mean free path of iron is found to be 15.6 + or - 2.2 g/sq cm, consistent with predictions of geometric cross-section formulae. An absolute flux of VH nuclei 10 to 20% higher than earlier experiments at similar geomagnetic cutoff and level of solar activity was measured. The relative abundances of even-charged nuclei are found to be in good agreement with results of other recent high resolution counter experiments. The observed cosmic ray chemical composition implies relative abundances at the cosmic ray source of Ca/Fe = 0.12 + or - 0.04 and S/Fe = 0.14 + or - 0.05.

  19. Nuclei at HERA and heavy ion physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.; Strikman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Copies of 16 viewgraph sets from a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 17-18 November, 1995. Titles of talks: HERA: The Present; HERA: Potential with Nuclei; Review of Hadron-Lepton Nucleus Data; Fermilab E665: results in muon scattering; Interactions of Quarks and Gluons with Nuclear Matter; Rescattering in Nuclear Targets for Photoproduction and DIS; Structure Functions and Nuclear Effect at PHENIX; Probing Spin-Averaged and Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions Using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR); Jet Quenching in eA, pA, AA; Nuclear Gluon Shadowing via Continuum Lepton Pairs; What can we learn from HERA with a colliding heavy ion beam? The limiting curve of leading particles at infinite A; Coherent Production of Vector Mesons off Light Nuclei in DIS; A Model of High Parton Densities in PQCD; Gluon Production for Weizaecker-Williams Field in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions; Summary Talk.

  20. Heavy-particle radioactivity of superheavy nuclei.

    PubMed

    Poenaru, D N; Gherghescu, R A; Greiner, W

    2011-08-01

    The concept of heavy-particle radioactivity (HPR) is changed to allow emitted particles with Z(e) > 28 from parents with Z > 110 and daughter around (208)Pb. Calculations for superheavy (SH) nuclei with Z = 104-124 are showing a trend toward shorter half-lives and larger branching ratio relative to α decay for heavier SHs. It is possible to find regions in which HPR is stronger than alpha decay. The new mass table AME11 and the theoretical KTUY05 and FRDM95 masses are used to determine the released energy. For 124 we found isotopes with half-lives in the range of ns to ps. PMID:21902317

  1. Abundances of cosmic ray nuclei heavier than 50 Sn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Fickle, R. K.; Garrard, T. L.; Stone, E. C.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported from 430 days of exposure of the heavy nuclei experiment on the HEAO-3 spacecraft. These results are confined to the heavy nuclei with Z equal to or greater than 50 and emphasize the conclusions obtained on the relative numbers of actinides and heavy stable elements in the lead-platinum region. The extreme paucity of actinides found is inconsistent with the predictions of a cosmic ray source that is highly enriched in r-process material, but quite consistent with a source whose composition is similar to that of normal solar system material. An upper limit, at the 95 percent confidence level, is placed in the ratio of nuclei with Z equal to or greater than 88/(Z in the range from 74 to 87) of 0.03.

  2. Active Galactic Nuclei:. Sources for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, P. L.; Becker, J. K.; Caramete, L.; Gergely, L.; Mariş, I. C.; Meli, A.; de Souza, V.; Stanev, T.

    Ultra high energy cosmic ray events presently show a spectrum, which we interpret here as galactic cosmic rays due to a starburst, in the radio galaxy Cen A which is pushed up in energy by the shock of a relativistic jet. The knee feature and the particles with energy immediately higher in galactic cosmic rays then turn into the bulk of ultra high energy cosmic rays. This entails that all ultra high energy cosmic rays are heavy nuclei. This picture is viable if the majority of the observed ultra high energy events come from the radio galaxy Cen A, and are scattered by intergalactic magnetic fields across much of the sky.

  3. Interactions of heavy nuclei, Kr, Xe and Ho, in light targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kertzman, M. P.; Klarmann, J.; Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Garrard, T. L.; Israel, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past few years, the HEAO-3 measurements of the abundance of ultra-heavy cosmic ray nuclei (Z 26) at Earth were analyzed. In order to interpret these abundances in terms of a source composition, allowances must be made for the propagation of the nuclei in the interstellar medium. Vital to any calculation of the propagation is a knowlege of the total and partial interaction cross sections for these heavy nuclei on hydrogen. Until recently, data on such reactions have been scarce. The semi-empirical formalism of Silberberg and Tsao were relied upon to predict the partial cross sections. However, now that relativistic heavy ion beams are available at the LBL Bevalac, some of the cross sections of interest can be measured at energies close to those of the cosmic ray nuclei being observed.

  4. X-ray decay lines from heavy nuclei in supernova remnants as a probe of the r-process origin and the birth periods of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, Justin L.; Metzger, Brian D.; Arcones, Almudena; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    The origin of rapid neutron capture (r-process) nuclei remains one of the longest standing mysteries in nuclear astrophysics. Core collapse supernovae (SNe) and neutron star binary mergers are likely r-process sites, but little evidence yet exists for their in situ formation in such environments. Motivated by the advent of sensitive new or planned X-ray telescopes such as the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), we revisit the prospects for the detection of X-ray decay lines from r-process nuclei in young or nearby supernova remnants. For all remnants planned to be observed by NuSTAR (and several others), we conclude that r-process nuclei are detectable only if the remnant possesses a large overabundance O ≳ 10^3 relative to the average yield per SN. Prospects are better for the next Galactic SN (assumed age of 3 yr and distance of 10 kpc), for which an average r-process yield is detectable via the 10.7 (9.2) keV line complexes of 194Os by LOFT at 6σ (5σ) confidence; the 27.3 keV line complex of 125Sb is detectable by NuSTAR at 2σ for O ≳ 2. We also consider X-rays lines from the remnants of Galactic magnetars, motivated by the much higher r-process yields of the magnetorotationally driven SNe predicted to birth magnetars. The ˜3.6-3.9 keV lines of 126Sn are potentially detectable in the remnants of the magnetars 1E1547.0-5408 and 1E2259+586 by LOFT for an assumed r-process yield predicted by recent simulations. The (non-)detection of these lines can thus probe whether magnetars are indeed born with millisecond periods. Finally, we consider a blind survey of the Galactic plane with LOFT for r-process lines from the most recent binary neutron star merger remnant, concluding that a detection is unlikely without additional information on the merger location.

  5. Mechanism of heavy ion fusion to superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, Gurgen G.; Antonenko, Nikolai V.; Scheid, Werner

    2011-10-01

    This article reviews different models for the description of fusion of heavy ions to superheavy nuclei by using adiabatic and diabatic potentials. The dynamics of fusion is basically different in the two types of models for fusion: In the adiabatic models the nuclei melt together, whereas in the diabatic models the nuclei transfer nucleons between each other up to the instant when the compound nucleus is formed. As final result we state that diabatic potentials seem more appropriate for the description of fusion of heavy nuclei than adiabatic potentials.

  6. Interactions of heavy nuclei, Kr, Xe and Ho, in light targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kertzman, M. P.; Klarmann, J.; Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Garrard, T. L.; Israel, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past few years, the HEAO-3 measurements of the abundances of ultra-heavy cosmic ray nuclei (Z 26) at earth have been analyzed. In order to interpret these abundances in terms of a source composition, allowance must be made for the propagation of the nuclei in the interstellar medium. Vital to any calculation of the propagation is a knowlege of the total and partial interaction cross sections for these heavy nuclei on hydrogen. Until recently, data on such reactions have been scarce. However, now that relativistic heavy ion beams are available at the LBL Bevalac, some of the cross sections of interest can be measured at energies close to those of the cosmic ray nuclei being observed. During a recent calibration at the Bevalac of an array similar to the HEAO-C3 UH-nuclei detector, targets of raphite (C), polyethylene (CH2), and aluminum were exposed to five heavy ion beams ranging in charge (Z) from 36 to 92. Total and partial charge changing cross sections for the various beam nuclei on hydrogen can be determined from the measured cross sections on C and CH2, and will be applied to the propagation problem. The cross sections on Al can be used to correct the abundances of UH cosmic rays observed in the HEAO C-3 detector for interactions in the detector itself.

  7. Ultra heavy cosmic ray experiment (A0178)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A.; Osullivan, D.; Bosch, J.; Keegan, R.; Wenzel, K. P.; Jansen, F.; Domingo, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) is based on a modular array of 192 side viewing solid state nuclear track detector stacks. These stacks were mounted in sets of four in 48 pressure vessels using 16 peripheral LDEF trays. The geometry factor for high energy cosmic ray nuclei, allowing for Earth shadowing, was 30 sq m sr, giving a total exposure factor of 170 sq m sr y at an orbital inclination of 28.4 degs. Scanning results indicate that about 3000 cosmic ray nuclei in the charge region with Z greater than 65 were collected. This sample is more than ten times the current world data in the field (taken to be the data set from the HEAO-3 mission plus that from the Ariel-6 mission) and is sufficient to provide the world's first statistically significant sample of actinide cosmic rays. Results are presented including a sample of ultra heavy cosmic ray nuclei, analysis of pre-flight and post-flight calibration events and details of track response in the context of detector temperature history. The integrated effect of all temperature and age related latent track variations cause a maximum charge shift of + or - 0.8e for uranium and + or - 0.6e for the platinum-lead group. Astrophysical implications of the UHCRE charge spectrum are discussed.

  8. Reactions of synthesis of heavy nuclei: Brief summary and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.

    2006-06-15

    The possible reactions of synthesis of extremely heavy nuclei with almost closed proton and neutron shells are analyzed on the basis of current experimental and theoretical data on the properties of the isotopes of superheavy elements. It has been shown that advances in obtaining extremely heavy nuclei for which microscopic models predict an increase in stability require further investigations of the mechanism of synthesis reactions. Direct and model experiments aimed at solving this problem are discussed.

  9. Analytic expressions for {alpha} particle preformation in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. F.; Wang, Y. J.; Dong, J. M.; Royer, G.

    2009-11-15

    Experimental {alpha} decay energies and half-lives are investigated systematically to extract {alpha} particle preformation in heavy nuclei. Formulas for the preformation factors are proposed that can be used to guide microscopic studies on preformation factors and perform accurate calculations of the {alpha} decay half-lives. There is little evidence for the existence of an island of long stability of superheavy nuclei.

  10. Cosmic Ray Nuclei (CRN) detector investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Peter; Muller, Dietrich; Lheureux, Jacques; Swordy, Simon

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Nuclei (CRN) detector was designed to measure elemental composition and energy spectra of cosmic radiation nuclei ranging from lithium to iron. CRN was flown as part of Spacelab 2 in 1985, and consisted of three basic components: a gas Cerenkov counter, a transition radiation detector, and plastic scintillators. The results of the experiment indicate that the relative abundance of elements in this range, traveling at near relativistic velocities, is similar to those reported at lower energy.

  11. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made.

  12. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, W. U.

    1993-08-01

    Papers on the following topics are included: The Cold-Fusion Saga; Decay Patterns of Dysprosium Nuclei Produced in S-32 + Sn-118,124 Fusion Reactions; Unexpected Features of Reactions Between Very Heavy Ions at Intermediate Bombarding Energies; Correlations Between Neutrons and Charged Products from the Dissipative Reaction Au-197 + Pb-208 at E/A = 29 MeV; Dissipative Dynamics of Projectile-Like Fragment Production in the Reaction Bi-209 + Xe-136 at E/A = 28.2 MeV; Dynamical Production of Intermediate-Mass Fragments in Peripheral Bi-209 + Xe-136 Collisions at E(sub lab)/A = 28.2 MeV; The Rochester 960-Liter Neutron Multiplicity Meter; A Simple Pulse Processing Concept for a Low-Cost Pulse-Shape-Based Particle Identification; A One-Transistor Preamplifier for PMT Anode Signals; A Five-Channel Multistop TDC/Event Handler for the SuperBall Neutron Multiplicity Meter; Construction of the SuperBall - a 16,000-Liter Neutron Detector for Calorimetric Studies of Intermediate-Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions; A Computer Code for Light Detection Efficiency Calculations for Photo-multipliers of a Neutron Detector; Evaluation of Gd-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for the SuperBall Neutron Calorimeter; and Measurement of the Interaction of Cosmic-Ray mu(-) with a Muon Telescope.

  13. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, compared the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers to beams of 26Fe, 36Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z sq scaling.

  14. Transport of cosmic ray nuclei in various materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.; Letaw, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic-ray heavy ions have become a concern in space radiation effects analyses. Heavy ions rapidly deposit energy and create dense ionization trails as they traverse materials. Collection of the free charge disrupts the operation of microelectronic circuits. This effect, called the single-event upset, can cause a loss of digital data. Passage of high linear energy transfer particles through the eyes has been observed by Apollo astronauts. These heavy ions have great radiobiological effectiveness and are the primary risk factor for leukemia induction on a manned Mars mission. Models of the transport of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei through materials depend heavily on our understanding of the cosmic-ray environment, nuclear spallation cross sections, and computer transport codes. Our group has initiated and pursued the development of a full capability for modeling these transport processes. A recent review of this ongoing effort is presented in Ref. 5. In this paper, we discuss transport methods and present new results comparing the attenuation of cosmic rays in various materials.

  15. Transport of cosmic ray nuclei in various materials.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, R; Tsao, C H; Letaw, J R

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic-ray heavy ions have become a concern in space radiation effects analyses. Heavy ions rapidly deposit energy and create dense ionization trails as they traverse materials. Collection of the free charge disrupts the operation of microelectronic circuits. This effect, called the single-event upset, can cause a loss of digital data. Passage of high linear energy transfer particles through the eyes has been observed by Apollo astronauts. These heavy ions have great radiobiological effectiveness and are the primary risk factor for leukemia induction on a manned Mars mission. Models of the transport of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei through materials depend heavily on our understanding of the cosmic-ray environment, nuclear spallation cross sections, and computer transport codes. Our group has initiated and pursued the development of a full capability for modeling these transport processes. A recent review of this ongoing effort is presented in Ref. 5. In this paper, we discuss transport methods and present new results comparing the attenuation of cosmic rays in various materials. PMID:11538213

  16. Formation of Heavy and Superheavy Neutron Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, Valery; Greiner, Walter

    2010-04-30

    A new way is proposed to discover and examine unknown neutron-rich heavy and superheavy nuclei at the 'north-east' part of the nuclear map. The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map is very close to stability while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides to the east of the stability line (also those located along the neutron closed shell N = 126) is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleo-genesis. A novel idea is proposed for the production of these nuclei via low-energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions using a gain given by the shell effects. This finding may spur new studies at heavy ion facilities and should have significant impact for future experiments. The use of the multi-nucleon transfer reactions in low-energy collisions of heavy actinide nuclei gives us also the only chance to approach the 'island of stability' of superheavy elements. A possibility for a three-body decay (heavy ternary fission) is predicted for superheavy nuclei.

  17. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R K; Townsend, L W

    1994-07-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made. PMID:9969695

  18. Photo-disintegration of heavy nuclei at the core of Cen A

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Esha; Gupta, Nayantara E-mail: nayan@rri.res.in

    2014-04-01

    Fermi LAT has detected gamma ray emissions from the core of Cen A. More recently, a new component in the gamma ray spectrum from the core has been reported in the energy range of 4 GeV to tens of GeV. We show that the new component and the HESS detected spectrum of gamma rays from the core at higher energy have possibly a common origin in photo-disintegration of heavy nuclei. Assuming the cosmic rays are mostly Fe nuclei inside the core and their spectrum has a low energy cut-off at 52 TeV in the wind frame moving with a Doppler factor 0.25 with respect to the observer on earth, the cosmic ray luminosity required to explain the observed gamma ray flux above 1 GeV is found to be 1.5 × 10{sup 43} erg/sec.

  19. Gamma rays from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1990-01-01

    The general properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and quasars are reviewed with emphasis on their continuum spectral emission. Two general classes of models for the continuum are outlined and critically reviewed in view of the impending GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory) launch and observations. The importance of GRO in distinguishing between these models and in general in furthering the understanding of AGN is discussed. The very broad terms the status of the current understanding of AGN are discussed.

  20. A Semi-microscopic Approach to Clusterization in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Darai, J.; Cseh, J.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Algora, A.; Hess, P. O.; Scheid, W.

    2009-08-26

    We present a semimicroscopic approach to clusterization in heavy nuclei. The method is largely based on symmetry-considerations. As an example we determine the possible binary clusterizations of the shape isomers of the {sup 56}Ni nucleus. We combine our structure-considerations with energy-calculations.

  1. Recent studies of heavy nuclei far from stability at JYFL

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, R.; Enqvist, T.; Helariutta, K.

    1996-12-31

    The new K=130 Cyclotron + ECR facility of the Physics Department of the University of Jyvaskyla (JYFL) provides stable beams from protons up to krypton ions for nuclear structure studies. Two instruments designed especially for in-beam spectroscopic studies of heavy nuclei at JYFL are introduced in this contribution. Some results from recent measurements with them are reported.

  2. Radiative corrections to high energy lepton bremsstrahlung on heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, Andrej B.

    2008-01-01

    One-loop radiative corrections to the leptonic tensor in high energy bremsstrahlung on heavy nuclei are calculated. Virtual and real photon radiation is taken into account. Double bremsstrahlung is simulated by means of Monte Carlo. Numerical results are presented for the case of muon bremsstrahlung in conditions of the COMPASS experiment at CERN.

  3. The LDEF ultra heavy cosmic ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osullivan, D.; Thompson, A.; Bosch, J.; Keegan, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smit, A.; Domingo, C.

    1992-01-01

    The LDEF Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) used 16 side viewing LDEF trays giving a total geometry factor for high energy cosmic rays of 30 sq m sr. The total exposure factor was 170 sq m sr y. The experiment is based on a modular array of 192 solid state nuclear track detector stacks, mounted in sets of four in 48 pressure vessels. The extended duration of the LDEF mission has resulted in a greatly enhanced potential scientific yield from the UHCRE. Initial scanning results indicate that at least 1800 cosmic ray nuclei with Z greater than 65 were collected, including the world's first statistically significant sample of actinides. Post flight work to date and the current status of the experiment are reviewed.

  4. The LDEF ultra heavy cosmic ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osullivan, D.; Thompson, A.; Bosch, J.; Keegan, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smit, A.; Domingo, C.

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) used 16 side viewing LDEF trays giving a total geometry factor for high energy cosmic rays of 30 sq m sr. The total exposure factor was 170 sq m sr y. The experiment is based on a modular array of 192 solid state nuclear track detector stacks, mounted in sets of 4 pressure vessels (3 experiment tray). The extended duration of the LDEF mission has resulted in a greatly enhanced potential scientific yield from the UHCRE. Initial scanning results indicate that at least 2000 cosmic ray nuclei with Z greater than 65 were collected, including the world's first statistically significant sample of actinides. Postflight work to date and the current status of the experiment are reviewed. Provisional results from analysis of preflight and postflight calibrations are presented.

  5. Properties of heavy and superheavy nuclei in supernova environments

    SciTech Connect

    Buervenich, T. J.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, W.

    2008-05-12

    The properties of nuclei embedded in an electron gas are studied within the relativistic mean-field approach. These studies are relevant for nuclear properties in astrophysical environments such as neutron-star crusts and supernova explosions. The electron gas is treated as a constant background in the Wigner-Seitz cell approximation. We investigate the stability of nuclei with respect to {alpha} and {beta} decay. We find that the presence of the electrons leads to stabilizing effects for {alpha} decay at high electron densities. Furthermore, the screening effect shifts the proton dripline to more proton-rich nuclei, and the stability line with respect to {beta}-decay is shifted to more neutron-rich nuclei. Implications for the creation and survival of very heavy nuclear systems are discussed.

  6. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a recent calibration at the LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers were compared to beams of 26Fe, 36 Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79 Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z squared scaling.

  7. Quantum effects in low-energy photofission of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tsipenyuk, Y.M.; Ostapenko, Y.B.; Smirenkin, G.N.; Soldatov, A.S.

    1984-09-01

    The article is devoted to quantum effects in highly deformed nuclei and the related features of the fission mechanism in the low-energy photofission of heavy nuclei. The following questions are considered: the spectrum of transition states (fission channels), the symmetry of the nuclear configuration in the deformation process, the features of the passage through the barrier due to the existence in the second well of quasistationary states of fissile and nonfissile modes, the isomeric-shelf phenomenon in deep sub-barrier fission, and the relation between the fragment mass distribution and the structure of the fission barrier.

  8. Determination of the charge of relativistic heavy nuclei from emulsion tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, S. H., Jr.; Eby, P. B.

    1971-01-01

    The number of delta rays with energies between 50 and 150 keV that are produced by heavy nuclei in emulsions is calculated. The Z(2) dependence predicted by the first Born approximation is corrected by a direct calculation of the Mott exact phase-shift scattering cross section. Comparisons are made with corrections predicted by the second Born approximation. When the phase-shift results are applied to the problem of charge identification, corrections of up to 4 units of charge for 1.457-GeV/nucleon nuclei with charge Z = 75 are found.

  9. Capabilities of the LDEF-2 heavy nuclei collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drach, J.; Price, P. B.; Salamon, M. H.; Tarle, G.; Ahlen, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    To take the next big step beyond High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-3) the Heavy Nuclei Collector (HNC), to be carried on an LDEF reflight, has the goals of greatly increased collecting power ( 30 actinides) and charge resolution sigma sub Z or = 0.25 E for Z up to approximately 100, which will provide abundances of all the charges 40 or Z or = 96 and permit sensitive searches for hypothetical particles such as monopoles, superheavy elements, and quark nuggets.

  10. Post-launch analysis of data from the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory Heavy Nuclei Experiment (HEAO-C3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Final Report on the continuing analysis of data from the Heavy Nuclei Experiment (HNE), flown on the HEAO-3 mission, is presented. The HNE was designed to measure the elemental abundances of relativistic cosmic ray nuclei covering the charge range 17 is less than or equal to Z is less than or equal to 130. The result of these measurements is significant to the study of nucleosynthesis, the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic ray nuclei, and the properties of the interstellar medium.

  11. The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Adams, J. H.; Barbier, L. M.; Craig, N.; Cummings, A. C.; Cummings, J. R.; Doke, T.; Hasebe, N.; Hayashi, T.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The primary scientific objectives of HNX, which was recently selected by NASA for a Small Explorer (SMEX) Mission Concept Study, are to measure the age of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since nucleosynthesis, determine the injection mechanism for the GCR accelerator (Volatility or FIP), and study the mix of nucleosynthetic processes that contribute to the source of GCRs. The experimental goal of HNX is to measure the elemental abundances of all individual stable nuclei from neon through the actinides and possibly beyond. HNX is composed of two instruments: ECCO, which measures elemental abundances of nuclei with Z greater than or equal to 72, and ENTICE. which measures elemental abundances of nuclei with Z between 10 and 82. We describe the mission and the science that can be addressed by HNX.

  12. The Energetic Trans-Iron Composition Experiment (ENTICE) on the Heavy Nuclei Explorer (HNX) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hink, P. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Energetic Trans-Iron Composition Experiment (ENTICE) experiment is one of two experiments which comprise the Heavy Nuclei Explorer (HNX) mission. The experimental goal of ENTICE is to measure with high precision the elemental abundances of all nuclei with 10LZL82. This will enable us to determine if the injection mechanism for the cosmic ray accelerator is controlled by FIP or Volatility and to study the mix of nucleosynthetic processes that contribute to the galactic cosmic ray source. The ENTICE experiment utilizes the dE/dx-C method of charge determination and consists of silicon dE/dx detectors, Cherenkov detectors with two different refractive indices, and a scintillating fiber hodoscope. The geometrical factor of the instrument is approximately 8m2sr. We will present a description of the instrument and its expected performance based on beam tests and a balloon flight of a prototype instrument.

  13. Fusion and fission of heavy and superheavy nuclei (experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, M. G.; Vardaci, E.; Itkis, I. M.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    The scope of this review is to summarize the main advancements in the search of signatures of the compound nucleus fission and quasifission processes in heavy and superheavy systems. The understanding of fusion and fission in heavy and superheavy elements is needed for tracing paths aimed at reaching the island of stability situated near Z = 114- 122 and N = 184. With increasing charge of the interacting nuclei other processes, like quasifission, emerge and compete against fusion. Hence also their study must be pursued. After a brief look at the experimental techniques, the behavior of several observables is extracted from the most recent data to aid in the disentanglement of the various competing processes which hinder the production of superheavy elements.

  14. Gamma ray astronomy and the origin of the light nuclei. [cosmic ray and interstellar gas reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, H.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear reactions induced by the collisions of the protons and alphas of the galactic cosmic ray with heavy nuclei of the interstellar gas are responsible for the continuous production of the light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron in the galaxy. To better than one order of magnitude, the observed ratios of these abundances to hydrogen abundance and the nuclidic abundance ratios between themselves are accounted for by simply considering the effect of fast protons and alphas with a flux and an energy spectrum as observed in galactic cosmic rays, for a period comparable with the life of our galaxy. The role of gamma ray astronomy in solving problems that occur when accurate agreement is sought with increasingly accurate data is discussed.

  15. Very high energy antineutrinos from photo-disintegration of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nayantara

    2016-02-01

    The photo-disintegration of cosmic ray nuclei by starlight leads to the production of secondary antineutrinos. We have assumed that the flux of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei near the Galactic plane region is the same as that observed near the earth and calculated the antineutrino flux produced from their photo-disintegration. The IceCube detector has measured the neutrino/antineutrino flux in the TeV-PeV energy range. Our calculated secondary antineutrino flux in the energy range of 10-100 TeV is found to be much less compared to the flux detected by the IceCube collaboration. The upper limit on the intensity of the radiation field in the extragalactic medium is much lower than that near the Galactic center. If we extend our formalism to the extragalactic medium the contribution from the photo-disintegration of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray heavy nuclei remains insignificant due to their very low flux.

  16. Charmed Mesons in Nuclei with Heavy-Quark Spin Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, L.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Nieves, J.; Romanets, O.; Salcedo, L. L.

    2013-08-01

    We study the properties of charmed pseudoscalar and vector mesons in dense matter within a unitary meson-baryon coupled-channel model which incorporates heavy-quark spin symmetry. This is accomplished by extending the SU(3) Weinberg-Tomozawa Lagrangian to incorporate spin-flavor symmetry and implement a suitable flavor symmetry breaking. Several resonances with negative parity are generated dynamically by the s-wave interaction between pseudoscalar and vector meson multiplets with 1/2+ and 3/2+ baryons. Those states are then compared to experimental data as well as theoretical models. Next, Pauli-blocking effects and meson self-energies are introduced in a self-consistent manner to obtain the open-charm meson spectral functions in a dense nuclear environment. We finally discuss the formation of D-mesic nuclei.

  17. Remarks on the fission barriers of super-heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.; Heinz, S.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J.; Münzenberg, G.; Antalic, S.; Barth, W.; Dahl, L.; Eberhardt, K.; Grzywacz, R.; Hamilton, J. H.; Henderson, R. A.; Kenneally, J. M.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lang, R.; Lommel, B.; Miernik, K.; Miller, D.; Moody, K. J.; Morita, K.; Nishio, K.; Popeko, A. G.; Roberto, J. B.; Runke, J.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Scheidenberger, C.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Tinschert, K.; Trautmann, N.; Uusitalo, J.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Shell-correction energies of super-heavy nuclei are approximated by using Q_{α} values of measured decay chains. Five decay chains were analyzed, which start at the isotopes 285Fl, 294118, 291Lv, 292Lv and 293Lv. The data are compared with predictions of macroscopic-microscopic models. Fission barriers are estimated that can be used to eliminate uncertainties in partial fission half-lives and in calculations of evaporation-residue cross-sections. In that calculations, fission probability of the compound nucleus is a major factor contributing to the total cross-section. The data also provide constraints on the cross-sections of capture and quasi-fission in the entrance channel of the fusion reaction. Arguments are presented that fusion reactions for synthesis of isotopes of elements 118 and 120 may have higher cross-sections than assumed so far.

  18. Strictly finite-range potential for light and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, P.; Lovas, R. G.; Betan, R. M. Id; Vertse, T.; Balkay, L.

    2014-05-01

    Strictly finite-range (SFR) potentials are exactly zero beyond their finite range. Single-particle energies and densities, as well as S-matrix pole trajectories, are studied in a few SFR potentials suited for the description of neutrons interacting with light and heavy nuclei. The SFR potentials considered are the standard cutoff Woods-Saxon (CWS) potentials and two potentials approaching zero smoothly: the SV potential introduced by Salamon and Vertse [Phys. Rev. C 77, 037302 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevC.77.037302] and the SS potential of Sahu and Sahu [Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 21, 1250067 (2012), 10.1142/S021830131250067X]. The parameters of these latter potentials were set so that the potentials may be similar to the CWS shape. The range of the SV and SS potentials scales with the cube root of the mass number of the core like the nuclear radius itself. For light nuclei a single term of the SV potential (with a single parameter) is enough for a good description of the neutron-nucleus interaction. The trajectories are compared with a benchmark for which the starting points (belonging to potential depth zero) can be determined independently. Even the CWS potential is found to conform to this benchmark if the range is identified with the cutoff radius. For the CWS potentials some trajectories show irregular shapes, while for the SV and SS potentials all trajectories behave regularly.

  19. Isotopic stack - measurement of heavy cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.

    1981-01-01

    Heavy cosmic ray nuclei with nuclear charge, Z, equal to or greater than 3 are to be measured using an isotopic stack consisting of passive visual track detectors which remain sensitive throughout the entire mission. The scientific data are stored in latent tracks which are produced by heavy ions and which can be revealed in the investigator's laboratory after recovery. During the mission, only housekeeping data have to be collected. The exposure onboard Spacelab 1 allows the study of the chemical composition and energy spectrum of articles which have energies in the range 20 to 100 million electron volts per atomic mass unit, as well as the isotopic composition of heavy galactic cosmic rays with energies in the range 100 to 1000 million electron volts per atomic mass unit.

  20. Secondary electron background produced by heavy nuclei in a multiwire proportional counter hodoscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, S. H., Jr.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Schwille, H.; Pollvogt, U.

    1974-01-01

    The secondary electron background produced by heavy nuclei in a multiwire proportional counter hodoscope is calculated using both a simplified and a more complete Monte Carlo model. These results are compared with experimental data from a small multiwire proportional counter hodoscope operated in a 530 MeV/nucleon accelerator beam of nitrogen nuclei. Estimates of the secondary electron background produced by heavy relativistic nuclei are presented along with the detailed results from calculations of energy deposition in the hodoscope counter cells.

  1. ECCO: Th/U/Pu/Cm Dating of Galactic Cosmic Ray Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Weaver, B. A.; Solarz, M.; Dominquez, G.; Craig, N.; Adams, J. H.; Barbier, L. M.; Christian, E. R.; Mitchell, J. W.; Binns, W. R.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ECCO (Extremely-heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer) instrument is one of two instruments which comprise the HNX (Heavy Nuclei Explorer) mission. The principal goal of ECCO is to measure the age of galactic cosmic ray nuclei using the actinides (Th, U, Pu, Cm) as clocks. As a bonus, ECCO will search with unprecedented sensitivity for long-lived elements in the superheavy island of stability. ECCO is an enormous array (23 sq. m) of BP-1 glass track-etch detectors, and is based on the successful flight heritage of the Trek detector which was deployed externally on Mir. We present a description of the instrument, estimates of expected performance, and recent calibrations which demonstrate that the actinides can be resolved from each other with good charge resolution.

  2. Composition and energy spectra of heavy nuclei of unknown origin detected on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. H.; Price, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    Lexan track detectors with large collecting power were exposed inside and outside Skylab during late 1973 and early 1974. Steeply falling energy spectra of nuclei with Z greater than or equal to 8 and energies between 10 and 40 MeV were observed at intensities much higher than those observed outside the magnetosphere. Four possible sources (solar flare particles; low-energy cosmic rays; the anomalous component of low-energy cosmic rays; particles trapped in the inner Van Allen belt) are examined using Skylab particle flux data outside the magnetosphere and other measurements. The composition is found to be most consistent with that of the solar corona. It is suggested that heavy solar wind ions enter the magnetosphere, are accelerated, and populate the inner radiation belt.

  3. Medium-heavy nuclei from nucleon-nucleon interactions in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takashi; Aoki, Sinya; Charron, Bruno; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji; HAL QCD Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock method with the nucleon-nucleon forces obtained from lattice QCD simulations, the properties of the medium-heavy doubly magic nuclei such as 16O and 40Ca are investigated. We found that those nuclei are bound for the pseudoscalar meson mass MPS≃470 MeV. The mass number dependence of the binding energies, single-particle spectra, and density distributions are qualitatively consistent with those expected from empirical data at the physical point, although these hypothetical nuclei at heavy quark mass have smaller binding energies than the real nuclei.

  4. Nuclear isospin asymmetry in α decay of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Eunkyoung; Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho; Oh, Yongseok

    2016-08-01

    The effects of nuclear isospin asymmetry on α -decay lifetimes of heavy nuclei are investigated within various phenomenological models of the nuclear potential for the α particle. We consider the widely used simple square-well potential and Woods-Saxon potential and modify them by including an isospin asymmetry term. We then suggest a model for the potential of the α particle motivated by a microscopic phenomenological approach of the Skyrme force model, which naturally introduces the isospin-dependent form of the nuclear potential for the α particle. The empirical α -decay lifetime formula of Viola and Seaborg [J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 28, 741 (1966), 10.1016/0022-1902(66)80412-8] is also modified to include isospin asymmetry effects. The obtained α -decay half-lives are in good agreement with the experimental data, and we find that including the nuclear isospin effects somehow improves the theoretical results for α -decay half-lives. The implications of these results are discussed, and the predictions on the α -decay lifetimes of superheavy elements are also presented.

  5. The decay of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  6. Anisotropies of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei diffusing from extragalactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harari, Diego; Mollerach, Silvia; Roulet, Esteban

    2015-09-01

    We obtain the dipolar anisotropies in the arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei diffusing from nearby extragalactic sources. We consider mixed-composition scenarios in which different cosmic ray nuclei are accelerated up to the same maximum rigidity, so that E heavy composition above the ankle. We obtain the anisotropies through Monte Carlo simulations that implement the cosmic ray diffusion in extragalactic turbulent fields as well as the effects of photodisintegrations and other energy losses. Dipolar anisotropies at the level of 5% to 10% at energies ˜10 EeV are predicted for plausible values of the source density and magnetic fields.

  7. Predicted CALET Measurements of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian

    2013-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET), comprised of main calorimeter telescope (CAL) and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM), is under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014. CAL consists of a Charge Detector (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an Imaging Calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (X0) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC) with 27 X0 of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of CAL are to measure electron energy spectra from 1GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1,000 TeV. In this paper we discuss the predicted abundance measurements CAL can make of rare ultra-heavy (UH) nuclei (30 <=Z <=40). In addition to the nuclei that pass within the full CAL geometry, UH nuclei can be resolved using the CHD and top IMC layers without requiring particle energy determination in the TASC in the portion of the ISS 51.6^o inclination orbit where the geomagnetic rigidity cutoffs are above minimum ionization in the scintillator. In 5-years CAL would collect 4-5 times the UH statistics of TIGER.

  8. Super-Heavy Element and Other Exotic Nuclei Research at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyer, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The experimental nuclear physics group at LLNL is actively investigating exotic nuclei in a variety of regions of the chart of nuclides - from light nuclei to super-heavy elements. The experimental nuclear physics effort at LLNL is centered on investigating nuclei at the extremes--in particular, extremes of spin, isospin, neutron richness, excitation energy, decay and detectability, mass, and stability. This talk will focus on recent heavy and super-heavy element experiments including nuclear structure investigations of the heaviest nuclei. Other areas of research, including radioactive ion beam experiments, trapping experiments, nuclear decay spectroscopy experiments, and rare decay searches, will be discussed as time permits. Recent experimental results on studies of exotic nuclei by scientists at LLNL will be presented.

  9. Heavy particle radioactivity from superheavy nuclei leading to 298114 daughter nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Priyanka, B.

    2014-09-01

    The feasibility for the alpha decay and the heavy particle decay from the even-even superheavy (SH) nuclei with Z = 116- 124 has been studied within the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). Our predicted half lives agree well with the values evaluated using the Universal formula for cluster decay (UNIV) of Poenaru et al., the Universal Decay Law (UDL) of Qi et al., and the Scaling Law of Horoi et al. The spontaneous fission half lives of the corresponding parents have also been evaluated using the semi-empirical formula of Santhosh et al. Within our fission model, we have studied the cluster formation probability for various clusters and the maximum cluster formation probability is found for the decay accompanying 298114. In the plots for log10 (T1/2) against the neutron number of the daughter in the corresponding decay, the half life is found to be the minimum for the decay leading to 298114 (Z = 114, N = 184). Most of the predicted half lives are well within the present upper limit for measurements (T1/2 <1030 s) and the computed alpha half lives for 290,292Lv agree well with the experimental data.

  10. Monte Carlo Simulation of Heavy Nuclei Photofission at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade-II, E.; Freitas, E.; Garcia, F.; Tavares, O. A. P.; Duarte, S. B.

    2009-06-03

    A detailed description of photofission process at intermediate energies (200 to 1000 MeV) is presented. The study of the reaction is performed by a Monte Carlo method which allows the investigation of properties of residual nuclei and fissioning nuclei. The information obtained indicate that multifragmentation is negligible at the photon energies studied here, and that the symmetrical fission is dominant. Energy and mass distributions of residual and fissioning nuclei were calculated.

  11. The X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific goals of X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei are discussed. The underlying energy source, the regions responsible for the optical emission lines, the different types of active galaxies, and cosmology are considered. The requirements for an X-ray mission of broad band width, large collecting area, modest spatial resolution and good spectral resolution are outlined. It is concluded that the ESA XMM mission meets these requirements.

  12. Searches for superheavy elements in nature: Cosmic-ray nuclei; spontaneous fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    There is little chance that superheavy nuclei with lifetimes of no less than 100 million years are present on the stability island discovered at present. Also, pessimistic are the results of estimates made about their nucleosynthesis in r-process. Nevertheless, the search for these nuclei in nature is justified in view of the fundamental importance of this topic. The first statistically significant data set was obtained by the LDEF Ultra-Heavy Cosmic-Ray Experiment, consisting of 35 tracks of actinide nuclei in galactic cosmic rays. Because of their exceptionally long exposure time in Galaxy, olivine crystals extracted from meteorites generate interest as detectors providing unique data regarding the nuclear composition of ancient cosmic rays. The contemporary searches for superheavy elements in the earth matter rely on knowledge obtained from chemical studies of artificially synthesized superheavy nuclei. New results finding out the chemical behavior of superheavy elements should be employed to obtain samples enriched in their homologues. The detection of rare spontaneous fission events and the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry are employed in these experiments.

  13. High-energy cosmic-ray nuclei from high- and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts and implications for multimessenger astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-07-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are one of the candidates of ultrahigh-energy (> or approx. 10{sup 18.5} eV) cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources. We investigate high-energy cosmic-ray acceleration including heavy nuclei in GRBs by using Geant 4, and discuss its various implications, taking both high-luminosity (HL) and low-luminosity (LL) GRBs into account. This is because LL GRBs may also make a significant contribution to the observed UHECR flux if they form a distinct population. We show that not only protons, but also heavier nuclei can be accelerated up to ultrahigh energies in the internal, (external) reverse, and forward shock models. We also show that the condition for ultrahigh-energy heavy nuclei such as iron to survive is almost the same as that for {approx}TeV gamma rays to escape from the source and for high-energy neutrinos not to be much produced. The multimessenger astronomy by neutrino and GeV-TeV gamma-ray telescopes such as IceCube and KM3Net, GLAST and MAGIC will be important to see whether GRBs can be accelerators of ultrahigh-energy heavy nuclei. We also demonstrate expected spectra of high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays, and discuss their detectabilities. In addition, we discuss implications of the GRB-UHECR hypothesis. We point out, since the number densities of HL GRBs and LL GRBs are quite different, its determination by UHECR observations is also important.

  14. Heavy nuclei confinement effect in a pulsed light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, S. S.; Roshchupkin, S. P.

    2011-04-01

    It is a model theoretical work of the applied character in which: "Outside the framework of the dipole approximation (with an accuracy of about v/c) the effective interaction force between stripped uranium nuclei in the presence pulsed field of two laser waves extending towards each other is theoretically studied. It is shown that the effective interaction force between uranium nuclei, can become an attractive force on certain time intervals in the presence of the pulsed laser field. As a result the pulsed laser field can slow down backward motion of nuclei in 7 times."

  15. Cosmic ray nuclei from extragalactic and galactic pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke

    2013-02-01

    In an extragalactic newly-born pulsar, nuclei striped off the star surface can be accelerated to extreme energies and leave the source through dense supernova surroundings. The escaped ultrahigh energy cosmic rays can explain both UHE energy spectral and atmospheric depth observations. In addition, assuming that Galactic pulsars accelerate cosmic rays with the same injection composition, very high energy cosmic rays from local pulsars can meet the flux measurements from above the knee to the ankle, and at the same time, agree with the detected composition trend.

  16. X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    It is often held that the X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) arises from a region close to the central energy source. Thus X-ray observations may provide the best constraints on the central engine. In particular, the shape of the X-ray continuum gives information about the mechanism for photon generation, X-ray time variability data can constrain the size and mass of the continuum source, and X-ray occultation data give constraints on the relative sizes of the continuum source and the intervening absorbing material (often assumed to be the broad line clouds). In addition, since a fair fraction of the total energy of an AGN is emitted at X-ray wavelengths, direct measurement of the amount and spectral form of this radiation is important for modeling of the optically emitting clouds.

  17. Light nuclei production in fusion of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, N.V.; Ivanova, S.P.; Jolos, R.V.; Scheid, W. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna )

    1994-10-01

    A possible mechanism of the production of light nuclei in fusion reactions is considered. It is shown that the decay of the dinuclear system during its evolution to a compound nucleus yields a substantial rate for the production of light nuclei. The cross section of this process is calculated for the reaction [sup 58]Ni+[sup 58]Ni. The coupling of other modes of motion causes an increase of the asymmetric decay of the dinuclear system.

  18. Introduction to the study of collisions between heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bayman, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    Current investigations concerning the collisions of nuclei governed by small de Broglie wavelengths are reviewed. The wave packets localize nuclei in regions small compared to their diameters. Cross sections are examined for potential scattering, elastic scattering, quasi-molecular states, peripheral particle-transfer reactions, fusion, and deep inelastic collisions. Theories of fusion and deep inelastic collisions are summarized. This paper is in the nature of a review-tutorial. 45 references, 51 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

  19. High-energy multiple muons and heavy primary cosmic-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizutani, K.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Higashi, S.

    1985-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations were carried out on high-energy multiple muons. On the lateral spread, the comparison with the deep underground observations indicates that the primary cosmic rays include heavy nuclei of high content. A method to determine the average mass number of primary particles in the energy around 10 to the 15th power eV is suggested.

  20. X-ray laser microscopy of rat sperm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B. ); Trebes, J.E.; Balhorn, R.; Mrowka, S.; Barbee, T.W.Jr.; Brase, J.; Corzett, M.; Koch, J.A.; Lee, C.; London, R.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Stone, G. ); Anderson, E.; Attwood, D.T. ); Gray, J. ); Kern, D. )

    1992-10-09

    The development of high brightness and short pulse width x-ray lasers now offers biologists the possibility of high-resolution imaging of specimens in an aqueous environment without the blurring effects associated with natural motions and chemical erosion. As a step toward developing the capabilities of this type of x-ray microscopy, a tantalum x-ray laser at 44.83 angstrom wavelength was used together with an x-ray zone plate lens to image both unlabeled and selectively gold-labeled dried rat sperm nuclei. The observed images show {approximately}500 angstrom features, illustrate the importance of x-ray microscopy in determining chemical composition, and provide information about the uniformity of sperm chromatin organization and the extent of sperm chromatin hydration.

  1. Reactions of Synthesis of Heavy Nuclei Results and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Oganessian, Yu.

    2006-08-14

    The experimental and theoretical results on the properties of the isotopes of superheavy elements, obtained up to now, have made it possible to consider different reactions for the synthesis of heavier nuclei located in the vicinity of the closed proton and neutron shells. It is shown that the advance to the heaviest possible nuclei, for which the microscopic models predict further rise of stability, is inseparably linked to the future investigation of the mechanism of synthesis reactions. Direct and model experiments, aimed at solving this problem, are also discussed.

  2. Production of light nuclei in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Barrette, J.; Bellwied, R.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cleland, W.E.; Cormier, T.M.; David, G.; Dee, J.; Diebold, G.E.; Dietzsch, O.; Germani, J.V.; Gilbert, S.; Greene, S.V.; Hall, J.R.; Hemmick, T.K.; Herrmann, N.; Hong, B.; Jayananda, K.; Kraus, D.; Kumar, B.S.; Lacasse, R.; Lissauer, D.; Llope, W.J.; Ludlam, T.W.; McCorkle, S.; Majka, R.; Mark, S.K.; Mitchell, J.T.; Muthuswamy, M.; O'Brien, E.; Pruneau, C.; Rotondo, F.S.; Sandweiss, J.; daSilva, N.C.; Sonnadara, U.; Stachel, J.; Takai, H.; Takagui, E.M.; Throwe, T.G.; Wolfe, D.; Woody, C.L.; Xu, N.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zou, C. Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt McGill University, Montreal, Canada H3A University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 University of Sa

    1994-08-01

    We have measured cross sections for the synthesis of nuclei of mass [ital A][le]4 in collisions of 14.6[ital A] GeV/[ital c] [sup 28]Si nuclei with targets of Pb, Cu, and Al. The data are measured at close to center-of-mass rapidities, and are unique in their exploration of the centrality dependence of nucleosynthesis. Simple coalescence models that were used to study nucleosynthesis at lower energies are inadequate for the description of our measurements. Our data and improved models are used to extract parameters related to the size of the interaction volume at freeze-out.

  3. Neutron flow between nuclei as the principal enhancement mechanism in heavy-ion subbarrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Stelson, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The observed enhanced cross sections for heavy-ion fusion are interpreted with a model in which the near barrier cross sections are dominated by neck formation initiated by neutron flow between the colliding nuclei. The collective properties of the colliding nuclei are then interpreted as a modulation of the thresholds for neck formation and dominate the cross sections in the region far below the barrier. 12 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Structure properties of medium and heavy exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidarov, M. K.

    2012-09-01

    Investigations of important characteristics of the structure of nuclei near drip-lines in coordinate and momentum space have been performed. The charge form factors, charge and matter densities and the corresponding rms radii for even-even isotopes of Ni, Kr, and Sn are calculated in the framework of deformed self-consistent mean field Skyrme DDHF+BCS method. The resulting charge radii and neutron skin thicknesses of these nuclei are compared with available experimental data, as well as with other theoretical predictions. The formation of a neutron skin is analyzed in terms of various definitions. Its correlation with the nuclear symmetry energy is studied within the coherent density fluctuation model using the symmetry energy as a function of density within the Brueckner energy-density functional. The nucleon momentum distributions for the same isotopic chains of neutron-rich nuclei are studied in the framework of the same mean-field method, as well as of theoretical correlation methods based on light-front dynamics and local density approximation. The isotopic sensitivities of the calculated neutron and proton momentum distributions are investigated together with the effects of nucleon correlations and deformation of nuclei.

  5. Role of compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-05-01

    Hot compound nuclei are frequently produced in intermediate-energy reactions through a variety of processes. Their decay is shown to be an important and at times dominant source of complex fragments, high energy-gamma rays, and even pions.

  6. Nucleosynthesis of neutron-rich heavy nuclei during explosive helium burning in massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, J. B.; Woosley, S. E.; Weaver, T. A.; Schramm, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    The production of heavy nuclei during explosive helium burning has been calculated using a hydrodynamical model of a 15-solar mass (Type II) supernova and an n-process nuclear reaction network. It is found that the resulting neutron-rich heavy nuclei are not produced in the relative abundances of solar-system r-process material, especially in the vicinity of Pt, nor are any actinides produced. These deficiencies reflect an inadequate supply of neutrons. However, some neutron-rich isotopes, normally associated with the r-process, are produced which may be significant for the production of isotopic anomalies in meteorites.

  7. Studies of the Shapes of Heavy Nuclei at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Peter A.

    For certain combinations of protons and neutrons there is a theoretical expectation that the shape of nuclei can assume octupole deformation, which would give rise to reflection asymmetry or a "pear-shape" in the intrinsic frame, either dynamically (octupole vibrations) or statically (permanent octupole deformation). In this talk I will briefly review the historic evidence for reflection asymmetry in nuclei and describe how recent experiments carried out at REX-ISOLDE have constrained nuclear theory and how they contribute to tests of extensions of the Standard Model. I will also discuss future prospects for measuring nuclear shapes from Coulomb Excitation: experiments are being planned that will exploit beams from HIE-ISOLDE that are cooled in the TSR storage ring and injected into a solenoidal spectrometer similar to the HELIOS device developed at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  8. X-Ray Reprocessing in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2004-01-01

    This is the final report for research entitled "X-ray reprocessing in active galactic nuclei," into X-ray absorption and emission in various classes of active galaxy via X-ray spectral signatures. The fundamental goal of the research was to use these signatures as probes of the central engine structure and circumnuclear environment of active galactic nuclei. The most important accomplishment supported by this grant involved the detailed analysis and interpretation of the XMM data for the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. This work was performed by Drs. Christopher Reynolds and Mitchell Begelman in collaboration with Dr. Jorn Wilms (University of Tubingen, Germany; PI of the XMM observation) and other European scientists. With XMM we obtained medium resolution X-ray spectra of unprecedented quality for this Seyfert galaxy. Modeling the X-ray spectrum within the framework of accretion disk reflection models produced the first evidence for energy extraction from the spin of a black hole. Specifically, we found that the extreme gravitational redshifts required to explain the X-ray spectrum suggests that the bulk of the energy dissipation is concentrated very close to the black hole, in contrast with the expectations of any pure accretion disk model. In a second paper we addressed the low- energy spectral complexity and used RXTE specta to pin down the high-energy spectral index, thus firming up our initial interpretation. Additionally, we carried out detailed spectral and variability analyses of a number of Seyfert and radio galaxies (e.g., NGC 5548 and 3C 111) and developed general techniques that will be useful in performing X-ray reverberation mapping of accretion disks in AGN, once adequate data becomes available. A list of papers supported by this research is included.

  9. One-quasiparticle states in odd-Z heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kuklin, S. N.; Scheid, W.

    2010-11-15

    The isotopic dependencies of one-quasiparticle states in Es and Md are treated. In {sup 253,255}Lr, the energies of the lowest one-quasiproton states are calculated. The one-quasiparticle isomer states are revealed in the nuclei of an {alpha}-decay chain starting from {sup 269}Rg. The {alpha} decays from some isomer states are predicted. The population of isomer states in the complete fusion reactions is discussed.

  10. Diffuse γ-Ray Emission from Misaligned Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, M.; Calore, F.; Donato, F.; Ajello, M.; Latronico, L.

    2014-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with jets seen at small viewing angles are the most luminous and abundant objects in the γ-ray sky. AGNs with jets misaligned along the line of sight appear fainter in the sky but are more numerous than the brighter blazars. We calculate the diffuse γ-ray emission due to the population of misaligned AGNs (MAGNs) unresolved by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). A correlation between the γ-ray luminosity and the radio-core luminosity is established and demonstrated to be physical by statistical tests, as well as compatible with upper limits based on Fermi-LAT data for a large sample of radio-loud MAGNs. We constrain the derived γ-ray luminosity function by means of the source-count distribution of the radio galaxies detected by the Fermi-LAT. We finally calculate the diffuse γ-ray flux due to the whole MAGN population. Our results demonstrate that MAGNs can contribute from 10% up to nearly the entire measured isotropic gamma-ray background. We evaluate a theoretical uncertainty on the flux of almost an order of magnitude.

  11. Diffuse γ-ray emission from misaligned active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mauro, M.; Donato, F.; Calore, F.; Ajello, M.; Latronico, L.

    2014-01-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with jets seen at small viewing angles are the most luminous and abundant objects in the γ-ray sky. AGNs with jets misaligned along the line of sight appear fainter in the sky but are more numerous than the brighter blazars. We calculate the diffuse γ-ray emission due to the population of misaligned AGNs (MAGNs) unresolved by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). A correlation between the γ-ray luminosity and the radio-core luminosity is established and demonstrated to be physical by statistical tests, as well as compatible with upper limits based on Fermi-LAT data for a large sample of radio-loud MAGNs. We constrain the derived γ-ray luminosity function by means of the source-count distribution of the radio galaxies detected by the Fermi-LAT. We finally calculate the diffuse γ-ray flux due to the whole MAGN population. Our results demonstrate that MAGNs can contribute from 10% up to nearly the entire measured isotropic gamma-ray background. We evaluate a theoretical uncertainty on the flux of almost an order of magnitude.

  12. The α decay spectroscopic factor of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    The spectroscopic factor which refers to the preformation probability of an α cluster inside parent radioactive nuclei is investigated. The study is based on the cluster model of α decay that is extended to account for the deformation degrees of freedom. The calculations are carried out for 179 even(Z)-even(N) parent nuclei in the mass region of A = 144-294. Taking into account the deformations of daughter nuclei, the semi-microscopic calculations of the α-daughter interaction potential are performed using the Hamiltonian energy density approach in terms of the SLy4 Skyrme-like effective interaction. The calculated potential is then implemented to find both the assault frequency and the penetration probability of the α particle by means of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation at different orientations of the deformed daughter. By averaging the obtained decay widths over different orientations, the half-lives of the mentioned α decays are then estimated. Taking into account the errors on both the released energy and the experimental half-life times, the extracted half-lives are employed in turn to deduce the α spectroscopic factor. The results show a periodic behaviour of the spectroscopic factor as a function of the charge and neutron numbers characterized by several local maxima and minima. The predicted minima are mainly related to the proton and neutron shell and subshell closures. In addition to the well-known closed shells of the nucleonic numbers 50, 82, and 126, the obtained values of the spectroscopic factor give some evidence for the presence of closed subshells of nucleonic numbers 70, 102 (104) and 152 (150). A simple formula is suggested to roughly estimate the spectroscopic factor in terms of the numbers of protons and neutrons of the parent nucleus outside its closed shells. The parameters of this formula are fitted to the deduced values of the spectroscopic factor.

  13. Symmetries in heavy nuclei and the proton-neutron interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) nuclear structure model can be expressed in terms of the U(6) group, and thereby leads to three dynamical symmetries (or group chains) corresponding to different nuclear coupling schemes and geometrical shapes. The status of the empirical evidence for these three symmetries is reviewed, along with brief comments on the possible existence of supersymmetries in nuclei. The relationships between these symmetries, the nuclear phase transitional regions linking them, and the residual proton-neutron interaction are discussed in terms of a particularly simple scheme for parameterizing the effects of that interaction. 34 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Manifestation of cluster effects in collective octupole and superdeformed states of heavy nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneidman, T. M.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of reflection-asymmetric deformation on the properties of the low-lying negative-parity collective states and superdeformed states of heavy nuclei are analyzed basing on dinuclear model. The results of consideration of the alternating parity bands in actinides and the superdeformed bands in 60Zn, Pb and Hg isotopes are discussed.

  15. Projected shell model for Gamow-Teller transitions in heavy, deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-Jun; Sun, Yang; Gao, Zao-Chun; Kiran Ghorui, Surja

    2016-02-01

    Calculations of Gamow-Teller (GT) transition rates for heavy, deformed nuclei, which are useful input for nuclear astrophysics studies, are usually done with the quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We propose a shell-model method by applying the Projected Shell Model (PSM) based on deformed bases. With this method, it is possible to perform a state-by-state calculation for nuclear matrix elements for β-decay and electron-capture in heavy nuclei. Taking β- decay from 168Dy to 168Ho as an example, we show that the known experimental B(GT) from the ground state of the mother nucleus to the low-lying states of the daughter nucleus could be well described. Moreover, strong transitions to high-lying states are predicted to occur, which may considerably enhance the total decay rates once these nuclei are exposed to hot stellar environments.

  16. Calculations of {alpha}-decay half-lives for heavy and superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yibin; Ni Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2011-04-15

    Systematic calculations on the {alpha}-decay half-lives of heavy and superheavy nuclei are performed within a deformed version of the cluster model, using the modified two-potential approach. The deformed Woods-Saxon potential is employed to calculate the {alpha}-decay width through a deformed barrier. For comparison the calculated {alpha}-decay half-lives in the empirical relations are also presented. The present study is initially restricted to even-even nuclei in the heavy mass region with N>126. Then the study is extended to the recently observed heaviest nuclei, including synthesized superheavy elements and isotopes. The {alpha}-decay half-lives obtained are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Active galactic nuclei at gamma-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles Dennison; Giebels, Berrie

    2016-06-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei can be copious extragalactic emitters of MeV-GeV-TeV γ rays, a phenomenon linked to the presence of relativistic jets powered by a super-massive black hole in the center of the host galaxy. Most of γ-ray emitting active galactic nuclei, with more than 1500 known at GeV energies, and more than 60 at TeV energies, are called "blazars". The standard blazar paradigm features a jet of relativistic magnetized plasma ejected from the neighborhood of a spinning and accreting super-massive black hole, close to the observer direction. Two classes of blazars are distinguished from observations: the flat-spectrum radio-quasar class (FSRQ) is characterized by strong external radiation fields, emission of broad optical lines, and dust tori. The BL Lac class (from the name of one of its members, BL Lacertae) corresponds to weaker advection-dominated flows with γ-ray spectra dominated by the inverse Compton effect on synchrotron photons. This paradigm has been very successful for modeling the broadband spectral energy distributions of blazars. However, many fundamental issues remain, including the role of hadronic processes and the rapid variability of a few FSRQs and several BL Lac objects whose synchrotron spectrum peaks at UV or X-ray frequencies. A class of γ-ray-emitting radio galaxies, which are thought to be the misaligned counterparts of blazars, has emerged from the results of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. Soft γ-ray emission has been detected from a few nearby Seyfert galaxies, though it is not clear whether those γ rays originate from the nucleus. Blazars and their misaligned counterparts make up most of the ≳100 MeV extragalactic γ-ray background (EGB), and are suspected of being the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The future "Cherenkov Telescope Array", in synergy with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and a wide range of telescopes in space and on the ground, will write the next chapter

  18. Detection of ultra rare α decays of super heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yuri S.

    2007-04-01

    Three approaches to the measurement of a rare α decaying products produced in heavy-ion induced nuclear reactions are described. One is based on a chemical extraction and following deposition of the nuclides under investigation onto the surface of the detector, whereas the second one is associated with long-lived products implanted into silicon detectors by using the electromagnetic separation technique. The third approach relates with an application of real-time mode detection of correlated energy-time-position recoil-α sequences from 48Ca induced nuclear reactions with actinide targets, like 242,244Pu, 245,248Cm, 239Am and 249Cf. Namely with this technique, it has became possible to provide a radical suppression of backgrounds in the full fusion (3-5n) reactions aimed to the synthesis of super heavy elements with Z=113-116.

  19. Proximity potential for heavy ion reactions on deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, A. J.; Bayman, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    The usual treatment of the deformed optical model for analysis of heavy ion induced inelastic scattering data involves a deformed (target) radius, a spherical (projectile) radius and a potential strength dependent on the surface separation along the line between the two centers. Several authors using various approaches have shown that this center line potential is geometrically inadequate especially for description of higher L deformation parameters probed in heavy ion induced inelastic scattering experiments. A quantitatively adequate form of the deformed proximity potential suitable for use with a coupled channels reaction code in the analysis of inelastic scattering data above the Coulomb barrier is described. A major objective is to be able to extract reliably higher deformed multipole moments from such data. The deformed potential calculated in the folding model will serve as a geometrically exact benchmark to evaluate the accuracy of the proximity potential prescriptions. (WHK)

  20. α-DECAY Properties of Heavy and Superheavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. F.

    2013-11-01

    The experimental investigation cannot presently distinguish explicitly whether the α particle is preformed in mother nucleus or it is formed during penetrating of the potential barrier. Consequently, the α-decay has been mainly described using the cluster-like theories and the fission-like theories. In any way, the assault frequency plays a pivotal role in the two different decay modes. A microscopic approach is adopted to estimate the assault frequency and the results are consistent with the assault frequency extracted within the cluster-like model, which suggests that the α-decay is rather a radioactive emission process of a cluster preformed in the nucleus but before the potential barrier penetration. The α-decay half-life are estimated in the framework of the preformed cluster-like model to explore the island of stability of superheavy nuclei.

  1. Use of relativistic rise in ionization chambers for measurement of high energy heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Vogel, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument has been constructed to measure the energy spectra of cosmic-ray heavy nuclei in the range of about 0.3 to about 100 GeV/amu. It makes use of the relativistic rise portion of the Bethe-Bloch curve in ionization chambers for energy determination in the 10- to 100-GeV/amu interval. The instrument consists of six layers of dual-gap ionization chambers for energy determination above 10 GeV/amu. Charge is determined with a NE114 scintillator and a Pilot 425 plastic Cerenkov counter. A CO2 gas Cerenkov detector (1 atm; threshold of 30 GeV/amu) calibrates the ion chambers in the relativistic rise region. The main emphasis of the instrument is the determination of the change of the ratio of Iron (26) to the Iron secondaries (21-25) in the energy range of 10 to 100 GeV/amu. Preliminary data from a balloon flight in the fall of 1982 from Palestine, TX is presented.

  2. Muonic x-ray study of the even Os nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, M. V.; Shera, E. B.; Wohlfahrt, H. D.; Yamazaki, Y.; Steffen, R. M.; Sheline, R. K.

    1981-10-01

    Precision measurements have been made of the muonic x-ray spectra of the transitional nuclei 186,188,190,192Os. Equivalent Barrett radii and isotope shifts have been determined, as have isomer shifts of the first excited 2+ states. These results are compared with other experiments and with theoretical calculations. The systematics of isotope shifts in the deformed nuclei are also discussed. Generalized E 2 moments of the charge distribution have been extracted in a nearly model-independent way and conventional electromagnetic moments have been deduced by assuming a specific transition charge density model. The latter are in good agreement with recent calculations of both the interacting boson approximation and the boson expansion theory. However, a serious discrepancy in the values of the quadrupole moments determined from the muonic and Coulomb excitation experiments is apparent. The model dependence of the muonic results (including the effect of a triaxial model charge distribution) is explored as a possible cause of the discrepancy; however, no effect large enough to explain the discrepancy is found. Furthermore, no feature of the muonic spectra was found which could be used to distinguish between a triaxial and an axially symmetric charge distribution. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE 186,188,190,192Os; measured muonic x-ray spectra; deduced monopole and quadrupole charge parameters, isotope and isomer shifts.

  3. What obscures low-X-ray-scattering active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönig, S. F.; Gandhi, P.; Asmus, D.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Antonucci, R.; Ueda, Y.; Ichikawa, K.

    2014-02-01

    X-ray surveys have revealed a new class of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a very low observed fraction of scattered soft X-rays, fscat <0.5 per cent. Based on X-ray modelling, these `X-ray new-type', or low observed X-ray-scattering (hereafter, `low-scattering') sources have been interpreted as deeply buried AGN with a high covering factor of gas. In this paper, we address the questions whether the host galaxies of low-scattering AGN may contribute to the observed X-ray properties, and whether we can find any direct evidence for high covering factors from the infrared (IR) emission. We find that X-ray low-scattering AGN are preferentially hosted by highly inclined galaxies or merger systems as compared to other Seyfert galaxies, increasing the likelihood that the line of sight towards the AGN intersects with high columns of host-galactic gas and dust. Moreover, while a detailed analysis of the IR emission of low-scattering AGN ESO 103-G35 remains inconclusive, we do not find any indication of systematically higher dust covering factors in a sample of low-scattering AGN based on their IR emission. For ESO 103-G35, we constrained the temperature, mass and location of the IR emitting dust which is consistent with expectations for the dusty torus. However, a deep silicate absorption feature probably from much cooler dust suggests an additional screen absorber on larger scales within the host galaxy. Taking these findings together, we propose that the low fscat observed in low-scattering AGN is not necessarily the result of circumnuclear dust but could originate from interference of host-galactic gas with a column density of the order of 1022 cm-2 with the line of sight. We discuss implications of this hypothesis for X-ray models, high-ionization emission lines and observed star formation activity in these objects.

  4. Analysis of quasifission competition in fusion reactions forming heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerton, Kalee; Kohley, Zachary; Morrissey, Dave; Wakhle, Aditya; Stiefel, Krystin; Hinde, David; Dasgupta, Mahananda; Williams, Elizabeth; Simenel, Cedric; Carter, Ian; Cook, Kaitlin; Jeung, Dongyun; Luong, Duc Huy; McNeil, Steven; Palshetkar, Chandani; Rafferty, Dominic

    2015-10-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions have provided a mechanism for the production of superheavy elements allowing for the extension of both the periodic table and chart of the nuclides. However, fusion of the projectile and target, forming a compound nucleus, is hindered by orders of magnitude by the quasifission process in heavy systems. In order to fully understand this mechanism, and make accurate predictions for superheavy element production cross sections, a clear description of the interplay between the fusion-fission and quasifission reaction channels is necessary. The mass-angle distributions of fragments formed in 8 different Cr + W reactions were measured at the Australia National University in order to explore the N/Z dependence of the quasifission process. Two sets of data were measured: one at a constant energy relative to the fusion barrier and one at a constant compound nucleus excitation energy. The results of this analysis will provide insight into the effect of using more neutron-rich beams in superheavy element production reactions.

  5. NEW EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON THE LIQUID DROP MODEL OF HEAVY NUCLEI AND QUANTUM APPROACH TO LIGHT NUCLEI FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2013-08-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at subnuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. A model free energy is constructed, based on the relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with the proton number up to {approx}1000. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the liquid drop model to all nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the new liquid drop model so that the temperature dependences of bulk energies could be taken into account. Furthermore, we extend the region in the nuclear chart, in which shell effects are included, by using theoretical mass data in addition to experimental ones. We also adopt a quantum-theoretical mass evaluation of light nuclei, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts that are not included in the ordinary liquid drop model. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that the abundances of heavy nuclei are modified by the shell effects of nuclei and temperature dependence of bulk energies. These changes may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. The abundances of light nuclei are also modified by the new mass evaluation, which may affect the heating and cooling rates of supernova cores and shocked envelopes.

  6. Two-neutron transfer reactions with heavy-deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.; Landowne, S.; Esbensen, H.

    1988-01-01

    In a recent communication we pointed out that one can combine the macroscopic model for two-particle transfer reactions on deformed nuclei with the sudden limit approximation for rotational excitation, and thereby obtain a practical method for calculating transfer reactions leading to high-spin states. As an example, we presented results for the reaction WSDy(VYNi,WNi) WDy populating the ground-state rotational band up to the spin I = 14 state. We have also tested the validity of the sudden limit for the inelastic excitation of high spin states and we have noted how the macroscopic model may be modified to allow for more microscopic nuclear structure effects in an application to diabolic pair-transfer processes. This paper describes our subsequent work in which we investigated the systematic features of pair-transfer reactions within the macroscopic model by using heavier projectiles to generate higher spins and by decomposing the cross sections according to the multipolarity of the transfer interaction. Particular attention is paid to characteristic structures in the angular distributions for the lower spin states and how they depend on the angular momentum carried by the transferred particles. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Competition between complete fusion and quasifission in reactions with heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.; Adamian, G. G.; Volkov, V. V.

    1998-02-15

    A model based on the dinuclear system concept is suggested for the calculation of the competition between complete fusion and quasifission in reactions with heavy nuclei. The fusion rate through the inner fusion barrier in mass asymmetry is found by using the Kramers-type expression. The calculated cross sections for the heaviest nuclei are in a good agreement with the experimental data. The experimentally observed rapid fall-off of the cross section of the cold fusion with increasing charge number Z of the compound nucleus is explained.

  8. Symmetry-dictated trucation: Solutions of the spherical shell model for heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M.W. |

    1992-12-31

    Principles of dynamical symmetry are used to simplify the spherical shell model. The resulting symmetry-dictated truncation leads to dynamical symmetry solutions that are often in quantitative agreement with a variety of observables. Numerical calculations, including terms that break the dynamical symmetries, are shown that correspond to shell model calculations for heavy deformed nuclei. The effective residual interaction is simple, well-behaved, and can be determined from basic observables. With this approach, we intend to apply the shell model in systematic fashion to all nuclei. The implications for nuclear structure far from stability and for nuclear masses and other quantities of interest in astrophysics are discussed.

  9. Science requirements for Heavy Nuclei Collection (HNC) experiment on NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Mission 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, P. Buford

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Nuclei Collection (HNC) is a passive array of stacks of a special glass, 14 sheets thick, that record tracks of ultraheavy cosmic rays for later readout by automated systems on Earth. The primary goal is to determine the relative abundances of both the odd- and even-Z cosmic rays with Z equal to or greater than 50 with statistics a factor at least 60 greater than obtained in HEAO-3 and to obtain charge resolution at least as good as 0.25 charge unit. The secondary goal is to search for hypothetical particles such as superheavy elements. The HNC detector array will have a cumulative collection power equivalent to flying 32 sq m of detectors in space for 4 years. The array will be flown as a free-flight spacecraft and/or attached to Space Station Freedom.

  10. Neutron productions in the fragmentation of relativistic heavy nuclei and formation of a beam of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    The production of quasimonoenergetic high-energy neutrons at zero angle (0°) in the spallation of relativistic heavy nuclei is discussed by considering the example of the interaction of lead nuclei with light target nuclei. It is shown that this process can be used to generate a beam of high-energy neutrons at existing heavy ion accelerators. At the same time, itmay lead to the appearance of a parasitic neutron beam because of the interaction of the heavy-ion beam used with beam line and experimental setup materials.

  11. Production of heavy neutron-rich nuclei in transfer reactions within the dinuclear system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Long; Feng, Zhao-Qing; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of nucleon transfer processes in heavy-ion collisions is investigated within the dinuclear system model. The production cross sections of nuclei in the reactions 136Xe+208Pb and 238U+248Cm are calculated, and the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. The transfer cross sections for the 58Ni+208Pb reaction are calculated and compared with the experimental data. We predict the production cross sections of neutron-rich nuclei 165-168 Eu, 169-173 Tb, 173-178 Ho, and 181-185Yb based on the reaction 176Yb+238U. It can be seen that the production cross sections of the neutron-rich nuclei 165Eu, 169Tb, 173Ho, and 181Yb are 2.84 μb, 6.90 μb, 46.24 μb, and 53.61 μb, respectively, which could be synthesized in experiment.

  12. Influence of shell effects on the formation of light nuclei in collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, N.V.; Dzholos, R.V. )

    1989-07-01

    Various approaches to calculation of the coefficients of the transport equation which describes the process of multinucleon transfers, are analyzed. It is shown that, without resorting to the averaging of matrix elements over many shell configurations, one can obtain expressions for transition probabilities that include the effects of nuclear shell structure. On this basis, the yield of light nuclei in reactions induced by heavy ions is studied in the framework of the degenerate-shell model. The calculations, which are carried out on the assumption that the wave functions of high-lying one-particle states of the system are not concentrated in one nucleus but are distributed over the two nuclei proportionally to their volumes, lead to an appreciable increase of the yield of light elements as compared to calculations in which one-particle states are assumed to belong to only one of the nuclei forming the double system.

  13. Bridging the nuclear structure gap between stable and super heavy nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Seweryniak, D.; Khoo, T. L.; Ahmad, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Robinson, A.; Back, B. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Davids, C. N.; Greene, J. P.; Gros, S.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Peterson, D.; Zhu, S. F.; Physics; Univ. of York; Univ. of Massachusetts at Lowell; Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Univ. of Jyvaskyla; CSNSM Orsay; Yale Univ.; Univ. of Liverpool; RIKEN; Univ. of Maryland; Univ. of Notre Dame

    2010-01-01

    Due to recent advances in detection techniques, excited states in several trans-fermium nuclei were studied in many laboratories worldwide, shedding light on the evolution of nuclear structure between stable nuclei and the predicted island of stability centered around spherical magic numbers. In particular, studies of K-isomers around the Z=100 and N=152 deformed shell closures extended information on the energies of Nilsson orbitals at the Fermi surface. Some of these orbitals originate from spherical states, which are relevant to the magic gaps in super-heavy nuclei. The single-particle energies can be used to test various theoretical predictions and aid in extrapolations towards heavier systems. So far, the Woods-Saxon potential reproduces the data best, while self-consistent approaches miss some of the observed features, indicating a need to modify the underlying effective nucleon-nucleon interactions.

  14. Unwrapping the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are complex phenomena. At the heart of an AGN is a relativistic accretion disk around a spinning supermassive black hole (SMBH) with an X-ray emitting corona and, sometimes, a relativistic jet. On larger scales, the outer accretion disk and molecular torus act as the reservoirs of gas for the continuing AGN activity. And on all scales from the black hole outwards, powerful winds are seen that probably affect the evolution of the host galaxy as well as regulate the feeding of the AGN itself. In this review article, we discuss how X-ray spectroscopy can be used to study each of these components. We highlight how recent measurements of the high-energy cutoff in the X-ray continuum by NuSTAR are pushing us to conclude that X-ray coronae are radiatively-compact and have electron temperatures regulated by electron-positron pair production. We show that the predominance of rapidly-rotating objects in current surveys of SMBH spin is entirely unsurprising once one accounts for the observational selection bias resulting from the spin-dependence of the radiative efficiency. We review recent progress in our understanding of fast (v˜ (0.1-0.3)c, highly-ionized (mainly visible in Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines), high-column density winds that may dominate quasar-mode galactic feedback. Finally, we end with a brief look forward to the promise of Astro-H and future X-ray spectropolarimeters.

  15. Nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in a degenerate plasma with nuclei of heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossen, M. A. Mamun, A. A.

    2015-10-15

    The ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves propagating in a fully relativistic degenerate dense plasma (containing relativistic degenerate electron and ion fluids, and immobile nuclei of heavy elements) have been theoretically investigated. The relativistic hydrodynamic model is used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation by the reductive perturbation method. The stationary solitary wave solution of this K-dV equation is obtained to characterize the basic features of the IA solitary structures that are found to exist in such a degenerate plasma. It is found that the effects of electron dynamics, relativistic degeneracy of the plasma fluids, stationary nuclei of heavy elements, etc., significantly modify the basic properties of the IA solitary structures. The implications of this results in astrophysical compact objects like white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

  16. Nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in a degenerate plasma with nuclei of heavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves propagating in a fully relativistic degenerate dense plasma (containing relativistic degenerate electron and ion fluids, and immobile nuclei of heavy elements) have been theoretically investigated. The relativistic hydrodynamic model is used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation by the reductive perturbation method. The stationary solitary wave solution of this K-dV equation is obtained to characterize the basic features of the IA solitary structures that are found to exist in such a degenerate plasma. It is found that the effects of electron dynamics, relativistic degeneracy of the plasma fluids, stationary nuclei of heavy elements, etc., significantly modify the basic properties of the IA solitary structures. The implications of this results in astrophysical compact objects like white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

  17. A mechanism for the abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flare particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, B. G.; Mogro-Campero, A.

    1973-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed to account for the recently reported abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flares. The mechanism requires two acceleration stages for its operation: First, fully stripped ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies, and subsequently, a fraction of these ions are Fermi accelerated to higher energies. It is shown that because injection into Fermi acceleration is rigidity dependent and the ions may pick up electrons during transport to the Fermi acceleration region, an enhancement of the abundances of heavy nuclei can occur. The degree of the enhancement depends on a number of factors particular to each flare, so that the degree of enhancement may be variable from flare to flare, or may be a function of time within a given flare. In some flares, conditions may be such that no enhancement would be expected.

  18. Level densities of heavy nuclei in the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Bertsch, G. F.; Gilbreth, C. N.; Nakada, H.; Özen, C.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear level densities are necessary input to the Hauser-Feshbach theory of compound nuclear reactions. However, the microscopic calculation of level densities in the presence of correlations is a challenging many-body problem. The configurationinteraction shell model provides a suitable framework for the inclusion of correlations and shell effects, but the large dimensionality of the many-particle model space has limited its application in heavy nuclei. The shell model Monte Carlo method enables calculations in spaces that are many orders of magnitude larger than spaces that can be treated by conventional diagonalization methods and has proven to be a powerful tool in the microscopic calculation of level densities. We discuss recent applications of the method in heavy nuclei.

  19. Isospin dependence of fragment spectra in heavy/super-heavy colliding nuclei at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugh, Rajiv; Kumar, Rohit; Vinayak, Karan Singh

    2016-05-01

    Using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) approach, we performed a theoretical investigation of the evolution of various kinds of fragments in heavy and superheavy-ion reactions in the intermediate/medium energy domain. We demonstrated direct impact of symmetry energy and Coulomb interactions on the evolution of fragments. Final fragment spectra (yields) obtained from the analysis of various heavy/super-heavy ion reactions at different reaction conditions show high sensitivity towards Coulomb interactions and less significant sensitivity to symmetry energy forms. No inconsistent pattern of fragment structure is obtained in case of super-heavy ion involved reactions for all the parameterizations of density dependence of symmetry energy.

  20. Properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L. Shlomo, Sh. Tulupov, B. A. Urin, M. H.

    2015-07-15

    The recently developed particle-hole dispersive optical model is applied to describe properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. In particular, the double transition density averaged over the energy of the isoscalar monopole excitations is considered for {sup 208}Pb in a wide energy interval, which includes the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone. The energy-averaged strength functions of these resonances are also analyzed.

  1. Composition and energy spectra of heavy nuclei of unknown origin detected on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. H.; Price, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    At the orbit of Skylab, steeply falling energy spectra of nuclei with atomic numbers of at least 8 and energies between about 10 and 40 MeV/amu at intensities much higher than seen outside the magnetosphere were observed. The composition is consistent with that of the solar corona. It is suggested that heavy solar-wind ions enter the magnetosphere, are accelerated, and populate the inner radiation belt.

  2. {alpha}-decay calculations of heavy and superheavy nuclei using effective mean-field potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, J. C.; Lin, Z. J.; Xu, F. R.; Zhao, E. G.

    2007-10-15

    Using an effective potential that is based on the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock mean-field model, systematic {alpha}-decay properties of even-even heavy and superheavy nuclei have been investigated. Calculations do not raise any adjustable parameter. The obtained {alpha}-decay half-lives agree reasonably well with experimental data. The characteristics of the effective potential and the deformation effect on the {alpha} decay are discussed.

  3. Production of heavy and superheavy neutron-rich nuclei in transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Greiner, Walter

    2011-04-15

    The problem of production and study of heavy neutron-rich nuclei has been intensively discussed during recent years. Many reasons arouse a great interest in this problem. The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map are very close to the {beta} stability line while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides (also those located along the neutron closed shell N=126 to the right-hand side of the stability line) is extremely important for nuclear astrophysic investigations and, in particular, for the understanding of the r process of astrophysical nucleogenesis. For elements with Z>100 only neutron deficient isotopes (located to the left of the stability line) have been synthesized so far. The 'northeast' area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion-fission reactions nor in fragmentation processes widely used nowadays for the production of new nuclei. Multinucleon transfer processes in near barrier collisions of heavy (and very heavy, U-like) ions seem to be the only reaction mechanism allowing us to produce and explore neutron-rich heavy nuclei including those located at the superheavy island of stability. In this paper several transfer reactions for different projectile-target combinations are studied in detail. Besides the predictions for the cross sections of such processes, we also analyze the angular and energy distributions of primary and survived reaction products in the laboratory frame. These results, as well as predicted excitation functions for the yields of neutron-rich superheavy isotopes, might be useful for the design of appropriate experimental equipment and for carrying out experiments of such kind.

  4. Nucleosynthesis of neutron-rich heavy nuclei during explosive helium burning in a 15 solar-mass supernova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, J. B.; Woosley, S. E.; Weaver, T. A.; Schramm, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    The production of heavy nuclei during explosive helium burning has been calculated using the Weaver and Woosley self-consistent model of a complete 15 solar-mass star and the n-process code of Blake and Schramm. It was found that the resulting neutron-rich heavy nuclei are not produced in the relative abundances of solar-system r-process material (such as a Pt peak) nor are any actinides produced. Basically insufficient neutrons are available.

  5. ENERGY SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY NUCLEI AT HIGH ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Malinine, A.; Allison, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Barbier, L.; Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Jeon, J. A.; Minnick, S.

    2009-12-10

    We present new measurements of the energy spectra of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei from the second flight of the balloon-borne experiment Cosmic-Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM). The instrument included different particle detectors to provide redundant charge identification and measure the energy of CRs up to several hundred TeV. The measured individual energy spectra of C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe are presented up to approx10{sup 14} eV. The spectral shape looks nearly the same for these primary elements and it can be fitted to an E {sup -2.66} {sup +}- {sup 0.04} power law in energy. Moreover, a new measurement of the absolute intensity of nitrogen in the 100-800 GeV/n energy range with smaller errors than previous observations, clearly indicates a hardening of the spectrum at high energy. The relative abundance of N/O at the top of the atmosphere is measured to be 0.080 +- 0.025 (stat.)+-0.025 (sys.) at approx800 GeV/n, in good agreement with a recent result from the first CREAM flight.

  6. {gamma}-ray Spectroscopy of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei in the A{approx}130 Region using SPIRAL beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stezowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rosse, B.; Schmitt, Ch.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2008-11-11

    A fusion-evaporation experiment has been performed with a SPIRAL {sup 76}Kr radioactive beam in order to study the deformation of rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The experimental setup consisted in the EXOGAM {gamma}-array, coupled to the light-charged particles (LCP) DIAMANT detector and to the VAMOS heavy-ion spectrometer. The difficulties inherent to such measurements are enlightened. The coupling between EXOGAM and DIAMANT has been used to decrease the huge background caused by the radioactivity of the beam. It further permits assigning new {gamma}-ray transitions to specific residual nuclei. A {gamma}-ray belonging to the {sup 130}Pm level scheme has thus been observed for the first time.

  7. Study of near-stability nuclei populated as fission fragments in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Nelson, Ronald O; Devlin, Matthew; Cizewski, Jolie A; Krucken, Reiner; Clark, R M; Fallon, Paul; Lee, I Yang; Macchiavelli, Agusto O; Becker, John A; Younes, Walid

    2010-01-01

    Examples are presented to illustrate the power of prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of fission fragments from compound nuclei with A {approx} 200 formed in fusion-evaporation reactions in experiments using the Gammasphere Ge-detector array. Complementary methods, such as Coulomb excitation and deep-inelastic processes, are also discussed. In other cases (n, xn{gamma}) reactions on stable isotopes have been used to establish neutron excitation functions for {gamma}-rays using a pulsed 'white'-neutron source, coupled to a high-energy-resolution germanium-detector array. The excitation functions can unambiguously assign {gamma}-rays to a specific reaction product. Results from all these methods bridge the gaps in the systematics of high-spin states between the neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclei. Results near shell closures should motivate new shell model calculations.

  8. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Shchepunov, V. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Gulbekyan, G. G.; Khabarov, M. V.; Bekhterev, V. V.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Efremov, A. A.; Pashenko, S. V.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Yeremin, A. V.; Yavor, M. I.; Kalimov, A. G.

    2003-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 -3. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A≈20 to A≈500, its mass acceptance is as large as ±2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90° electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given.

  9. Excitation energies of double isobar-analog states in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poplavskii, I. V.

    1988-12-01

    Several new relationships are established for isomultiplets on the basis of a theory in which the Coulomb coupling constant (CCC) is allowed to be complex. In particular, the following rule is formulated: the energies for fission or decay of members of an isomultiplet into a charged cluster and members of the corresponding daughter isomultiplet are equidistant. This relationship is well satisfied for isomultiplets with /ital A/less than or equal to60. By extrapolating the rule for fission and decay energies to the region of heavy nuclei, the excitation energies /ital E//sub /ital x// of double isobar-analog states (DIASs) are found for the nuclei /sup 197,199/Hg, /sup 205/Pb, /sup 205 - -209/Po, /sup 209/At, and /sup 238/Pu. A comparison of the computed energies /ital E//sub /ital x// with the experimentally measured values for /sup 208/Po attest to the reliability and good accuracy of the method proposed here when used to determine the excitation energies of DIASs in heavy nuclei.

  10. Application of JAERI quantum molecular dynamics model for collisions of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji

    2016-06-01

    The quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) model incorporated into the general-purpose radiation transport code PHITS was revised for accurate prediction of fragment yields in peripheral collisions. For more accurate simulation of peripheral collisions, stability of the nuclei at their ground state was improved and the algorithm to reject invalid events was modified. In-medium correction on nucleon-nucleon cross sections was also considered. To clarify the effect of this improvement on fragmentation of heavy nuclei, the new QMD model coupled with a statistical decay model was used to calculate fragment production cross sections of Ag and Au targets and compared with the data of earlier measurement. It is shown that the revised version can predict cross section more accurately.

  11. Formation of Heavy Compound Nuclei, Their Survival and Correlation with Longtime-Scale Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Karamian, S. A.; Yakushev, A.-B.

    2007-05-22

    Fusion of two massive nuclei with formation of super-heavy compound nucleus (CN) is driven by the potential energy gradient, as follows from the analysis of nuclear reaction cross-sections. The conservative energy of the system is deduced in simple approximation using regularized nuclear mass and interaction barrier values. Different reaction for the synthesis of Zc (110-118) nuclei are compared and the favourable conditions are found for fusion of the stable (W-Pt) isotopes with radioactive fission fragment projectiles, like 94Kr or 100Sr. Thus, the cold fusion method can be extended for a synthesis of elements with Z > 113. Survival of the evaporation residue is defined by the neutron-to-fission probability ratio and by the successful emission of gammas at final step of the reaction. Numerical estimates are presented. Fixation of evaporation residue products must correlate with longtime-scale fission and available experimental results are discussed.

  12. Delta excitations in heavy nuclei induced by (3He,t) and (p,n) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esbensen, H.; Lee, T.-S. H.

    1985-12-01

    Delta excitations in heavy nuclei, induced by charge exchange reactions, are studied using the surface response model. The residual pion-exchange interaction and the self-energy of the delta in a nuclear medium is included in the random-phase-approximation response. The peak position observed in (3He,t) reactions can be explained by the self-energy of the delta extracted from pion-nucleus scattering, and the magnitude of the cross section is consistent with Glauber theory. The comparison to (p,n) data is reasonable; contributions from neutron decay of the delta, which are left out in the calculations, constitute a substantial experimental background.

  13. Energy Approach to Resonance states of Compound Superheavy Nucleus and EPPP in Heavy Nuclei Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, Alexander V.

    2005-10-26

    A consistent unified energy approach (operator perturbation theory) is used for numerical calculations of the electron-positron pair production cross-section in heavy nuclei collisions. Resonance phenomena in the nuclear subsystem lead to the structurization of the positron spectrum produced. The positron spectrum narrow peaks are treated as resonance states of the compound superheavy nucleus. Calculation results for the differential cross-sections of the U-U collision energies E1 (E1=162.0keV- third s-resonance; E1=247.6keV- the fourth s-resonance) are presented.

  14. Relativistic theory for the elementary process of bremsstrahlung induced by heavy spin-zero nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D. H.

    2016-05-01

    Doubly and triply differential cross sections for the bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy spin-polarized electrons in the field of heavy bare nuclei are calculated within a fully relativistic partial-wave approach at collision energies between 1 and 30 MeV. Investigating 208Pb as a test case, it is shown that if the photons are emitted at backward angles, nuclear size effects may play an important role even below 10 MeV. Comparison is made with experimental data on the circular polarization correlations between incoming electron and emitted photon at a collision energy of 3.5 MeV. It is demonstrated that, independent of energy, the plane-wave Born approximation severely underestimates the cross section for heavy targets. Moreover, it gives at most a qualitative prescription of the polarization correlations, except possibly in the forward hemisphere.

  15. Super-heavy nuclei with Z = 118 and their mass and charge spectrum of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslyuk, V. T.; Smolyanyuk, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The first results of the calculation of the mass and charge yields of fission fragments for over 60 isotopes which have Z = 118 are presented. The results were obtained from the condition of thermodynamic ordering of the ensemble of fission fragments. The role of neutrons shells with N = 82 or N = 126 and protons shells with Z = 50 in the realization of symmetric (or one-humped) and asymmetric (2- or 3-humped) shapes of the fission-fragment yields with the transition from neutron-proficient to neutron-deficient isotopes was investigated. The data of fragments yields had been analyzed under the conditions of a “cold” and “hot” fission. The calculations show the possibility to identify super-heavy nuclei with Z ≥ 118 produced synthetically by heavy-ion reaction on their mass/charge spectrum division.

  16. Analytical approach to cosmic ray ionization by nuclei with charge Z in the middle atmosphere - Distribution of galactic CR effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Mateev, L.

    2008-11-01

    The effects of galactic and solar cosmic rays (CR) in the middle atmosphere are considered in this work. A new analytical approach for CR ionization by protons and nuclei with charge Z in the lower ionosphere and middle atmosphere is developed in this paper. For this purpose the ionization losses (d E/d h) according to the Bohr-Bethe-Bloch formula for the energetic charged particles are approximated in three different energy intervals. More accurate expressions for energy decrease E( h) and electron production rate profiles q( h) are derived. The obtained formulas allow comparatively easy computer programming. The integrand in q( h) gives the possibility for application of adequate numerical methods - such as Romberg method or Gauss quadrature, for the solution of the mathematical problem. On this way the process of interaction of cosmic ray particles with the upper, middle and lower atmosphere will be described much more realistically. Computations for cosmic ray ionization in the middle atmosphere are made. The full CR composition is taken into account: protons, Helium ( α-particles), light L, medium M, heavy H and very heavy VH group of nuclei.

  17. Cosmic gamma-rays and cosmic nuclei above 1 TeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    Work on cosmic gamma rays and cosmic nuclei above I TeV is described and evaluated. The prospect that gamma ray astronomy above I TeV will give new insights into high energy cosmic ray origin within our galaxy is particularly bright.

  18. Competition between {alpha} decay and spontaneous fission for heavy and superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chang; Ren Zhongzhou; Guo Yanqing

    2008-10-15

    We systematically investigate the {alpha}-decay and spontaneous fission half-lives for heavy and superheavy nuclei with proton number Z{>=}90. The {alpha}-decay half-lives are obtained by the deformed version of the density-dependent cluster model (DDCM). In the DDCM, the microscopic potential between the {alpha} particle and the daughter nucleus is evaluated numerically from the double-folding model with the M3Y interaction. The influence of the core deformation on the double-folding potential is also properly taken into account by the multipole expansion method. The spontaneous fission half-lives of nuclei from {sup 232}Th to {sup 286}114 are calculated with the parabolic potential approximation by taking nuclear structure effects into account. The agreement between theoretical results and the newly observed data is satisfactory for both {alpha} emitters and spontaneous fission nuclei. The competition between {alpha} decay and spontaneous fission is analyzed in detail and the branching ratios of these two decay modes are predicted for the unknown cases.

  19. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, W.U.

    1993-08-01

    This report contain papers on the following topics: The Cold-Fusion Saga; Decay Patterns of Dysprosium Nuclei Produced in {sup 32}S + {sup 118,124}Sn Fusion Reactions; Unexpected Features of Reactions Between Very Heavy Ions at Intermediate Bombarding Energies; Correlations Between Neutrons and Charged Products from the Dissipative Reaction {sup 197}Au+{sup 208}Pb at E/A = 29 MeV; Dissipative Dynamics of Projectile-Like Fragment Production in the Reaction {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe at E/A = 28.2 MeV; Dynamical Production of Intermediate-Mass Fragments in Peripheral {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe Collisions at E{sub lab}/A = 28.2 MeV; The Rochester 960-Liter Neutron Multiplicity Meter; A Simple Pulse Processing Concept for a Low-Cost Pulse-Shape-Based Particle Identification; A One-Transistor Preamplifier for PMT Anode Signals; A Five-Channel Multistop TDC/Event Handler for the SuperBall Neutron Multiplicity Meter; Construction of the SuperBall -- a 16,000-Liter Neutron Detector for Calorimetric Studies of Intermediate-Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions; A Computer Code for Light Detection Efficiency Calculations for Photo-multipliers of a Neutron Detector; Evaluation of Gd-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for the SuperBall Neutron Calorimeter; and Measurement of the Interaction of Cosmic-Ray {mu}{sup {minus}} with a Muon Telescope.

  20. Extracting nuclear sizes of medium to heavy nuclei from total reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, W.; Hatakeyama, S.; Ebata, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Proton and neutron radii are fundamental quantities of atomic nuclei. To study the sizes of short-lived unstable nuclei, there is a need for an alternative to electron scattering. Purpose: The recent paper by Horiuchi et al. [Phys. Rev. C 89, 011601(R) (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.89.011601 proposed a possible way of extracting the matter and neutron-skin thickness of light- to medium-mass nuclei using total reaction cross section, σR. The analysis is extended to medium to heavy nuclei up to lead isotopes with due attention to Coulomb breakup contributions as well as density distributions improved by paring correlation. Methods: We formulate a quantitative calculation of σR based on the Glauber model including the Coulomb breakup. To substantiate the treatment of the Coulomb breakup, we also evaluate the Coulomb breakup cross section due to the electric dipole field in a canonical-basis-time-dependent-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory in the three-dimensional coordinate space. Results: We analyze σR's of 103 nuclei with Z =20 , 28, 40, 50, 70, and 82 incident on light targets, H,21, 4He, and 12C. Three kinds of Skyrme interactions are tested to generate those wave functions. To discuss possible uncertainty due to the Coulomb breakup, we examine its dependence on the target, the incident energy, and the Skyrme interaction. The proton is a most promising target for extracting the nuclear sizes as the Coulomb excitation can safely be neglected. We find that the so-called reaction radius, aR=√{σR/π } , for the proton target is very well approximated by a linear function of two variables, the matter radius and the skin thickness, in which three constants depend only on the incident energy. We quantify the accuracy of σR measurements needed to extract the nuclear sizes. Conclusions: The proton is the best target because, once the incident energy is set, its aR is very accurately determined by only the matter radius and neutron-skin thickness. If σR's at

  1. Charge-exchange resonances and restoration of the Wigner SU(4)-symmetry in heavy and superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Tikhonov, V. N.

    2016-01-01

    Energies of the giant Gamow-Teller and analog resonances -EG and EA, respectively, - are calculated within the microscopic theory of finite Fermi system. The calculated energy difference ΔEG-A = EG-EA tends to zero with A in heavy nuclei indicating the restoration of Wigner SU(4)-symmetry. The calculated ΔEG-A values are in good agreement with the experimental data. The average deviation is 0.30MeV for the 33 considered nuclei where experimental data are available. The ΔEG-A values are investigated for very heavy and superheavy nuclei up to the mass number A = 290. Using the experimental data for the analog resonance energies, the isotopic dependence of the Coulomb energy differences for neighboring isobars are analyzed within the SU(4)-approach for more than 400 nuclei in the mass number range of A = 3-244. The Wigner SU(4)-symmetry restoration for heavy and superheavy nuclei is confirmed. It is shown that the restoration of SU(4)-symmetry does not contradict the possibility of the existence of the "island of stability" in the region of superheavy nuclei.

  2. [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei in the presence of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The luminosity of [C ii] is used as a probe of the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C ii] luminosity. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of the ionized carbon and its distribution among highly ionized states in the interstellar gas in galactic nuclei under the influence of X-ray sources. We calculate the [C ii] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of soft X-rays. Methods: We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [C ii] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei representing conditions in the Galactic central molecular zone and a higher density AGN model. The behavior of the [C ii] luminosity is calculated as a function of the X-ray luminosity. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. Results: We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C ii] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C+ abundance in the WIM, converting some fraction to C2+ and higher ionization states and thus reducing its [C ii] luminosity. For an X-ray luminosity L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1 the [C ii] luminosity can be suppressed by a factor of a few, and for very strong sources, L(X-ray) >1044 erg s-1 such as found for many AGNs, the [C ii] luminosity is significantly depressed. Comparison of the model with several extragalactic sources shows that the [C ii] to far-infrared ratio declines for L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1, in reasonable agreement with our model. Conclusions: We conclude that X-rays

  3. Development of the Experimental Setup Dedicated for Alpha, Gamma and Electron Spectroscopy of Heavy Nuclei at FLNR JINR

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremin, A.; Malyshev, O.; Popeko, A.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Hauschild, K.; Dorvaux, O.; Saro, S.; Pantelika, D.

    2010-04-30

    Various types of reactions and identification techniques were applied in the investigation of formation cross sections and decay properties of transuranium elements. The fusion--evaporation reactions with heavy targets, recoil--separation techniques and identification of nuclei by the parent--daughter generic coincidences with the known daughter-nuclei after implantation into position--sensitive detectors were the most successful tools for production and identification of the heaviest elements known presently. This technique may be further improved and presently it may be very promising for the identification of new elements, search for new isotopes and measurement of new decay data for the known nuclei.At the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Dubna), investigations of the complete fusion reactions leading to the synthesis of heavy and superheavy nuclei with the use of heavy ion beams from a powerful U400 cyclotron have been an important part of the experimental program. It is planned to upgrade U400 cyclotron of the FLNR, to deliver beams with higher intensities and smooth variation of energies.New experimental set up, the velocity filter, is now developing for synthesis and studies of the decay properties of heavy nuclei. At the focal plane of the separator GABRIELA set up (alpha,beta,gamma detectors array) will be installed.

  4. Progress report on the ultra heavy cosmic ray experiment (AO178)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A.; Osullivan, D.; Bosch, J.; Keegan, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Jansen, F.; Domingo, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) is based on a modular array of 192 side-viewing solid state nuclear track detector stacks. These stacks were mounted in sets of four in 48 pressure vessels employing sixteen peripheral Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) trays. The extended duration of the LDEF mission has resulted in a greatly enhanced scientific yield from the UHCRE. The geometry factor for high energy cosmic ray nuclei, allowing for Earth shadowing, was 30 sq m-sr, giving a total exposure factor of 170 sq m-sr-y at an orbital inclination of 28.4 degrees. Scanning results indicate that about 3000 cosmic ray nuclei in the charge region with Z greater than 65 were collected. This sample is more than ten times the current world data in the field (taken to be the data set from the HEAO-3 mission plus that from the Ariel-6 mission) and is sufficient to provide the world's first statistically significant sample of actinide (Z greater than 88) cosmic rays. Results to date are presented including details of ultra-heavy cosmic ray nuclei, analysis of pre-flight and post-flight calibration events and details of track response in the context of detector temperature history. The integrated effect of all temperature and age related latent track variations cause a maximum charge shift of +/- 0.8 e for uranium and +/- 0.6 e for the platinum-lead group. The precision of charge assignment as a function of energy is derived and evidence for remarkably good charge resolution achieved in the UHCRE is considered. Astrophysical implications of the UHCRE charge spectrum are discussed.

  5. Heavy nuclei far from stability in the N < 126, Z > 82 region

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    There are long-standing calculations suggesting that nuclei in the N < 126, Z > 82 region far from stability exhibit deformation effects. Away from stability an observable permanent quadrupole deformation should be achieved but, as yet, there is no experimental evidence for such an effect. A series of experiments was performed to assess the production of nuclei in this region and to study their structure. These experiments were performed using gamma-ray spectroscopy to investigate the low-lying level schemes and alpha-particle spectroscopy in order to isolate fine structure in the decay. The low-lying level structure of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 202}Rn was studied, for the first time, using the {sup 181}Ta({sup 27}Al,6n) and {sup 192}Pt({sup 16}O,6n) reactions. Gamma-ray transitions between excited states in {sup 202}Rn were identified by mass tagging the Fragment Mass Analyzer and by observation of coincident X rays. Transitions in {sup 203}Rn were also identified. The level scheme deduced from these data is consistent with the systematics of light radon isotopes below the N = 126 shell closure and with theoretical calculations indicating that the ground-state shape should not be strongly deformed at N = 116.

  6. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing experimental efforts to detect cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos are guided by the expectation that astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray protons would also generate neutrinos through interactions with ambient matter and/or photons. However, there will be a reduction in the predicted neutrino flux if cosmic ray sources accelerate not only protons but also significant numbers of heavier nuclei, as is indicated by recent air shower data. We consider plausible extragalactic sources such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and starburst galaxies and demand consistency with the observed cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum at Earth after allowing for propagation through intergalactic radiation fields. This allows us to calculate the expected neutrino fluxes from the sources, normalized to the observed cosmic ray spectrum. We find that the likely signals are still within reach of next generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.PACS95.85.Ry98.70.Rz98.54.Cm98.54.EpReferencesFor a review, see:F.HalzenD.HooperRep. Prog. Phys.6520021025A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.972006221101A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationAstropart. Phys.262006282arXiv:astro-ph/0611063arXiv:astro-ph/0702265V.NiessANTARES CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8672006217I.KravchenkoPhys. Rev. D732006082002S.W.BarwickANITA CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.962006171101V.Van ElewyckPierre Auger CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8092006187For a survey of possible sources and event rates in km3 detectors see e.g.,W.BednarekG.F.BurgioT.MontaruliNew Astron. Rev.4920051M.D.KistlerJ.F.BeacomPhys. Rev. D742006063007A. Kappes, J. Hinton, C. Stegmann, F.A. Aharonian, arXiv:astro-ph/0607286.A.LevinsonE.WaxmanPhys. Rev. Lett.872001171101C.DistefanoD.GuettaE.WaxmanA.LevinsonAstrophys. J.5752002378F.A.AharonianL.A.AnchordoquiD.KhangulyanT.MontaruliJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.392006408J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenAstrophys. J.5762002L33F.VissaniAstropart. Phys.262006310F.W

  7. Development of High Resolution Solid-State Track Detector for Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Doke, T.; Hareyama, M.; Hasebe, N.; Ota, S.; Sakurai, K.; Sato, M.; Yasuda, N.; Nakamura, S.; Kamei, T.; Tawara, H.; Ogura, K.

    The observation of trans-iron nuclei in galactic cosmic rays (Z?30) requires a high performance cosmic ray detector telescope with a very large exposure area because of their extremely low fluxes. It is realized by the use of solid-state track detector of CR-39, which has an advantage of easy extension of exposure area. The verification of mass and nuclear charge identifications with CR-39 solid-state track detector newly developed for the observation of heavy cosmic ray particles has been made using Fe ions from NIRS-HIMAC. Mass and charge resolutions for Fe nuclei are found to be ~0.22 amu and 0.22 cu in rms, respectively. Moreover, it is necessary to raise the Z/??detection threshold in order to suppress background tracks produced by galactic cosmic rays with Z/?<30. The new track detectors of copolymers of CR-39 and DAP (diallyl phthalate) have been developed and verified their performances. From the point of view of stability for the cosmic ray exposure environment such as temperature and vacuum in space, newly BP-1 glass detector with high sensitivity is also currently under development. The combination of such solid-state track detector with the high speed scanning system enables us to realize a large-scaled observation for trans-iron galactic cosmic rays.

  8. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the neutron-rich nuclei {sup 89}Rb, {sup 92}Y, and {sup 93}Y with multinucleon transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bucurescu, D.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.; Mihai, C.; Suliman, G.; Rusu, C.; Marginean, N.; Ur, C. A.; Marginean, R.; De Angelis, G.; Corradi, L.; Vedova, F. Della; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Guiot, B.; Napoli, D.; Stefanini, A. M.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Beghini, S.

    2007-12-15

    The positive-parity yrast states in the {sup 89}Rb, {sup 92}Y, and {sup 93}Y nuclei were studied using {gamma}-ray spectroscopy with heavy-ion induced reactions. In the multinucleon transfer reactions {sup 208}Pb+{sup 90}Zr (590 MeV) and {sup 238}U+{sup 82}Se (505 MeV), several {gamma}-ray transitions were identified in these nuclei by means of coincidences between recoiling ions identified with the PRISMA spectrometer and {gamma} rays detected with the CLARA {gamma}-ray array in thin target experiments. Level schemes were subsequently determined from triple-{gamma} coincidences recorded with the GASP array in a thick target experiment, in the reactions produced by a 470 MeV {sup 82}Se beam with a {sup 192}Os target. The observed level schemes are compared to shell-model calculations.

  9. Cross section parameterizations for cosmic ray nuclei. 1: Single nucleon removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Parameterizations of single nucleon removal from electromagnetic and strong interactions of cosmic rays with nuclei are presented. These parameterizations are based upon the most accurate theoretical calculations available to date. They should be very suitable for use in cosmic ray propagation through interstellar space, the Earth's atmosphere, lunar samples, meteorites, spacecraft walls and lunar and martian habitats.

  10. Excitation of Δ and N* resonances in isobaric charge-exchange reactions of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaña, I.; Benlliure, J.; Geissel, H.; Lenske, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Vargas, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model for the study of the excitation of Δ(1232) and N*(1440) resonances in isobaric charge-exchange (AZ, A(Z ± 1)) reactions of heavy nuclei. Quasi-elastic and inelastic elementary processes contributing to the double differential cross sections of the reactions are described in terms of the exchange of virtual pions. The inelastic channel includes processes where the resonances are excited both in the target and in the projectile nucleus. We present results for reactions of 112Sn and 124Sn on different targets. Our results confirm that the position of the Δ peak is insensitive to targets with mass number A ≥ 12, and show that the origin of the Δ peak shift towards low excitation energies, with respect to its position in reactions with a proton target, can be easily explained in terms of the superposition of the different excitation mechanisms contributing to the reaction.

  11. Finite amplitude method applied to the giant dipole resonance in heavy rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Kortelainen, Markus; Hinohara, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Background: The quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), within the framework of nuclear density functional theory (DFT), has been a standard tool to access the collective excitations of atomic nuclei. Recently, the finite amplitude method (FAM) was developed in order to perform the QRPA calculations efficiently without any truncation on the two-quasiparticle model space. Purpose: We discuss the nuclear giant dipole resonance (GDR) in heavy rare-earth isotopes, for which the conventional matrix diagonalization of the QRPA is numerically demanding. A role of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule enhancement factor, connected to the isovector effective mass, is also investigated. Methods: The electric dipole photoabsorption cross section was calculated within a parallelized FAM-QRPA scheme. We employed the Skyrme energy density functional self-consistently in the DFT calculation for the ground states and FAM-QRPA calculation for the excitations. Results: The mean GDR frequency and width are mostly reproduced with the FAM-QRPA, when compared to experimental data, although some deficiency is observed with isotopes heavier than erbium. A role of the TRK enhancement factor in actual GDR strength is clearly shown: its increment leads to a shift of the GDR strength to higher-energy region, without a significant change in the transition amplitudes. Conclusions: The newly developed FAM-QRPA scheme shows remarkable efficiency, which enables one to perform systematic analysis of GDR for heavy rare-earth nuclei. The theoretical deficiency of the photoabsorption cross section could not be improved by only adjusting the TRK enhancement factor, suggesting the necessity of an approach beyond self-consistent QRPA and/or a more systematic optimization of the energy density functional (EDF) parameters.

  12. Review of even element super-heavy nuclei and search for element 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.; Heinz, S.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J.; Münzenberg, G.; Antalic, S.; Barth, W.; Burkhard, H. G.; Dahl, L.; Eberhardt, K.; Grzywacz, R.; Hamilton, J. H.; Henderson, R. A.; Kenneally, J. M.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lang, R.; Lommel, B.; Miernik, K.; Miller, D.; Moody, K. J.; Morita, K.; Nishio, K.; Popeko, A. G.; Roberto, J. B.; Runke, J.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Saro, S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schött, H. J.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Tinschert, K.; Trautmann, N.; Uusitalo, J.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction 54Cr + 248Cm was investigated at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI, Darmstadt, with the intention to study production and decay properties of isotopes of element 120. Three correlated signals were measured, which occurred within a period of 279ms. The heights of the signals correspond with the expectations for a decay sequence starting with an isotope of element 120. However, a complete decay chain cannot be established, since a signal from the implantation of the evaporation residue cannot be identified unambiguously. Measured properties of the event chain are discussed in detail. The result is compared with theoretical predictions. Previously measured decay properties of even element super-heavy nuclei were compiled in order to find arguments for an assignment from the systematics of experimental data. In the course of this review, a few tentatively assigned data could be corrected. New interpretations are given for results which could not be assigned definitely in previous studies. The discussion revealed that the cross-section for production of element 120 could be high enough so that a successful experiment seems possible with presently available techniques. However, a continuation of the experiment at SHIP for a necessary confirmation of the results obtained in a relatively short irradiation of five weeks is not possible at GSI presently. Therefore, we decided to publish the results of the measurement and of the review as they exist now. In the summary and outlook section we also present concepts for the continuation of research in the field of super-heavy nuclei.

  13. The Energetic Trans-Iron Composition Experiment (ENTICE) on the Heavy Nuclei Explorer (HNX) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, M. H.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Barbier, L. M.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Craig, N.; Cummings, A. C.; Doke, T.; Hasebe, N.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ENTICE experiment is one of two instruments that make up the HNX mission. The experimental goal of ENTICE is to measure with high precision the elemental abundances of all nuclei with Z between 10 and 82. This will enable us to determine if the injection mechanism for the cosmic ray accelerator is controlled by FIP or Volatility and to study the mix of nucleosynthetic processes that contribute to the galactic cosmic ray source. The ENTICE experiment utilizes the dE/dx-C method of charge determination and consists of silicon dE/dx detectors, Cherenkov detectors with two different refractive indices, and a fiber hodoscope. We will describe the instrument and its performance based on beam tests of a prototype instrument.

  14. New aspects of heavy cosmic rays from calcium to nickel (Z = 20 to 28)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, Richard A.; Webber, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Over the two year course of this grant a study was conducted to explore the implications of composition measurements of heavy cosmic rays made by the Third High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-3). To interpret these and other measurements this study combined for the first time new laboratory measurements of the fragmentation cross sections of heavy nuclei, a new semi-empirical cross section formula, and the latest in cosmic ray propagation and solar modulation models. These models were used to interpret abundance measurements from six recent satellite experiments, including, in particular, two from HEAO-3. The principal results of the study were: (1) an improved interpretation of the Mn-54 clock in cosmic rays, including predictions of the isotopic abundances of Mn for comparison with future isotope measurements; (2) the first realization of the effect of Mn-54 decay on studies of the source abundances of Fe isotopes; (3) improved source abundances of the elements Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni in the cosmic ray source material; (4) an improved fit to the abundances of Fe secondaries in cosmic rays; and (5) additional evidence that supports the validity of the leaky-box model of cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy. This final report summarizes these new results, the new tools that were developed to obtain them, and presents a bibliography of talks and publications that resulted from this work.

  15. Contribution of cosmic ray heavy ions to the radiation hazard in manned space flights.

    PubMed

    Domingo, C; Font, J; Baixeras, C; Font, L l; Fernandez, F

    1999-01-01

    Primary cosmic radiation arriving near the Earth may be classified into two general categories: the gamma component and the hadronic component. The hadronic component contains mainly protons, a small amount of alpha particles and a smaller amount of heavier charged nuclei (ions). Although the fluxes of these heavier ions are very small in comparison to those of protons, they are able to originate a huge linear energy transfer (LET). This work studies the contribution of heavy ions from cosmic rays to the radiation hazard to which the crew of a manned long duration space flight might be exposed. The geometry of the energy deposition by a heavy ion is studied, and it is found that energies of the order of up to 10(23) J kg-1 are deposited. PMID:11542231

  16. Energy Spectra of Cosmic Ray Nuclei to Above 100 Gev/nucleon. [measurement of energy spectra of cosmic ray nuclei boron to iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Siohan, F.; Ormes, J. F.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Arens, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical composition cosmic rays as a function of energy in the range of a few GeV/nucleon to some hundreds of GeV/nucleon for boron through iron are presented. The experiment combined an ionization spectrometer and a gas Cherenkov counter, which was flown on a balloon, to perform two different and independent energy measurements. The experimental apparatus is described in detail. The energy dependence of the cosmic ray escape length for boron and iron is reported and predicted changes in the energy dependence of the ratios of primary nuclei 0/C and iron/C+0 are discussed.

  17. Electron-positron pairs in physics and astrophysics: From heavy nuclei to black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Remo; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2010-02-01

    Due to the interaction of physics and astrophysics we are witnessing in these years a splendid synthesis of theoretical, experimental and observational results originating from three fundamental physical processes. They were originally proposed by Dirac, by Breit and Wheeler and by Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger. For almost seventy years they have all three been followed by a continued effort of experimental verification on Earth-based experiments. The Dirac process, e+e-→2γ, has been by far the most successful. It has obtained extremely accurate experimental verification and has led as well to an enormous number of new physics in possibly one of the most fruitful experimental avenues by introduction of storage rings in Frascati and followed by the largest accelerators worldwide: DESY, SLAC etc. The Breit-Wheeler process, 2γ→e+e-, although conceptually simple, being the inverse process of the Dirac one, has been by far one of the most difficult to be verified experimentally. Only recently, through the technology based on free electron X-ray laser and its numerous applications in Earth-based experiments, some first indications of its possible verification have been reached. The vacuum polarization process in strong electromagnetic field, pioneered by Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, introduced the concept of critical electric field Ec=me2c3/(eħ). It has been searched without success for more than forty years by heavy-ion collisions in many of the leading particle accelerators worldwide. The novel situation today is that these same processes can be studied on a much more grandiose scale during the gravitational collapse leading to the formation of a black hole being observed in Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). This report is dedicated to the scientific race. The theoretical and experimental work developed in Earth-based laboratories is confronted with the theoretical interpretation of space-based observations of phenomena originating on cosmological

  18. The UH-nuclei cosmic ray detector on the third High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Scarlett, W. R.; Waddington, C. J.; Stone, E. C.

    1981-01-01

    The third High Energy Astronomy Observatory satellite (HEAO-3) carries a particle telescope for the detection of highly charged cosmic ray nuclei. These nuclei, which have Z equal to or greater than 28, are much rarer than the lower charged nuclei in the cosmic radiation. As a consequence, this particle telescope was required to have a large collecting area as well as an ability to resolve individual elements. This paper describes the telescope, composed of large area parallel plate ionization chambers, multiwire ion chamber hodoscopes and a Cherenkov radiation detector. The resulting telescope has a total geometry factor of 59,000 sq cm sr and is capable of measuring the charges of nuclei in the range Z = 14-120.

  19. Description of electromagnetic and favored α transitions in heavy odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, A.; Delion, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    We describe electromagnetic and favored α transitions to rotational bands in odd-mass nuclei built upon a single particle state with angular momentum projection Ω ≠1/2 in the region 88 ≤Z ≤98 . We use the particle coupled to an even-even core approach described by the coherent state model and the coupled channels method to estimate partial α -decay widths. We reproduce the energy levels of the rotational band where favored α transitions occur for 26 nuclei and predict B (" close=")E 2 )">E 2 values for electromagnetic transitions to the band head using a deformation parameter and a Hamiltonian strength parameter for each nucleus, together with an effective collective charge depending linearly on the deformation parameter. Where experimental data are available, the contribution of the single particle effective charge to the total B value is calculated. The Hamiltonian describing the α -nucleus interaction contains two terms, a spherically symmetric potential given by the double-folding of the M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction plus a repulsive core simulating the Pauli principle and a quadrupole-quadrupole (QQ) interaction. The α -decaying state is identified as a narrow outgoing resonance in this potential. The intensity of the transition to the first excited state is reproduced by the QQ coupling strength. It depends linearly both on the nuclear deformation and the square of the reduced width for the decay to the band head, respectively. Predicted intensities for transitions to higher excited states are in a reasonable agreement with experimental data. This formalism offers a unified description of energy levels, electromagnetic and favored α transitions for known heavy odd-mass α emitters.

  20. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajek, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J.; Fijał-Kirejczyk, I.; Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L2-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  1. Heavy Cosmic Ray Measurement Aboard Spacelab-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.; Krause, J.; Fischer, E.; Enge, W.

    1985-01-01

    A stack of CR-39 plastic track detectors was exposed to cosmic radiation during the 10 days mission aboard Spacelab-1. A part of the stack was rotated one revolution within 7 days. The impact time of most of the particles was correlated with the orbit position of the shuttle and thus with geomagnetic field parameters. The analysis of heavy particles with charge Z greater than or equal to 6 in the energy range 50-150 MeV per nucleon with special emphasis on geomagnetically forbidden particles is reported.

  2. Fragmentation of spherical radioactive heavy nuclei as a novel probe of transient effects in fission

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, C.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Kelic, A.; Heinz, A.; Jurado, B.

    2010-06-15

    Peripheral collisions with radioactive heavy-ion beams at relativistic energies are discussed as an innovative approach for probing the transient regime experienced by fissile systems evolving toward quasiequilibrium and thereby studying the viscous nature of nuclear matter. A dedicated experiment using the advanced technical installations of GSI, Darmstadt, made it possible to realize ideal conditions for the investigation of relaxation effects in a metastable well. Combined with a highly sensitive experimental signature, it provides a measure of the transient effects with respect to the flux over the fission barrier. Within a two-step reaction process, 45 proton-rich unstable spherical isotopes between At and Th produced by projectile-fragmentation of a stable {sup 238}U beam have been used as secondary projectiles which impinge on lead target nuclei. The fragmentation of the radioactive projectiles results in nearly spherical compound nuclei that span a wide range in excitation energy and fissility. The decay of these excited systems by fission is studied with a dedicated setup which, together with the inverse kinematics of the reaction, permits the detection of both fission products in coincidence and the determination of their atomic numbers with high resolution. The information on the nuclear charges of the two fragments is used to sort the data according to the initial excitation energy and fissility of the compound nucleus. The width of the fission-fragment nuclear charge distribution is shown to be specifically sensitive to presaddle transient effects and is used to establish a clock for the passage of the saddle point. The comparison of the experimental results with model calculations points to a fission delay tau{sub trans} of (3.3+-0.7)x10{sup -21} s for initially spherical compound nuclei, independent of excitation energy and fissility. This value suggests a nuclear dissipation strength beta at small deformation of (4.5+-0.5)x10{sup 21} s{sup -1}. The

  3. Density functional theory computation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance parameters in light and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Kiplangat

    This thesis illustrates the utilization of Density functional theory (DFT) in calculations of gas and solution phase Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) properties of light and heavy nuclei. Computing NMR properties is still a challenge and there are many unknown factors that are still being explored. For instance, influence of hydrogen-bonding; thermal motion; vibration; rotation and solvent effects. In one of the theoretical studies of 195Pt NMR chemical shift in cisplatin and its derivatives illustrated in Chapter 2 and 3 of this thesis. The importance of representing explicit solvent molecules explicitly around the Pt center in cisplatin complexes was outlined. In the same complexes, solvent effect contributed about half of the J(Pt-N) coupling constant. Indicating the significance of considering the surrounding solvent molecules in elucidating the NMR measurements of cisplatin binding to DNA. In chapter 4, we explore the Spin-Orbit (SO) effects on the 29Si and 13C chemical shifts induced by surrounding metal and ligands. The unusual Ni, Pd, Pt trends in SO effects to the 29Si in metallasilatrane complexes X-Si-(mu-mt)4-M-Y was interpreted based on electronic and relativistic effects rather than by structural differences between the complexes. In addition, we develop a non-linear model for predicting NMR SO effects in a series of organics bonded to heavy nuclei halides. In chapter 5, we extend the idea of "Chemist's orbitals" LMO analysis to the quantum chemical proton NMR computation of systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds. Consequently, we explicitly link the relationship between the NMR parameters related to H-bonded systems and intuitive picture of a chemical bond from quantum calculations. The analysis shows how NMR signatures characteristic of H-bond can be explained by local bonding and electron delocalization concepts. One shortcoming of some of the anti-cancer agents like cisplatin is that they are toxic and researchers are looking for

  4. Nuclear fragmentation parameters needed for interpretation of observed fluxes of UH cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Cummings, J. R.; Garrard, T. L.; Geer, L. Y.; Klarmann, J.; Nilsen, B. S.

    1995-01-01

    Any study of the origin of the UH nuclei in the cosmic rays requires that their observed abundances be propagated back to the source. This demands a knowledge of the interaction cross sections in the materials of the detectors, any local overlying matter, and the interstellar medium. New measurements of interaction probabilities of 10.6 GeV/n gold nuclei show significant differences from previous measurements made at less than 1.0 GeV/n nuclei. These differences are particularly marked for a hydrogen target. Hence, those cross sections previously measured at low energies should not be applied to cosmic ray observations made at energies greater than or = 2 GeV/n. Without a measurement of the energy dependence of these cross sections it will be difficult to make reliable propagation calculations, since the differences between measured and predicted cross sections are still at the 20 to 30% level.

  5. The elemental and isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    A directly accessible sample of matter which originates outside the solar system is provided by galactic cosmic rays. The present investigation is primarily concerned with progress related to questions raised regarding the similarity or difference between solar system matter and matter coming from outside the solar system. The investigation takes into account U.S. contributions to this topic over the period from 1979 to 1982. The cosmic ray (CR) abundances of all the elements from H to Ni (atomic number Z=1 to 28) have now been measured. Cosmic ray source (CRS) and solar system (SS) elemental compositions are listed in a table, and the ratio of CRS to SS abundance for 21 elements is shown in a graph. There is now clear evidence from CR isotope studies that the nucleosynthesis of CRS material has differed from that of SS material.

  6. Ultra-heavy cosmic rays: Theoretical implications of recent observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, J. B.; Hainebach, K. L.; Schramm, D. N.; Anglin, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Extreme ultraheavy cosmic ray observations (Z greater or equal 70) are compared with r-process models. A detailed cosmic ray propagation calculation is used to transform the calculated source distributions to those observed at the earth. The r-process production abundances are calculated using different mass formulae and beta-rate formulae; an empirical estimate based on the observed solar system abundances is used also. There is the continued strong indication of an r-process dominance in the extreme ultra-heavy cosmic rays. However it is shown that the observed high actinide/Pt ratio in the cosmic rays cannot be fit with the same r-process calculation which also fits the solar system material. This result suggests that the cosmic rays probably undergo some preferential acceleration in addition to the apparent general enrichment in heavy (r-process) material. As estimate also is made of the expected relative abundance of superheavy elements in the cosmic rays if the anomalous heavy xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is due to a fissioning superheavy element.

  7. Early results from the ultra heavy cosmic ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osullivan, D.; Thompson, A.; Bosch, J.; Keegan, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Jansen, F.; Domingo, C.

    1995-01-01

    Data extraction and analysis of the LDEF Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment is continuing. Almost twice the pre LDEF world sample has been investigated and some details of the charge spectrum in the region from Z approximately 70 up to and including the actinides are presented. The early results indicate r process enhancement over solar system source abundances.

  8. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Liewen; Ko Che Ming; Xu Jun; Li Baoan

    2010-08-15

    Expressing explicitly the parameters of the standard Skyrme interaction in terms of the macroscopic properties of asymmetric nuclear matter, we show in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach that unambiguous correlations exist between observables of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness {Delta}r{sub np} of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E{sub sym}({rho}{sub 0}) and its density slope L at saturation density {rho}{sub 0}. Combining these constraints with those from recent analyses of isospin diffusion and the double neutron/proton ratio in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies leads to a more stringent limit on L approximately independent of E{sub sym}({rho}{sub 0}). The implication of these new constraints on the {Delta}r{sub np} of {sup 208}Pb as well as the core-crust transition density and pressure in neutron stars is discussed.

  9. Pygmy dipole resonance as a constraint on the neutron skin of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2006-04-15

    The isotopic dependence of the isovector Pygmy dipole response in tin is studied within the framework of the relativistic random-phase approximation. Regarded as an oscillation of the neutron skin against the isospin-symmetric core, the pygmy dipole resonance may place important constraints on the neutron skin of heavy nuclei and, as a result, on the equation of state of neutron-rich matter. The present study centers around two questions. First, is there a strong correlation between the development of a neutron skin and the emergence of low-energy isovector dipole strength? Second, could one use the recently measured Pygmy dipole resonance in {sup 130}Sn and {sup 132}Sn to discriminate among theoretical models? For the first question we found that although a strong correlation between the neutron skin and the Pygmy dipole resonance exists, a mild anticorrelation develops beyond {sup 120}Sn. The answer to the second question suggests that models with overly large neutron skins--and thus stiff symmetry energies--are in conflict with experiment.

  10. Outflowing X-ray corona in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junxian; Liu, Teng; Yang, Huan; Zhu, Feifan; Zhou, Youyuan

    2015-08-01

    Hard X-ray emission in radio-quiet AGNs is believed to be produced via inverse Compton scattering by hot and compact corona near the super massive black hole. However the origin and physical properties of the coronae, including geometry, kinematics and dynamics, yet remain poorly known. Taking [OIV] 25.89um emission line as an isotropic indicator of AGN's intrinsic luminosity, we compare the intrinsic corona X-ray emission between Seyfert 1 and Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxies, which are viewed at different inclinations according to the unification scheme. We find that Seyfert 1 galaxies are brighter in "absorption-corrected" 2-10 keV emission by a factor of ~2.8, comparing with Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxies. The Seyfert 1 and Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxies follow a statistically identical correlation between the absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminosity and the SWIFT BAT 14-195 keV luminosity, indicating that our absorption correction to the 2-10 keV flux is sufficient. The difference between the two populations thus can not be attributed to X-ray absorption, and instead implies an intrinsic anisotropy in the corona X-ray emission. This striking anisotropy of X-ray emission can be explained by a bipolar outflowing corona with a bulk velocity of ~0.3-0.5c. This would provide a natural link between the so-called coronae and weak jets in these systems. We also show that how this study would affect our understanding to the nature of mid-infrared emission in AGNs and the properties of dusty torus. Furthermore, such anisotropy implies that, contrary to previous understanding based on the assumption of isotropic corona emission, hard X-ray AGN surveys are biased against type 2 AGNs even after absorption-correction, and careful correction for this effect is required to measure the obscured fraction from X-ray surveys. Other interesting consequences of this discovery will also be discussed.

  11. OCCUPATION OF X-RAY-SELECTED GALAXY GROUPS BY X-RAY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Allevato, V.; Finoguenov, A.; Hasinger, G.; Cappelluti, N.; Miyaji, T.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Zamorani, G.; Gilli, R.; George, M. R.; Tanaka, M.; Silverman, J.; Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Shankar, F.

    2012-10-10

    We present the first direct measurement of the mean halo occupation distribution (HOD) of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field at z {<=} 1, based on the association of 41 XMM and 17 C-COSMOS AGNs with member galaxies of 189 X-ray-detected galaxy groups from XMM-Newton and Chandra data. We model the mean AGN occupation in the halo mass range log M{sub 200} [M{sub Sun }] = 13-14.5 with a rolling-off power law with the best-fit index {alpha} = 0.06(- 0.22; 0.36) and normalization parameter f{sub a} 0.05(0.04; 0.06). We find the mean HOD of AGNs among central galaxies to be modeled by a softened step function at log M{sub h} > log M{sub min} = 12.75(12.10, 12.95) M{sub Sun} while for the satellite AGN HOD we find a preference for an increasing AGN fraction with M{sub h} , suggesting that the average number of AGNs in satellite galaxies grows slower ({alpha}{sub s} < 0.6) than the linear proportion ({alpha}{sub s} = 1) observed for the satellite HOD of samples of galaxies. We present an estimate of the projected autocorrelation function (ACF) of galaxy groups over the range of r{sub p} = 0.1-40 h {sup -1} Mpc at (z) = 0.5. We use the large-scale clustering signal to verify the agreement between the group bias estimated by using the observed galaxy groups ACF and the value derived from the group mass estimates. We perform a measurement of the projected AGN-galaxy-group cross-correlation function, excluding from the analysis AGNs that are within galaxy groups and we model the two-halo term of the clustering signal with the mean AGN HOD based on our results.

  12. Increased delivery of condensation nuclei during the Late Heavy Bombardment to the terrestrial and martian atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    During the period of the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), between 4.1 and 3.8 Ga, the impact rate within the entire Solar System was up to a few thousand times higher than the current value (Ryder 2002, Bottke et al. 2012, Fassett and Minton 2013). Multiple basin-forming events on inner planets that occurred during this time had a strong but short-lasting (up to few thousands of years) effect on atmospheres of Earth and Mars (Sleep et al. 1989, Segura et al. 2002, 2012). However, the role of the continuous flux of smaller impactors has not been assessed so far. We calculated the amount of meteoric material in the 10^-3 kg to 106 kg size range delivered to Earth and Mars during the LHB based on the impact flux at the top of the Earth's atmosphere based on results from Bland and Artemieva (2006). Those values were recalculated for Mars based on Ivanov and Hartmann (2009) and then recalculated to the LHB peak based on estimates from Ryder (2002), Bottke et al. (2012), Fassett and Minton (2013). During the LHB, the amount of meteoritic material within this size range delivered to Earth was up to ~1.7*10^10 kg/year and 1.4*10^10 kg/year for Mars. The impactors that ablate and are disrupted during atmospheric entry can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (Rosen 1968, Hunten et al. 1980, Ogurtsov and Raspopov 2011). The amount of material delivered during LHB to the upper stratosphere and lower mezosphere (Hunten et al. 1980, Bland and Artemieva 2006) is comparable to the current terrestrial annual emission of mineral cloud condensation nuclei of 0.5-8*10^12 kg/year (Tegen 2003). On Mars, the availability of condensation nuclei is one of the main factors guiding water-ice cloud formation (Montmessin et al. 2004), which is in turn one of the main climatic factors influencing the hydrological cycle (Michaels et al. 2006) and radiative balance of the planet (Haberle et al. 1999, Wordsworth et al. 2013, Urata and Toon 2013). Increased delivery of condensation nuclei during the

  13. A new transition radiation detector for cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lheureux, J.; Meyer, P.; Muller, D.; Swordy, S.

    1981-01-01

    Test measurements on materials for transition radiation detectors at a low Lorentz factor are reported. The materials will be based on board Spacelab-2 for determining the composition and energy spectra of nuclear cosmic rays in the 1 TeV/nucleon range. The transition radiation detectors consist of a sandwich of radiator-photon detector combinations. The radiators emit X-rays and are composed of polyolefin fibers used with Xe filled multiwired proportional chamber (MWPC) detectors capable of detecting particle Lorentz factors of several hundred. The sizing of the detectors is outlined, noting the requirement of a thickness which provides a maximum ratio of transition radiation to total signal in the chambers. The fiber radiator-MWPC responses were tested at Fermilab and in an electron cyclotron. An increase in transition radiation detection was found as a square power law of Z, and the use of six radiator-MWPC on board the Spacelab-2 is outlined.

  14. Setup with Laser Ionization in Gas Cell for Production and Study of Neutron-Rich Heavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Zemlyanoy, S. G.; Kozulin, E. M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Fedosseev, V.; Bark, R.; Janas, Z.; Othman, H. A.

    2015-11-01

    The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map are very close to stability while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides along the neutron closed shell N=126 is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and, in particular, for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleosynthesis. This area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion-fission reactions nor in fragmentation processes widely used nowadays for the production of exotic nuclei. A new way was recently proposed for the production of these nuclei via low-energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions. The estimated yields of neutron-rich nuclei are found to be significantly high in such reactions and several tens of new nuclides can be produced, for example, in the near-barrier collision of 136Xe with 208Pb. A new setup is proposed to produce and study heavy neutron-rich nuclei located along the neutron closed shell N=126.

  15. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei from extragalactic pulsars and the effect of their Galactic counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Olinto, Angela V.

    2013-03-01

    The acceleration of ultrahigh energy nuclei in fast spinning newborn pulsars can explain the observed spectrum of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and the trend towards heavier nuclei for energies above 1019 eV as reported by the Auger Observatory. Pulsar acceleration implies a hard injection spectrum ( ~ E-1) due to pulsar spin down and a maximum energy Emax ~ Z 1019 eV due to the limit on the spin rate of neutron stars. We have previously shown that the escape through the young supernova remnant softens the spectrum, decreases slightly the maximum energy, and generates secondary nuclei. Here we show that the distribution of pulsar birth periods and the effect of propagation in the interstellar and intergalactic media modifies the combined spectrum of all pulsars. By assuming a normal distribution of pulsar birth periods centered at 300 ms, we show that the contribution of extragalactic pulsar births to the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectrum naturally gives rise to a contribution to very high energy cosmic rays (VHECRs, between 1016 and 1018 eV) by Galactic pulsar births. The required injected composition to fit the observed spectrum depends on the absolute energy scale, which is uncertain, differing between Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The contribution of Galactic pulsar births can also bridge the gap between predictions for cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants and the observed spectrum just below the ankle, depending on the composition of the cosmic rays that escape the supernova remnant and the diffusion behavior of VHECRs in the Galaxy.

  16. Heavy quarks and nuclei, or the charm & beauty of nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, D.

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following: why heavy quarks? Heavy quarkonium in QCD vacuum and in matter; Phenomenology of quarkonium production; Induced decay of QCD vacuum in heavy ion collisions? Implications for quarkonium production; and Outlook.

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich products of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thick-target {gamma}{gamma} coincidence techniques are being used to explore the spectroscopy of otherwise hard-to-reach neutron-rich products of deep-inelastic heavy ion reactions. Extensive {gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements were performed at ATLAS using pulsed beams of {sup 80}Se, {sup 136}Xe, and {sup 238}U on lead-backed {sup 122,124}Sn targets with energies 10-15% above the Coulomb barrier. Gamma-ray coincidence intensities were used to map out yield distributions with A and Z for even-even product nuclei around the target and around the projectile. The main features of the yield patterns are understandable in terms of N/Z equilibration. We had the most success in studying the decays of yrast isomers. Thus far, more than thirty new {mu}s isomers in the Z = 50 region were found and characterized. Making isotopic assignments for previously unknown {gamma}-ray cascades proves to be one of the biggest problems. Our assignments were based (a) on rare overlaps with radioactivity data, (b) on the relative yields with different beams, and (c) on observed cross-coincidences between {gamma} rays from light and heavy reaction partners. However, the primary products of deep inelastic collisions often are sufficiently excited for subsequent neutron evaporation, so {gamma}{gamma} cross-coincidence results require careful interpretation.

  18. The cosmological evolution and luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Avni, Y.; Giommi, P.; Griffiths, R. E.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Danziger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 31 AGNs extracted from a fully identified sample of X-ray sources from the Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey and is therefore exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space is found to be strongly nonuniform. The amount of cosmological evolution required by the X-ray data is derived in the framework of pure luminosity evolution and is found to be smaller than the amount determined from optically selected samples. The X-ray luminosity function is derived. It can be satisfactorily represented by a single power law only over a limited range of absolute luminosities. Evidence that the luminosity function flattens at low luminosity or steepens at high luminosity, or both, is presented and discussed.

  19. A Study of Heavy Trans-Iron Primary Cosmic Rays (Z More than or Equal to 55) with a Fast Film Cerenkov Detector. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, L. S.

    1972-01-01

    The detection and measurement of the cosmic ray charge spectrum for nuclei heavier than iron (Fe, Z = 26) are discussed. These trans-iron nuclei are of great interest for several reasons. They promise to be one of the more sensitive clocks for use in determining the age of cosmic rays. The discovery of radioactive nuclides and their decay products in the primary flux, will allow an estimation of the elapsed time since these cosmic rays were synthesized. In addition, the relatively short interaction length of the very heavy trans-iron particles makes their relative abundance a source of information regarding the amount of interstellar matter that they had to traverse to reach the earth. A study of the trans-iron cosmic rays may provide clues as to the very processes of nucleosyntheses by which the bulk of the trans-iron nuclei in the universe are produced. This in turn may shed light on the mechanics of the supernova, which is postulated to be the major source of all cosmic rays. Finally, trans-iron cosmic ray experiments may demonstrate the existence of the recently postulated super-heavy nuclei.

  20. Challenging Cosmic Ray Propagation with Antiprotons: Evidence for a "Fresh" Nuclei Component?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Ormes, Jonathan F.

    2002-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic ray (CR) antiproton flux have been shown to challenge existing CR propagation models. It was shown that the reacceleration models designed to match secondary to primary nuclei ratio (e.g., Boron/Carbon) produce too few antiprotons, while the traditional non-reacceleration models can reproduce the antiproton flux but fall short of explaining the low-energy decrease in the secondary to primary nuclei ratio. Matching both the secondary to primary nuclei ratio and antiproton flux requires artificial breaks in the diffusion coefficient and the primary injection spectrum suggesting the need for other approaches. In the present paper we discuss one possibility to overcome these difficulties. Using the measured antiproton flux to fix the diffusion coefficient, we show that the spectra of primary nuclei as measured in the heliosphere may contain a fresh local unprocessed component at low energies, thus decreasing the measured secondary to primary nuclei ratio. A model reproducing antiprotons, B/C ratio, and abundances up to Ni is presented.

  1. Space plasma physics: isotopic stack: measurement of heavy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Beaujean, R; Schmidt, M; Enge, W; Siegmon, G; Krause, J; Fischer, E

    1984-07-13

    A stack of plastic nuclear track detectors was exposed to heavy cosmic rays on the pallet of Spacelab 1. Some layers of the stack were rotated with respect to the main stack to determine the arrival time of the particles. After return of the stack the latent particle tracks are revealed by chemical etching. Under the optical microscope the charge, mass, energy, and impact direction of the particles can be deduced from the track geometry. PMID:17837938

  2. May heavy neutrinos solve underground and cosmic-ray puzzles?

    SciTech Connect

    Belotsky, K. M. Fargion, D. Khlopov, M. Yu. Konoplich, R. V.

    2008-01-15

    Primordial heavy neutrinos of the fourth generation might explain different astrophysical puzzles. The simplest fourth-neutrino scenario is consistent with known fourth-neutrino physics, cosmic ray antimatter, cosmic gamma fluxes, and positive signals in underground detectors for a very narrow neutrino mass window (46-47 GeV). However, accounting for the constraint of underground experiment CDMS prohibits solution of cosmic-ray puzzles in this scenario. We have analyzed extended heavy-neutrino models related to the clumpiness of neutrino density, new interactions in heavy-neutrino annihilation, neutrino asymmetry, and neutrino decay. We found that, in these models, the cosmic-ray imprint may fit the positive underground signals in DAMA/Nal experiment in the entire mass range 46-70 GeV allowed from uncertainties of electroweak parameters, while satisfaction of the CDMS constraint reduces the mass range to around 50 GeV, where all data can come to consent in the framework of the considered hypothesis.

  3. Abundances of secondary elements among the ultra heavy cosmic rays: Results from HEAO-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klarmann, J.; Stone, E. C.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Margolis, S. H.; Waddington, C. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Kertzman, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the abundances of elements of charge 62 or Z or = 73 in the cosmic radiation from the HEAO-3 Heavy Nuclei Experiment (HNE) are discussed. These elements, having solar, and presumably source, abundances much less than the heavier Pt and Pb groups, are expected to be largely products of spallation. Thus they are indicators of the conditions prevailing during the propagation of cosmic rays. The abundances have changed from those reported previously due to a different data selection. This results in better charge resolution and in a higher mean energy for the particles. All the particles included were required to have had a cutoff rigidity R sub c 5 GV. This allowed the charge determination to be based solely on the Cherenkov measurement.

  4. Interaction of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation with gamma rays produced by a jet in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zbyszewska, Magda

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory give evidence for the existence of a type of blazar with strong gamma-ray emission. Data obtained by EGRET for the quasar 3C 279 show a spectrum between 100 MeV and 10 GeV. Photons of such energies should interact with the X-rays and produce positron/electron pairs. If the optical depth against pair production for the gamma rays is large (tau(gamma gamma) greater than 1), the gamma-ray spectrum should be affected. The importance of this process has been pointed out by, e.g., Maraschi, Ghisellini, & Celotti (1992). Several works (e.g., Dermer 1993; Zbyszewska 1993; Sikora, Begelman, & Rees 1993) concerning gamma-ray radiation from quasar 3C 279 have proposed a model in which the gamma rays are produced via interaction between a moving cloud of relativistic electrons and external soft photons. The presence of gamma rays in active galactic nuclei spectra gives constraints on the localization and the luminosity of the medium which produces ultraviolet/X-ray photons. We investigate what conditions should be fulfilled in the above model to avoid the absorption of the gamma rays due to pair production.

  5. A comment on the validity of fragmentation parameters measured in nuclear emulsions. [cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence is reexamined which has been cited as suggesting serious errors in the use of fragmentation parameters appropriate to an airlike medium deduced from measurements made in nuclear emulsions to evaluate corrections for certain effects in balloon-borne observations of cosmic-ray nuclei. Fragmentation parameters for hydrogenlike interactions are calculated and shown to be in overall good agreement with those obtained previously for air. Experimentally measured fragmentation parameters in emulsion are compared with values computed semiempirically, and reasonable agreement is indicated.

  6. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION Charge spectrum of galactic cosmic ray nuclei as measured in meteorite olivines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Andrei B.; Bagulya, Aleksandr V.; Vladimirov, Mikhail S.; Goncharova, Lyudmila A.; Ivliev, Aleksandr I.; Kalinina, Galina V.; Kashkarov, Leonid L.; Konovalova, Nina S.; Okat'eva, Natal'ya M.; Polukhina, Natal'ya G.; Rusetskii, Aleksei S.; Starkov, Nikolai I.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents experimental results on galactic cosmic ray nuclei in olivine crystals from the Marjalahti and Eagle Station pallasites. The charge spectrum of the nuclei is measured to be in good agreement with the experimental data from the HEAO-3 and ARIEL-6 satellite missions.

  7. A new measurement of the flux of the light cosmic-ray nuclei at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J.; Dwyer, J.; Mueller, D.; Swordy, S.; Tang, K. K.

    1994-01-01

    A new cosmic-ray detector utilizing a ring-imaging Cerenkov counter to determine the energy of light cosmic-ray nuclei was flown on high-altitude balloon from Fort Sumner, NM, in 1991 September. We describe the design and performance of this instrument and discuss the data analysis procedures. The measurement provides a new determination of the absolute flux and differential energy spectrum of the primary cosmic-ray species helium between 40 and 320 GeV/nucleon. The experiment also yields the spectra of carbon and oxygen and some information on the intensities of the secondary nuclei Li, Be, and B. A comparison between our results and previous measurements of heavier nuclei (Z greater than or equal to 4) from HEAO 3 and Spacelab 2 indicates good consistency between these measurements. The data set is compared with the results of a leaky box propagation model. We find good agreement with this model if the abundance of helium relative to oxygen at the source is taken to be 25 +/- 6 and if the source spectrum is given by a power law in energy proportional to E(exp -2.15).

  8. Testing astrophysical models for the PAMELA positron excess with cosmic ray nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2009-08-21

    The excess in the positron fraction measured by PAMELA has been interpreted as due to annihilation or decay of dark matter in the Galaxy. More prosaically it has been ascribed to direct production of positrons by nearby pulsars or due to pion production during diffusive shock acceleration of hadronic cosmic rays in nearby sources. We point out that measurements of secondary cosmic ray nuclei can discriminate between these possibilities. New data on the titanium-to-iron ratio support the hadronic source model above and enable a prediction for the boron-to-carbon ratio at energies above 100 GeV. PMID:19792709

  9. On the origin of power-law X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosman, I.; Shaham, J.; Shaviv, G.

    1984-01-01

    In the present analytical model for a power law X-ray continuum production in active galactic nuclei, the dissipation of turbulent energy flux above the accretion disk forms an optically thin transition layer with an inverted temperature gradient. The emitted thermal radiation has a power law spectrum in the 0.1-100 keV range, with a photon energy spectral index gamma of about 0.4-1.0. Thermal X-ray contribution from the layer is 5-10 percent of the total disk luminosity. The gamma value of 0.75 is suggested as a 'natural' power law index for Seyfert galaxies and QSOs.

  10. Comparative study of depth dose distributions for beams of light and heavy nuclei in tissue-like media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2008-04-01

    We study the energy deposition by beams of light and heavy nuclei in tissue-like media for their possible application in charged-particle cancer therapy. The depth-dose distributions for protons, 3He, 12C, 20Ne and 58Ni nuclei are calculated within a Monte Carlo model based on the GEANT4 toolkit. These distributions are compared with each other and with available experimental data. It is demonstrated that nuclear fragmentation reactions essentially reduce the peak-to-plateau ratio of the dose profiles for deeply penetrating energetic ions heavier than 3He. On the other hand, the shapes of depth-dose profiles for all projectiles up to 58Ni were found similar at low penetration depths.

  11. Light (anti-)nuclei production and flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lilin; Ko, Che Ming; Yin, Xuejiao

    2015-12-01

    Using the coalescence model based on the phase-space distributions of protons, neutrons, Λ s , and their antiparticles from a multiphase transport (AMPT) model, we study the production of light nuclei (H, H, He, H) and their antinuclei in Pb+Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV. The resulting transverse momentum spectra, elliptic flows, and coalescence parameters for these nuclei are presented and compared with available experimental data. We also show the constituent number scaled elliptic flows of these nuclei and discuss its implications.

  12. Preliminary spectra of the primary cosmic ray nuclei from the first year of the NUCLEON experiment exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The NUCLEON cosmic ray observatory is designed to measure high energy cosmic ray composition and energy distribution. Methods of identification of charge and energy measurement for primary cosmic ray nuclei are considered. C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, Fe energy spectra are presented and discussed. The results are obtained from the first year of the planned exposure time.

  13. X-ray spectroscopy of AGN with the AXAF 'Microcalorimeter'. [Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    A novel technique for X-ray spectroscopy has been configured as part of the definition payload of the AXAF Observatory. It is basically a calorimeter which, operating at 0.1 K, senses the total conversion of single photoelectrically absorbed X-rays via the differential temperature rise of the absorber. The technique promises to achieve less than 10 eV FWHM with near-unit efficiency simultaneously over the entire AXAF bandpass. This combination of high resolution and high efficiency allows for the possibility of investigating thermal, fluorescent and absorption X-ray line features in many types of X-ray source, including a large sample of active galactic nuclei.

  14. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei from extragalactic pulsars and the effect of their Galactic counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ke; Olinto, Angela V.; Kotera, Kumiko E-mail: kotera@iap.fr

    2013-03-01

    The acceleration of ultrahigh energy nuclei in fast spinning newborn pulsars can explain the observed spectrum of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and the trend towards heavier nuclei for energies above 10{sup 19} eV as reported by the Auger Observatory. Pulsar acceleration implies a hard injection spectrum ( ∼ E{sup −1}) due to pulsar spin down and a maximum energy E{sub max} ∼ Z 10{sup 19} eV due to the limit on the spin rate of neutron stars. We have previously shown that the escape through the young supernova remnant softens the spectrum, decreases slightly the maximum energy, and generates secondary nuclei. Here we show that the distribution of pulsar birth periods and the effect of propagation in the interstellar and intergalactic media modifies the combined spectrum of all pulsars. By assuming a normal distribution of pulsar birth periods centered at 300 ms, we show that the contribution of extragalactic pulsar births to the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectrum naturally gives rise to a contribution to very high energy cosmic rays (VHECRs, between 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 18} eV) by Galactic pulsar births. The required injected composition to fit the observed spectrum depends on the absolute energy scale, which is uncertain, differing between Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The contribution of Galactic pulsar births can also bridge the gap between predictions for cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants and the observed spectrum just below the ankle, depending on the composition of the cosmic rays that escape the supernova remnant and the diffusion behavior of VHECRs in the Galaxy.

  15. Portable X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, V.

    1999-10-25

    The X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detection System was designed and built by Ames Laboratory and the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University. The system uses a C-frame inspection head with an X-ray tube mounted on one side of the frame and an imaging unit and a high purity germanium detector on the other side. the inspection head is portable and can be easily positioned around ventilation ducts and pipes up to 36 inches in diameter. Wide angle and narrow beam X-ray shots are used to identify the type of holdup material and the amount of the contaminant. Precise assay data can be obtained within minutes of the interrogation. A profile of the containerized holdup material and a permanent record of the measurement are immediately available.

  16. On the excitation energy of deep-hole states in medium-heavy-mass spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiytsev, G. V.; Igashov, S. Yu.; Urin, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Within the particle-hole dispersive optical model it is shown that the spreading effect determines a significant part of the anomalously large excitation energy of deep-hole states in the 90Zr and 208Pb parent nuclei.

  17. Enrichment of heavy nuclei in He-3-rich flares. [Imp-7 observed solar events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, G. J.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    IMP-7 observations of five solar-flare particle events characterized by He-3 enrichment are reported which show that such events are also enriched in nuclei with charges (Z) of at least 6. The ratio of these nuclei to H-1 at approximately 3 MeV/nucleon was found to be enriched by about 10 to 100 times, while the ratio with respect to He-4 was enriched by about 3 to 30 times. It is suggested that the simultaneous enhancement of He-3 and the heavier nuclei as well as the absence of H-2 and H-3 during the observed events may be partly due to a preferential acceleration process which depends on the ratio of the square of the charge to the atomic weight of the nuclei.

  18. Isotopic dependence of the cross section for the induced fission of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bolgova, O. N.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.; Ivanova, S. P.; Scheid, W.

    2009-06-15

    The cross sections for the induced fission of {sup 211-223}Ra, {sup 203-211}Rn, and {sup 221-231}Th nuclei undergoing peripheral collisions with {sup 208}Pb nuclei are calculated on the basis of the statistical model. The role of the N = 126 neutron shell is studied. The level density in excited nuclei is determined within the Fermi gas model and a model that takes into account the collective enhancement of the level density. The inclusion of a particle-hole excitation in addition to a collective Coulomb excitation makes it possible to obtain a satisfactory description of experimental cross sections for the fission of radium isotopes. The calculated ratios of the cross sections for the induced fission of {sup 236}U ({sup 237}U) and {sup 238}U ({sup 239}U) nuclei agree with experimental data.

  19. Mean-field studies of time reversal breaking states in super-heavy nuclei with the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, L. M.

    2015-10-15

    Recent progress on the description of time reversal breaking (odd mass and multi-quasiparticle excitation) states in super-heavy nuclei within a mean field framework and using several flavors of the Gogny interaction is reported. The study includes ground and excited states in selected odd mass isotopes of nobelium and mendelevium as well as high K isomeric states in {sup 254}No. These are two and four-quasiparticle excitations that are treated in the same self-consistent HFB plus blocking framework as the odd mass states.

  20. Properties and synthesis of heavy nuclei and properties of neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchler, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The nuclear Thomas-Fermi model which is based on nuclear matter calculations has been successfully applied to the study of the bulk properties of nuclei. It is ideally suited for extrapolation into the region of very neutron-rich and of superheavy nuclei. It is therefore a valuable approach for r-process calculations as well as for the study of neutron star matter at subnuclear densities.

  1. Determination of radiative neutron capture cross sections for unstable nuclei by the {gamma}-ray strength function method

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, H.; Goriely, S.

    2012-11-12

    An indirect method referred to as the {gamma}-ray strength function method has been devised to determine radiative neutron capture cross sections for unstable nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability. This method is based on the {gamma}-ray strength function which interconnects radiative neutron capture and photoneutron emission within the statistical model. The method was applied to several unstable nuclei such as {sup 93,95}Zr, {sup 107}Pd, and 121,123Sn. This method offers a versatile application extended to unstable nuclei far from the stability when combined with Coulomb dissociation experiments at RIKEN-RIBF and GSI.

  2. New active galactic nuclei among the INTEGRAL and SWIFT X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenin, R. A.; Mescheryakov, A. V.; Revnivtsev, M. G.; Sazonov, S. Yu.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Pavlinsky, M. N.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2008-06-01

    We present the results of our optical identifications of a set of X-ray sources from the INTEGRAL and SWIFT all-sky surveys. The optical data have been obtained with the 1.5-m Russian-Turkish Telescope (RTT-150). Nine X-ray sources have been identified with active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two of them are located in the nearby spiral galaxies MCG-01-05-047 and NGC 973 seen almost edge-on. One source, IGR J16562-3301, is probably a BL Lac object (blazar). The remaining AGNs are observed as the starlike nuclei of spiral galaxies whose spectra exhibit broad emission lines. The relation between the hard X-ray (17-60 keV) luminosity and the [O III] 5007 line luminosity, log L x/ L [O III] ≈ 2.1, holds good for most of the AGNs detected in hard X rays. However, the luminosities of some AGNs deviate from this relation. The fraction of such objects can reach ˜20%. In particular, the [O III] line flux is lower for two nearby edge-on spiral galaxies. This can be explained by the effect of absorption in the galactic disks.

  3. Analysis of nearly simultaneous x-ray and optical observations of active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Rosemary Hill optical and EINSTEIN X-ray observations of a sample of 36 galactic nuclei (AGN) were reduced and analyzed. Seventy-two x-ray observations of these sources were reduced, nineteen of which yielded spectral information. Of these spectra observations, significant hydrogen column densities above the galactic value were required for nine of the active galactic nuclei. X-ray variability was detected in eight of the eleven sources which were observed more than once by EINSTEIN. Correlations between the x-ray and optical luminosities were investigated using the Jefferys method of least squares. This method allows for errors in both variables. The results indicate a strong correlation between the x-ray and optical luminosities for the entire sample. Division of the sample into groups with similar optical variability characteristics show that the less violently violent variable AGN are more highly correlated than the violently variable blazars. Infrared and radio observations were combined with the x-ray and optical observations of six AGN. These sources were modelled in terms of the synchrotron-self-Compton model. The turnover frequency falls between the infrared and radio data and reliable estimates of this parameter are difficult to estimate. Therefore the results were found as a function of the turnover frequency. Four sources required relativistic bulk motion or beaming. Multifrequency spectra made at different times for one individual source, 0235+164, required different amounts of beaming to satisfy the x-ray observations. Sizes of the emitting regions for the sources modelled ranged from 0.5 parsec to 1.0 parsec.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF X-RAY FEEDBACK FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON HOST GALAXY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hambrick, D. Clay; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.

    2011-09-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations of galaxies with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have typically employed feedback that is purely local, i.e., an injection of energy to the immediate neighborhood of the black hole (BH). We perform GADGET-2 simulations of massive elliptical galaxies with an additional feedback component: an observationally calibrated X-ray radiation field which emanates from the BH and heats gas out to large radii from the galaxy center. We find that including the heating and radiation pressure associated with this X-ray flux in our simulations enhances the effects which are commonly reported from AGN feedback. This new feedback model is twice as effective as traditional feedback at suppressing star formation, produces three times less star formation in the last 6 Gyr, and modestly lowers the final BH mass (30%). It is also significantly more effective than an X-ray background in reducing the number of satellite galaxies.

  5. Measurement of Relative Abundances of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Rays with CALET on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian; Calet Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a Japanese-Italian-US astroparticle observatory that was launched from the Tanegashima Space Center on the H-IIB Launch Vehicle No.5 (H-IIB F5) aboard the KOUNOTORI5 (HTV5 cargo transfer vehicle) to the International Space Station (ISS) on August 19, 2015. The HTV5 arrived at the ISS on August 24, and CALET was installed on port 9 of the Japanese Experiment Module ``Kibo'' Exposed Facility (JEM-EF), where CALET underwent the planned turn on and checkout procedures. CALET has completed its commissioning phase and its main calorimeter (CAL) is observing the highest energy cosmic electrons from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, along with cosmic ray nuclei through iron up to 1,000 TeV and gamma-rays above 10 GeV. In a five-year mission CALET will also have the exposure to measure the relative abundances of the ultra-heavy (UH) cosmic rays with ~4 × the statistics of the TIGER instrument for the full CAL acceptance. Rigidity cutoffs based on the earth's geomagnetic field in the 51.6° inclination ISS orbit can provide an energy independent UH measurement with expanded acceptance with ~10 × the TIGER statistics. An overview of the anticipated performance and preliminary CALET UH analysis data will be presented. This research was supported by NASA at Washington University under Grant Number NNX11AE02G.

  6. Improved version of a binding energy formula for heavy and superheavy nuclei with Z{>=}90 and N{>=}140

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Tiekuang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2008-06-15

    A local formula of binding energy for heavy and superheavy nuclei has very recently been proposed [Dong and Ren, Phys. Rev. C 72, 064331 (2005)]. In this paper, the limit of the predictive ability of this local formula is investigated. It is found that the neutron-proton correlations should be considered when higher precision is required. On the one hand, we introduce a new term |N-Z-50|/A, and on the other hand we consider the different strengths of proton-proton, neutron-neutron, and neutron-proton pairing correlations. For the first time, the standard deviation {radical}({sigma}{sup 2}) of the binding energies for 117 nuclei with Z{>=}90 and N{>=}140 is reduced to 0.105 MeV. The {alpha} decay energies Q{sub {alpha}} and half-lives T{sub {alpha}} of nuclei with Z=102-118 are reproduced quite well. The proton drip line of superheavy elements from Md (Z=101) to Ds (Z=110) are predicted.

  7. Extending studies of the fusion of heavy nuclei to the neutron rich region using accelerated radioactive ion beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Dan

    2011-01-01

    One of the stated goals for proposed and existing facilities that produce and accelerate radioactive ion beams is to explore and achieve a new understanding of the reactions mechanisms leading to the synthesis of the heaviest nuclei. Nuclear synthesis of two large nuclei into a single entity is a complex multistep process. The beam intensities of radioactive ions accelerated at present day facilities are not sufficient to synthesize super heavy elements. However the study of the iso-spin dependence of nuclear synthesis and the many processes competing with it can be carried out at present day facilities. Of special interest are cases where the interacting nuclei and the synthesized product are extremely neutron-rich. The effects of neutron excess on the reaction processes leading to the formation of the synthesized nucleus that emerged in earlier studies are poorly understood and sometimes counter intuitive. Results from measurements performed at HRIBF, as well as our plans for future measurements and the equipment being prepared will be presented.

  8. Isotopic dependence of fusion cross sections in reactions with heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2000-09-01

    The dependence of fusion cross section on the isotopic composition of colliding nuclei is analysed within the dinuclear system concept for compound nucleus formation. Probabilities of fusion and surviving probabilities, ingredients of the evaporation residue cross sections, depend decisively on the neutron numbers of the dinuclear system. Evaporation residue cross sections for the production of actinides and superheavy nuclei, listed in table form, are discussed and compared with existing experimental data. In the Pb-based reactions neutron-rich radioactive projectiles are shown to lead to similar fusion cross sections as stable projectiles.

  9. Tracks of heavy and superheavy cosmic nuclei in olivines of extraterrestrial origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatova, R.; Lkhagvasuren, D.; Otgonsuren, O.; Pellas, P.; Pereligin, V.; Pero, K.; Stetsenko, S.; Taneva, T.; Iadav, D.

    The results of a study of the tracks of galactic nulei with X equal to or greater than 50 are reviewed with particular reference to an analysis of meteoritic olivine samples using an annealing technique. More than 500 tracks of nuclei with Z equal to or greater than 50 have been detected, including three tracks that are 1.5-1.8 times longer than those of uranium and thorium. These tracks are thought to belong to nuclei with Z of not less than 110.

  10. Next-Generation Facilities for the Research with Exotic Nuclei and Super-Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidenberger, Christoph

    The present decade is governed by the construction and advent of new, dedicated radioactive beam facilities in several continents. These forthcoming facilities will allow to explore hitherto unknown territory in the chart of nuclei and to study new phenomena, effects and structural features in exotic nuclei. Increasing intensity of primary and secondary beams, selective and efficient separation techniques adapted to the reaction mechanisms and production methods, and sensitive instruments and detectors are the key prerequisites for new findings and exploratory measurements. The new facilities and instruments will enhance the science potential tremendously.

  11. Spectral evolution of active galactic nuclei: A unified description of the X-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Letter, D.; Boldt, E.

    1982-09-01

    A model for spectral evolution is presented whereby active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the type observed individually have emerged from an earlier stage at zroughly-equal4 in which they are the thermal X-ray sources responsible for most of the comic X-ray background (CXB). We pursue the conjecture that these precursor objects are initially supermassive Schwarzschild black holes with accretion disks radiating near the Eddington luminosity limit. It is noted that after approx.10/sup 8/ years these central black holes are spun up to a ''canonical'' Kerr equilibriuim state (a/M = 0.998) and shown how they can lead to spectral evolution involving nonthermal emission extending to gamma-rays, at the expense of reduced thermal disk radiation. A superposition of sources in the precursor stage can thereby account for that major portion of the CXB remaining after the contributions of usual AGN are considered, while a superposition of AGN sources at z<1 can account for the gamima-ray background. Extensive X-ray measurements carried out with the HEAO 1 and HEAO 2 missions, as well as gamma-ray and optical data, are shown to compare favorably with principal features of this model. Several further observational tests are suggested for establishing the validity of this scenario for AGN spectral evolution.

  12. Spectral evolution of active galactic nuclei: A unified description of the X-ray and gamma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, D.; Boldt, E.

    1982-01-01

    A model for spectral evolution is presented whereby active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the type observed individually emerge from an earlier stage at z approx = 4 in which they are the thermal X-ray sources responsible for most of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB). The conjecture is pursued that these precursor objects are initially supermassive Schwarzschild black holes with accretion disks radiating near the Eddington luminosity limit. It is noted that after approx. 10 to the 8th power years these central black holes are spun-up to a canonical Kerr equilibrium state (A/M = 0.998; Thorne 1974) and shown how they then can lead to spectral evolution involving non-thermal emission extending to gamma rays, at the expense of reduced thermal disk radiation. That major portion of the CXB remaining after the contribution of usual AGN are considered, while a superposition of AGN sources at z 1 can account for the gamma ray background. Extensive X-ray measurements carried out with the HEAO 1 and 2 missions as well as gamma ray and optical data are shown to compare favorably with principal features of this model.

  13. PeV neutrinos from intergalactic interactions of cosmic rays emitted by active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Kalashev, Oleg E; Kusenko, Alexander; Essey, Warren

    2013-07-26

    The observed very high energy spectra of distant blazars are well described by secondary gamma rays produced in line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays with background photons. In the absence of the cosmic-ray contribution, one would not expect to observe very hard spectra from distant sources, but the cosmic ray interactions generate very high energy gamma rays relatively close to the observer, and they are not attenuated significantly. The same interactions of cosmic rays are expected to produce a flux of neutrinos with energies peaked around 1 PeV. We show that the diffuse isotropic neutrino background from many distant sources can be consistent with the neutrino events recently detected by the IceCube experiment. We also find that the flux from any individual nearby source is insufficient to account for these events. The narrow spectrum around 1 PeV implies that some active galactic nuclei can accelerate protons to EeV energies. PMID:23931348

  14. Analysis of nearly simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, James Raymond

    Rosemary Hill optical and EINSTEIN X-ray observations of a sample of 36 active galactic nuclei (AGN) were reduced and analyzed. Seventy-two X-ray observations of these sources were reduced, nineteen of which yielded spectral information. Of these spectral observations, significant hydrogen column densities above the galactic value were required for nine of the eleven sources which were observed more than once by EINSTEIN. Correlations between the X-ray and optical luminosities were investigated using the Jefferys method of least squares. This method allows for errors in both variables. The results indicate a strong correlation between the X-ray and optical luminosities for the entire sample. Division of the sample into groups with similar optical variability characteristics show that the less violently violent variable AGN are more highly correlated than the violently variable blazars. Infrared and radio observations were combined with the X-ray and optical observations of six AGN. These sources were modelled in terms of the synchrotron-self-Compton model. The turnover frequency falls between the infrared and radio data and reliable estimates of this parameter are difficult to estimate. Therefore the results were found as a function of the turnover frequency. Four sources required relativistic bulk motion or beaming. Multifrequency spectra made at different times for one individual source, 0235+164, required different amounts of beaming to satisfy the X-ray observations. Sizes of the emitting regions for the sources modelled ranged from 0.5 parsec to 1.0 parsec.

  15. Germ cell mutagenesis in medaka fish after exposures to high-energy cosmic ray nuclei: A human model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Atsuko; Shima, Akihiro; Nojima, Kumie; Seino, Yo; Setlow, Richard B.

    2005-04-01

    Astronauts beyond the Earth's orbit are exposed to high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei with high values of linear energy transfer (LET), resulting in much more biological damage than from x-rays or -rays and may result in mutations and cancer induction. The relative biological effectiveness of these nuclei depends on the LET, rising to as high as 50 at LET values of 100-200 keV/µm. An endpoint of concern is germ cell mutations passed on to offspring, arising from exposure to these nuclei. A vertebrate model for germ cell mutation is Medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). We exposed wild type males to doses of 1 GeV per nucleon Fe nuclei or to 290 MeV per nucleon C nuclei. They were mated to females with recessive mutations at five-color loci. The transparent embryos from >100 days of mating (representing exposed sperm, spermatids, or spermatogonia) were observed so as to detect dominant lethal mutations and total color mutations, even though the embryos might not hatch. The relative number of mutant embryos as a function of dose were compared with those induced by -rays. The relative biological effectiveness values for dominant lethal mutations and total color mutations for exposed sperm and spermatids were 1.3-2.1 for exposure to C nuclei and 1.5-3.0 for exposure to Fe nuclei. (The spermatogonial data were uncertain.) These low values, and the negligible number of viable mutations, compared with those for mutations in somatic cells and for neoplastic transformation, indicate that germ cell mutations arising from exposures to cosmic ray nuclei are not a significant hazard to astronauts. astronaut hazards | linear energy transfer | relative biological effect

  16. Debye Layer Confinement of Nucleons in Nuclei for Heavy Nuclear Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ghahramany, N.; Ghanaatian, M.

    2008-04-21

    Following the laser ablation studies leading to a theory of nuclei confinement by a Debye layer mechanism, we present here numerical evaluations for the known stable nuclei where the Coulomb repulsion is included as a rather minor component especially for lager nuclei. It is noticed that the well known empirical nuclear density of 2x10{sup 38} cm{sup -3} follows for a nucleon number A<60 for iron. The crucial change of the Fermi energy into the relativistic branch for the nucleons results for a density at 3x10{sup 39} cm{sup -3} which density corresponds to the Debye layer equilibrium near uranium above which the Fermi energy will not permit any nucleation. It is speculated whether the range between both densities at the big bang expansion at temperatures of few 100 keV and at 200 seconds after the big bang is resulting in a nuclear-chemical Boltzmann equilibrium for the generation of the endothermic nuclear generation. The question is then open, what additional nuclear expansion forces are acting in the elements between uranium and iron during this equilibrium reactions in nuclei such that the empirical nuclear density is produced.

  17. Spectroscopic factors and cluster decay half-lives of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kuklin, S.N.; Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.

    2005-01-01

    The cluster radioactivity is treated under the assumption that the light clusters are produced by a collective motion of the nuclear system in the charge asymmetry coordinate with further penetration through the Coulomb barrier. The known experimental data on cluster radioactivity are described. The half-lives of cluster emission of neutron-deficient actinides and medium-mass nuclei are predicted.

  18. Relativistic particles and gamma-rays in quasars and active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protheroe, R. J.; Kazanas, D.

    1983-01-01

    A model for a class of quasars and active galactic nuclei is described in which a shock around a massive black hole randomizes the infall kinetic energy of spherically accreting matter producing a nonthermal spectrum of high energy protons. These protons may be responsible for the secondary production (via tau + or - decay) of the radio emitting high energy electrons and also of high energy gamma rays (via Pi decay and inverse Compton interactions of the electrons). The correlation between radio and gamma ray emission implied by the model is in good agreement with observations of 3C273. Observation of the flux of high energy neutrinos from quasars may provide a test for the model.

  19. Relativistic particles and gamma-ray in quasars and active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protheroe, R. J.; Kazanas, D.

    1982-01-01

    A model for a class of quasars and active galactic nuclei is described in which a shock around a massive black hole randomizes the infall kinetic energy of spherically accreting matter producing a nonthermal spectrum of high energy protons. These protons may be responsible for the secondary production (via tau + or - decay) of the radio emitting high energy electrons and also of high energy gamma rays (via pi decay and inverse Compton interactions of the electrons). The correlation between radio and gamma ray emission implied by the model is in good agreement with observations of 3C273. Observation of the flux of high energy neutrinos from quasars may provide a test for the model.

  20. Photon damping in cosmic-ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-04-07

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10/sup 20/ eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10/sup 15/. Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultra high energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can void disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultra high energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found.

  1. Order-to-chaos transition in rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Ward, D.; Fallon, P.; Cromaz, M.; Clark, R.M.; Descovich, M.; Diamond, R.M.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.

    2004-05-13

    The authors have studied the narrow (valley-ridge) structure in the {gamma}-ray spectrum following a heavy-ion fusion reaction that produces several ytterbium nuclei. The intensity of this structure can be quantitatively related to the average chaotic behavior in these nuclei and they have traced this behavior from nearly fully ordered to nearly fully chaotic.

  2. X-ray induced stellar mass loss near active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. Mark; Shull, J. Michael

    1988-01-01

    The effects of UV and X-ray radiation on stars in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are critically evaluated. Mass loss rates in X-ray-induced winds are evaluated for realistic red giant models, and the effects of the ablation of stellar envelopes by radiation pressure are considered. The importance of X-ray-induced mass loss in the standard quasar model is evaluated and whether it can provide a source of accretion fuel or emission-line clouds is discussed. It is concluded that thermal winds driven by X-ray heating are a minor total supply of mass to AGN, but that thermal plus line-driven winds and stellar ablation may increase the mass loss and improve the chances for supplying a fraction of the necessary mass supply to the central object. It is speculated that when steady winds are inefficient, complex time-dependent processes due to X-ray energy injection deep into a stellar atmosphere could still release significant mass from stars.

  3. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The Pierre auger

    2007-12-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) [1]. The correlation has maximum significance for cosmic rays with energy greater than {approx} 6 x 10{sup 19} eV and AGN at a distance less than {approx} 75 Mpc. We have confirmed the anisotropy at a confidence level of more than 99% through a test with parameters specified a priori, using an independent data set. The observed correlation is compatible with the hypothesis that cosmic rays with the highest energies originate from extra-galactic sources close enough so that their flux is not significantly attenuated by interaction with the cosmic background radiation (the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect). The angular scale of the correlation observed is a few degrees, which suggests a predominantly light composition unless the magnetic fields are very weak outside the thin disk of our galaxy. Our present data do not identify AGN as the sources of cosmic rays unambiguously, and other candidate sources which are distributed as nearby AGN are not ruled out. We discuss the prospect of unequivocal identification of individual sources of the highest-energy cosmic rays within a few years of continued operation of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  4. Studies of the shapes of heavy pear-shaped nuclei at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    For certain combinations of protons and neutrons there is a theoretical expectation that the shape of nuclei can assume octupole deformation, which would give rise to reflection asymmetry or a "pear-shape" in the intrinsic frame, either dynamically (octupole vibrations) or statically (permanent octupole deformation). I will briefly review the historic evidence for reflection asymmetry in nuclei and describe how recent experiments carried out at REX-ISOLDE have constrained nuclear theory and how they contribute to tests of extensions of the Standard Model. I will also discuss future prospects for measuring nuclear shapes from Coulomb Excitation: experiments are being planned that will exploit beams from HIE-ISOLDE that are cooled in the TSR storage ring and injected into a solenoidal spectrometer similar to the HELIOS device developed at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  5. Nilsson-SU3 self-consistency in heavy N =Z nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuker, A. P.; Poves, A.; Nowacki, F.; Lenzi, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    It is argued that there exist natural shell-model spaces optimally adapted to the operation of two variants of Elliott's SU3 symmetry that provide accurate predictions of quadrupole moments of deformed states. A self-consistent Nilsson-like calculation describes the competition between the realistic quadrupole force and the central field, indicating a remarkable stability of the quadrupole moments—which remain close to their quasi- and pseudo-SU3 values—as the single-particle splittings increase. A detailed study of the N =Z even nuclei from 56Ni to 96Cd reveals that the region of prolate deformation is bounded by a pair of transitional nuclei 72Kr and 84Mo in which prolate ground-state bands are predicted to dominate, though coexisting with oblate ones.

  6. Behavior of one-quasiparticle levels in odd isotonic chains of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kuklin, S. N.; Malov, L. A.; Lu, B. N.; Zhou, S. G.

    2011-08-15

    The low-lying one-quasiparticle states are studied in the isotonic chains with N=147, 149, 151, 153, and 155 within the microscopic-macroscopic and self-consistent approaches. The energies of one-quasiparticle states change rather smoothly in the isotonic chains if there is no cross of the proton subshell. The {alpha}-decay schemes of several nuclei are suggested. The isomeric states in the odd isotopes of Fm and No are discussed.

  7. Processing Code System for Production of Group Constants of Heavy Resonant Nuclei.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1981-06-11

    Version 00 TIMS-1 calculates the infinitely dilute group cross sections and the temperature dependent self-shielding factors for arbitrary values of sigma0 and R where sigma0 is the effective background cross section of potential scattering and R the ratio of the atomic number densities for two resonant nuclei, if any. TIMS-1 is specifically programmed to use the evaluated nuclear data file of ENDF/B or JENDL as input data.

  8. ECCO: The extremely heavy cosmic ray composition observer

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A. J.; Weaver, B. A.; Solarz, M.; Price, P. B.; Lin, C.-L.

    1999-01-22

    Using the Trek ultraheavy galactic cosmic ray collector onboard Mir, we have measured the abundances of even-Z elements from {sub 76}Os through the actinides in the galactic cosmic rays, with a charge resolution of {approx}0.45e, roughly a three-fold improvement in resolution over pioneering measurements by HEAO, Ariel, and UHCRE onboard LDEF. Building on the successful design of Trek, we plan to design and construct ECCO, a large array of BP-1 glass track-etch detectors which would be deployed on the International Space Station. ECCO, the Extremely Heavy Cosmic Ray Composition Observer, would have sufficient charge resolution and collecting power to accurately measure the abundances of the very rare actinides with respect to each other and with respect to the platinum-group. These abundance measurements will strongly distinguish between models of GCR origin. We are verifying a promising new detector concept, which would result in significant cost savings, and would have several technical advantages over previous detector configurations; also, we are testing an advanced gas-transfer hodoscope for ECCO. Finally, we are constructing mockup ECCO modules for flight testing in preparation for a launch in 2003 and supporting an accommodation and design study for ECCO at GSFC.

  9. The WISE Gamma-Ray Strip Parametrization: The Nature of the Gamma-Ray Active Galactic Nuclei of Uncertain Type

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, D.; Grindlay, J.E.; Smith, Howard A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-04-02

    Despite the large number of discoveries made recently by Fermi, the origins of the so called unidentified {gamma}-ray sources remain unknown. The large number of these sources suggests that among them there could be a population that significantly contributes to the isotropic gamma-ray background and is therefore crucial to understand their nature. The first step toward a complete comprehension of the unidentified {gamma}-ray source population is to identify those that can be associated with blazars, the most numerous class of extragalactic sources in the {gamma}-ray sky. Recently, we discovered that blazars can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources using the infrared (IR) WISE satellite colors. The blazar population delineates a remarkable and distinctive region of the IR color-color space, the WISE blazar strip. In particular, the subregion delineated by the {gamma}-ray emitting blazars is even narrower and we named it as the WISE Gamma-ray Strip (WGS). In this paper we parametrize the WGS on the basis of a single parameter s that we then use to determine if {gamma}-ray Active Galactic Nuclei of the uncertain type (AGUs) detected by Fermi are consistent with the WGS and so can be considered blazar candidates. We find that 54 AGUs out of a set 60 analyzed have IR colors consistent with the WGS; only 6 AGUs are outliers. This result implies that a very high percentage (i.e., in this sample about 90%) of the AGUs detected by Fermi are indeed blazar candidates.

  10. The WISE Gamma-Ray Strip Parameterization: The Nature of the Gamma-Ray Active Galactic Nuclei of Uncertain Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, D.; Grindlay, J. E.; Smith, Howard A.

    2012-05-01

    Despite the large number of discoveries made recently by Fermi, the origins of the so-called unidentified γ-ray sources remain unknown. The large number of these sources suggests that there could be a population among them that significantly contributes to the isotropic gamma-ray background and it is therefore crucial to understand their nature. The first step toward a complete comprehension of the unidentified γ-ray source population is to identify those that can be associated with blazars, the most numerous class of extragalactic sources in the γ-ray sky. Recently, we discovered that blazars can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources using the infrared (IR) WISE satellite colors. The blazar population delineates a remarkable and distinctive region of the IR color-color space, the WISE blazar strip. In particular, the subregion delineated by the γ-ray emitting blazars is even narrower and we named it the WISE Gamma-ray Strip (WGS). In this paper, we parameterize the WGS on the basis of a single parameter s that we then use to determine if γ-ray active galactic nuclei of the uncertain type (AGUs) detected by Fermi are consistent with the WGS and can be considered blazar candidates. We find that 54 AGUs out of a set of 60 analyzed have IR colors consistent with the WGS; only 6 AGUs are outliers. This result implies that a very high percentage (i.e., in this sample about 90%) of the AGUs detected by Fermi are indeed blazar candidates.

  11. X-Ray Constraints on Accretion and Starburst Processes in Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Andrew Francis

    The results of X-ray observations of a sample of nearby low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN), low-ionization nuclear emission line regions (LINERs), and starburst galaxies are presented. In general the 0.4-10.0 keV spectra of this heterogenous sample are fit well by a two-component model consisting of an optically-thin plasma with a temperature of ~0.7 keV and a power-law model with a photon index of ~1.7. Both the hot gas component and the hard, possibly nonthermal, X-ray emission appear to be common features of galaxies showing signs of nuclear activity. The spectrum of the hard component (roughly in the 2-10 keV bandpass) is most consistent with AGN, which are postulated to be accreting supermassive blackholes. X-ray binaries that are probably accreting blackhole candidates also appear to contribute significantly to the hard, and possibly to a lesser extent, the soft X-ray emission. Very hot (T~108 K) gas in a 'superwind' may also be contributing to the hard flux in some cases, probably concentrated in the nuclear regions of the galaxies. Another possible contributor to the featureless X-ray continuum may be inverse-Compton scattering of infrared photons, but the contribution of this component is sensitive to model assumptions. The soft emission appears to be supernovae-heated interstellar medium (ISM). In some cases, the SN-heating is actually in the form of a superwind, in which case ~90% of the X-ray emitting gas is 'swept-up' ISM and the remainder is (cooling) superwind emission out in the disks of the galaxies. Very low absolutes abundances are observed, but the uncertainties are large. Relative abundances are more secure and suggest that Fe is underabundant relative to α-process elements. The low relative Fe abundance may be due to enrichment by Type-II supernovae and∨ dust depletion, but non-equilibrium ionization may also be playing a part. Future observations by X-ray telescopes with high spatial and spectral resolution and improved

  12. Nucleon pairing correlations and the α cluster preformation probability inside heavy and superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of paired or unpaired protons and neutrons in the open-shell radioactive α emitter affects the preformation probability of the α cluster inside it. The α-preformation probability inside the odd ( Z )-even ( N ) , even ( Z )-odd ( N ) , and odd ( Z )-odd ( N ) α emitters is investigated. The study is restricted to those decays with no angular momentum transfer to make a precise prediction about the mere pairing effect. The extended cluster model of α decay and the WKB approximation are used by taking into account the deformation degrees of freedom to carry out the calculations for 105 parent nuclei in the mass region of A =175 -289 . The α + daughter interaction potential is calculated by using the Hamiltonian energy-density approach in terms of the SLy4 Skyrme-like interaction, then it is implemented to find the average decay width over the different orientations. The half-life of the decay is then estimated and employed in turn to extract the α-preformation probability by taking account of errors on both the released energy and the experimental half-life time. According to the present calculations, it is found that the α cluster preformation probability inside the nuclei which have unpaired nucleons is less than it would be in the neighboring nuclei of the same shell and subshell closures but have no unpaired nucleons. In particular, the effect of the single unpaired neutron in the even ( Z )-odd ( N ) nuclei is slightly larger than that of the single unpaired proton in the odd ( Z )-even ( N ) ones. The effect of the unpaired nucleons appears more clearly in the odd ( Z )-odd ( N ) nuclei which have both an unpaired neutron and an unpaired proton. Based on the obtained results, an empirical pairing term is added to the empirical formula [J. Phys. G 40, 105102 (2013), 10.1088/0954-3899/40/10/105102] that relates the α cluster preformation probability to the proton and neutron numbers outside the closed shells of the parent nucleus.

  13. SPECTRAL SURVEY OF X-RAY BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FROM THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2011-03-15

    Using long-term monitoring data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have selected 23 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with sufficient brightness and overall observation time to derive broadband X-ray spectra from 3 to {approx}>100 keV. Our sample includes mainly radio-quiet Seyferts, as well as seven radio-loud sources. Given the longevity of the RXTE mission, the greater part of our data is spread out over more than a decade, providing truly long-term average spectra and eliminating inconsistencies arising from variability. We present long-term average values of absorption, Fe line parameters, Compton reflection strengths, and photon indices, as well as fluxes and luminosities for the hard and very hard energy bands, 2-10 keV and 20-100 keV, respectively. We find tentative evidence for high-energy rollovers in three of our objects. We improve upon previous surveys of the very hard X-ray energy band in terms of accuracy and sensitivity, particularly with respect to confirming and quantifying the Compton reflection component. This survey is meant to provide a baseline for future analysis with respect to the long-term averages for these sources and to cement the legacy of RXTE, and especially its High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment, as a contributor to AGN spectral science.

  14. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE X-RAY TIME-DELAY TRANSFER FUNCTION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, E.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Giustini, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2012-11-20

    The origin of the observed time lags, in nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs), between hard and soft X-ray photons is investigated using new XMM-Newton data for the narrow-line Seyfert I galaxy Ark 564 and existing data for 1H 0707-495 and NGC 4051. These AGNs have highly variable X-ray light curves that contain frequent, high peaks of emission. The averaged light curve of the peaks is directly measured from the time series, and it is shown that (1) peaks occur at the same time, within the measurement uncertainties, at all X-ray energies, and (2) there exists a substantial tail of excess emission at hard X-ray energies, which is delayed with respect to the time of the main peak, and is particularly prominent in Ark 564. Observation (1) rules out that the observed lags are caused by Comptonization time delays and disfavors a simple model of propagating fluctuations on the accretion disk. Observation (2) is consistent with time lags caused by Compton-scattering reverberation from material a few thousand light-seconds from the primary X-ray source. The power spectral density and the frequency-dependent phase lags of the peak light curves are consistent with those of the full time series. There is evidence for non-stationarity in the Ark 564 time series in both the Fourier and peaks analyses. A sharp 'negative' lag (variations at hard photon energies lead soft photon energies) observed in Ark 564 appears to be generated by the shape of the hard-band transfer function and does not arise from soft-band reflection of X-rays. These results reinforce the evidence for the existence of X-ray reverberation in type I AGN, which requires that these AGNs are significantly affected by scattering from circumnuclear material a few tens or hundreds of gravitational radii in extent.

  15. Observations of columnal recombination in the ionization tracks of energetic heavy nuclei in an argon-methane gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of ionization signals resulting from the passage of energetic heavy nuclei through a gas mixture consisting of 95 mol percent Ar plus 5 mol percent CH4, at an absolute pressure of 3 atm are presented. The measurements take place under a uniform electric field perpendicular to the ionization track. The signals were compared to the calculated energy losses, with an assumption of proportionality between energy loss rate and ionization rate. Significant deviations from proportionality are found for energy loss rate grater than about 3000 MeV sq cm/g, while fractional deviations are found to be proportional to the energy loss rate (dE/dx) exp m, where m is equal to about two. These results are attributed to the columnal recombination.

  16. Simulating γ-γ coincidences of β-delayed γ-rays from fission product nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Stephen; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing radiation from material that has undergone neutron induced fission is important for fields such as nuclear forensics, reactor physics, and nonproliferation monitoring. The γ-ray spectroscopy of fission products is a major part of the characterization of a material's fissile inventory and the energy of incident neutrons inducing fission. Cumulative yields and γ-ray intensities from nuclear databases are inputs into a GEANT4 simulation to create expected γ-ray spectra from irradiated 235U. The simulations include not only isotropically emitted γ-rays but also γ-γ cascades from certain fission products, emitted with their appropriate angular correlations. Here γ singles spectra as well as γ-γ coincidence spectra are simulated in detectors at both 90° and 180° pairings. The ability of these GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations to duplicate experimental data is explored in this work. These simulations demonstrate potential in exploiting angular correlations of γ-γ cascades in fission product decays to determine isotopic content. Analyzing experimental and simulated γ-γ coincidence spectra as opposed to singles spectra should improve the ability to identify fission product nuclei since such spectra are cleaner and contain more resolved peaks when compared to γ singles spectra.

  17. Accretion disk winds in active galactic nuclei: X-ray observations, models, and feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. A strong support of this ``quasar mode'' feedback came from the recent X-ray observation of a mildly relativistic accretion disk wind in a ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and its connection with a large-scale molecular outflow, providing a direct link between the SMBH and the gas out of which stars form. Spectroscopic observations, especially in the X-ray band, show that such accretion disk winds may be common in local AGN and quasars. However, their origin and characteristics are still not fully understood. Detailed theoretical models and simulations focused on radiation, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or a combination of these two processes to investigate the possible acceleration mechanisms and the dynamics of these winds. Some of these models have been directly compared to X-ray spectra, providing important insights into the wind physics. However, fundamental improvements on these studies will come only from the unprecedented energy resolution and sensitivity of the upcoming X-ray observatories, namely ASTRO-H (launch date early 2016) and Athena (2028).

  18. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei: Progress report, September 1, 1987--August 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, W.U.; Huizenga, J.R.

    1988-08-01

    The effect of successively increasing gradients of the potential energy surface on mass and charge transport was studied experimentally and theoretically with a series of damped reactions induced by /sup 48/Ca, /sup 64/Ni, /sup 58/Ni, and /sup 40/Ca projectiles on /sup 238/U targets. Combined transport-evaporation calculations that were performed for the interpretation of data demonstrate a systematic deficiency of quantitative reaction theory. A new type of experimental method has been employed to study several moments of the energy partition in damped reactions, measuring multiplicity correlations of neutrons emitted from the asymptotic fragments with a specially designed, directionally sensitive multiplicity counter. First results indicate significant departures of damped reaction systems from thermal equilibrium. Employing realistic Monte Carlo simulation of published experiments, it was demonstrated that the directions of net mass transfer and energy deposit are uncorrelated in damped reactions. Evaporative and preequilibrium neutron emission has been studied for the asymmetric heavy-ion system /sup 139/La + /sup 40/Ar. The disequilibrium energy transport phenomena observed in the experiment are quantitatively reproduced by model calculations. A strong impact-parameter dependence of preequilibrium emission is demonstrated. The emission patterns of ..cap alpha.. particles evaporated from high spin compound nuclei, previously attributed to exotic nuclear shapes, have been explained in realistic statistical model calculations for nuclei with conventional shapes. A new octal digital delay module has been designed and tested.

  19. Description of the dipole giant resonance in heavy and superheavy nuclei within Skyrme random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinig, W.; Nesterenko, V. O.; Kvasil, J.; Vesely, P.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2008-10-15

    The E1(T=1) isovector dipole giant resonance (GDR) in heavy and superheavy deformed nuclei is analyzed over a sample of 18 rare-earth nuclei, four actinides, and three chains of superheavy elements (Z=102, 114, and 120). The basis of the description is the self-consistent separable random-phase approximation (SRPA) using the Skyrme force SLy6. The model well reproduces the experimental data in the rare-earth and actinide regions. The trend of the resonance peak energies follows the estimates from collective models, showing a bias to the volume mode for the rare-earth isotopes and a mix of volume and surface modes for actinides and superheavy elements. The widths of the GDR are mainly determined by the Landau fragmentation, which in turn is found to be strongly influenced by deformation. A deformation splitting of the GDR can contribute to about one-third of the width, and about 1 MeV further broadening can be associated with mechanisms beyond the SRPA description (e.g., escape widths and coupling with complex configurations)

  20. EVIDENCE FOR ANOMALOUS NUCLEI AMONG RELATIVISTIC PROJECTILE FRAGMENTS FROM HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT BEVALAC ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, E.M.; Gimpel, R.W.; Heckman, H.H.; Karant, Y.J.; Judek, B.; Ganssauge, E.

    1980-06-01

    Two independent emulsion experiments using Bevalac beams of {sup 16}O and {sup 56}Fe at {approx}2 GeV/nucleon find with > 99.7% confidence that the reaction mean-free paths of projectile fragments, 3 {approx}< Z {approx}< 26, are shorter for a few centimeters after their emission than at larger distances, or than predicted from experiments on beam nuclei. This effect, which is enhanced in later generations of fragments, can be interpreted by the relatively rare occurrence of fragments that interact with an unexpectedly large cross section.

  1. Forward-backward multiplicity fluctuations in heavy nuclei collisions in the wounded nucleon model

    SciTech Connect

    Bzdak, Adam; Wozniak, Krzysztof

    2010-03-15

    We use the wounded nucleon model to study the forward-backward multiplicity fluctuations measured by the PHOBOS Collaboration in Au + Au collisions at sq root(s{sub N{sub N}})=200 GeV. The enhancement of forward-backward fluctuations in Au + Au collisions with respect to the elementary p+p interactions is explained in this model by the asymmetric shape of the pseudorapidity density of produced particles from a single wounded nucleon and the fluctuations of the number of wounded nucleons in the colliding nuclei. The wounded nucleon model describes these experimental data better than the HIJING, AMPT, or UrQMD models do.

  2. Fission barriers for Po nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sagaidak, R. N.; Andreyev, A. N.

    2009-05-15

    Evaporation residues and fission excitation functions obtained in complete fusion reactions leading to Po compound nuclei have been analyzed in the framework of the standard statistical model. Macroscopic fission barriers deduced from the cross-section data analysis are compared with the predictions of various theoretical models and available data. A drop in the Po barriers with the decrease in a neutron number was found, which is stronger than predicted by any theory. The presence of entrance channel effects and collective excitations in the compound nucleus decay is considered as a possible reason for the barrier reduction.

  3. The optical emission lines of type 1 X-ray bright Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mura, G.; Berton, M.; Ciroi, S.; Cracco, V.; Di Mille, F.; Rafanelli, P.

    2014-10-01

    A strong X-ray emission is one of the defining signatures of nuclear activity in galaxies. According to the Unified Model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), both the X-ray radiation and the prominent broad emission lines, characterizing the optical and UV spectra of Type 1 AGNs, are originated in the innermost regions of the sources, close to the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH), which power the central engine. Since the emission is concentrated in a very compact region (with typical size r⩽0.1 pc) and it is not possible to obtain resolved images of the source, spectroscopic studies of this radiation represent the only valuable key to constrain the physical properties of matter and its structure in the center of active galaxies. Based on previous studies on the physics of the Broad Line Region (BLR) and on the X-ray spectra of broad (FWHMHβ ⩾ 2000 km s-1) and narrow line (1000 km s-1 ⩽FWHMHβ ⩽ 2000 km s-1) emitting objects, it has been observed that the kinematic and ionization properties of matter close to the SMBHs are related together, and, in particular, that ionization is higher in narrow line sources. Here we report on the study of the optical and X-ray spectra of a sample of Type 1 AGNs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, within an upper redshift limit of z=0.35, and detected at X-ray energies. We present analysis of the broad emission line fluxes and profiles, as well as the properties of the X-ray continuum and Fe Kα emission and we use these parameters to assess the consistency of our current AGN understanding.

  4. Non-Axial Octupole Deformations and Tetrahedral Symmetry in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, Katarzyna; Dudek, Jerzy

    2005-11-21

    The total energies of about 120 nuclei in the Thorium region have been calculated within the macroscopic-microscopic method in the 5-dimensional space of deformation parameters {alpha}20, {alpha}22, {alpha}30, {alpha}32 and {alpha}40. The macroscopic energy term contains the nuclear surface-curvature dependence as proposed within the LSD approach. The microscopic energies are calculated with the Woods-Saxon single particle potential employing the universal set of parameters.We study a possible presence of the octupole axial and non-axial degrees of freedom all-over in the ({beta}, {gamma})-plane focussing on the ground-states, secondary minima and in the saddle points. In fact, a competition between axial and tri-axial octupole deformation parameters is obtained at the saddle points and in the secondary minima for many isotones with N > 136. The presence of the tetrahedral symmetry minima is predicted in numerous nuclei in the discussed region, although most of the time at relatively high excitation energies.

  5. On the charge to mass ratio of neutron cores and heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Patricelli, B.; Rotondo, M.; Ruffini, R.

    2008-01-03

    We determine theoretically the relation between the total number of protons N{sub p} and the mass number A (the charge to mass ratio) of nuclei and neutron cores with the model recently proposed by Ruffini et al. (2007) and we compare it with other N{sub p} versus A relations: the empirical one, related to the Periodic Table, and the semi-empirical relation, obtained by minimizing the Weizsaecker mass formula. We find that there is a very good agreement between all the relations for values of A typical of nuclei, with differences of the order of per cent. Our relation and the semi-empirical one are in agreement up to A{approx}10{sup 4}; for higher values, we find that the two relations differ. We interprete the different behaviour of our theoretical relation as a result of the penetration of electrons (initially confined in an external shell) inside the core, that becomes more and more important by increasing A; these effects are not taken into account in the semi-empirical mass-formula.

  6. Magnetic dipole moment measurements of picosecond states in even and odd heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ballon, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The perturbed angular correlation transient field technique is used to measure the precession of nuclear magnetic moments of low lying excited states in isotopes of silver, neodymium, samarium, and gadolinium. The precession measurements are used to explore three main areas of study. First, from the measurements made on /sup 150/Sm transversing gadolinium targets, the temperature dependence of the transient hyperfine field is deduced at /sup 150/Sm nuclei traveling at 2 < v/v/sub 0/ < 4. These are compared with similar measurements made using iron targets. Second, the deduced values of the g-factors of the 2/sub 1/ + states in even neodymium, samarium and gadolinium isotopes are discussed in connection with a possible proton shell closure at Z = 64. Third, the deduced values of the g-factors of the 3/2/sub 1/- and 5/2/sub 1/- states of /sup 107,109/Ag are compared to various theoretical predictions in order to explore any simple relationships that may exist between these states and the first 2/sub 1/+ states of neighboring even-even nuclei.

  7. Evaluation of the Doppler-Broadening of Gamma-Ray Spectra from Neutron Inelastic Scattering on Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, Phillip C.; Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Howard, Joseph; Musser, Jason

    2009-03-10

    Neutron-induced gamma-ray reactions are extensively used in the nondestructive analysis of materials and other areas where the information about the chemical composition of a substance is crucial. The common technique to find the intensity of the gamma ray is to fit gamma-ray line shape with an analytical function, for example, a Gaussian. However, the Gaussian fitting may fail if the gamma-ray peak is Doppler-broadened since this leads to the miscalculation of the area of the peak and, therefore, to misidentification of the material. Due to momentum considerations, Doppler-broadening occurs primarily with gamma rays from neutron-induced inelastic scattering reactions with light nuclei. The recoiling nucleus of interest must have excited states whose lifetimes are much smaller than the time of flight in the material. We have examined various light nuclei bombarded by 14 MeV neutrons to predict when the peak shape of a neutron-induced gamma ray emitted from these nuclei will be Doppler-broadened. We have found that nearly all the gamma rays from neutron-induced gamma-ray reactions on light elements (A<20) are Doppler-broadened with only a few exceptions. This means that utilization of resolution curves derived from isotopic sources or thermal neutron capture reactions have little value in the analysis.

  8. RELATIVE COMPOSITION AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF LIGHT NUCLEI IN COSMIC RAYS: RESULTS FROM AMS-01

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Berdugo, J.; Allaby, J.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Azzarello, P.; Battiston, R.; Anderhub, H.; Ao, L.; Arefiev, A.; Arruda, L.; Barao, F.; Barreira, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Bene, P.

    2010-11-20

    Measurement of the chemical and isotopic composition of cosmic rays is essential for the precise understanding of their propagation in the galaxy. While the model parameters are mainly determined using the B/C ratio, the study of extended sets of ratios can provide stronger constraints on the propagation models. In this paper, the relative abundances of light-nuclei lithium, beryllium, boron, and carbon are presented. The secondary-to-primary ratios Li/C, Be/C, and B/C have been measured in the kinetic energy range 0.35-45 GeV nucleon{sup -1}. The isotopic ratio {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li is also determined in the magnetic rigidity interval 2.5-6.3 GV. The secondary-to-secondary ratios Li/Be, Li/B, and Be/B are also reported. These measurements are based on the data collected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-01 during the STS-91 space shuttle flight in 1998 June. Our experimental results are in substantial agreement with other measurements, where they exist. We describe our light-nuclei data with a diffusive-reacceleration model. A 10%-15% overproduction of Be is found in the model predictions and can be attributed to uncertainties in the production cross-section data.

  9. Do light nuclei display a universal γ-ray strength function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Nyhus, H. T.; Siem, S.; Syed, N. U. H.; Toft, H. K.; Tveten, G. M.; Harissopulos, S.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Lagoyannis, A.; Perdikakis, G.; Spyrou, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Mazurek, K.; Krtička, T.; Lönnroth, T.; Norrby, M.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2012-02-01

    In this work we focus on properties in the quasi-continuum of light nuclei. Generally, both level density and γ-ray strength function (γ-SF) differ from nucleus to nucleus. In order to investigate this closer, we have performed particle-γ coincidences using the reactions (p, p'), (p, d) and (p, t) on a 46Ti target. In particular, the very rich data set of the 46Ti(p, p')46Ti inelastic scattering reaction allows analysis of the coincidence data for many independent data sets. Using the Oslo method, we find one common level density for all data sets. If transitions to well-separated low-energy levels are included, the deduced γ-SF may change by a factor of 2 - 3, due strong to Porter-Thomas fluctuations. However, a universal γ-SF with small fluctuations is found provided that only excitation energies above 3 MeV are taken into account. The nuclear structure of the titaniums is discussed within a combinatorial quasi-particle model, showing that only few Nilsson orbitals participate in building up the level density for these light nuclei.

  10. Studies of heavy ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, September 1, 1985-August 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Huizenga, J.R.; Schroeder, W.U.

    1986-08-01

    Progress is reported of research directed to explore nuclear relaxation and transport phenomena induced in heavy-ion collisions, in the range from near-barrier energies to more than 20 MeV per nucleon above the interaction barrier. Transport processes studied include the redistribution of kinetic energy of relative motion and of linear momentum as well as the gradual relaxation of various conditions of a colliding heavy-ion system, initially far from thermodynamic equilibrium, towards a uniform population of phase space. And, finally, they include the stochastic, equilibrium, and nonequilibrium patterns of nuclear disintegration. The group activities range from design of hardware to theoretical modeling. 112 refs., 56 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. On the X-Ray Low- and High-Velocity Outflows in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, J. M.; Tombesi, F.

    2012-01-01

    An exploration of the relationship between bolometric luminosity and outflow velocity for two classes of X-ray outflows in a large sample of active galactic nuclei has been performed. We find that line radiation pressure could be one physical mechanism that might accelerate the gas we observe in warm absorber, v approx. 100-1000 km/s, and on comparable but less stringent grounds the ultrafast outflows, v approx. 0.03-0.3c. If comparable with the escape velocity of the system, the first is naturally located at distances of the dusty torus, '" I pc, and the second at subparsec scales, approx.0.01 pc, in accordance with large set of observational evidence existing in the literature. The presentation of this relationship might give us key clues for our understanding of the different physical mechanisms acting in the centre of galaxies, the feedback process and its impact on the evolution of the host galaxy.

  12. X-ray variability in active galaxy nuclei and quasars in less than one day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.; Feigelson, E.; Griffiths, R. E.; Henry, J. P.; Tananbaum, H.

    1980-01-01

    Data obtained from the Einstein Observatory demonstrating variations in X-ray emission from the nuclei of active galaxies and quasars on time scales of hours rather than previously observed days or years is presented. Light curves obtained from the Einstein imaging proportional counter for the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 6814 and from the High Resolution Imager for the quasars OX 169 and 3C 273 are illustrated, and variations by factors greater than two on time scales less than 20,000 sec for the first two objects and by a factor of 10% on a time scale over 50,000 sec for 3C 273 are pointed out. The measurements are also used to determine that thermal bremsstrahlung cannot be the cause of the intensity decay in OX 169, and that, in the absence of relativistic effects, the efficiency for energy release in the matter involved in the emission of 3C 273 is at least 0.1.

  13. X-ray spectra and time variability of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of broad line active galactic nuclei (AGN) of all types (Seyfert I's, NELG's, broadline radio galaxies) are well fit by a power law in the .5 to 100 keV band of man energy slope alpha = .68 + or - .15. There is, as yet, no strong evidence for time variability of this slope in a given object. The constraints that this places on simple models of the central energy source are discussed. BL Lac objects have quite different X-ray spectral properties and show pronounced X-ray spectral variability. On time scales longer than 12 hours most radio quiet AGN do not show strong, delta I/I .5, variability. The probability of variability of these AGN seems to be inversely related to their luminosity. However characteristics timescales for variability have not been measured for many objects. This general lack of variability may imply that most AGN are well below the Eddington limit. Radio bright AGN tend to be more variable than radio quiet AGN on long, tau approx 6 month, timescales.

  14. Ion-heated thermal Comptonization models and x-ray spectral correlations in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dermer, C.D.

    1989-11-01

    Recent Ginga observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxies NGC 4051 and MCG 6-30-15 show a positive correlation between the 2-10 keV luminosity and photon spectral index {alpha}. Similar behavior has also been reported in Exosat and Einstein observations of other active galactic nuclei, and is suggested in hard x-ray low-state data of the galactic black-hole candidate Cygnus X-1. A two-temperature thermal Comptonization model with internal soft-photon production provides a simple explanation for this correlation. The electron temperature, determined by a balance between ion heating and radiative cooling, decreases in response to an enhancement of the soft photon flux, resulting in a softening of the spectrum and an increase in the soft x-ray luminosity. The bulk of the soft photons are produced through pion production in collisions between the hot ions. Pivoting of the spectrum at photon energies {var epsilon} > 50 keV is a consequence of variations in the ion temperature. An important test of the model would be time correlations between soft and hard x-ray bands. 17 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Continuum {gamma} rays feeding normal and superdeformed states in Gd nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.H.; Cinausero, M.; de Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.; Gadea, A.; Napoli, D.R.; Bazzacco, D.; Lunardi, S.; Viesti, G.; Petrache, C.M.; Rossi Alvarez, C.

    1997-03-01

    The feeding mechanism of the superdeformed bands in {sup 147}Gd and {sup 148}Gd has been studied via the {sup 124}Sn + {sup 29}Si reaction at a beam energy of 157 MeV. Using the BGO inner ball of the GASP array, high-energy {gamma} rays have been detected in coincidence with discrete transitions deexciting normal-deformed (ND) and superdeformed (SD) states in the final product nuclei. The slope of the measured high-energy {gamma}-ray spectra depends strongly on the number of emitted neutrons and is somewhat lower for spectra in coincidence with SD bands than for those in coincidence with ND structures. Both observations are qualitatively reproduced by statistical model Monte Carlo calculations, which point out the importance of angular momentum effects in the emission of energetic {gamma} rays. The present data exclude the enhanced population of SD bands when fed through high-energy E1 transitions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Ionized Absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei and Very Steap Soft X-Ray Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Steep soft X-ray (0.1-2 keV) quasars share several unusual properties: narrow Balmer lines, strong Fe II emission, large and fast X-ray variability, and a rather steep 2-10 keV spectrum. These intriguing objects have been suggested to be the analogues of Galactic black hole candidates in the high, soft state. We present here results from ASCA observations for two of these quasars: NAB 0205 + 024 and PG 1244 + 026. Both objects show similar variations (factor of approximately 2 in 10 ks), despite a factor of approximately 10 difference in the 0.5-10 keV luminosity (7.3 x 10(exp 43) erg/s for PG 1244 + 026 and 6.4 x 10(exp 44) erg/s for NAB 0205 + 024, assuming isotropic emission, H(sub 0) = 50.0 and q(sub 0) = 0.0). The X-ray continuum of the two quasars flattens by 0.5-1 going from the 0.1-2 keV band towards higher energies, strengthening recent results on another half-dozen steep soft X-ray active galactic nuclei. PG 1244 + 026 shows a significant feature in the '1-keV' region, which can be described either as a broad emission line centered at 0.95 keV (quasar frame) or as edge or line absorption at 1.17 (1.22) keV. The line emission could be a result of reflection from a highly ionized accretion disc, in line with the view that steep soft X-ray quasars are emitting close to the Eddington luminosity. Photoelectric edge absorption or resonant line absorption could be produced by gas outflowing at a large velocity (0.3-0.6 c).

  17. Ensemble X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei from serendipitous source catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnetti, F.; Turriziani, S.; Trevese, D.

    2011-12-01

    Context. The X-ray variability of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been most often investigated with studies of individual, nearby sources, and only a few ensemble analyses have been applied to large samples in wide ranges of luminosity and redshift. Aims: We aim to determine the ensemble variability properties of two serendipitously selected AGN samples extracted from the catalogues of XMM-Newton and Swift, with redshift between ~0.2 and ~4.5, and X-ray luminosities, in the 0.5-4.5 keV band, between ~1043 erg/s and ~1046 erg/s. Methods: We used the structure function (SF), which operates in the time domain, and allows for an ensemble analysis even when only a few observations are available for individual sources and the power spectral density (PSD) cannot be derived. The SF is also more appropriate than fractional variability and excess variance, because these parameters are biased by the duration of the monitoring time interval in the rest-frame, and therefore by cosmological time dilation. Results: We find statistically consistent results for the two samples, with the SF described by a power law of the time lag, approximately as SF ∝ τ0.1. We do not find evidence of the break in the SF, at variance with the case of lower luminosity AGNs. We confirm a strong anti-correlation of the variability with X-ray luminosity, accompanied by a change of the slope of the SF. We find evidence in support of a weak, intrinsic, average increase of X-ray variability with redshift. Conclusions: The change of amplitude and slope of the SF with X-ray luminosity provides new constraints on both single oscillator models and multiple subunit models of variability. Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Photoactivation experiment on Au197 and its implications for the dipole strength in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, C.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Bemmerer, D.; Beyer, R.; Grosse, E.; Klug, J.; Kosev, K.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2008-11-01

    The 197Au(γ,n) reaction is used as an activation standard for photodisintegration studies on astrophysically relevant nuclei. At the bremsstrahlung facility of the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear accelerator of high Brilliance and low Emittance) of Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, photoactivation measurements on Au197 have been performed with bremsstrahlung endpoint energies from 8.0 to 15.5 MeV. The measured activation yield is compared with previous experiments as well as with calculations using Hauser-Feshbach statistical models. It is shown that the experimental data are best described by a two-Lorentzian parametrization with taking the axial deformation of Au197 into account. The experimental 197Au(γ,n) reaction yield measured at ELBE via the photoactivation method is found to be consistent with previous experimental data using photon scattering or neutron detection methods.

  19. Charged Particle and Gamma-Ray Measurements of Heavy Ion Fusion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mien-Win

    1981-06-01

    Heavy ion fusion has been studied by charged particle and (gamma)-ray measurements. In the charged particle experiment, the total fusion cross sections for the systems ('18)O + ('27)Al, ('28,30)Si have been measured in the energy range 30 MeV (LESSTHEQ) E(,lab). (LESSTHEQ) 68 MeV by detecting the evaporation residues directly in a (DELTA)E-E fusion telescope. The fusion cross sections for the systems ('18)O + ('27)Al, ('28)Si were found to saturate at (TURN)1150 mb and that for ('18)O + ('30)Si at (TURN)1250 mb. A smooth energy dependence of fusion cross sections has been observed for all three systems, with the possible exception that a very broad and not pronounced structure has been noticed for ('18)O + ('28)Si at (TURN)27 MeV c.m. energy. Parameterizations of the data for the three systems with the Glas-Mosel model and the Bass model are presented. The fusion data for ('18)O + ('28)Si are also discussed in terms of the statistical yrast model. In the (gamma)-ray experiment, the partial fusion cross sections for the systems ('19)F + 27Al, ('18)O + ('28)Si and ('16)O + ('30)Si have been determined over three common excitation energies of 48.9 MeV, 53 MeV and 55.5 MeV by measuring the deexcitation (gamma)-ray yields for the various evaporation residues in two Ge(Li) detectors and normalizing to the total fusion cross sections measured in the charged particle measurements. Comparing the measured partial fusion cross sections for the three systems with the cascaded Hauser-Feshbach calculations, a reasonably good fit has been found for most of the strongly populated evaporation residues, while big discrepancies have been observed for the weakly populated ones. The interesting features observed from the comparison of the over-all fit between the measured fusion data and the statistical model calculations for ('16)O + ('30)Si and the other two systems are discussed. The relative excitation functions for 9 strongly populated nuclei for the above three systems have also

  20. Cosmogenic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raisbeck, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclei, nuclides formed by nuclear interactions of galactic and solar cosmic rays with extraterrestrial or terrestrial matter are discussed. Long lived radioactive cosmogenic isotopes are focused upon. Their uses in dating, as tracers of the interactions of cosmic rays with matter, and in obtaining information on the variation of primary cosmic ray flux in the past are discussed.

  1. Nucleon and heavy-ion total and absorption cross section for selected nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Costner, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Approximate solutions of the coupled-channel equations for high-energy composite particle scattering are obtained and are applied to the nuclear scattering problem. Relationships between several approximation procedures are established and discussed. The eikonal formalism is used with a small-angle approximation to calculate the coherent elastic scattered amplitude from which total and absorption cross sections are derived. Detailed comparisons with nucleon-nucleus experiments show agreement within 5 percent except at lower energies where the eikonal approximation is of questionable accuracy. Even at these lower energies, agreement is within 15 percent. Tables of cross sections required for cosmic heavy-ion transport and shielding studies are presented.

  2. Calculated half-lives and kinetic energies for spontaneous emission of heavy ions from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D.N.; Greiner, W.; Depta, K.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A.

    1986-05-01

    The most probable decays by spontaneous emission of heavy ions are listed for nuclides with Z = 47--106 and total half-lives>1 ..mu..sec. Partial half-lives, branching ratios relative to ..cap alpha.. decay, kinetic energies, and Q values are estimated by using the analytical superasymmetric fission model, a semiempirical formula for those ..cap alpha..-decay lifetimes which have not been measured, and the new Wapstra--Audi mass tables. Numerous ''stable'' nuclides with Z>40 are found to be metastable with respect to the new decay modes. The current experimental status is briefly reviewed.

  3. A CORRELATION BETWEEN THE HIGHEST ENERGY COSMIC RAYS AND NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI DETECTED BY FERMI

    SciTech Connect

    Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Bonatto, Charles; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2010-10-10

    We analyze the correlation of the positions of {gamma}-ray sources in the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) First Source Catalog (1FGL) and the First LAT Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) Catalog (1LAC) with the arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory, in order to investigate the origin of UHECRs. We find that Galactic sources and blazars identified in the 1FGL are not significantly correlated with UHECRs, while the 1LAC sources display a mild correlation (2.6{sigma} level) on an {approx}2.{sup 0}4 angular scale. When selecting only the 1LAC AGNs closer than 200 Mpc, we find a strong association (5.4{sigma}) between their positions and the directions of UHECRs on an {approx}17{sup 0} angular scale; the probability of the observed configuration being due to an isotropic flux of cosmic rays is 5 x 10{sup -8}. There is also a 5{sigma} correlation with nearby 1LAC sources on a 6.{sup 0}5 scale. We identify seven '{gamma}-ray loud' AGNs which are associated with UHECRs within {approx}17{sup 0} and are likely candidates for the production sites of UHECRs: Centaurus A, NGC 4945, ESO 323-G77, 4C+04.77, NGC 1218, RX J0008.0+1450, and NGC 253. We interpret these results as providing additional support to the hypothesis of the origin of UHECRs in nearby extragalactic objects. As the angular scales of the correlations are large, we discuss the possibility that intervening magnetic fields might be considerably deflecting the trajectories of the particles on their way to Earth.

  4. Hypertriton and light nuclei production at Lambda-production subthreshold energy in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Zu, Z.; Chen, J.H., Ma, Y.G., Cai, X-Z, Ma, G.L., Zhong, C.

    2011-08-01

    High-energy heavy-ion collisions produce abundant hyperons and nucleons. A dynamical coalescence model coupled with the ART model is employed to study the production probabilities of light clusters, deuteron (d), triton (t), helion ({sup 3}He), and hypertriton ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H) at subthreshold energy of Aproduction ({approx} 1 GeV per nucleon). We study the dependence on the reaction system size of the coalescence penalty factor per additional nucleon and entropy per nucleon. The Strangeness Population Factor (S{sub 3} = {sup 3}{sub {Lambda}}H/({sup 3}He x {Lambda}/p)) shows an extra suppression of hypertriton comparing to light clusters of the same mass number. This model predicts a hypertriton production cross-section of a few {mu}b in {sup 36}Ar+{sup 36}Ar, {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 56}Ni+{sup 56}Ni in 1 A GeV reactions. The production rate is as high as a few hypertritons per million collisions, which shows that the fixed-target heavy-ion collisions at CSR (Lanzhou/China) at {Lambda} subthreshold energy are suitable for breaking new ground in hypernuclear physics.

  5. Hypertriton and light nuclei production at Λ-production subthreshold energy in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Chen, Jin-Hui; Ma, Yu-Gang; Xu, Zhang-Bu; Cai, Xiang-Zhou; Ma, Guo-Liang; Zhong, Chen

    2011-08-01

    High-energy heavy-ion collisions produce abundant hyperons and nucleons. A dynamical coalescence model coupled with the ART model is employed to study the production probabilities of light clusters, deuteron (d), triton (t), helion (3He), and hypertriton (3ΛH) at subthreshold energy of Aproduction (≈ 1 GeV per nucleon). We study the dependence on the reaction system size of the coalescence penalty factor per additional nucleon and entropy per nucleon. The Strangeness Population Factor shows an extra suppression of hypertriton comparing to light clusters of the same mass number. This model predicts a hypertriton production cross-section of a few μb in 36Ar+36Ar, 40Ca+40Ca and 56Ni+56Ni in 1 A GeV reactions. The production rate is as high as a few hypertritons per million collisions, which shows that the fixed-target heavy-ion collisions at CSR (Lanzhou/China) at Λ subthreshold energy are suitable for breaking new ground in hypernuclear physics.

  6. Spectroscopy of few-particle nuclei around magic {sup 132}Sn from fission product {gamma}-ray studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C. T.

    1998-07-29

    We are studying the yrast structure of very neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic {sup 132}Sn by analyzing fission product {gamma}-ray data from a {sup 248}Cm source at Eurogam II. Yrast cascades in several few-valence-particle nuclei have been identified through {gamma}{gamma} cross coincidences with their complementary fission partners. Results for two-valence-particle nuclei {sup 132}Sb, {sup 134}Te, {sup 134}Sb and {sup 134}Sn provide empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions which, combined with single-particle energies already known in the one-particle nuclei, are essential for shell-model analysis in this region. Findings for the N = 82 nuclei {sup 134}Te and {sup 135}I have now been extended to the four-proton nucleus {sup 136}Xe. Results for the two-neutron nucleus {sup 134}Sn and the N = 83 isotones {sup 134}Sb, {sup 135}Te and {sup 135}I open up the spectroscopy of nuclei in the northeast quadrant above {sup 132}Sn.

  7. Photofission of Heavy Nuclei from 0.2 to 3.8 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    C. Cetina; P. Heimberg; B. L. Berman; W. J. Briscoe; G. Feldman; L. Y. Murphy; Hall Crannell; A. Longhi; D. I. Sober; J. C. Sanabria; G. Ya. Kezerashvili

    2002-04-01

    Total photofission cross sections for {sup 237}Np, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup nat}Pb have been measured simultaneously, using tagged photons in the energy range E{sub {gamma}} = 0.17-3.84 GeV in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The fission fragments were detected using parallel-plate avalanche detectors. Our results show that, of these nuclei, {sup 237}Np has the largest photofission cross section per nucleon, and that the photofission cross section for {sup 238}U relative to that for {sup 237}Np is about 80% over the entire energy range. The relative photofission cross sections per nucleon increase with the fissility parameter Z{sup 2}/A, approaching an apparent asymptote at the Z{sup 2}/A value for {sup 237}Np, and they do not depend strongly on the incident photon energy over this entire energy range. These results, together with a comparison of the {sup 237}Np photofission cross section per nucleon with total photoabsorption data, indicate that the photofission probability for {sup 237}Np is almost unity. If we make this assumption, we observe a significant shadowing of the interior nucleons starting below 1.5 GeV, so that the photoabsorption cross section decreases by 20% near 4 GeV.

  8. Phase and structural transformations in metallic iron under the action of heavy ions and recoil nuclei.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, I; Novikov, D

    2014-02-01

    By the use of various modes of Mössbauer spectroscopy after effects of irradiation of metal iron with (12)C(4+) and (14)N(5+) ions of medium energies, and alpha-particles and the (208)Tl, (208,212)Pb, and (216)Po recoil from a (228)Th-source have been studied. The experimental data obtained in the study enabled various types of external and internal radiation to be compared in regard to the damage they cause, as well as to their effect on the structure-, phase composition- and corrosion resistance properties of metallic iron. Irradiation with (12)C(4+) and (14)N(5+) ions is accompanied by both structural disordering of the α-Fe lattice, and the appearance of γ-phase in the bulk metal. This is indicated by a single line which is 2 to 3-fold broadened (as compared to the lines of the magnetic sextet). This is a result of a strong local heating of the lattice in the thermal spike area with a subsequent instant cooling-down and recrystallization of this "molted" area. Irradiation of iron foils with (12)C(4+)- and (14)N(5+) ions and with recoil nuclei does provoke corrosion processes (the formation of γ-FeOOH) and is accompanied by an intensive oxidation of the metal. PMID:24378918

  9. The Boson Expansion Theory as the Nuclear Structure Theory for the Heavy Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung-Bae

    1987-09-01

    Sometime ago, Kishimoto and Tamura developed a formalism of boson expansion theory (BET), and then Weeks and Tamura showed that it fitted many experimental data of collective nuclei. This formalism has recently been simplified significantly by Pedrocchi, Jamaluddin and Tamura. The new and old theories are very closely related but are not exactly the same. It has thus been desired to see whether the new theory can also fit data, and to show that it indeed works well constitutes a major part of this thesis. It is in fact seen that a number of data of Sm, Os and Pt isotopes are explained nicely. Since the new form of the theory is rather simple, it permits us to take into account easily the effects of noncollective states to the behavior of collective states. This thesis shows that a remarkably improved fit to data of magnetic moments of Sm isotopes is achieved in this way. The thesis discusses one additional subject. It is a result of an effort made to improve the BET by removing as much as possible the error due to the use of the BCS theory. This was done by applying a method developed by Li to the Dyson form of BET. A way to develop this work further is suggested.

  10. The boson expansion theory as the nuclear structure theory for the heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.B.

    1987-01-01

    Sometime sago, Kishimoto and Tamura developed a formalism of boson expansion theory (BET), and then Weeks and Tamura showed that it fitted many experimental data of collective nuclei. This formalism has recently been simplified significantly be Pedrocchi, Jamaluddin and Tamura. The new and old theories are very closely related but are not exactly the same. It has thus been desired to see whether the new theory can also fit data, and to show that it indeed works well constitutes a major part of this thesis. It is in fact seen that a number of data of Sm, Os and Pt isotopes are explained nicely. Since the new form of the theory is rather simple, it permits us to take into account easily the effects of noncollective states to the behavior of collective states. This thesis shows that are remarkably improved fit to data of magnetic moments of SM isotopes is achieved in this way. The thesis discusses one additional subject. It is a result of an effort made to improve the BET by removing as much as possible the error due to the use of the BCS theory. This was done by applying a method developed by Li to the Dyson form of BET. A way to develop this work further is suggested.

  11. X-ray spectral parameters for a sample of 95 active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasylenko, A. A.; Zhdanov, V. I.; Fedorova, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a broadband X-ray analysis of a new homogeneous sample of 95 active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the 22-month Swift/BAT all-sky survey. For this sample we treated jointly the X-ray spectra observed by XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL missions for the total spectral range of 0.5-250 keV. Photon index \\varGamma, relative reflection R, equivalent width of Fe K_{α} line EW_{FeK}, hydrogen column density NH, exponential cut-off energy Ec and intrinsic luminosity L_{corr} are determined for all objects of the sample. We investigated correlations \\varGamma-R, EW_{FeK}-L_{corr}, \\varGamma-Ec, EW_{FeK}-NH. Dependence "\\varGamma-R" for Seyfert 1/2 galaxies has been investigated separately. We found that the relative reflection parameter at low power-law indexes for Seyfert 2 galaxies is systematically higher than for Seyfert 1 ones. This can be related to an increasing contribution of the reflected radiation from the gas-dust torus. Our data show that there exists some anticorrelation between EW_{FeK} and L_{corr}, but it is not strong. We have not found statistically significant deviations from the AGN Unified Model.

  12. Detailed Shape and Evolutionary Behavior of the X-Ray Luminosity Function of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, T.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Puccetti, S.; Elvis, M.; Brunner, H.; Fotopoulou, S.; Ueda, Y.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Akiyama, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Lanzuisi, G.; Merloni, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-05-01

    We construct the rest-frame 2-10 keV intrinsic X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from a combination of X-ray surveys from the all-sky Swift BAT survey to the Chandra Deep Field South. We use ˜3200 AGNs in our analysis, which covers six orders of magnitude in flux. The inclusion of XMM and Chandra COSMOS data has allowed us to investigate the detailed behavior of the XLF and evolution. In deriving our XLF, we take into account realistic AGN spectrum templates, absorption corrections, and probability density distributions in photometric redshift. We present an analytical expression for the overall behavior of the XLF in terms of the luminosity-dependent density evolution, smoothed two-power-law expressions in 11 redshift shells, three-segment power-law expression of the number density evolution in four luminosity classes, and binned XLF. We observe a sudden flattening of the low luminosity end slope of the XLF slope at z ≳0.6. Detailed structures of the AGN downsizing have also been revealed, where the number density curves have two clear breaks at all luminosity classes above log {{L}X}\\gt 43. The two-break structure is suggestive of two-phase AGN evolution, consisting of major merger triggering and secular processes.

  13. Low-mass Active Galactic Nuclei with Rapid X-Ray Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Minjin

    2016-04-01

    We present a detailed study of the optical spectroscopic properties of 12 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with candidate low-mass black holes (BHs) selected by Kamizasa et al. through rapid X-ray variability. The high-quality, echellette Magellan spectra reveal broad Hα emission in all the sources, allowing us to estimate robust virial BH masses and Eddington ratios for this unique sample. We confirm that the sample contains low-mass BHs accreting at high rates: the median MBH = 1.2 × 106 M⊙ and median Lbol/LEdd = 0.44. The sample follows the MBH–σ* relation, within the considerable scatter typical of pseudobulges, the probable hosts of these low-mass AGNs. Various lines of evidence suggest that ongoing star formation is prevalent in these systems. We propose a new strategy to estimate star formation rates in AGNs hosted by low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies, based on modification of an existing method using the strength of [O ii] λ3727, [O iii] λ5007, and X-rays.

  14. Spectral-luminosity evolution of active galactic nuclei and the cosmic X- and gamma ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, Darryl; Boldt, Elihu

    1992-01-01

    Coherent electromagnetic dynamo acceleration processes, which act on charge particles within the context of black hole accretion disk scenarios, are generally regarded as the underlying central power source for active galactic nuclei (AGN). If the precursor active galaxies (PAG) for such AGN are formed at high redshift and contain initial seed black holes with mass approximately equal to 10(exp 4) solar masses, then the Eddington limited X-ray radiation emitted during their lifetime will undergo the phenomenon of 'spectral-luminosity evolution'. When accretion disks are first formed at the onset of galaxy formation the accretion rate occurs at very high values of luminosity/size compactness parameter L/R greater than 10(exp 30) erg/cm-sec. In the absence of extended structure, such high values of L/R generate dynamic constraints which suppress coherent, black hole/accretion disk dynamo particle acceleration processes. This inhibits nonthermal radiation processes and causes the spectrum of X-radiation emitted by PAG to be predominantly thermal. A superposition of PAG sources at z is greater than or equal to 6 can account for the residual cosmic X-ray background (CXB) obtained from the total CXB after subtraction of foreground AGN sources associated with present epoch Seyfert galaxies. The manner in which the PAG undergo spectral-luminosity evolution into Seyfert galaxies is investigated.

  15. Status and prospects of investigations into the collinear cluster decay of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Mkaza, N.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Kondratyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A. Mishinsky, G. V.; Malaza, V.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.

    2014-12-15

    Basic experimental results confirming the existence a new cluster-decay type called collinear cluster tripartition (CCT) are presented. Decays of this type manifest themselves, in particular, as a two-dimensional region of a locally enhanced yield of fragments (bump) that corresponds to specific missing-mass values in the mass-mass distribution of fission fragments. One of the decay modes that contribute to the bump can be treated as a cluster-decay type that is new in relation to the well-known heavy-ion or lead radioactivity. The conclusions drawn from an analysis of correlation mass distributions are confirmed by the results obtained from neutron-gated data, measurements of the nuclear charge for CCT events, and the direct detection of new-decay products.

  16. The Electron Shell and Alpha Decay in Super-Heavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igashov, S. Yu.; Tchuvil'Sky, Yu. M.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of the electron shell on the characteristics of the alpha decay of the 294118 isotope, as an example of a super-heavy atom, is studied theoretically. The calculation is based on direct solution of the Schrödinger equation. The rigorous quantum-mechanical approach being developed makes possible the outer boundary condition of the alpha-particle diverging wave to be taken into account properly. The effect under discussion depends on the behavior of the function of electron density both in the classically-forbidden and the classically-allowed areas of alpha-particle motion. A principally new effect - increasing of the decay rate originated by the part of electron shell located in the classically-allowed area - is revealed in the chosen example. The influence of relativistic properties of inner electrons, scenario of penetration of the alpha-particle through the atomic shell and finite size of nucleus are also studied.

  17. Status and prospects of investigations into the collinear cluster decay of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Mkaza, N.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Kondratyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Mishinsky, G. V.; Malaza, V.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.

    2014-12-01

    Basic experimental results confirming the existence a new cluster-decay type called collinear cluster tripartition (CCT) are presented. Decays of this type manifest themselves, in particular, as a two-dimensional region of a locally enhanced yield of fragments (bump) that corresponds to specific missing-mass values in the mass-mass distribution of fission fragments. One of the decay modes that contribute to the bump can be treated as a cluster-decay type that is new in relation to the well-known heavy-ion or lead radioactivity. The conclusions drawn from an analysis of correlation mass distributions are confirmed by the results obtained from neutron-gated data, measurements of the nuclear charge for CCT events, and the direct detection of new-decay products.

  18. Nucleon-induced fission cross sections of heavy nuclei in the intermediate energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofiev, Alexander V.

    Fission is the most important nuclear reaction for society at large today due to its use in energy production. However, this has raised the problem of how to treat the long-lived radioactive waste from nuclear reactors. A radical solution would be to change the composition of the waste into stable or short-lived nuclides, which could be done through nuclear transmutation. Such a concept requires accelerator-driven systems to be designed, where those for transmutation are reactor hybrids. This thesis is a contribution to the knowledge base for developing transmutation systems, specifically with respect to the computational modeling of the underlying nuclear reactions, induced by the incident and secondary particles. Intermediate energy fission cross sections are one important type of such data. Moreover, they are essential for understanding the fission process itself and related nuclear interactions. The experimental part of this work was performed at the neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Fission cross sections of 238U, 209Bi, natPb, 208Pb, 197Au, natW, and 181Ta were measured for neutrons in the range En = 30-160 MeV using thin-film breakdown counters for the fission fragment detection. A model was developed for the determination of the efficiency of such detectors. A compilation of existing data on proton-induced fission cross sections for nuclei from 165Ho to 239Pu was performed. The results, which constitute the main body of information in this field, were added to the worldwide EXFOR database. The dependences of the cross sections on incident energy and target nucleus were studied, which resulted in systematics that make it possible to give estimates for unmeasured nuclides. Nucleon-induced fission cross sections were calculated using an extended version of the cascade exciton model. A comparison with the systematics and the experimental data obtained in the present work revealed significant discrepancies. A modification of the model

  19. A quantitative investigation of the solar modulation of cosmic-ray protons and helium nuclei. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    The differential energy spectra of cosmic ray protons and He nuclei were measured at energies up to 315 MeV/nucleon using balloon-borne and satellite-borne instruments. These spectra are presented for solar quiet times for the years 1966 through 1970. The data analysis is verified by extensive accelerator calibrations of the detector systems and by calculations and measurements of the production of secondary protons in the atmosphere. The spectra of protons and He nuclei in this energy range are dominated by the solar modulation of the local interstellar spectra. Numerical solutions to the transport equation are presented for a wide range of parameters.

  20. Predicted CALET measurements of ultra-heavy cosmic ray relative abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, B. F.

    2014-05-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (X∘) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 X∘ of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the instrument are to measure electron energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1,000 TeV. In this paper we describe how the geomagnetic field at the 51.6° inclination orbit of the ISS can be used to allow CALET to measure the rare ultra-heavy (UH) cosmic ray (CR) abundances, which provide important clues for the CR source and acceleration mechanism. The CHD scintillator response is relatively insensitive to energy above minimum ionization, and the angle-dependent rigidity as a function of geomagnetic latitude can be exploited to discriminate particles above this energy threshold. Such events require corrections for trajectory in instrument that can be made with only the top 4 layers of the IMC, which allows for considerably greater geometric acceptance than for events that require passage through the TASC for energy determination. Using this approach CALET will be able to measure UH CR relative abundances over its expected mission with superior statistics to previous space instruments.

  1. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC ACCRETION DISK WINDS AS X-RAY ABSORBERS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Behar, Ehud

    2010-05-20

    We present the two-dimensional ionization structure of self-similar magnetohydrodynamic winds off accretion disks around and irradiated by a central X-ray point source. On the basis of earlier observational clues and theoretical arguments, we focus our attention on a subset of these winds, namely those with radial density dependence n(r) {proportional_to} 1/r (r is the spherical radial coordinate). We employ the photoionization code XSTAR to compute the ionic abundances of a large number of ions of different elements and then compile their line-of-sight (LOS) absorption columns. We focus our attention on the distribution of the column density of the various ions as a function of the ionization parameter {xi} (or equivalently r) and the angle {theta}. Particular attention is paid to the absorption measure distribution (AMD), namely their hydrogen-equivalent column per logarithmic {xi} interval, dN{sub H}/dlog {xi}, which provides a measure of the winds' radial density profiles. For the chosen density profile n(r) {proportional_to} 1/r, the AMD is found to be independent of {xi}, in good agreement with its behavior inferred from the X-ray spectra of several active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the specific wind structure and X-ray spectrum, we also compute detailed absorption line profiles for a number of ions to obtain their LOS velocities, v {approx} 100-300 km s{sup -1} (at log {xi} {approx} 2-3) for Fe XVII and v {approx} 1000-4000 km s{sup -1} (at log {xi} {approx} 4-5) for Fe XXV, in good agreement with the observation. Our models describe the X-ray absorption properties of these winds with only two parameters, namely the mass-accretion rate m-dot and the LOS angle {theta}. The probability of obscuration of the X-ray ionizing source in these winds decreases with increasing m-dot and increases steeply with the LOS inclination angle {theta}. As such, we concur with previous authors that these wind configurations, viewed globally, incorporate all the requisite

  2. LOW-FIDELITY COVARIANCES FOR NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS ON 57 STRUCTURAL AND 31 HEAVY NUCLEI IN THE FAST REGION.

    SciTech Connect

    PIGNI,M.T.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2008-03-01

    We produced a large set of neutron cross section covariances in the energy range of 5 keV-20 MeV. The present set of data on 57 structural materials and 31 heavy nuclei follows our earlier work on 219 fission product materials and completes our extensive contribution to the low-fidelity covariance project (307 materials). This project aims to provide initial, low-fidelity yet consistent estimates of covariance data for nuclear criticality safety applications. The evaluation methodology combines the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE which calculates sensitivity to nuclear reaction model parameters, and the Bayesian code KALMAN that propagates uncertainties of the model parameters to cross sections. Taking into account the large scale of the project, only marginal reference to experimental data was made. The covariances were derived from the perturbation of several key model parameters selected by the sensitivity analysis. These parameters refer to the optical model potential, the level densities and the strength of the pre-equilibrium emission. This work represents the first attempt ever to generate nuclear data covariances on such a large scale.

  3. Spectroscopy of Neutron-rich Nuclei of the A{approx_equal}60 region populated through binary heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardi, S.

    2008-11-11

    Neutron-rich nuclei of the mass A = 60 region (from V to Fe) have been studied through multi-nucleon transfer reactions by bombarding a {sup 238}U target with beams of {sup 64}Ni and {sup 70}Zn. Unambiguous identification of prompt {gamma} rays belonging to each nucleus has been achieved by using the efficient gamma-array CLARA coupled to the large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer PRISMA installed at the Legnaro National Laboratories. With the new data, the existence of the N = 32 sub-shell closure has been corroborated through the study of odd V isotopes, whereas a new region of deformation appears for neutron-rich Fe nuclei close to N = 40. The results obtained for all these nuclei are compared with shell model calculations which reproduces quite well the experimental data also for the most neutron-rich nuclei when excitations from the fp shell into the upper g{sub 9/2} orbital are allowed.

  4. Radio-Loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 as a New Class of Gamma-Ray Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Foschini, L.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kadler, M.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Persic, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sambruna, R.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi/LAT Collaboration; Ghisellini, G.; Maraschi, L.; Tavecchio, F.

    2009-12-01

    We report the discovery with Fermi/LAT of γ-ray emission from three radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies: PKS 1502+036 (z = 0.409), 1H 0323+342 (z = 0.061), and PKS 2004 - 447 (z = 0.24). In addition to PMN J0948+0022 (z = 0.585), the first source of this type to be detected in γ rays, they may form an emerging new class of γ-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These findings can have strong implications on our knowledge about relativistic jets and the unified model of the AGN.

  5. Comparison of Single Event Transients Generated by Short Pulsed X-Rays, Lasers and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoza, David; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Tockstein, Michael A.; Brewe, Dale L.; Wells, Nathan P.; Koga, Rokutaro; Gaab, K. M.; Lotshaw, William T.; Moss, Steven C.

    2014-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the transients generated by pulsed x-rays, heavy ions, and different laser wavelengths in a Si p-i-n photodiode. We compare the charge collected by all of the excitation methods to determine the equivalent LET for pulsed x-rays relative to heavy ions. Our comparisons show that pulsed x-rays from synchrotron sources can generate a large range of equivalent LET and generate transients similar to those excited by laser pulses and heavy ion strikes. We also look at how the pulse width of the transients changes for the different excitation methods. We show that the charge collected with pulsed x-rays is greater than expected as the x-ray photon energy increases. Combined with their capability of focusing to small spot sizes and of penetrating metallization, pulsed x-rays are a promising new tool for high resolution screening of SEE susceptibility

  6. Radiation quality of cosmic ray nuclei studied with Geant4-based simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigo, Lucas N.; Pshenichnov, Igor A.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Bleicher, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    In future missions in deep space a space craft will be exposed to a non-negligible flux of high charge and energy (HZE) particles present in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR). One of the major concerns of manned missions is the impact on humans of complex radiation fields which result from the interactions of HZE particles with the spacecraft materials. The radiation quality of several ions representing GCR is investigated by calculating microdosimetry spectra. A Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy Ion Therapy (MCHIT) is used to simulate microdosimetry data for HZE particles in extended media where fragmentation reactions play a certain role. Our model is able to reproduce measured microdosimetry spectra for H, He, Li, C and Si in the energy range of 150-490 MeV/u. The effect of nuclear fragmentation on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of He, Li and C is estimated and found to be below 10%.

  7. Band-head spectra of low-energy single-particle excitations in some well-deformed, odd-mass heavy nuclei within a microscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Meng-Hock; Duy Duc, Dao; Nhan Hao, T. V.; Thuy Long, Ha; Quentin, P.; Bonneau, L.

    2016-01-01

    In four well-deformed heavy odd nuclei, the energies of low-lying rotational band heads have been determined microscopically within a self-consistent Hartree-Fock-plus-BCS approach with blocking. A Skyrme nucleon-nucleon effective interaction has been used together with a seniority force to describe pairing correlations. Only such states which are phenomenologically deemed to be related to single-particle excitations have been considered. The polarization effects, including those associated with the genuine time-reversal symmetry breaking have been fully taken into account within our model assumptions. The calculated spectra are in reasonably good qualitative agreement with available data for the considered odd-neutron nuclei. This is not so much the case for the odd-proton nuclei. A potential explanation for such a difference in behavior is proposed.

  8. Effect of three-body Coulomb interactions on the breakup of light nuclei in the field of a heavy ion: An asymptotic estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Alt, E.O.; Irgaziev, B.F.; Muminov, A.T.

    1995-11-01

    The quasielastic breakup of light nuclei into two charged fragments in the Coulomb field of a heavy multiply charged ion are studied. For fragments diverging with extremely low energies an asymptotic estimate is obtained for the ratio of the differential cross section in which three-body Coulomb effects are taken into account to that in which these effects are disregarded. It is shown that effects due to the acceleration of breakup fragments in the field of the heavy ion are significant. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Studies of heavy ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, August 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Huizenga, J.R.; Schroeder, W.U.

    1984-08-01

    The status of the current understanding of the microscopic mechanisms operating in damped nuclear reactions is reviewed. Several experimental and conceptual problems of attempts to determine the nuclear interaction potential for distances inside the fusion barrier are discussed. An explanation of the unexpectedly large angular anisotropies of fragments from fission of heavy systems produced at large spins has been found in terms of the statistical scission model. In this model, the phase space available to the final deformed fission fragments governs the fission probability. Processes associated with incomplete linear-momentum transfer have been studied for 292-MeV /sup 20/Ne-induced fission with targets of /sup 165/Ho, /sup 181/Ta, /sup 197/Au, /sup 209/Bi, and /sup 238/U. Preequilibrium neutron emission has been studied in central and peripheral /sup 165/Ho + /sup 20/Ne and /sup 165/Ho + /sup 12/C collisions at bombarding energies between 11 and 25 MeV/nucleon. In preparation of kinematically complete coincidence experiments, a fast, position-sensitive avalanche detector with a large active area has been developed. The theoretical framework of the statistical scission model for fission has been reconsidered. Exclusive measurements were made of alpha particles emitted in the damped reaction /sup 165/Ho + /sup 56/Fe at E/sub Lab/ = 465 MeV. The data were interpreted with the aid of rather detailed Monte Carlo evaporation simulations. As part of an extensive coincidence study of equilibration mechanisms in damped reactions, inclusive measurements of projectile-like and fusion-fission-like fragments have been performed for the /sup 197/Au + /sup 51/V system at E/sub Lab/ = 447 MeV. The damped reaction features have been interpreted in terms of phenomenological reaction models. (WHK)

  10. Upturn in the ratios of nuclei of Z=16-24 and abundant heavy nuclei to iron as observed in the ATIC experiment above 50 GeV/n and the Local Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Alexander; Zatsepin, Victor; Sokolskaya, Natalia

    The ratios of heavy nuclei from sulfur (Z=16) to chromium (Z=24) fluxes and abundant heavy nuclei fluxes to the flux of iron were measured recently in the ATIC-2 experiment. These ratios are decreasing functions of energy from 5 GeV/n to approximately 30-50 GeV/n as expected. However, an unexpected sharp upturn in the ratios is observed above energies 30-50 GeV/n with high statistical significance and methodical reliability. Some details of the data are presented and discussed. Such a phenomenon could not be understood within usual uniform propagation models. A possible origin of the upturn is discussed and it is demonstrated that it can be explained as a propagation effect within a model of `closed galaxy with an embedded Local Bubble'. Moreover it is shown that a universal upturn at energies 200-300 GeV/n in the spectra of abundant even primary nuclei observed previously in the ATIC, CREAM and PAMELA experiments is also predicted by this model.

  11. FULL SPECTRAL SURVEY OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2013-08-01

    We have analyzed spectra for all active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer archive. We present long-term average values of absorption, Fe line equivalent width (EW), Compton reflection, and photon index, and calculate fluxes and luminosities in the 2-10 keV band for 100 AGN with sufficient brightness and overall observation time to yield high-quality spectral results. We compare these parameters across the different classifications of Seyferts and blazars. Our distributions of photon indices for Seyfert 1s and 2s are consistent with the idea that Seyferts share a common central engine; however, our distributions of Compton reflection hump strengths do not support the classical picture of absorption by a torus and reflection off a Compton-thick disk with type depending only on inclination angle. We conclude that a more complex reflecting geometry such as a combined disk and torus or clumpy torus is likely a more accurate picture of the Compton-thick material. We find that Compton reflection is present in {approx}85% of Seyferts and by comparing Fe line EW's to Compton reflection hump strengths we have found that on average 40% of the Fe line arises in Compton thick material; however, this ratio was not consistent from object to object and did not seem to be dependent on optical classification.

  12. Hard-X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei in the INTEGRAL complete sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Bird, A. J.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present the hard-X-ray spectral analysis of a complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by INTEGRAL/IBIS. In conjunction with IBIS spectra, we make use of Swift/BAT data, with the aim of cross-calibrating the two instruments, studying source variability and constraining some important spectral parameters. We find that flux variability is present in at least 14 per cent of the sample, while spectral variability is found only in one object. There is general good agreement between BAT and IBIS spectra, despite a systematic mismatch of about 22 per cent in normalization. When fitted with a simple power-law model, type 1 and type 2 sources appear to have very similar average photon indices, suggesting that they are powered by the same mechanism. As expected, we also find that a simple power law does not always describe the data sufficiently well, thus indicating a certain degree of spectral complexity, which can be ascribed to features like a high energy cut-off and/or a reflection component. Fixing the reflection to be 0, 1 or 2, we find that our sample covers quite a large range in photon indices as well as cut-off energies; however, the spread is due only to a small number of objects, while the majority of the AGNs lie within well-defined boundaries of photon index (1 ≤ Γ ≤ 2) and cut-off energy (30 ≤ Ecut ≤ 300 keV).

  13. THE GLOBAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE HARD X-RAY EXCESS IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, M. M.; Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. N.; Miller, L.

    2013-01-10

    Recent evidence for a strong 'hard excess' of flux at energies {approx}> 20 keV in some Suzaku observations of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has motivated an exploratory study of the phenomenon in the local type 1 AGN population. We have selected all type 1 AGNs in the Swift Burst Alert Telescope 58 month catalog and cross-correlated them with the holdings of the Suzaku public archive. We find the hard excess phenomenon to be a ubiquitous property of type 1 AGNs. Taken together, the spectral hardness and equivalent width of Fe K{alpha} emission are consistent with reprocessing by an ensemble of Compton-thick clouds that partially cover the continuum source. In the context of such a model, {approx}80% of the sample has a hardness ratio consistent with >50% covering of the continuum by low-ionization, Compton-thick gas. A more detailed study of the three hardest X-ray spectra in our sample reveal a sharp Fe K absorption edge at {approx}7 keV in each of them, indicating that blurred reflection is not responsible for the very hard spectral forms. Simple considerations place the distribution of Compton-thick clouds at or within the optical broad-line region.

  14. Gamma-ray blazars and active galactic nuclei seen by the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, B.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ciprini, S.; Cutini, S.; Gasparrini, D.

    2015-03-01

    The third catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-LAT (3LAC) is presented. It is based on the third Fermi-LAT catalog (3FGL) of sources detected with a test statistic (TS) greater than 25 using the first 4 years of data. The 3LAC includes 1591 AGNs located at high Galactic latitudes, |b| > 10 (with 28 duplicate associations, thus corresponding to 1563 gamma-ray sources among 2192 sources in the 3FGL catalog), a 71% increase over the second catalog based on 2 years of data. A very large majority of these AGNs (98%) are blazars. About half of the newly detected blazars are of unknown type, i.e., they lack spectroscopic information of sufficient quality to determine the strength of their emission lines. The general properties of the 3LAC sample confirm previous findings from earlier catalogs, but some new subclasses (e.g., intermediate- and high-synchrotron-peaked FSRQs) have now been significantly detected.

  15. Statistical analysis of the correlation between active galactic nuclei and ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hang Bae; Kim, Jihyun E-mail: jihyunkim@hanyang.ac.kr

    2011-03-01

    We develop the statistical methods for comparing two sets of arrival directions of cosmic rays in which the two-dimensional distribution of arrival directions is reduced to the one-dimensional distributions so that the standard one-dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test can be applied. Then we apply them to the analysis of correlation between the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 5.7 × 10{sup 19} eV, observed by Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) and Akeno Giant Air Shower Array (AGASA), and the active galactic nuclei (AGN) within the distance 100 Mpc. For statistical test, we set up the simple AGN model for UHECR sources in which a certain fraction of observed UHECR are originated from AGN within a chosen distance, assuming that all AGN have equal UHECR luminosity and smearing angle, and the remaining fraction are from the isotropic background contribution. For the PAO data, our methods exclude not only a hypothesis that the observed UHECR are simply isotropically distributed but also a hypothesis that they are completely originated from the selected AGN. But, the addition of appropriate amount of isotropic component either through the background contribution or through the large smearing effect improves the correlation greatly and makes the AGN hypothesis for UHECR sources a viable one. We also point out that restricting AGN within the distance bin of 40–60 Mpc happens to yield a good correlation without appreciable isotropic component and large smearing effect. For the AGASA data, we don't find any significant correlation with AGN.

  16. X-ray variability and the inner region in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, P.; Mangalam, A. E-mail: mangalam@iiap.res.in

    2014-08-20

    We present theoretical models of X-ray variability attributable to orbital signatures from an accretion disk including emission region size, quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), and its quality factor Q, and the emergence of a break frequency in the power spectral density shape. We find a fractional variability amplitude of F{sub var}∝M{sub ∙}{sup −0.4}. We conduct a time series analysis on X-ray light curves (0.3-10 keV) of a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A statistically significant bend frequency is inferred in 9 of 58 light curves (16%) from 3 AGNs for which the break timescale is consistent with the reported BH spin but not with the reported BH mass. Upper limits of 2.85 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} in NGC 4051, 8.02 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} in MRK 766, and 4.68 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} in MCG-6-30-15 are inferred for maximally spinning BHs. For REJ 1034+396 where a QPO at 3733 s was reported, we obtain an emission region size of (6-6.5) M and a BH spin of a ≲ 0.08. The relativistic inner region of a thin disk, dominated by radiation pressure and electron scattering, is likely to host the orbital features as the simulated Q ranges from 6.3 × 10{sup –2} to 4.25 × 10{sup 6}, containing the observed Q. The derived value of Q ∼ 32 for REJ 1034+396 therefore suggests that the AGN hosts a thin disk.

  17. The Energy Spectra of Heavy Nuclei Measured by the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panov, A. D.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazley, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays in the region of total energy from 100 GeV to near 100 TeV for Z from 1 to 26. ATIC consists of a pixelated silicon matrix detector to measure charge plus a fully active BGO calorimeter, to measure energy, located below a carbon target interleaved with three layers of scintillator hodoscope. The ATIC instrument had a second (scientific) flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 12/29/02 to 1/18/03, yielding 20 days of good data. The GEANT 3.21 Monte Carlo code with the QGSM event generator and the FLUKA code with the DPMJET-II event generator were used to convert energy deposition measurements to primary energy. We present the preliminary energy spectra for the abundant elements C, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe and compare them with the results of the first (test) flight of ATIC in 2000-01 and with results from the HEAO-3 and CRN experiments.

  18. Search for gamma-ray-emitting active galactic nuclei in the Fermi-LAT unassociated sample using machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Doert, M.; Errando, M. E-mail: errando@astro.columbia.edu

    2014-02-10

    The second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) is the deepest all-sky survey available in the gamma-ray band. It contains 1873 sources, of which 576 remain unassociated. Machine-learning algorithms can be trained on the gamma-ray properties of known active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to find objects with AGN-like properties in the unassociated sample. This analysis finds 231 high-confidence AGN candidates, with increased robustness provided by intersecting two complementary algorithms. A method to estimate the performance of the classification algorithm is also presented, that takes into account the differences between associated and unassociated gamma-ray sources. Follow-up observations targeting AGN candidates, or studies of multiwavelength archival data, will reduce the number of unassociated gamma-ray sources and contribute to a more complete characterization of the population of gamma-ray emitting AGNs.

  19. Simulations of cosmic-ray feedback by active galactic nuclei in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijacki, Debora; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2008-07-01

    Feedback processes by active galactic nuclei (AGN) appear to be a key for understanding the nature of the very X-ray luminous cool cores found in many clusters of galaxies. We investigate a numerical model for AGN feedback where for the first time a relativistic particle population in AGN-inflated bubbles is followed within a full cosmological context. In our high-resolution simulations of galaxy cluster formation, we assume that black hole accretion is accompanied by energy feedback that occurs in two different modes, depending on the accretion rate itself. At high accretion rates, a small fraction of the radiated energy is coupled thermally to the gas surrounding the quasar, while in a low-accretion state, mechanically efficient feedback in the form of hot, buoyant bubbles that are inflated by radio activity is considered. Unlike previous work, we inject a non-thermal particle population of relativistic protons into the AGN bubbles, instead of adopting a purely thermal heating. We then follow the subsequent evolution of the cosmic-ray (CR) plasma inside the bubbles, considering both its hydrodynamical interactions and dissipation processes relevant to the CR population. This permits us to analyse the impact of CR bubbles on the surrounding intracluster medium, and in particular, how this contrasts with the purely thermal case. Due to the different buoyancy of relativistic plasma and the comparatively long CR dissipation time-scale, we find substantial changes in the evolution of clusters as a result of CR feedback. In particular, the non-thermal population can provide significant pressure support in central cluster regions at low thermal temperatures, providing a natural explanation for the decreasing temperature profiles found in cool core clusters. At the same time, the morphologies of the bubbles and of the induced X-ray cavities show a striking similarity to observational findings. AGN feedback with CRs also proves efficient in regulating cluster cooling

  20. Effects of rotation of fissioning nuclei in the angular distributions of prompt neutrons and gamma rays originating from the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 233U and 235U nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2014-06-01

    The results of an experiment devoted to searches for effects of rotation of fissioning nuclei in the angular distributions of prompt neutrons and gamma rays originating from the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 233U nuclei are presented. The effects discovered in these angular distributions are opposite in sign to their counterparts in the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 235U nuclei. This is at odds with data on the relative signs of respective effects in the angular distribution of alpha particles from the ternary fission of the same nuclei and may be indicative of problems in the model currently used to describe the effect in question. The report on which this article is based was presented at the seminar held at the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics and dedicated to the 90th anniversary of the birth of Yu.G. Abov, corresponding member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Editor in Chief of the journal Physics of Atomic Nuclei.

  1. New approach to the interaction of cosmic rays with nuclei in spacecraft shielding and the human body

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, B.W.; Nix, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of high-energy cosmic rays with nuclei in spacecraft shielding and the human body is important for manned interplanetary missions and is not well understood either experimentally or theoretically. We present a new theoretical approach to this problem based on classical hadrodynamics for extended nucleons, which treats nucleons of finite size interacting with massive meson fields. This theory represents the classical analogue of the quantum hadrodynamics of Serot and Walecka without the assumptions of the mean-field approximation and point nucleons. It provides a natural covariant microscopic approach to collisions between cosmic rays and nuclei that automatically includes space-time non-locality and retardation, nonequilibrium phenomena, interactions among all nucleons, and particle production. Unlike previous models, this approach is manifestly Lorentz covariant and satisfies a priori the basic conditions that are present when cosmic rays collide with nuclei, namely an interaction time that is extremely short and a nucleon mean-free path, force range, and internucleon separation that are all comparable in size. We review the history of classical meson-field theory and derive the classical relativistic equations of motion for nucleons of finite size interacting with massive scalar and vector meson fields.

  2. An X-Ray Spectral Survey of Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei with ASCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Eracleous, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    1999-11-01

    We present a uniform and systematic analysis of the 0.6-10 keV X-ray spectra of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed by ASCA. The sample, which is not statistically complete, includes 10 broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs), five radio-loud quasars (QSRs), nine narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs), and 10 radio galaxies (RGs) of mixed FR I and FR II types. For several sources the ASCA data are presented here for the first time. The exposure times of the observations and the fluxes of the objects vary over a wide range; as a result, so does the signal-to-noise ratio of the individual X-ray spectra. At soft X-rays, about 50% of NLRGs and 100% of RGs exhibit thermal plasma emission components, with bimodal distributions of temperatures and luminosities. This indicates that the emission in such an object arises in hot gas either in a surrounding cluster or loose group or in a hot corona, consistent with previous ROSAT and optical results. At energies above 2 keV, a hard power-law component (photon index Γ~1.7-1.8) is detected in 90% of cases. The power-law photon indices and luminosities in BLRGs, QSRs, and NLRGs are similar. This is consistent with simple orientation-based unification schemes for lobe-dominated radio-loud sources in which BLRGs, QSRs, and NLRGs harbor the same type of central engine. Moreover, excess cold absorption in the range 1021-1024 cm-2 is detected in most (but not all) NLRGs, consistent with absorption by obscuring tori, as postulated by unification scenarios. The ASCA data provide initial evidence that the immediate gaseous environment of the X-ray source of BLRGs may be different than in Seyfert 1 galaxies: absorption edges of ionized oxygen, common in the latter, are detected in only one BLRG. Instead we detect large columns of cold gas in a fraction (~44%-60%) of BLRGs and QSRs, comparable to the columns detected in NLRGs, which is puzzling. This difference hints at different physical and/or geometrical properties of the medium

  3. NO CLEAR SUBMILLIMETER SIGNATURE OF SUPPRESSED STAR FORMATION AMONG X-RAY LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Del Moro, A.; Rovilos, E.; Altieri, B.; Coia, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Daddi, E.; Le Floc'h, E.; Leiton, R.; Dasyra, K.; Dickinson, M.; Kartaltepe, J.; Hickox, R. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Rosario, D.; and others

    2012-11-20

    Many theoretical models require powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to suppress star formation in distant galaxies and reproduce the observed properties of today's massive galaxies. A recent study based on Herschel-SPIRE submillimeter observations claimed to provide direct support for this picture, reporting a significant decrease in the mean star formation rates (SFRs) of the most luminous AGNs (L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3 in the Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N). In this Letter, we extend these results using Herschel-SPIRE 250 {mu}m data in the COSMOS and Chandra Deep Field-South fields to achieve an order-of-magnitude improvement in the number of sources at L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. On the basis of our analysis, we find no strong evidence for suppressed star formation in L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} AGNs at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3. The mean SFRs of the AGNs are constant over the broad X-ray luminosity range of L{sub X} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 43}-10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} (with mean SFRs consistent with typical star-forming galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 2; (SFRs) Almost-Equal-To 100-200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). We suggest that the previous CDF-N results were likely due to low number statistics. We discuss our results in the context of current theoretical models.

  4. MEASURING X-RAY VARIABILITY IN FAINT/SPARSELY SAMPLED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Allevato, V.; Paolillo, M.; Papadakis, I.; Pinto, C.

    2013-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of the normalized excess variance of variability process characterized by a ''red-noise'' power spectral density (PSD), as in the case of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We perform Monte Carlo simulations of light curves, assuming both a continuous and a sparse sampling pattern and various signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns). We show that the normalized excess variance is a biased estimate of the variance even in the case of continuously sampled light curves. The bias depends on the PSD slope and on the sampling pattern, but not on the S/N. We provide a simple formula to account for the bias, which yields unbiased estimates with an accuracy better than 15%. We show that the normalized excess variance estimates based on single light curves (especially for sparse sampling and S/N < 3) are highly uncertain (even if corrected for bias) and we propose instead the use of an ''ensemble estimate'', based on multiple light curves of the same object, or on the use of light curves of many objects. These estimates have symmetric distributions, known errors, and can also be corrected for biases. We use our results to estimate the ability to measure the intrinsic source variability in current data, and show that they could also be useful in the planning of the observing strategy of future surveys such as those provided by X-ray missions studying distant and/or faint AGN populations and, more in general, in the estimation of the variability amplitude of sources that will result from future surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST.

  5. Current and Future Measurements of Ultra-Heavy Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Jason; Supertiger Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    There is strong evidence from recent experiments that suggest a source of galactic cosmic rays is in superbubble regions and that particles here are accelerated through the shocks from supernova explosions. Through further study of ultra-heavy cosmic-rays, those particles with a Z >26, we can verify and explore the particle source and acceleration process of cosmic-rays. Measuring these particles is a challenge due to their low flux and high interaction cross section, requiring extremely large detectors flown on balloons and in space. In this talk we will discuss how past and recent ultra-heavy cosmic ray measurements have shaped our understanding of the cosmic-ray source and acceleration process and what we hope to learn from future measurements. We will present results on the abundances of ultra-heavy cosmic rays in the charge range 26 <= Z <= 40 from the SuperTIGER Antarctic balloon flight and compare these with previous results from ACE-CRIS and TIGER. We will also review the current status of active missions to measure ultra-heavy cosmic rays and discuss future possibilities.

  6. [Results of measuring the charge and energy spectra of heavy nuclei on board the artificial Earth satellite Kosmos-936].

    PubMed

    Dashin, S A; Marennyĭ, A M; Gertsen, G P

    1982-01-01

    The measurements were performed using a package of dielectric track detectors mounted behind the shield of 60-80 kg.m-2 thick. The charge of nuclei was determined from the complete track length. As a result, 1915 tracks of nuclei with Z greater than or equal to 6 in the energy range 100-450 MeV/nuclon were detected and identified. The differential charge spectrum of nuclei with 6 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28 and the energy spectrum of nuclei of the iron group were built. For iron nuclei the following ration of isotope groups was obtained: (Fe52 + Fe53 + Fe54): (Fe55 + Fe56 + Fe57) : (Fe58 + Fe59 + Fe60) = (0.30 +/- 0.08) = (0.49 +/- 0.10) : (0.21 +/- 0.05). PMID:7098416

  7. Zirconium—Hafnium Isotope Evidence from Meteorites for the Decoupled Synthesis of Light and Heavy Neutron-rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, W.; Schönbächler, M.; Sprung, P.; Vogel, N.

    2013-11-01

    Recent work based on analyses of meteorite and terrestrial whole-rock samples showed that the r- and s- process isotopes of Hf were homogeneously distributed throughout the inner solar system. We report new Hf isotope data for Calcium-Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) of the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende, and novel high-precision Zr isotope data for these CAIs and three carbonaceous chondrites (CM, CO, CK). Our Zr data reveal enrichments in the neutron-rich isotope 96Zr (<=1ɛ in 96Zr/90Zr) for bulk chondrites and CAIs (~2ɛ). Potential isotope effects due to incomplete sample dissolution, galactic and cosmic ray spallation, and the nuclear field shift are assessed and excluded, leading to the conclusion that the 96Zr isotope variations are of nucleosynthetic origin. The 96Zr enrichments are coupled with 50Ti excesses suggesting that both nuclides were produced in the same astrophysical environment. The same CAIs also exhibit deficits in r-process Hf isotopes, which provides strong evidence for a decoupling between the nucleosynthetic processes that produce the light (A <= 130) and heavy (A > 130) neutron-rich isotopes. We propose that the light neutron-capture isotopes largely formed in Type II supernovae (SNeII) with higher mass progenitors than the supernovae that produced the heavy r-process isotopes. In the context of our model, the light isotopes (e.g. 96Zr) are predominantly synthesized via charged-particle reactions in a high entropy wind environment, in which Hf isotopes are not produced. Collectively, our data indicates that CAIs sampled an excess of materials produced in a normal mass (12-25 M ⊙) SNII.

  8. ZIRCONIUM—HAFNIUM ISOTOPE EVIDENCE FROM METEORITES FOR THE DECOUPLED SYNTHESIS OF LIGHT AND HEAVY NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Akram, W.; Schönbächler, M.; Sprung, P.; Vogel, N.

    2013-11-10

    Recent work based on analyses of meteorite and terrestrial whole-rock samples showed that the r- and s- process isotopes of Hf were homogeneously distributed throughout the inner solar system. We report new Hf isotope data for Calcium-Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) of the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende, and novel high-precision Zr isotope data for these CAIs and three carbonaceous chondrites (CM, CO, CK). Our Zr data reveal enrichments in the neutron-rich isotope {sup 96}Zr (≤1ε in {sup 96}Zr/{sup 90}Zr) for bulk chondrites and CAIs (∼2ε). Potential isotope effects due to incomplete sample dissolution, galactic and cosmic ray spallation, and the nuclear field shift are assessed and excluded, leading to the conclusion that the {sup 96}Zr isotope variations are of nucleosynthetic origin. The {sup 96}Zr enrichments are coupled with {sup 50}Ti excesses suggesting that both nuclides were produced in the same astrophysical environment. The same CAIs also exhibit deficits in r-process Hf isotopes, which provides strong evidence for a decoupling between the nucleosynthetic processes that produce the light (A ≤ 130) and heavy (A > 130) neutron-rich isotopes. We propose that the light neutron-capture isotopes largely formed in Type II supernovae (SNeII) with higher mass progenitors than the supernovae that produced the heavy r-process isotopes. In the context of our model, the light isotopes (e.g. {sup 96}Zr) are predominantly synthesized via charged-particle reactions in a high entropy wind environment, in which Hf isotopes are not produced. Collectively, our data indicates that CAIs sampled an excess of materials produced in a normal mass (12-25 M{sub ☉}) SNII.

  9. GSFC Contributions to the NATO X-ray Astronomy Institute, Erice, July 1979. [X-ray spectra of supernova remants, galactic X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of X-ray astronomical spectroscopy in general is presented and results obtained by HEAO 1 and 2 as well as earlier spacecraft are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the spectra of supernova remnants; galactic binary X-ray sources, cataclysmic variables, bulges, pulsars, and stars; the active nuclei of Seyfert 1 galaxy, BL Lac, and quasars; the diffuse X-ray background; and galactic clusters.

  10. CRPropa 2.0 - A public framework for propagating high energy nuclei, secondary gamma rays and neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz; Kulbartz, Jörg; Maccione, Luca; Nierstenhoefer, Nils; Schiffer, Peter; Sigl, Günter; van Vliet, Arjen René

    2013-02-01

    Version 2.0 of CRPropa [CRPropa is published under the 3rd version of the GNU General Public License (GPLv3). It is available, together with a detailed documentation of the code, at https://crpropa.desy.de.] is public software to model the extra-galactic propagation of ultra-high energy nuclei of atomic number Z⩽26 through structured magnetic fields and ambient photon backgrounds taking into account all relevant particle interactions. CRPropa covers the energy range 7×1016rays and neutrinos which allows the study of their link with the charged primary nuclei - the so called multi-messenger connection. After a general introduction we present several sample applications of current interest concerning the physics of extragalactic ultra-high energy radiation.

  11. Persistent after-effects of heavy rain on concentrations of ice nuclei and rainfall suggest a biological cause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigg, E. K.; Soubeyrand, S.; Morris, C. E.

    2015-03-01

    Rainfall is one of the most important aspects of climate, but the extent to which atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) influence its formation, quantity, frequency, and location is not clear. Microorganisms and other biological particles are released following rainfall and have been shown to serve as efficient IN, in turn impacting cloud and precipitation formation. Here we investigated potential long-term effects of IN on rainfall frequency and quantity. Differences in IN concentrations and rainfall after and before days of large rainfall accumulation (i.e., key days) were calculated for measurements made over the past century in southeastern and southwestern Australia. Cumulative differences in IN concentrations and daily rainfall quantity and frequency as a function of days from a key day demonstrated statistically significant increasing logarithmic trends (R2 > 0.97). Based on observations that cumulative effects of rainfall persisted for about 20 days, we calculated cumulative differences for the entire sequence of key days at each site to create a historical record of how the differences changed with time. Comparison of pre-1960 and post-1960 sequences most commonly showed smaller rainfall totals in the post-1960 sequences, particularly in regions downwind from coal-fired power stations. This led us to explore the hypothesis that the increased leaf surface populations of IN-active bacteria due to rain led to a sustained but slowly diminishing increase in atmospheric concentrations of IN that could potentially initiate or augment rainfall. This hypothesis is supported by previous research showing that leaf surface populations of the ice-nucleating bacterium Pseudomonas syringae increased by orders of magnitude after heavy rain and that microorganisms become airborne during and after rain in a forest ecosystem. At the sites studied in this work, aerosols that could have initiated rain from sources unrelated to previous rainfall events (such as power stations) would

  12. Prospects for further studies of effects of T-odd asymmetry in the emission of light particles in the polarized-neutron-induced ternary fission of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. A.; Gagarskii, A. M.; Guseva, I. S.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Gönnenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.

    2008-07-01

    Prospects for further studies of TRI and ROT effects of T-odd asymmetry in the emission of light particles in the ternary and binary fission of heavy nuclei that is induced by slow polarized neutrons are considered with a view to studying the mechanism for the formation of these effects and using them to get new information about fission dynamics. It is planned to investigate the dependence of the corresponding T-odd-asymmetry coefficients on the main characteristics of the fission reaction.

  13. Directional distributions of beta-rays emitted from polarized 60Co nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirovsky, L. M.; Lee, W. P.; Sabbas, A. M.; Groves, J. L.; Wu, C. S.

    1980-07-01

    The 60Co nuclei in a thin permendur foil were polarized by a pair of orthogonal magnetic flux loops at ultralow temperatures. The observed angular distribution and the asymmetry factor ( Aexp = -1.01 ± 0.02) are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions of (1 + α cos θ) dependence and Atheory = -1.0.

  14. Nonthermal electron-positron pair production and the 'universal' X-ray spectrum of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.; Lightman, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    A nonthermal model for power-law X-ray and gamma-ray sources is considered. An initial, primary distribution of relativistic electrons is injected and cooled via Compton scattering of soft photons (produced either externally or by the synchrotron mechanism). The scattered photons, constituting a primary gamma-ray source, produce electron-positron pairs that act as a secondary electron injection, which in turn produce a secondary photon spectrum. Pairs formed by a part of the photon spectrum optically thin to pair production are taken into account. The distribution of particles and photons is obtained, and numerical results as well as analytical solutions to certain special cases are presented. For the case of a delta-function primary electron injection it is found that the photon spectrum in the X-ray region is well approximated by a power law, with the energy spectral index alpha(X) lying in the relatively narrow range 0.5-0.9 as the compactness parameter L(x)/R (where L(x) is the X-ray luminosity and R is the source radius) varies over many orders of magnitude. This is proposed as a possible mechanism to explain the universal X-ray spectra observed from active galactic nuclei.

  15. Optical Counterparts of Undetermined Type γ-Ray Active Galactic Nuclei with Blazar-Like Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mura, Giovanni; Chiaro, Graziano; Ciroi, Stefano; Rafanelli, Piero; Salvetti, David; Berton, Marco; Cracco, Valentina

    2015-12-01

    During its first four years of scientific observations, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) detected 3033 γ-ray sources above a 4 σ significance level. Although most of the extra-galactic sources are active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the blazar class, other families of AGNs are observed too, while a still high fraction of detections (˜30%) remains with uncertain association or classification. According to the currently accepted interpretation, the AGN γ-ray emission arises from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of low energy photons by relativistic particles confined in a jet, which, in the case of blazars, is oriented very close to our line-of-sight. Taking advantage of data from radio and X-ray wavelengths, which we expect to be produced together with γ-rays, providing a much better source localization potential, we focused our attention on a sample of γ-ray Blazar Candidates of Undetermined type (BCUs), starting a campaign of optical spectroscopic observations. The main aims of our investigation include a census of the AGN families that contribute to γ-ray emission and a study of their redshift distribution, with the subsequent implications on the intrinsic source power. We furthermore analyze which γ-ray properties can better constrain the nature of the source, thus helping in the study of objects not yet associated with a reliable low frequency counterpart. Here we report on the instruments and techniques used to identify the optical counterparts of γ-ray sources, we give an overview on the status of our work, and we discuss the implications of a large scale study of γ-ray emitting AGNs.

  16. NUCLEI AT HIGH ANGULAR MOMENTUM

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.; Stephens, F.S.

    1980-06-01

    It appears that most nuclei show a compromise between purely collective and purely non-collective behavior at very high spins.non~collective behavior in nuclei has been seen only as high as 36 or 37{bar h}, at which point a more collective structure seems to develop. The concepts underlying the study of high angular momentum states are discussed. The factors that limit angular momentum in nuclei are considered. The currently emerging state of physics of very high spin states is reviewed. The detailed calculations currently made for high spin states are described, focusing not on the calculations themselves, but on the physical input to them and results that come out. Production of high-spin states using heavy-ion reactions is reviewed. Studies of {gamma}-rays de-exciting the evaporation residues from heavy-ion reactions are covered. Two types of {gamma} rays occur: those that cool the nucleus to or toward the yrast line, called "statistical," and those that are more or less parallel to the yrast line and remove the angular momentum, called "yrast~like." Collective rotation, in simplest form the motion of a deformed nucleus around an axis perpendicular to its symmetry axis, is also covered.

  17. Survivability and Fusability in Reactions Leading to Heavy Nuclei in the Vicinity of the N = 126 Closed Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Sagaidak, Roman N.

    2009-08-26

    The macroscopic component of fission barriers for Po to Th nuclei around the N = 126 closed neutron shell has been derived within the framework of the analysis of available fission and evaporation residues excitation functions using the conventional barrier passing (fusion) model coupled with the standard statistical model and compared with the predictions of various theoretical models.

  18. The subarcsecond mid-infrared view of local active galactic nuclei - II. The mid-infrared-X-ray correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Gandhi, P.; Hönig, S. F.; Smette, A.; Duschl, W. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present an updated mid-infrared (MIR) versus X-ray correlation for the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) population based on the high angular resolution 12 and 18μm continuum fluxes from the AGN subarcsecond MIR atlas and 2-10 keV and 14-195 keV data collected from the literature. We isolate a sample of 152 objects with reliable AGN nature and multi-epoch X-ray data and minimal MIR contribution from star formation. Although the sample is not homogeneous or complete, we show that our results are unlikely to be affected by significant biases. The MIR-X-ray correlation is nearly linear and within a factor of 2 independent of the AGN type and the wavebands used. The observed scatter is <0.4 dex. A possible flattening of the correlation slope at the highest luminosities probed (˜1045 erg s-1) towards low MIR luminosities for a given X-ray luminosity is indicated but not significant. Unobscured objects have, on average, an MIR-X-ray ratio that is only ≤0.15 dex higher than that of obscured objects. Objects with intermediate X-ray column densities (22 < log NH < 23) actually show the highest MIR-X-ray ratio on average. Radio-loud objects show a higher mean MIR-X-ray ratio at low luminosities while the ratio is lower than average at high luminosities. This may be explained by synchrotron emission from the jet contributing to the MIR at low luminosities and additional X-ray emission at high luminosities. True Seyfert 2 candidates do not show any deviation from the general behaviour suggesting that they possess a dusty obscurer as in other AGN. Double AGN also do not deviate. Finally, we show that the MIR-X-ray correlation can be used to investigate the AGN nature of uncertain objects. Specifically, we give equations that allow us to determine the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosities and column densities for objects with complex X-ray properties to within 0.34 dex. These techniques are applied to the uncertain objects of the remaining AGN MIR atlas, demonstrating the

  19. Gamma-rays from Heavy Minimal Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Ibarra, Alejandro; Lamperstorfer, Anna S.; Tytgat, Michel H.G.

    2015-10-27

    Motivated by the Minimal Dark Matter scenario, we consider the annihilation into gamma rays of candidates in the fermionic 5-plet and scalar 7-plet representations of SU(2){sub L}, taking into account both the Sommerfeld effect and the internal bremsstrahlung. Assuming the Einasto profile, we show that present measurements of the Galactic Center by the H.E.S.S. instrument exclude the 5-plet and 7-plet as the dominant form of dark matter for masses between 1 TeV and 20 TeV, in particular, the 5-plet mass leading to the observed dark matter density via thermal freeze-out. We also discuss prospects for the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array, which will be able to probe even heavier dark matter masses, including the scenario where the scalar 7-plet is thermally produced.

  20. Production of secondary particles and nuclei in cosmic rays collisions with the interstellar gas using the FLUKA code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazziotta, M. N.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gaggero, D.; Loparco, F.; Sala, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    The measured fluxes of secondary particles produced by the interactions of Cosmic Rays (CRs) with the astronomical environment play a crucial role in understanding the physics of CR transport. In this work we present a comprehensive calculation of the secondary hadron, lepton, gamma-ray and neutrino yields produced by the inelastic interactions between several species of stable or long-lived cosmic rays projectiles (p, D, T, 3He, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10Be, 10B, 11B, 12C, 13C, 14C, 14N, 15N, 16O, 17O, 18O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si) and different target gas nuclei (p, 4He, 12C, 14N, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, 28Si and 40Ar). The yields are calculated using FLUKA, a simulation package designed to compute the energy distributions of secondary products with large accuracy in a wide energy range. The present results provide, for the first time, a complete and self-consistent set of all the relevant inclusive cross sections regarding the whole spectrum of secondary products in nuclear collisions. We cover, for the projectiles, a kinetic energy range extending from 0.1 GeV/n up to 100 TeV/n in the lab frame. In order to show the importance of our results for multi-messenger studies about the physics of CR propagation, we evaluate the propagated spectra of Galactic secondary nuclei, leptons, and gamma rays produced by the interactions of CRs with the interstellar gas, exploiting the numerical codes DRAGON and GammaSky. We show that, adopting our cross section database, we are able to provide a good fit of a complete sample of CR observables, including: leptonic and hadronic spectra measured at Earth, the local interstellar spectra measured by Voyager, and the gamma-ray emissivities from Fermi-LAT collaboration. We also show a set of gamma-ray and neutrino full-sky maps and spectra.

  1. Active galactic nuclei, neutrinos, and interacting cosmic rays in NGC 253 and NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Gallagher III, J. S.; Everett, John E.

    2014-01-10

    The galaxies M82, NGC 253, NGC 1068, and NGC 4945 have been detected in γ-rays by Fermi. Previously, we developed and tested a model for cosmic-ray interactions in the starburst galaxy M82. Now, we aim to explore the differences between starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) environments by applying our self-consistent model to the starburst galaxy NGC 253 and the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. Assuming a constant cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency by supernova remnants with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations, predict the radio and γ-ray spectra, and compare with published measurements. We find that our models easily fit the observed γ-ray spectrum for NGC 253 while constraining the cosmic-ray source spectral index and acceleration efficiency. However, we encountered difficultly modeling the observed radio data and constraining the speed of the galactic wind and the magnetic field strength, unless the gas mass is less than currently preferred values. Additionally, our starburst model consistently underestimates the observed γ-ray flux and overestimates the radio flux for NGC 1068; these issues would be resolved if the AGN is the primary source of γ-rays. We discuss the implications of these results and make predictions for the neutrino fluxes for both galaxies.

  2. Analysis of Flow Cytometry DNA Damage Response Protein Activation Kinetics Following X-rays and High Energy Iron Nuclei Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Universities Space Research Association; Chappell, Lori J.; Whalen, Mary K.; Gurai, Sheena; Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janice M.

    2010-12-15

    We developed a mathematical method to analyze flow cytometry data to describe the kinetics of {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 phosphorylations ensuing various qualities of low dose radiation in normal human fibroblast cells. Previously reported flow cytometry kinetic results for these DSB repair phospho-proteins revealed that distributions of intensity were highly skewed, severely limiting the detection of differences in the very low dose range. Distributional analysis reveals significant differences between control and low dose samples when distributions are compared using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Radiation quality differences are found in the distribution shapes and when a nonlinear model is used to relate dose and time to the decay of the mean ratio of phosphoprotein intensities of irradiated samples to controls. We analyzed cell cycle phase and radiation quality dependent characteristic repair times and residual phospho-protein levels with these methods. Characteristic repair times for {gamma}H2AX were higher following Fe nuclei as compared to X-rays in G1 cells (4.5 {+-} 0.46 h vs 3.26 {+-} 0.76 h, respectively), and in S/G2 cells (5.51 {+-} 2.94 h vs 2.87 {+-} 0.45 h, respectively). The RBE in G1 cells for Fe nuclei relative to X-rays for {gamma}H2AX was 2.05 {+-} 0.61 and 5.02 {+-} 3.47, at 2 h and 24-h postirradiation, respectively. For pATF2, a saturation effect is observed with reduced expression at high doses, especially for Fe nuclei, with much slower characteristic repair times (>7 h) compared to X-rays. RBEs for pATF2 were 0.66 {+-} 0.13 and 1.66 {+-} 0.46 at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. Significant differences in {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 levels comparing irradiated samples to control were noted even at the lowest dose analyzed (0.05 Gy) using these methods of analysis. These results reveal that mathematical models can be applied to flow cytometry data to uncover important and subtle differences following exposure to various qualities of low dose radiation.

  3. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: A COMPARISON WITH LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Jonathan; Chatterjee, Suchetana; Myers, Adam D.; Zheng Zheng; Hickox, Ryan E-mail: schatte1@uwyo.edu

    2013-09-10

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z {approx} 1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGNs in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z {approx} 1.2, we derive a median mass of 1.02{sub -0.23}{sup +0.21} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} h{sup -1} M{sub sun} for halos hosting central AGNs and an upper limit of {approx}10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5{sigma} level) that X-ray AGNs reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z {approx} 1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGNs is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests that AGN halo occupancy increases with increasing halo mass. We project the XMM-COSMOS 2PCF measurements to forecast the required survey parameters needed in future AGN clustering studies to enable higher precision HOD constraints and determinations of key physical parameters like the satellite fraction and duty cycle. We find that N {sup 2}/A {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2} (with N the number of AGNs in a survey area of A deg{sup 2}) is sufficient to constrain the HOD parameters at the 10% level, which is easily achievable by upcoming and proposed X-ray surveys.

  4. NUCLEAR AND HEAVY ION PHYSICS: α-decay half-lives of superheavy nuclei and general predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jian-Min; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Wang, Yan-Zhao; Zuo, Wei; Su, Xin-Ning; Li, Jun-Qing

    2009-08-01

    The generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) and the cluster model have been employed to calculate the α-decay half-lives of superheavy nuclei (SHN) using the experimental α-decay Q values. The results of the cluster model are slightly poorer than those from the GLDM if experimental Q values are used. The prediction powers of these two models with theoretical Q values from Audi et al. (QAudi) and Muntian et al. (QM) have been tested to find that the cluster model with QAudi and QM could provide reliable results for Z > 112 but the GLDM with QAudi for Z <= 112. The half-lives of some still unknown nuclei are predicted by these two models and these results may be useful for future experimental assignment and identification.

  5. Gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-rays and heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Roy, D; Guida, P; Zhou, G; Echiburu-Chau, C; Calaf, G M

    2008-05-01

    Several genetic aberrations and gene expression changes have been shown to occur when cells are exposed to various types of radiation. The integrity of DNA depends upon several processes that include DNA damage recognition and repair, replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Ionizing radiation has many sources, including radon decay from the soil and X-rays from medical practice. Epidemiological evidence indicates a risk for cancer by inducing genetic alterations through DNA damage, and molecular alterations have been reported in epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. A spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cell model, MCF-10F, was used to examine the gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-ray and heavy ion exposure, by a cDNA expression array of DNA damage and repair genes. This cell line was exposed to 10, 50, 100 and 200 cGy of either X-rays or heavy ions and gene expression profiles were studied. Results indicated that out of a total of 161 genes, 38 were differentially expressed by X-ray treatment and 24 by heavy ion (Fe(+2)) treatment. Eight genes were common to both treatments and were confirmed by Northern blot analysis: BRCA1, BIRC2/CIAP1, CENP-E, DDB1, MRE11A, RAD54/ATRX, Wip1 and XPF/ERCC4. A number of candidate genes reported here may be useful molecular biomarkers of radiation exposure in breast cells. PMID:18425356

  6. Ionized absorbers, ionized emitters, and the X-ray spectrum of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai

    1993-01-01

    Broad absorption features are common in the X-ray spectrum of low-luminosity AGNs. The features have been modeled by leaky neutral absorbers or by highly ionized gas that completely occult the continuum source. Such models are incomplete since they do not take into account all the physical processes in the gas. In particular, no previous model included the X-ray emission by the ionized absorbing gas and the reflection of the continuum source radiation. The present work discusses the emission, absorption, and reflection properties of photoionized gases with emphasis on conditions thought to prevail in AGNs. It shows that such gas is likely to produce intense X-ray line and continuum radiation and to reflect a sizable fraction of the nonstellar continuum at all energies. If such gas is indeed responsible for the observed X-ray absorption, then absorption edges are much weaker than commonly assumed, and some residual X-ray continuum is likely to be observed even if the line of sight is completely blocked. Moreover, X-ray emission features may show up in sources not showing X-ray absorption. This has immense consequences for medium-resolution X-ray missions, such as BBXRT and Astro-D, and for the planned high-resolution experiments on board XMM and AXAF.

  7. Galactic cosmic ray composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment is given of the galactic cosmic ray source (GCRS) elemental composition and its correlation with first ionization potential. The isotopic composition of heavy nuclei; spallation cross sections; energy spectra of primary nuclei; electrons; positrons; local galactic reference abundances; comparison of solar energetic particles and solar coronal compositions; the hydrogen; lead; nitrogen; helium; and germanium deficiency problems; and the excess of elements are among the topics covered.

  8. X-ray refelection from photoionized media in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zycki, Piotr T.; Krolik, Julian H.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Kallman, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the spectrum of X-ray radiation and reprocessed by a partly ionized optically thick medium in an active galactic nucleus. We self-consistently calculate the ionization balance and thermal balance in the medium along with the distribution of X-ray intensity with optical depth. In addition to absorption or scattering of the incident X-rays, we also compute the spectrum of X-rays emitted by the material, including lines, edges, and bremsstrahlung. The albedo of the medium depends primarily on the X-ray ionization parameter (ratio of incident flux to gas density, zeta(sub Chi), and secondarily on the UV flux generated by dissipation inside the disk; we locate the critical range of zeta(sub Chi) over which the albedo increases from small to nearly unity. While the continuum reflection is very weak below 10 keV when zeta(sub Chi) is small, significnat fluxes are emitted in atomic lines and edges in this energy range. In the limit of large zeta(sub Chi), the albedo below 10 keV increases, but reflection in this band is never gray: some photoelectric absorption remains up to rather large values of zeta(sub Chi), while at still higher values, inverse Compton scattering amplifies the soft X-ray flux. These features are sufficiently sharp that current and near-future X-ray experiments should permit diagnostic measures of zeta(sub Chi).

  9. Cosmic ray measurements of light and medium nuclei using a new telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Kish, J. C.; Lezniak, J. A.; Simpson, G.; Webber, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Three separate balloon flights provided with a new multielement cosmic ray telescope are used to collect data on the isotopic composition of cosmic rays of Z equals 3 to 10 in the energy range 150-450 MeV/nuc. The discussion covers Li, Be, B, C, N, and O. The data on Ne is a new finding that suggests a possible enhancement of Ne-22 in cosmic rays relative to the normally accepted universal abundances. Other data are presented which directly verify the expected geomagnetic cutoff effects on isotopes characterized by different charge-to-mass ratio.

  10. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A

  11. Population and decay of superdeformed nuclei probed by discrete and quasi-continuum γ-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Martens, A.; Lauritsen, T.; Leoni, S.; Døssing, T.; Khoo, T. L.; Siem, S.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear superdeformation at high spin was discovered a little over 30 years ago. Since then, a large body of data has been collected on the subject and many new and interesting phenomena have been discovered. In particular, the way superdeformed states are populated and depopulated offers a unique laboratory to study rotational motion as a function of excitation energy and the evolution of nuclear structure over a large interval in energy and spin. This article focuses on the experimental techniques and methods developed to study the quasicontinuous spectra of gamma rays emitted by rapidly rotating superdeformed nuclei and presents the results regarding rotational damping, the transition from ordered to chaotic motion and quantum tunnelling in a complex environment.

  12. An instrument to measure the spectrum of cosmic ray iron and other nuclei to above 100 GeV-nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, J. F.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    A balloon-borne detector system for extending the study of cosmic ray composition to the energy region beyond 100 GeV/nucleon is described. The instrument incorporates an ionization calorimeter and a gas Cherenkov counter filled with freon for the determination of energies, and a charge module, consisting of scintillation and a lucite Cherenkov counter, for determining the charge of the incoming particle. The scintillators were utilized to determine the position of the incoming particle in addition to its charge. The characteristics of these detectors with respect to resolution, and the methods employed in laboratory calibration, cross-checks with flight data and actual performance in the flights are described in detail. Monte Carlo simulation of the ionization calorimeter and comparison of the response of the calorimeter and gas Cherenkov counter for complex nuclei was used to convert the observed calorimeter signal to absolute energy in a consistent manner.

  13. Chemical-shift tensors of heavy nuclei in network solids: a DFT/ZORA investigation of (207)Pb chemical-shift tensors using the bond-valence method.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Fahri; Dybowski, C

    2015-10-14

    Cluster models are used in calculation of (207)Pb NMR magnetic-shielding parameters of α-PbO, β-PbO, Pb3O4, Pb2SnO4, PbF2, PbCl2, PbBr2, PbClOH, PbBrOH, PbIOH, PbSiO3, and Pb3(PO4)2. We examine the effects of cluster size, method of termination of the cluster, charge on the cluster, introduction of exact exchange, and relativistic effects on calculation of magnetic-shielding tensors with density functional theory. Proper termination of the cluster for a network solid, including approximations such as compensation of charge by the bond-valence (BV) method, is essential to provide results that agree with experiment. The inclusion of relativistic effects at the spin-orbit level for such heavy nuclei is an essential factor in achieving agreement with experiment. PMID:26345261

  14. Cosmic rays and the emission line regions of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects that the synchrotron emitting relativistic electrons could have on the emission line regions which characterize active nuclei are discussed. Detailed models of both the inner, dense, broad line region and the outer, lower density, narrow line region are presented, together with the first models of the optically emitting gas often found within extended radio lobes. If the relativistic gas which produces the synchrotron radio emission is mixed with the emission line region gas then significant changes in the emission line spectrum will result. The effects of the synchrotron emitting electrons on filaments in the Crab Nebula are discussed in an appendix, along with a comparison between the experimental calculations, which employ the mean escape probability formalism, and recent Hubbard and Puetter models.

  15. Spin-lattice relaxation of heavy spin-1/2 nuclei in diamagnetic solids: A Raman process mediated by spin-rotation interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Alexander J.; Beckmann, Peter A.; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2006-12-01

    We present a theory for the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation of heavy spin-1/2 nuclei in solids, which explains within an order of magnitude the unexpectedly effective lead and thallium nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates observed in the ionic solids lead molybdate, lead chloride, lead nitrate, thallium nitrate, thallium nitrite, and thallium perchlorate. The observed rates are proportional to the square of the temperature and are independent of magnetic field. This rules out all known mechanisms usually employed to model nuclear spin relaxation in lighter spin-1/2 nuclei. The relaxation is caused by a Raman process involving the interactions between nuclear spins and lattice vibrations via a fluctuating spin-rotation magnetic field. The model places an emphasis on the time dependence of the angular velocity of pairs of adjacent atoms rather than on their angular momentum. Thus the spin-rotation interaction is characterized not in the traditional manner by a spin-rotation constant but by a related physical parameter, the magnetorotation constant, which relates the local magnetic field generated by spin rotation to an angular velocity. Our semiclassical relaxation model involves a frequency-mode description of the spectral density that can directly be related to the mean-square amplitudes and mode densities of lattice vibrations in the Debye model.

  16. LUMINOUS X-RAY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Koulouridis, E.; Plionis, M.

    2010-05-10

    We present a study of X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) overdensities in 16 Abell clusters, within the redshift range 0.073 < z < 0.279, in order to investigate the effect of the hot inter-cluster environment on the triggering of the AGN phenomenon. The X-ray AGN overdensities, with respect to the field expectations, were estimated for sources with L{sub x} {>=} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} (at the redshift of the clusters) and within an area of 1 h {sup -1} {sub 72} Mpc radius (excluding the core). To investigate the presence or absence of a true enhancement of luminous X-ray AGNs in the cluster area, we also derived the corresponding optical galaxy overdensities, using a suitable range of r-band magnitudes. We always find the latter to be significantly higher (and only in two cases roughly equal) with respect to the corresponding X-ray overdensities. Over the whole cluster sample, the mean X-ray point-source overdensity is a factor of {approx}4 less than that corresponding to bright optical galaxies, a difference which is significant at a >0.995 level, as indicated by an appropriate student's t-test. We conclude that the triggering of luminous X-ray AGNs in rich clusters is strongly suppressed. Furthermore, searching for optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey counterparts of all the X-ray sources, associated with our clusters, we found that about half appear to be background QSOs, while others are background and foreground AGNs or stars. The true overdensity of X-ray point sources, associated with the clusters, is therefore even smaller than what our statistical approach revealed.

  17. Screening heavy metals levels in hair of sanitation workers by X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Md Khudzari, Jauharah; Wagiran, Husin; Hossain, I; Ibrahim, Noorddin

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study of human hair as a bio-indicator for detection of heavy metals as part of environmental health surveillance programs project to develop a subject of interest in the biomedical and environmental sciences. A total of 34 hair samples were analyzed that consisting of 29 samples from sanitation workers and five samples from students. The hair samples were prepared and treated in accordance to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommendations. The concentrations of heavy metals were analyzed using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique by X-50 Mobile X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) at Oceanography Institute, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu. The performance of EDXRF analyzer was tested by Standard Reference Material (SRM 2711) Montana Soil which was in good agreement with certified value within 14% deviations except for Hg. While seven heavy metals: Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, and Sb were detected in both groups, three additional elements, i.e. As, Hg and Pb, were detected only in sanitation workers group. For sanitation workers group, the mean concentration of six elements, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, and Sb, shows elevated concentration as compared to the control samples concentration. Results from both groups were compared and discussed in relation to their respective heavy metals concentrations. PMID:22846873

  18. Host galaxy colour gradients and accretion disc obscuration in AEGIS z ~ 1 X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, C. M.; Lotz, J. M.; Salim, S.; Laird, E. S.; Coil, A. L.; Bundy, K.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Rosario, D. J. V.; Primack, J. R.; Faber, S. M.

    2010-10-01

    We describe the effect of active galactic nucleus (AGN) light on host galaxy optical and UV-optical colours, as determined from X-ray-selected AGN host galaxies at z ~ 1, and compare the AGN host galaxy colours to those of a control sample matched to the AGN sample in both redshift and stellar mass. We identify as X-ray-selected AGNs 8.7+4-3 per cent of the red-sequence control galaxies, 9.8 +/- 3 per cent of the blue-cloud control galaxies and 14.7+4-3 per cent of the green-valley control galaxies. The nuclear colours of AGN hosts are generally bluer than their outer colours, while the control galaxies exhibit redder nuclei. AGNs in blue-cloud host galaxies experience less X-ray obscuration, while AGNs in red-sequence hosts have more, which is the reverse of what is expected from general considerations of the interstellar medium. Outer and integrated colours of AGN hosts generally agree with the control galaxies, regardless of X-ray obscuration, but the nuclear colours of unobscured AGNs are typically much bluer, especially for X-ray luminous objects. Visible point sources are seen in many of these, indicating that the nuclear colours have been contaminated by AGN light and that obscuration of the X-ray radiation and visible light are therefore highly correlated. Red AGN hosts are typically slightly bluer than red-sequence control galaxies, which suggests that their stellar populations are slightly younger. We compare these colour data to current models of AGN formation. The unexpected trend of less X-ray obscuration in blue-cloud galaxies and more in red-sequence galaxies is problematic for all AGN feedback models, in which gas and dust is thought to be removed as star formation shuts down. A second class of models involving radiative instabilities in hot gas is more promising for red-sequence AGNs but predicts a larger number of point sources in red-sequence AGNs than is observed. Regardless, it appears that multiple AGN models are necessary to explain the

  19. Energetic Nuclei, Superdensity and Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldin, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    High-energy, relativistic nuclei were first observed in cosmic rays. Studing these nuclei has provided an opportunity for analyzing the composition of cosmic rays and for experimentally verifying principles governing the behavior of nuclear matter at high and super-high temperatures. Medical research using accelerated nuclei is suggested.…

  20. Transitional nuclei near shell closures

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, G.

    2014-08-14

    High spin states in Bismuth and Thallium nuclei near the Z = 82 shell closure and Cesium nuclei near the N = 82 shell closure in A = 190 and A = 130 regions, respectively, have been experimentally investigated using heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction and by detecting the gamma rays using the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Interesting shape properties in these transitional nuclei have been observed. The results were compared with the neighboring nuclei in these two regions. The total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations have been performed for a better understanding of the observed properties. In mass region A = 190, a change in shape from spherical to deformed has been observd around neutron number N = 112 for the Bi (Z = 83) isotopes with proton number above the magic gap Z = 82, whereas, the shape of Tl (Z = 81) isotopes with proton number below the magic gap Z = 82 remains stable as a function of neutron number. An important transition from aplanar to planar configuration of angular momentum vectors leading to the occurance of nuclar chirality and magnetic rotation, respectively, has been proposed for the unique parity πh{sub 11/2}⊗νh{sub 11/2} configuration in Cs isotopes in the mass region A ∼ 130 around neutron number N = 79. These results are in commensurate with the TRS calculations.

  1. Energy spectra of cosmic-ray nuclei from 50 to 2000 GeV per amu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunsfeld, John M.; L'Heureux, Jacques; Meyer, Peter; Muller, Dietrich; Swordy, Simon P.

    1988-01-01

    A direct measurement of the elemental composition of cosmic rays up to energies of several TeV/amu was performed during the Spacelab 2 flight of the Space Shuttle. Results on the spectral shape for the elements C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe, obtained from this experiment, are presented. It was found that the C and O energy spectra retain a power-law spectrum in energy with an exponent Gamma of about 2.65. The Fe spectrum is flatter (Gamma of about 2.55) up to a particle energy of about 10 to the 14th eV, indicating a steady increase in the relative abundance of iron in cosmic rays up to this energy. The energy spectra of Ne, Mg, and Si are steeper than anticipated. This behavior is unexpected within current models of cosmic-ray acceleration.

  2. Thermonuclear breakup reactions of light nuclei. II - Gamma-ray line production and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guessoum, Nidhal

    1989-01-01

    The main consequence of nuclear breakup reactions in high-temperature plasmas is shown to be to reduce the production of the gamma-ray lines, due to the breakup of these species at high temperature. Results of the emissivities of all the relevant gamma-ray lines are discussed. It is shown that the magnitude of the breakup effect on the line emissivities depends strongly on temperature, but more importantly on the plasma density and on the available time for the ion processes. Other effects considered include the production of neutrons (from the breakup of helium) and its consequences (such as the production of gamma rays from n-capture reactions and dynamical effects in accretion disk plasmas).

  3. The effects of newly measured cross sections in hydrogen on the production of secondary nuclei during the propagation of cosmic rays through interstellar H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Gupta, M.; Koch-Miramond, L.; Masse, P.

    1985-01-01

    The cross sections of six important cosmic ray source nuclei in hydrogen at several energies between 300 and 1800 MeV/nuc were measured. Significant differences, sometimes exceeding 50%, exist between these new measurements and the earlier semiempirical predictions, and a new set of semiempirical formulae are being determined that better describe this fragmentation. New cross sections were obtained so that the systematics of their effects on cosmic ray propagation through interstellar hydrogen can be examined.

  4. The Discovery of X-ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Back in 1974 the UHURU catalog (3U) had been published with many UHGLS - unidentified high galactic latitude sources. Identifications were hampered by the square degree sized error boxes (positional uncertainties). Could these explain the cosmic X-ray background? Could UHGLS be "X-ray galaxies"? Only three active galaxies (AGNs) had been found as X-ray sources: 3C273, Cen A and NGC 4151, while others had upper limits. What was the difference between X-ray and non-X-ray AGNs? It turned out that the slightly better positioning capability and slightly deeper sensitivity of the Ariel V Sky Survey Instrument (SSI), launched in October 1974, were just enough to show that the UHGLS were Seyfert galaxies. And I was lucky enough that I'd joined the Leicester X-ray group and had taken on the UHGLS for my PhD thesis, with Ken Pounds as my supervisor. With the SSI we made a catalog of high latitude sources, the "2A" catalog, including about a dozen known Seyfert galaxies (lowish luminosity nearby AGNs) and, with Mike Penston and Martin Ward, we went on to identify many of them with both newly discovered normal broad emission line AGNs and a few new "narrow emission line galaxies", or NELGs, as we called them. We are now convinced that it is summation of many obscured NELGs that produce the flat spectrum of the X-ray background, and we are still searching for them in Chandra deep surveys and at higher energies with NuSTAR. There was an obvious connection between the X-ray obscuration and the optical reddening, which must lie outside the region emitting the broad optical spectral lines. Andy Lawrence and I, following a clue from Bill Keel, put this together into what we now call the Unified Scheme for AGN structure. This idea of a flattened torus obscuring the inner regions of the AGN was so dramatically confirmed a few years later -- by Ski Antonucci and Joe Miller's discovery of polarized broad emission lines in NGC1068 -- that the precursor papers became irrelevant. But Ariel

  5. X-ray Spectroscopy of Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei with XMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiMatteo, Tiziana; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of black hole masses in nearby galaxies has transformed our understanding of these systems, allowing us to quantify the relevant scales of power, length and time and explore how the activity of black holes is linked to their environments and to the evolution of their host galaxies. In this project, Dr. Tiziana Di Matteo has the primary responsibility for developing and investigating theoretical models for the origin of the X-ray emission observed in low-luminosity AGN. Dr. Di Matteo has been involved in interpreting X-ray data and assessing accretion models throughout the project.

  6. Diffusivity measurement of heavy ions in Wyoming montmorillonite gels by X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoshito

    2003-03-01

    Medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) was applied to the measurement of the diffusion coefficients of heavy ions in an artificial barrier material for the disposal of nuclear wastes. Cs(+), Sr(2+), I(-), and Br(-) are the heavy ions measured and the barrier used is the water-rich gel of Wyoming montmorillonite (86.5-100 wt.% H(2)O). X-ray CT yields an inevitable artifact (beam-hardening) in the obtained images. Before the diffusion experiments, the polychromatic primary X-ray spectrum of the CT scanner was measured by a CdZnTe detector, and the effects of the artifact were examined for an aqueous CsCl solution sample. The results show that the beam-hardening artifact derived from the polychromatic photon energy distribution can be suppressed by applying a special image reconstruction method assuming the chemical composition of samples. The transient one-dimensional diffusion of heavy ions in a plastic container filled with the gel was imaged nondestructively by the X-ray CT scanner with an in-plane resolution of 0.31 mm and slice thickness of 2 mm. The results show that diffusivities decrease with increasing clay weight fraction. The degree of the diffusivity decrease was high for cations (Cs(+) and Sr(2+)) and low for anions (I(-) and Br(-)). The quantitative decomposition of the contribution of the geometrical tortuosity and of the sorption to the diffusivity was performed by subtracting the diffusivity of nonsorbing I(-) from the measured diffusivities. The results show that the contribution of the sorption is large for Cs(+), Sr(2+) and small for Br(-). Because X-ray CT allows nondestructive and quick measurements of diffusivities, the technique would be useful particularly for measuring the diffusive migration of harmful radioactive elements. PMID:12598101

  7. The Radio/Gamma-Ray Connection in Active Galactic Nuclei in the Era of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Angelakis, E.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; MeEnery, J. E.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of the correlation between radio and gamma-ray emission of the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by Fermi during its first year of operation, with the largest data sets ever used for this purpose.We use both archival interferometric 8.4 GHz data (from the Very Large Array and ATCA, for the full sample of 599 sources) and concurrent single-dish 15 GHz measurements from the OwensValley RadioObservatory (OVRO, for a sub sample of 199 objects). Our unprecedentedly large sample permits us to assess with high accuracy the statistical significance of the correlation, using a surrogate data method designed to simultaneously account for common-distance bias and the effect of a limited dynamical range in the observed quantities. We find that the statistical significance of a positive correlation between the centimeter radio and the broadband (E > 100 MeV) gamma-ray energy flux is very high for the whole AGN sample, with a probability of <10(exp -7) for the correlation appearing by chance. Using the OVRO data, we find that concurrent data improve the significance of the correlation from 1.6 10(exp -6) to 9.0 10(exp -8). Our large sample size allows us to study the dependence of correlation strength and significance on specific source types and gamma-ray energy band. We find that the correlation is very significant (chance probability < 10(exp -7)) for both flat spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects separately; a dependence of the correlation strength on the considered gamma-ray energy band is also present, but additional data will be necessary to constrain its significance.

  8. The X-ray view of radio-loud active galactic nuclei: The central engine and its environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Davide

    The non-thermal emission from many Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is obscured by optically thick circumnuclear matter, particularly at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. In radio-loud (RL) sources, the AGN activity is coupled with the presence of a bipolar jet that emit radio through g-ray light which is relativistically beamed along the jet axes. The combination of absorption and beaming produces highly anisotropic radiation. The understanding of the origin and magnitude of this radiation allows astronomers to unify different classes of AGN; that is, to identify each single, underlying AGN type that gives rise to different classes through different orientations with respect to the jet axis. This is the fundamental notion behind what are called "unification models" of AGN. Although this general idea is well accepted, many aspects remain matter of debate. In fact, the explanation of the wide and complex variety of AGN phenomena must be searched in a combination of apparent differences (like orientation) and real differences in a number of physical parameters (like gas/dust content and distribution, luminosity, etc.). The goal of this thesis is to address some of the RL unification open questions using X-ray data. The improved sensitivity and angular resolution of a new generation of satellites, combined with the fact that X-rays provide useful information on a variety of AGN phenomena, will allow me to: (1) Study the broadband X-ray continua of BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) and Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs); (2) Probe the emission from the very inner region of an AGN; (3) Determine the presence and characteristic of extended X-ray emission from the AGN environment. The results obtained from theses studies will provide me insights into (1) the X-ray average spectral properties of BL Lacs and FSRQs and the physical processes responsible of the emission; (2) the presence of the obscuring torus and the amount of absorption, (3) the nature of X-ray emission, and (4

  9. Scientific Drivers for X-Ray Polarimetry Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei and Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshtipour, Banafsheh

    2016-04-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations promise to give us insights into the structure of the the accretion flows and collimated outflows (jets) of mass accreting supermassive black holes. In this talk, I will present results from general relativistic ray tracing studies showing that the spectropolarimetric observations of bright Seyfert galaxies give information that is complimentary to that from Fe K-alpha line and Compton reflection hump spectroscopy. Combining polarimetric with spectral and timing results will allow us to pin down the physical properties of the accretion disk and corona with higher accuracy and with smaller systematic uncertainties. The X-ray polarimetric observations of blazars (mass accreting supermassive black holes with jets aligned with the line of sight) will allow us to study the structure of the magnetic field inside the jets (and thus to constrain the jet launching mechanism) in high synchrotron peaked blazars, and to identify and constrain the emission mechanism responsible for the X-ray to gamma-ray emission in low and intermediate synchrotron peaked blazars.

  10. Radiation pressure acceleration by X-rays in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelouche, Doron; Netzer, Hagai

    2001-09-01

    We present calculations of the dynamics of highly ionized gas (HIG) clouds that are confined by external pressure, and are photoionized by AGN continuum. We focus on the gas that is seen, in absorption, in the X-ray spectrum of many AGN and show that such gas can reach hydrostatic equilibrium under various conditions. The principal conclusion is that the clouds can be accelerated to high velocities by the central X-ray source. The dynamical problem can be reduced to the calculation of a single parameter, the average force multiplier, . The typical value of is ~10 suggesting that radiation pressure acceleration by X-rays is efficient for L/LEdd>~0.1. The terminal velocity scales with the escape velocity at the base of the flow and can exceed it by a large factor. The typical velocity for a HIG flow that originates at R=1017cm in a source with Lx=1044ergs-1 is ~1000kms-1, i.e. similar to the velocities observed in several X-ray and UV absorption systems. Highly ionized AGN clouds are driven mainly by bound-free absorption, and bound-bound processes are less important unless the lines are significantly broadened or the column density is very small. Pressure laws that result in constant or outward decreasing ionization parameters are most effective in accelerating the flow.

  11. HARD X-RAY LAGS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: TESTING THE DISTANT REVERBERATION HYPOTHESIS WITH NGC 6814

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Uttley, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2013-11-10

    We present an X-ray spectral and temporal analysis of the variable active galaxy NGC 6814, observed with Suzaku during 2011 November. Remarkably, the X-ray spectrum shows no evidence for the soft excess commonly observed amongst other active galaxies, despite its relatively low level of obscuration, and is dominated across the whole Suzaku bandpass by the intrinsic powerlaw-like continuum. Despite this, we clearly detect the presence of a low-frequency hard lag of ∼1600 s between the 0.5-2.0 and 2.0-5.0 keV energy bands at greater than 6σ significance, similar to those reported in the literature for a variety of other active galactic nuclei (AGNs). At these energies, any additional emission from, e.g., a very weak, undetected soft excess, or from distant reflection must contribute less than 3% of the observed countrates (at 90% confidence). Given the lack of any significant continuum emission component other than the powerlaw, we can rule out models that invoke distant reprocessing for the observed lag behavior, which must instead be associated with this continuum emission. These results are fully consistent with a propagating fluctuation origin for the low-frequency hard lags, and with the interpretation of the high-frequency soft lags—a common feature seen in the highest quality AGN data with strong soft excesses—as reverberation from the inner accretion disk.

  12. On different types of instabilities in black hole accretion discs: implications for X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiuk, Agnieszka; Czerny, Bożena

    2011-07-01

    We discuss two important instability mechanisms that may lead to the limit-cycle oscillations of the luminosity of the accretion discs around compact objects: ionization instability and radiation pressure instability. Ionization instability is well established as a mechanism of X-ray novae eruptions in black hole binary systems, but its applicability to active galactic nuclei (AGN) is still problematic. Radiation pressure theory has still a very weak observational background in any of these sources. In this paper, we attempt to confront the parameter space of these instabilities with the observational data. At the basis of this simple survey of sources properties, we argue that the radiation pressure instability is likely to be present in several Galactic sources with the Eddington ratios being above 0.15 and in AGN with the Eddington ratio above 0.025. Our results favour the parametrization of the viscosity through the geometrical mean of the radiation and gas pressure in both Galactic sources and AGN. More examples of the quasi-regular outbursts in the time-scales of 100 s in Galactic sources and hundreds of years in AGN are needed to formulate firm conclusions. We also show that the disc sizes in the X-ray novae are consistent with the ionization instability. This instability may also considerably influence the lifetime cycle and overall complexity in the supermassive black hole environment.

  13. Fermi-LAT γ-ray anisotropy and intensity explained by unresolved radio-loud active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, Mattia Di; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M. E-mail: alessandro.cuoco@to.infn.it E-mail: jsg@tapir.caltech.edu

    2014-11-01

    Radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) are expected to contribute substantially to both the intensity and anisotropy of the isotropic γ-ray background (IGRB). In turn, the measured properties of the IGRB can be used to constrain the characteristics of proposed contributing source classes. We consider individual subclasses of radio-loud AGN, including low-, intermediate-, and high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and misaligned AGN. Using updated models of the γ-ray luminosity functions of these populations, we evaluate the energy-dependent contribution of each source class to the intensity and anisotropy of the IGRB. We find that collectively radio-loud AGN can account for the entirety of the IGRB intensity and anisotropy as measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Misaligned AGN provide the bulk of the measured intensity but a negligible contribution to the anisotropy, while high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects provide the dominant contribution to the anisotropy. In anticipation of upcoming measurements with the Fermi-LAT and the forthcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array, we predict the anisotropy in the broader energy range that will be accessible to future observations.

  14. The hard X-ray luminosity function of high-redshift (3 < z ≲ 5) active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Iwasawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) of 0.5-2 keV band selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshift. We have assembled a sample of 141 AGN at 3 < z ≲ 5 from X-ray surveys of different size and depth, in order to sample different regions in the LX - z plane. The HXLF is fitted in the range log LX ˜ 43-45 with standard analytical evolutionary models through a maximum likelihood procedure. The evolution of the HXLF is well described by a pure density evolution, with the AGN space density declining by a factor of ˜10 from z = 3 to 5. A luminosity-dependent density evolution model, which, normally, best represents the HXLF evolution at lower redshift, is also consistent with the data, but a larger sample of low-luminosity (log LX < 44), high-redshift AGN is necessary to constrain this model. We also estimated the intrinsic fraction of AGN obscured by a column density log NH ≥ 23 to be 0.54 ± 0.05, with no strong dependence on luminosity. This fraction is higher than the value in the Local Universe, suggesting an evolution of the luminous (LX > 1044 erg s-1) obscured AGN fraction from z = 0 to z > 3.

  15. SCATTERED X-RAYS IN OBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOMETRICAL STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, Kazuhisa; Terashima, Yuichi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Ishino, Yukiko; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koss, Michael

    2010-03-01

    We construct a new sample of 32 obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue to investigate their multiwavelength properties in relation to the 'scattering fraction', the ratio of the soft X-ray flux to the absorption-corrected direct emission. The sample covers a broad range of the scattering fraction ({approx}0.1%-10%). A quarter of the 32 AGNs have a very low scattering fraction (<= 0.5%), which suggests that they are buried in a geometrically thick torus with a very small opening angle. We investigate correlations between the scattering fraction and multiwavelength properties. We find that AGNs with a small scattering fraction tend to have low [O III]lambda5007/X-ray luminosity ratios. This result agrees with the expectation that the extent of the narrow-line region is small because of the small opening angle of the torus. There is no significant correlation between scattering fraction and far-infrared luminosity. This implies that a scale height of the torus is not primarily determined by starburst activity. We also compare scattering fraction with black hole mass or Eddington ratio and find a weak anti-correlation between the Eddington ratio and scattering fraction. This implies that more rapidly growing supermassive black holes tend to have thicker tori.

  16. Variability of the X-ray broad iron spectral features in active galactic nuclei and black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, M.; Ebisawa, K.; Tsujimoto, M.; Inoue, H.

    2016-05-01

    The ``broad iron spectral features'' are often seen in X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and black-hole binaries (BHB). These features may be explained either by the ``relativistic disc reflection'' scenario or the ``partial covering'' scenario: It is hardly possible to determine which model is valid from time-averaged spectral analysis. Thus, X-ray spectral variability has been investigated to constrain spectral models. To that end, it is crucial to study iron structure of BHBs in detail at short time-scales, which is, for the first time, made possible with the Parallel-sum clocking (P-sum) mode of XIS detectors on board of Suzaku. This observational mode has a time-resolution of 7.8 ms as well as a CCD energy-resolution. We have carried out systematic calibration of the P-sum mode, and investigated spectral variability of the BHB GRS 1915+105. Consequently, we found that the spectral variability of GRS 1915+105 does not show iron features at sub-seconds. This is totally different from variability of AGN such as 1H0707-495, where the variation amplitude significantly drops at the iron K-energy band. This difference can be naturally explained in the framework of the ``partial covering'' scenario.

  17. Heavy primary spectra observed by RUNJOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apanasenko, A. V.; Beresovskaya, V. A.; Fujii, M.; Galkin, V. I.; Hareyama, M.; Ichimura, M.; Ito, S.; Kamioka, E.; Kitami, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Kopenkin, V. V.; Kuramata, S.; Kuriyama, T.; Lapshin, V. I.; Managadze, A. K.; Matsutani, H.; Mikami, H.; Misnikova, N. P.; Mukhamedshin, R. A.; Namiki, M.; Nanjo, H.; Nazarov, S. N.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Oe, T.; Ohta, S.; Osedlo, V. I.; Oshuev, D. S.; Publichenko, P. A.; Rakobolskaya, I. V.; Roganova, T. M.; Saito, M.; Sazhina, G. P.; Semba, H.; Shabanova, Yu. N.; Shibata, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Sveshnikova, L. G.; Takahashi, K.; Tsutiya, T.; Taran, V. M.; Yajima, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Yashin, I. V.; Zamchalova, E. A.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2001-08-01

    RUssian Nippon JOint Balloon (RUNJOB) has been observing the primary spectra of cosmic ray nuclei since 1995. Data from 6 out of 10 succesful flights will be used to report the spectra of heavy primaries up to iron nucleus with the energy range more than 1014 eV/particle. The details of analysis like charge and energy determinations will be also given.

  18. X-ray color analysis of the spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai; Turner, T. J.; George, Ian M.

    1994-01-01

    The identification and detection of X-ray absorption and emission features depends on the resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the observation, the understanding of the instrument response, and the Galactic line-of-sight absorption. Since many of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) data sets are limited in their S/N and full modeling of the physical conditions is rather complicated, we suggest a new analysis method based on 'X-ray colors.' The two sets of X-ray colors, defined for low (ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC)) and medium (Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT)) and ASCA Solid-State Imaging Spectrometers (SIS) resolution experiments, are used to separate regions of different physical conditions in a two-dimensional color-color plane. They are similar but superior to previous methods using the X-ray 'hardness ratio' in being able to reveal more of the physical properties of the source. We illustrate the use of such diagrams by studying a number of AGNs suspected of showing absorption features. A sample of 14 AGNs observed by the ROSAT PSPC is presented which includes several objects with suspected 'warm absorbers' along the line-of-sight to the nucleus, several others exhibiting intrinsic continuum variations, and a number of control objects thought to be featureless. Our new observations show, for the first time, the color variation as a function of time for three of the Seyfert 1 sources: NGC 4051, Mrk 335, and Mrk 766. The variations suggest that in two sources we are witnessing real changes in continuum shape, while one (NGC 4051) is consistent with having a warm absorber. Four of the objects observed by BBXRT are reanalyzed using our X-ray colors. Out of these, we discuss in detail the case of NGC 4151 and show that the color-color analysis agrees very well with previous, detailed spectral fitting methods. In particular, we confirm that the observed BBXRT observation of this source is not consistent with the warm absorber

  19. Towards a Faddeev-AGS description of (d, p) reactions with heavy nuclei: Regularizing integrals with Coulomb functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremenko, V.; Hlophe, L.; Elster, Ch.; Nunes, F. M.; Thompson, I. J.; Arbanas, G.; Escher, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    The repulsive Coulomb force poses severe challenges when describing (d, p) reactions for highly charged nuclei as a three-body problem. Casting Faddeev-AGS equations in a Coulomb basis avoids introducing screening of the Coulomb force. However, momentum space partial-wave t-matrix elements need to be evaluated in this basis. When those t-matrices are separable, the evaluation requires the folding of a form factor, depending on one momentum variable, with a momentum space partial-wave Coulomb function, which has a singular behavior at the external momentum q. We developed an improved regularization scheme to calculate Coulomb distorted form factors as the integral over the Coulomb function and complex nuclear form factors.

  20. ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF LIGHT NUCLEI IN COSMIC RAYS: RESULTS FROM AMS-01

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Berdugo, J.; Allaby, J.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Azzarello, P.; Battiston, R.; Anderhub, H.; Ao, L.; Arefiev, A.; Arruda, L.; Barao, F.; Barreira, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Berges, P.

    2011-08-01

    The variety of isotopes in cosmic rays allows us to study different aspects of the processes that cosmic rays undergo between the time they are produced and the time of their arrival in the heliosphere. In this paper, we present measurements of the isotopic ratios {sup 2}H/{sup 4}He, {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li/{sup 7}Li, {sup 7}Be/({sup 9}Be+{sup 10}Be), and {sup 10}B/{sup 11}B in the range 0.2-1.4 GeV of kinetic energy per nucleon. The measurements are based on the data collected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, AMS-01, during the STS-91 flight in 1998 June.

  1. Neutron-rich nuclei in cosmic rays and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prantzos, N.; Casse, M.; Arnould, M.; Arcoragi, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Wolf-Rayet stars figure prominently in astrophysical research. As a bonus, they seem to offer, in the recent past, an interesting connection between classical astronomy and high energy astrophysics due to their unusual composition and their huge mechanical power. The material flowing from WC stars (carbon-rich WR stars) contains gas which has been processed through core-helium burning, i.e., considerably enriched into 12C,16O, 22Ne, and 25,26Mg. This composition is reminiscent of the cosmic ray source anomalies. Encouraging agreement is obtained with observation in the mass range 12 A 26 assuming acceleration of wind particles at the shock that delineates the WR cavity, and adequate dilution with normal cosmic rays, but silicon poses.

  2. Composition and spectra of primary cosmic-ray electrons and nuclei above 10 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P.

    1975-01-01

    Recent experiments have extended the knowledge of the flux and energy spectra of individual cosmic-ray components to much higher energies than had previously been accessible. Both electron and nuclear components show a behavior at high energy which is unexpected, and which carries information regarding the sources and the propagation of particles between sources and observer. Electromagnetic interactions which are suffered by the electrons in interstellar space should steepen their spectrum, a steepening that would reveal the average lifetime a cosmic-ray particle spends in the galaxy. Measurements up to 1000 GeV show no such steepening. It was discovered that the composition of the nuclear species which is now measured up to 100 GeV/nucleon changes with energy. This change indicates traversal of less interstellar matter by the high energy particles than by those of lower energy.-

  3. X-ray reflection from cold matter in the nuclei of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Nandra, K.; Stewart, G. C.; George, I. M.; Fabian, A. C.

    1990-03-01

    The discovery of continuum absorption and reflection in a composite spectrum from 12 Ginga observations of Seyfert-type AGN is reported. Most of these spectral features are shown to be well-modeled by reprocessing of hard X-ray power-law continuum in a slab (or perhaps a disk) of cold matter. There is also evidence for a substantial line-of-sight column of photoionized material.

  4. Active Galactic Nuclei, Quasars, BL Lac Objects and X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The XMM COSMOS survey is producing the large surface density of X-ray sources anticipated. The first batch of approx. 200 sources is being studied in relation to the large scale structure derived from deep optical/near-IR imaging from Subaru and CFHT. The photometric redshifts from the opt/IR imaging program allow a first look at structure vs. redshift, identifying high z clusters. A consortium of SAO, U. Arizona and the Carnegie Institute of Washington (Pasadena) has started a large program using the 6.5meter Magellan telescopes in Chile with the prime objective of identifying the XMM X-ray sources in the COSMOS field. The first series of observing runs using the new IMACS multi-slit spectrograph on Magellan will take place in January and February of 2005. Some 300 spectra per field will be taken, including 70%-80% of the XMM sources in each field. The four first fields cover the center of the COSMOS field. A VLT consortium is set to obtain bulk redshifts of the field galaxies. The added accuracy of the spectroscopic redshifts over the photo-z's will allow much lower density structures to be seen, voids and filaments. The association of X-ray selected AGNs, and quasars with these filaments, is a major motivation for our studies. Comparison to the deep VLA radio data now becoming available is about to begin.

  5. Clumpy tori around type II active galactic nuclei as revealed by X-ray fluorescent lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiren; Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo; Xu, Weiwei; Gou, Lijun; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    The reflection spectrum of a torus around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is characterized by X-ray fluorescent lines, which are most prominent for type II AGNs. A clumpy torus allows photons reflected from the back-side of the torus to leak through the front regions that are free of obscuration. The observed X-ray fluorescent lines are therefore sensitive to the clumpiness of the torus. We analysed a sample of type II AGNs observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS), and measured the fluxes for the Si Kα and Fe Kα lines. The measured Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios, spanning a range between 5 and 60, are far smaller than the ratios predicted from simulations of smooth tori, indicating that the tori of the studied sources have clumpy distributions rather than smooth ones. We compared the measured Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios with simulation results of clumpy tori. The Circinus galaxy has a Fe Kα/Si Kα ratio of ˜60, which is close to the simulation results for N = 5, where N is the average number of clumps along the line of sight. The Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios of the other sources are all below the simulation results for N = 2. Overall, this shows that the non-Fe fluorescent lines in the soft X-ray band are a potentially powerful probe of the clumpiness of tori around AGNs.

  6. THE LONGEST TIMESCALE X-RAY VARIABILITY REVEALS EVIDENCE FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE HIGH ACCRETION STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Youhong

    2011-01-01

    The All Sky Monitor (ASM) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer has continuously monitored a number of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with similar sampling rates for 14 years, from 1996 January to 2009 December. Utilizing the archival ASM data of 27 AGNs, we calculate the normalized excess variances of the 300-day binned X-ray light curves on the longest timescale (between 300 days and 14 years) explored so far. The observed variance appears to be independent of AGN black-hole mass and bolometric luminosity. According to the scaling relation of black-hole mass (and bolometric luminosity) from galactic black hole X-ray binaries (GBHs) to AGNs, the break timescales that correspond to the break frequencies detected in the power spectral density (PSD) of our AGNs are larger than the binsize (300 days) of the ASM light curves. As a result, the singly broken power-law (soft-state) PSD predicts the variance to be independent of mass and luminosity. Nevertheless, the doubly broken power-law (hard-state) PSD predicts, with the widely accepted ratio of the two break frequencies, that the variance increases with increasing mass and decreases with increasing luminosity. Therefore, the independence of the observed variance on mass and luminosity suggests that AGNs should have soft-state PSDs. Taking into account the scaling of the break timescale with mass and luminosity synchronously, the observed variances are also more consistent with the soft-state than the hard-state PSD predictions. With the averaged variance of AGNs and the soft-state PSD assumption, we obtain a universal PSD amplitude of 0.030 {+-} 0.022. By analogy with the GBH PSDs in the high/soft state, the longest timescale variability supports the standpoint that AGNs are scaled-up GBHs in the high accretion state, as already implied by the direct PSD analysis.

  7. OPTICAL SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE HARD X-RAY-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Lisa M.; Keeney, Brian; Lewis, Karen T.; Koss, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2010-02-10

    The Swift Burst Alert Telescope survey of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is providing an unprecedented view of local AGNs ((z) {approx} 0.03) and their host galaxy properties. In this paper, we present an analysis of the optical spectra of a sample of 64 AGNs from the nine month survey, detected solely based on their 14-195 keV flux. Our analysis includes both archived spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and our own observations from the 2.1 m Kitt Peak National Observatory telescope. Among our results, we include line ratio classifications utilizing standard emission line diagnostic plots, [O III] 5007 A luminosities, and Hbeta-derived black hole masses. As in our X-ray study, we find the type 2 sources to be less luminous (in [O III] 5007 A and 14-195 keV luminosities) with lower accretion rates than the type 1 sources. We find that the optically classified low-ionization narrow emission line regions, H II/composite galaxies, and ambiguous sources have the lowest luminosities, while both broad-line and narrow-line Seyferts have similar luminosities. From a comparison of the hard X-ray (14-195 keV) and [O III] luminosities, we find that both the observed and extinction-corrected [O III] luminosities are weakly correlated with X-ray luminosity. In a study of the host galaxy properties from both continuum fits and measurements of the stellar absorption indices, we find that the hosts of the narrow-line sources have properties consistent with late-type galaxies.

  8. An X-ray spectral model for clumpy tori in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo E-mail: lixb@ihep.ac.cn

    2014-05-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model for the clumpy torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) using Geant4, which includes the physical processes of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering, γ conversion, fluorescence line, and Auger process. Since the electrons in the torus are expected to be bounded instead of free, the deviation of the scattering cross section from the Klein-Nishina cross section has also been included, which changes the X-ray spectra by up to 25% below 10 keV. We have investigated the effect of the clumpiness parameters on the reflection spectra and the strength of the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The volume filling factor of the clouds in the clumpy torus only slightly influences the reflection spectra, however, the total column density and the number of clouds along the line of sight significantly change the shapes and amplitudes of the reflection spectra. The effect of column density is similar to the case of a smooth torus, while a small number of clouds along the line of sight will smooth out the anisotropy of the reflection spectra and the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The smoothing effect is mild in the low column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}), whereas it is much more evident in the high column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 25} cm{sup –2}). Our model provides a quantitative tool for the spectral analysis of the clumpy torus. We suggest that the joint fits of the broad band spectral energy distributions of AGNs (from X-ray to infrared) should better constrain the structure of the torus.

  9. Soft X-Ray Excess from Shocked Accreting Plasma in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Hendry, Douglas; Clark, Peter; Tombesi, Francesco; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel theoretical model to describe the physical identity of the soft X-ray excess that is ubiquitously detected in many Seyfert galaxies, by considering a steady-state, axisymmetric plasma accretion within the innermost stable circular orbit around a black hole (BH) accretion disk. We extend our earlier theoretical investigations on general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic accretion, which implied that the accreting plasma can develop into a standing shock under suitable physical conditions, causing the downstream flow to be sufficiently hot due to shock compression. We perform numerical calculations to examine, for sets of fiducial plasma parameters, the physical nature of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks under strong gravity for different BH spins. We show that thermal seed photons from the standard accretion disk can be effectively Compton up-scattered by the energized sub-relativistic electrons in the hot downstream plasma to produce the soft excess feature in X-rays. As a case study, we construct a three-parameter Comptonization model of inclination angle θ obs, disk photon temperature kT in, and downstream electron energy kT e to calculate the predicted spectra in comparison with a 60 ks XMM-Newton/EPIC-pn spectrum of a typical radio-quiet Seyfert 1 active galactic nucleus, Ark 120. Our χ 2-analyses demonstrate that the model is plausible for successfully describing data for both non-spinning and spinning BHs with derived ranges of 61.3 keV ≲ kT e ≲ 144.3 keV, 21.6 eV ≲ kT in ≲ 34.0 eV, and 17.°5 ≲ θ obs ≲ 42.°6, indicating a compact Comptonizing region of three to four gravitational radii that resembles the putative X-ray coronae.

  10. On the Contribution of Gamma Ray Bursts to the Galactic Inventory of Some Intermediate Mass Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Surman, R; McLaughlin, G C

    2004-01-23

    Light curves from a growing number of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) indicate that GRBs copiously produce radioactive Ni moving outward at fractions of the speed of light. We calculate nuclear abundances of elements accompanying the outflowing Ni under the assumption that this Ni originates from a wind blown off of a viscous accretion disk. We also show that GRB's likely contribute appreciably to the galactic inventory of {sup 42}Ca, {sup 45}Sc, {sup 46}Ti, {sup 49}Ti, {sup 63}Cu, and may be an important site for the production of {sup 64}Zn.

  11. Intrinsic disc emission and the soft X-ray excess in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, Chris; Davis, S. W.; Jin, C.; Blaes, O.; Ward, M.

    2012-03-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies have low-mass black holes and mass accretion rates close to (or exceeding) Eddington, so a standard blackbody accretion disc should peak in the extreme ultraviolet. However, the lack of true absorption opacity in the disc means that the emission is better approximated by a colour temperature corrected blackbody, and this colour temperature correction is large enough (˜2.4) that the bare disc emission from a zero spin black hole can extend into the soft X-ray bandpass. Part of the soft X-ray excess seen in these objects must be intrinsic emission from the disc unless the vertical structure is very different to that predicted. None the less, this is not the whole story even for the extreme NLS1 as the shape of the soft excess is much broader than predicted by a bare disc spectrum, indicating some Compton upscattering by warm, optically thick material. We associate this with the disc itself, so it must ultimately be powered by mass accretion. We build an energetically self-consistent model assuming that the emission thermalizes to a (colour temperature corrected) blackbody only at large radii. At smaller radii the gravitational energy is split between powering optically thick Comptonized disc emission (forming the soft X-ray excess) and an optically thin corona above the disc (forming the tail to higher energies). We show examples of this model fit to the extreme NLS1 RE J1034+396, and to the much lower Eddington fraction broad-line Seyfert 1 PG 1048+231. We use these to guide our fits and interpretations of three template spectra made from co-adding multiple sources to track out a sequence of active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra as a function of L/LEdd. Both the individual objects and template spectra show the surprising result that the Compton upscattered soft X-ray excess decreases in importance with increasing L/LEdd. The strongest soft excesses are associated with low mass accretion rate AGN rather than being tied to some

  12. Exploring the active galactic nuclei population with extreme X-ray-to-optical flux ratios (fx/fo > 50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Ceca, R.; Carrera, F. J.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Corral, A.; Del Moro, A.; Mateos, S.; Ruiz, A.; Watson, M. G.

    2015-03-01

    The cosmic history of the growth of supermassive black holes in galactic centres parallels that of star formation in the Universe. However, an important fraction of this growth occurs inconspicuously in obscured objects, where ultraviolet/optical/near-infrared emission is heavily obscured by dust. Since the X-ray flux is less attenuated, a high X-ray-to-optical flux ratio (fx/fo) is expected to be an efficient tool to find out these obscured accreting sources. We explore here via optical spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and infrared photometry the most extreme cases of this population (those with fx/fo > 50, EXO50 sources hereafter), using a well-defined sample of seven X-ray sources extracted from the 2XMM catalogue. Five EXO50 sources (˜70 per cent of the sample) in the bright flux regime explored by our survey (f(2-10 keV) ≥ 1.5 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) are associated with obscured AGN (NH > 1022 cm-2), spanning a redshift range between 0.75 and 1 and characterized by 2-10 keV intrinsic luminosities in the QSO regime (e.g. well in excess to 1044 erg s-1). We did not find compelling evidence of Compton thick active galacic nuclei (AGN). Overall, the EXO50 type 2 QSOs do not seem to be different from standard X-ray-selected type 2 QSOs in terms of nuclear absorption; a very high AGN/host galaxy ratio seems to play a major role in explaining their extreme properties. Interestingly, three out of five EXO50 type 2 QSO objects can be classified as extreme dust-obscured galaxies (EDOGs, f24 μm/fR ≥ 2000), suggesting that a very high AGN/host ratios (along with the large amount of dust absorption) could be the natural explanation also for a part of the EDOG population. The remaining two EXO50 sources are classified as BL Lac objects, having rather extreme properties, and which are good candidates for TeV emission.

  13. MEASUREMENTS OF THE RELATIVE ABUNDANCES OF HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC-RAY NUCLEI IN THE TeV/NUCLEON REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Malinin, A.; Allison, P. S.; Beatty, J. J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Barbier, L.; Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Jeon, J. A.; Lee, J.

    2010-06-01

    We present measurements of the relative abundances of cosmic-ray nuclei in the energy range of 500-3980 GeV/nucleon from the second flight of the Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass balloon-borne experiment. Particle energy was determined using a sampling tungsten/scintillating-fiber calorimeter, while particle charge was identified precisely with a dual-layer silicon charge detector installed for this flight. The resulting element ratios C/O, N/O, Ne/O, Mg/O, Si/O, and Fe/O at the top of atmosphere are 0.919 {+-} 0.123{sup stat} {+-} 0.030{sup syst}, 0.076 {+-} 0.019{sup stat} {+-} 0.013{sup syst}, 0.115 {+-} 0.031{sup stat} {+-} 0.004{sup syst}, 0.153 {+-} 0.039{sup stat} {+-} 0.005{sup syst}, 0.180 {+-} 0.045{sup stat} {+-} 0.006{sup syst}, and 0.139 {+-} 0.043{sup stat} {+-} 0.005{sup syst}, respectively, which agree with measurements at lower energies. The source abundance of N/O is found to be 0.054 {+-} 0.013{sup stat} {+-} 0.009{sup syst+0.010esc} {sub -0.017}. The cosmic-ray source abundances are compared to local Galactic (LG) abundances as a function of first ionization potential and as a function of condensation temperature. At high energies the trend that the cosmic-ray source abundances at large ionization potential or low condensation temperature are suppressed compared to their LG abundances continues. Therefore, the injection mechanism must be the same at TeV/nucleon energies as at the lower energies measured by HEAO-3, CRN, and TRACER. Furthermore, the cosmic-ray source abundances are compared to a mixture of 80% solar system abundances and 20% massive stellar outflow (MSO) as a function of atomic mass. The good agreement with TIGER measurements at lower energies confirms the existence of a substantial fraction of MSO material required in the {approx}TeV per nucleon region.

  14. OBLIQUE SHOCKS AS THE ORIGIN OF RADIO TO GAMMA-RAY VARIABILITY IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Philip A.; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D. E-mail: mfa@umich.edu

    2011-07-10

    The 'shock in jet' model for centimeter-waveband blazar variability is revisited, allowing for arbitrary shock orientation with respect to the jet flow direction, and both random and ordered magnetic field. It is shown that oblique shocks can explain events with swings in polarization position angle much less than the 90{sup 0} associated with transverse structures, while retaining the general characteristics of outbursts, including spectral behavior and level of peak percentage polarization. Models dominated by a force-free, minimum energy magnetic field configuration (essentially helical) display a shallow rise in percentage polarization and frequency-dependent swing in polarization position angle not in agreement with the results of single-dish monitoring observations, implying that the field is predominantly random in the quiescent state. Outbursts well explained by the 'shock in jet' model are present during {gamma}-ray flaring in several sources, supporting the idea that shock events are responsible for activity from the radio to {gamma}-ray bands.

  15. Research in particles and fields. [cosmic rays, gamma rays, and cosmic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Buffington, A.; Davis, L., Jr.; Prince, T. A.; Vogt, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Research activities in cosmic rays, gamma rays, and astrophysical plasmas are reviewed. Energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons were used to carry out the investigations. Specific instruments mentioned are: the high energy isotope spectrometer telescope, the electron/isotope spectrometer, the heavy isotope spectrometer telescope, and magnetometers. Solar flares, planetary magnetospheres, element abundance, the isotopic composition of low energy cosmic rays, and heavy nuclei are among the topics receiving research attention.

  16. The Stored Energy of Gravitational Collapse Powers Gamma Ray Bursts, Active Galactic Nuclei and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, Howard

    2004-05-01

    The recent discovery of almost 100% polarization of the prompt gamma ray emission from GRB021206 (1) confirms my ````Strong'' Magnetic Field'' model (SMF). In SMF, Storage Ring (SR) particles were accelerated during the gravitational collapse of the pregalactic/prequasar plasma that is permeated by a large-scale primordial magnetic field (2.3). The enormous, intense, slender, relativistic, stable, coherent Astrophysical Storage Ring stores a small fraction of the gravitational collapse energy in an almost radiationless state, unless disturbed. Galactic morphology varies as the ratio of magnetic energy to rotational energy in each object. GRB are due to a ``rock'' i.e. white dwarf,ordinary star,neutron star,planet,etc. falling through the SR and being rapidly vaporized into a hot plasma fireball. The fireball speeds on into the huge organized magnetic field surrounding the current ring, thus generating very highly polarized prompt gamma ray emission from the synchrotron radiation process. The timing fits the GRB observations. A ``rock'' racing at 1000 km/sec across a 20,000 km path in the beam produces a twenty second burst. Tracking across a short chord yields a short burst. Typical currents in space are sometimes made of many slender filaments. Thus the puzzling less than one millisecond spikes observed in some GRB are simply describing the structure of that particular SR at that time. 1. W. Coburn & S. E. Boggs, Nature 423, 425 (2003) 2. H. D. Greyber in After the Dark Ages:When Galaxies Were Young, AIP Conf. Proc. 470, eds. S. Holt & E. Smith, (1998) 3. H. D. Greyber in a Space Telescope Science Institute Report from their 2001 Spring Symposium, ``The Dark Universe: Matter, Energy and Gravity'', ed. Mario Livio, published March 2003.

  17. A search for heavy long lived particles in high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mincer, A.; Freudenreich, H.; Goodman, J. A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Yodh, G. B.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Berley, D.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an experimental search for energetic particles which arrive at sea level delayed with respect to the shower front, with an order of magnitude greater exposure than previous experiments are presented. The experiment was sensitive to showers from cosmic rays between 10 to the 5th power and 10 to the 7th power Gev per nucleus. No evidence for the existence of heavy long lived particles in air showers was found. An upper limit to the flux of these particles was set at the 90% confidence level of 1.4 x 10 to the minus 12th power cm(-2) sr(-1) s(-1).

  18. Variations of the relative abundances of He, (C,N,O) and Fe-group nuclei in solar cosmic rays and their relationship to solar particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Biswas, S.; Fichtel, C. E.; Pellerin, C. J.; Reames, D. V.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the flux of helium nuclei in the 24 January 1971 event and of helium and (C,N,O) nuclei in the 1 September 1971 event are combined with previous measurements to obtain the relative abundances of helium, (C,N,O), and Fe-group nuclei in these events. These data are then summarized together with previously reported results to show that, even when the same detector system using a dE/dx plus range technique is used, differences in the He/(C,N,O) value in the same energy/nucleon interval are observed in solar cosmic ray events. Further, when the He/(C,N,O) value is lower the He/(Fe-group nuclei) value is also systematically lower in these large events. When solar particle acceleration theory is analyzed, it is seen that the results suggest that, for large events, Coulomb energy loss probably does not play a major role in determining solar particle composition at higher energies (10 MeV). The variations in multicharged nuclei composition are more likely due to partial ionization during the acceleration phase.

  19. THE SuperTIGER Instrument: Measurement of Elemental Abundances of Ultra-Heavy Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Bose, R. G.; Braun, D. L.; Brandt, T. J.; Daniels, W. M.; DowKonnt, P. F.; Fitzsimmons, S. P.; Hahne, D. J.; Hams, T.; Israel, M. H.; Klemic, J.; Labrador, A. W.; Link, J. T.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Moore, P.; Murphy, R. P.; Olevitch, M. A.; Rauch, B. F.; Sakai, K.; San Sebastian, F.; Sasaki, M.; Simburger, G. E.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Ward, J. E.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) instrument was developed to measure the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements from Ne-10 to Zr-40 with individual element resolution and the high statistics needed to test models of cosmic-ray origins. SuperTIGER also makes exploratory measurements of the abundances of elements with 40 < Z < or = 60 and measures the energy spectra of the more abundant elements for Z < or = 30 from about 0.8 to 10 GeV/nucleon. This instrument is an enlarged and higher resolution version of the earlier TIGER instrument. It was designed to provide the largest geometric acceptance possible and to reach as high an altitude as possible, flying on a standard long-duration 1.11 million cu m balloon. SuperTIGER was launched from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on 2012 December 8, and made about 2.7 revolutions around the South Pole in 55 days of flight, returning data on over 50 x 10(exp 6) cosmic-ray nuclei with Z > or = 10, including approx.1300 with Z > 29 and approx.60 with Z > 49. Here, we describe the instrument, the methods of charge identification employed, the SuperTIGER balloon flight, and the instrument performance.

  20. The SUPERTIGER Instrument: Measurement of Elemental Abundances of Ultra-Heavy Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, W. R.; Bose, R. G.; Braun, D. L.; Brandt, T. J.; Daniels, W. M.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Fitzsimmons, S. P.; Hahne, D. J.; Hams, T.; Israel, M. H.; Klemic, J.; Labrador, A. W.; Link, J. T.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Moore, P.; Murphy, R. P.; Olevitch, M. A.; Rauch, B. F.; Sakai, K.; San Sebastian, F.; Sasaki, M.; Simburger, G. E.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Ward, J. E.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) instrument was developed to measure the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements from 10Ne to 40Zr with individual element resolution and the high statistics needed to test models of cosmic-ray origins. SuperTIGER also makes exploratory measurements of the abundances of elements with 40 < Z <= 60 and measures the energy spectra of the more abundant elements for Z <= 30 from about 0.8 to 10 GeV/nucleon. This instrument is an enlarged and higher resolution version of the earlier TIGER instrument. It was designed to provide the largest geometric acceptance possible and to reach as high an altitude as possible, flying on a standard long-duration 1.11 million m3 balloon. SuperTIGER was launched from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on 2012 December 8, and made about 2.7 revolutions around the South Pole in 55 days of flight, returning data on over 50 × 106 cosmic-ray nuclei with Z >= 10, including ~1300 with Z > 29 and ~60 with Z > 49. Here, we describe the instrument, the methods of charge identification employed, the SuperTIGER balloon flight, and the instrument performance.

  1. The superTIGER instrument: Measurement of elemental abundances of ultra-heavy galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Binns, W. R.; Bose, R. G.; Braun, D. L.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Israel, M. H.; Moore, P.; Murphy, R. P.; Olevitch, M. A.; Rauch, B. F.; Brandt, T. J.; Daniels, W. M.; Fitzsimmons, S. P.; Hahne, D. J.; Hams, T.; Link, J. T.; Mitchell, J. W.; Sakai, K.; and others

    2014-06-10

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) instrument was developed to measure the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements from {sub 10}Ne to {sub 40}Zr with individual element resolution and the high statistics needed to test models of cosmic-ray origins. SuperTIGER also makes exploratory measurements of the abundances of elements with 40 < Z ≤ 60 and measures the energy spectra of the more abundant elements for Z ≤ 30 from about 0.8 to 10 GeV/nucleon. This instrument is an enlarged and higher resolution version of the earlier TIGER instrument. It was designed to provide the largest geometric acceptance possible and to reach as high an altitude as possible, flying on a standard long-duration 1.11 million m{sup 3} balloon. SuperTIGER was launched from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on 2012 December 8, and made about 2.7 revolutions around the South Pole in 55 days of flight, returning data on over 50 × 10{sup 6} cosmic-ray nuclei with Z ≥ 10, including ∼1300 with Z > 29 and ∼60 with Z > 49. Here, we describe the instrument, the methods of charge identification employed, the SuperTIGER balloon flight, and the instrument performance.

  2. New Calculation of Antiproton Production by Cosmic Ray Protons and Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachelriess, Michael; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Ostapchenko, Sergey S.

    2015-04-01

    A dramatic increase in the accuracy and statistics of space-borne cosmic ray (CR) measurements has yielded several breakthroughs over the last several years. The most puzzling is the rise in the positron fraction above ∼10 GeV over the predictions of the propagation models assuming pure secondary production. The accuracy of the antiproton production cross section is critical for astrophysical applications and searches for new physics since antiprotons in CRs seem to hold the keys to many puzzles including the origin of those excess positrons. However, model calculations of antiproton production in CR interactions with interstellar gas are often employing parameterizations that are out of date or are using outdated physical concepts. This may lead to an incorrect interpretation of antiproton data which could have broad consequences for other areas of astrophysics. In this work, we calculate antiproton production in pp-, pA-, and AA-interactions using EPOS-LHC and QGSJET-II-04, two of the most advanced Monte Carlo (MC) generators tuned to numerous accelerator data including those from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We show that the antiproton yields obtained with these MC generators differ by up to an order of magnitude from yields of parameterizations commonly used in astrophysics.

  3. Setup for in situ x-ray diffraction study of swift heavy ion irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kulriya, P. K.; Singh, F.; Tripathi, A.; Ahuja, R.; Kothari, A.; Dutt, R. N.; Mishra, Y. K.; Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D. K.

    2007-11-15

    An in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of the Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre for in situ studies of phase change in swift heavy ion irradiated materials. A high vacuum chamber with suitable windows for incident and diffracted X-rays is integrated with the goniometer and the beamline. Indigenously made liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) temperature sample cooling unit is installed. The snapshots of growth of particles with fluence of 90 MeV Ni ions were recorded using in situ XRD experiment, illustrating the potential of this in situ facility. A thin film of C{sub 60} was used to test the sample cooling unit. It shows that the phase of the C{sub 60} film transforms from a cubic lattice (at room temperature) to a fcc lattice at around T=255 K.

  4. Cross section systematics for the lightest Bi and Po nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A.N.; Ackermann, D.; Muenzenberg, G.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Streicher, B.; Darby, I.G.; Page, R.D.; Wiseman, D.R.; Franchoo, S.; Hessberger, F.P.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Lommel, B.; Kindler, B.; Mann, R.; Sulignano, B.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.; Vel, K. van de; Duppen, P. van

    2005-07-01

    The production of the very neutron-deficient nuclides {sup 184-192}Bi and {sup 186-192}Po in the vicinity of the neutron midshell at N = 104 has been studied by using heavy-ion-induced complete fusion reactions in a series of experiments at the velocity filter SHIP. The cross sections for the xn and pxn evaporation channels of the {sup 46}Ti+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 190}Po*,{sup 98}Mo+{sup 92}Mo{yields}{sup 190}Po*,{sup 50,52}Cr+{sup 142}Nd{yields}{sup 192,194}Po*, and {sup 94,95}Mo+{sup 93}Nb{yields}{sup 187,188}Bi* reactions were measured. The results obtained, together with the previously known cross section data for the heavier Bi and Po nuclides, are compared with the results of statistical model calculations carried out with the HIVAP code. It is shown that a satisfactory description of the experimental data requires a significant (up to 35%) reduction of the theoretical fission barriers. The optimal reactions for production of the lightest Bi and Po isotopes are discussed.

  5. Hadrons in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2004-08-30

    Changes of hadronic properties in dense nuclear matter as predicted by theory have usually been investigated by means of relativistic heavy-ion reactions. In this talk I show that observable consequences of such changes can also be seen in more elementary reactions on nuclei. Particular emphasis is put on a discussion of photonuclear reactions; examples are the dilepton production at {approx_equal} 1 GeV and the hadron production in nuclei at 10-20 GeV photon energies. The observable effects are expected to be as large as in relativistic heavy-ion collisions and can be more directly related to the underlying hadronic changes.

  6. Effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles and photons during fission of heavy nuclei by polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gagarskii, A. M.; Guseva, I. S.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Mutterer, M.; Kuz'mina, T. E.; Petrov, G. A.; Tyurin, G.; Nesvizhevsky, V.

    2011-12-15

    The new physical effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles (LCPs) during the ternary fission of some heavy nuclei by cold polarized neutrons have been experimentally studied. The coefficients of triple scalar and vector correlation of the pulses of light particles and fission fragments (TRI effect) and the fivefold correlation of the same vectors (ROT effect) have been measured. These effects are believed to be caused by the rotation of polarized fissioning system around its polarization direction. The treatment of the experimental data for LCPs in the framework of this hypothesis leads to a good agreement between the calculation results and experimental data. The calculated value of the angle of rotation of the fission axis in the ternary fission of the polarized fissioning {sup 236}U* compound nucleus was used to process the results of measuring the ROT effect for {gamma} photons from binary-fission fragments of the same nucleus. A satisfactory description of these experimental data is obtained which serves a convincing confirmation of the rotation hypothesis.

  7. Deformed shell model calculations of half lives for β+/EC decay and 2ν β+β+/β+EC/ECEC decay in medium-heavy N~Z nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Shukla, A.; Sahu, R.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2008-08-01

    The β+/EC half-lives of medium heavy N~Z nuclei with mass number A~64-80 are calculated within the deformed shell model (DSM) based on Hartree-Fock states by employing a modified Kuo interaction in (2p3/2,1f5/2,2p1/2,1g9/2) space. The DSM model has been quite successful in predicting many spectroscopic properties of N~Z medium heavy nuclei with A~64-80. The calculated β+/EC half-lives, for prolate and oblate shapes, compare well with the predictions of the calculations with Skyrme force by Sarriguren Going further, following recent searches, half-lives for 2ν β+β+/β+EC/ECEC decay for the nucleus Kr78 are calculated using DSM and the results compare well with QRPA predictions.

  8. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE KINETIC POWER AND BOLOMETRIC LUMINOSITY OF JETS: LIMITATION FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI, AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Renyi; Hou, Shujin; Xie, Fu-Guo E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P {sub jet} and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L {sub jet} of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P {sub jet} and L {sub jet} being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ∼10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1} to ∼10{sup 52} erg s{sup –1}, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P {sub jet}-L {sub jet} correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  9. Relationship between the Kinetic Power and Bolometric Luminosity of Jets: Limitation from Black Hole X-Ray Binaries, Active Galactic Nuclei, and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renyi; Xie, Fu-Guo; Hou, Shujin

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P jet and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L jet of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P jet and L jet being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ~1031 erg s-1 to ~1052 erg s-1, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P jet-L jet correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  10. Abundances of Ultra-Heavy Galactic Cosmic Rays from the SuperTIGER Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ryan; Supertiger Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SuperTIGER (Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) experiment was launched on a long-duration balloon flight from Williams Field, Antarctica, on December 8, 2012. The instrument measured the relative elemental abundances of Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the charge (Z) range Z > 10 with excellent charge resolution, displaying well resolved individual element peaks for 10 <= Z <= 40. During its record-breaking 55-day flight, SuperTIGER collected ~4.73 ×106 Iron nuclei, ~8 times as many as detected by its predecessor, TIGER, with charge resolution at iron of < 0.18 cu. SuperTIGER measures charge (Z) and energy (E) using a combination of three scintillator and two Cherenkov detectors, and employs a scintillating fiber hodoscope for event trajectory determination. The data include more than 600 events in the charge range 30 < Z <= 40. SuperTIGER is the first experiment to resolve elemental abundances in this charge range with single-element resolution and high statistics. The SuperTIGER measured abundances are generally consistent with previous experimental results from TIGER and ACE-CRIS, with improved statistical precision. Our results confirm the earlier results from TIGER, supporting a model of cosmic-ray origin in OB associations. This research was supported by NASA under Grants NNX09AC17G, NNX14AB25G, the Peggy and Steve Fossett Foundation and the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences at Washington University.

  11. Studies of yrast and continuum states in A = 140 - 160 nuclei. Progress report for 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.J.

    1986-02-01

    The results of nuclear structure investigations by in-beam ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy following heavy ion reactions are summarized. Detailed information is given for the proton-rich nuclei /sup 151/Tm, /sup 152/Tm and /sup 150/Ho, and for nuh/sub 11/2//sup n/ states in heavy tin isotopes. The first experiments performed with the new Compton-suppressed detector array at ATLAS are outlined.

  12. Spectra of protons and nuclei in the energy range of 1010 ÷ 1020 eV in the framework of Galactic cosmic ray origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Nikolay; Lagutin, Anatoly; Tyumentsev, Alexander; Raikin, Roman

    2015-08-01

    We consider the problem of the cosmic ray spectrum formation assuming that cosmic rays are produced by Galactic sources. The anomalous diffusion equation proposed in our recent papers is used to describe cosmic ray propagation in the interstellar medium. We show that in the framework of this approach and with generation spectrum exponent γ = 2.85 it is possible to reproduce locally observed basic features of cosmic rays in the energy region of 1010 ÷ 1020 eV: difference between spectral exponents of protons and other nuclei, mass composition variation, “knee” problem, flattening of the primary spectrum at E ≥ 1018 ÷ 1019 eV. The crucial model predictions for the mass composition behaviour in the ultra-high energy region are discussed.

  13. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice. Cosmic ray amorphisation cross-section and sputtering yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, E.; Augé, B.; Boduch, P.; Brunetto, R.; Chabot, M.; Domaracka, A.; Ding, J. J.; Kamalou, O.; Lv, X. Y.; Rothard, H.; da Silveira, E. F.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. Aims: We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. Methods: We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). Results: The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic stopping power. Conclusions: The final state of cosmic ray irradiation for porous amorphous and crystalline ice, as monitored by infrared spectroscopy, is the same, but with a large difference in cross-section, hence in time scale in an astrophysical context. The cosmic ray water-ice sputtering rates compete with the UV photodesorption yields reported in the literature. The prevalence of direct cosmic ray sputtering over cosmic-ray induced photons photodesorption may be particularly true for ices strongly bonded to the ice mantles surfaces, such as hydrogen-bonded ice structures or more generally the so-called polar ices. Experiments performed at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) Caen, France. Part of this work has been financed by the French INSU-CNRS programme "Physique et Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire" (PCMI) and the ANR IGLIAS.

  14. Elemental Abundances of Ultra-Heavy Galactic Cosmic Rays from the SuperTIGER Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    The SuperTIGER (Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) experiment was launched on a long-duration balloon flight from Williams Field, Antarctica, on December 8, 2012. The instrument measured the relative elemental abundances of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) for charge (Z) Z>10 with excellent charge resolution, displaying well resolved individual element peaks for 10 ≤ Z ≤ 40. During its record-breaking 55-day flight, SuperTIGER collected ˜4.73 x10^{6} Iron nuclei, ˜8 times as many as detected by its predecessor, TIGER, with charge resolution at iron of 0.17 cu. SuperTIGER measures charge (Z) and energy (E) using a combination of three scintillator and two Cherenkov detectors, and employs a scintillating fiber hodoscope for event trajectory determination. The SuperTIGER data have been analyzed to correct for instrument effects and remove events that underwent nuclear interactions within the instrument. The data include more than 600 events in the charge range 30 < Z ≤ 40. SuperTIGER is the first experiment to resolve elemental abundances of every element in this charge range with high statistics and single-element resolution. The relative abundances of the galactic cosmic ray source have been derived from the measured relative elemental abundances using atmospheric and interstellar propagations. The SuperTIGER measured abundances are generally consistent with previous experimental results from TIGER and ACE-CRIS, with improved statistical precision. The SuperTIGER results confirm the earlier results from TIGER, supporting a model of cosmic-ray origin in OB associations, with preferential acceleration of refractory elements over volatile elements ordered by atomic mass (A). A second SuperTIGER Antarctic flight is planned for December 2017. Details of the instrument, flight, data analysis, and ongoing preparations will be presented.

  15. Gamma-ray and Neutrino Fluxes from Heavy Dark Matter in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammaldi, V.; Cembranos, J. A. R.; de la Cruz-Dombriz, A.; Lineros, R. A.; Maroto, A. L.

    We present a study of the Galactic Center region as a possible source of both secondary gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes from annihilating dark matter. We have studied the gamma-ray flux observed by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source. The data are well fitted as annihilating dark matter in combination with an astrophysical background. The analysis was performed by means of simulated gamma spectra produced by Monte Carlo event generators packages. We analyze the differences in the spectra obtained by the various Monte Carlo codes developed so far in particle physics. We show that, within some uncertainty, the HESS data can be fitted as a signal from a heavy dark matter density distribution peaked at the Galactic Center, with a power-law for the background with a spectral index which is compatible with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data from the same region. If this kind of dark matter distribution generates the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS, we also expect to observe a neutrino flux. We show prospective results for the observation of secondary neutrinos with the Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and Abyss environmental RESearch project (ANTARES), Ice Cube Neutrino Observatory (Ice Cube) and the Cubic Kilometer Neutrino Telescope (KM3NeT). Prospects solely depend on the device resolution angle when its effective area and the minimum energy threshold are fixed.

  16. Simultaneous exposure of mammalian cells to heavy ions and X-rays.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Y; Aoki, M; Durante, M

    2002-01-01

    Crews of space missions are exposed to a mixed radiation field, including sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. To determine the biological effectiveness of mixed high-/low-LET radiation fields, mammalian cells were exposed in vitro simultaneously to X-rays and heavy ions, accelerated at the HIMAC accelerator. X-ray doses ranged from 1 to 11 Gy. At the same time, cells were exposed to either 40Ar (550 MeV/n, 86 keV/micrometers), 28Si (100 MeV/n, 150 keV/micrometers), or 56Fe (115 MeV/n, 442 keV/micrometers) ions. Survival was measured in hamster V79 fibroblasts. Structural aberrations in chromosome 2 were measured by chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization in isolated human lymphocytes. For argon and silicon experiments, measured damage in the mixed radiation field was consistent with the value expected using an additive function for low- and high-LET separated data. A small deviation from a simple additive function is observed with very high-LET iron ions combined to X-rays. PMID:12530448

  17. Simultaneous exposure of mammalian cells to heavy ions and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Y.; Aoki, M.; Durante, M.

    Crews of space missions are exposed to a mixed radiation field, including sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. To determine the biological effectiveness of mixed high-/low-LET radiation fields, mammalian cells were exposed in vitro simultaneously to X-rays and heavy ions, accelerated at the HIMAC accelerator. X-ray doses ranged from 1 to 11 Gy. At the same time, cells were exposed to either 40Ar (550 MeV/n, 86 keV/μm), 28Si (100 MeV/n, 150 keV/μm), or 56Fe (115 MeV/n, 442 keV/μm) ions. Survival was measured in hamster V79 fibroblasts. Structural aberrations in chromosome 2 were measured by chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization in isolated human lymphocytes. For argon and silicon experiments, measured damage in the mixed radiation field was consistent with the value expected using an additive function for low- and high-LET separated data. A small deviation from a simple additive function is observed with very high-LET iron ions combined to X-rays.

  18. Studies of yrast and continuum states in A=140-160 nuclei. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980. [Purdue Univ. , 1/1/80-12/31/80

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of nuclei in the A approx. 150 region was investigated by in-beam ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion beams, mostly from the Argonne Tandem-Linac. Results for the nuclei /sup 148/Dy, /sup 149/Dy, /sup 153/Dy, /sup 154/Dy, /sup 149/Ho, and /sup 150/Ho are summarized. The feeding of yrast states in these nuclei and the link between the highest known yrast states and the continuum region were also studied. 6 figures.

  19. Radiolysis of H2O:CO2 ices by heavy energetic cosmic ray analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, S.; Seperuelo Duarte, E.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2010-11-01

    An experimental study of the interaction of heavy, highly charged, and energetic ions (52 MeV 58Ni13+) with pure H2O, pure CO2 and mixed H2O:CO2 astrophysical ice analogs is presented. This analysis aims to simulate the chemical and the physicochemical interactions induced by heavy cosmic rays inside dense and cold astrophysical environments, such as molecular clouds or protostellar clouds. The measurements were performed at the heavy ion accelerator GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds in Caen, France). The gas samples were deposited onto a CsI substrate at 13 K. In-situ analysis was performed by a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer at different fluences. Radiolysis yields of the produced species were quantified. The dissociation cross sections of pure H2O and CO2 ices are 1.1 and 1.9 × 10-13 cm2, respectively. For mixed H2O:CO2 (10:1), the dissociation cross sections of both species are about 1 × 10-13 cm2. The measured sputtering yield of pure CO2 ice is 2.2 × 104 molec ion-1. After a fluence of 2-3 × 1012 ions cm-2, the CO2/CO ratio becomes roughly constant (~0.1), independent of the initial CO2/H2O ratio. A similar behavior is observed for the H2O2/H2O ratio, which stabilizes at 0.01, independent of the initial H2O column density or relative abundance.

  20. K-edge x-ray fluorescence analysis for actinide and heavy elements solution concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, D.C.

    1984-07-01

    Advantages of using Co-57 as an exciter for K XRFA include: a compact design that requires no x-ray tubes; the exciter-detector assembly locates remote from support electronics; on-line, at-line, or off-line configurations for monitor/measurements; systems that can be run by semi-skilled technicians, once programmed; and operated via remote terminals with results sent to control rooms; heavy element concentrations that are measurable thru industrial pipes; independent of minor changes in solution matrix or source half life with concentration results reported in near-real-time; a dynamic range of measurable concentrations that is greater than 10/sup 4/; measurement times that are reasonable even at 1 gram/liter; and for nuclear safeguards, it provides the <0.5% accuracy required by DOE for the accountability of U, Pu, or both, once the system is calibrated.

  1. New Measurements of Trapped Anomalous Cosmic Rays and Other Heavy Ions in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Blake, J. B.; Crain, W. R.; Lin, A. Y.; Mabry, D. J.; Zakrzewski, M. P.; Turpin, M. A.; McNab, M. C.

    2008-12-01

    Anomalous cosmic rays (ACR) are a sample of the local interstellar medium that originate as neutral atoms with first ionization potential greater than that of hydrogen. Once the atoms become singly ionized by solar ultraviolet radiation or charge exchange with the solar wind, they convect to the outer heliosphere, become accelerated to greater than 10 MeV/nucleon at the termination shock, and propagate back in to the inner heliosphere. The Earth's magnetosphere becomes a reservoir for ACR ions after the ions become further stripped in collisions with the upper atmosphere and are stably trapped near L=2 with long lifetimes. During the last solar cycle, observations from low-Earth orbit with SAMPEX and other satellites mapped the abundances and time dependence of the trapped ACR. Those observations revealed insights into the ACR acceleration process, the trapping process, as well as other elements (Mg-S and Fe) that might have originated as pickup ions from dust grains in the inner heliosphere. Radial diffusion of solar energetic particles into low L is also a potential source for trapped heavies near L=2. This paper reports new measurements of the trapped heavy ion abundances, energy spectra, and pitch angle distributions in the inner (L<3) magnetosphere made with the High Linear Energy Transfer (HiLET) sensor in highly elliptical Earth orbit. HiLET uses arrays of silicon detectors in multiple coincidence with high thresholds to eliminate backgrounds from penetrating protons and electrons. The energy range is ~3 to 30 MeV/nucleon (Z=8). Our measurement database begins in the spring of 2008, and therefore we are observing solar minimum conditions when the ACR and trapped ACR intensities are at their highest. Compared to the LEO measurements from the last solar cycle, HiLET has the advantage of sampling the heavy-ion environment in the inner magnetosphere near the magnetic equator where the trapped heavy ions have maximum intensity. We will report on the new findings

  2. Electromagnetic dissociation effects in galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for calculating cross sections for the breakup of galactic heavy ions by the Coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei are presented. By using the Weizsacker-Williams method of virtual quanta, estimates of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for a variety of reactions applicable to galactic cosmic ray shielding studies are presented and compared with other predictions and with available experimental data.

  3. Angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ruskov, I. N.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Skoy, V. R.; Barmakov, Yu. N.; Bogolyubov, E. P.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Yurkov, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    The work is devoted to measuring the angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei. A portable ING-27 neutron generator (designed and fabricated at VNIIA, Moscow) with a built-in 64-pixel silicon α-detector was used as a source of tagged neutrons. The γ-rays of characteristic nuclear radiation from 12C were detected with a spectrometric system that consisted of 22 γ-detectors based on NaI(Tl) crystals arranged around the carbon target. The measured angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays is analyzed and compared with the results of other published experimental works.

  4. A statistical analysis of the broadband 0.1 to 3.5 keV spectral properties of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. J.; Cordova, F. A.

    1994-01-01

    We survey the broadband spectral properties of approximately 500 X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed with the Einstein Observatory. Included in this survey are the approximately 450 AGNs in the Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) of Gioia et al. (1990) and the approximately 50 AGNs in the Ultrasoft Survey of Cordova et al. (1992). We present a revised version of the latter sample, based on the post publication discovery of a software error in the Einstein Rev-1b processing. We find that the mean spectral index of the AGNs between 0.1 and 0.6 keV is softer, and the distribution of indices wider, than previous estimates based on analyses of the X-ray spectra of optically selected AGNs. A subset of these AGNs exhibit flux variabiulity, some on timescales as short as 0.05 days. A correlation between radio and hard X-ray luminosity is confirmed, but the data do not support a correlation between the radio and soft X-ray luminosities, or between radio loudness and soft X-ray spectral slope. Evidence for physically distinct soft and hard X-ray components is found, along with the possibility of a bias in previous optically selected samples toward selection of AGNs with flatter X-ray spectra.

  5. HILT - A heavy ion large area proportional counter telescope for solar and anomalous cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klecker, Berndt; Hovestadt, Dietrich; Scholer, M.; Arbinger, H.; Ertl, M.; Kaestle, H.; Kuenneth, E.; Laeverenz, P.; Seidenschwang, E.; Blake, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    The HILT sensor has been designed to measure heavy ion elemental abundances, energy spectra, and direction of incidence in the mass range from He to Fe and in the energy range 4 to 250 MeV/nucleon. With its large geometric factor of 60 sq cm sr the sensor is optimized to provide compositional and spectral measurements for low intensity cosmic rays (i.e. for small solar energetic particle events and for the anomalous component of cosmic rays). The instrument combines a large area ion drift chamber-proportional counter system with two arrays of 16 Li-drift solid state detectors and 16 CsI crystals. The multi dE/dx-E technique provides a low background mass and energy determination. The sensor also measures particle direction. Combining these measurements with the information on the spacecraft position and attitude in the low-altitude polar orbit, it will be possible to infer the ionic charge of the ions from the local cutoff of the Earth's magnetic field. The ionic charge in this energy range is of particular interest because it provides unique clues to the origin of these particles and has not been investigated systematically so far. Together with the other instruments on board SAMPEX (LEICA, MAST, and PET), a comprehensive measurement of the entire solar and anomalous particle population will be achieved.

  6. Enhancement of X-ray Energy Deposition via Heavy Element Sensitization in Biological Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara; Pradhan, Anil; Nahar, Sultana; Barth, Rolf

    2015-05-01

    Energy (dose) deposition by low vs. high energy x-rays (LEX & HEX), approximately E ~ 100 keV and E > 1 MeV respectively, was studied in biological matter sensitized with heavy elements (high-Z or HZ) to improve radiation therapy of cancer. Computations and simulations show that LEX interact favorably with HZ sensitizers by depositing more dose than HEX. LEX photons effectively photoionize deep inner electronic shells and release cell-killing Auger electrons near malignant cells embedded with HZ atoms. HEX photons predominantly Compton scatter with little interaction, even with HZ elements. Monte Carlo simulations show that in comparison to unsensitized tissue, LEX irradiation of HZ-sensitized models resulted in up to a factor of 2 increase in dose deposition relative to HEX. To validate the studies, in vitro experiments were performed using 2 distinct cancer cell types treated with Pt-based sensitizers, then irradiated with a LEX 160 KV x-ray source and a HEX 6 MV LINAC employed in radiation therapy. The experiments support numerical simulations, and demonstrate several factors lower survival of HZ-sensitized cells irradiated with LEX compared with HEX.

  7. Residual skin damage in rats 1 year after exposure to x rays or accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, J.T.; McDonald, M.; Howard, J.

    1982-01-01

    In conjunction with a study on the biological effects of accelerated heavy ions on rat spinal cord, we were able to assess the residual skin damage remaining 1 year postirradiation. In this study, rats were irradiated with 230-kVp fractionated doses of either X rays, carbon ions, or neon ions. Four radiation fractions were given at daily intervals. For the carbon and neon ion exposures, rats were irradiated in both the plateau and spread Bragg peak (4 cm) regions of ionization. Comparing doses that produced complete epilation with a slight suggestion of a residual radiation scar, it was found that the relative biological effectivesness (RBE) values 1 year postirradiation for the four fraction irradiations were: carbon ions (plateau ionization region), 1.06; carbon ions (spread Bragg peak ionization region), 1.88; neon ions (plateau region of ionization), 1.55; and neon ions (spread Bragg peak ionization region), 2.26. RBE values for production of paralysis after spinal cord irradiation (using the same X-ray total dose levels for comparison purposes) were in all cases higher than the RBE values obtained from assessment of residual skin injury.

  8. Basic Research on the Composition of Heavy Cosmic Rays: The Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder Experiment (TIGER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. Robert

    2004-01-01

    Among the most fundamental astrophysical problems is understanding the mechanism by which particles are accelerated to the enormous energies observed in the cosmic rays. That problem can be conveniently divided into two questions: (1) What is the source of the energy and the mechanism for converting the energy of that source into the energy of individual cosmic-ray nuclei, and (2) what is the source of the material that is accelerated and the mechanism for injecting that material into the cosmic-ray accelerator? There is a general consensus that the answer to the first of these questions, for nuclei with energy eV, is that the source of their energy is almost certainly from supernova explosions (e.g., Ginzburg & Syrovatskii, 1964). The answer to the second question is still uncertain, although evidence in favor of a superbubble origin of cosmic rays is becoming quite significant (Higdon et al, 2203 and Binns, 2005 (Submitted to ApJ). There are several ways of interpreting available data that lead to quite different models for the source of the material and its injection mechanism. With the The Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder Experiment (TIGER) instrument we have obtained data that will help to distinguish among these possible models. In the report, the TIGER flights, the instrument itself, results, and a publication list as a result of the work are presented.

  9. Laboratory Studies of the X-Ray Emission Produced by the Interaction of Solar Wind Heavy Ions with Comets

    SciTech Connect

    Beriersdorfer, P; Chen, H; May, M J; Thorn, D; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Kelly, R L; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Szymkowiak, A E; Kahn, S M

    2002-08-09

    The process of X-ray emission following charge exchange between solar wind heavy ions and cometary gases is studied in the laboratory. The emission is recorded with the spare ASTRO-E 6 x 6 microcalorimeter array. The microcalorimeter affords a resolution of better than 10 eV in the range of X-ray energies of interest and thus individual emission lines can be resolved. Our present measurements focus on the most abundant K-shell heavy ions found in the solar wind. In particular, we measure the K-shell emission of bare C, N, O, and Ne, and their hydrogen-like counter parts interacting with such gases as CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Several results are noted that had not been considered in the early cometary X-ray models.

  10. Laboratory Studies of the X-ray Emission Produced by the Interaction of Solar Wind Heavy Ions with Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; May, M.; Thorn, D.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    2002-01-01

    The process of X-ray emission following charge exchange between solar wind heavy ions and cometary gases is studied in the laboratory. The emission is recorded with the spare ASTRO-E 6x6 microcalorimeter array. The microcalorimeter affords a resolution of better than 10 eV in the range of X-ray energies of interest arid thus individual emission lines can be resolved. Our present measurements focus on the most abundant K-shell heavy ions found in the solar wind. In particular, we measure the K-shell emission of bare C, N, O, and Ne, and their hydrogenlike counter parts interacting with such gases as CO2, N2, and CH4. Several results are noted that had not been considered in the early cometary X-ray models.

  11. Heavy Ion Fragmentation Experiments at the Bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using the heavy-ion capability of the Bevatron were studied. The purpose was to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Attempts were also made to: (1) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (2) test the applicability of high-energy multi-particle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (3) apply the cross-section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (4) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross sections.

  12. A MINI X-RAY SURVEY OF SUB-DAMPED LYMAN-ALPHA ABSORPTION SYSTEMS: SEARCHING FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FORMED IN PROTOGALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chartas, G.; Asper, A.; Kulkarni, V. P. E-mail: kulkarni@sc.edu

    2013-10-01

    A significant fraction of the sub-damped Lyman-alpha (sub-DLA) absorption systems in quasar spectra appear to be metal-rich, including many with even super-solar element abundances. This raises the question whether some sub-DLAs may harbor active galactic nuclei (AGNs), since supersolar metallicities are observed in AGNs. Here, we investigate this question based on a mini-survey of 21 quasars known to contain sub-DLAs in their spectra. The X-ray observations were performed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In cases of no detection, we estimated upper limits for the X-ray luminosities of possible AGNs at the redshifts of the sub-DLAs. In six cases, we find possible X-ray emission within ∼1'' of the background quasar, which is consistent with the presence of a nearby X-ray source. If these nearby X-ray sources are at the redshifts of the sub-DLAs, then their estimated 0.2-10 keV luminosities range between 0.8 × 10{sup 44} h {sup –2} and 4.2 × 10{sup 44} h {sup –2} erg s{sup –1}, thus ruling out a normal late-type galaxy origin, and suggesting that the emission originates in a galactic nucleus near the center of a protogalaxy. The projected distances of these possible nearby X-ray sources from the background quasars lie in the range of 3-7 h {sup –1} kpc, which is consistent with our hypothesis that they represent AGNs centered on the sub-DLAs. Deeper follow-up X-ray and optical observations are required to confirm the marginal detections of X-rays from these sub-DLA galaxies.

  13. New X-ray microprobe system for trace heavy element analysis using ultraprecise X-ray mirror optics of long working distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Yasuko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Uruga, Tomoya

    2010-05-01

    A new X-ray microprobe system for trace heavy element analysis using ultraprecise X-ray mirror optics of 300 mm long working distance has been developed at beamline 37XU of SPring-8. A focusing test has been performed in the X-ray energy range 20-37.7 keV. A focused beam size of 1.3 μm ( V)×1.5 μm ( H) has been achieved at an X-ray energy of 30 keV, and a total photon flux of the focused beam was about 2.7×10 10 photons/s. Micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) analysis of eggplant roots has been carried out using the developed microprobe. It is clearly observed in the XRF images that cadmium is highly accumulated in the endodermis, exodermis and epidermis of roots. This study demonstrates the potential of scanning microscopy for heavy elements analysis in the high-energy X-ray region.

  14. Cloud chamber visualization of primary cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, James A.

    2013-02-07

    From 1948 until 1963, cloud chambers were carried to the top of the atmosphere by balloons. From these flights, which were begun by Edward P. Ney at the University of Minnesota, came the following results: discovery of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, development of scintillation and cherenkov detectors, discovery of cosmic ray electrons, and studies of solar proton events. The history of that era is illustrated here by cloud chamber photographs of primary cosmic rays.

  15. Correlation of individual cosmic ray nuclei with the observation of light flashes by Apollo astronauts. [nuclear emulsion detector design and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, L. S.; Osborne, W. Z.; Bailey, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear emulsion detector known as the Apollo Light Flash Moving Emulsion Detector (ALFMED) was designed: (1) to record tracks of primary cosmic rays; (2) to provide time-of-passage information via a relative plate translation technique; (3) to provide particle trajectory information; and (4) to fit into a masklike device that could be located about the head and eyes of an astronaut. An ALFMED device was worn by an astronaut observing light flashes for 60 minutes on each of the last two Apollo missions. During the Apollo 17 experiment seventeen separate flashes were reported by the observer. With one-third of the total plate area completely analyzed, two definite correlations have been found between Z greater than 8 cosmic ray nuclei traversing an eye and the reports of visual sensations.

  16. The fate of ultrahigh energy nuclei in the immediate environment of young fast-rotating pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, Kumiko; Amato, Elena; Blasi, Pasquale

    2015-08-01

    Young, fast-rotating neutron stars are promising candidate sources for the production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). The interest in this model has recently been boosted by the latest chemical composition measurements of cosmic rays, that seem to show the presence of a heavy nuclear component at the highest energies. Neutrons stars, with their metal-rich surfaces, are potentially interesting sources of such nuclei, but some open issues remain: 1) is it possible to extract these nuclei from the star's surface? 2) Do the nuclei survive the severe conditions present in the magnetosphere of the neutron star? 3) What happens to the surviving nuclei once they enter the wind that is launched outside the light cylinder? In this paper we address these issues in a quantitative way, proving that for the most reasonable range of neutron star surface temperatures (T<107 K), a large fraction of heavy nuclei survive photo-disintegration losses. These processes, together with curvature losses and acceleration in the star's electric potential, lead to injection of nuclei with a chemical composition that is mixed, even if only iron is extracted from the surface. We show that under certain conditions the chemical composition injected into the wind region is compatible with that required in previous work based on purely phenomenological arguments (typically ~50% protons, ~30% CNO and ~20% Fe), and provides a reasonable explanation of the mass abundance inferred from ultra high energy data.

  17. Neutrino and Cosmic-Ray Emission and Cumulative Background from Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows in Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Murase, Kohta; Toma, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    We study high-energy neutrino and cosmic-ray (CR) emission from the cores of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN). In LLAGN, the thermalization of particles is expected to be incomplete in radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAF), allowing the existence of non-thermal particles. In this work, assuming stochastic particle acceleration due to turbulence in RIAFs, we solve the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate spectra of escaping neutrinos and CRs. The RIAF in LLAGN can emit CR protons with ≳ 10 PeV energies and TeV-PeV neutrinos generated via pp and/or pγ reactions. We find that, if ˜1% of the accretion luminosity is carried away by non-thermal ions, the diffuse neutrino intensity from the cores of LLAGN may be as high as {E}ν 2{{Φ }}ν ˜ 3× {10}-8 {GeV} {{cm}}-2 {{s}}-1 {{sr}}-1, which can be compatible with the observed IceCube data. This result does not contradict either of the diffuse gamma-ray background observed by Fermi or observed diffuse CR flux. Our model suggests that, although very-high-energy gamma-rays may not escape, radio-quiet active galactic nuclei with RIAFs can emit GeV gamma-rays, which could be used for testing the model. We also calculate the neutron luminosity from RIAFs of LLAGN, and discuss a strong constraint on the model of jet mass loading mediated by neutrons from the diffuse neutrino observation.

  18. X-Rays of Heavy Elements for Nanotechnological Applications:. W and Pb Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2013-03-01

    Heavy elements can absorb or emit hard X-rays and hence are commonly implemented in various high energy nanotechnological applications. The absorptin or emission occurs mainly through the 1s-2p (Kα) transitions, and the process can be used as the source for production of radiation or electron in the applications. For enhanced productions of electrons and photons in the nanobiomedical applications, investigations have focused on the K-shell ionization of the atom or ion. This is because of the well-known rise in photoionization at the K-shell ionization threshold. However, experimental investigations to find any evidence of this rise has not been successful. We have developed a new method called Resonant Theranostics for biomedical applications, where we show that the energy for the rise is related to 1s-np, particularly to 1s-2p transitions which appear as resonances in the photoionization for heavy elements. The energy for the 1s-2p transitions varies some with the ionic state of the element and gives a narrow band resonant energy for the element. The strength of the process depends on the oscillator strength of the transitions. This report will demonstrate these through illustrations of the resonant energy range and strengths of photoabsorption due to K-alpha transitions using some elements, such as tungsten (W, Z=74) and lead (Pb, Z=82). An X-ray photon can ionize a high-Z element by ejection of a K-shell electron. This will create a hole or vacancy which, through the Auger process, will be filled out by an upper shell electron with emission of a photon. Such process at the resonant energy can lead to Koster-Kronig cascade giving out a number of photons and electrons as the element goes through various ionic states and can be modeled using the oscillator strengths. Such emissions are highly desirable in radiation therapy application. Present illustrations will include electric dipole allowed transitions for nine ionic states, from hydrogen to fluorine like ions

  19. Analytical Approach to Cosmic Ray Ionization by Nuclei with Charge Z in the Middle Atmosphere - Distribution of Galactic / Solar CR and SEP Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P.; Ruder, H.; Mateev, L.

    The effects of galactic and solar cosmic rays CR in the middle atmosphere are considered in this work The solar energetic particles SEP effects are important in the upper stratosphere mesosphere and lower thermosphere In fact CR determine the electric conductivity in the middle atmosphere and influence on this way on the electric processes in it CR introduce the solar variability in the middle atmosphere - because they are modulated by solar wind A new analytical approach for CR ionization by protons and nuclei with charge Z in the lower ionosphere and middle atmosphere is developed in this paper For this purpose the ionization losses dE dh according to the Bohr-Bethe-Bloch formula for the energetic charged particles are approximated in five different energy intervals similarly to Dorman Cosmic Rays in the Earth s Atmosphere and Underground Kluwer Academic Publishers Dordrecht 2004 but a few precision corrections are involved More accurate expressions for energy decrease E h and electron production rate profiles q h are derived The obtained formulas allow comparatively easy computer programming The integrand in q h gives the possibility for application of adequate numerical methods - such as Romberg method or Gauss quadrature for the solution of the mathematical problem On this way the process of interaction of cosmic ray particles with the upper middle and lower atmosphere will be described much more realistically Computations for cosmic ray ionization in the middle atmosphere are made The full CR composition is taken into account protons

  20. Half-life systematics across the N=126 shell closure: role of first-forbidden transitions in the β decay of heavy neutron-rich nuclei.

    PubMed

    Morales, A I; Benlliure, J; Kurtukián-Nieto, T; Schmidt, K-H; Verma, S; Regan, P H; Podolyák, Z; Górska, M; Pietri, S; Kumar, R; Casarejos, E; Al-Dahan, N; Algora, A; Alkhomashi, N; Álvarez-Pol, H; Benzoni, G; Blazhev, A; Boutachkov, P; Bruce, A M; Cáceres, L S; Cullen, I J; Denis Bacelar, A M; Doornenbal, P; Estévez-Aguado, M E; Farrelly, G; Fujita, Y; Garnsworthy, A B; Gelletly, W; Gerl, J; Grebosz, J; Hoischen, R; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lalkovski, S; Liu, Z; Mihai, C; Molina, F; Mücher, D; Rubio, B; Shaffner, H; Steer, S J; Tamii, A; Tashenov, S; Valiente-Dobón, J J; Walker, P M; Wollersheim, H J; Woods, P J

    2014-07-11

    This Letter reports on a systematic study of β-decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic (208)Pb. The lifetimes of the 126-neutron shell isotone (204)Pt and the neighboring (200-202)Ir, (203)Pt, (204)Au are presented together with other 19 half-lives measured during the "stopped beam" campaign of the rare isotope investigations at GSI collaboration. The results constrain the main nuclear theories used in calculations of r-process nucleosynthesis. Predictions based on a statistical macroscopic description of the first-forbidden β strength reveal significant deviations for most of the nuclei with N<126. In contrast, theories including a fully microscopic treatment of allowed and first-forbidden transitions reproduce more satisfactorily the trend in the measured half-lives for the nuclei in this region, where the r-process pathway passes through during β decay back to stability. PMID:25062171

  1. The effects of X-rays from active galactic nuclei on the interstellar medium of the surrounding galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of an active nucleus on the large-scale properties of the host galaxy are examined, focusing on the effects of X-ray heating on the host galaxy's interstellar medium. The basic properties of AGNs and several questions concerning AGNs are reviewed. The relationship between X-ray heated winds and coronae is outlined. The case of X-ray heated winds in type 2 Seyfert galaxies is discussed.

  2. Experimental spectral measurements of heavy K-edge filtered beams for x-ray computed mammotomography

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, D J; McKinley, R L; Tornai, M P

    2012-01-01

    A dual modality computed mammotomography (CmT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system for dedicated 3D breast imaging is in development. Using heavy K-edge filtration, the CmT component narrows the energy spectrum of the cone-shaped x-ray beam incident on the patient’s pendant, uncompressed breast. This quasi-monochromatic beam is expected to improve discrimination of tissue with similar attenuation coefficients while restraining absorbed dose to below that of dual view mammography. Previous simulation studies showed the optimal energy that maximizes dose efficiency for a 50/50% adipose/glandular breast is between 30 and 40 keV. This study experimentally validates these results using pre-breast and post-breast spectral measurements made under tungsten tube voltages between 40 and 100 kVp using filter materials with K-edge values ranging from 15 to 70 keV. Different filter material thicknesses are used, approximately equivalent to the 200th and 500th attenuating value layer (VL) thickness. Cerium (K = 40.4 keV) filtered post-breast spectra for 8–18 cm breasts are measured for a range of breast compositions. Figures of merit include mean beam energy, spectral full-width at tenth-maximum, beam hardening and dose for the range of breast sizes. Measurements corroborate simulation results, indicating that for a given dose, a 200th VL of cerium filtration may have optimal performance in the dedicated mammotomography paradigm. PMID:17228108

  3. High pressure X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of heavy-fermion cerium and uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Daniel

    Investigations into f- electron heavy-fermion materials have revealed a wide range of novel behavior. Hydrostatic pressure is a valuable "clean" non-thermal parameter that can be used to systematically study them by tuning their ground state properties. The rare earth compound CeCu2Ge 2 shows an unusual two-domed region of unconventional superconductivity under pressure, similar to its isostructural counterpart CeCu2Si2. While the lower pressure dome at about 10 GPa is caused by a magnetic quantum critical point (QCP), the higher one at about 16 GPa is less well understood. Previous structural measurements have indicated that it may be caused by critical valence fluctuations, so in this study the valence of CeCu 2Ge2 is directly measured using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) under pressure in a diamond anvil cell up to 20 GPa. An expected valence discontinuity is not seen, but comparisons to CeCu 2Si2 show interesting similarities. Uranium's 5f electrons are intermediate between localized and delocalized. Studying the degree of localization is vital to completely understand the properties of actinides. Performing XANES and Partial Florescence Yield (PFY) measurements in a diamond anvil cell to tune the distance between uranium atoms, I have measured the energy shift in the white line of UCu2Si2, U3Ni 5Al19, and UCd11 with pressure. A positive shift in energy indicated a delocalization of 5f electrons, a change in 5f configurations, or a combination of both.

  4. Predicted CALET Measurements of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Abundances and Electron and Positron Fluxes Using the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian

    2012-03-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (r.l.) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 r.l. of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the experiment are to measure electron energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1,000 TeV. In this paper we discuss the capability of CALET to make additional measurements by exploiting the geomagnetic field it will be exposed to in the ISS 51.6^o inclination orbit. The rare nuclei heavier than nickel (Z=28) can be resolved using the CHD and top IMC layers without requiring particle energy determination in the TASC in field regions where the rigidity cutoffs are above minimum ionization in the scintillator. CALET can also measure the distinct fluxes of cosmic ray positrons and electrons using the earth shadow of the geomagnetic field.

  5. Cosmic-ray record in solar system matter

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.; Arnold, J.R.; Lal, D.

    1983-01-14

    The energetic nuclei in cosmic rays interact with meteoroids, the moon, planets, and other solar system matter. The nucleides and heavy nuclei tracks produced by the cosmic-ray particles in these targets contain a wealth of information about the history of the objects and temporal ans spatial variations in the particle fluxes. Most lunar samples and many meteorites ahve complex histories of cosmic-ray exposure from erosion, gardening, fragmentation, orbital changes, and other processes. There appear to be variations in the past fluxes of solar particles, and possibly also galactic cosmic rays, on time scales of 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 7/ years.

  6. X-ray solution scattering of squid heavy meromyosin: strengthening the evidence for an ancient compact off state.

    PubMed

    Gillilan, Richard E; Kumar, V S Senthil; O'Neall-Hennessey, Elizabeth; Cohen, Carolyn; Brown, Jerry H

    2013-01-01

    The overall conformations of regulated myosins or heavy meromyosins from chicken/turkey, scallop, tarantula, limulus, and scorpion sources have been studied by a number of techniques, including electron microscopy, sedimentation, and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance. These studies have indicated that the binding of regulatory ions changes the conformation of the molecule from a compact shape found in the "off" state of the muscle to extended relationships between the tail and independently mobile heads that predominate in the "on" state. Here we strengthen the argument for the generality of this conformational change by using small angle X-ray scattering on heavy meromyosin from squid. Small angle X-ray scattering allows the protein to be visualized in solution under mild and relatively physiological conditions, and squid differs from the other species studied by at least 500 million years of evolution. Analysis of the data indicates that upon addition of Ca(2+) the radius of gyration increases. Differences in the squid "on" and "off" states are clearly distinguishable as bimodal and unimodal pair distance distribution functions respectively. These observations are consistent with a Ca(2+)-free squid heavy meromyosin that is compact, but which becomes extended when Ca(2+) is bound. Further, the scattering profile derived from the current model of tarantula heavy meromyosin in the "off" state is in excellent agreement with the measured "off" state scattering profile for squid heavy meromyosin. The previous and current studies together provide significant evidence that regulated myosin's compact off-state conformation is an ancient trait, inherited from a common ancestor during divergent evolution. PMID:24358137

  7. Peculiar high energy cosmic ray stratospheric event reveals a heavy primary origin particle above the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kopenkin, V.; Fujimoto, Y.

    2005-01-15

    We wish to put forward an explanation for a peculiar cosmic ray event with energy {sigma}E{sub {gamma}}{>=}2x10{sup 15} eV detected in 1975 by the balloon borne emulsion chamber experiment performed in the stratosphere, at the altitude {>=}30 km above sea level. For almost 30 years the event has been described as unusual, invoking new exotic mechanisms or models. In our opinion there is no need for an extraordinary explanation. Contrary to the widespread belief, the event gives us an example of 'unrecognized standard physics'. At the same time this event revealed a variety of features which are of considerable interest for cosmic rays, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. Here we show that the observed family is most likely to be a result of a heavy nucleus interaction with an air nucleus. In this case a primary particle would originally have been in the energy region above 'the knee' of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  8. Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao Tien; Egelhof, Peter; Gales, Sydney; Giai, Nguyen Van; Motobayashi, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    Studies at the RIKEN RI beam factory / T. Motobayashi -- Dilute nuclear states / M. Freer -- Studies of exotic systems using transfer reactions at GANIL / D. Beaumel et al. -- First results from the Magnex large-acceptance spectrometer / A. Cunsolo et al. -- The ICHOR project and spin-isospin physics with unstable beams / H. Sakai -- Structure and low-lying states of the [symbol]He exotic nucleus via direct reactions on proton / V. Lapoux et al. -- Shell gap below [symbol]Sn based on the excited states in [symbol]Cd and [symbol]In / M. Górska -- Heavy neutron-rich nuclei produced in the fragmentation of a [symbol]Pb beam / Zs. Podolyák et al. -- Breakup and incomplete fusion in reactions of weakly-bound nuclei / D.J. Hinde et al. -- Excited states of [symbol]B and [symbol]He and their cluster aspect / Y. Kanada-En'yo et al. -- Nuclear reactions with weakly-bound systems: the treatment of the continuum / C. H. Dasso, A. Vitturi -- Dynamic evolution of three-body decaying resonances / A. S. Jensen et al. -- Prerainbow oscillations in [symbol]He scattering from the Hoyle state of [symbol]C and alpha particle condensation / S. Ohkubo, Y. Hirabayashi -- Angular dispersion behavior in heavy ion elastic scattering / Q. Wang et al. -- Microscopic optical potential in relativistic approach / Z.Yu. Ma et al. -- Exotic nuclei studied in direct reactions at low momentum transfer - recent results and future perspectives at fair / P. Egelhof -- Isotopic temperatures and symmetry energy in spectator fragmentation / M. De Napoli et al. -- Multi-channel algebraic scattering theory and the structure of exotic compound nuclei / K. Amos et al. -- Results for the first feasibility study for the EXL project at the experimental storage ring at GSI / N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki et al. -- Coulomb excitation of ISOLDE neutron-rich beams along the Z = 28 chain / P. Van Duppen -- The gamma decay of the pygmy resonance far from stability and the GDR at finite temperature / G. Benzoni et al

  9. Study of Analytic Statistical Model for Decay of Light and Medium Mass Nuclei in Nuclear Fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1996-01-01

    The angular momentum independent statistical decay model is often applied using a Monte-Carlo simulation to describe the decay of prefragment nuclei in heavy ion reactions. This paper presents an analytical approach to the decay problem of nuclei with mass number less than 60, which is important for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) studies. This decay problem of nuclei with mass number less than 60 incorporates well-known levels of the lightest nuclei (A less than 11) to improve convergence and accuracy. A sensitivity study of the model level density function is used to determine the impact on mass and charge distributions in nuclear fragmentation. This angular momentum independent statistical decay model also describes the momentum and energy distribution of emitted particles (n, p, d, t, h, and a) from a prefragment nucleus.

  10. BREAKING THE {sigma}{sub 8}-{Omega} {sub m} DEGENERACY USING THE CLUSTERING OF HIGH-z X-RAY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, Spyros; Plionis, Manolis

    2010-05-10

    The clustering of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appears to be a valuable tool for extracting cosmological information. Using the recent high-precision angular clustering results of {approx}30,000 XMM-Newton soft (0.5-2 keV) X-ray sources, which have a median redshift of z {approx} 1, and assuming a flat geometry, a constant in comoving coordinates AGN clustering evolution, and the AGN bias evolution model of Basilakos et al., we manage to break the {sigma}{sub 8}-{Omega} {sub m} degeneracy. The resulting cosmological constraints are {Omega} {sub m} = 0.27{sup +0.03} {sub -0.05}, w = -0.90{sup +0.10} {sub -0.16}, and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.74{sup +0.14} {sub -0.12}, while the dark matter host halo mass, in which the X-ray selected AGNs are presumed to reside, is M = 2.50{sup +0.50} {sub -1.50} x 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}. For the constant {Lambda} model (w = -1) we find {Omega} {sub m} = 0.24 {+-} 0.06 and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.83{sup +0.11} {sub -0.16}, in good agreement with recent studies based on cluster abundances, weak lensing, and the cosmic microwave background, but in disagreement with the recent bulk flow analysis.

  11. Spatial-dependent Propagation of Cosmic Rays Results in the Spectrum of Proton, Ratios of P/P, and B/C, and Anisotropy of Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yi-Qing; Tian, Zhen; Jin, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Recent precise measurements of cosmic ray spectra revealed an anomalous hardening at ∼200 GV, observed by the ATIC, CREAM, PAMELA, and AMS02 experiments. Particularly, the latest observation of the \\bar{p}/p ratio by AMS02 demonstrated a flat distribution, which further validated the spectral anomalies of secondary particles. All those new phenomena indicated that the conventional propagation model of cosmic rays meets a challenge. In this work, the spatial-dependent diffusion coefficient D(r,z,p) is employed by tracing the source distribution under the physical picture of the two-halo model in the DRAGON package. Under such a scenario, the model calculation will result in two-component spectra for primary nuclei. Due to the smaller rigidity dependence of D(r,z,p) in the galactic disk, the ratios secondary-to-primary will inevitably be flatter and the expected anisotropy of cosmic rays will be much more attenuated than in the conventional model. As a result, we can reproduce the spectral hardening of protons, the flat ratios of \\bar{p}/p and B/C, and consistent anisotropy from ∼100 GeV to ∼100 TeV by only adopting one set of spatial-dependent diffusion coefficients D(r,z,p) in a galactic disk.

  12. Heavy nucleus collisions between 20 and 60 GeV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Interest in studying relativistic nucleus-nucleus interations arises from the fact that they offer an opportunity to probe nuclear matter at high density and temperature. It is expected that under such extreme conditions a transition from hadronic matter into quark-gluon plasma occurs and that in the interactions of highly relativistic nuclei such conditions are created. Cosmic rays remain a unique source of high energy heavy nuclei. The Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE-3) was designed to study the collisions of heavy cosmic ray nuclei with different nuclear targets at energies beyond 20 GeV/nucleon. JACEE-3 experiment was carried out using a combined electronic counters and an emulsion chamber detector, which was exposed to the cosmic rays on a balloon at an altitude of 5 g/sq cm.

  13. A Commercial off-the-shelf pMOS Transistor as X-ray and Heavy Ion Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Melo, M. A. A.; Aguiar, V. A. P.; Rallo, A.; Santos, R. B. B.; Medina, N. H.; Added, N.; Seixas, L. E., Jr.; Leite, F. G.; Cunha, F. G.; Cirne, K. H.; Giacomini, R.; de Oliveira, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor (pMOS) transistors were suggested as fit for the task of detecting and quantifying ionizing radiation dose. Linearity, small detection volume, fast readout, portability, low power consumption and low radiation attenuation are some of the pMOS advantages over PIN diode and thermoluminiscent dosimeters. A hand-held measurement system using a low power commercial off-the-shelf pMOSas the sensor would have a clear advantage due to the lower cost incurred by a standard technological process. In this research work, we tested the commercial device 3N163 regarding its behaviouras an X-ray sensor, as well as its possible application as a heavy-ion detector. To study the radiation effects of X-rays, a XRD-7000 (Shimadzu) X-ray diffraction setup was used to produce 10-keV effective energy photons. Heavy ions tests involved 12C, 16O, 19F, 28Si, 35Cl, 63Cu and 107Ag beams scattered at 15° by a 275 μg/cm2 gold target, which provide LETs (Linear Energy Transfer) from 4 to 40 MeV/mg/cm2. The signal readout was done using a 1 GHz oscilloscope with a 10-Gsamples/s conversion rate, high enough to permit the recording of transient pulses in the drain current. In this case, an ion can cause a current signal proportional to the ion beam used. Through this study it was found that a simple commercial pMOS device can be reliably used as a detector of X-rays as well as heavy ion detector.

  14. Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors for X-Ray Spectroscopy on Trapped Highly-Charged Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The application of Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors (CLTDs) has been proposed at the Heavy-Ion TRAP facility HITRAP which is currently being installed at the Helmholtz Research Center for Heavy Ion Research GSI. This cold ion trap setup will allow the investigation of X-rays from ions practically at rest, for which the excellent energy resolution of CLTDs can be used to its full advantage. However, the relatively low intensities at HITRAP demand larger solid angles and an optimized cryogenic setup. The influence of external magnetic fields has to be taken into account. CLTDs will also be a substantial part of the instrumental equipment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Heavy Ion Research (FAIR), for which a wide variety of high-precision X-ray spectroscopy experiments has been proposed. This contribution will give an overview on the chances and challenges for the application of CLTDs at HITRAP as well as perspectives for future experiments at the FAIR facility.

  15. The Energetic Trans-Iron Nuclei Experiment (ENTICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; Denolfo, G. A.; Hams, T.; Link, J. T.; Mitchell, J. W.; Sasaki, M.; Adams, J. H.; Waddington, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    The ENTICE experiment is one of two instruments that comprise the "Orbiting Astrophysical Spectrometer in Space (OASIS)" which is presently undergoing a NASA "Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study". ENTICE is designed to make high precision measurements of the abundances of individual elements from neon through the actinides and, in addition, will search for possible superheavy nuclei in the galactic cosmic rays. The ENTICE instrument utilizes silicon detectors, aerogel and acrylic Cherenkov counters, and a scintillating optical fiber hodoscope to measure the charge and energy of these ultra-heavy nuclei for energies greater than 0.3 GeV/nucleon. It is a large instrument consisting of four modules with a total effective geometrical factor of 20 m2sr. Measurements made in space for a period of 3 years with ENTICE will enable us to determine if cosmic rays include a component of recently synthesized heavy elements (Pu and Cm), what the age of that component is, and test the model of the OB association origin of galactic cosmic rays. Additionally, it will enable us to study how diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic rays operates differently on interstellar grains and gas.

  16. Ionization Processes in the Atmosphere of Titan (Research Note). III. Ionization by High-Z Nuclei Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C.; Lilensten, J.; Desorgher, L.; Fluckiger, E.; Velinov, P.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed the importance of particle precipitation in the atmosphere of Titan thanks to in-situ measurements. These ionizing particles (electrons, protons, and cosmic rays) have a strong impact on the chemistry, hence must be modeled. Aims. We revisit our computation of ionization in the atmosphere of Titan by cosmic rays. The high-energy high-mass ions are taken into account to improve the precision of the calculation of the ion production profile. Methods. The Badhwahr and O Neill model for cosmic ray spectrum was adapted for the Titan model. We used the TransTitan model coupled with the Planetocosmics model to compute the ion production by cosmic rays. We compared the results with the NAIRAS/HZETRN ionization model used for the first time for a body that differs from the Earth. Results. The cosmic ray ionization is computed for five groups of cosmic rays, depending on their charge and mass: protons, alpha, Z = 8 (oxygen), Z = 14 (silicon), and Z = 26 (iron) nucleus. Protons and alpha particles ionize mainly at 65 km altitude, while the higher mass nucleons ionize at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the ionization at higher altitude is insufficient to obscure the impact of Saturn s magnetosphere protons at a 500 km altitude. The ionization rate at the peak (altitude: 65 km, for all the different conditions) lies between 30 and 40/cu cm/s. Conclusions. These new computations show for the first time the importance of high Z cosmic rays on the ionization of the Titan atmosphere. The updated full ionization profile shape does not differ significantly from that found in our previous calculations (Paper I: Gronoff et al. 2009, 506, 955) but undergoes a strong increase in intensity below an altitude of 400 km, especially between 200 and 400 km altitude where alpha and heavier particles (in the cosmic ray spectrum) are responsible for 40% of the ionization. The comparison of several models of ionization and cosmic ray spectra (in

  17. Heavy ion fragmentation experiments at the bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative research efforts to study the fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using heavy ion beams of the Bevatron/Bevalac are described. The goal of the program is to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Effects were also made to: (a) study processes of heavy nuclei in matter, (b) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (c) test the applicability of high energy multiparticle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (d) apply the cross section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (e) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross-sections.

  18. The X-ray flux dipole of active galactic nuclei and the peculiar motion of the Local Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Boldt, Elihu

    1990-01-01

    X-ray emission from 30 resolved AGN's are used to study the dipole moment of their flux distribution on the sky. The data are derived from the Piccinotti et al. (1982) survey. X-ray fluxes are analyzed in terms of the alignment with the direction of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies. It is observed that the direction of the dipole moment of the flux is (313 deg, 38 deg); the dipole direction deviates from the LG velocity by 39 deg. It is detected that the amplitude of the dipole is about 50 percent of the corresponding monopole. Based on a comparison of the data with previous observations it is suggested that the X-ray emission from AGNs traces the underlying mass distribution at least as strongly as optical and IR emission from galaxies.

  19. MEASUREMENT OF THE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN AND HELIUM NUCLEI IN COSMIC RAYS WITH THE PAMELA EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Carbone, R.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Borisov, S.; Casolino, M.; De Pascale, M. P.; Bottai, S.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Castellini, G.; Danilchenko, I. A.; De Santis, C.; and others

    2013-06-10

    The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make new measurements of cosmic ray H and He isotopes. The isotopic composition was measured between 100 and 600 MeV/n for hydrogen and between 100 and 900 MeV/n for helium isotopes over the 23rd solar minimum from 2006 July to 2007 December. The energy spectrum of these components carries fundamental information regarding the propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy which are competitive with those obtained from other secondary to primary measurements such as B/C.

  20. Acceleration and propagation of high Z cosmic rays in a pulsar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Ryan, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The survival of high Z nuclei in the X-ray photon field of a pulsar is investigated. For heavy nuclei with energies greater than or equal to 100 GeV/nucleon, 100 keV X-ray photons have sufficient energy to cause photodisintegration with cross sections of approximately 10 to the minus 25th power sq cm. Using the observed properties of the Crab pulsar, extrapolation back to epochs when the pulsar was more active indicates that the photon field is sufficiently dense to prevent the acceleration of heavy nuclei within the velocity of light cylinder. On this model, the upper limit on the energy of the escaping nuclei varies with time. The models for cosmic ray acceleration in supernova explosions or by pulsars will be related to experimental observations.

  1. Very high energy gamma rays from active galactic nuclei: Cascading on the cosmic background radiation fields and the formation of pair halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonian, F. A.; Coppi, P. S.; Voelk, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent high-energy gamma-ray observations (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 MeV) of blazar Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) show emission spectra with no clear upper energy cutoff. AGNs, considered to be possible sources for the observed flux of cosmic rays beyond 10(exp 19) eV, may well have emission extending into the very high energy (VHE), (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV) domain. Because VHE gamma-rays are absorbed by pair production on the intergalactic background radiation fields, much of this emission may not be directly visible. The electromagnetic cascades initiated by absorbed VHE gamma-rays, however, may be observable. Since, most probably, the velocities of (e(+), e(-)) pairs produced in a cascade are quickly isotropized by an ambient random magnetic field, extended 'halos' (R greater than 1 Mpc) of pairs will be formed around AGNs with VHE emission. The cascade radiation from these pair halos is emitted isotropically and should be observable at energies below a few TeV. The halo radiation can be distinguished by its characteristic variation in spectrum and intensity with angular distance from the central source. This variation depends weakly on the details of the central source model, e.g., the orientation and beaming/opening angle of an emitting jet. Limiting or determining the intensity of the pair halo can thus serve as a model-independent bound on or measure of the VHE power of AGNs. Next-generation Cherenkov telescopes may be able to image a pair halo.

  2. The X-Ray Zurich Environmental Study (X-ZENS). I. Chandra and XMM-Newton Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei in Galaxies in nearby Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, J. D.; Miniati, F.; Finoguenov, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Cibinel, A.; Lilly, S. J.; Schawinski, K.

    2014-01-01

    We describe X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton of 18 M group ~ 1-6 × 1013 M ⊙, z ~ 0.05 galaxy groups from the Zurich ENvironmental Study. The X-ray data aim at establishing the frequency and properties, unaffected by host galaxy dilution and obscuration, of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in central and satellite galaxies, also as a function of halo-centric distance. X-ray point-source detections are reported for 22 of the 177 galaxies, down to a sensitivity level of f 0.5 - 8 keV ~ 5 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1, corresponding to a limiting luminosity of L 0.5 - 8 keV ~ 3 × 1040 erg s-1. With the majority of the X-ray sources attributed to AGNs of low-to-moderate levels (L/L Edd >~ 10-4), we discuss the detection rate in the context of the occupation of AGNs to halos of this mass scale and redshift and compare the structural and morphological properties between AGN-active and non-active galaxies. At galaxy mass scales <1011 M ⊙, central galaxies appear to be a factor of ~4 more likely to host AGNs than satellite galaxies of similar mass. This effect, coupled with the tendency for AGNs to be hosted by massive galaxies, explains the (weak) trend for AGNs to be preferentially found in the inner parts of group halos, with no detectable trend with halo-centric distance in the frequency of AGNs within the satellite population. Finally, our data indicate that the rate of decline with redshift of AGN activity in galaxy groups matches that of the global AGN population, indicating that either AGN activity occurs preferentially in group halos or that the evolution rate is independent of halo mass.

  3. The cascade ICF reactor with an x-ray and debris shield and a heavy-ion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.; Tabak, M.

    1990-09-28

    The use of a 1-kg solid-lithium x-ray and debris shield around each fusion fuel pellet prevents vaporization of, and destructive shock waves in, the Cascade blanket granules thereby increasing their lifetime. The shield vaporizes as it absorbs energy and the vapor flows into the blanket several centimeters. The shield also increases tritium breeding and enhances vacuum pumping of high Z materials that are vaporized in the fuel pellet. Using heavy ion beams allows illumination of the fuel pellets with the restricted geometry present in Cascade. We used a 5 MJ driver with 18 beams (one 3 {times} 3 array from each end).

  4. Chandra X-Ray and Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Optically Selected Kiloparsec-scale Binary Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Host Galaxy Morphology and AGN Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Jinyi; Liu, Xin; Ho, Luis C.; Shen, Yue; Peng, Chien Y.; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provide clues to how gas-rich mergers trigger and fuel AGNs and how supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs evolve in a gas-rich environment. While significant effort has been invested in their identification, the detailed properties of binary AGNs and their host galaxies are still poorly constrained. In a companion paper, we examined the nature of ionizing sources in the double nuclei of four kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs with redshifts between 0.1 and 0.2. Here, we present their host galaxy morphology based on F336W (U-band) and F105W (Y-band) images taken by the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our targets have double-peaked narrow emission lines and were confirmed to host binary AGNs with follow-up observations. We find that kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs occur in galaxy mergers with diverse morphological types. There are three major mergers with intermediate morphologies and a minor merger with a dominant disk component. We estimate the masses of the SMBHs from their host bulge stellar masses and obtain Eddington ratios for each AGN. Compared with a representative control sample drawn at the same redshift and stellar mass, the AGN luminosities and Eddington ratios of our binary AGNs are similar to those of single AGNs. The U ‑ Y color maps indicate that clumpy star-forming regions could significantly affect the X-ray detection of binary AGNs, e.g., the hardness ratio. Considering the weak X-ray emission in AGNs triggered in merger systems, we suggest that samples of X-ray-selected AGNs may be biased against gas-rich mergers. Based, in part, on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program number GO 12363.

  5. Study of heavy element structure with in-beam. cap alpha. /sup -/,. beta. /sup -/ and. gamma. -ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Decman, D.J.; Henry, E.A.; Hoff, R.W.; Mann, L.G.; Struble, G.L.; Ussery, L.E.

    1984-05-10

    We describe our in-beam superconducting conversion electron spectrometer and its use in a (t,p) proton-conversion electron coincidence mode. Several examples of completed and on-going investigations are presented. These include: E0 strength from the /sup 238/U fission isomer; electromagnetic properties of the J/sup ..pi../ = 6/sup +/ and 8/sup +/ states of /sup 210/Pb; single particle and cluster states of /sup 213/Fr; the J/sup ..pi../ = 21/2/sup +/ isomer in /sup 197/Au and /sup 199/Au; and the cluster states of /sup 199/Au. Results of the study of odd-odd deformed /sup 244/Am are presented. The latter results performed using neutron-capture gamma-ray and conversion electron techniques are compared to recent developments in the modeling of deformed odd-odd nuclei. 23 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Scintillation Detector for the Measurement of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Rays on the Super-TIGER Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Jason

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design and construction of the scintillation detectors for the Super-TIGER experiment. Super-TIGER is a large-area (5.4sq m) balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the abundances of cosmic-ray nuclei between Z= 10 and Z=56. It is based on the successful TIGER experiment that flew in Antarctica in 2001 and 2003. Super-TIGER has three layers of scintillation detectors, two Cherenkov detectors and a scintillating fiber hodoscope. The scintillation detector employs four wavelength shifter bars surrounding the edges of the scintillator to collect the light from particles traversing the detector. PMTs are optically coupled at both ends of the bars for light collection. We report on laboratory performance of the scintillation counters using muons. In addition we discuss the design challenges and detector response over this broad charge range including the effect of scintilator saturation.

  7. Superiority of Low Energy 160 KV X-Rays Compared to High Energy 6 MV X-Rays in Heavy Element Radiosensitization for Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Palmer, Alycia; Turro, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    High energy X-rays in the MeV range are generally employed in conventional radiation therapy from linear accelerators (LINAC) to ensure sufficient penetration depths. However, lower energy X-rays in the keV range may be more effective when coupled with heavy element (high-Z or HZ) radiosensitizers. Numerical simulations of X-ray energy deposition for tumor phantoms sensitized with HZ radiosensitizers were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The results showed enhancement in energy deposition to radiosensitized phantoms relative to unsensitized phantoms for low energy X-rays in the keV range. In contrast, minimal enhancement was seen using high energy X-rays in the MeV range. Dose enhancement factors (DEFs) were computed and showed radiosensitization only in the low energy range < 200 keV, far lower than the energy of the majority of photons in the LINAC energy range. In vitro studies were carried to demonstrate the tumoricidal effects of HZ sensitized F98 rat glioma cells following irradiation with both low energy 160 kV and high energy 6 MV X-ray sources. The platinum compound, pyridine terpyridine Pt(II) nitrate, was initially used because it was 7x less toxic that an equivalent amount of carboplatin in vitro studies. This would allow us to separate the radiotoxic and the chemotoxic effects of HZ sensitizers. Results from this study showed a 10-fold dose dependent reduction in surviving fractions (SF) of radiosensitized cells treated with low energy 160 kV X-rays compared to those treated with 6 MV X-rays. This is in agreement with our simulations that show an increase in dose deposition in radiosensitized tumors for low energy X-rays. Due to unforeen in vivo toxicity, however, another in vitro study was performed using the commonly used, Pt-based chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin which confirmed earlier results. This lays the ground work for a planned in vivo study using F98 glioma bearing rats. This study demonstrates that while high energy X-rays are

  8. Attenuation of gamma rays in a few types of heavy concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Abulfaraj, W.; Abdul-majid, S.; Othman, F. )

    1991-01-01

    Heavy concrete can generally be produced using heavy aggregates. Because of its high density, the material would have higher linear gamma and neutron attenuation characteristics than ordinary concrete. Several types of heavy ores abundantly available in Saudi Arabia were mixed with sand, cement, and water to produce several types of heavy concrete whose gamma attenuation properties were studied. The heavy ores selected were basalt pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), barite (BaSO{sub 4}), hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and marble (CaCO{sub 3}) these ores are usually found mixed with other ores or compounds. Pyrite can be found with pyrhotite (FeS) and a small quantity of calcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}) and sphalerite (ZnS) in addition to traces of lead, gold, and silver. Barite contains a small quantity of calcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}), galena (PbS), and quartz (SiO{sub 2}). Hematite ores may be found with goethite (HFeO{sub 2}) and magnitite (FeFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Elemental analysis of hematite shows that ores contain mostly iron with silicon with smaller quantities of aluminum, calcium, manganese, and sulfur. Marble may be found mixed with dolomite (CaCO{sub 3}{center dot}MgCO{sub 3}) in addition to trace quantities of other compounds.

  9. Intensities of high-energy cosmic rays at Mount Kanbala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of atmospheric cosmic rays at Mt. Kanbala (520 g/sq cm.) are measured with emulsion chambers. The power indexes of the spectra are values of about 2.0 for both gamma-rays and hadrons. Those fluxes are consistent with the ones expected from the model of primary cosmic rays with heavy nuclei of high content in the energy around 10 to the 15th power eV.

  10. Radiations from hot nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1993-01-01

    The investigation indicates that nuclei with excitation energy of a few hundred MeV to BeV are more likely to radiate hot nuclear clusters than neutrons. These daughter clusters could, furthermore, de-excite emitting other hot nuclei, and the chain continues until these nuclei cool off sufficiently to evaporate primarily neutrons. A few GeV excited nuclei could radiate elementary particles preferentially over neutrons. Impact of space radiation with materials (for example, spacecraft) produces highly excited nuclei which cool down emitting electromagnetic and particle radiations. At a few MeV excitation energy, neutron emission becomes more dominant than gamma-ray emission and one often attributes the cooling to take place by successive neutron decay. However, a recent experiment studying the cooling process of 396 MeV excited Hg-190 casts some doubt on this thinking, and the purpose of this investigation is to explore the possibility of other types of nuclear emission which might out-compete with neutron evaporation.

  11. An instrument to measure the spectrum of cosmic ray iron and other nuclei to above 100 GeV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, J. F.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.

    1979-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument system for the study of cosmic ray composition in the energy region beyond 100 GeV/nucleon is described. The large area detector incorporates an ionization spectrometer or calorimeter to determine the energy of the incident particles which is calibrated in flight by a gas Cerenkov counter filled with freon 12 at 20 psi. Calibration of calorimeter response indicates that the effects of ionization energy loss and nucleon fragmentation are correctly accounted for in a Monte Carlo simulation. A charge measuring module consisting of five scintillators and a lucite Cerenkov counter is used to determine the charge and position of the incoming particles. A spatial resolution of 5 to 10 cm has been obtained by using the ratios of pulse heights in different photomultiplier tubes aimed at the same scintillators within the module. The detector represents the heaviest cosmic ray experiment that can be flown over 30 km using the dynamic launching technique commonly employed.

  12. An Instrument to Measure Elemental Energy Spectra of Cosmic Ray Nuclei Up to 10(exp 16) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov,S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    A longstanding goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of cosmic rays up to and through the "knee" (approx. equal to 3 x 10 (exp 15) eV. It is not currently feasible to achieve this goal with an ionization calorimeter because the mass required to be deployed in Earth orbit is very large (at least 50 tonnes). An alternative method will be presented. This is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer using silicon microstrip detector technology. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11)- 10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a design for a new lightweight instrument with a large aperture (KLEM) will be described.

  13. The systematic study of N/Z dependence on surface diffuseness parameter in the fusion of heavy neutron-rich colliding nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Suman; Dutt, Ishwar

    2016-05-01

    Surface diffuseness parameter used in Woods-Saxon form of potential have been extracted from a large number of experimentally studied neutron-rich fusion cross sections at near barrier energies. The results of our systematic study reveals that the extracted diffuseness parameter depend linearly on the N/Z ratio of the fusing nuclei. Further, we demonstrated that the extracted values of surface diffuseness parameter lies within the range a = 0.40 to 0.77 fm as compared to commonly accepted value form scattering i.e. 0.63 fm.

  14. Determination of heavy metals in macrozoobenthos from the rivers Tisza and Szamos by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woelfl, S.; Mages, M.; Óvári, M.; Geller, W.

    2006-11-01

    In 2000, accidents in the Romanian mining industry in key catchment areas led to heavy metal contamination of the Hungarian rivers Tisza and Szamos resulting in substantial heavy metal loads in several sediments of the upper river basins. This enhanced metal content might have been bioaccumulated in benthic organisms during the following years. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test, whether the zoobenthic fauna showed an enhanced metal content 3 years after the industrial accident. Macrozoobenthic insect larvae (chironomids) were sampled 100 m below and above the confluent site of the rivers Tisza and Szamos during summer 2003 and for comparison purpose also in the river Maros, a tributary of the Tisza river, during 2005. In order to determine their heavy metal content, single specimens were prepared and analysed by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TRXF) according to the modified dry method. Fe was much lower and Mn and Zn much higher concentrated in benthos from the more contaminated Szamos river compared to the Tisza and Maros rivers. In this sense, the benthic organisms reflected very well the enhanced metal concentrations in the contaminated rivers being suitable as bioindicators of metal contamination. However, the sediment bioaccumulation factor was low at all sampling sites indicating a low bioavailability of trace metals for benthic organisms.

  15. RADIO STACKING REVEALS EVIDENCE FOR STAR FORMATION IN THE HOST GALAXIES OF X-RAY-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AT z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, C. M.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Ivison, R. J.

    2011-11-20

    Nuclear starbursts may contribute to the obscuration of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The predicted star formation rates (SFRs) are modest, and, for the obscured AGNs that form the X-ray background at z < 1, the associated faint radio emission lies just beyond the sensitivity limits of the deepest surveys. Here, we search for this level of star formation by studying a sample of 359 X-ray-selected AGNs at z < 1 from the Cosmic Evolution Survey field that are not detected by current radio surveys. The AGNs are separated into bins based on redshift, X-ray luminosity, obscuration, and mid-infrared characteristics. An estimate of the AGN contribution to the radio flux density is subtracted from each radio image, and the images are then stacked to uncover any residual faint radio flux density. All of the bins containing 24 {mu}m detected AGNs are detected with a signal-to-noise >3{sigma} in the stacked radio images. In contrast, AGNs not detected at 24 {mu}m are not detected in the resulting stacked radio images. This result provides strong evidence that the stacked radio signals are likely associated with star formation. The estimated SFRs derived from the radio stacks range from 3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} to 29 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Although it is not possible to associate the radio emission with a specific region of the host galaxies, these results are consistent with the predictions of nuclear starburst disks in AGN host galaxies.

  16. CHANDRA X-RAY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF OPTICALLY SELECTED KILOPARSEC-SCALE BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. NATURE OF THE NUCLEAR IONIZING SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Civano, Francesca; Shen, Yue; Green, Paul; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-01-10

    Kiloparsec-scale binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) signal active supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs in merging galaxies. Despite their significance, unambiguously confirmed cases remain scarce and most have been discovered serendipitously. In a previous systematic search, we optically identified four kpc-scale binary AGNs from candidates selected with double-peaked narrow emission lines at z = 0.1-0.2. Here, we present Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of these four systems. We critically examine and confirm the binary-AGN scenario for two of the four targets, by combining high angular resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra ACIS-S, better nuclear position constraints from WFC3 F105W imaging, and direct starburst estimates from WFC3 F336W imaging; for the other two targets, the existing data are still consistent with the binary-AGN scenario, but we cannot rule out the possibility of only one AGN ionizing gas in both merging galaxies. We find tentative evidence for a systematically smaller X-ray-to-[O III] luminosity ratio and/or higher Compton-thick fraction in optically selected kpc-scale binary AGNs than in single AGNs, possibly caused by a higher nuclear gas column due to mergers and/or a viewing angle bias related to the double-peak narrow-line selection. While our result lends some further support to the general approach of optically identifying kpc-scale binary AGNs, it also highlights the challenge and ambiguity of X-ray confirmation.

  17. BROADBAND X-RAY SPECTRA OF TWO LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI NGC 1566 AND NGC 4941 OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi

    2013-06-20

    We report the first broadband X-ray spectra of the low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs), NGC 1566 (type 1.5) and NGC 4941 (type 2), observed with Suzaku and Swift/BAT covering the 0.5-195 keV band. Both targets have hard X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 41-42} erg s{sup -1} in the 15-55 keV band. The spectra of the nucleus are well reproduced by a sum of partially or fully covered transmitted emission and its reflection from the accretion disk, reprocessed emission from the torus accompanied by a strong narrow iron-K{alpha} line, and a scattered component (for NGC 4941). We do not significantly detect a broad iron-K{alpha} line from the inner accretion disk in both targets, and obtain an upper limit on the corresponding solid angle of {Omega}/2{pi} < 0.3 in NGC 1566. The reflection strength from the torus is moderate, {Omega}/2{pi}=0.45{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10} in NGC 1566 and {Omega}/2{pi}=0.64{sup +0.69}{sub -0.27} in NGC 4941. Comparison of the equivalent width of the narrow iron-K{alpha} line with a model prediction based on a simple torus geometry constrains its half-opening angle to be {theta}{sub oa} {approx_equal} 60 Degree-Sign -70 Degree-Sign in NGC 4941. These results agree with the obscured AGN fraction obtained from hard X-ray and mid-infrared selected samples at similar luminosities. Our results support the implication that the averaged covering fraction of AGN tori is peaked at L {approx} 10{sup 42-43} erg s{sup -1} but decreases toward lower luminosities.

  18. Radiation Mechanism and Jet Composition of Gamma-Ray Bursts and GeV-TeV-selected Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Liang, En-Wei; Sun, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Bing; Lu, Ye; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2013-09-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and GeV-TeV-selected radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are compared based on our systematic modeling of the observed spectral energy distributions of a sample of AGNs with a single-zone leptonic model. We show that the correlation between the jet power (P jet) and the prompt gamma-ray luminosity (L jet) of GRBs is consistent, within the uncertainties, with the correlation between jet power and the synchrotron peak luminosity (L s, jet) of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Their radiation efficiencies (ε) are also comparable (>10% for most sources), which increase with the bolometric jet luminosity (L bol, jet) for FSRQs and with the L jet for GRBs with similar power-law indices. BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) do not follow the P jet-L s, jet relation of FSRQs. They have lower ε and L bol, jet values than FSRQs, and a tentative L bol, jet-ε relation is also found, with a power-law index different from that of the FSRQs. The magnetization parameters (σ) of FSRQs are on average larger than that of BL Lacs. They are anti-correlated with ε for the FSRQs, but positively correlated with ε for the BL Lacs. GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies potentially share similar properties with FSRQs. Based on the analogy between GRBs and FSRQs, we suggest that the prompt gamma-ray emission of GRBs is likely produced by the synchrotron process in a magnetized jet with high radiation efficiency, similar to FSRQs. The jets of BL Lacs, on the other hand, are less efficient and are likely more matter-dominated.

  19. Galactic cosmic ray composition and energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Galactic cosmic ray nuclei represent a significant risk to long-duration spaceflight outside the magnetosphere. We review briefly existing measurements of the composition and energy spectra of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, pointing out which species and energy ranges are most critical to assessing cosmic ray risks for spaceflight. Key data sets are identified and a table of cosmic ray abundances is presented for elements from H to Ni (Z = 1 to 28). Because of the 22-year nature of the solar modulation cycle, data from the approaching 1998 solar minimum is especially important to reducing uncertainties in the cosmic ray radiation hazard. It is recommended that efforts to model this hazard take advantage of approaches that have been developed to model the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays.

  20. The properties of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei. II - A deeper look at the cosmological evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Della Ceca, Roberto; Maccacaro, Tommaso; Gioia, Isabella M.; Wolter, Anna; Stocke, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed study of the cosmological properties of X-ray selected AGN is presented. The data are analyzed within the framework of a pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model and the two most population evolutionary forms. Evidence is found for luminosity-dependent luminosity evolution if the evolution function has the exponential form. The simpler PLE model is more acceptable if the data are fitted with a power-law evolution function. Similar results are obtained in the optical domain from an analysis of a sample of optically selected QSOs with z less than 2.2 and B less than 20.