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Sample records for rayonnements ionisants cancers

  1. Les neuropeptides gastro-intestinaux cibles des effets des rayonnements ionisants : altérations fonctionnelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linard, C.; Esposito, V.; Wysocki, J.; Griffiths, N. M.

    1998-04-01

    The symptoms associated with exposure to ionizing radiation are nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea. The response of the gut is complex involving modifications of motility and fluid and electrolyte transport. Gastrointestinal regulatory peptides have an important role in these functions. This study showed that radiation-induced tissue variations of neuropeptides have some repercussions on intestinal biological activity of these peptides soon after irradiation. In addition such modifications are also seen a few years after irradiation. Les symptômes associés à l'exposition aux rayonnements ionisants sont des nausées, vomissements et diarrhées. La réponse du système digestif est complexe, impliquant des modifications de la motilité et du transport d'eau et d'électrolytes. les neuropeptides gastro-intestinaux ont un rôle important dans ces fonctions. Cette étude montre que les variations tissulaires de ces neuropeptides induites par l'irradiation ont des répercussions sur l'activité biologique intestinale pour des temps précoces mais que ces perturbations sont encore visibles quelques années après l'irradiation.

  2. [Thyroid cancer following exposure to ionising radiation].

    PubMed

    Schlumberger, M; Chevillard, S; Ory, K; Dupuy, C; Le Guen, B; de Vathaire, F

    2011-08-01

    Exposure to ionising radiations during childhood increases the risk of thyroid cancer. Similar risk factors have been found after external radiation exposure or internal contamination with radioactive iodine isotopes. In case of contamination with radioiodines, administration of potassium iodide can prevent thyroid irradiation. PMID:21723770

  3. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk. PMID:26126928

  4. Age at exposure to ionising radiation and cancer mortality among Hanford workers: follow up through 1994

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S; Richardson, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Studies of workers at the plutonium production factory in Hanford, WA have led to conflicting conclusions about the role of age at exposure as a modifier of associations between ionising radiation and cancer. Aims: To evaluate the influence of age at exposure on radiation risk estimates in an updated follow up of Hanford workers. Methods: A cohort of 26 389 workers hired between 1944 and 1978 was followed through 1994 to ascertain vital status and causes of death. External radiation dose estimates were derived from personal dosimeters. Poisson regression was used to estimate associations between mortality and cumulative external radiation dose at all ages, and in specific age ranges. Results: A total of 8153 deaths were identified, 2265 of which included cancer as an underlying or contributory cause. Estimates of the excess relative risk per Sievert (ERR/Sv) for cumulative radiation doses at all ages combined were negative for all cause and leukaemia and positive for all cancer and lung cancer. Cumulative doses accrued at ages below 35, 35–44, and 45–54 showed little association with mortality. For cumulative dose accrued at ages 55 and above (10 year lag), the estimated ERR/Sv for all cancers was 3.24 (90% CI: 0.80 to 6.17), primarily due to an association with lung cancer (ERR/Sv: 9.05, 90% CI: 2.96 to 17.92). Conclusions: Associations between radiation and cancer mortality in this cohort are primarily a function of doses at older ages and deaths from lung cancer. The association of older age radiation exposures and cancer mortality is similar to observations from several other occupational studies. PMID:15961623

  5. Risk of cancer after low doses of ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study in 15 countries

    PubMed Central

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M; Gilbert, E; Hakama, M; Hill, C; Howe, G; Kaldor, J; Muirhead, C R; Schubauer-Berigan, M; Yoshimura, T; Bermann, F; Cowper, G; Fix, J; Hacker, C; Heinmiller, B; Marshall, M; Thierry-Chef, I; Utterback, D; Ahn, Y-O; Amoros, E; Ashmore, P; Auvinen, A; Bae, J-M; Solano, J Bernar; Biau, A; Combalot, E; Deboodt, P; Sacristan, A Diez; Eklof, M; Engels, H; Engholm, G; Gulis, G; Habib, R; Holan, K; Hyvonen, H; Kerekes, A; Kurtinaitis, J; Malker, H; Martuzzi, M; Mastauskas, A; Monnet, A; Moser, M; Pearce, M S; Richardson, D B; Rodriguez-Artalejo, F; Rogel, A; Tardy, H; Telle-Lamberton, M; Turai, I; Usel, M; Veress, K

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To provide direct estimates of risk of cancer after protracted low doses of ionising radiation and to strengthen the scientific basis of radiation protection standards for environmental, occupational, and medical diagnostic exposures. Design Multinational retrospective cohort study of cancer mortality. Setting Cohorts of workers in the nuclear industry in 15 countries. Participants 407 391 workers individually monitored for external radiation with a total follow-up of 5.2 million person years. Main outcome measurements Estimates of excess relative risks per sievert (Sv) of radiation dose for mortality from cancers other than leukaemia and from leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, the main causes of death considered by radiation protection authorities. Results The excess relative risk for cancers other than leukaemia was 0.97 per Sv, 95% confidence interval 0.14 to 1.97. Analyses of causes of death related or unrelated to smoking indicate that, although confounding by smoking may be present, it is unlikely to explain all of this increased risk. The excess relative risk for leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia was 1.93 per Sv (< 0 to 8.47). On the basis of these estimates, 1-2% of deaths from cancer among workers in this cohort may be attributable to radiation. Conclusions These estimates, from the largest study of nuclear workers ever conducted, are higher than, but statistically compatible with, the risk estimates used for current radiation protection standards. The results suggest that there is a small excess risk of cancer, even at the low doses and dose rates typically received by nuclear workers in this study. PMID:15987704

  6. Risk of cancer from occupational exposure to ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study of workers in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States (INWORKS)

    PubMed Central

    Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; Gillies, Michael; O’Hagan, Jacqueline A; Hamra, Ghassan B; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; Moissonnier, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is protracted exposure to low doses of ionising radiation associated with an increased risk of solid cancer? Methods In this cohort study, 308 297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66 632 known deaths by the end of follow-up, 17 957 were due to solid cancers. Study answer and limitations Results suggest a linear increase in the rate of cancer with increasing radiation exposure. The average cumulative colon dose estimated among exposed workers was 20.9 mGy (median 4.1 mGy). The estimated rate of mortality from all cancers excluding leukaemia increased with cumulative dose by 48% per Gy (90% confidence interval 20% to 79%), lagged by 10 years. Similar associations were seen for mortality from all solid cancers (47% (18% to 79%)), and within each country. The estimated association over the dose range of 0-100 mGy was similar in magnitude to that obtained over the entire dose range but less precise. Smoking and occupational asbestos exposure are potential confounders; however, exclusion of deaths from lung cancer and pleural cancer did not affect the estimated association. Despite substantial efforts to characterise the performance of the radiation dosimeters used, the possibility of measurement error remains. What this study adds The study provides a direct estimate of the association between protracted low dose exposure to ionising radiation and solid cancer mortality. Although high dose rate exposures are thought to be more dangerous than low dose rate exposures, the risk per unit of radiation dose for cancer among radiation workers was similar to estimates derived from studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Quantifying the cancer risks associated

  7. [Low dose ionising radiation and cancer: findings and methods. Report of a meeting and consequences for Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Schüler, G; Gutzwiller, F

    1991-01-01

    Today's society is concerned about the dangers of ionising radiation, especially in the aftermath of Chernobyl. On the other hand, there exists a widespread lack of understanding radiation biology and radioepidemiology--the very sciences which provide the data from which today's risk estimates have been derived. The papers in this issue of the Journal were presented at a workshop on "Low level radiation and cancer: data and methods" held on 10th-11th December in Feuisberg, near Zurich. The meeting was organised by the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine of the University of Zurich under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health. Its aims were threefold. First, to give an introduction to some basic facts and methodological issues in radiation physics, biology and epidemiology. Secondly, to give an overview of the availability of data for radioepidemiological research in Switzerland and, thirdly, to evaluate possible research strategies in this country. A list of some notions and units commonly used in the radiation sciences serves an an introduction to the field (G. Schüler et al.). In using units and notions it is important to distinguish the description of biological experiments and epidemiological observations from definitions and risk projections proposed by international reports and consensus bodies for radioprotection purposes. The next papers deal more specifically with selected aspects of the basic sciences. Dosimetry means quantifying the physical effects of ionizing radiation in human tissue; this is not a straight-forward procedure (I. Cordt). The foundations of general radiation biology are succinctly summarised by C. Michel. An account of our present knowledge and theories of radiation carcinogenesis is provided by W. Burkart. W Lutz compares dose-response models of chemical carcinogenesis with those used in radiation carcinogenesis. During the last decade the epidemiological foundations of radioprotection have changed

  8. Strong ionisation in carbon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaymak, V.; Pukhov, A.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Rocca, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Surfaces covered with nanostructures, such as nanowire arrays, are shown to facilitate a significantly higher absorption of laser energy as compared to flat surfaces. Due to the efficient coupling of the laser energy, highly energetic electrons are produced, which in turn can emit intense ultrafast X-ray pulses. Full three dimensional PIC simulations are used to analyse the behaviour of arrays of carbon nanowires 400 nm in diameter, irradiated by a 400-nm laser pulse of 60-fs duration at FWHM and a vector potential of α0 = 18. We analyse the ionisation dynamics of the nanowires. The difference of the ionisation strength and structure between linearly and circularly polarised laser beam is investigated. The nanowires are found to be fully ionised after about 30 laser cycles. Circularly polarised light reveals a slightly stronger ionisation effect.

  9. Recombination processes in ionised plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, Robert

    The observational analysis of astrophysical plasmas relies on accurate calculations of the atomic processes involved. The recombination spectra of singly ionised oxygen (O il) and carbon (C il) present excellent tools for investigating regions such as planetary nebulae and H II regions. In this thesis, detailed treatments of the recombination processes of both O II and C II are presented. Using the R-matrix solution to the close coupling equations, I present the results of accurate photoionisation calculations. Bound state energy levels are determined and oscillator strengths calculated for both species. Recombination coefficients were evalu ated for low n and 1, for C II in LS-coupling, and 0 II in intermediate coupling, taking particular care to treat resonances effectively. Sample photoionisation cross-sections are presented for both species, and compared to previous work. A complete radiative-cascade model is treated for both species, in order to determine line emissivities under nebular conditions at a wide range of temperatures and densities. Collisional effects are treated for C II, along with, for the first time, the effects of high temperature dielectronic recombination, allowing the modelling of regions of much higher electron temperature than previous work. The O II calculations were performed under intermediate coupling for the first time, allowing the effects of non-statistical popula tions of the parent ion fine-structure levels and dielectronic recombination onto bound states within this fine-structure to be taken into account in line emissivities. Detailed comparison with previous theoretical work was made for both species. The application of the C II and 0 n recombination spectra to determining tempera ture and densities from the observed spectra of a number of ionised nebulae is considered. The potential for using the new recombination spectra as diagnostic tools to solve some of the key problems in the study of ionised nebulae is demonstrated.

  10. Some characteristics of the glutathione cycle revealed by ionising and non-ionising electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Holt, J A

    1995-10-01

    The cyclic reaction of GSH-->GSSG-->GSH (designated R(exp) or R(e)) obeys the three specific features of life by producing energy in exponential quantities relative to time, is in effect irreversible and is inherited from generation to generation. In multicellular life, this reaction produces the energy for mitosis and is kept in controlled inactivity until needed to maintain perfection of form and function by energising mitosis. The immediate control of Re appears to be feedback process-dependent on the concentration of GSSG. Ultra high-frequency electromagnetic radiation of 434 MHz (UHF) will change Re from inactive to active and, in so doing, it causes resonance and/or fluorescence of the glutathione cycle which changes its radiosensitivity. Re is the primary direct target of ionising radiation and produces the energy for mitosis. Clinical observations suggest that, in the normal cell, Re is inactive and is not killed by 3 x 2700 rads or 6 x 1650 rads yet, when active, its sensitivity value (DO) is approximately 160 rads. Using the standard radiobiological equation of response to ionising radiation, it can be deduced that radiosensitive cancers have two or three Re units active per cell and radioresistance increases in proportion to the number of potentially active Re units per cell. Re appears to be the main cause of cancers' increased conductivity of electricity compared with normal tissue. In cancer therapy, UHF is the best radiosensitiser ever discovered (up to two or more decades). Re is also intelligent compared with non-exponential reactions but cannot be the basis of intellectual brain functions which must be based on non-electrical chemical processes. PMID:8577298

  11. Ionisation as indicator for cosmic ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuppan, F.; Röken, C.; Fedrau, N.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2014-06-01

    Astrospheres and wind bubbles of massive stars are believed to be sources of cosmic rays with energies E ≲ 1 TeV. These particles are not directly detectable, but their impact on surrounding matter, in particular ionisation of atomic and molecular hydrogen, can lead to observable signatures. A correlation study of both gamma ray emission, induced by proton-proton interactions of cosmic ray protons with kinetic energies Ep ≥ 280 MeV with ambient hydrogen, and ionisation induced by cosmic ray protons of kinetic energies Ep < 280 MeV can be performed in order to study potential sources of (sub)TeV cosmic rays.

  12. Occupational exposure to ionising radiation and mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Artalejo, F; Castaño Lara, S; de Andrés Manzano, B; García Ferruelo, M; Iglesias Martín, L; Calero, J R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Firstly, to ascertain whether mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board (Junta de Energía Nuclear-JEN) was higher than that for the Spanish population overall; and secondly, if this were so, to ascertain whether this difference was associated with exposure to ionising radiation. METHODS: A retrospective follow up of a cohort of 5657 workers was carried out for the period 1954-92. Cohort mortality was compared with that for the Spanish population overall, with standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) adjusted for sex, age, and calendar period. Also, Poisson models were used to analyse mortality from lung cancer in the cohort by level of exposure to ionising radiation. RESULTS: Workers' median and mean cumulative exposures were 4.04 and 11.42 mSv, respectively. Mean annual exposure was 1.33 mSv. Excess mortality due to bone tumours was found for the cohort as a whole (six deaths observed; SMR 2.95; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.08 to 6.43). Among miners, excess mortality was found for non-malignant respiratory diseases (SMR 2.94; 95% CI 2.27 to 3.75), and for lung cancer bordering on statistical significance (SMR 1.50; 95% CI 0.96 to 2.23; P = 0.055). Relative risks of dying of lung cancer from ionising radiation in the dose quartiles 2, 3, and 4 versus the lowest dose quartile, were 1.00, 1.64, and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Excess mortality from lung cancer was found among JEN miners. Nevertheless, no clear relation was found between mortality from lung cancer and level of exposure to ionising radiation in the JEN cohort. Continued follow up of the cohort is required to confirm excess mortality from bone tumours. PMID:9155782

  13. Apport du rayonnement synchrotron à l'étude de cheveux archéologiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, L.; Chevallier, P.; Doucet, J.; Simionovici, A.; Tsoucaris, G.; Walter, P.

    2002-07-01

    La préservation dans certains contextes archéologiques des cheveux humains et des fibres animales est favorisée par leur transformation chimique au contact d'objets métalliques. Afin de mieux comprendre les phénomènes complexes mis en jeu, nous avons étudié expérimentalement la fixation de cations métalliques (Cu et Pb) dans des cheveux modèles à partir de différentes méthodes de caractérisation utilisant le rayonnement X synchrotron. Nous avons ainsi pu mettre en évidence la fixation spécifique d'une partie de ces cations au sein des lipides structurés du cheveu. La comparaison entre échantillons modèles et archéologiques apporte de nouvelles données concernant les premières étapes d'altération des cheveux archéologiques.

  14. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  15. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B

    2016-07-21

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these. PMID:27351409

  16. Étude des perturbations conduites et rayonnées dans une cellule de commutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, F.; Forest, F.; Puzo, A.; Rojat, G.

    1993-12-01

    The principles used in static conversion and the rise of the performances of the new switching devices contribue to increase the level of electromagnetic noises emitted by electronic converters. We have studied the way how these perturbations are created and coupled through their environment in conducted and radiated mode by a switching cell. This one can work in hard switching, zero current or voltage switching modes. We first outline the general problems of electromagnetic pollution and their metrology in converters. Then we describe the experimental environment. We analyse the mechanisms of generation of parasitic signals in a switching cell related to the electrical constraints and its switching mode. The simulated results, issued of the analytical models obtained, are confronted with the experimental ones. Then we show a method to calculate analytically the E and H near fields. It has been confirmed by experimental results. At last, we present, in a synthetic manner, the main results obtained, relative to the switching mode and the electrical constraints, using a new characterizing method. Theses results will allow the designer to incorporate the electromagnetic considerations in the conception of a converter. Les principes de commutation employés en conversion statique, l'évolution des performances statiques et dynamiques des composants, contribuent à faire des dispositifs de conversion statique de puissants générateurs de perturbations conduites et rayonnées. Nous nous sommes attachés à étudier les mécanismes de génération et de couplage des perturbations, tant en mode conduit que rayonné dans des structures à une seule cellule de commutation et fonctionnant selon les trois principaux modes de commutation : commutation forcée, à zéro de courant (ZCS), et à zéro de tension (ZVS). Après la mise en évidence de la problématique de pollution électromagnétique dans les structures et leur métrologie, nous décrivons l'environnement exp

  17. Determination of structure parameters in molecular tunnelling ionisation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in a molecular tunnelling ionisation model (the so-called MO-ADK model) for 23 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behaviour are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model. We show that the orientation-dependent ionisation rate reflects the shape of the ionising orbitals in general. The influences of the Stark shifts of the energy levels on the orientation-dependent ionisation rates of the polar molecules are studied. We also examine the angle-dependent ionisation rates (or probabilities) based on the MO-ADK model by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation calculations and with recent experimental measurements.

  18. Ionising radiation: are orthopaedic surgeons at risk?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G. L.; Briggs, T. W.; Lavy, C. B.; Nordeen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Modern orthopaedic trauma practice involves increased exposure of the surgeon to ionising radiation. However, there have been no studies to investigate whether the doses received are within limits for non-classified workers. In this study, whole body, eye and extremity, namely hand, doses were measured in six orthopaedic surgeons during trauma cases requiring the use of X-rays in theatre. None of the subjects approached the recommended maximum dose levels for either the whole body, eyes or hands. This finding is reassuring. In orthopaedics, the limiting dose is that to the hands. This differs from previously studied groups, such as radiologists and cardiologists, in whom the limiting factor is the dose to the lens of the eye. Although current precautions appear to be adequate, safe practice in the future will depend on continuing vigilance and repetition of studies similar to this one as techniques and workloads change. PMID:1416705

  19. Single site double core level ionisation of OCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, L.; Tashiro, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ehara, M.; Ueda, K.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Feifel, R.

    2014-08-01

    Single site O1s, C1s and S2p double ionisation of the OCS molecule has been investigated using a magnetic bottle multi-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer. Photon energies of 1300, 750 and 520 eV, respectively, were used for the ionisation, and spectra were obtained from which the double core ionisation energies could be determined. The energies measured for 1s double ionisation are 1172 eV (O1s-2) and 659 eV (C1s-2). For the S2p double ionisation three dicationic states are expected, 3P, 1D and 1S. The ionisation energies obtained for these states are 373 eV (3P), 380 eV (1D) and 388 eV (1S). The ratio between the double and single core ionisation energies are in all cases equal or close to 2.20. Auger spectra of OCS, associated with the O1s-2, C1s-2 and S2p-2 dicationic states, were also recorded incorporating both electrons emitted as a result of the filling of the two core vacancies. As for other small molecules, the spectra show an atomic-like character with Auger bands located in the range 480-560 eV for oxygen, 235-295 eV for carbon and 100-160 eV for sulphur. The interpretation of the spectra is supported by CASSCF and CASCI calculations. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 3.7 × 10-4 for oxygen at 1300 eV, 3.7 × 10-4 for carbon at 750 eV and as 2.2 × 10-3 for sulphur at 520 eV.

  20. Cosmic-ray ionisation of dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupre, Solenn

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) are of tremendous importance in the dynamical and chemical evolution of interstellar molecular clouds, where stars and planets form. CRs are likely accelerated in the shells of supernova remnants (SNR), thus molecular clouds nearby can be irradiated by intense fluxes of CRs. CR protons have two major effects on dense molecular clouds: 1) when they encounter the dense medium, high-energy protons (>280 MeV) create pions that decay into gamma-rays. This process makes SNR-molecular cloud associations intense GeV and/or TeV sources whose spectra mimic the CR spectrum. 2) at lower energies, CRs penetrate the cloud and ionise the gas, leading to the formation of molecular species characteristic of the presence of CRs, called tracers of the ionisation. Studying these tracers gives information on low-energy CRs that are unaccessible to any other observations. I studied the CR ionisation of molecular clouds next to three SNRs: W28, W51C and W44. These SNRs are known to be interacting with the nearby clouds, from the presence of shocked gas, OH masers and pion-decay induced gamma-ray emission. My work includes millimeter observations and chemical modeling of tracers of the ionisation in these dense molecular clouds. In these three regions, we determined an enhanced CR ionisation rate, supporting the hypothesis of an origin of the CRs in the SNR nearby. The evolution of the CR ionisation rate with the distance to the SNR brings valuable constraints on the propagation properties of low-energy CRs. The method used relies on observations of the molecular ions HCO+ and DCO+, which shows crucial limitations at high ionisation. Therefore, I investigated, both through modeling and observations, the chemical abundances of several other species to try and identity alternative tracers of the ionisation. In particular, in the W44 region, observations of N2H+ bring additional constraints on the physical conditions, volatile abundances in the cloud, and the ionisation

  1. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, I; Dini, V; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Biffoni, M; Balduzzi, M; Fratini, E; Belli, M; Campa, A; Esposito, G; Cirrone, G; Romano, F; Stancampiano, C; Pelacchi, F; Pallini, R; Tabocchini, M A

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with (137)Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u(-1) in the dose range of 5-40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality. PMID:25969527

  2. The effectiveness of photocatalytic ionisation disinfection of filter materials.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Katarzyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of photocatalytic ionisation as a disinfection method for filter materials contaminated by microorganisms, and to assess how air relative humidity (RH), time and microbe type influence the effectiveness of this disinfection. In the quantitative analysis of a used car air filter, bacterial contamination equalled 1.2 x 10(5) cfu/cm2, fungal contamination was 3.8 x 10(6) cfu/cm2, and the isolated microorganisms were Aspergillus niger, Bacillus megaterium, Cladosporium herbarum, Cryptococcus laurenti, Micrococcus sp., Rhodotorula glutinis and Staphylococcus cohnii. In the model experiment, three isolates (C. herbarum, R. glutinis, S. cohnii) and 3 ATCC species (A. niger, E. coli, S. aureus) were used for photocatalytic ionisation disinfection. The conditions of effective photocatalytic ionisation disinfection (R > or = 99.9%) were established as 2-3 h at RH = 77% (bacteria) and 6-24 h at RH = 53% (fungi). RH has an influence on the effectiveness of the photocatalytic disinfection process; the highest effectiveness was obtained for bacteria at RH = 77%, with results 5% higher than for RH = 49%. The studies show that the sensitivity of microorganisms to photocatalytic ionisation disinfection is ordered as follows: Gram-positive bacteria (S. cohnii, S. aureus), Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli), yeasts (R. glutinis), and moulds (C. herbarum, A. niger). Of all the mathematical models used for the description of death dynamics after photocatalytic ionisation disinfection, the Chick-Watson model is the most useful, but for more resistant microorganisms, the delayed Chick-Watson model is highly recommended. It therefore seems, that the presented disinfection method of photocatalytic ionisation can be successfully used to clean filtration materials. PMID:24053016

  3. Chemical profile of mango (Mangifera indica L.) using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Bruno G; Costa, Helber B; Ventura, José A; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Barroso, Maria E S; Correia, Radigya M; Pimentel, Elisângela F; Pinto, Fernanda E; Endringer, Denise C; Romão, Wanderson

    2016-08-01

    Mangifera indica L., mango fruit, is consumed as a dietary supplement with purported health benefits; it is widely used in the food industry. Herein, the chemical profile of the Ubá mango at four distinct maturation stages was evaluated during the process of growth and maturity using negative-ion mode electrospray ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI(-)FT-ICR MS) and physicochemical characterisation analysis (total titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), TSS/TA ratio, and total polyphenolic content). Primary (organic acids and sugars) and secondary metabolites (polyphenolic compounds) were mostly identified in the third maturation stage, thus indicating the best stage for harvesting and consuming the fruit. In addition, the potential cancer chemoprevention of the secondary metabolites (phenolic extracts obtained from mango samples) was evaluated using the induction of quinone reductase activity, concluding that fruit polyphenols have the potential for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26988473

  4. Comparison of low and high dose ionising radiation using topological analysis of gene coexpression networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The growing use of imaging procedures in medicine has raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionising radiation (LDIR). While the disastrous effects of high dose ionising radiation (HDIR) is well documented, the detrimental effects of LDIR is not well understood and has been a topic of much debate. Since little is known about the effects of LDIR, various kinds of wet-lab and computational analyses are required to advance knowledge in this domain. In this paper we carry out an “upside-down pyramid” form of systems biology analysis of microarray data. We characterised the global genomic response following 10 cGy (low dose) and 100 cGy (high dose) doses of X-ray ionising radiation at four time points by analysing the topology of gene coexpression networks. This study includes a rich experimental design and state-of-the-art computational systems biology methods of analysis to study the differences in the transcriptional response of skin cells exposed to low and high doses of radiation. Results Using this method we found important genes that have been linked to immune response, cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, we also were able to identify genes such as BRCA1, ABCA1, TNFRSF1B, MLLT11 that have been associated with various types of cancers. We were also able to detect many genes known to be associated with various medical conditions. Conclusions Our method of applying network topological differences can aid in identifying the differences among similar (eg: radiation effect) yet very different biological conditions (eg: different dose and time) to generate testable hypotheses. This is the first study where a network level analysis was performed across two different radiation doses at various time points, thereby illustrating changes in the cellular response over time. PMID:22594378

  5. Binary-Encounter-Bethe ionisation cross sections for simulation of DNA damage by the direct effect of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Plante, I; Cucinotta, F A

    2015-09-01

    DNA damage is of crucial importance in the understanding of the effects of ionising radiation. To refine existing DNA damage models, an approach using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) cross sections was developed. The differential cross sections for ionisation of the molecular orbitals of the DNA bases, sugars and phosphates are calculated using the electron binding energy, the mean kinetic energy and the occupancy number of each orbital as parameters. The resulting cross section has an analytic form which is quite convenient to use for Monte-Carlo codes that randomly sample the energy loss occurring during an ionisation event. We also describe an algorithm to simulate the interactions of electrons with DNA in the radiation transport code RITRACKS using the integrated BEB cross section for the bases, sugar and phosphates. PMID:25870431

  6. Development of a RILIS ionisation scheme for gold at ISOLDE, CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. A.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Kosuri, P.

    2006-07-01

    At the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility, the resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) can be used to ionise reaction products as they effuse from the target. The RILIS process of laser step-wise resonance ionisation of atoms in a hot metal cavity provides a highly element selective stage in the preparation of the radioactive ion beam. As a result, the ISOLDE mass separators can provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. With the addition of a new three-step ionisation scheme for gold, the RILIS is now capable of ionising 26 of the elements. The optimal scheme was determined during an extensive study of the atomic energy levels and auto-ionising states of gold, carried out by means of in-source resonance ionisation spectroscopy. Details of the ionisation scheme and a summary of the spectroscopy study are presented.

  7. Development of a RILIS ionisation scheme for gold at ISOLDE, CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. A.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Kosuri, P.

    At the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility, the resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) can be used to ionise reaction products as they effuse from the target. The RILIS process of laser step-wise resonance ionisation of atoms in a hot metal cavity provides a highly element selective stage in the preparation of the radioactive ion beam. As a result, the ISOLDE mass separators can provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. With the addition of a new three-step ionisation scheme for gold, the RILIS is now capable of ionising 26 of the elements. The optimal scheme was determined during an extensive study of the atomic energy levels and auto-ionising states of gold, carried out by means of in-source resonance ionisation spectroscopy. Details of the ionisation scheme and a summary of the spectroscopy study are presented.

  8. Occupational Exposure to Natural Sources of Ionising Radiation in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Organo, Catherine; Colgan, Tony; Fenton, David; Synnott, Hugh; Currivan, Lorraine

    2008-08-01

    The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) has recently completed a detailed evaluation of all radiation exposure pathways from sources of both natural and artificial radiation in the Irish environment. This paper presents a compilation of the occupational doses received by Irish workers exposed to natural sources of ionising radiation.

  9. Occupational Exposure to Natural Sources of Ionising Radiation in Ireland

    SciTech Connect

    Organo, Catherine; Colgan, Tony; Fenton, David; Synnott, Hugh; Currivan, Lorraine

    2008-08-07

    The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) has recently completed a detailed evaluation of all radiation exposure pathways from sources of both natural and artificial radiation in the Irish environment. This paper presents a compilation of the occupational doses received by Irish workers exposed to natural sources of ionising radiation.

  10. Analysis of intact bacteria using rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Jones, Emrys A; Veselkov, Kirill A; Rebec, Monica; Bundy, Jacob G; Takats, Zoltan

    2013-07-14

    An identification system for microorganisms based on recently developed rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry (REIMS) is presented. Nine bacterial species cultured on various growth media were correctly identified to family-, genus-, and species-level based on their different mass spectral fingerprints using a cross-validated maximum margin criterion model. PMID:23736664

  11. Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Ya

    2006-04-30

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  12. Ionised outflows in z ~ 2.4 quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: Outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are invoked by galaxy evolutionary models to quench star formation and to explain the origin of the relations observed locally between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies. We here aim to detect extended ionised outflows in luminous quasars, where we expect the highest activity both in star formation and in black-hole accretion. Currently, there are only a few studies based on spatially resolved observations of outflows at high redshift, z > 2. Methods: We analysed a sample of six luminous (L > 1047 erg/s) quasars at z ~ 2.4, observed in H-band using the near-IR integral field spectrometer SINFONI at the VLT. We performed a kinematic analysis of the [Oiii] emission line at λ = 5007 Å. Results: We detect fast, spatially extended outflows in five out of six targets. [Oiii]λ5007 has a complex gas kinematic, with blue-shifted velocities of a few hundreds of km s-1 and line widths up to 1500 km s-1. Using the spectroastrometric method, we infer a size of the ionised outflows of up to ~2 kpc. The properties of the ionised outflows, mass outflow rate, momentum rate, and kinetic power, are correlated with the AGN luminosity. The increase in outflow rate with increasing AGN luminosity is consistent with the idea that a luminous AGN pushes away the surrounding gas through fast outflows that are driven by radiation pressure, which depends on the emitted luminosity. Conclusions: We derive mass outflow rates of about 6-700 M⊙ yr-1 for our sample, which are lower than those observed in molecular outflows. The physical properties of ionised outflows show dependences on AGN luminosity that are similar to those of molecular outflows, but indicate that the mass of ionised gas is lower than that of molecular outflows. Alternatively, this discrepancy between ionised and molecular outflows could be explained with different acceleration mechanisms. Based on Observations collected at the European Organisation for

  13. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  14. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  15. Ionisation of a quantum dot by electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P A; Gordeeva, S V

    2012-08-31

    We have derived analytical formulas for differential and total ionisation probabilities of a two-dimensional quantum dot by a constant electric field. In the adiabatic approximation, we have calculated the probability of this process in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave and in a superposition of constant and alternating electric fields. The imaginary-time method is used to obtain the momentum distribution of the ionisation probability of a bound system by an intense field generated by a superposition of parallel constant and alternating electric fields. The total probability of the process per unit time is calculated with exponential accuracy. The dependence of the results obtained on the characteristic parameters of the problem is investigated. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Wedge Absorber Design for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.; Snopok, P.; Coney, L.; Jansson, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    In the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE), muons are cooled by ionisation cooling. Muons are passed through material, reducing the total momentum of the beam. This results in a decrease in transverse emittance and a slight increase in longitudinal emittance, but overall reduction of 6d beam emittance. In emittance exchange, a dispersive beam is passed through wedge-shaped absorbers. Muons with higher energy pass through more material, resulting in a reduction in longitudinal emittance as well as transverse emittance. We consider the cooling performance of different wedge materials and geometries and propose a set of measurements that would be made in MICE.We outline the resources these measurements would require and detail some constraints that guide the choice of wedge parameters.

  17. Ionisation of C60: is it temperature dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, M. Sai; Narasimhan, T. S. Lakshmi; Balasubramanian, R.; Mathews, C. K.

    1994-01-01

    In a recent paper, Drewello [T. Drewello, W. Kratschmer, M. Fieber-Erdmann and A. Ding, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Processes, 124 (1993) R1] reported a temperature dependent ionisation cross section for the formation of C2+60 in their photoionisation dynamic studies on C60 using synchrotron radiation. To check this, the ratio of ion intensities of C2+60 to that of C60 was determined as a function of temperature of C60 samples using a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer. Our results indicate the absence of any temperature dependence of cross section for the formation of C2+60 in the temperature range of measurement (600-800 K) using electron impact ionisation.

  18. IEC STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Voytchev, Miroslav; Ambrosi, P.; Behrens, R.; Chiaro Jr, Peter John

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents IEC/SC 45B Radiation protection instrumentation and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

  19. Erich Regener and the ionisation maximum of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, P.; Watson, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the 1930s the German physicist Erich Regener (1881-1955) did important work on the measurement of the rate of production of ionisation deep under water and in the atmosphere. Along with one of his students, Georg Pfotzer, he discovered the altitude at which the production of ionisation in the atmosphere reaches a maximum, often, but misleadingly, called the Pfotzer maximum. Regener was one of the first to estimate the energy density of cosmic rays, an estimate that was used by Baade and Zwicky to bolster their postulate that supernovae might be their source. Yet Regener's name is less recognised by present-day cosmic ray physicists than it should be, largely because in 1937 he was forced to take early retirement by the National Socialists as his wife had Jewish ancestors. In this paper we briefly review his work on cosmic rays and recommend an alternative naming of the ionisation maximum. The influence that Regener had on the field through his son, his son-in-law, his grandsons and his students, and through his links with Rutherford's group in Cambridge, is discussed in an appendix. Regener was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics by Schrödinger in 1938. He died in 1955 at the age of 73.

  20. Mortality and ionising radiation exposures among workers employed at the Fernald Feed Materials Production Center (1951–1985)

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Sharon R; Bertke, Stephen J; Hein, Misty Jena; Daniels, Robert D; Fleming, Donald A; Anderson, Jeri L; Pinney, Susan M; Hornung, Richard W; Tseng, Chih-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine mortality patterns and dose-response relations between ionising radiation and mortality outcomes of a priori interest in 6409 uranium workers employed for at least 30 days (1951–1985), and followed through 2004. Methods Cohort mortality was evaluated through standardised mortality ratios (SMR). Linear excess relative risk (ERR) regression models examined associations between cause-specific mortality and exposures to internal ionising radiation from uranium deposition, external gamma and x-ray radiation, and radon decay products, while adjusting for non-radiologic covariates. Results Person-years at risk totalled 236 568 (mean follow-up 37 years), and 43% of the cohort had died. All-cause mortality was below expectation only in salaried workers. Cancer mortality was significantly elevated in hourly males, primarily from excess lung cancer (SMR=1.25, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.42). Cancer mortality in salaried males was near expectation, but lymphohaematopoietic malignancies were significantly elevated (SMR=1.52, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.12). A positive dose-response relation was observed for intestinal cancer, with a significant elevation in the highest internal organ dose category and a significant dose-response with organ dose from internal uranium deposition (ERR=1.5 per 100 µGy, 95% CI 0.12 to 4.1). Conclusions A healthy worker effect was observed only in salaried workers. Hourly workers had excess cancer mortality compared with the US population, although there was little evidence of a dose-response trend for any cancer evaluated except intestinal cancer. The association between non-malignant respiratory disease and radiation dose observed in previous studies was not apparent, possibly due to improved exposure assessment, different outcome groupings, and extended follow-up. PMID:23322915

  1. Electron impact ionisation cross sections for atomic and molecular allotropes of phosphorous and arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhutadia, Harshad; Chaudhari, Ashok; Vinodkumar, Minaxi

    2015-12-01

    We report electron impact total ionisation cross sections for phosphorous (P), arsenic (As), diphosphorous (P2), diarsenic (As2), tetra phosphorous (P4) and tetra arsenic (As4) from the threshold of the target to 2000 eV. We employed spherical complex optical potential to compute total inelastic cross sections (Qinel). The total ionisation cross section is extracted from the total inelastic cross section using the complex scattering potential-ionisation contribution method. The results of most of the targets studied here compare well with the measurements and the theoretical data wherever available. The correlation between the peak of ionisation cross sections with the number of target electrons and polarisability is also reported. It is observed that the maximum ionisation cross sections depend linearly on the number of target electrons and polarisability of the target. This linear correlation is used to predict the maximum ionisation cross sections for the targets (I2, HI and PF3) where no experimental data are available.

  2. NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-08-01

    NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

  3. Threshold law for positron-atom impact ionisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.

    1982-01-01

    The threshold law for ionisation of atoms by positron impact is adduced in analogy with our approach to the electron-atom ionization. It is concluded the Coulomb-dipole region of the potential gives the essential part of the interaction in both cases and leads to the same kind of result: a modulated linear law. An additional process which enters positron ionization is positronium formation in the continuum, but that will not dominate the threshold yield. The result is in sharp contrast to the positron threshold law as recently derived by Klar on the basis of a Wannier-type analysis.

  4. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia Liver cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer ... have any symptoms. In certain cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, symptoms often do not start until the disease ...

  5. Romanian medical exposure to ionising radiation in 2012.

    PubMed

    Girjoaba, O; Cucu, A

    2015-07-01

    Medical exposure, the main source of artificial exposure, shows an increasing trend in the last years, manifested both by increasing the number of examinations with ionising radiation and by increasing the patient dose level. Annual results obtained for medical exposure to ionising radiation based on the data collected from Romanian hospitals are useful for the update of the national database and optimisation of diagnostic procedures in radiology and nuclear medicine. Medical exposure level is expressed in terms of annual collective dose and is evaluated from annual frequencies and the average effective dose per procedure for different types of radiological and nuclear medicine procedures. The Romanian hospitals reported during 2012 a number of 5,505,792 radiological examinations and 17,088 diagnostic procedures of nuclear medicine. Based on the data reported, the average effective doses and their contributions to the collective dose were evaluated. The main contributions to the collective dose of the radiological procedures are registered for CT abdomen and pelvis region, followed by thorax CT and head CT examinations. The next positions are fluoroscopic examination of the thorax and gastrointestinal disease and radiographic examination of the lumbar spine and thorax, which in spite of their low effective dose have an important contribution to the collective dose due to the large number of examinations. For nuclear medicine procedures, major contributions to collective dose are given by bone scintigraphy, followed by PET-CT and thyroid scintigraphy. PMID:25848102

  6. EDDIX--a database of ionisation double differential cross sections.

    PubMed

    MacGibbon, J H; Emerson, S; Liamsuwan, T; Nikjoo, H

    2011-02-01

    The use of Monte Carlo track structure is a choice method in biophysical modelling and calculations. To precisely model 3D and 4D tracks, the cross section for the ionisation by an incoming ion, double differential in the outgoing electron energy and angle, is required. However, the double differential cross section cannot be theoretically modelled over the full range of parameters. To address this issue, a database of all available experimental data has been constructed. Currently, the database of Experimental Double Differential Ionisation Cross sections (EDDIX) contains over 1200 digitalised experimentally measured datasets from the 1960s to present date, covering all available ion species (hydrogen to uranium) and all available target species. Double differential cross sections are also presented with the aid of an eight parameter functions fitted to the cross sections. The parameters include projectile species and charge, target nuclear charge and atomic mass, projectile atomic mass and energy, electron energy and deflection angle. It is planned to freely distribute EDDIX and make it available to the radiation research community for use in the analytical and numerical modelling of track structure. PMID:21113060

  7. Sensitivity of LHC experiments to exotic highly ionising particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roeck, A.; Katre, A.; Mermod, P.; Milstead, D.; Sloan, T.

    2012-04-01

    The experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are able to discover or set limits on the production of exotic particles with TeV-scale masses possessing values of electric and/or magnetic charge such that they behave as highly ionising particles (HIPs). In this paper the sensitivity of the LHC experiments to HIP production is discussed in detail. It is shown that a number of different detection methods are required to investigate as fully as possible the charge-mass range. These include direct detection as the HIPs pass through either passive or active detectors and, in the case of magnetically charged objects, the so-called induction method with which magnetic monopoles which stop in accelerator and detector material could be observed. The benefit of using complementary approaches to HIP detection is discussed.

  8. Hazards of ionising radiation: 100 years of observations on man.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R.

    1995-01-01

    In November 1895, when Conrad Röntgen serendipitously discovered X-rays, epidemiology was effectively limited to the study of infectious disease. What little epidemiological work was done in other fields was done as part of clinical medicine or under the heading of geographical pathology. The risks from exposure to X-rays and subsequently from other types of ionising radiation were consequently discovered by qualitative association or animal experiment. They did not begin to be quantified in humans until half a century later, when epidemiology emerged as a scientific discipline capable of quantifying risks of non-infectious disease and the scientific world was alerted to the need for assessing the effects of the radiation to which large populations might be exposed by the use of nuclear energy in peace and war. PMID:8519643

  9. Ionisation Equilibrium for the Non-Maxwellian Electron n-Distributions in Solar Flares: Updated Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-12-01

    We use the latest available atomic data to calculate the ionisation and recombination rates for the non-Maxwellian n-distributions, which were shown previously to provide a good fit to the enhanced intensities of dielectronic satellite lines during solar flares. The ionisation and recombination coefficients are subsequently used to derive the ionisation equilibrium. To do so, we consider odd values of n ranging from 1 to 19, i.e., from Maxwellian to strongly non-Maxwellian cases. These calculations involve all elements with proton number up to 30, i.e., H to Zn. The n-distributions modify both the ionisation and the recombination rates. The ionisation rates decrease more steeply at lower pseudo-temperatures, while the radiative recombination rate is reduced due to a lower number of low-energy electrons. The peaks of the dielectronic recombination rates become narrower. These changes are reflected in the ionisation equilibrium. Ion abundance peaks become narrower and can also be shifted, mostly towards higher temperatures. The He-like ions are an important exception, as they are formed in a larger temperature range than that for the Maxwellian distribution. The ions Si xiii - xiv used previously for the diagnostics of the n-distributions are affected only weakly, confirming the determination of n. The ionisation equilibria are available as the electronic supplementary material in a format compatible with the CHIANTI database.

  10. Ionisation effect on the electron localisation in the subcycle waveform shaping scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Feng, Zhengpeng; Long, Hua

    2015-03-01

    We have theoretically studied the ionisation effect on the asymmetric dissociation of H+2 exposed to the synthesised multicycle infrared pulses of different wavelengths by solving the time-dependent Schr?dinger equation without using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. It has been demonstrated that the ionisation does slightly influence the electron localisation for the relatively low pulse intensity (less than 1014 W/cm2). However, our further results show that the ionisation effect becomes much more significant when increasing the pulse intensity, leading to a distinctly different mechanism responsible for the enhancement of the electron localisation.

  11. Photo-ionisation mass spectrometry as detection method for gas chromatography. Optical selectivity and multidimensional comprehensive separations.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Welthagen, Werner; Gröger, Thomas

    2008-03-14

    Mass spectrometry (MS) with soft ionisation techniques (i.e. ionisation without fragmentation of the analyte molecules) for gaseous samples exhibits interesting analytical properties for direct analysis applications (i.e. direct inlet mass spectrometric on-line monitoring) as well as mass spectrometric detection method for gas chromatography (GC-MS). Commonly either chemical ionisation (CI) or field ionisation (FI) is applied as soft ionisation technology for GC-MS. An interesting alternative to the CI and FI technologies methods are photo-ionisation (PI) methods. PI overcomes some of the limitations of CI and FI and furthermore add some unique analytical properties. The resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) method uses intense UV-laser pulses (wavelength range approximately 350-193 nm) for highly selective, sensitive and soft ionisation of predominately aromatic compounds. The single photon ionisation (SPI) method utilises VUV light (from lamps or laser sources, wavelengths range approximately 150-110 nm) can be used for a universal soft ionisation of organic molecules. In this article the historical development as well as the current status and concepts of gas chromatography hyphenated to photo-ionisation mass spectrometry are reviewed. PMID:17915237

  12. Experimental investigation of ionisation track structure of carbon ions at HIL Warsaw.

    PubMed

    Bantsar, A; Hilgers, G; Pszona, S; Rabus, H; Szeflinski, Z

    2015-09-01

    In view of the upcoming radiation therapy with carbon ions, the ionisation structure of the carbon ion track at the nanometre scale is of particular interest. Two different nanodosimeters capable of measuring track structure of ionising particles in a gas target equivalent to a nanometric site in condensed matter were involved in the presented experimental investigation, namely the NCBJ Jet Counter and the PTB Ion Counter. At the accelerator facility of the HIL in Warsaw, simulated nanometric volumes were irradiated with carbon ions of 45 and 76 MeV of kinetic energy, corresponding to a range in the tissue of ∼85 µm and ∼190 µm, respectively. The filling gas of both nanodosimeters' ionisation volume was molecular nitrogen N2, and the ionisation cluster size distributions, i.e. the statistical distribution of the number of ionizations produced by one single primary carbon ion in the filling gas, were measured for the two primary particle energies. PMID:25897141

  13. Ionisation Chambers and Secondary Emission Monitors at the PROSCAN Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, Rudolf

    2006-11-20

    PROSCAN, the dedicated new medical facility at PSI using proton beams for the treatment of deep seated tumours and eye melanoma, is now in the commissioning phase. Air filled ionisation chambers in several configurations are used as current monitors, profile monitors, halo, position and loss monitors at the PROSCAN beam lines. Similar monitors based on secondary emission are used for profile and current measurements in the regime where saturation deteriorates the accuracy of the ionisation chambers.

  14. Education and training issues in individual monitoring of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, P; Kamenopoulou, V

    2011-03-01

    The present article deals with the education and training (E&T) issues of individual monitoring (IM) of ionising radiation, based on the requirements provided by the Basic Safety Standards Euratom Directive and the European Commission Technical Recommendations for IM of external radiation. The structure and the objectives of E&T programmes addressed to the staff of dosimetry services, in order to allow the recognition and ensure the continuity of expertise are discussed. The necessity for the establishment of a national strategy for building competence in IM through information, education, training and retraining programmes, addressed to the individually monitored personnel is underlined. The train the trainers' concept is recognised as being an important tool for optimising resources and transferring the skills necessary for building competence. The conditions under which an efficient train the trainers' approach can be established are discussed. Examples of curricula concerning the key persons involved in the provision of E&T in occupational radiation protection are also given. PMID:21131663

  15. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. Cancerous cells are also called malignant cells. Causes Cancer grows out of cells in the body. Normal ... of many cancers remains unknown. The most common cause of cancer-related death is lung cancer. In the U.S., ...

  16. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  17. A VLT VIMOS IFU study of the ionisation nebula surrounding the supersoft X-ray source CAL 83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruyters, P.; Exter, K.; Roberts, T. P.; Rappaport, S.

    2012-08-01

    Context. CAL 83 is a prototype of the class of Super Soft X-ray Sources (SXS). It is a binary consisting of a low mass secondary that is transferring mass onto a white dwarf primary and is the only known SXS surrounded by an ionisation nebula, made up of the interstellar medium (ISM) ionised by the source itself. We study this nebula using integral field spectroscopy. Aims: The study of ionised material can inform us about the source that is responsible for the ionisation, in a way that is complementary to studying the source directly. Since CAL 83 is the only SXS known with an ionisation nebula, we have an opportunity to see if such studies are as useful for SXSs as they have been for other X-ray ionised nebulae. We can use these data to compare to models of how CAL 83 should ionise its surroundings, based on what we know about the source emission spectrum and the physical conditions of the surrounding ISM. Methods: With the VIMOS integral field spectrograph we obtained spectra over a 25 × 25'' field of view, encompassing one quarter of the nebula. Emission line maps - H i, He II λ4686, [OIII] λλ4959,5007, [NII] λλ6548,5683, and [SII] λλ6716,6731 - are produced in order to study the morphology of the ionised gas. We include CAL 83 on diagrams of various diagnostic ion ratios to compare it to other X-ray ionised sources. Finally we computed some simple models of the ionised gas around CAL 83 and compare the predicted to the observed spectra. Results: CAL 83 appears to have a fairly standard ionisation nebula as far as the morphology goes: the edges where H is recombining are strong in the low stage ionisation lines and the central, clumpy regions are stronger in the higher stage ionisation lines. But the He ii emission is unusual in being confined to one side of CAL 83 rather than being homogeneously distributed as with the other ions. We model the CAL 83 nebula with cloudy using model parameters for SXSs found in the literature. The He ii emission does not

  18. Development of a new ionisation chamber, for HP(10) measurement, using Monte-Carlo simulation and experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Silva, H; Cardoso, J; Oliveira, C

    2011-03-01

    An ionisation chamber that directly measures the quantity personal dose equivalent, H(p)(10), is used as a secondary standard in some metrology laboratories. An ionisation chamber of this type was first developed by Ankerhold. Using the Monte-Carlo simulation, the dose in the sensitive volume as a function of the IC dimensions and the effects of the several components of the ionising chamber have been investigated. Based on these results, a new ionising chamber, lighter than the previous ones, is constructed and experimentally tested. PMID:21208934

  19. Bayesian analysis of nanodosimetric ionisation distributions due to alpha particles and protons.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, L; Ferretti, A; Colautti, P; Grosswendt, B

    2011-02-01

    Track-nanodosimetry has the objective to investigate the stochastic aspect of ionisation events in particle tracks, by evaluating the probability distribution of the number of ionisations produced in a nanometric target volume positioned at distance d from a particle track. Such kind of measurements makes use of electron (or ion) gas detectors with detecting efficiencies non-uniformly distributed inside the target volume. This fact makes the reconstruction of true ionisation distributions, which correspond to an ideal efficiency of 100%, non-trivial. Bayesian unfolding has been applied to ionisation distributions produced by 5.4 MeV alpha particles and 20 MeV protons in cylindrical volumes of propane of 20 nm equivalent size, positioned at different impact parameters with respect to the primary beam. It will be shown that a Bayesian analysis performed by subdividing the target volume in sub-regions of different detection efficiencies is able to provide a good reconstruction of the true nanodosimetric ionisation distributions. PMID:21112893

  20. No evidence for large-scale outflows in the extended ionised halo of ULIRG Mrk273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, R. A. W.; Zaurín, J. Rodríguez; Tadhunter, C. N.; Rose, M.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Spoon, H.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present deep new GTC/OSIRIS narrow-band images and optical WHT/ISIS long-slit spectroscopy of the merging system Mrk273 that show a spectacular extended halo of warm ionised gas out to a radius of ˜45 kpc from the system nucleus. Outside of the immediate nuclear regions (r > 6 kpc), there is no evidence for kinematic disturbance in the ionised gas: in the extended regions covered by our spectroscopic slits the emission lines are relatively narrow (FWHM ≲ 350 kms^{-1}) and velocity shifts small (|ΔV| ≲250 kms^{-1}). This is despite the presence of powerful near-nuclear outflows (FWHM > 1000 kms^{-1}; |ΔV| > 400 kms^{-1}; r < 6 kpc). Diagnostic ratio plots are fully consistent with Seyfert 2 photo-ionisation to the NE of the nuclear region, however to the SW the plots are more consistent with low-velocity radiative shock models. The kinematics of the ionised gas, combined with the fact that the main structures are aligned with low-surface-brightness tidal continuum features, are consistent with the idea that the ionised halo represents tidal debris left over from a possible triple-merger event, rather than a reservoir of outflowing gas.

  1. Multiphoton ionisation and dissociation of NO 2 by 50 fs laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, R. P.; Kilic, H. S.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Kosmidis, C.; McCanny, T.; Langley, A. J.; Shaikh, W.

    1996-04-01

    Multiphoton ionisation and dissociation of NO 2 has been studied experimentally at 375 nm for laser pulse widths of 10 ns and 50 fs. The parent NO 2 ion peak is not seen in the ns data. In all spectra, the main peak observed is due to the ionisation of the NO molecule which results from the dissociation of excited NO 2 formed after absorbing a 375 nm photon. The intensity dependencies of both NO and NO 2 ion peaks have also been measured. The data has been analysed within the context of a rate equation model using published cross-sections and dissociation rates except for the two-photon ionisation cross-section for NO 2 which was chosen to reproduce the NO 2/NO ion signal ratios at 50 fs. The rate equation model provides a good description of the complete set of data. Indirectly, it may be concluded that coherence effects do not play an important role in the multiphoton excitation/ionisation of NO 2. The data also rules out the importance of above-ionisation dissociation in NO 2 — a conclusion which is consistent with previous data at 496 and 248 nm for laser pulse widths ⩾ 300 fs.

  2. Single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon-interference identification and positive-ionisation characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Xu, S.; Dougans, A.

    2013-01-01

    A single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) is a good alternative to conventional spectrometers based on tandem electrostatic acceleration for radiocarbon measurement and permits experimentation with both negative and positive carbon ions. However, such 14C AMS of either polarity ions is limited by an interference. In the case of anion acceleration we have newly determined this to be summed 13C and 16O by improvising an additional Wien filter on our SSAMS deck. Also, 14C AMS might be improved by removing its dependency on negative-ionisation in a sputter ion source. This requires negative-ionisation of sample atoms elsewhere to suppress the 14N interference, which we accomplish by transmitting initially positive ions through a thin membrane. The ionisation dependence on ion-energy is found to be consistent with previous experimentation with vapours and thicker foils.

  3. The ionisation energy of cyclopentadienone: a photoelectron-photoion coincidence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormond, Thomas K.; Hemberger, Patrick; Troy, Tyler P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2015-08-01

    Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence (iPEPICO) spectra of cyclopentadienone (C5H4=O and C5D4=O) have been measured at the Swiss Light Source Synchrotron (Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland) at the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Beamline. Complementary to the photoelectron spectra, photoionisation efficiency curves were measured with tunable VUV radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline at the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA). For both experiments, molecular beams diluted in argon and helium were generated from the vacuum flash pyrolysis of o-phenylene sulphite in a resistively heated microtubular SiC flow reactor. The Franck-Condon profiles and ionisation energies were calculated at the CCSD(T) level of theory, and are in excellent agreement with the observed iPEPICO spectra. The ionisation energies of both cyclopentadienone-d0, IE(C5H4=O), and cyclopentadienone-d4, IE(C5D4=O), were observed to be the same: 9.41 ± 0.01 eV. The mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectrum (ms-TPES) of cyclopentadienone reveals that the C=C stretch in the ground state of the cation is excited upon ionisation, supporting computational evidence that the ground state of the cation is ? 2A2, and is in agreement with previous studies. However, the previously reported ionisation potential has been improved considerably in this work. In addition, since o-benzoquinone (o-O=C6H4=O and o-O=C6D4=O) is also produced in this process, its ms-TPES has been recorded. From the iPEPICO and photoionisation efficiency spectra, we infer an adiabatic ionisation energy of IE(o-O=C6H4=O) = 9.3 ± 0.1 eV, but the rather structureless spectrum indicates a strong change in geometry upon ionisation making this value less reliable.

  4. Cosmic ray induced ionisation of a molecular cloud shocked by the W28 supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupré, S.; Hily-Blant, P.; Ceccarelli, C.; Dubus, G.; Gabici, S.; Montmerle, T.

    2014-08-01

    Cosmic rays are an essential ingredient in the evolution of the interstellar medium, as they dominate the ionisation of the dense molecular gas, where stars and planets form. However, since they are efficiently scattered by the galactic magnetic fields, many questions remain open, such as where exactly they are accelerated, what is their original energy spectrum, and how they propagate into molecular clouds. In this work we present new observations and discuss in detail a method that allows us to measure the cosmic ray ionisation rate towards the molecular clouds close to the W28 supernova remnant. To perform these measurements, we use CO, HCO+, and DCO+ millimetre line observations and compare them with the predictions of radiative transfer and chemical models away from thermodynamical equilibrium. The CO observations allow us to constrain the density, temperature, and column density towards each observed position, while the DCO+/HCO+ abundance ratios provide us with constraints on the electron fraction and, consequently, on the cosmic ray ionisation rate. Towards positions located close to the supernova remnant, we find cosmic ray ionisation rates much larger (≳100) than those in standard galactic clouds. Conversely, towards one position situated at a larger distance, we derive a standard cosmic ray ionisation rate. Overall, these observations support the hypothesis that the γ rays observed in the region have a hadronic origin. In addition, based on CR diffusion estimates, we find that the ionisation of the gas is likely due to 0.1-1 GeV cosmic rays. Finally, these observations are also in agreement with the global picture of cosmic ray diffusion, in which the low-energy tail of the cosmic ray population diffuses at smaller distances than the high-energy counterpart.

  5. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge. PMID:24324250

  6. Dynamics of ionisation and entanglement in the 'atom + quantum electromagnetic field' system

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapova, P R; Tikhonova, O V

    2012-03-31

    The dynamics of a model Rydberg atom in a strong nonclassical electromagnetic field is investigated. The field-induced transitions to the continuum involving different numbers of photons (with intermediate states in the discrete spectrum) are taken into account and the specific features of ionisation in 'squeezed' field states are considered in comparison with the case of classical light. A significant decrease in the ionisation rate is found, which is caused by the interference stabilisation of the atomic system. The entanglement of the atomic and field subsystems, the temporal dynamics of the correlations found, and the possibility of measuring them are analysed.

  7. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your life Being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer Being at risk for skin cancer Depending on ... than nonsmokers. Other forms of tobacco can also cause cancer, such as cigars, chewing tobacco and snuff. If ...

  8. Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Atomic Models in Explaining Subsequent Ionisation Energy Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry students' explanations of ionisation energy phenomena often involve a number of non-scientific or inappropriate ideas being used to form causality arguments. Research has attributed this to many science teachers using these ideas themselves (Tan and Taber, in "J Chem Educ" 86(5):623-629, 2009). This research extends this work by…

  9. Destruction of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation and the implications for life detection on Mars.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Page, Kristian; Jorge-Villar, Susana E; Wright, Gary; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J; Ward, John M; Edwards, Howell G M

    2012-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a very effective approach for the detection of microorganisms colonising hostile environments on Earth. The ExoMars rover, due for launch in 2018, will carry a Raman laser spectrometer to analyse samples of the martian subsurface collected by the probe's 2-m drill in a search for similar biosignatures. The martian surface is unprotected from the flux of cosmic rays, an ionising radiation field that will degrade organic molecules and so diminish and distort the detectable Raman signature of potential martian microbial life. This study employs Raman spectroscopy to analyse samples of two model organisms, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and the extremely radiation resistant polyextremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, that have been exposed to increasing doses of ionising radiation. The three most prominent peaks in the Raman spectra are from cellular carotenoids: deinoxanthin in D. radiodurans and β-carotene in Synechocystis. The degradative effect of ionising radiation is clearly seen, with significant diminishment of carotenoid spectral peak heights after 15 kGy and complete erasure of Raman biosignatures by 150 kGy of ionising radiation. The Raman signal of carotenoid in D. radiodurans diminishes more rapidly than that of Synechocystis, believed to be due to deinoxanthin acting as a superior scavenger of radiolytically produced reactive oxygen species, and so being destroyed more quickly than the less efficient antioxidant β-carotene. This study highlights the necessity for further experimental work on the manner and rate of degradation of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation, as this is of prime importance for the successful detection of microbial life in the martian near subsurface. PMID:22349404

  10. Study of the mechanism of direct laser desorption/ionisation for some small organic molecules (M < 400 Daltons).

    PubMed

    Benazouz; Hakim; Debrun; Strivay; Weber

    1999-12-15

    Aspects of direct laser desorption/ionisation have been studied for three molecules, aminotriazole (positive ion), dinoterb and ioxynil (negative ion). The samples are deposited on metallic substrates, and a nitrogen laser is used for desorption/ionisation; ion yields are measured with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Previous work had shown that ion yields can strongly vary from one substrate to another, and that this variation does not reflect the (calculated) metal surface temperatures. New results obtained in this work indicate that the desorption/ionisation mechanism is linked to the physical state of the substrate surface. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10567927

  11. Suppression of the contribution of short trajectories into above-threshold ionisation spectra by a two-colour laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Zheltukhin, A. N.; Silaev, A. A.; Knyazeva, D. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Flegel', A. V.; Frolov, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied spectra of above-threshold ionisation of atoms by a two-colour laser field with collinear linearly polarised components. We have found a sharp (gap-like) dependence of the length of the high-energy plateau in above-threshold ionisation spectra on the relative phase of the two-colour field at comparable intensities of the field components. Using the quasi-classical analysis we have shown that this effect results from the suppression of partial above-threshold ionisation amplitudes, associated with closed classical trajectories of an electron in the laser field, within a certain range of relative phase values.

  12. Theoretical investigation of the ultrafast dissociation of ionised biomolecules immersed in water: direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Gaigeot, M-P; Lopez-Tarifa, P; Martin, F; Alcami, M; Vuilleumier, R; Tavernelli, I; Hervé du Penhoat, M-A; Politis, M-F

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical simulations are particularly well suited to investigate, at a molecular level, direct and indirect effects of ionising radiations in DNA, as in the particular case of irradiation by swift heavy ions such as those used in hadron therapy. In the past recent years, we have developed the modeling at the microscopic level of the early stages of the Coulomb explosion of DNA molecules immersed in liquid water that follows the irradiation by swift heavy ions. To that end, Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory molecular dynamics simulations (TD-DFT MD) have been developed where localised Wannier orbitals are propagated. This latter enables to separate molecular orbitals of each water molecule from the molecular orbitals of the biomolecule. Our main objective is to demonstrate that the double ionisation of one molecule of the liquid sample, either one water molecule from the solvent or the biomolecule, may be in some cases responsible for the formation of an atomic oxygen as a direct consequence of the molecule Coulomb explosion. Our hypothesis is that the molecular double ionisation arising from irradiation by swift heavy ions (about 10% of ionisation events by ions whose velocity is about the third of speed of light), as a primary event, though maybe less probable than other events resulting from the electronic cascading (for instance, electronic excitations, electron attachments), may be systematically more damageable (and more lethal), as supported by experiments that have been carried out in our group in the 1990s (in studies of damages created by K holes in DNA). The chemical reactivity of the produced atomic oxygen with other radicals present in the medium will ultimately lead to chemical products that are harmful to DNA. In the present paper, we review our theoretical methodology in an attempt that the community be familiar with our new approach. Results on the production of atomic oxygen as a result of the double ionisation of water or as a result of

  13. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  14. Exploring the Powerful Ionised Wind in the Seyfert Galaxy PG1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, Ken

    2013-10-01

    Highly-ionised high-speed winds in AGN (UFOs) were first detected with XMM-Newton a decade ago, and are now established as a key factor in the study of SMBH accretion, and in the growth and metal enrichment of their host galaxies. However, information on the ionisation and dynamical structure, and the ultimate fate of UFOs remains very limited. We request a 600ks extended XMM-Newton study of the prototype UFO PG1211+143 in AO-13, to obtain high quality EPIC and RGS spectra, to map the flow structure and variability, while seeking evidence for the anticipated interaction with the ISM and possible conversion of the energetic wind to a momentum-driven flow.

  15. Classification of the Spectra of Highly Ionised Atoms During the Last Seven Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, B. C.

    1981-10-01

    This review of recent contributions to the classification of the spectra of highly ionised atoms emphasises how major research projects have influenced progress. These projects include experiments on board orbiting space satellites and SKYLAB, those of fusion research (notably involving TOKAMAK devices), studies with giant pulse laser-produced-plasmas and beam-foil spectroscopy. In addition, the large volume of data gathered through the application of traditional methods and the impact of theoretical calculations are discussed. A comprehensive reference list of papers reporting emission line identifications for elements lighter than nickel and ionisation stages higher than the fourth is included, along with references to other bibliographies and compilations of energy levels, or wavelengths and identifications.

  16. The effect of highly ionising particles on the CMS silicon strip tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Hrubec, J.; Krammer, M.; Pernicka, M.; Waltenberger, W.; Beaumont, W.; de Langhe, E.; de Wolf, E.; Tasevsky, M.; Bouhali, O.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Neuckermans, L.; Vander-Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Goorens, R.; Heyninck, J.; Lowette, S.; Tavernier, S.; Van Lancker, L.; Yu, C.; Assouak, S.; Bonnet, J.-L.; Bruno, G.; De-Callatay, B.; De-Favereau-de-Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; De-Visscher, S.; Favart, D.; Gregoire, G.; Keutgen, Th.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Michotte, D.; Militaru, O.; Ninane, A.; Ovyn, S.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Roberfroid, V.; Rouby, X.; Van-der-Aa, O.; Vander-Donckt, M.; Boulogne, I.; Daubie, E.; Defontaines, F.; Herquet, P.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Katajisto, H.; Linden, T.; Luukka, P.; Lampen, T.; Mäenpää, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuuva, T.; Ageron, M.; Chabanat, E.; Contardo, D.; Estre, N.; Haroutunian, R.; Lumb, N.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Trocme, B.; Blaes, R.; Charles, F.; Drouhin, F.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Fontaine, J. C.; Berst, J. D.; Brom, J. M.; Didierjean, F.; Goerlach, U.; Gross, L.; Juillot, P.; Lounis, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Olivetto, C.; Strub, R.; Vanhove, P.; Vintache, D.; Adolphi, R.; Brauer, R.; Braunschweig, W.; Esser, H.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; König, S.; Kukulies, C.; Olzem, J.; Ostaptchouk, A.; Pandoulas, D.; Pierschel, G.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Siedling, R.; Thomas, M.; Wlochal, M.; Beissel, F.; Boffin, K.-D.; Duda, M.; Flossdorf, A.; Flugge, G.; Franke, T.; Hangarter, K.; Hegner, B.; Hermanns, Th.; Kasselmann, S.; Kress, Th.; Linn, A.; Mnich, J.; Nowack, A.; Poettgens, M.; Pooth, O.; Reinhold, B.; Bleyl, M.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Pein, U.; Schleper, P.; Schirm, N.; Steinbrück, G.; Stoye, M.; Tesch, S.; van Staa, R.; Wick, K.; Atz, B.; Barvich, T.; Blum, P.; de Boer, W.; Boegelspacher, F.; Dirkes, G.; Fahrer, M.; Fernandez, J.; Frey, M.; Furgeri, A.; Grigoriev, E.; Hartmann, F.; Heier, S.; Muller, T.; Ortega-Gomez, T.; Simonis, H.-J.; Steck, P.; Theel, A.; Weiler, T.; Zhukov, V.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; De Robertis, G.; Fiore, L.; Giordano, D.; Maggi, G.; Mennea, M.; My, S.; Radicci, V.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Albergo, S.; Bellini, V.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Sutera, C.; Tricomi, A.; Tuvè, C.; Bocci, A.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Landi, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Magini, N.; Mersi, S.; Marchettini, C.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Parrini, G.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Candelori, A.; Dorigo, T.; Giubilato, P.; Kaminsky, A.; Loreti, M.; Nigro, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Rando, R.; Angarano, M. M.; Babucci, E.; Benedetti, D.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Brunetti, M. T.; Checcucci, B.; Dinu, N.; Fanò, L.; Giorgi, M.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Postolache, V.; Puscalau, M.; Ricci, D.; Santinelli, R.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L.; Zucchetti, C.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Borrello, L.; Bosi, F.; Castaldi, R.; D'Alfonso, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Dutta, S.; Foa, L.; Gennai, S.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Lomtadze, T.; Mangano, B.; Messineo, A.; Moggi, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzi, A.; Rizzi, D.; Segneri, G.; Sentenac, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tonelli, G.; Verdini, P. G.; Biino, C.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Favro, G.; Trapani, P.; Peroni, C.; Romero, A.; Migliore, E.; Abbaneo, D.; Ahmed, F.; Bartalini, P.; Bernardino-Rodriguez, N.; Breuker, H.; Buchmuller, O.; Carrone, E.; Cattai, A.; Chierici, R.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dierlamm, A.; Eppard, M.; Frey, A.; Gill, K.; Grabit, R.; Honma, A.; Huhtinen, M.; Magazzu, G.; Mannelli, M.; Marchioro, A.; Onnela, A.; Perea-Solano, B.; Petagna, P.; Postema, H.; Risoldi, M.; Rolandi, G.; Siegrist, P.; Troska, I.; Tsirou, A.; Vasey, F.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Bertl, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Kästli, H.-Ch.; Kotlinski, D.; MacPherson, A.; Rohe, T.; Freudenreich, K.; Lustermann, W.; Pauss, F.; Eichler, R.; Erdmann, W.; Grab, C.; Schoning, A.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; Dorokhov, A.; Hörmann, C.; Pruys, H.; Prokofiev, K.; Regenfus, C.; Robmann, P.; Speer, T.; Bell, K. W.; Coughlan, J.; French, M.; Halsall, R.; Jones, L.; Pearson, M.; Rogers, G.; Tomalin, I.; Bainbridge, R.; Barrillon, P.; Colling, D.; Dris, S.; Foudas, C.; Fulcher, J.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Macevoy, B. C.; Noy, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Takahashi, M.; Zorba, O.; Barnett, B.; Chien, C.-Y.; Kim, D. W.; Liang, G.; Swartz, M.; Atac, M.; Demarteau, M.; Joshi, U.; Kwan, S.; Spiegel, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Gerber, C. E.; Shabalina, E.; Ten, T.; Lander, R.; Pellett, D.; Gobbi, B.; Kubantsev, M.; Malik, S.; Tilden, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Christofek, L.; Coppage, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Demina, R.; Kahl, W. E.; Khanov, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Pukhaeva, N.; Reay, N. W.; Rizatdinova, F.; Sidwell, R. A.; Stanton, N. R.; Cremaldi, L.; Sanders, D.; Bartz, E.; Doroshenko, J.; Koeth, T.; Perera, L.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Worm, S.; Gartung, P.; Hanson, G. G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Páztor, G.; Eusebi, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hocker, A.; Tipton, P.; Affolder, A.; Campagnari, C.; Hale, D.; Incandela, J.; Kyre, S.; Lamb, J.; Taylor, R.; White, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Garfinkel, A.; Rott, C.; Roy, A.

    2005-05-01

    Inelastic nuclear collisions of hadrons incident on silicon sensors can generate secondary highly ionising particles (HIPs) and deposit as much energy within the sensor bulk as several hundred minimum ionising particles. The large signals generated by these 'HIP events' can momentarily saturate the APV25 front-end readout chip for the silicon strip tracker (SST) sub-detector of the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment, resulting in deadtime in the detector readout system. This paper presents studies of this phenomenon through simulation, laboratory measurements and dedicated beam tests. A proposed change to a front-end component to reduce the APV25 sensitivity to HIP events is also examined. The results are used to infer the expected effect on the performance of the CMS SST at the future large hadron collider. The induced inefficiencies are at the percent level and will have a negligible effect on the physics performance of the SST.

  17. The Interplay Between Molecular and Ionised Gas Surrounding the Massive Embedded Star AFGL 4176

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Katharine G.; Beuther, Henrik; Linz, Hendrik; Boley, P.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Keto, E.; Wood, K.; van Boekel, R.

    In order to investigate whether the feedback produced by photo-ionisation has an important effect on the geometry of the circumstellar dust and gas around forming massive stars, we have observed the luminous southern embedded star AFGL 4176 in transitions of NH3 and the hydrogen recombination line H68α. We present our preliminary results, which show a compact HII region embedded in a parsec-scale (radius ˜ 0.7 pc) rotating envelope/torus. In addition, the HII region is found to be offset from the centre of the envelope, and the velocity gradient in the ionised gas is not aligned with the rotation axis of the envelope, suggesting complex dynamics and multiplicity.

  18. The nature of the ionised nebula surrounding the red supergiant W26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant W26 in the massive star cluster Westerlund 1 is surrounded by a compact ionised nebula. This is unique among RSGs, and the excitation mechanism of the nebula is not yet known - it may be ionised by an unseen compact companion, or by a nearby blue supergiant. We present new observations of the nebula: high resolution spatially resolved spectra taken with FLAMES at the VLT show that the nebula is a ring, with velocities consistent with that expected for red supergiant ejecta, and ruling out the possibility of a Luminous Blue Variable-type eruption preceding the RSG phase as the origin of the nebula. A triangular patch of nebulosity outside the ring appears to be associated with W26, and may be material stripped from the expanding ring by the cumulative cluster wind and radiation field.

  19. The effect of electrospray solvent composition on desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) efficiency and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Green, F M; Salter, T L; Gilmore, I S; Stokes, P; O'Connor, G

    2010-04-01

    In desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) the interaction between the electrospray and the surface is key to two important analytical parameters, the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. We evaluate the effect of the electrospray solvent type, organic solvent fraction with water, analyte solubility and substrate wettability on DESI erosion diameter and material transferral into useful ion signal. To do this five amino acids, glycine, alanine, valine, leucine and phenylalanine are prepared as thin films on three substrates, UV/ozone treated glass, glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Four different solvents, acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and propan-2-ol (IPA), are used with organic solvent fractions with water varying from 0.1 to 1. These model systems allow the solubility or wettability to be kept constant as other parameters are varied. Additionally, comparison with electrospray ionisation (ESI) allows effects of ionisation efficiency to be determined. It is shown that the DESI efficiency is linearly dependent on the solubility (for these materials at least) and for analytes with solubilities below 1.5 g kg(-1), additional strategies may be required for DESI to be effective. We show that the DESI erosion diameter improves linearly with organic solvent fraction, with an organic solvent fraction of 0.9 instead of 0.5 leading to a 2 fold improvement. Furthermore, this leads to a 35 fold increase in DESI efficiency, defined as the molecular ion yield per unit area. It is shown that these improvements correlate with smaller droplet sizes rather than surface wetting or ionisation. PMID:20349538

  20. Gain Calculations for Inner-Shell Lasing by Electron Collisional Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upcraft, L. M.

    2002-11-01

    Current high power femtosecond lasers have been shown to produce electron pulses which may be appropriate for the pumping of X-Ray lasers through collisional ionisation. Non-radiative Coster-Kronig type decay processes may be fast enough to form an inverted state and allow X-ray lasing within the biologically interesting "water window". Calculations of the atomic processes in metallic Ti, Mn and Cu are presented that potentially useable gains on the M1 - L3 transition.

  1. Analysis of oak tannins by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mämmelä, P; Savolainen, H; Lindroos, L; Kangas, J; Vartiainen, T

    2000-09-01

    Extractable tannins were analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry in two oak species, North American white oak (Quercus alba) and European red oak (Quercus robur). They mainly included various glucose gallic and ellagic acid esters. The structures were partially determined, and they included grandinin/roburin E, castalagin/vescalagin, gallic acid, valoneic acid bilactone, monogalloyl glucose, digalloyl glucose, trigalloyl glucose, ellagic acid rhamnose, quercitrin and ellagic acid. PMID:10999626

  2. Ionisation and discharge in cloud-forming atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helling, Ch; Rimmer, P. B.; Rodriguez-Barrera, I. M.; Wood, Kenneth; Robertson, G. B.; Stark, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Brown dwarfs and giant gas extrasolar planets have cold atmospheres with rich chemical compositions from which mineral cloud particles form. Their properties, like particle sizes and material composition, vary with height, and the mineral cloud particles are charged due to triboelectric processes in such dynamic atmospheres. The dynamics of the atmospheric gas is driven by the irradiating host star and/or by the rotation of the objects that changes during its lifetime. Thermal gas ionisation in these ultra-cool but dense atmospheres allows electrostatic interactions and magnetic coupling of a substantial atmosphere volume. Combined with a strong magnetic field \\gg {{B}\\text{Earth}} , a chromosphere and aurorae might form as suggested by radio and x-ray observations of brown dwarfs. Non-equilibrium processes like cosmic ray ionisation and discharge processes in clouds will increase the local pool of free electrons in the gas. Cosmic rays and lighting discharges also alter the composition of the local atmospheric gas such that tracer molecules might be identified. Cosmic rays affect the atmosphere through air showers in a certain volume which was modelled with a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to be able to visualise their spacial extent. Given a certain degree of thermal ionisation of the atmospheric gas, we suggest that electron attachment to charge mineral cloud particles is too inefficient to cause an electrostatic disruption of the cloud particles. Cloud particles will therefore not be destroyed by Coulomb explosion for the local temperature in the collisional dominated brown dwarf and giant gas planet atmospheres. However, the cloud particles are destroyed electrostatically in regions with strong gas ionisation. The potential size of such cloud holes would, however, be too small and might occur too far inside the cloud to mimic the effect of, e.g. magnetic field induced star spots.

  3. A Carbon Nano Tube electron impact ionisation source for low-power, compact spacecraft mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, S.; Bardwell, M. W.; Morse, A. D.; Morgan, G. H.

    2012-04-01

    A novel ionisation source which uses commercially available Carbon Nano Tube devices is demonstrated as a replacement for a filament based ionisation source in an ion trap mass spectrometer. The carbon nanotube ion source electron emission was characterised and exhibited typical emission of 30 ± 1.7 μA with an applied voltage differential of 300 V between the carbon nanotube tips and the extraction grid. The ion source was tested for longevity and operated under a condition of continuous emission for a period of 44 h; there was an observed reduction in emission current of 26.5% during operation. Spectra were generated by installing the ion source into a Finnigan Mat ITD700 ion trap mass spectrometer; the spectra recorded showed all of the characteristic m/z peaks from m/z 69 to m/z 219. Perfluorotributylamine spectra were collected and averaged contiguously for a period of 48 h with no significant signal loss or peak mass allocation shift. The low power requirements and low mass of this novel ionisation source are considered be of great value to future space missions where mass spectrometric technology will be employed.

  4. Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Atomic Models in Explaining Subsequent Ionisation Energy Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2012-06-01

    Chemistry students' explanations of ionisation energy phenomena often involve a number of non-scientific or inappropriate ideas being used to form causality arguments. Research has attributed this to many science teachers using these ideas themselves (Tan and Taber, in J Chem Educ 86(5):623-629, 2009). This research extends this work by considering which atomic models are used in pre-service teachers' explanations and how that relates to the causality ideas expressed. Thirty-one pre-service teachers were interviewed. Each was asked to describe and explain four different atomic representations (Rutherford, Electron cloud micrograph, Bohr and Schrödinger types) in as much detail as they could. They also provided an explanation for the subsequent ionisation energy values for an oxygen atom and identified which representations were helpful in explaining the values. Significantly, when pre-service teachers only used Bohr type representations, they did not use repelling electron ideas in their explanations. However, arguments that were based on electron-electron repulsion used features from Schrödinger type atoms. These findings suggest that many pre-service teachers need to develop their atomic modelling skills so that they select and use models more expertly and that subsequent ionisation explanations offer a context in which to explore different atomic models' limitations and their deployment as explanatory resources.

  5. A liquid ionisation detector for digital radiography of therapeutic megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Meertens, H; van Herk, M; Weeda, J

    1985-04-01

    Experiments with an ionisation detector were performed in order to determine whether it was possible to obtain high energy photon beam images for radiotherapy treatment verification. A small prototype detector with a field of view of 78 mm X 78 mm and constructed from printed circuit boards was used. The imaging area was a matrix ionisation chamber, filled with air or liquid (2,2,4-trimethylpentane). A minicomputer was used to control the data acquisition electronics and to reconstruct and restore the images. The images were displayed on a viewing console for computed tomography images. The liquid filled detector with a front-rear board separation of 1.0 mm gave the best results. The spatial resolution was about 3.8 mm with a density resolution of 0.5% for a data acquisition time of 120 s. Comparison of the liquid detector images with corresponding metal screen-film detector images showed that the image qualities were the same. An important advantage of the ionisation detector image is that grey scale modification, sharpening and smoothing by digital processing can easily be performed. PMID:3923505

  6. Radiation in the workplace-a review of studies of the risks of occupational exposure to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Richard

    2009-06-01

    Many individuals are, or have been, exposed to ionising radiation in the course of their work and the epidemiological study of occupationally irradiated groups offers an important opportunity to complement the estimates of risks to health resulting from exposure to radiation that are obtained from other populations, such as the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Moreover, workplace exposure to radiation usually involves irradiation conditions that are of direct relevance to the principal concern of radiological protection: protracted exposure to low level radiation. Further, some workers have been exposed to radioactive material that has been inadvertently taken into the body, and the study of these groups leads to risk estimates derived directly from the experience of those irradiated by these 'internal emitters', intakes of alpha-particle-emitters being of particular interest. Workforces that have been the subject of epidemiological study include medical staff, aircrews, radium dial luminisers, underground hard-rock miners, Chernobyl clean-up workers, nuclear weapons test participants and nuclear industry workers. The first solid epidemiological evidence of the stochastic effects of irradiation came from a study of occupational exposure to medical x-rays that was reported in 1944, which demonstrated a large excess risk of leukaemia among US radiologists; but the general lack of dose records for early medical staff who tended to experience the highest exposures hampers the derivation of risks per unit dose received by medical workers. The instrument dial luminisers who inadvertently ingested large amounts of radium-based paint and underground hard-rock miners who inhaled large quantities of radon and its decay products suffered markedly raised excess risks of, respectively, bone and lung cancers; the miner studies have provided standard risk estimates for radon-induced lung cancer. The large numbers of nuclear industry

  7. [Cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  8. Born total ionisation cross sections: An algebraic computing program using Maple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2003-08-01

    The software described in this paper uses the Maple algebraic computing environment to calculate an analytic form for the matrix element of the plane-wave Born approximation of the electron-impact ionisation of an atomic orbital, with arbitrary orbital and angular momentum quantum numbers. The atomic orbitals are approximated by Hartree-Fock Slater functions, and the ejected electron is modelled by a hydrogenic Coulomb wave, made orthogonal to all occupied orbitals of the target atom. Clenshaw-Curtis integration techniques are then used to calculate the total ionisation cross-section. For improved performance, the numerical integrations are performed using FORTRAN by automatically converting the analytic matrix element for each orbital into a FORTRAN subroutine. The results compare favourably with experimental data for a wide range of elements, including the transition metals, with excellent convergence at high energies. Program summaryTitle of program: BIX Catalogue identifier:ADRZ Program summary URL:http://www.cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/cpc/summaries/ADRZ Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: Platform independent Operating systems: Tested on DEC Alpha Unix, Windows NT 4.0 and Windows XP Professional Edition Programming language used: Maple V Release 5.1 and FORTRAN 90 Memory required: 256 MB No. of processors used: 1 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:61754 Distributed format:tar gzip file Keywords: Born approximation, electron-impact ionisation cross-section, Maple, Hartree-Fock Nature of physical problem: Calculates the total electron impact ionisation cross-section for neutral and ionised atomic species using the first-Born approximation. The scattered electron is modelled by a plane wave, and the ejected electron is modelled by a hydrogenic Coulomb wave, which is made orthogonal to all occupied atomic orbitals, and the atomic orbitals are approximated by Hartree-Fock Slater

  9. Design and performance of an ionisation chamber for the measurement of low alpha-activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, A.; Hutsch, J.; Krüger, F.; Sobiella, M.; Wilsenach, H.; Zuber, K.

    2016-04-01

    A new ionisation chamber for alpha-spectroscopy has been built from radio-pure materials for the purpose of investigating long lived alpha-decays. The measurement makes use of pulse shape analysis to discriminate between signal and background events. The design and performance of the chamber is described in this paper. A background rate of (10.9 ± 0.6) counts per day in the energy region of 1-9 MeV was achieved with a run period of 30.8 days. The background is dominantly produced by radon daughters.

  10. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  11. Forensic applications of desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Morelato, Marie; Beavis, Alison; Kirkbride, Paul; Roux, Claude

    2013-03-10

    Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an emerging analytical technique that enables in situ mass spectrometric analysis of specimens under ambient conditions. It has been successfully applied to a large range of forensically relevant materials. This review assesses and highlights forensic applications of DESI-MS including the analysis and detection of illicit drugs, explosives, chemical warfare agents, inks and documents, fingermarks, gunshot residues and drugs of abuse in urine and plasma specimens. The minimal specimen preparation required for analysis and the sensitivity of detection achieved offer great advantages, especially in the field of forensic science. PMID:23498998

  12. Estimation of useful yield in surface analysis using single photon ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Moore, J. F.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Savina, M. R.; Tripa, C. E.

    2003-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and laser desorption photoionisation (LDPI) have been used to investigate the desorption of molecules from self-assembled monolayers of phenylsulphides. LDPI, using an F 2 excimer laser to single photon ionise gave the lowest fragmentation. A useful yield greater than 0.5% was found for analysis of diphenyldisulphide self-assembled monolayers. It is shown that using a free electron laser to postionise will lead, in the future, to analysis of many atoms and molecules with useful yields approaching 30%.

  13. EVOLUTION OF THE IEC AND EN STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION.

    PubMed

    Voytchev, M; Behrens, R; Ambrosi, P; Radev, R; Chiaro, P

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the evolution of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the European standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation issued, respectively, from the committees IEC/Sub Committee 45B and European Committee for Electro-technical Standardization/Technical Committee 45B 'Radiation protection instrumentation'. Standards for passive individual photon and beta dosimetry systems as well as those for active individual monitors are discussed. A neutron ambient dose equivalent (rate) meter standard and a technical report concerning the determination of uncertainty in measurement are also covered. PMID:26443545

  14. Skin dose measurements using radiochromic films, TLDS and ionisation chamber and comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Alashrah, Saleh; Kandaiya, Sivamany; Maalej, Nabil; El-Taher, A

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the surface dose is very important for patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose at the surface of a water phantom at a depth of 0.007 cm as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement with radiochromic films (RFs), thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber in a 6-MV photon beam. The results were compared with the theoretical calculation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software (MCNP5, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc). The RF was calibrated by placing the films at a depth of maximum dose (d(max)) in a solid water phantom and exposing it to doses from 0 to 500 cGy. The films were scanned using a transmission high-resolution HP scanner. The optical density of the film was obtained from the red component of the RGB images using ImageJ software. The per cent surface dose (PSD) and percentage depth dose (PDD) curve were obtained by placing film pieces at the surface and at different depths in the solid water phantom. TLDs were placed at a depth of 10 cm in a solid water phantom for calibration. Then the TLDs were placed at different depths in the water phantom and were exposed to obtain the PDD. The obtained PSD and PDD values were compared with those obtained using a cylindrical ionisation chamber. The PSD was also determined using Monte Carlo simulation of a LINAC 6-MV photon beam. The extrapolation method was used to determine the PSD for all measurements. The PSD was 15.0±3.6% for RF. The TLD measurement of the PSD was 16.0±5.0%. The (0.6 cm(3)) cylindrical ionisation chamber measurement of the PSD was 50.0±3.0%. The theoretical calculation using MCNP5 and DOSXYZnrc yielded a PSD of 15.0±2.0% and 15.7±2.2%. In this study, good agreement between PSD measurements was observed using RF and TLDs with the Monte Carlo calculation. However, the cylindrical chamber measurement yielded an overestimate of the PSD

  15. Investigating ionisation cluster size distribution due to sub-1 keV electrons in view of Heisenberg's Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Palmans, H.; Hao, L.; Nisbet, A.

    2015-09-01

    As the wavelengths of low energy electrons become comparable with the length scale of the mean ionisation step size, each event particle should be treated with care as the condition outlined in Heisenberg's uncertainty principle (HUP) should also be satisfied. Within this quantum-classical regime, spatial delocalisations of individual ionisation event sites that are generated outside the target region are calculated, and particular attention is given to the validity of using classical transport methods in simulations of nanodosimetric parameters such as mean cluster size, first and second moments, variance and cumulative frequency of ionisation cluster-size probability distributions. This paper presents the comparison between conventionally calculated nanodosimetric quantities and the ones where interacting particles are treated semi-classically with spatial uncertainties satisfied by HUP. The simulated primary charged particles are electrons of energies between 100 eV and 1 keV in DNA equivalent target aqueous water volumes using GEANT4-DNA.

  16. Ionisation effects on the permeation of pharmaceutical compounds through silicone membrane.

    PubMed

    Waters, L J; Bhuiyan, A K M M H

    2016-05-01

    Silicone membrane is frequently used as an in vitro skin mimic whereby experiments incorporate a range of buffered media which may vary in pH. As a consequence of such variability in pH there is a corresponding variability in the degree of ionisation which in turn, could influence permeation through the mainly hydrophobic-rich membrane structure. This study reports the effect of pH on the permeation of five model compounds (benzoic acid, benzotriazole, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and lidocaine). For the five compounds analysed, each at three distinct percentages of ionisation, it was found that the greater extent of permeation was always for the more 'neutral', i.e. more greatly unionised, species rather than the anionic or cationic species. These findings fit with the theory that the hydrophobic membrane encourages permeation of 'lipid-like' structures, i.e. the more unionised form of compounds. However, results obtained with an Inverse Gas Chromatography Surface Energy Analyser (iGC SEA) indicate the membrane surface to be an electron dense environment. In the knowledge that unionised forms of compounds permeate (rather than the charged species) this negatively charged surface was not anticipated, i.e. the basic membrane surface did not appear to affect permeation. PMID:26896663

  17. High throughput volatile fatty acid skin metabolite profiling by thermal desorption secondary electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Helen J; Reynolds, James C; Riazanskaia, Svetlana; Thomas, C L Paul

    2014-09-01

    The non-invasive nature of volatile organic compound (VOC) sampling from skin makes this a priority in the development of new screening and diagnostic assays. Evaluation of recent literature highlights the tension between the analytical utility of ambient ionisation approaches for skin profiling and the practicality of undertaking larger campaigns (higher statistical power), or undertaking research in remote locations. This study describes how VOC may be sampled from skin and recovered from a polydimethylsilicone sampling coupon and analysed by thermal desorption (TD) interfaced to secondary electrospray ionisation (SESI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for the high throughput screening of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from human skin. Analysis times were reduced by 79% compared to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods (GC-MS) and limits of detection in the range 300 to 900 pg cm(-2) for VFA skin concentrations were obtained. Using body odour as a surrogate model for clinical testing 10 Filipino participants, 5 high and 5 low odour, were sampled in Manilla and the samples returned to the UK and screened by TD-SESI-MS and TD-GC-MS for malodour precursors with greater than >95% agreement between the two analytical techniques. Eight additional VFAs were also identified by both techniques with chains 4 to 15 carbons long being observed. TD-SESI-MS appears to have significant potential for the high throughput targeted screening of volatile biomarkers in human skin. PMID:24992564

  18. Adaptive response to ionising radiation induced by cadmium in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Choi, V W Y; Ng, C Y P; Kong, M K Y; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2013-03-01

    An adaptive response is a biological response where the exposure of cells or animals to a low priming exposure induces mechanisms that protect the cells or animals against the detrimental effects of a subsequent larger challenging exposure. In realistic environmental situations, living organisms can be exposed to a mixture of stressors, and the resultant effects due to such exposures are referred to as multiple stressor effects. In the present work we demonstrated, via quantification of apoptosis in the embryos, that embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) subjected to a priming exposure provided by one environmental stressor (cadmium in micromolar concentrations) could undergo an adaptive response against a subsequent challenging exposure provided by another environmental stressor (alpha particles). We concluded that zebrafish embryos treated with 1 to 10 μM Cd at 5 h postfertilisation (hpf) for both 1 and 5 h could undergo an adaptive response against subsequent ~4.4 mGy alpha-particle irradiation at 10 hpf, which could be interpreted as an antagonistic multiple stressor effect between Cd and ionising radiation. The zebrafish has become a popular vertebrate model for studying the in vivo response to ionising radiation. As such, our results suggested that multiple stressor effects should be carefully considered for human radiation risk assessment since the risk may be perturbed by another environmental stressor such as a heavy metal. PMID:23296313

  19. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  20. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, A V; Mavritskii, O B; Egorov, A N; Pechenkin, A A; Savchenkov, D V

    2014-12-31

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Effects of ionised or chelated water-soluble mineral mixture supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics, meat quality and intestinal microbiota in broilers.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, S D; Lee, B R; Kim, I H

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of dietary supplementation of water-soluble ionised or chelated mineral mixture on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics, relative organ weight, meat quality and excreta microflora in broilers. A total of 408 Arbor Acres broilers (17 birds in 8 replicate pens) were randomly allocated into one of the following three treatments: (1) Control/basal diet (CON), (2) T1 (basal diet + 0.5% ionised mineral mixture solution, pH 3.0) and (3) T2 (basal diet + 0.5% chelated mineral mixture solution, pH 3.0). The body weight gain was greater and feed conversion ratio was lower in broilers supplemented with ionised or chelated mineral liquid complex compared to CON during the grower and overall phase of the experiment. No significant effect in the concentration of Ca and P in the blood was observed in birds supplemented with ionised or chelated mineral mixture solution. No adverse effects were observed in organ weight and meat quality with ionised or chelated mineral mixture supplementation. Regarding intestinal microbiota counts there was a reduction of Escherichia coli counts in the small intestine in ionised mineral supplemented birds. In the large intestine, E. coli as well as Salmonella populations were reduced in ionised mineral supplemented birds. In conclusion, ionised or chelated minerals have partial positive effects in improving growth performance and reducing pathogenic bacteria load in the gastro-intestinal tract. PMID:27088481

  2. Multidisciplinary approach to assess the sensitivity of dwarf tomato plants to low-LET ionising radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Micco, Veronica; De Pascale, Stefania; Aronne, Giovanna; Paradiso, Roberta; Vitaglione, Paola; Turano, Mimmo; Arena, Carmen

    Ionising radiation, acting alone or in interaction with microgravity and other environmental constraints, may affect plant at molecular, morpho-structural and physiological level. The intensity of the plant’s response depends on the properties of radiation and on the features of the plant itself. Indeed, different species are characterised by different susceptibility to radiation which may change during the life course. The aim of this research was to study the radiosensitivity to low-LET ionising radiation of plants of dwarf tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. ‘Microtom’) at two phenological phases (vegetative and reproductive), within the purpose of analysing plants for consideration as candidates for Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) in Space. To pursue this objective, plants of the cultivar Microtom were irradiated with different doses of X-rays either at the stage of the second true leaf (VP - vegetative phase) or when at least one flower was blossomed (RP - reproductive phase). Plant’s response to ionising radiation was assessed through a multidisciplinary approach combining genetic analyses, ecophysiological measurements, morpho-anatomical characterisation of leaves and fruits, nutritional analyses of fruits. Growth, molecular and morpho-functional traits were measured during plant development up to fruiting in both VP and RP plant groups, and compared with non-irradiated control plants. Plant growth was monitored weekly recording parameters such as plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, flowering and fruiting rate. Potential DNA alterations were explored through Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. The efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus was evaluated by determining photosynthetic pigment composition, photochemistry and leaf gas exchanges. Leaf and fruit structure were analysed through light and epi-fluorescence microscopy. Leaf anatomical traits related to photosynthetic efficiency, and to structural radioprotection

  3. Evidence For The Tongue of Ionisation In The Winter Dayside Ionosphere Over Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryse, S. E.; Sims, R. W.; Moen, J.

    Results are presented from a multi-instrument investigation of the dayside ionosphere at high latitudes, under conditions of Bz<0, that provide evidence for the tongue- of-ionisation (TOI) in winter over Svalbard. The TOI, transporting photoionisation from sub-auroral latitudes into the polar cap, has been identified in three successive tomography images at latitudes on the equatorward edge of the auroral region in the post-noon sector. Simultaneous observations by the ESR incoherent scatter radar re- veal cold plasma of increased density in the vicinity of the throat region where the TOI enters the polar cap. Supporting evidence for the feature is provided by optical emissions measured by meridian scanning photometers, together with plasma drift and particle observations from DMSP satellites. The observations are discussed in light of earlier modelling studies of the TOI.

  4. The risk of childhood leukaemia following exposure to ionising radiation--a review.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Since the early years of follow-up of the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, it has been apparent that childhood leukaemia has a particular sensitivity to induction by ionising radiation, the excess relative risk (ERR) being expressed as a temporal wave with time since exposure. This pattern has been generally confirmed by studies of children treated with radiotherapy. Case-control studies of childhood leukaemia and antenatal exposure to diagnostic x-rays, a recent large cohort study of leukaemia following CT examinations of young people, and a recent large case-control study of natural background γ-radiation and childhood leukaemia have found evidence of raised risks following low-level exposure. These findings indicate that an ERR/Sv for childhood leukaemia of ~50, which may be derived from risk models based upon the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, is broadly applicable to low dose or low dose-rate exposure circumstances. PMID:23296257

  5. Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of low molecular weight synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anthony T; Williams, Jonathan P; Scrivens, James H

    2006-01-01

    A range of low molecular weight synthetic polymers has been characterised by means of desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) combined with both mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Accurate mass experiments were used to aid the structural determination of some of the oligomeric materials. The polymers analysed were poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(alpha-methyl styrene). An application of the technique for characterisation of a polymer used as part of an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical tablet is described. The mass spectra and tandem mass spectra of all of the polymers were obtained in seconds, indicating the sensitivity of the technique. PMID:16912984

  6. The perturbation correction factor of ionisation chambers in beta-radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Böhm, J

    1980-01-01

    In determining the absorbed dose in a solid medium by means of gas-filled ionisation chambers, the perturbation of the radiation field by the chamber needs to be taken into account. So far, an appropriate correction factor has neither been calculated nor measured for beta-radiation. This work describes its experimental determination for an extrapolation chamber and beta-radiation fields of 147Pm, 204Tl, and 90Sr + 90Y. The results show that the correction factor may be assumed to be the product of a shield factor and a scatter factor the magnitudes of which depend on the chamber geometry and the radiation field. The change of the perturbation correction factor with phantom depth is important for the measurement of depth dose curves. This is demonstrated by an example. PMID:7360793

  7. Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry: Sensitive and Quantitative Chemical Depth Profiling of Solid Materials.

    PubMed

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Direct quantitative and sensitive chemical analysis of solid materials with high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction is of high importance in various fields of analytical research, ranging from in situ space research to the semiconductor industry. Accurate knowledge of the chemical composition of solid materials allows a better understanding of physical and chemical processes that formed/altered the material and allows e.g. to further improve these processes. So far, state-of-the-art techniques such as SIMS, LA-ICP-MS or GD-MS have been applied for chemical analyses in these fields of research. In this report we review the current measurement capability and the applicability of our Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (instrument name LMS) for the chemical analysis of solids with high spatial resolution. The most recent chemical analyses conducted on various solid materials, including e.g. alloys, fossils and meteorites are discussed. PMID:27131112

  8. Preparation of (K:Eu) NaSO4 phosphor for lyoluminescence dosimetry of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Dhoble, S J

    2002-01-01

    Gamma ray dosimetry using lyoluminescence is a low cost and simple system. As sulphate based phosphors are used for TL radiation dosimetry they therefore seem to be a promising material for LL gamma ray dosimetry. A study on LL properties of Eu activated KNaSO4 and K3Na(SO4)2 gamma irradiated materials is reported. Eu doped KNaSO4 shows maximum LL yield in the above system. It shows a linear response from 0.06 to 10 C.kg(-1) and there is not much fading of LL intensity, indicating the phosphor to be suitable as a lyoluminescence dosimetry phosphor of ionising radiation. The doped Eu ion acts as an activator and thus enhances the LL intensity of the phosphor. PMID:12382879

  9. Carrier-envelope phase effects in few-cycle ionisation of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielpinski, David; Wallace, W. C.; Pullen, M. G.; Ghafur, O.; Laban, D. E.; Palmer, A. J.; Hanne, G. F.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Bartschat, K.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.; Tong, X.-M.; Quiney, H. M.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2012-06-01

    The control of strong-field photoionization with laser carrier-envelope phase (CEP) is the key enabling technique for attosecond science. Currently, quantitatively accurate ab initio simulations of this process can only be carried out for atomic hydrogen. We have observed CEP effects in the above-threshold ionisation of atomic hydrogen for the first time. The modulation due to CEP is mapped over a wide range of laser intensity and electron energy. The data is compared with ab initio simulations for the time dependent Schr"odinger equation carried out using three separate methodologies, as well as a semi-ab initio simulation method. We find reasonable agreement between experiment and all simulations over the entire sampled parameter space. Our results point the way toward accurate calibration of absolute laser CEP by means of the uniquely calculable hydrogen system.

  10. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  11. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  12. Oral brush biopsy analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry profiling--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Remmerbach, Torsten W; Maurer, Katja; Janke, Sebastian; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Eschrich, Klaus; Bertolini, Julia; Hofmann, Herbert; Rupf, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) often present as advanced tumours requiring aggressive local and regional therapy and result in significant functional impairment. The objective is to develop pre-symptomatic screening detection of OSCC by a brush biopsy method which is less invasive than the conventional biopsy for histology. Given the molecular heterogeneity of oral cancer, it is unlikely that even a panel of tumour markers would provide accurate diagnosis. Therefore, approaches such as the matrix-assisted-laser-desorption/ionisation-time-of-flight-mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) allow several biomarkers or peptide profile patterns to be simultaneously assessed. Brush biopsies from 27 patients with histology-proven OSCCs plus 40 biopsies from 10 healthy controls were collected. MALDI-TOF-MS profiling was performed and additional statistical analysis of the data was used to classify the disease status according to the biological behaviour of the lesion. For classification a support vector machine algorithm was trained using spectra of brush biopsy samples to distinguish healthy control patients from patients with histology-proven OSCC. MALDI-TOF-MS was able to distinguish between healthy patients and OSCC patients with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 93%. In summary, MALDI-TOF-MS in combination with sophisticated bioinformatic methods can distinguish OSCC patients from non-cancer controls with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Further improvement and validation of this approach is necessary to determine its feasibility to assist the pre-symptomatic detection of head and neck cancer screening in routine daily practice. PMID:21354855

  13. Simultaneous determination of volatile and non-volatile nitrosamines in processed meat products by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation and electrospray ionisation.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, S S; Duedahl-Olesen, L; Granby, K

    2014-02-21

    A sensitive, selective and generic method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the contents (μgkg(-1) range) of both volatile nitrosamines (VNA) and non-volatile nitrosamines (NVNA) in processed meat products. The extraction procedure only requires basic laboratory equipment and a small volume of organic solvent. Separation and quantification were performed by the developed LC-(APCI/ESI)MS/MS method. The method was validated using spiked samples of three different processed meat products. Satisfactory recoveries (50-130%) and precisions (2-23%) were obtained for eight VNA and six NVNAs with LODs generally between 0.2 and 1μgkg(-1), though for a few analyte/matrix combinations higher LODs were obtained (3 to 18μgkg(-1)). The validation results show that results obtained for one meat product is not always valid for other meat products. We were not able to obtain satisfactory results for N-nitrosohydroxyproline (NHPRO), N-nitrosodibenzylamine (NDBzA) and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA). Application of the APCI interface improved the sensitivity of the method, because of less matrix interference, and gave the method a wider scope, as some NAs were ionisable only by APCI. However, it was only possible to ionize N-nitroso-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NTCA) and N-nitroso-2-methyl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NMTCA) by ESI. The validated method was applied for the analysis of processed meat products and contents of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), N-nitrosomethylaniline (NMA), N-nitrosoproline (NPRO), NTCA, and NMTCA were found in one or several nitrite cured meat products, whereas none were detected in non-nitrite cured bacon. PMID:24468241

  14. The use of particle beam mass spectrometry for the measurement of impurities in a nabumetone drug substance, not easily amenable to atmospheric pressure ionisation techniques.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J C; Hawtin, P N; Monté, S; Balogh, M; Jones, T

    2001-01-01

    Liquid chromatography/particle beam mass spectrometry (LC/PB-MS) was used for the structural elucidation of some impurities in nabumetone as this compound poorly ionises by atmospheric pressure ionisation (API) techniques. PB-MS was optimised for nabumetone and a sensitivity study was carried out. To obtain full scan electron ionisation spectra a minimum of 100 ng of compound on column was needed. By using 20 mg/mL solutions of nabumetone, impurities at levels of about 250 ppm mass fraction relative to nabumetone could be detected. Results were compared with LC/API-MS and previous GC/MS. PMID:11223957

  15. High-performance liquid chromatographic, capillary electrophoretic and capillary electrophoretic-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometric analysis of selected alkaloid groups.

    PubMed

    Stöckigt, Joachim; Sheludk, Yuri; Unger, Matthias; Gerasimenko, Irina; Warzecha, Heribert; Stöckigt, Detlef

    2002-08-16

    Systems for efficient separation of selected alkaloid groups by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE) and capillary electrophoresis coupled with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS) are described. The optimized HPLC system was applied for the separation of 23 standard indole alkaloids as well as for qualitative and quantitative analyses of crude alkaloid extracts of Rauvolfia serpentina X Rhazya stricta hybrid cell cultures. The developed conditions for CE analysis proved to be efficient for separation of mixtures of standard indole and beta-carboline alkaloids. The described buffer system is also applicable in the combination of CE with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. This analytical technique allowed the separation and identification of components of standard indole alkaloid mixture as well as crude extracts of R. serpentina roots, R. serpentina cell suspension cultures and cortex of Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco. The influence of buffer composition and analyte structures on separation is discussed. PMID:12219932

  16. Investigation of the ionisation density dependence of the glow curve characteristics of LIF:MG,TI (TLD-100)

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Horowitz, A.; Oster, L.; Marino, S.; Datz, H.; Margaliot, M.

    2008-01-01

    The dependence of the shape of the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) on ionisation density was investigated using irradiation with 90Sr/90Y beta rays, 60 and 250 kVp X rays, various heavy-charged particles and 0.2 and 14 MeV neutrons. Special attention is focused on the properties of high-temperature thermoluminescence; specifically, the behaviour of the high-temperature ratio (HTR) of Peaks 7 and 8 as a function of batch and annealing protocol. The correlation of Peaks 7 and 8 with average linear-energy-transfer (LET) is also investigated. The HTR of Peak 7 is found to be independent of LET for values of LET approximately >30 keV µm−1. The behaviour of the HTR of Peak 8 with LET is observed to be erratic, which suggests that applications using the HTR should separate the contributions of Peaks 7 and 8 using computerised glow curve deconvolution. The behaviour of the HTR following neutron irradiation is complex and not fully understood. The shape of composite Peak 5 is observed to be broader following high ionisation alpha particle irradiation, suggesting that the combined use of the HTR and the shape of Peak 5 could lead to improved ionisation density discrimination for particles of high LET. PMID:18667402

  17. Matrix-free mass spectrometric imaging using laser desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Richard J A; Pitt, Andrew R; Harrison, David; Weidt, Stefan K; Langridge-Smith, Pat R R; Barrett, Michael P; Logan Mackay, C

    2011-04-15

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool in metabolomics and proteomics for the spatial localization and identification of pharmaceuticals, metabolites, lipids, peptides and proteins in biological tissues. However, sample preparation remains a crucial variable in obtaining the most accurate distributions. Common washing steps used to remove salts, and solvent-based matrix application, allow analyte spreading to occur. Solvent-free matrix applications can reduce this risk, but increase the possibility of ionisation bias due to matrix adhesion to tissue sections. We report here the use of matrix-free MSI using laser desorption ionisation performed on a 12 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. We used unprocessed tissue with no post-processing following thaw-mounting on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI) indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates. The identification and distribution of a range of phospholipids in mouse brain and kidney sections are presented and compared with previously published MALDI time-of-flight (TOF) MSI distributions. PMID:21416534

  18. Formation of 2-propanol in condensed molecular films of acetaldehyde following electron impact ionisation-induced proton transfer*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrmann, Tobias; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies on thin condensed layers of acetaldehyde have previously revealed that electron exposure at an energy above the ionisation threshold leads to formation of 2-propanol. However, the mechanism of this reaction remained unclear. Therefore, a computational approach is used to explore the electron-induced reactions of acetaldehyde yielding 2-propanol. Starting from hydrogen-bonded dimers of acetaldehyde we show that the initial ionisation event triggers proton transfer between the two acetaldehyde moieties resulting in a hydrogen-bonded complex of a [OCCH3] radical and a protonated acetaldehyde cation. Given an excess energy of up to 0.75 eV and a favourable arrangement, a methyl radical released upon dissociation of the CC bond within the [OCCH3] radical can migrate to the carbonyl carbon of the protonated acetaldehyde cation. This produces a 2-propanol radical cation and CO. Neutral 2-propanol is then obtained by recombination with a second electron. A mechanism involving ionisation-driven proton transfer is thus proposed as pathway to the formation of 2-propanol during electron exposure of condensed layers of acetaldehyde.

  19. Genotoxicity in earthworm after combined treatment of ionising radiation and mercury.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Tae Ho; An, Kwang-Guk; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2014-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of mercury and radiation on earthworms (Eisenia fetida). The levels of DNA damage and the repair kinetics in the coelomocytes of E. fetida treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl₂) and ionising radiation (gamma rays) were analysed by means of the comet assay. For detection of DNA damage and repair, E. fetida was exposed to HgCl₂ (0-160 mg kg(-1)) and irradiated with gamma rays (0-50 Gy) in vivo. The increase in DNA damage depended on the concentration of mercury or dose of radiation. The results showed that the more the oxidative stress induced by mercury and radiation the longer the repair time that was required. When a combination of HgCl₂ and gamma rays was applied, the cell damage was much higher than those treated with HgCl₂ or radiation alone, which indicated that the genotoxic effects were increased after the combined treatment of mercury and radiation. PMID:24870361

  20. Resolving Ionisation and Metallicity on Parsec Scales Across Primordial Analogues with HST-WFC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Auger, M.; Calzetti, D.; Kewley, L.; Aloisi, A.; Pettini, M.; Trussler, J.

    2016-06-01

    Nearby Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies are excellent laboratories for conducting detailed spatially resolved spectroscopic analyses of star-formation (SF), feedback, and chemical evolution in relatively pristine, low-metallicity environments analogous to those thought to exist in the early Universe. In this talk I will show a new, extensive dataset of narrow-band HST-WFC3 imaging where I essentially use HST as a high-spatial-resolution IFU to map six major emission lines in unprecedented detail, including HeII emission from WR stars. In this pioneering study, I spatially resolve diagnostic line ratios on sub-pc scales in two BCDs and deduce which ionisation mechanisms (e.g. shocks and/or photoionisation) are at work and assess their role in shaping the global galaxy properties. Moreover, I will present the first 'metallicity image' of a star-forming galaxy, revealing inhomogeneities on scales as small as <50~pc. This work not only demonstrates the benefits of high-resolution spatially-resolved observations in assessing the effects of feedback mechanisms and accurate chemical abundances, but also the limitations of emission line diagnostic tools which can break down on scales smaller than a H II region. Both aspects are especially relevant as we enter the era of extremely large telescopes, when observing structure on ˜~10~pc scales will no longer be limited to the local universe.

  1. Investigating the degradation of the sympathomimetic drug phenylephrine by electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trommer, Hagen; Raith, Klaus; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2010-06-01

    The frequently used sympathomimetic drug phenylephrine has been studied by electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry. The stability of the adrenoceptor agonist was examined by investigations of the pharmaceutically used salts phenylephrine hydrochloride and phenylephrine bitartrate. Photostability has been studied by use of an irradiation equipment emitting a solar radiation spectrum. The experiments were carried out by analysis of aqueous drug solutions before and after irradiation treatment. The phenylephrine derivative with unsaturated side chain originating from the drug by loss of one water molecule has been detected as the major degradation product of both phenylephrine salts the hydrochloride and the bitartrate. Further degradation and oxidation products were detectable already in the full scan mode demonstrating a low stability of the drug. Tandem mass spectrometry and multiple stage mass spectrometry experiments enabled the establishment of fragmentation schemes of both salts for the first time. Irradiation treatment indicated that phenylephrine bitartrate is more prone to degradation than the hydrochloride because of an additional decomposition sensitivity of the tartaric acid counter ion. An interaction between phenylephrine and its counter ion degradation products via a nucleophilic addition mechanism is suggested to be the explanation for the detected ion signals after irradiation treatment of phenylephrine bitartrate. PMID:20122809

  2. A gas ionisation Direct-STIM detector for MeV ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norarat, Rattanaporn; Guibert, Edouard; Jeanneret, Patrick; Dellea, Mario; Jenni, Josef; Roux, Adrien; Stoppini, Luc; Whitlow, Harry J.

    2015-04-01

    Direct-Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (Direct-STIM) is a powerful technique that yields structural information in sub-cellular whole cell imaging. Usually, a Si p-i-n diode is used in Direct-STIM measurements as a detector. In order to overcome the detrimental effects of radiation damage which appears as a broadening in the energy resolution, we have developed a gas ionisation detector for use with a focused ion beam. The design is based on the ETH Frisch grid-less off-axis Geiger-Müller geometry. It is developed for use in a MeV ion microscope with a standard Oxford Microbeams triplet lens and scanning system. The design has a large available solid angle for other detectors (e.g. proton induced fluorescence). Here we report the performance for imaging ReNcells VM with μm resolution where energy resolutions of <24 keV fwhm could be achieved for 1 MeV protons using isobutane gas.

  3. 100 years of Cosmic Rays - from the ionisation of air to beyond the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Alan

    2012-03-01

    The study of cosmic rays has impacted on many disciplines, including astrophysics, particle physics, carbon dating and radio astronomy: it has thus had scientific and societal impact. They were discovered in 1912 as a result of the efforts by some of the most distinguished scientists of that era, puzzled by their inability to explain the discharge of ionisation chambers. I will describe some of the early work that led, inter alia, to the discovery of the positron, the muon and the first strange particles and thus to the birth of particle physics. In 1938 it was found that showers of particles that arrive at the earth simultaneously are produced by primary cosmic rays of ˜10^15 eV, about 10^5 times more energetic than any particles that had been contemplated before. I will discuss how study of these showers has led to the discovery of cosmic rays of energies as great as 3 x 10^20 eV, challenging our understanding of where and how they are created. Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, the largest cosmic-ray detector ever built, is now being used for astrophysical studies and to give glimpses of some hadronic physics at centre-of-mass energies more than 4 times greater than are accessible at the LHC.

  4. Calibration, performance and type testing of personal dosemeters used in ionising-radiation applications in Greece.

    PubMed

    Boziari, A; Hourdakis, C J

    2007-01-01

    Active Personal Dosemeters (APDs) are widely used in real-time personal dosimetry. Their performance, operational characteristics and limitations, as well as their calibration should be routinely checked to assure satisfactory operation and safe use. This study summarises the results of such type tests and calibrations performed in almost 4750 dosemeters at Ionising Radiation Calibration Laboratory (HIRCL) of Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC). About 13.8% of the pencil type and 4.3% of the electronic dosemeters were found to be out of limits of acceptable performance. For the pencil type dosemeters, the mean calibration factor (CF+/-SD) for high- and low-dose categories was found to be 1.014+/-0.102 (range 0.793-1.458) and 0.995+/-0.059 (range 0.794-1.311), respectively. Of these >85% of them had reproducibility better than 90%, while <1% showed remarkable non-linearity and approximately 10% of them failed to retain the dose reading within the limits after 24 h. For the electronic dosemeters, the mean CF was 1.034+/-0.046 (range 0.967-1.238). The majority of them showed good reproducibility and linearity results while, after irradiation, the dose readings were not shifted through time. The energy response varies with the dosemeter type, reaching in one dosemeter type down to 50%. Both electronic and pencil did not showed electronic equilibrium problems. PMID:17185312

  5. Artificially-aged cachaça samples characterised by direct infusion electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Patterson P; Resende, Ana M M; Augusti, Daniella V; Badotti, Fernanda; Gomes, Fátima de Cássia O; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Eberlin, Marcos N; Augusti, Rodinei

    2014-01-15

    Direct infusion electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode [ESI(-)-MS] was employed to evaluate the authenticity of aged cachaças, a traditional and valuable Brazilian alcoholic beverage prepared from the distillation of brewed sugarcane juice and aged in barrels made of common woods. Counterfeit samples were prepared by adding dyes, sawdust or essences to a freshly-distiled, much less valuable sample (white cachaça) to simulate the 1-2years long natural ageing in wooden barrels. A simple visual inspection revealed remarkable differences between the ESI(-)-MS of the authentic samples (aged in oak or amburana casks) and the artificially-aged counterfeit samples. A set of diagnostic ions were detectable in the ESI(-)-MS of the authentic samples aged in oak (m/z 197, 241, 301 and 307) and amburana (m/z 271 and 377/379). This fast and direct methodology seems useful as a routine procedure to monitor this highly profitable and common counterfeit practice. PMID:24054215

  6. An isotopic analysis of ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-06-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find an enrichment factor (δ34S) of 8.7 ± 0.4‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  7. An isotope view on ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-02-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find a δ34S value of 8.7 ± 0.4‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  8. An isotopic view of ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S. O.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-04-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism remains undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find a d34S value of 8.7 ± 0.4 ‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  9. Application of positive mode atmospheric chemical ionisation to distinguish epimeric oleanolic and ursolic acids.

    PubMed

    Townley, Chloe; Brettell, Rhea C; Bowen, Richard D; Gallagher, Richard T; Martin, William H C

    2015-01-01

    A new and more reliable method is reported for distinguishing the equatorial and axial epimers of oleanolic and ursolic acids and related triterpenoids based primarily on the relative abundance of the [M+H](+) and [M+-H(2)O](+) signals in their positive mode atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectra. The rate of elimination of water, which is the principal primary fragmentation of protonated oleanolic and ursolic acids, depends systematically on the stereochemistry of the hydroxyl group in the 3 position. For the b-epimer, in which the 3-hydroxyl substituent is in an equatorial position,[M+-H(2)O](+) is the base peak. In contrast, for the α-epimer, where the 3-hydroxyl group is axial, [M + H](+) is the base peak. This trend, which is general for a range of derivatives of oleanolic and ursolic acids, including the corresponding methyl esters, allows epimeric triterpenoids in these series to be securely differentiated. Confirmatory information is available from the collision-induced dissociation of the [M+-H(2)O](+) primary fragment ions, which follow different pathways for the species derived from axial and equatorial epimers of oleanolic and ursolic acids. These two pieces of independent spectral information permit the stereochemistry of epimeric oleanolic and ursolic acids (and selected derivatives) to be assigned with confidence without relying either on chromatographic retention times or referring to the spectra or other properties of authentic samples of these triterpenoids. PMID:26307724

  10. Effect of penetrating ionising radiation on the mechanical properties of pericardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daar, Eman; Woods, E.; Keddie, J. L.; Nisbet, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2010-07-01

    The pericardium is an anistropic composite material made up of collagen and elastin fibres embedded in an amorphous matrix mainly composed of proteoglycan and hyaluronan. The collagen fibres are arranged in layers, with different directions of alignment in each layer, giving rise to interesting mechanical properties of pericardium, including the ability to undergo large deformation during performance of regular physiological functions. The present study aims to investigate the effect of penetrating photon ionising radiation on bovine pericardium tissue, being part of a study of the effect of cardiac doses received in breast radiotherapy and the possibility that this can give rise to cardiovascular complications. Irradiation doses in the range 5-80 Gy were used. To characterise the various mechanical properties [elastic modulus, stress relaxation, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and fracture] a uniaxial tensile test method was applied. The preliminary results reflect the wide inter-sample variations that are expected in dealing with tissues, with only a weak indication of increase in the UTS of the pericardium tissue with increase in radiation dose. Such an effect has also been observed by others, with reduction in UTS at doses of 80 Gy.

  11. Resveratrol and its methoxy-derivatives as modulators of DNA damage induced by ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Traversi, Gianandrea; Fiore, Mario; Leone, Stefano; Basso, Emiliano; Di Muzio, Elena; Polticelli, Fabio; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2016-07-01

    Various naturally occurring stilbene-like compounds that are related to resveratrol (RSV) possess some of the beneficial effects of the parent molecule and provide even further benefits. Therefore, a series of methoxylated analogues of RSV were prepared with the aim of increasing antitumour and proapoptotic activity. In a previous article, we studied two methoxy-derivatives, pterostilbene (PTERO) and trimethoxystilbene (TRIMETHOXY), in which the first was formed by the substitution of two hydroxyl groups with two methoxy groups (trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxystilbene) and the second was formed by the replacement of all three OH groups with methoxy groups (trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene). Both methoxy-derivatives showed stronger antioxidant activity when compared with RSV. In the present article, we focused on the analysis of the ability of RSV and its two methoxylated derivatives to protect proliferating non-tumoural cells from the damage induced by ionising radiation (IR). First we showed that the methoxy derivatives, contrary to their parental compound, are unable to affect topoisomerase enzyme and consequently are not clastogenic per se Second we showed that both PTERO and TRIMETHOXY more efficiently reduce the chromosome damage induced by IR. Furthermore, TRIMETHOXY, but not PTERO, causes a delay in cell proliferation, particularly in mitosis progression increasing the number of cells in metaphase at the expense of prophases and ana/telophases. PMID:26819346

  12. Beer fingerprinting by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Márová, Ivana; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2012-11-15

    A method allowing parallel fingerprinting of proteins and maltooligosaccharides directly from untreated beer samples is presented. These two classes of compounds were detected by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of beer mixed with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid solution. The maltooligosaccharide profiles acquired from the MALDI sample spot center were not found characteristic for beers of different source and technology. On the other hand, according to profiles containing protein signals acquired from crystals formed on the border of the MALDI sample spot, we were able to distinguish beer samples of the same brand produced by different breweries. The discriminatory abilities of the method were further examined on a set of 17 lager beers, where the fingerprints containing protein signals enabled resolution of majority of examined brands. We propose MALDI-TOF-MS profiling as a rapid tool for beer brewing technology process monitoring, quality control, and determination of beer authenticity. PMID:22868116

  13. Xpg limits the expansion of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells after ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Avila, Alush I; Illing, Anett; Becker, Friedrich; Maerz, Lars D; Morita, Yohei; Philipp, Melanie; Burkhalter, Martin D

    2016-07-27

    Reduced capacity of genome maintenance represents a problem for any organism, potentially causing premature death, carcinogenesis, or accelerated ageing. Strikingly though, loss of certain genome stability factors can be beneficial, especially for the maintenance of tissue stem cells of the intestine and the haematopoietic system. We therefore screened for genome stability factors negatively impacting maintenance of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the context of ionising radiation (IR). We found that in vivo knock down of Xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group G (Xpg) causes elevation of HSC numbers after IR treatment, while numbers of haematopoietic progenitors are elevated to a lesser extent. IR rapidly induces Xpg both on mRNA and on protein level. Prevention of this induction does not influence activation of the checkpoint cascade, yet attenuates late checkpoint steps such as induction of p21 and Noxa. This causes a leaky cell cycle arrest and lower levels of apoptosis, both contributing to increased colony formation and transformation rates. Xpg thus helps to adequately induce DNA damage responses after IR, thereby keeping the expansion of damaged cells under control. This represents a new function of Xpg in the response to IR, in addition to its well-characterized role in nucleotide excision repair. PMID:27137888

  14. Radiation safety in the nuclear medicine department: impact of the UK Ionising Radiations Regulations.

    PubMed

    Harding, L K

    1987-09-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine requires integration of radiation safety with patient care and radiopharmaceutical standards. Nationally there was useful discussion in the UK before the Ionising Radiations Regulations and Approved Code of Practice were published, although such consultation had been lacking when the Medicines Act was implemented. Most of the new considerations relating to nuclear medicine stem from Schedule 6 of the Regulations. Generally, the presence of a single patient does not require a controlled area. However, when several patients are present, or radiopharmaceuticals are being prepared prior to injection, a controlled area is required. Classification of workers is not likely to be required in a typical nuclear medicine department in the UK, although most parts of the nuclear medicine department will need to be controlled areas. These include the radiopharmacy, radionuclide dispensary, injection room, and imaging rooms if patients are injected in them. The importance of finger dose measurements is emphasised. Patient wards, however, need not be controlled areas. A particular concern in nuclear medicine was that patients should not need to be admitted to hospital merely to comply with legislation. This is possibly the case and clarification will probably be available when the Notes for Guidance are published. Most procedures in nuclear medicine departments will remain unchanged. Further information is required, however, on patient waiting rooms, handling flood sources, pregnancy, and breast feeding. Within the hospital, detailed and multidisciplinary discussion will need to take place within the forum of the radiation safety committee. PMID:3664186

  15. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  16. The Vertical Structure of Warm Ionised Gas in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaensler, B. M.; Madsen, G. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Mao, S. A.

    2008-11-01

    We present a new joint analysis of pulsar dispersion measures and diffuse Hα emission in the Milky Way, which we use to derive the density, pressure and filling factor of the thick disk component of the warm ionised medium (WIM) as a function of height above the Galactic disk. By excluding sightlines at low Galactic latitude that are contaminated by Hii regions and spiral arms, we find that the exponential scale-height of free electrons in the diffuse WIM is 1830-250+120 pc, a factor of two larger than has been derived in previous studies. The corresponding inconsistent scale heights for dispersion measure and emission measure imply that the vertical profiles of mass and pressure in the WIM are decoupled, and that the filling factor of WIM clouds is a geometric response to the competing environmental influences of thermal and non-thermal processes. Extrapolating the properties of the thick-disk WIM to mid-plane, we infer a volume-averaged electron density 0.014 +/- 0.001 cm-3, produced by clouds of typical electron density 0.34 +/- 0.06 cm-3 with a volume filling factor 0.04 +/- 0.01. As one moves off the plane, the filling factor increases to a maximum of ~30% at a height of ~1-1.5 kpc, before then declining to accommodate the increasing presence of hot, coronal gas. Since models for the WIM with a ~1 kpc scale-height have been widely used to estimate distances to radio pulsars, our revised parameters suggest that the distances to many high-latitude pulsars have been substantially underestimated.

  17. Ionising Radiation Exposure to Orthopaedic Trainees: The Effect of Sub-Specialty Training

    PubMed Central

    Oddy, MJ; Aldam, CH

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We monitored image intensifier use by orthopaedic trainees to assess their exposure to ionising radiation and to investigate the influence of sub-specialty training. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five different orthopaedic registrars recorded their monthly image intensifier screening times and exposure doses for all cases (trauma and elective), for a combined total of 12 non-consecutive months. Radiation exposure was monitored using shoulder and waist film badges worn both by surgeons and radiographers screening their cases. RESULTS Registrars in spinal sub-specialties were exposed to significantly higher doses per case and cumulative doses per month than non-spinal trainees (P < 0.05), but significantly lower screening times per case (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in cumulative screening times per month (P > 0.05). Regression analysis for all surgeons showed a significant relationship between shoulder film badge reading and cumulative dose exposed per month (P < 0.05), but not for cumulative screening time. Shoulder film badge recordings were significantly higher for spinal compared with non-spinal registrars (P < 0.05), although all badges were below the level for radiation reporting. Only one radiographer badge recorded a dose above threshold. CONCLUSIONS Whilst the long-term effects of sub-reporting doses of radiation are not fully understood, we consider that this study demonstrates that trainees should not be complacent in accepting inadequate radiation protection. The higher doses encountered with spinal imaging means that sub-specialty trainees should be alerted to the risk of their increased exposure. The principle of minimising radiation exposure must be maintained by all trainees at all times. PMID:16720002

  18. Low-dose ionising radiation and cardiovascular diseases--Strategies for molecular epidemiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Auvinen, Anssi; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Laurier, Dominique; Little, Mark P; Peters, Annette; Raj, Ken; Russell, Nicola S; Tapio, Soile; Zhang, Wei; Gomolka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that high-dose ionising radiation causes cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the evidence for a causal relationship between long-term risk of cardiovascular diseases after moderate doses (0.5-5 Gy) is suggestive and weak after low doses (<0.5 Gy). However, evidence is emerging that doses under 0.5 Gy may also increase long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. This would have major implications for radiation protection with respect to medical use of radiation for diagnostic purposes and occupational or environmental radiation exposure. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain information about the presence and possible magnitude of radiation-related cardiovascular disease risk at doses of less than 0.5 Gy. The biological mechanisms implicated in any such effects are unclear and results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Molecular epidemiological studies can improve the understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk estimation of radiation-induced circulatory disease at low doses. Within the European DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) project, strategies to conduct molecular epidemiological studies in this field have been developed and evaluated. Key potentially useful European cohorts are the Mayak workers, other nuclear workers, uranium miners, Chernobyl liquidators, the Techa river residents and several diagnostic or low-dose radiotherapy patient cohorts. Criteria for informative studies are given and biomarkers to be investigated suggested. A close collaboration between epidemiology, biology and dosimetry is recommended, not only among experts in the radiation field, but also those in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26041268

  19. Ionised concentrations in calcium and magnesium buffers: Standards and precise measurement are mandatory.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, John A S; Kay, James W; Elder, Hugh Y

    2016-09-01

    In Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) buffer solutions the ionised concentrations ([X(2+)]) are either calculated or measured. Calculated values vary by up to a factor of seven due to the following four problems: 1) There is no agreement amongst the tabulated constants in the literature. These constants have usually to be corrected for ionic strength and temperature. 2) The ionic strength correction entails the calculation of the single ion activity coefficient, which involves non-thermodynamic assumptions; the data for temperature correction is not always available. 3) Measured pH is in terms of activity i.e. pHa. pHa measurements are complicated by the change in the liquid junction potentials at the reference electrode making an accurate conversion from H(+) activity to H(+) concentration uncertain. 4) Ligands such as EGTA bind water and are not 100% pure. Ligand purity has to be measured, even when the [X(2+)] are calculated. The calculated [X(2+)] in buffers are so inconsistent that calculation is not an option. Until standards are available, the [X(2+)] in the buffers must be measured. The Ligand Optimisation Method is an accurate and independently verified method of doing this (McGuigan & Stumpff, Anal. Biochem. 436, 29, 2013). Lack of standards means it is not possible to compare the published [Ca(2+)] in the nmolar range, and the apparent constant (K(/)) values for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding to intracellular ligands amongst different laboratories. Standardisation of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) buffers is now essential. The parameters to achieve this are proposed. PMID:26975789

  20. Gold nanoparticles as novel agents for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S; Hirst, D G; O'Sullivan, J M

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising agents for cancer therapy and are being investigated as drug carriers, photothermal agents, contrast agents and radiosensitisers. This review introduces the field of nanotechnology with a focus on recent gold nanoparticle research which has led to early-phase clinical trials. In particular, the pre-clinical evidence for gold nanoparticles as sensitisers with ionising radiation in vitro and in vivo at kilovoltage and megavoltage energies is discussed. PMID:22010024

  1. Gold nanoparticles as novel agents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Hirst, D G; O'Sullivan, J M

    2012-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising agents for cancer therapy and are being investigated as drug carriers, photothermal agents, contrast agents and radiosensitisers. This review introduces the field of nanotechnology with a focus on recent gold nanoparticle research which has led to early-phase clinical trials. In particular, the pre-clinical evidence for gold nanoparticles as sensitisers with ionising radiation in vitro and in vivo at kilovoltage and megavoltage energies is discussed. PMID:22010024

  2. Laser ablation and ionisation by laser plasma radiation in the atmospheric-pressure mass spectrometry of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pento, A V; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Grechnikov, A A; Alimpiev, S S

    2013-01-31

    A new method was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of organic and bioorganic compounds, which involves laser ablation with the ionisation of its products by laser-plasma radiation and enables analysing gaseous, liquid, and solid substances at atmospheric pressure without sample preparation. The capabilities of this method were demonstrated by the examples of fast pharmaceutical composition screening, real-time atmosphere composition analysis, and construction of the mass spectrometric images of organic compound distributions in biological materials. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  3. Capillary electrophoresis with electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry for the characterisation of degradation products in aged papers.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Anne-Laurence; Seemann, Agathe; Lavédrine, Bertrand

    2012-01-30

    A methodology for capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (CE/ESI-MS) was developed for the simultaneous analysis of degradation products from paper among two families of compounds: low molar mass aliphatic organic acids, and aromatic (phenolic and furanic) compounds. The work comprises the optimisation of the CE separation and the ESI-MS parameters for improved sensitivity with model compounds using two successive designs of experiments. The method was applied to the analysis of lignocellulosic paper at different stages of accelerated hygrothermal ageing. The compounds of interest were identified. Most of them could be quantified and several additional analytes were separated. PMID:22284496

  4. Ionisation and fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by femtosecond laser pulses at wavelengths resonant with cation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, L.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Tasker, A. D.; McKenna, P.; McCanny, T.; Kosmidis, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Jones, D. R.; Issac, R. C.; Jamieson, S.

    2002-07-01

    When femtosecond laser pulses irradiate hydrocarbon molecules, then many fragmentation channels evident in nanosecond irradiation are bypassed, providing a strong analytically useful parent ion. However a number of molecules show only a very small or indeed no parent ions and recent papers suggest that those that do not produce parent peaks have cation transitions in resonance with the femtosecond laser wavelength. This Letter shows that this resonance effect is not universal and some aromatic molecules not only show strong parent peaks but also doubly and triply ionised entities when their cation absorption spectrum is strongly resonant at either the 800 or 400 nm or indeed both.

  5. Chemotaxonomy of bacteria by comprehensive GC and GC-MS in electron impact and chemical ionisation mode.

    PubMed

    David, Frank; Tienpont, Bart; Sandra, Pat

    2008-10-01

    The analysis of the cellular lipidic fraction of bacteria is described. After hydrolysis and methylation, the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) are determined by 1-D GC using the Sherlock MIDI bacteria identification system, by comprehensive GC (GC x GC) and by GC-MS in electron impact (EI) and positive chemical ionisation (PCI) mode. With GC x GC, the enhanced selectivity and group type separation provides a more complete elucidation of the fatty acids in microorganisms. GC-EI-MS and GC-PCI-MS were helpful for confirmation. The bacteria selected in this study are Brevundimonas diminuta, Chryseobacterium gleum and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. PMID:18792008

  6. New laboratory atomic data for neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements for astrophysics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Juliet C.; Nave, Gillian; Liggins, Florence; Clear, Christian; Ruffoni, Matthew; Sansonetti, Craig

    2015-08-01

    We present new laboratory spectroscopic measurements to produce atomic data for astrophysically important species: neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements.We use high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometry (FTS) (resolving power up to 2x106 at 200nm) to measure atomic spectra, giving accurate line wavelengths (to a few parts in 108), atomic energy levels, hyperfine structure splitting and log gfs (accurate to a few %) (Ruffoni et al this meeting). These data are vital for astrophysical spectral analyses for: line identification, spectrum synthesis, elemental abundance determinations [eg 1], and disentangling of blends etc. It is not possible to theoretically calculate these atomic data to the accuracy needed for modern astrophysics applications.At Imperial College we have a unique visible-VUV FT spectrometer with short wavelength cut-off of 135nm. We supplement FTS data at shorter wavelengths with spectra recorded on the NIST 10.7m grating spectrograph (with phosphor image or photographic plates) and at longer wavelengths in the IR we use the NIST IR FT spectrometer.An elemental spectrum may contain thousands of spectral lines from the IR to VUV. We use these wavelengths to correct known atomic energy levels, and search for new atomic levels. The result is a classified linelist and accurate atomic energy levels.We present progress on iron group element atomic energy levels and wavelengths for V I and V II [2,3], Co III [4], Cr I, Mn I and Mn II, and Ni II.This work is supported by STFC(UK), The Leverhulme Trust, The Royal Society and NASA.References[1] Bergemann M, Pickering JC & Gehren T,“NLTE analysis of Co I/Co II lines in spectra of cool stars with new laboratory hyperfine splitting constants",MNRAS 401(2) 1334 (2010)[2] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V II”, ApJS 207,13 (2013)[3] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V I",ApJS 192,11 (2011)[4] Smillie DG

  7. The multiple stressor effect in zebrafish embryos from simultaneous exposure to ionising radiation and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Ng, C Y P; Choi, V W Y; Lam, A C L; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2013-03-01

    Living organisms are exposed to a mixture of environmental stressors, and the resultant effects are referred to as multiple stressor effects. In the present work, we studied the multiple stressor effect in embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) from simultaneous exposure to ionising radiation (alpha particles) and cadmium through quantification of apoptotic signals at 24 h postfertilisation (hpf) revealed by vital dye acridine orange staining. For each set of experiments, 32-40 dechorionated embryos were deployed, which were divided into four groups each having 8-10 embryos. The four groups of embryos were referred to as (1) the control group (C), which received no further treatments after dechorionation; (2) the Cd-dosed and irradiated group (CdIr), which was exposed to 100 μM Cd from 5 to 24 hpf, and also received about 4.4 mGy from alpha particles at 5 hpf; (3) the irradiated group (Ir), which received about 4.4 mGy from alpha particles at 5 hpf; and (4) the Cd-dosed group (Cd), which was exposed to 100 μM Cd from 5 to 24 hpf. In general, the CdIr, Ir and Cd groups had more apoptotic signals than the C group. Within the 12 sets of experimental results, two showed significant synergistic effects, one showed a weakly synergistic effect and nine showed additive effects. The multiple stressor effect of 100 μM Cd with ~4.4 mGy alpha-particle radiation resulted in an additive or synergistic effect, but no antagonistic effect. The failure to identify significant synergistic effects for some sets of data, and thus their subsequent classification as additive effects, might be a result of the relatively small magnitude of the synergistic effects. The results showed that the radiation risk could be perturbed by another environmental stressor such as a heavy metal, and as such a realistic human radiation risk assessment should in general take into account the multiple stressor effects. PMID:23296360

  8. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  9. Determination of chlorinated paraffins in sediments from the Firth of Clyde by gas chromatography with electron capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry and carbon skeleton analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection.

    PubMed

    Hussy, Ines; Webster, Lynda; Russell, Marie; Moffat, Colin

    2012-07-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of increasing concern, but are to date not widely investigated in the environment, largely due to the challenges involved in their quantification. Here, SCCPs were quantified in marine sediments from the Firth of Clyde, Scotland, by gas chromatography with electron capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-ECNIMS) and through carbon skeleton analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID), and the analytical challenges encountered are discussed. Concentrations in the sediments ranged from 0.4 to 69 μg kg(-1) when determined by GC-ECNIMS, and from 5.6 to 379 μg kg(-1) when determined by GC-FID. For 8 out of 11 samples, analysis by GC-FID gave higher results than analysis by GC-ECNIMS. Unexpected aspects of the analysis, such as the presence of high concentrations of longer chain chlorinated paraffins in the samples, are also presented. PMID:22417782

  10. Letter: characterisation and identification of spermine and spermidine derivatives in Microdesmis keayana and Microdesmis puberula roots by electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roumy, Vincent; Hennebelle, Thierry; Zamblé, Alexis; Zamblé Yao, Jacques; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2008-01-01

    Three new N(1),N(5),N(14)-tris(4- hydroxycinnamoyl)spermines were identified in hydromethanolic root extracts of Microdesmis keayana J. Léonard and Microdesmis puberula Hook f. The electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) technique with specific nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of hydrolysed products made it possible to identify N(1),N(5),N(14)-tris(p-coumaroyl)spermine, N(1)-feruloyl,N(5),N(14)-di(p-coumaroyl)spermine and N(1),N(5),N(14)-tris(feruloyl)spermine, named keayanines B, C and D, respectively. ESI-MS/MS analysis most effectively provided structural data although high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry was also used to characterise four other compounds from Microdesmis puberula-keayanidines A, B, C and keayanine A-which had already been identified in M. keayana. This chemical data is the first to be published for M. puberula which is a commonly used plant in Central African traditional medicine. PMID:18493101

  11. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  12. Thermally annealed gold nanoparticles for surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    PubMed

    Pilolli, Rosa; Ditaranto, Nicoletta; Di Franco, Cinzia; Palmisano, Francesco; Cioffi, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Metal nanomaterials have an emerging role in surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) providing a useful tool to overcome some limitations intrinsically related to the use of conventional organic matrices in matrix-assisted LDI-MS. In this contribution, the possibility to use a stainless-steel-supported gold nanoparticle (AuNP) film as a versatile platform for SALDI-MS was assessed. A sacrificial anode electrosynthetic route was chosen in order to obtain morphologically controlled core-shell AuNPs; the colloidal AuNPs were, thereafter, drop cast onto a stainless-steel sample plate and the resulting AuNP film was thermally annealed in order to improve its effectiveness as LDI-MS promoter. Spectroscopic characterization of the nanostructured film by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was crucial for understanding how annealing induced changes in the surface chemistry and influenced the performance of AuNPs as desorption/ionisation promoter. In particular, it was demonstrated that the post-deposition treatments were essential to enhance the AuNP core/analyte interaction, thus resulting in SALDI-MS spectra of significantly improved quality. The AuNP films were applied to the detection of three different classes of low molecular weight (LMW) analytes, i.e. amino acids, peptides and LMW polymers, in order to demonstrate the versatility of this nanostructured material. PMID:22825677

  13. Internet-based ICRP resource for healthcare providers on the risks and benefits of medical imaging that uses ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Demeter, S; Applegate, K E; Perez, M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 3 Working Party was to update the 2001 web-based module 'Radiation and your patient: a guide for medical practitioners' from ICRP. The key elements of this task were: to clearly identify the target audience (such as healthcare providers with an emphasis on primary care); to review other reputable sources of information; and to succinctly publish the contribution made by ICRP to the various topics. A 'question-and-answer' format addressing practical topics was adopted. These topics included benefits and risks of imaging using ionising radiation in common medical situations, as well as pertaining to specific populations such as pregnant, breast-feeding, and paediatric patients. In general, the benefits of medical imaging and related procedures far outweigh the potential risks associated with ionising radiation exposure. However, it is still important to ensure that the examinations are clinically justified, that the procedure is optimised to deliver the lowest dose commensurate with the medical purpose, and that consideration is given to diagnostic reference levels for particular classes of examinations. PMID:27012846

  14. Vertical ionisation potentials of a number of crown ethers from charge transfer bands of their EDA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Sharma, Anubha; Nayak, Sandip K.; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2002-11-01

    Vertical ionisation potentials ( IDv) of a number of crown ethers, viz. dibenzo-30-crown-10 (Crown 1), benzo-15-crown-5 (Crown 2), dibenzo-24-crown-8 (Crown 3), dicyclohexano-24-crown-8 (Crown 4) and 4'-nitrobenzo-15-crown-5 (Crown 5) are being reported for the first time from a study of EDA interaction of these crown ethers with a number of electron acceptors like C 60, C 70, o-chloranil, p-chloranil, 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ) and pyromellitic diimide (PMD). The study has been carried out in CCl 4 medium by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Charge transfer (CT) absorption bands in the 360-900 nm range have been found in each case (excepting the 60 fullerene-Crown 4 system). The vertical ionisation potentials ( IDv) of all the crown ethers thus determined show a good correlation with those calculated by the semiempirical AM1 method. Of the six acceptors under study the vertical electron affinity of PMD was not found in the literature. This has also been determined from an analysis of the present hνCT data.

  15. Solvent Separating Secondary Metabolites Directly from Biosynthetic Tissue for Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioactive metabolites are often heterogeneously expressed in tissues both spatially and over time. Therefore, traditional solvent extraction methods benefit from an understanding of the in situ sites of biosynthesis and storage to deal with heterogeneity and maximize yield. Recently, surface-assisted mass spectrometry (MS) methods namely nanostructure-assisted laser desorption ionisation (NALDI) and desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) surfaces have been developed to enable the direct detection of low molecular weight metabolites. Since direct tissue NALDI-MS or DIOS-MS produce complex spectra due to the wide variety of other metabolites and fragments present in the low mass range, we report here the use of “on surface” solvent separation directly from mollusc tissue onto nanostructured surfaces for MS analysis, as a mechanism for simplifying data annotation and detecting possible artefacts from compound delocalization during the preparative steps. Water, ethanol, chloroform and hexane selectively extracted a range of choline esters, brominated indoles and lipids from Dicathais orbita hypobranchial tissue imprints. These compounds could be quantified on the nanostructured surfaces by comparison to standard curves generated from the pure compounds. Surface-assisted MS could have broad utility for detecting a broad range of secondary metabolites in complex marine tissue samples. PMID:25786067

  16. Airborne hydrogen cyanide measurements using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer for the plume identification of biomass burning forest fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, M.; Bacak, A.; Muller, J. B. A.; O'Shea, S. J.; Xiao, P.; Ashfold, M. N. R.; Cooke, M. C.; Batt, R.; Shallcross, D. E.; Oram, D. E.; Forster, G.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Percival, C. J.

    2013-09-01

    A chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS) was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from biomass burning events in Canada using I- reagent ions on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the BORTAS campaign in 2011. The ionisation scheme enabled highly sensitive measurements at 1 Hz frequency through biomass burning plumes in the troposphere. A strong correlation between the HCN, carbon monoxide (CO) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) was observed, indicating the potential of HCN as a biomass burning (BB) marker. A plume was defined as being 6 standard deviations above background for the flights. This method was compared with a number of alternative plume-defining techniques employing CO and CH3CN measurements. The 6-sigma technique produced the highest R2 values for correlations with CO. A normalised excess mixing ratio (NEMR) of 3.68 ± 0.149 pptv ppbv-1 was calculated, which is within the range quoted in previous research (Hornbrook et al., 2011). The global tropospheric model STOCHEM-CRI incorporated both the observed ratio and extreme ratios derived from other studies to generate global emission totals of HCN via biomass burning. Using the ratio derived from this work, the emission total for HCN from BB was 0.92 Tg (N) yr-1.

  17. Airborne hydrogen cyanide measurements using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer for the plume identification of biomass burning forest fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, M.; Bacak, A.; Muller, J. B. A.; O'Shea, S. J.; Xiao, P.; Ashfold, M. N. R.; Cooke, M. C.; Batt, R.; Shallcross, D. E.; Oram, D. E.; Forster, G.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Percival, C. J.

    2013-02-01

    A Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from biomass burning events in Canada using I- reagent ions on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the BORTAS campaign in 2011. The ionisation scheme enabled highly sensitive measurements at 1 Hz frequency through biomass burning plumes in the troposphere. A strong correlation between the HCN, carbon monoxide (CO) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) was observed, indicating the potential of HCN as a biomass burning (BB) marker. A plume was defined as being 6 standard deviations above background for the flights. This method was compared with a number of alternative plume defining techniques employing CO and CH3CN measurements. The 6 sigma technique produced the highest R2 values for correlations with CO. A Normalised Excess Mixing Ratio (NEMR) of 3.76 ± 0.022 pptv ppbv-1 was calculated which is within the range quoted in previous research (Hornbrook et al., 2011). The global tropospheric model STOCHEM-CRI incorporated both the observed ratio and extreme ratios derived from other studies to generate global emission totals of HCN via biomass burning. Using the ratio derived from this work the emission total for HCN from BB was 0.92 Tg (N) yr-1.

  18. Leaf Anatomy and Photochemical Behaviour of Solanum lycopersicum L. Plants from Seeds Irradiated with Low-LET Ionising Radiation

    PubMed Central

    De Micco, V.; Paradiso, R.; Aronne, G.; De Pascale, S.; Quarto, M.; Arena, C.

    2014-01-01

    Plants can be exposed to ionising radiation not only in Space but also on Earth, due to specific technological applications or after nuclear disasters. The response of plants to ionising radiation depends on radiation quality/quantity and/or plant characteristics. In this paper, we analyse some growth traits, leaf anatomy, and ecophysiological features of plants of Solanum lycopersicum L. “Microtom” grown from seeds irradiated with increasing doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 20, 50, and 100 Gy). Both juvenile and compound leaves from plants developed from irradiated and control seeds were analysed through light and epifluorescence microscopy. Digital image analysis allowed quantifying anatomical parameters to detect the occurrence of signs of structural damage. Fluorescence parameters and total photosynthetic pigment content were analysed to evaluate the functioning of the photosynthetic machinery. Radiation did not affect percentage and rate of seed germination. Plants from irradiated seeds accomplished the crop cycle and showed a more compact habitus. Dose-depended tendencies of variations occurred in phenolic content, while other leaf anatomical parameters did not show distinct trends after irradiation. The sporadic perturbations of leaf structure, observed during the vegetative phase, after high levels of radiation were not so severe as to induce any significant alterations in photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:24883400

  19. Study on the influence of the B4C layer thickness on the neutron flux and energy distribution shape in multi-electrode ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tymińska, K; Maciak, M; Ośko, J; Tulik, P; Zielczyński, M; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A model of a multi-electrode ionisation chamber, with polypropylene electrodes coated with a thin layer of B4C was created within Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNPX) and Fluktuierende Kaskade (FLUKA) codes. The influence of the layer thickness on neutron absorption in B4C and on the neutron spectra in the consecutive intra-electrode gas volumes has been studied using the MCNPX and FLUKA codes. The results will be used for designing the new type of the ionisation chamber. PMID:24729596

  20. In situ analysis of Titan's tholins by Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Gazeau, M.; Mahjoub, A.; Szopa, C.; Schwell, M.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of the whole project developed in collaboration (LISA/LATMOS) is to provide a better understanding of the chemical composition of Titan aerosols laboratory analogs, called tholins, and thereby of their formation pathways. The tholins are produced in the PAMPRE reactor (French acronyme for Aerosols Microgravity Production by Reactives Plasmas) developed at LATMOS. These tholins are generated in levitation (wall effects are thus limited) in a low pressure radiofrequency plasma. Up to now, the determination of the physical and chemical properties of these tholins was achieved after their collection and ex-situ analysis by several methods. Their bulk composition was then determined but their insoluble part is still unknown. Other studies were performed after the transfer of the soluble part of the aerosols to different analytical instruments. Therefore, possible artifacts could have influenced the results. We present the SMARD (a French acronym for Mass Spectrometry of Aerosols by InfraRed Laser Desorption) program. A challenging issue of our work is to perform the soluble and unsoluble parts of PAMPRE tholins' analysis in real time and in situ. The coupling of the PAMPRE reactor to a unique instrument (Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry) developed at LISA should allow determining in real time and in situ the characteristics (chemical composition together with granulometry) of the nanometric aerosols. The later are introduced in the analytical instrument using an aerodynamic lens device. Their detection and aerodynamic diameter are determined using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Then, the L2DI (Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation) technique is used in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles: they are vaporized using a 10 μm CO2 pulsed laser and the gas produced is then ionized by a 248 nm KrF Excimer laser. Finally, the molecular ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass

  1. Neutral and ionised gas around the post-red supergiant IRC +10 420 at AU size scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudmaijer, R. D.; de Wit, W. J.

    2013-03-01

    Context. IRC +10 420 is one of the few known massive stars in rapid transition from the red supergiant phase to the Wolf-Rayet or luminous blue variable phase. Aims: The star has an ionised wind and using the Brγ line we assess the mass-loss on spatial scales of ~1 AU. Methods: We present new VLT Interferometer AMBER data which are combined with all other AMBER data present in the literature. The final dataset covers a position angle range of ~180° and baselines up to 110 m. The spectrally dispersed visibilities, differential phases and line flux are conjointly analysed and modelled. We also present the first AMBER/FINITO observations which cover a larger wavelength range and allow us to observe the Na i doublet at 2.2 μm. The data are complemented by X-Shooter data, which provide a higher spectral resolution view. Results: The Brγ emission line and the Na i doublet are both spatially resolved. After correcting the AMBER data for the fact that the lines are not spectrally resolved, we find that Brγ traces a ring with a diameter of 4.18 mas, in agreement with higher spectral resolution data. We consider a geometric model in which the Brγ emission emerges from the top and bottom rings of an hour-glass shaped structure, viewed almost pole-on. It provides satisfactory fits to most visibilities and differential phases. The fact that we detect line emission from a neutral metal like Na i within the ionised region, a very unusual occurrence, suggests the presence of a dense pseudo-photosphere. Conclusions: The ionised wind can be reproduced with a polar wind, which could well have the shape of an hour-glass. Closer in, the resolved Na i emission is found to occur on scales barely larger than the continuum. This fact and that many yellow hypergiants exhibit this comparatively rare emission hints at the presence of a "Yellow" or even "White Wall" in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, preventing them from visibly evolving to the blue. Based on observations at ESO, and in

  2. Rapid and simultaneous determination of polychlorinated biphenyls and their main metabolites (hydroxylated and methyl sulfonyl) by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry: comparison of different ionisation modes.

    PubMed

    Castro-Puyana, M; Herrero, L; González, M J; Gómara, B

    2013-07-17

    Instrumental methods based on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have been developed and compared using two different MS ionisation modes, electron impact (EI) and electron capture negative ionisation (ECNI), for the fast, quantitative and simultaneous determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and their main metabolites (hydroxylated PCBs, OH-PCBs, and methyl sulfone PCBs, MeSO2-PCBs). Parameters affecting chromatographic separation and MS detection were evaluated in order to achieve the highest selectivity and sensitivity for both operation modes. The analytical characteristics of the developed methods were studied and compared in terms of linear range, limits of detection (LODs), limits of quantification (LOQs), and instrumental precision (repeatability and intermediate precision). Both ionisation methods showed similar precision, being relative standard deviations (RSD, %) lower than 9% and 14% for repeatability and intermediate precision, respectively. However, better LODs (from 0.01 to 0.14 pg injected for the three families of congeners studied) were achieved using ECNI-MS as ionisation mode. The suitability of the developed method was demonstrated through their application to fish liver oil samples. PMID:23830433

  3. Investigation of colloidal graphite as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    PubMed

    Warren, Alexander D; Conway, Ulric; Arthur, Christopher J; Gates, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of low molecular weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry is problematic due to the interference and suppression of analyte ionisation by the matrices typically employed - which are themselves low molecular weight compounds. The application of colloidal graphite is demonstrated here as an easy to use matrix that can promote the ionisation of a wide range of analytes including low molecular weight organic compounds, complex natural products and inorganic complexes. Analyte ionisation with colloidal graphite is compared with traditional organic matrices along with various other sources of graphite (e.g. graphite rods and charcoal pencils). Factors such as ease of application, spectra reproducibility, spot longevity, spot-to-spot reproducibility and spot homogeneity (through single spot imaging) are explored. For some analytes, considerable matrix suppression effects are observed resulting in spectra completely devoid of matrix ions. We also report the observation of radical molecular ions [M(-●) ] in the negative ion mode, particularly with some aromatic analytes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27434807

  4. Follow-up of children exposed to ionising radiation from cardiac catheterisation: the Coccinelle study.

    PubMed

    Baysson, H; Nkoumazok, B; Barnaoui, S; Réhel, J L; Girodon, B; Milani, G; Boudjemline, Y; Bonnet, D; Laurier, D; Bernier, M O

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac catheterisation has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and treatment of children with a wide variety of congenital and acquired forms of cardiovascular disease. Despite the clear clinical benefit to the patient, radiation exposure from paediatric cardiac catheterisation procedures (CCPs) may be substantial. Given children's greater sensitivity to radiation and the longer life span during which radiation health effects can develop, an epidemiological cohort study, named Coccinelle or 'Ladybird' (French acronym for 'Cohorte sur le risque de cancer après cardiologie interventionnelle pédiatrique'), is carried out in France to evaluate the risks of leukaemia and solid cancers in this population. A total number of 8000 included children are expected. Individual CCP-related doses will be assessed for each child included in the cohort. For each CCP performed, dosimetric parameters (dose-area product, fluoroscopy time and total number of cine frames) are retrieved retrospectively. Organ doses, especially to the lung, the oesophagus and the thyroid, are calculated with PCXMC software. The cohort will be followed up through linkage with French paediatric cancer registries. PMID:25833897

  5. Follow-up of children exposed to ionising radiation from cardiac catheterisation: the Coccinelle study

    PubMed Central

    Baysson, H.; Nkoumazok, B.; Barnaoui, S.; Réhel, J. L.; Girodon, B.; Milani, G.; Boudjemline, Y.; Bonnet, D.; Laurier, D.; Bernier, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterisation has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and treatment of children with a wide variety of congenital and acquired forms of cardiovascular disease. Despite the clear clinical benefit to the patient, radiation exposure from paediatric cardiac catheterisation procedures (CCPs) may be substantial. Given children's greater sensitivity to radiation and the longer life span during which radiation health effects can develop, an epidemiological cohort study, named Coccinelle or ‘Ladybird’ (French acronym for ‘Cohorte sur le risque de cancer après cardiologie interventionnelle pédiatrique’), is carried out in France to evaluate the risks of leukaemia and solid cancers in this population. A total number of 8000 included children are expected. Individual CCP-related doses will be assessed for each child included in the cohort. For each CCP performed, dosimetric parameters (dose–area product, fluoroscopy time and total number of cine frames) are retrieved retrospectively. Organ doses, especially to the lung, the oesophagus and the thyroid, are calculated with PCXMC software. The cohort will be followed up through linkage with French paediatric cancer registries. PMID:25833897

  6. Role of the resistivity of insulating field emitters on the energy of field-ionised and field-evaporated atoms.

    PubMed

    Arnoldi, L; Silaeva, E P; Vurpillot, F; Deconihout, B; Cadel, E; Blum, I; Vella, A

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of laser atom probe analyses, it is important to understand all the physical processes induced by the combination of the high electrical field and the femtosecond laser beam during field evaporation. New information can be accessed from the energy of evaporated surface atoms or field-ionised atoms of an imaging gas. In order to study the ions energy, we combine La-APT and FIM analyses in a new experimental setup equipped with electrostatic lenses. We report measurements for semiconductors and oxides and we study the influence of the illumination conditions (laser power and wavelength), the evaporation rate, the sample geometry and the tip preparation processes. The results are discussed taking into account the resistive properties of non-metallic samples and the photo-stimulated conductivity. This work clarifies the role of the laser and DC field in the energy deficit of field evaporated ions. PMID:25484362

  7. Spectroscopy of acetylene Rydberg states studied by VUV absorption and (3+1)-Resonantly Enhanced Multiphoton Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyé, Séverine; Campos, Andrea; Fillion, Jean-Hugues; Douin, Stéphane; Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Gauyacq, Dolores

    2004-03-01

    The ungerade ns+ nd Rydberg states of C 2H 2 converging to the ground state of the C 2H 2+ cation have been investigated in the energy range 74 000- 88 000 cm-1 by (3+1)-multiphoton ionisation (REMPI) and by VUV absorption spectroscopy at the Super-ACO synchrotron radiation facility. Both methods have allowed the selective analysis of the Rydberg transitions with rotational resolution. Mulliken's semi-united atom model, in which predissociation has been taken into account, was used to understand the relative three-photon intensities among the different electronic transitions within the same Rydberg supercomplex. Lifetimes have been evaluated and illustrate very different behaviours towards predissociation for the observed Rydberg states. To cite this article: S. Boyé et al., C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  8. Direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry for aroma analysis: Speed, sensitivity and resolution of isobaric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jublot, Lionel; Linforth, Robert S. T.; Taylor, Andrew J.

    2005-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) sources were developed for real time analysis of volatile release from foods using an ion trap (IT) mass spectrometer (MS). Key objectives were spectral simplicity (minimal fragmentation), response time and signal to noise ratio. The benefits of APCI-IT-MS were assessed by comparing the performance for in vivo and headspace analyses with that obtained using APCI coupled to a quadrupole mass analyser. Using MS-MS, direct APCI-IT-MS was able to differentiate mixtures of some C6 and terpene isobaric aroma compounds. Resolution could be achieved for some compounds by monitoring specific secondary ions. Direct resolution was also achieved with two of the three isobaric compounds released from chocolate with time as the sample was eaten.

  9. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging and its development for plant protein imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) uses the power of high mass resolution time of flight (ToF) mass spectrometry coupled to the raster of lasers shots across the cut surface of tissues to provide new insights into the spatial distribution of biomolecules within biological tissues. The history of this technique in animals and plants is considered and the potential for analysis of proteins by this technique in plants is discussed. Protein biomarker identification from MALDI-MSI is a challenge and a number of different approaches to address this bottleneck are discussed. The technical considerations needed for MALDI-MSI are reviewed and these are presented alongside examples from our own work and a protocol for MALDI-MSI of proteins in plant samples. PMID:21726462

  10. Thermoluminescent properties of Ni and Co doped synthetic, high pressure, high temperature diamonds: application to ionising radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Benabdesselam, M; Iacconi, P; Gheeraert, E; Kanda, H; Lapraz, D; Briand, D

    2002-01-01

    An investigation of the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthetic diamond crystals grown under diluted nickel or cobalt as solvent catalysts is reported. After a study of TL properties of 6 different samples, it is shown that a crystal grown with Ni+2%Ti and annealed at 2100 K presents an intense glow peak at around 490 K. This peak is characterised by a broad emission band centred at 530 nm (2.34 eV). This crystal presents a significant, reproducible and linear TL response relative to the absorbed dose up to an X ray air kerma of 10 Gy. All these features make this material suitable for ionising radiation dosimetry. A similar study is made on another crystal grown from pure Co, and a comparative review of the results does show that for dosimetry work, Ni-containing diamonds are more appropriate than those grown from Co catalyst. PMID:12382890

  11. Excitation of low-frequency residual currents at combination frequencies of an ionising two-colour laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Kostin, V. A.; Laryushin, I. D.; Silaev, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the processes of excitation of low-frequency residual currents in a plasma produced through ionisation of gases by two-colour laser pulses in laser-plasma schemes for THz generation. We have developed an analytical approach that allows one to find residual currents in the case when one of the components of a two-colour pulse is weak enough. The derived analytical expressions show that the effective generation of the residual current (and hence the effective THz generation) is possible if the ratio of the frequencies in the two-colour laser pulse is close to a rational fraction with a not very big odd sum of the numerator and denominator. The results of numerical calculations (including those based on the solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation) agree well with the analytical results.

  12. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  13. Rapid screening of illicit additives in weight loss dietary supplements with desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wu, Y; Zhao, Y; Sun, W; Ding, L; Guo, B; Chen, B

    2012-08-01

    Desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI), the relatively novel ambient mass spectrometry (MS) technique, was utilised to screen for illicit additives in weight-loss food. The five usually abused chemicals - fenfluramine, N-di-desmethyl sibutramine, N-mono-desmethyl sibutramine, sibutramine and phenolphthalein - were detected with the proposed DCBI-MS method. Fast single-sample and high-throughput analysis was demonstrated. Semi-quantification was accomplished based on peak areas in the ion chromatograms. Four illicit additives were identified and semi-quantified in commercial samples. As there was no tedious sample pre-treatment compared with conventional HPLC methods, high-throughput analysis was achieved with DCBI. The results proved that DCBI-MS is a powerful tool for the rapid screening of illicit additives in weight-loss dietary supplements. PMID:22784191

  14. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Eye Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Eye Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Eye Cancer Overview Statistics ...

  15. Cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov

  16. Nucleoplasmic bridges and acrocentric chromosome associations as early markers of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation in occupationally exposed hospital workers.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Ionising radiation, with the contribution of telomere shortening, induces DNA double-strand breaks that result in chromosome end fusion, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and chromosome aberrations (ChAbs) as well as dicentric chromosomes. In order to investigate the chromosomal damage induced by occupational ionising radiation at low exposure levels, and to find early markers of health hazard, peripheral lymphocytes of occupationally exposed hospital workers were cytogenetically analysed. Results showed a significant difference in the frequency of ChAbs in exposed subjects relative to controls. A significant number of NPBs between nuclei of binucleated cultured lymphocytes from exposed subjects were also observed, as well as a consistent amount of acrocentric chromosomes with associations of their short arms. Excluding confounding factors, the frequencies of all these three biological endpoints differed significantly in exposed subjects from those in controls. Because the absence of telomeres and/or their short length could be a common root for both the findings, we utilised fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique with telomeric repeat as probe to demonstrate that, in exposed subjects, chromatin of short arms of involved acrocentric chromosomes did not exhibit a telomeric shortening but appeared strongly decondensed. This finding suggests that NPBs and telomeric acrocentric association should be regarded as early markers of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation and their increase should be seen as an early warning for the health of the involved workers. PMID:25381312

  17. Evidence for a Circum-Nuclear and Ionised Absorber in the X-ray Obscured Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Sambruna, R. M.; Gofford, J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Suzaku observation of the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445. We confirm the results obtained with the previous X-ray observations which unveiled the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines and an overall X-ray emission which strongly resembles a typical Seyfert 2 despite of the optical classification as an unobscured AGN. The broad band spectrum allowed us to measure for the first time the amount of reflection (R approximately 0.9) which together with the relatively strong neutral Fe Ka emission line (EW approximately 100 eV) strongly supports a scenario where a Compton-thick mirror is present. The primary X ray continuum is strongly obscured by an absorber with a column density of NH = 2 - 3 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter. Two possible scenarios are proposed for the absorber: a neutral partial covering or a mildly ionised absorber with an ionisation parameter log xi approximately 1.0 erg centimeter per second. A comparison with the past and more recent X-ray observations of 3C 445 performed with XMM-Newton and Chandra is presented, which provided tentative evidence that the ionised and outflowing absorber varied. We argue that the absorber is probably associated with an equatorial diskwind located within the parsec scale molecular torus.

  18. Kinematic alignment of non-interacting CALIFA galaxies. Quantifying the impact of bars on stellar and ionised gas velocity field orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; García-Lorenzo, B.; van de Ven, G.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Spekkens, K.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Husemann, B.; Mast, D.; García-Benito, R.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Del Olmo, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Kehrig, C.; Marino, R. A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Ziegler, B.; McIntosh, D. H.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Califa Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We present 80 stellar and ionised gas velocity maps from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey in order to characterise the kinematic orientation of non-interacting galaxies. The study of galaxies in isolation is a key step towards understanding how fast-external processes, such as major mergers, affect kinematic properties in galaxies. We derived the global and individual (projected approaching and receding sides) kinematic position angles (PAs) for both the stellar and ionised gas line-of-sight velocity distributions. When compared to the photometric PA, we find that morpho-kinematic differences are smaller than 22 degrees in 90% of the sample for both stellar and nebular components and that internal kinematic misalignments are generally smaller than 16 degrees. We find a tight relation between the global stellar and ionised gas kinematic PA consistent with circular-flow pattern motions in both components (~90% of the sample has differences smaller than 16 degrees). This relation also holds, generally in barred galaxies across the bar and galaxy disc scales. Our findings suggest that even in the presence of strong bars, both the stellar and the gaseous components tend to follow the gravitational potential of the disc. As a result, kinematic orientation can be used to assess the degree of external distortions in interacting galaxies. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Determination of agrochemical compounds in soya plants by imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Alexander K; Clench, Malcolm R; Crosland, Susan; Sharples, Kate R

    2005-01-01

    Detection and imaging of the herbicide mesotrione (2-(4-mesyl-2-nitrobenzoyl)cyclohexane-1,3-dione) and the fungicide azoxystrobin (methyl (E)-2-{2-[6-(2-cyanophenoxy)pyrimidin-4-yloxy]phenyl}-3-methoxyacrylate), on the surface of the soya leaf, and the detection and imaging of azoxystrobin inside the stem of the soya plant, have been achieved using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In leaf analysis experiments, the two pesticides were deposited onto the surface of individual soya leaves on growing plants. The soya leaves were removed and prepared for direct and indirect (following blotting onto matrix-coated cellulose membranes) imaging analysis at different periods after initial pesticide application. In stem analysis experiments, azoxystrobin was added to the nutrient solution of a soya plant growing in a hydroponics system. The plant was left for 48 h, and then horizontal and vertical stem sections were prepared for direct imaging analysis. The images obtained demonstrate the applicability of MALDI imaging to the detection and imaging of small organic compounds in plant tissue and further extend the analytical repertoire of the versatile MALDI technique. PMID:16106343

  20. Determination of sulfonamides by packed column supercritical fluid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Dost, K; Jones, D C; Davidson, G

    2000-07-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics are widely used to prevent bacterial infections in livestock, and residues are commonly found in milk and meat. Packed column supercritical fluid chromatography (pSFC) with detection using ultra violet (UV) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) provides a versatile method for the detection and quantification of six major sulfonamides. The APCI mass spectra for all the sulfonamides consisted of protonated molecules at low cone voltages. Increasing the cone voltage led to informative fragmentation patterns, which provided structural information for identification purposes. The pSFC-APCI-MS technique was shown to be linear (r2 > or = 0.999) over the concentration range 0.1-50 micrograms ml-1 using total ion current. The precision and the accuracy of the system and validation of sample preparation are acceptable, with RSD < 2% and relative error 8%. Selected ion monitoring gave detection limits as follows: sulfadiazine 41, sulfamethoxazole 45, sulfamerazine 47, sulfamethizole 59, sulfamethazine 181 and sulfadimethoxine 96 micrograms l-1, which are lower than the amounts permitted in milk products. The APCI pSFC-MS system was shown to have a high degree of reproducibility. The technique was then applied to determine the above sulfonamides in milk. The results obtained show that there are no matrix effects from the milk and that the detection limits remained as stated for the standard solutions. PMID:10984919

  1. Identification of synthetic dyes in early colour photographs using capillary electrophoresis and electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-Montes, Ana Ma; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; Desmazières, Bernard; Lavédrine, Bertrand

    2013-09-30

    Capillary electrophoresis with photodiode array detection (CE-PDA) and with electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS) was used for the separation and the identification of 23 synthetic organic dyes, among those used in early 20th century colour photographs such as autochromes. Both cationic and anionic dyes could be separated within 15min using a single CE-PDA method. The method was used as the basis to develop a CE-ESI-MS methodology through the optimisation of the relevant ESI and MS parameters. Sheath liquid composition, nebulising gas pressure, drying gas flow rate and drying gas temperature were found to influence the sensitivity of the detection. These parameters were optimised in positive and negative ion modes for cationic dyes and anionic dyes, respectively. The two analyses could be carried out successively on a single sample. In view of the application to cultural heritage objects, the CE-ESI-MS analytical procedure was applied to identify the dyes in a Filmcolor artefact, late version of the autochrome. The results complemented and enhanced current knowledge as four cationic dyes and three anionic dyes were identified. Four additional dyes are proposed as possibly present as traces. PMID:23953463

  2. Observations of a groove in the interplanetary Lyman alpha pattern as the signature of enhanced ionisation in the neutral sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaux, J. L.; Quemerais, E.; Lallement, R.; Summanen, T.; Kyrola, E.

    1995-06-01

    We report several observations of the Lyman alpha interplanetary emission recorded by a photometer flown in 1976-1977 on board the Soviet spacecraft Prognoz-5 and Prognoz-6. Several scans made in a plane perpendicular to the sun were cutting through the maximum emission region. where the interstellar hydrogen is approaching nearest to the sun (upwind region). On each of these scans is observed a dip in the intensity curve near the ecliptic plane. about 30 deg wide and approximately equals 10% deep. They reveal the presence of a new feature of the interplanetary emission. a 'groove' aligned approximately with the ecliptic plane. This groove is present only near the upwind direction, and is interpreted as the result of enhanced ionisation of interstellar H by charge-exchange with the solar wind in a sheet of approximately 30 deg around the average position of the neutral sheet at this time of solar this Lyman alpha groove is a prime target for future observations with SWAN experiment on SOHO.

  3. Observations of a groove in the interplanetary Lyman alpha pattern as the signature of enhanced ionisation in the neutral sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertaux, J. L.; Quemerais, E.; Lallement, R.; Summanen, T.; Kyrola, E.

    1995-01-01

    We report several observations of the Lyman alpha interplanetary emission recorded by a photometer flown in 1976-1977 on board the Soviet spacecraft Prognoz-5 and Prognoz-6. Several scans made in a plane perpendicular to the sun were cutting through the maximum emission region. where the interstellar hydrogen is approaching nearest to the sun (upwind region). On each of these scans is observed a dip in the intensity curve near the ecliptic plane. about 30 deg wide and approximately equals 10% deep. They reveal the presence of a new feature of the interplanetary emission. a 'groove' aligned approximately with the ecliptic plane. This groove is present only near the upwind direction, and is interpreted as the result of enhanced ionisation of interstellar H by charge-exchange with the solar wind in a sheet of approximately 30 deg around the average position of the neutral sheet at this time of solar this Lyman alpha groove is a prime target for future observations with SWAN experiment on SOHO.

  4. Thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry using particle suspension matrices.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anna; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S; Parr, Vic

    2002-06-01

    Particle suspension matrices have been successfully utilized for the analysis of tetracycline antibiotics by thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS). Particles of different materials and sizes have been investigated (Co-UFP, TiN, TiO2, Graphite and Silicon) by applying particle suspensions to eluted TLC plates. Mass spectra and mass chromatograms have been recorded directly from the TLC plates. Strong cationization by sodium and potassium was obtained in the positive ion mode, with [M+Na-NH3]+ ions being the predominant signals. The TLC-MALDI mass spectra recorded from graphite suspensions showed the lowest background noise and the highest peak intensities from the range of suspension matrices studied. The mass accuracy from graphite films was improved by adding the peptide Phe-Phe to the graphite suspensions. This allowed internal recalibration of the TLC-MALDI mass spectra acquired during a run. One major potential advantage of TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS has been demonstrated in the analysis of chlortetracycline and tetracycline in a mixture of oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, tetracycline and minocycline. Examination of the TLC plate prior to MALDI analysis showed only an unresolved spot for chlortetracycline and tetracycline. However by investigation of the MALDI mass spectra and plotting of single ion chromatograms separate peaks for chlortetracycline and tetracycline could be obtained. PMID:12134822

  5. Analysis of organophosphate flame retardants and plasticisers in water by isotope dilution gas chromatography-electron ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teo, Tiffany L L; McDonald, James A; Coleman, Heather M; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-10-01

    The widespread use of organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) in commercial products have led to their increased presence in the environment. In this study, a rapid and reliable analytical method was developed for the analysis of five PFRs in water using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with electron ionisation (EI) and a run time of 13 min. The PFRs investigated were tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP). Solid phase extraction (SPE) was undertaken to extract and concentrate target analytes from aqueous matrices. All water samples were extracted from a volume of 500 mL. Isotopically labelled compounds were used to account for analytical variability and for accurate quantification by isotope dilution. Method recoveries for all compounds were above 80% in all tested water samples. Method detection limits for all target analytes ranged from 0.3 to 24 ng/L in ultrapure water, tap water, seawater, surface water, secondary effluent and swimming pool water. Validation of this method confirmed satisfactory method stability with less than 1% coefficients of variation, verifying that this approach produced good reproducibility. PMID:26078137

  6. Characterisation of a proposed internet synthesis of N,N-dimethyltryptamine using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martins, Cláudia P B; Freeman, Sally; Alder, John F; Brandt, Simon D

    2009-08-14

    The psychoactive properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) are known to induce altered states of consciousness in humans. These properties attract great interest from clinical, neuroscientific, clandestine and forensic communities. The Breath of Hope Synthesis was reported on an internet website as a convenient two-step methodology for the preparation of DMT. The analytical characterisation of the first stage was the subject of previous publications by the authors and involved the thermal decarboxylation of tryptophan and the formation of tryptamine. The present study reports on the characterisation of the second step of this procedure which was based on the methylation of tryptamine. This employed methyl iodide and benzyltriethylammonium chloride/sodium hydroxide as a phase transfer catalyst. The reaction product was characterised by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry and orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Quantitative evaluation was carried out in positive multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM), which included synthesis of the identified reaction products. MRM screening of the product did not lead to the detection of DMT. Instead, 11.1% tryptamine starting material, 21.0% N,N,N-trimethyltryptammonium iodide (TMT) and 47.4% 1-N-methyl-TMT were detected. A 0.5% trace of the monomethylated N-methyltryptamine was also detected. This study demonstrated the impact on product purity of doubtful synthetic methodologies discussed on the internet. PMID:19592003

  7. Rapid assignment of malting barley varieties by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - Time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Kořán, Michal; Jakešová, Michaela; Mikulíková, Renata; Boháč, Michal; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2016-09-01

    A method for discriminating malting barley varieties based on direct matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) fingerprinting of proteins was developed. Signals corresponding to hordeins were obtained by simple mixing of powdered barley grain with a MALDI matrix solution containing 12.5mgmL(-1) of ferulic acid in an acetonitrile:water:formic acid 50:33:17 v/v/v mixture. Compared to previous attempts at MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of barley proteins, the extraction and fractionation steps were practically omitted, resulting in a significant reduction in analytical time and costs. The discriminatory power was examined on twenty malting barley varieties and the practicability of the method was tested on sixty barley samples acquired from Pilsner Urquell Brewery. The method is proposed as a rapid tool for variety assignment and purity determination of malting barley that may replace gel electrophoresis currently used for this purpose. PMID:27041307

  8. Study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Avila, R; Beresford, N A; Agüero, A; Broed, R; Brown, J; Iospje, M; Robles, B; Suañez, A

    2004-12-01

    Uncertainty in estimations of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation may arise from a number of sources including values of the model parameters, empirical data, measurement errors and biases in the sampling. The significance of the overall uncertainty of an exposure assessment will depend on how the estimated dose compares with reference doses used for risk characterisation. In this paper, we present the results of a study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota using some of the models and parameters recommended in the FASSET methodology. The study was carried out for semi-natural terrestrial, agricultural and marine ecosystems, and for four radionuclides (137Cs, 239Pu, 129I and 237Np). The parameters of the radionuclide transfer models showed the highest sensitivity and contributed the most to the uncertainty in the predictions of doses to biota. The most important ones were related to the bioavailability and mobility of radionuclides in the environment, for example soil-to-plant transfer factors, the bioaccumulation factors for marine biota and the gut uptake fraction for terrestrial mammals. In contrast, the dose conversion coefficients showed low sensitivity and contributed little to the overall uncertainty. Radiobiological effectiveness contributed to the overall uncertainty of the dose estimations for alpha emitters although to a lesser degree than a number of transfer model parameters. PMID:15700701

  9. Characterisation of an inexpensive sonic spray ionisation source using laser-induced fluorescence imaging and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stindt, Arne; Warschat, Carsten; Bierstedt, Andreas; Panne, Ulrich; Riedel, Jens

    2014-01-01

    A commercially available airbrush gun as a new source for spray ionisation is presented. It is best operated employing moderate stagnation pressures, resulting in a sonic gas flow. A mass spectrometric investigation on the amino acid Lysine and several peptides reveals that this inexpensive approach results in reproducible mass spectra. The ion patterns strongly resemble the results from other studies obtained with custom-made sonic spray vaporisers. The patterns also resemble the mass spectra recorded with electrospray devices. For a better understanding of the vaporisation process, the mass spectrometry experiments are accompanied by laser-induced fluorescence experiments. Inverse Abel Transform of the obtained fluorescence maps allows the determination of the full three-dimensional distribution of the spray cone. Furthermore, via exploitation of the solvatochromism of the used dye the solvation-state distribution can be visualised. In addition, expansion parameters, such as droplet size and velocity, are obtained by laser stroboscopy. The experiments demonstrate that the analyte hardly desolvates throughout the expansion. This indicates a subsequent vaporisation of the residual solvent in the intermediate pressure region of the mass spectrometer. PMID:24881452

  10. Unrepairable DNA double-strand breaks that are generated by ionising radiation determine the fate of normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Noda, Asao; Hirai, Yuko; Hamasaki, Kanya; Mitani, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Nori; Kodama, Yoshiaki

    2012-11-15

    After an exposure to ionising radiation, cells can quickly repair damage to their genomes; however, a few unrepairable DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) emerge in the nucleus in a prolonged culture and perpetuate as long as the culture continues. These DSBs may be retained forever in cells such as non-dividing ageing tissues, which are resistant to apoptosis. We show that such unrepairable DSBs, which had been advocated by the classical target theory as the 'radiation hit', could account for permanent growth arrest and premature senescence. The unrepairable DSBs build up with repeated irradiation, which accounts for an accumulated dose. Because these DSBs tend to be paired, we propose that the untethered and 'torn-off' molecular structures at the broken ends of the DNA result in an alteration of chromatin structure, which protects the ends of the DNA from genomic catastrophe. Such biochemical responses are important for cell survival but may cause gradual tissue malfunction, which could lead to the late effects of radiation exposure. Thus, understanding the biology of unrepairable damage will provide new insights into the long-term effects of radiation. PMID:22899723

  11. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  12. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  13. Cancer Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  14. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  15. Cancer Staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  16. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  17. A derivatisation and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation multistage mass spectrometry method for the characterisation of naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E; Rowland, S J

    2008-12-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are partially uncharacterised complex mixtures of carboxylic acids, resulting from the microbial oxidation of petroleum hydrocarbons. They are associated with the fouling of pipelines and process equipment in oil production and with corrosion in oil refineries. As by-products of the rapidly expanding oil (tar) sands industries, NAs are also pollutants and have proved to be toxic to a range of organisms. They also have important beneficial uses as fungicides, tyre additives and, paradoxically, also in the manufacture of corrosion inhibitors. These features make the characterisation of NAs an important goal for analytical chemists. Here we describe the synthesis of amide derivatives of NAs for characterisation by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation multistage mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS(n)). The method was applied to commercially available carboxylic acids, novel synthetic NAs, commercial NAs refined from crude oils, crude oil NAs and Athabasca oil sands NAs. In addition to confirming the number of alicyclic rings and length of alkyl side chain substituents (confirming information from existing methods), the MS(n) results provided further structural information. Most important of these was the finding that bi- to polycyclic acids containing ethanoate side chains, in addition to alkyl substituents, were widespread amongst the oil and oil sands NAs. The latter NAs are known end members of the beta-oxidation of NAs with even carbon number alkanoate chains. Since such NA mixtures are toxic, they should be targets for bioremediation. Bioremediation of NAs can also be monitored better by application of the methods described herein. PMID:18988206

  18. The formation and evolution of reconnection-driven, slow-mode shocks in a partially ionised plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, A.; Takasao, S.; Nakamura, N.

    2016-06-01

    The role of slow-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in magnetic reconnection is of great importance for energy conversion and transport, but in many astrophysical plasmas the plasma is not fully ionised. In this paper, we use numerical simulations to investigate the role of collisional coupling between a proton-electron, charge-neutral fluid and a neutral hydrogen fluid for the one-dimensional (1D) Riemann problem initiated in a constant pressure and density background state by a discontinuity in the magnetic field. This system, in the MHD limit, is characterised by two waves. The first is a fast-mode rarefaction wave that drives a flow towards a slow-mode MHD shock wave. The system evolves through four stages: initiation, weak coupling, intermediate coupling, and a quasi-steady state. The initial stages are characterised by an over-pressured neutral region that expands with characteristics of a blast wave. In the later stages, the system tends towards a self-similar solution where the main drift velocity is concentrated in the thin region of the shock front. Because of the nature of the system, the neutral fluid is overpressured by the shock when compared to a purely hydrodynamic shock, which results in the neutral fluid expanding to form the shock precursor. Once it has formed, the thickness of the shock front is proportional to ξ i-1.2 , which is a smaller exponent than would be naively expected from simple scaling arguments. One interesting result is that the shock front is a continuous transition of the physical variables of subsonic velocity upstream of the shock front (a c-shock) to a sharp jump in the physical variables followed by a relaxation to the downstream values for supersonic upstream velocity (a j-shock). The frictional heating that results from the velocity drift across the shock front can amount to ~2 per cent of the reference magnetic energy.

  19. Considerations on the modelling and optimisation of resolution of ionisable compounds in extended pH-range columns.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lapasió, J R; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C; Bosch, E; Rosés, M

    2005-09-30

    The problems associated to the modelling and optimisation of the chromatographic resolution of mixtures involving ionisable solutes at varying pH and acetonitrile content are discussed. Several retention models that separate the contributions of solute, column and stationary phase, were used. The retention was predicted with low errors in large pH domains (2-12), which was an essential requirement to face the optimisation of resolution. The selected mixture was particularly problematic under the viewpoint of resolution, owing to the excessively diverse acid-base behaviour of solutes. This variety led to sudden drops in retention at different pH for each solute, yielding numerous peak crossing, which made finding shared regions of high resolution especially difficult. Conventional resolution diagrams for these situations are scarcely informative, since both the overall and the worst elementary resolutions drop to zero if at least two compounds remain overlapped, even when all the others are baseline resolved. A new chromatographic objective function is proposed to address this drawback. This function, called "limiting peak count", is based on the limiting peak purity concept, and measures the success in the resolution focusing on the resolved solutes, in contrast to conventional resolution assessments that attend mainly to the least resolved solutes. Limiting peak count yields the same result as conventional assessments when full resolution is possible, but it is also able to discriminate the maximal resolving power in low-resolution situations. It offers a different perspective to that given by the complementary mobile phases approach, and the computation is far simpler. PMID:16130785

  20. Determination of pharmaceutical compounds in skin by imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Josephine; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S

    2004-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOFMS) has been used to detect and image the distribution of a xenobiotic substance in skin. Porcine epidermal tissue was treated with 'Nizoral', a medicated shampoo containing ketoconazole (+/-)-1-acetyl-4-[p-[[(2R,4S)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl]methoxy]phenyl]piperazine) as active ingredient. Following incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C all excess formulation was washed from the surface. A cross-section of the drug-treated tissue was then blotted onto a cellulose membrane, precoated in matrix (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA)), by airspray deposition. In separate experiments the tissue surface was treated with Nizoral within a triangular former, and subsequently blotted onto a matrix-coated membrane. Sample membranes were then mounted into the recess of specialised MALDI targets with adhesive tape. All samples were analysed by MALDI-TOFMS using an Applied Biosystem 'Q-star Pulsar i' hybrid Q-TOF mass spectrometer fitted with an orthagonal MALDI ion source and imaging software. Detection of the protonated molecule was readily achievable by this technique. Treatment of the tissue within a template gave rise to images depicting the expected distribution of the drug, demonstrating that this technique is capable of producing spatially useful data. Ion images demonstrating the permeation of the applied compound into the skin were achieved by imaging a cross-sectional imprint of treated tissue. A calibration graph for the determination of ketoconazole was prepared using the sodium adduct of the matrix ion as an internal standard. This enabled construction of a quantitative profile of drug in skin. Conventional haematoxylin and eosin staining and microscopy methods were employed to obtain a histological image of the porcine epidermal tissue. Superimposing the mass spectrometric and histological images appeared to indicate drug

  1. The long-term effects of acute exposure to ionising radiation on survival and fertility in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sarapultseva, Elena I; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2016-10-01

    The results of recent studies have provided strong evidence for the transgenerational effects of parental exposure to ionising radiation and chemical mutagens. However, the transgenerational effects of parental exposure on survival and fertility remain poorly understood. To establish whether parental irradiation can affect the survival and fertility of directly exposed organisms and their offspring, crustacean Daphnia magna were given 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000mGy of acute γ-rays. Exposure to 1000 and 10,000mGy significantly compromised the viability of irradiated Daphnia and their first-generation progeny, but did not affect the second-generation progeny. The fertility of F0 and F1Daphnia gradually declined with the dose of parental exposure and significantly decreased at dose of 100mGy and at higher doses. The effects of parental irradiation on the number of broods were only observed among the F0Daphnia exposed to 1000 and 10,000mGy, whereas the brood size was equally affected in the two consecutive generations. In contrast, the F2 total fertility was compromised only among progeny of parents that received the highest dose of 10,000mGy. We propose that the decreased fertility observed among the F2 progeny of parents exposed to 10,000mGy is attributed to transgenerational effects of parental irradiation. Our results also indicate a substantial recovery of the F2 progeny of irradiated F0Daphnia exposed to the lower doses of acute γ-rays. PMID:27288911

  2. Quantitative analysis of surfactant deposits on human skin by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Massey, Karen A; Snelling, Anna M; Nicolaou, Anna

    2010-05-15

    Surfactants are commonly used as cleansing agents and yet there are concerns that they may also have a role in skin irritation. The lack of suitable methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of surfactant deposition on skin has hindered the in-depth investigation of such effects. Here, we report the application of reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) assays for two surfactants commonly used in consumer products, namely sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) and laurylamidopropyl betaine (LAPB), to a baseline study aiming to assess deposition levels on human skin. The linearity of the assays was established at 3-20 ng, with coefficient of variation below 5%. The detection limits were 100 pg for LAPB and 1 ng for SLES; quantitation limits were 500 pg for LAPB and 2.5 ng for SLES. The baseline study was conducted using a panel of 40 healthy volunteers. Skin extract samples were taken in triplicate from forearms, using ethanol. SLES was detected on most volunteers, with 75% of them having SLES deposits in the range of 100-600 ng/cm(2). LAPB was detected on the skin of all volunteers with 85% of them having deposit levels within the concentration range of 1-100 ng/cm(2). These results demonstrate the extent to which commonly used surfactants remain on the skin during the day. The analytical methods reported here can be applied to the investigation of surfactants in relation to general skin condition and to the development and optimisation of new consumer wash products. PMID:20391611

  3. Multi-residue analysis of pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing; Miao, Shui; Lehotay, Steven J; Li, Wen-Ting; Zhou, Heng; Mao, Xiu-Hong; Lu, Ji-Wei; Lan, Lan; Ji, Shen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a residue analysis method for the simultaneous determination of 107 pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), Angelica sinensis, A. dahurica, Leonurus heterophyllus Sweet, Pogostemon cablin and Lonicera japonica Thunb., was developed using gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionisation mode (GC-NCI-MS/MS). NCI has advantages of high sensitivity and selectivity to chemicals with electron-withdrawing groups, and yields low background interference. For sample preparation, QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) was applied. Due to the unique characteristics of TCMs, the clean-up step was optimised by adjusting amounts of primary secondary amine, C18, graphitised carbon black and silica sorbents. Validation was mainly performed by determining analyte recoveries at four different spiking concentrations of 10, 50, 100 and 200 ng g(-1), with seven replicates at each concentration. Method trueness, precision, linearity of calibration curves, lowest calibrated levels (LCLs) and matrix effects were determined to demonstrate method and instrument performance. Among the 107 pesticides tested, approximately 80% gave recoveries from 80% to 110% and < 10% relative standard deviation (RSD). The LCLs for nearly all pesticides were 5 ng g(-1), and as low as 0.1 ng g(-1) for dichlofenthion, endosulfan sulphate, flumetralin, isofenphos-methyl, methyl-pentachlorophenyl sulphide and trifluralin. The results indicate that GC-NCI-MS/MS is an excellent technique for quantitative and qualitative analysis of targeted GC-amenable pesticides at ultra-trace levels, especially in complex matrices such as TCMs. PMID:26125677

  4. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  5. Fragmentation, auto-modification and post ionisation proton bound dimer ion formation: the differential mobility spectrometry of low molecular weight alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, D M; Thomas, C L P; Eiceman, G A

    2016-08-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is currently being used for environmental monitoring of space craft atmospheres and has been proposed for the rapid assessment of patients at accident and emergency receptions. Three studies investigated hitherto undescribed complexity in the DMS spectra of methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol product ions formed from a (63)Ni ionisation source. 54 000 DMS spectra obtained over a concentration range of 0.01 mg m(-3)(g) to 1.80 g m(-3)(g) revealed the phenomenon of auto-modification of the product ions. This occurred when the neutral vapour concentration exceeded the level required to induce a neutral-ion collision during the low field portion of the dispersion field waveform. Further, post-ionisation cluster-ion formation or protonated monomer/proton bound dimer inter-conversion within the ion-filter was indicated by apparent shifts in the values of the protonated monomer compensation field maximum; indicative of post-ionisation conversion of the protonated monomer to a proton-bound dimer. APCI-DMS-quadrupole mass spectrometry studies enabled the ion dissociation products from dispersion-field heating to be monitored and product ion fragmentation relationships to be proposed. Methanol was not observed to dissociate, while propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol underwent dissociation reactions consistent with dehydration processes that led ultimately to the generation of what is tentatively assigned as a cyclo-C3H3(+) ion (m/z 39) and hydrated protons. Studies of the interaction of ion filter temperature with dispersion-field heating of product ions isolated dissociation/fragmentation product ions that have not been previously described in DMS. The implications of these combined findings with regard to data sharing and data interpretation were highlighted. PMID:27227997

  6. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Y.; Fuks, E.; Datz, H.; Oster, L.; Livingstone, J.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose–response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  7. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y; Fuks, E; Datz, H; Oster, L; Livingstone, J; Rosenfeld, A

    2011-06-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose-response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  8. Identification of main corticosteroids as illegal feed additives in milk replacers by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fiori, M; Pierdominici, E; Longo, F; Brambilla, G

    1998-05-22

    Corticosteroids were proposed as growth promoting agents to improve commercial quality of meat. We developed a liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) method able to identify the presence in milk replacers, when given by mouth, of dexamethasone, betamethasone, flumethasone, triamcinolone, predinisotone, prednisolone, methylprednisolone, fludrocortisone and beclomethasone, at levels in the range of 20-100 ppb. C18 solid-phase extraction, LC-RP C8 column separation, data acquisition (positive ions) in the scan range m/z 200-550 allowed us to differentiate and identify compounds by protonated molecules, their methanolic adducts and fragmentation patterns. PMID:9646497

  9. Cancer Statistics: Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 60,050 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 10,470 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 635,437 women living with endometrial cancer in ...

  10. Analysis of organophosphate flame retardant diester metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van den Eede, Nele; Neels, Hugo; Jorens, Philippe G; Covaci, Adrian

    2013-08-16

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of dialkyl and diaryl phosphates (DAPs), which are metabolites of organophosphate triesters (PFRs), in human urine. Target DAPs included dibutyl phosphate (DBP), diphenyl phosphate (DPHP), bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (BBOEP), bis(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (BCEP), bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BCPP), and bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BDCIPP). Sample preparation was based on solid phase extraction using a weak anion exchange sorbent (Oasis WAX). Although several instrumental techniques have been tested, best results were obtained with reversed phase liquid chromatography-negative electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) taking the total analysis time into account. Method accuracy at 3ng/mL in pooled urine ranged between 69 and 119% (recovery), while inter-day imprecision (as relative standard deviation) was <31%. The performance of the LC-MS/MS method was compared to a method based on gas chromatography-electron impact tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) and a good correlation (Pearson r=0.82, p<0.01) between the results of these two methods was obtained for DPHP. LC-MS/MS analysis was more suitable for DPHP and BBOEP with respective method limits of quantification (mLOQ) of 0.3 and 0.15ng/mL. In contrast, GC-MS/MS had a better sensitivity for BCEP, BCIPP, and BDCIPP, their respective mLOQs being 0.1, 0.06, 0.02ng/mL, compared to 1.2, 3.7, and 0.5ng/mL by LC-MS/MS. A set of urine samples from volunteers was analysed, in which DPHP was the major DAP metabolite. A significant increase of DPHP levels was observed in the group of smokers (geometric mean of 1.55ng/mL) compared to the non-smokers (geometric mean of 0.88ng/mL). Metabolic transformation of triphenyl phosphate to DPHP by metabolic enzymes induced in smokers could be an explanation for this observation. PMID:23849782

  11. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  12. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - ovaries ... Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women. It causes more deaths than any other type of female reproductive organ cancer. The cause of ovarian cancer is unknown. Risk ...

  13. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and pharynx (the back of the throat). Oral cancer accounts for roughly two percent of all cancers ...

  14. Phytosanitation with Ionising Radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter by Neil Heather and Guy Hallman, in “Pest Management and Phytosanitary Trade Barriers,” CABI Press, covers ionizing irradiation phytosanitary treatments. Although irradiation as an idea and research object has as long a phytosanitary history an any other phytosanitary treatment, c...

  15. Identification of N-glycans from Ebola virus glycoproteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight and negative ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Gayle; Harvey, David J.; Stroeher, Ute; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Royle, Louise; Dwek, Raymond A.; Rudd, Pauline M.

    2012-01-01

    The larger fragment of the transmembrane glycoprotein (GP1) and the soluble glycoprotein (sGP) of Ebola virus were expressed in human embryonic kidney cells and the secreted products were purified from the supernatant for carbohydrate analysis. The N-glycans were released with PNGase F from within sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels. Identification of the glycans was made with normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, negative ion electrospray ionisation fragmentation mass spectrometry and exoglycosidase digestion. Most glycans were complex bi-, tri-and tetra-antennary compounds with reduced amounts of galactose. No bisected compounds were detected. Triantennary glycans were branched on the 6-antenna; fucose was attached to the core GlcNAc residue. Sialylated glycans were present on sGP but were largely absent from GP1, the larger fragment of the transmembrane glycoprotein. Consistent with this was the generally higher level of processing of carbohydrates found on sGP as evidenced by a higher percentage of galactose and lower levels of high-mannose glycans than were found on GP1. These results confirm and expand previous findings on partial characterisation of the Ebola virus transmembrane glycoprotein. They represent the first detailed data on carbohydrate structures of the Ebola virus sGP. PMID:20131323

  16. Determination of ionisation chamber collection efficiency in a swept electron beam by means of thermoluminescent detectors and the "two-voltage" method.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, J; Rijnders, A; Ang, K K; Mellaerts, M; Grobet, P

    1985-06-01

    Two methods for determining the collection efficiency of a 0.6 cm3 thimble ionisation chamber exposed to the swept electron beam of a linear accelerator Therac 20 Saturne (CGR MeV) have been compared. In one method the chamber signal has been compared to that of simultaneously exposed thermoluminescent LiF dosemeters (TLD), in the other the "two-voltage" method of Boag, adapted for swept beams, has been used. By variation of the electron energy between 20 and 13 MeV, of the focus-skin-distance (FSD) between 200 and 100 cm and of the monitor rate between 400 monitor units (m.u.) and 100 m.u. per minute, different values could be produced for the peak charge density M. The collection efficiency of the chamber, operating at a standard voltage of 250 V, decreases from 0.99 to 0.84 for a charge density increasing from 0.3 X 10(-4) C/m3 to 7.5 X 10(-4) C/m3, respectively. The maximum deviation observed between the TLD and the "two-voltage" method adopted for similar M is never more than 2% and mostly smaller than 1%. It can be concluded that, under the present experimental conditions, the calculated ionisation chamber collection efficiency is confirmed by the experimental method using TL dosimetry. PMID:3925506

  17. Novel characterisation of minor α-linolenic acid isomers in linseed oil by gas chromatography and covalent adduct chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Brenna, J T; Lawrence, P; de la Fuente, M A

    2016-06-01

    Discrimination between polyunsaturated fatty acid isomers with three double bonds is a great challenge, due to structural similarities and similar polarities. In this study, we report the identification of four minor geometrical isomers of α-linolenic acid (ALA) present in linseed oil samples: (9E,12Z,15E)-, (9Z,12Z,15E)-, (9Z,12E,15Z)- and (9E,12Z,15Z)-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoic acids, chromatographically resolved by gas chromatography (GC) using a new and highly polar ionic phase column (SLB-IL111). Gas chromatography-electron ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-EIMS) determined that the four unknown compounds were C18:3 n-3 isomers. The positional 9-12-15 C18:3 configuration was achieved by covalent adduct chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (CACI-MS/MS) while geometrical configuration was established with analytical standards based on relative retention. We hypothesised that these isomers are formed during linseed oil deodorisation and postulate preferred and unfavoured isomerisation pathways of ALA. PMID:26830571

  18. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth ...

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  2. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  4. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Anal Cancer Anal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Anal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Anal Cancer Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Screening ...

  5. Cancer Statistics: Pancreas Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Pancreatic Cancer - Did you know that an estimated 46,000 Americans were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 53,070 % of All ...

  6. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  7. The Insidious Nature of "Hard-Core" Alternative Conceptions: Implications for the Constructivist Research Programme of Patterns in High School Students' and Pre-Service Teachers' Thinking about Ionisation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The present study contributes to the constructivist research programme (RP) into learning science by comparing patterns in responses from two groups of learners--senior high school students and pre-service teachers--in the same educational context (Singapore), to a diagnostic instrument relating to the topic of ionisation energies. This topic is…

  8. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  9. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  10. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  11. Testicular cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer ... The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. Factors that may ... increases if he has: Abnormal testicle development Exposure ...

  12. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk ...

  13. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Ovarian Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  14. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer statistics across the world. U.S. Cancer Mortality Trends The best indicator of progress against cancer is ... the number of cancer survivors has increased. These trends show that progress is being made against the ...

  15. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  16. Secondary ionisations in a wall-less ion-counting nanodosimeter: quantitative analysis and the effect on the comparison of measured and simulated track structure parameters in nanometric volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgers, Gerhard; Bug, Marion U.; Gargioni, Elisabetta; Rabus, Hans

    2015-10-01

    The object of investigation in nanodosimetry is the physical characteristics of the microscopic structure of ionising particle tracks, i.e. the sequence of the interaction types and interaction sites of a primary particle and all its secondaries, which reflects the stochastic nature of the radiation interaction. In view of the upcoming radiation therapy with protons and carbon ions, the ionisation structure of the ion track is of particular interest. Owing to limitations in current detector technology, the only way to determine the ionisation cluster size distribution in a DNA segment is to simulate the particle track structure in condensed matter. This is done using dedicated computer programs based on Monte Carlo procedures simulating the interaction of the primary ions with the target. Hence, there is a need to benchmark these computer codes using suitable experimental data. Ionisation cluster size distributions produced in the nanodosimeter's sensitive volume by monoenergetic protons and alpha particles (with energies between 0.1 MeV and 20 MeV) were measured at the PTB ion accelerator facilities. C3H8 and N2 were alternately used as the working gas. The measured data were compared with the simulation results obtained with the PTB Monte-Carlo code PTra [B. Grosswendt, Radiat. Environ. Biophys. 41, 103 (2002); M.U. Bug, E. Gargioni, H. Nettelbeck, W.Y. Baek, G. Hilgers, A.B. Rosenfeld, H. Rabus, Phys. Rev. E 88, 043308 (2013)]. Measured and simulated characteristics of the particle track structure are generally in good agreement for protons over the entire energy range investigated. For alpha particles with energies higher than the Bragg peak energy, a good agreement can also be seen, whereas for energies lower than the Bragg peak energy differences of as much as 25% occur. Significant deviations are only observed for large ionisation cluster sizes. These deviations can be explained by a background consisting of secondary ions. These ions are produced in the

  17. Identification of phenolic constituents in red chicory salads (Cichorium intybus) by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carazzone, Chiara; Mascherpa, Dora; Gazzani, Gabriella; Papetti, Adele

    2013-06-01

    Phenolic acids and flavonoids extracted from several types of Cichorium intybus var. silvestre salads ("Chioggia", "Treviso", "Treviso tardivo", and "Verona") were characterised by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation/mass spectrometry. Among the 64 compounds detected, several hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including 8 mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids, 3 tartaric acid derivatives, 31 flavonol and 2 flavone glycosides, as well as 10 anthocyanins were characterised based on UV spectra and MS(n) fragmentation patterns. Furthermore, several isomers of caffeic acid derivatives were distinguished for the first time by their specific mass spectral data. This is the first study reporting the glycosylation type and position of mono- and diglycosylated flavonoids in red salads. PMID:23411215

  18. Structural elucidation of monoterpene oxidation products by ion trap fragmentation using on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode.

    PubMed

    Warscheid, B; Hoffmann, T

    2001-01-01

    Based on ion trap mass spectrometry, an on-line method is described which provides valuable information on the molecular composition of structurally complex organic aerosols. The investigated aerosols were generated from the gas-phase ozonolysis of various C(10)H(16)-terpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, sabinene, limonene), and directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. Negative ion chemical ionisation at atmospheric pressure (APCI(-)) enabled the detection of multifunctional carboxylic acid products by combining inherent sensitivity and molecular weight information. Sequential low-energy collision-induced product ion fragmentation experiments (MS(n)) were performed in order to elucidate characteristic decomposition pathways of the compounds. Dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and hydroxyketocarboxylic acid products could be clearly distinguished by multistage on-line MS. Furthermore, sabinonic acid and two C(9)-ether compounds were tentatively identified for the first time by applying on-line APCI(-)-MS(n). PMID:11746892

  19. Rapid identification of vinca alkaloids by direct-injection electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry and confirmation by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Tai, Yuanpo; Sun, Cuirong; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2005-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the identification of Vinca alkaloids from a crude extract of Catharanthus roseus G. Don (Apocynaceae) by direct-injection electrospray ionisation (ESI) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed. The alkaloids vindoline, vindolidine, vincristine and vinblastine were evaluated in a commercial extract of C. roseus using this method. Catharanthine and its isomers 19S-vindolinine and vindolinine were detected in the commercial product by direct injection ESI/MS/MS and confirmed by preparation and by HPLC-ESI/MS. For the characterisation of different fragment fingerprints, ESI/MS/MS is a sensitive, rapid and convenient technique by which to identify some constituents in complex and mixed plant extracts. PMID:16223089

  20. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 25th ANNIVERSARY OF THE A.M. PROKHOROV GENERAL PHYSICS INSTITUTE: Femtosecond laser optical gas breakdown microplasma: the ionisation and postionisation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukin, V. V.; Garnov, S. V.; Malyutin, A. A.; Strelkov, V. V.

    2007-10-01

    The formation and evolution dynamics of the laser plasma produced in the microvolumes of gases (air, nitrogen, argon, and helium) upon their multiple ionisation by high-intensity (4×1016 W cm-2) tightly focused (to a region 1.7 μm in diameter) 400-nm, 100-fs second-harmonic pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser is studied. The spatiotemporal distribution profiles of the refractive index and electron microplasma density were recorded by ultrahigh-speed interferometry. The postionisation of a femtosecond laser plasma, i.e. the growth of the electron density known after the end of the exciting laser pulse, is detected for the first time. A theoretical model is proposed, which describes the mechanism of plasma postionisation by hot photoelectrons. The results of electron density calculations are in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Analysis of trace amounts of carbon dioxide, oxygen and carbon monoxide in nitrogen using dual capillary columns and a pulsed discharge helium ionisation detector.

    PubMed

    Janse van Rensburg, M; Botha, A; Rohwer, E

    2007-10-01

    Gas mixtures of trace amounts of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), dioxygen (O(2)), and carbon monoxide (CO) in dinitrogen (N(2)) were separated and quantified using parallel dual capillary columns and pulsed discharge helium ionisation detection (PDHID). The detection limits (9 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for CO(2), 7 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for O(2) and 37 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for CO) were lower than those reported previously for similar methods. Uncertainties were calculated and results were validated by comparison of the CO and CO(2) results with those obtained using conventional methods. The method was also used to analyse nitrogen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in oxygen. PMID:17765907

  2. Ionisation potential theorem in the presence of the electric field: Assessment of range-separated functional in the reproduction of orbital and excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borpuzari, Manash Protim; Boruah, Abhijit; Kar, Rahul

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the range-separated density functionals have been reported to reproduce gas phase orbital and excitation energies with good accuracy. In this article, we have revisited the ionisation potential theorem in the presence of external electric field. Numerical results on six linear molecules are presented and the performance of the range-separated density functionals in reproducing highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies, LUMO energies, HOMO-LUMO gaps in the presence of the external electric field is assessed. In addition, valence and Rydberg excitation energies in the presence of the external electric field are presented. It is found that the range-separated density functionals reproduce orbital and excitation energies accurately in the presence of the electric field. Moreover, we have performed fractional occupation calculation using cubic spline equation and tried to explain the performance of the functional.

  3. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of natural and synthetic desulphoglucosinolates and their chemical validation by UV, NMR and chemical ionisation-MS methods.

    PubMed

    Kiddle, G; Bennett, R N; Botting, N P; Davidson, N E; Robertson, A A; Wallsgrove, R M

    2001-01-01

    Methods are described for the optimised extraction, desulphation and HPLC separation of desulphoglucosinolates. These methods provide rapid separation, identification and quantitative measurements of glucosinolates extracted from Brassica napus L and related crops, of unusual glucosinolates found in crucifer weed species, and also of synthetic alkylglucosinolates. The desulphoglucosinolates used in these studies were either chemically synthesised (at least one example from each major structural class), or purified from various plant sources. Validation of the identities of the desulphoglucosinolates was by comparison of retention times with standards, and by UV, 1H- and 13C-NMR and chemical ionisation MS analysis. A list of useful species, and the specific tissues, from which high concentrations of standards can be extracted is included. PMID:11705329

  4. Characterisation of weathered hydrocarbon wastes at contaminated sites by GC-simulated distillation and nitrous oxide chemical ionisation GC-MS, with implications for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Simon J T; Hrudey, Steve E; Rawluk, Marv; Fuhr, Bryan J

    2004-08-01

    An extended analytical characterisation of weathered hydrocarbons isolated from historically contaminated sites in Alberta is presented. The characterisation of soil extracts, chromatographically separated into component classes, by GC-simulated distillation and nitrous oxide (N2O) chemical ionisation (CI) GC-MS provides new insights into the composition of the residual oil at these sites, the principal partition medium for risk critical components. The combined polar and asphaltene content of representative soil extracts ranged from 40% w/w to 70% w/w of the oils encountered. An abundance of C14-C22 2-4 ring alicyclics, alkylbenzenes and benzocycloparaffins is prevalent within the saturate fractions of site soils. Implications for the partitioning of risk critical compounds at sites with weathered hydrocarbons and the practical application of bioremediation technologies are discussed. PMID:15292955

  5. 2B or not 2B, that is the question: further investigations into the use of pencil as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Langley, G John; Herniman, Julie M; Townell, Marc S

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of pencil as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) for the study of actinides has previously been demonstrated (Black et al., Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2006; 20: 1053). Here, the scope of the types of molecules amenable to analysis by this method has been extended, establishing that approximately 90% of a library containing 50 diverse small molecules can be successfully analysed by this technique. Further, the role played by the bulk materials present in the different pencil leads has been investigated and a simple one-step deposition of matrix and calibration materials has been achieved through the fabrication of different calibration pencils (Cali-Pens). PMID:17171774

  6. Ionising Radiation Immediately Impairs Synaptic Plasticity-Associated Cytoskeletal Signalling Pathways in HT22 Cells and in Mouse Brain: An In Vitro/In Vivo Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Stefan J.; Buratovic, Sonja; von Toerne, Christine; Moertl, Simone; Stenerlöw, Bo; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Atkinson, Michael J.; Eriksson, Per; Tapio, Soile

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from brain malignancies are treated with high-dose ionising radiation. However, this may lead to severe learning and memory impairment. Preventive treatments to minimise these side effects have not been possible due to the lack of knowledge of the involved signalling pathways and molecular targets. Mouse hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells were irradiated with acute gamma doses of 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy and 4.0 Gy. Changes in the cellular proteome were investigated by isotope-coded protein label technology and tandem mass spectrometry after 4 and 24 hours. To compare the findings with the in vivo response, male NMRI mice were irradiated on postnatal day 10 with a gamma dose of 1.0 Gy, followed by evaluation of the cellular proteome of hippocampus and cortex 24 hours post-irradiation. Analysis of the in vitro proteome showed that signalling pathways related to synaptic actin-remodelling were significantly affected at 1.0 Gy and 4.0 Gy but not at 0.5 Gy after 4 and 24 hours. We observed radiation-induced reduction of the miR-132 and Rac1 levels; miR-132 is known to regulate Rac1 activity by blocking the GTPase-activating protein p250GAP. In the irradiated hippocampus and cortex we observed alterations in the signalling pathways similar to those in vitro. The decreased expression of miR-132 and Rac1 was associated with an increase in hippocampal cofilin and phospho-cofilin. The Rac1-Cofilin pathway is involved in the modulation of synaptic actin filament formation that is necessary for correct spine and synapse morphology to enable processes of learning and memory. We suggest that acute radiation exposure leads to rapid dendritic spine and synapse morphology alterations via aberrant cytoskeletal signalling and processing and that this is associated with the immediate neurocognitive side effects observed in patients treated with ionising radiation. PMID:25329592

  7. Analysis of peptides and protein digests by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry using neutral pH elution conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanzhong; Boysen, Reinhard I; Chowdhury, Jamil; Alam, Asif; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the advantages of carrying out the analysis of peptides and tryptic digests of proteins under gradient elution conditions at pH 6.5 by reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and in-line electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are documented. For these RP separations, a double endcapped, bidentate anchored n-octadecyl wide pore silica adsorbent was employed in a capillary column format. Compared to the corresponding analysis of the same peptides and protein tryptic digests using low pH elution conditions for their RP-HPLC separation, this alternative approach provides improved selectivity and more efficient separation of these analytes, thus allowing a more sensitive identification of proteins at different abundance levels, i.e. more tryptic peptides from the same protein could be confidently identified, enabling higher sequence coverage of the protein to be obtained. This approach was further evaluated with very complex tryptic digests derived from a human plasma protein sample using an online two-dimensional (2D) strong cation-exchange (SCX)-RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system. Again, at pH 6.5, with mobile phases of different compositions, improved chromatographic selectivities were obtained, concomitant with more sensitive on-line electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometric (ESI-MS/MS) analysis. As a consequence, more plasma proteins could be confidently identified, highlighting the potential of these RP-HPLC methods with elution at pH 6.5 to extend further the scope of proteomic investigations. PMID:25892073

  8. Characterisation of legumes by enzymatic hydrolysis, microdialysis sampling, and micro-high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okatch, Harriet; Torto, Nelson; Armateifio, Joan

    2003-04-11

    An assay based on enzymatic hydrolysisand microdialysis sampling, micro-high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (micro-HPAEC) with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the characterisation of legumes is presented. Characterisation of two bean varieties; Phaseolus mungo and P. acutifilous was based upon enzymatic hydrolysis using an endo-beta-mannanase from Aspergillus niger with subsequent analysis of the hydrolysates with HPAEC-MS. The hydrolysates were detected in the positive ionisation mode after desalting the chromatographic effluent, employing a cation-exchange membrane desalting device with water as the regenerating liquid. Mass chromatograms, acquiredafter hydrolysis of both bean samples for 12 h, showed two different profiles of hydrolysates. The P. mungo bean hydrolysate showed the presence of saccharides with a degree of polymerisation (DP) in the range of 2-6, whereas that of P. acutifilous showed only DPs of 2-5. Both bean samples had one type of DP 2, but showed different types of DPs 3, 4 and 5. Only the P. mungo sample showed the presence of DP 6. The most abundant fraction for P. mungo was DP 4, whereas that for P. acutifilous was DP 5. Tandem MS of the hydrolysates showed that the DP 2 hydrolysates observed for the samples were of the same type, having a 1,6 linkage. Also tandem MS data for DPs 3, 4, and 5 showed that similar hydrolysates were present within the same sample as well as among the two samples. The data also showed the existence of 1,6 linkages for DP 3, 4, and 5 hydrolysates. The single enzymatic hydrolysis in combination with microdialysis and HPAEC with ESI-MS proved to be sufficient and reproducible for profiling and showing the difference between the two bean samples. PMID:12735463

  9. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  10. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events. PMID:26390952

  11. Descriptive epidemiology of bone cancer in greater Bombay.

    PubMed

    Yeole, B B; Jussawalla, D J

    1998-09-01

    Bone tumours are comparatively uncommon, constituting only 0.5% of the total world cancer incidence. As Bone tumors consist of several distinct clinico-pathological entities, descriptive epidemiology of tumors at this site can be based only on studies where they can be distinguished. Ewing's sarcoma Chondrosarcoma and Osteosarcoma are the principal tumors involving bones. The basic data utilized for this study was collected from the Bombay Cancer Registry which was established in 1963, and is the first population based registry to be established in India. For studying the descriptive epidemiological variables the most recent 5 year incidence rates have been used. As a group, bone cancers represent 0.9% of the total number of incident cancer are seen in Greater Bombay. Males in general are seen to have a higher incidence of bone cancers than females. Ewing's sarcoma was found to be the commonest bone cancer in Bombay. The age specific incidence curves present striking differences according to cell types of bone cancer. Time trends in the incidence of these cancers, over the past 30 years have been presented. Our data indicate that there is a decreasing trend in incidence of bone cancers in females, whilst the rates are stable in males. Ionising radiation is the only environmental agent to cause this cancer. The discovery of other risk factors is the key prevention and will depend upon the experimental work undertaken to develop sub-clinical measures of risk that can be applied in interdisciplinary studies to identify more completely the causes of bone cancers. PMID:10226399

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  14. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  15. Measurement of small ion beams by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry using new 10(13) Ohm resistors.

    PubMed

    Koornneef, J M; Bouman, C; Schwieters, J B; Davies, G R

    2014-03-28

    We tested 5 newly manufactured - prototype - 10(13)Ohm resistors in the feedback loop of Faraday cup amplifiers to measure small ion beams by Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS). The high Ohmic resistors installed in the TRITON Plus at the VU University Amsterdam theoretically have 10 times lower noise levels relative to the default 10(11)Ohm resistors. To investigate the precision and accuracy of analyses using these new amplifiers we measured Sr and Nd isotopes of reference standards at a range of ion currents (3.2×10(-16) to 1×10(-12) A, corresponding to intensities of 32 μV to 100 mV on a default 10(11)Ohm amplifier) and on small amounts of material (100 and 10 pg). Internal precision and external reproducibility for Sr and Nd isotope ratios are both better when collected on 10(13) compared 10(12)Ohm resistors and to the default 10(11)Ohm resistors. At an (87)Sr ion current of 3×10(-14) A (3 mV on a 10(11)Ohm amplifier) the internal precision (2 SE) of (87)Sr/(86)Sr is 5 times better for 10(13)Ohm resistors compared to 10(11)Ohm resistors. The external reproducibility (2 SD) at this beam intensity is 9 times better. Multiple 100 and 10 pg Sr standards, ran to exhaustion, yielded low (87)Sr/(86)Sr compared to the long term average (e.g. 10 pg average=0.710083±164 (n=11) instead of 0.710244±12, n=73). The average off-set for 10 pg standards can be explained by a loading blank contribution of 1.3 pg. In contrast, Nd data on 100 pg and 10 pg samples are accurate suggesting that Nd loading blanks do not compromise the data. The external reproducibility of (143)Nd/(144)Nd on 100 pg samples is 125 ppm and 3.3‰ on 10 pg samples (2 RSD=relative standard deviation, n=10). Thus, variability in Nd and Sr isotope ratios in the 4th decimal place, e.g. (143)Nd/(144)Nd 0.5110-0.5119 or (87)Sr/(86)Sr 0.7100-0.7109, can be resolved in 10 to 100 pg samples provided that the procedural blanks and chemical separation are optimal. For measurements in the beam

  16. What Causes Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » What Causes Cancer? Cancer is a complex group of diseases with ... cancer. Learn About Cancer Topics Cancer Basics What Causes Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate ...

  17. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  18. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage-associated biomarkers of ionising radiation: current status and future relevance for radiology and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rothkamm, K

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic radiation technology has developed dramatically in recent years, and its use has increased significantly, bringing clinical benefit. The use of diagnostic radiology has become widespread in modern society, particularly in paediatrics where the clinical benefit needs to be balanced with the risk of leukaemia and brain cancer increasing after exposure to low doses of radiation. With improving long-term survival rates of radiotherapy patients and the ever-increasing use of diagnostic and interventional radiology procedures, concern has risen over the long-term risks and side effects from such treatments. Biomarker development in radiology and radiotherapy has progressed significantly in recent years to investigate the effects of such use and optimise treatment. Recent biomarker development has focused on improving the limitations of established techniques by the use of automation, increasing sensitivity and developing novel biomarkers capable of quicker results. The effect of low-dose exposure (0–100 mGy) used in radiology, which is increasingly linked to cancer incidences, is being investigated, as some recent research challenges the linear-no-threshold model. Radiotherapy biomarkers are focused on identifying radiosensitive patients, determining the treatment-associated risk and allowing for a tailored and more successful treatment of cancer patients. For biomarkers in any of these areas to be successfully developed, stringent criteria must be applied in techniques and analysis of data to reduce variation among reports and allow data sets to be accurately compared. Newly developed biomarkers can then be used in combination with the established techniques to better understand and quantify the individual biological response to exposures associated with radiology tests and to personalise treatment plans for patients. PMID:23659923

  19. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  20. NBS1 Heterozygosity and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    di Masi, Alessandra; Antoccia, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in the NBS1 gene are responsible for the Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by chromosome instability and hypersensitivity to ionising radiation (IR). Epidemiological data evidence that the NBS1 gene can be considered a susceptibility factor for cancer development, as demonstrated by the fact that almost 40% of NBS patients have developed a malignancy before the age of 21. Interestingly, also NBS1 heterozygotes, which are clinically asymptomatic, display an elevated risk to develop some types of malignant tumours, especially breast, prostate and colorectal cancers, lymphoblastic leukaemia, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). So far, nine mutations in the NBS1 gene have been found, at the heterozygous state, in cancer patients. Among them, the 657del5, the I171V and the R215W mutations are the most frequently described. The pathogenicity of these mutations is presumably connected with their occurrence in the highly conserved BRCT tandem domains of the NBS1 protein, which are present in a large superfamily of proteins, and are recognized as major mediators of processes related to cell-cycle checkpoint and DNA repair. This review will focus on the current state-of-knowledge regarding the correlation between carriers of NBS1 gene mutations and the proneness to the development of malignant tumours. PMID:19452044

  1. A miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation analyser for investigation of elemental/isotopic composition with the sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of the elemental and isotopic composition of solar system objects imposes critical constraints on models describing the origin of our solar system and can provide insight to chemical and physical processes taking place during the planetary evolution. So far, the investigation of chemical composition of planetary surfaces could be conducted almost exclusively by remotely controlled spectroscopic instruments from orbiting spacecraft, landers or rovers. With some exceptions, the sensitivity of these techniques is, however, limited and often only abundant elements can be investigated. Nevertheless, the spectroscopic techniques proved to be successful for global chemical mapping of entire planetary objects such as the Moon, Mars and asteroids. A combined afford of the measurements from orbit, landers and rovers can also yield the determination of local mineralogy. New instruments including Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (LIMS), have been recently included for several landed missions. LIBS is thought to improve flexibility of the investigations and offers a well localised chemical probing from distances up to 10-13 m. Since LIMS is a mass spectrometric technique it allows for very sensitive measurements of elements and isotopes. We will demonstrate the results of the current performance tests obtained by application of a miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation mass spectrometer, a LIMS instrument, developed in Bern for the chemical analysis of solids. So far, the only LIMS instrument on a spacecraft is the LAZMA instrument. This spectrometer was a part of the payload for PHOBOS-GRUNT mission and is also currently selected for LUNA-RESURCE and LUNA-GLOB missions to the lunar south poles (Managadze et al., 2011). Our LIMS instrument has the dimensions of 120 x Ø60 mm and with a weight of about 1.5 kg (all electronics included), it is the lightest mass analyser designed for in situ chemical

  2. Aerodigestive cancers: oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Haws, Luke; Haws, Bryn Taylor

    2014-09-01

    Worldwide, approximately 260,000 new cases of oral cancer occur, and more than 125,000 mortalities are attributed to oral cancers each year. Oral cancers most commonly arise in the tongue, followed by the floor of the mouth and the lower gum. Tobacco and alcohol use are the major risk factors, although human papillomavirus has been identified as an etiology in a small percentage of oral squamous cell cancers. Although the evidence to support routine annual screening for oral cancers is inconclusive, family physicians and dental practitioners should be attentive to precursor lesions, such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia, and strongly consider obtaining or referring for biopsy patients with suspicious lesions. Depending on stage, management of oral cancers often involves surgery, with or without postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Patients who have been treated for these cancers should undergo close surveillance by otolaryngology subspecialists, but their family physicians primarily will be responsible for their long-term care. Complications relating to management, including difficulties with speech, swallowing, and chewing, will need to be addressed. For patients with advanced-stage disease, family physicians also may be responsible for palliative and end-of-life care. PMID:25198382

  3. Is cancer risk of radiation workers larger than expected?

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, P; Rühm, W; Walsh, L; Blettner, M; Hammer, G; Zeeb, H

    2009-01-01

    Occupational exposures to ionising radiation mainly occur at low-dose rates and may accumulate effective doses of up to several hundred milligray. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the evidence of cancer risks from such low-dose-rate, moderate-dose (LDRMD) exposures. Our literature search for primary epidemiological studies on cancer incidence and mortality risks from LDRMD exposures included publications from 2002 to 2007, and an update of the UK National Registry for Radiation Workers study. For each (LDRMD) study we calculated the risk for the same types of cancer among the atomic bomb survivors with the same gender proportion and matched quantities for dose, mean age attained and mean age at exposure. A combined estimator of the ratio of the excess relative risk per dose from the LDRMD study to the corresponding value for the atomic bomb survivors was 1.21 (90% CI 0.51 to 1.90). The present analysis does not confirm that the cancer risk per dose for LDRMD exposures is lower than for the atomic bomb survivors. This result challenges the cancer risk values currently assumed for occupational exposures. PMID:19570756

  4. Is cancer risk of radiation workers larger than expected?

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Rühm, W; Walsh, L; Blettner, M; Hammer, G; Zeeb, H

    2009-12-01

    Occupational exposures to ionising radiation mainly occur at low-dose rates and may accumulate effective doses of up to several hundred milligray. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the evidence of cancer risks from such low-dose-rate, moderate-dose (LDRMD) exposures. Our literature search for primary epidemiological studies on cancer incidence and mortality risks from LDRMD exposures included publications from 2002 to 2007, and an update of the UK National Registry for Radiation Workers study. For each (LDRMD) study we calculated the risk for the same types of cancer among the atomic bomb survivors with the same gender proportion and matched quantities for dose, mean age attained and mean age at exposure. A combined estimator of the ratio of the excess relative risk per dose from the LDRMD study to the corresponding value for the atomic bomb survivors was 1.21 (90% CI 0.51 to 1.90). The present analysis does not confirm that the cancer risk per dose for LDRMD exposures is lower than for the atomic bomb survivors. This result challenges the cancer risk values currently assumed for occupational exposures. PMID:19570756

  5. Parathyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the thyroid gland, which is located at the base of the neck. Parathyroid cancer is a very rare type of cancer. Men and women are equally affected. It usually occurs in people older than 30. The cause of parathyroid cancer ...

  6. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of ... in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  7. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000380.htm Prostate cancer To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Prostate cancer is cancer that starts in the prostate gland. ...

  8. Cancer - penis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an organ that makes up part of the male reproductive system. Causes The exact cause is unknown. Smegma, a ... Squamous cell cancer - penis Images Male reproductive anatomy Male reproductive system References National Comprehensive Cancer Network. National Comprehensive Cancer ...

  9. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... controlled way. Cancer cells keep growing without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy for cancer. It works by killing the cancer ... It depends on the type and amount of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Some ...

  10. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - stomach; Gastric cancer; Gastric carcinoma; Adenocarcinoma of the stomach ... Several types of cancer can occur in the stomach. The most common type is called adenocarcinoma. It starts from one of the cell ...

  11. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. This type of cancer is sometimes called endometrial cancer. The symptoms of ...

  12. Cancer Moonshot

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Moonshot, led by Vice President Joe Biden, will marshal resources across the federal government to speed progress in cancer research and lead to improved cancer prevention, detection, and treatment.

  13. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  14. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  15. Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  16. Cancer Today

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society: Cancer Facts and Figures 2007 : NCI Cancer Screening Tests Screening tests can find diseases and conditions early when ... active or are older than 21. Prostate Cancer Screening (Men): Get advice from your doctor if you ...

  17. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  18. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  19. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers, including cancers of the blood and the lymphatic system ( leukemia , multiple myeloma , and lymphoma ), can form metastatic tumors. Although rare, the metastasis of blood and lymphatic system cancers to the lung, heart, central nervous system , ...

  20. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Anal Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Whether you (or ... the topics below to get started. What Is Anal Cancer? What is anal cancer? What are the ...

  1. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer is a cancer that starts in the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is located inside the front of your lower ... thyroid cells that are normally present in the thyroid gland. This form of thyroid cancer tends to occur ...

  2. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  3. Cancer Today

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor if you are considering having a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test or digital rectal examination (DRE). Skin ... regular colonoscopy for cancer of the colon, serum prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer, mammography for breast cancer, ...

  4. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  5. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for ... therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  6. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another part of the body is more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 ...

  7. A new approach for plasma (xeno)metabolomics based on solid-phase extraction and nanoflow liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    David, Arthur; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Lange, Anke; Tyler, Charles R; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-24

    Current metabolite profiling methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) platforms do not detect many of the components present at trace concentrations in extracts of plasma due to their low ionisation efficiency or to interference from highly abundant compounds. Nanoflow LC-nanospray MS platforms, which are commonly used in proteomics, could overcome these limitations and significantly increase analytical sensitivity and coverage of the plasma (xeno)metabolome (i.e., metabolites and xenobiotics), but require small injection volumes (<0.5μL). In this study, we developed sample preparation methods to remove ion suppressive phospholipids and concentrate remaining components of the plasma (xeno)metabolome in order to analyse sub-microliter volumes of plasma extracts for nanoflow ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nUHPLC-nESI-TOFMS). These methods use phospholipid filtration plates in combination with polymeric or mixed mode exchange solid-phase extraction (SPE). The phospholipid filtration plates removed >94% of the predominant phospholipid/lysophospholipid species from plasma, whilst absolute recoveries of 63 selected (xeno)metabolites from spiked plasma were generally between 60 and 104%. After a further SPE step, recoveries of test compounds were between 50 and 81%. Studies revealed that both the sample preparation methodology and nUHPLC-nESI-TOFMS analyses gave acceptable repeatability. A qualitative comparison of SPE methods revealed that sample concentration by either polymer or mixed mode ion-exchange SPE gave comprehensive metabolite coverage of plasma extracts, but the use of cation exchange SPE significantly increased detection of many cationic compounds in the sample extracts. Method detection limits for steroid, eicosanoid and bile metabolites were <1.0ng/mL plasma and for pharmaceutical contaminants were between 0.01 and 30ng/mL plasma. Comparison of the

  8. A new approach to studying the effects of ionising radiation on single cells using FTIR synchrotron microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, E.; Birarda, G.; Kowalska, J.; Lekki, J.; Vaccari, L.; Wiecheć, A.; Wood, B. R.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on single cells using a proton source was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy. The prostate cancer cells (DU-145) were irradiated by a specific number (50, 200, 400, 2000 and 4000) of protons per cell. Next after fixing the cells with 70% ethanol micro-FTIR spectra were obtained using both: (a) the synchrotron radiation source with a Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) detector and (b) a globar source with a focal plane array (FPA) detector. FTIR spectra obtained from both instrumental configurations were analyzed independently to investigate the changes in the DNA phosphodiester region (1150-950 cm-1) of irradiated and control (untreated by ionizing radiation) cells. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) scores plot revealed distinct clusters for all groups of irradiated cells, even for those irradiated by the smallest dose of protons. The dose-dependent changes in the relative intensities of DNA peak at 970 cm-1 (ribose-phosphate skeletal motions), along with a shift of the O-P-O band corresponding to the symmetric phosphodiester stretching mode at 1090 cm-1 were observed. The results demonstrate that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool to investigate DNA damage in single cells and may become an important tool in assessing cell damage following radiotherapy.

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  11. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  12. Combined effect of solvent content, temperature and pH on the chromatographic behaviour of ionisable compounds. III: Considerations about robustness.

    PubMed

    Pous-Torres, S; Torres-Lapasió, J R; Baeza-Baeza, J J; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2009-12-18

    We previously reported a model able to predict the retention time of ionisable compounds as a function of the solvent content, temperature and pH [J. Chromatogr. A 1163 (2007) 49]. The model was applied further, developing an optimisation of the resolution based on the peak purity concept [J. Chromatogr. A 1193 (2008) 117]. However, we left aside an important issue: we did not consider incidental overlaps caused by shifts in the predicted peak positions, owing either to uncertainties in the source data, modelling errors, or the practical implementation in the chromatograph of the optimal mobile phase (or any other). These shifts can ruin the predicted separation, since they can easily amount several peak-width units at pH values close to the logarithm of the solutes' acid-base constants. A probabilistic optimisation is proposed here, which is able to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the model and the consequences when the optimal mobile phase is implemented in the chromatograph. This approach assumes peak fluctuations in replicated assays obtained through Monte Carlo simulations, which gives rise to a distribution of elementary peak purities. The results yielded by the conventional (i.e. non-robust), derivative-penalised, and probabilistic optimisations were compared, checking the predicted and experimental chromatograms at several critical experimental conditions. Among the three approaches, only the probabilistic one was able to appraise properly the practical difficulties of the separation problem. PMID:19909960

  13. Structural characterisation of tyrosine-nitrated peptides by ultraviolet and infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petre, Brínduşa-Alina; Youhnovski, Nikolay; Lukkari, Juho; Weber, Reinhold; Przybylski, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins may occur in cells upon oxidative stress and inflammation processes mediated through generation of reactive nitroxyl from peroxynitrite. Tyrosine nitration from oxidative pathways may generate cytotoxic species that cause protein dysfunction and pathogenesis. A number of protein nitrations in vivo have been reported and some specific Tyrosine nitration sites have been recently identified using mass spectrometric methods. High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI) FT-ICR-MS) is shown here to be a highly efficient method in the determination of protein nitrations. Following the identification of nitration of the catalytic site Tyr-430 residue of bovine prostacyclin synthase, we synthesised several model peptides containing both unmodified tyrosine and 3-nitro-tyrosine residues, using solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The structures of the nitrotyrosine peptides were characterised both by ESI- and by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI)-FT-ICR-MS, using a standard ultraviolet (UV) nitrogen nitrogen laser and a 2.97 microm Nd-YAG infrared laser. Using UV-MALDI-MS, 3-nitrotyrosyl-peptides were found to undergo extensive photochemical fragmentation at the nitrophenyl group, which may hamper or prevent the unequivocal identification of Tyr-nitrations in cellular proteins. In contrast, infrared-MALDI-FT-ICR-MS did not produce fragmentation of molecular ions of Tyr-nitrated peptides. PMID:16322657

  14. Fractionation and analysis of lipopolysaccharide-derived oligosaccharides by zwitterionic-type hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Man-Kupisinska, Aleksandra; Bobko, Ewelina; Gozdziewicz, Tomasz K; Maciejewska, Anna; Jachymek, Wojciech; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta

    2016-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is a main surface antigen and virulence factor of Gram-negative bacteria. Regardless of the source of LPS, this molecule, isolated from the smooth forms of bacteria, is characterised by a general structural layout encompassing three regions: (i) an O-specific polysaccharide (O-PS) - a polymer of repeating oligosaccharide units, (ii) core oligosaccharide (OS), and (iii) the lipid A anchoring LPS in the outer membrane of the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Structural analysis usually requires degradation of LPS and further efficient separation of various poly- and oligosaccharide glycoforms. The hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was shown as an efficient technique for separation of labelled or native neutral and acidic glycans, glycopeptides, sialylated glycans, glycosylated and nonglycosylated peptides. Herein we adopted ZIC(®) (zwitterionic stationary phase covalently attached to porous silica)-HILIC technology in combination with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry to separate different LPS-derived oligosaccharides. As a result three effective procedures have been developed: (i) to separate different core oligosaccharides of Escherichia coli R1 LOS, (ii) to separate RU-[Hep]-Kdo oligosaccharides from core OS glycoforms of Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 LPS, and (iii) to separate Hep and Kdo-containing mono, di-, tri- and tetrasaccharides of H. alvei PCM 1200 LPS. Moreover, some of developed analytical procedures were scaled to semi-preparative protocols and used to obtain highly-purified fractions of the interest in larger quantities required for future evaluation, analysis, and biological applications. PMID:27085741

  15. Simultaneous determination of 16 brominated flame retardants in food and feed of animal origin by fast gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bichon, E; Guiffard, I; Vénisseau, A; Lesquin, E; Vaccher, V; Brosseaud, A; Marchand, P; Le Bizec, B

    2016-08-12

    A gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation was developed for the monitoring of 16 brominated flame retardants (7 usually monitored polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs) and BDE #209 and 8 additional emerging and novel BFRs) in food and feed of animal origin. The developed analytical method has decreased the run time by three compared to conventional strategies, using a 2.5m column length (5% phenyl stationary phase, 0.1mm i.d., 0.1μmf.t.), a pulsed split injection (1:5) with carrier gas helium flow rate at 0.48mLmin(-1) in one run of 20 min. For most BFRs, analytical data were compared with the current analytical strategy relying on GC/EI/HRMS (double sector, R=10000 at 10% valley). Performances in terms of sensitivity were found to meet the Commission recommendation (118/2014/EC) for nBFRs. GC/APCI/MS/MS represents a promising alternative for multi-BFRs analysis in complex matrices, in that it allows the monitoring of a wider list of contaminants in a single injection and a shorter run time. PMID:27425757

  16. Sensitive monitoring of monoterpene metabolites in human urine using two-step derivatisation and positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lukas; Belov, Vladimir N; Göen, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    A gas chromatographic-positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometric (GC-PCI-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of 10 oxidative metabolites of the monoterpenoid hydrocarbons α-pinene, (R)-limonene, and Δ(3)-carene ((+)-3-carene) in human urine was developed and tested for the monoterpene biomonitoring of the general population (n=36). The method involves enzymatic cleavage of the glucuronides followed by solid-supported liquid-liquid extraction and derivatisation using a two-step reaction with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide and N-(trimethylsilyl)imidazole. The method proved to be both sensitive and reliable with detection limits ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 μg L(-1). In contrast to the frequent and distinct quantities of (1S,2S,4R)-limonene-1,2-diol, the (1R,2R,4R)-stereoisomer could not be detected. The expected metabolite of (+)-3-carene, 3-caren-10-ol was not detected in any of the samples. All other metabolites were detected in almost all urine samples. The procedure enables for the first time the analysis of trace levels of a broad spectrum of mono- and bicyclic monoterpenoid metabolites (alcohols, diols, and carboxylic acids) in human urine. This analytical procedure is a powerful tool for population studies as well as for the discovery of human metabolism and toxicokinetics of monoterpenes. PMID:23953203

  17. Analysis of the bovine plasma proteome by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Henning, Ann-Kristin; Groschup, Martin H; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Karger, Axel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the bovine plasma proteome was analysed using a three step protocol: (1) plasma was treated with a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) to assimilate the differences in concentrations of different proteins in raw plasma; (2) CPLL-treated material was fractionated by three standard electrophoretic separation techniques, and (3) samples were analysed by nano-liquid chromatography (nLC) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) time-of-flight tandem (TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry. The efficiencies of three fractionation protocols for plasma proteome analysis were compared. After size fractionation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), resolution of proteins was better and yields of identified proteins were higher than after charge-based fractionation by preparative gel-free isoelectric focussing. For proteins with isoelectric points >6 and molecular weights ⩾ 63 kDa, the best results were obtained with a 'shotgun' approach, in which the CPLL-treated plasma was digested and the peptides, rather than the proteins, were fractionated by gel-free isoelectric focussing. However, the three fractionation techniques were largely complementary, since only about one-third of the proteome was identified by each approach. PMID:24268478

  18. The analysis of beta-agonists by packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography with ultra-violet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Jones, D C; Dost, K; Davidson, G; George, M W

    1999-06-01

    Packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography (pSFC) using ultra-violet (UV) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) provides a versatile method for the identification and quantification of beta-agonists. We have achieved good separation of clenbuterol, salbutamol, terbutaline and fenoterol with good resolution and reasonable retention times using a high concentration of methanol modifier in the supercritical CO2, together with small amounts of both acidic (trifluoroacetic acid, TFAA) and basic (triethylamine, TEA, or diethylamine, DEA) additives. APCI-MS gave unambiguous identification of the 4 analytes, and increasing cone voltage provided informative fragmentation patterns. The pSFC-MS technique was shown to be linear (R2 > or = 0.996) over the concentration range 1-50 micrograms ml-1. Single ion monitoring (SIM) gave detection limits (on-column) of 2.5 ng (clenbuterol), 0.83 ng (terbutaline), 7.6 ng (salbutamol) and 2.7 ng (fenoterol). The pSFC-MS system was shown to be reproducible within a day, between days, and between restrictors. Analysis of milk samples 'spiked' with beta-agonists showed that the matrix caused no interference, with detection limits of approximately 500 micrograms l-1 of beta-agonists. More dilute solutions could be analysed by pre-concentration before the SFC stage. PMID:10736867

  19. Improvement in the Iatroscan thin-layer chromatographic-flame ionisation detection analysis of marine lipids. Separation and quantitation of monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols in standards and natural samples.

    PubMed

    Striby, L; Lafont, R; Goutx, M

    1999-07-23

    Mono- and diacylglycerols are important intermediates in glycerolipid biodegradation and intracellular signalling pathways. A method for mass determination of these lipid classes in marine particles was developed using the Iatroscan, which combines thin layer chromatography (TLC) and flame ionisation detection (FID) techniques. We improved existing protocols by adding two elution steps: hexane-diethyl-ether-formic acid (70:30:0.2, v/v/v) after triacylglycerol and free fatty acid scan, and acetone 100% followed by chloroform-acetone-formic acid (99:1:0.2, v/v/v) after 1,2 diacylglycerols. Diacylglycerol isomers 1,2 and 1,3 were separated from each other, as well as from free sterols in standards and marine lipids from sediment trap particles. Monoacylglycerols were separated from pigments and galactosyl-lipids in the same trap samples and in a rich pigment phytoplankton extract of Dunaliella viridis. Quantitation of each class in samples was performed after calibration with 0.5 to 2 micrograms of standards. As many as 17 lipid classes can be identified and quantified in samples using this proposed six-step development. PMID:10457435

  20. Real-time analysis of organic compounds in ship engine aerosol emissions using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation and proton transfer mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Radischat, Christian; Sippula, Olli; Stengel, Benjamin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Sklorz, Martin; Rabe, Rom; Streibel, Thorsten; Harndorf, Horst; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Organic combustion aerosols from a marine medium-speed diesel engine, capable to run on distillate (diesel fuel) and residual fuels (heavy fuel oil), were investigated under various operating conditions and engine parameters. The online chemical characterisation of the organic components was conducted using a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (REMPI TOF MS) and a proton transfer reaction-quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-QMS). Oxygenated species, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons were characterised. Especially the aromatic hydrocarbons and their alkylated derivatives were very prominent in the exhaust of both fuels. Emission factors of known health-hazardous compounds (e.g. mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons) were calculated and found in higher amounts for heavy fuel oil (HFO) at typical engine loadings. Lower engine loads lead in general to increasing emissions for both fuels for almost every compound, e.g. naphthalene emissions varied for diesel fuel exhaust between 0.7 mg/kWh (75 % engine load, late start of injection (SOI)) and 11.8 mg/kWh (10 % engine load, late SOI) and for HFO exhaust between 3.3 and 60.5 mg/kWh, respectively. Both used mass spectrometric techniques showed that they are particularly suitable methods for online monitoring of combustion compounds and very helpful for the characterisation of health-relevant substances. Graphical abstract Three-dimensional REMPI data of organic species in diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil exhaust. PMID:25600686

  1. Rapid monitoring of carvacrol in plants and herbal medicines using matrix solid-phase dispersion and gas chromatography flame ionisation detector.

    PubMed

    Rashidipour, Marzieh; Heydari, Rouhollah; Feizbakhsh, Alireza; Hashemi, Payman

    2015-01-01

    Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) method coupled with gas chromatography flame ionisation detector as a quick and easy extraction technique has been developed to extract carvacrol from plants and herbal medicines. Influence of important parameters on the MSPD method efficiency, such as the sorbent material, the ratio of sample to sorbent material, elution solvent and volume of the elution solvent has been evaluated and optimised. Carvacrol was successfully extracted by diatomaceous earth as sorbent with 350 μL of dichloromethane as elution solvent. The calibration curve showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9965) and precision (RSD < 8.16%) in the concentration range of 0.5-100 μg mL(-1) for carvacrol. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.1 and 0.5 μg mL(-1), respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 74.4-80.5% with relative standard deviation (RSD) values ranging from 8.4% to 9.8%. The reported MSPD extraction method revealed to be simpler and faster than conventional methods used to quantify carvacrol from plants and herbal medicines. PMID:25421885

  2. Elucidating the structure of carbon nanoparticles by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qin; Meng, Xiangpeng; Choi, Martin M F; Gong, Xiaojuan; Chan, Wan

    2016-03-10

    A fast and accurate ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) method was developed for the separation and structural elucidation of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (CNP). The CNP was synthesised from microwave-assisted pyrolysis of citric acid (CA) and 1,2-ethylenediamine (EDA). By using UPLC separation, the CNP product was well separated into ten fractions within 4.0 min. Based on high-accuracy MS and MS/MS analyses, the CNP species were revealed to display six kinds of chemical formulas, including (C10H20N4O5)n, (C8H12N2O5)n, (C16H22N4O9)n, (C6H8O7)n, (C14H18N2O11)n, and (C14H16N2O10)n. In particular, our study revealed for the first time that the CNP species exist as supramolecular clusters with their individual monomers units linked together through non-covalent bonding forces. These findings clearly indicated the usefulness of UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS in identifying the chemical composition of CNP product. It is anticipated that our proposed methodology can be applied to study the structure-property relationships of CNP, facilitating in the production of CNP with desirable spectral features. PMID:26893091

  3. A novel matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging based methodology for the identification of sexual assault suspects.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Robert; Wolstenholme, Rosalind; Blackledge, Robert D; Clench, Malcolm R; Ferguson, Leesa S; Francese, Simona

    2011-02-15

    An increase in the use of condoms by sexual offenders has been observed. This is likely to be due both to the risk of sexually transmitted diseases and to prevent the transfer of DNA evidence. In this scenario the detection of condom lubricants at a crime scene could aid in proving corpus delicti. Here we show a novel application of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) for mapping the fingermark ridge pattern simultaneously to the detection of the condom lubricant within the fingermark itself. Two condom brands have been investigated to prove the concept. Condoms were handled producing lubricant-contaminated fingermarks. Images of the ridge pattern were obtained simultaneously to the detection of two lubricants, even several weeks after the fingermark deposition. The results therefore show the potential of MALDI MSI to link the suspect (identification through fingermark ridge pattern) to the crime (detection of condom lubricant) in one analysis. This would enable forensic scientists to provide evidence with stronger support in alleged cases of sexual assault. PMID:21213360

  4. How do monomeric components of a polymer gel dosimeter respond to ionising radiation: A steady-state radiolysis towards preparation of a 3D polymer gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek

    2011-12-01

    Ionising radiation-induced reactions of aqueous single monomer solutions and mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in a steady-state condition are presented below and above gelation doses in order to highlight reactions in irradiated 3D polymer gel dosimeters, which are assigned for radiotherapy dosimetry. Both monomers are shown to undergo radical polymerisation and cross-linking, which result in the measured increase in molecular weight and radius of gyration of the formed polydisperse polymer coils. The formation of nanogels was also observed for Bis solutions at a low concentration. In the case of PEGDA-Bis mixtures, co-polymerisation is suggested as well. At a sufficiently high radiation dose, the formation of a polymer network was observed for both monomers and their mixture. For this reason a sol-gel analysis for PEGDA and Bis was performed gravimetrically and a proposition of an alternative to this method employing a nuclear magnetic resonance technique is made. The two monomers were used for preparation of 3D polymer gel dosimeters having the acronyms PABIG and PABIG nx. The latter is presented for the first time in this work and is a type of the formerly established PABIG polymer gel dosimeter. The elementary characteristics of the new composition are presented, underlining the ease of its preparation, low dose threshold, and slightly increased sensitivity but lower quasi-linear range of dose response in comparison to PABIG.

  5. Comprehensive metabolic profiling of mono- and polyglutamated folates and their precursors in plant and animal tissue using liquid chromatography/negative ion electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Lee C; Ortori, Catharine A; Tucker, Gregory A; Sablitzky, Fred; Bennett, Malcolm J; Barrett, David A

    2005-01-01

    This work reports the use of reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry for the simultaneous profiling of folate-based metabolites including natural folates, their polyglutamatyl derivatives and their biosynthetic precursors in plant and animal tissue. A simple sample preparation method, using 0.1% citric acid and ascorbic acid in ice-cold methanol, was used to extract and stabilise the folates, and three internal standards were used. Chromatography was on a C18 column using slow gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of methanol/water with 5 mM dimethylhexylamine. Mass spectrometric detection was performed by multiple reaction monitoring in seven separate time windows in negative ion mode over the 25 min run time. Full, quantitative analysis was obtained for 16 folates and a 'semi-quantitative' analysis was possible for all other folates with up to eight conjugated glutamate residues by reference to structurally related calibration standards. The precision, accuracy and recovery of the method were generally within the accepted guidelines for a quantitative bioanalytical method and the method was linear over the range 0.2 to 10 ng of individual folate per sample. The method was applied to profile mono- and polyglutamated tetrahydrofolates (including subcellular analysis) in a range of plant species, including Arabidopsis, spinach, Brassica and wheat; the technique was also successfully applied to the profiling of folates in mouse tissue. PMID:16047318

  6. The hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) exists in several forms as shown by electrospray-ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buzy, A; Millar, A L; Legros, V; Wilkins, P C; Dalton, H; Jennings, K R

    1998-06-15

    The hydroxylase of the soluble methane monooxygenase from the bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has been investigated by means of electrospray-ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and liquid chromatography ESI-MS (LC/ESI-MS). The hydroxylase is a non-heme diiron protein consisting of three pairs of non-identical subunits (alpha approximately 60 kDa, beta approximately 45 kDa and gamma approximately 20 kDa). Liquid chromatographic separation of the hydroxylase subunits was required before MS analysis in order to detect the alpha-subunit. The masses measured for the three subunits were found to disagree with those calculated from their gene sequences. Experiments involving the use of CNBr and trypsin cleavage followed by LC/ESI-MS and MS/MS analyses permitted the location and correction of errors in the sequences deduced from the use of cDNA. The ESI-MS results also showed that the alpha-subunit of the hydroxylase exists in multiple forms which result from cleavage of the protein. This observation explains a number of enigmatic features of the protein previously reported in the literature and illustrates the pivotal role of ESI-MS in complementing data obtained from molecular biology for the characterisation of the primary sequence of proteins. PMID:9688272

  7. Study of the relative response factors of various gas chromatograph-flame ionisation detector systems for measurement of C2-C9 hydrocarbons in air.

    PubMed

    Slemr, J; Slemr, F; D'Souza, H; Partridge, R

    2004-12-17

    The assumption of an instrument response that is linear with carbon number is frequently used to quantify atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) when using gas chromatography (GC) and detection by flame ionisation detector (FID). In order to assess the validity of this widely used method the results of intercomparison measurements by 14 laboratories across Europe were evaluated. The intercomparison measurements were made on synthetic, gravimetrically-prepared, gas mixtures containing 30 hydrocarbons (C2-C9) in the low ppbv range, using various different GC-FID systems. The response per carbon atom of GC-FID systems to individual NMHCs, relative to that of butane, were found to differ by more than 25% across different systems. The differences were mostly caused by analytical errors within particular GC-FID systems and to a more minor degree by systematic deviations related to the molecular structure. (Correction factors due to the molecular structure would lessen the differences, e.g. by about 5% for olefin compounds.) The differences were larger than 10% even after elimination of obvious outliers. Thus, calibration of GC-FID systems with multicomponent NMHC mixtures is found to be essential whenever the accuracy of NMHC measurements is required to be better than about 10%. If calibration by multicomponent gas mixtures is not possible and effective carbon atom response factors are used to quantify the individual NMHC compounds then the particular analytical system should be carefully characterised and its responses to individual compounds be verified. PMID:15633746

  8. Influence of ionisation zone motion in high power impulse magnetron sputtering on angular ion flux and NbO x film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Robert; Clavero, César; Kolbeck, Jonathan; Anders, André

    2016-02-01

    The ion energies and fluxes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma from a Nb target were analysed angularly resolved along the tangential direction of the racetrack. A reactive oxygen-containing atmosphere was used as such discharge conditions are typically employed for the synthesis of thin films. Asymmetries in the flux distribution of the recorded ions as well as their energies and charge states were noticed when varying the angle between mass-energy analyser and target surface. More positively charged ions with higher count rates in the medium energy range of their distributions were detected in +\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} than in -\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction, thus confirming the notion that ionisation zones (also known as spokes or plasma bunches) are associated with moving potential humps. The motion of the recorded negatively charged high-energy oxygen ions was unaffected. Nb{{\\text{O}}x} thin films at different angles and positions were synthesised and analysed as to their structure and properties in order to correlate the observed plasma properties to the film growth conditions. The chemical composition and the film thickness varied with changing deposition angle, where the latter, similar to the ion fluxes, was higher in +\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} than in -\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction.

  9. Co-mutation of histone H2AX S139A with Y142A rescues Y142A-induced ionising radiation sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James A.L.; Eykelenboom, John K.; Lowndes, Noel F.

    2012-01-01

    Under normal conditions histone H2AX is constitutively phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y) 142 by Williams–Beuren syndrome transcription factor kinase (WSTF). Following DNA double strand breaks (DSB), Y142 is de-phosphorylated and serine (S) 139 is phosphorylated. Here we explored DSB-dependent cross talk between H2AX residues S139 and Y142. H2axY142A mutation resulted in increased sensitivity to ionising radiation (IR), compared to H2axS139A. Interestingly, co-mutation of S139A and Y142A rescued IR sensitivity. The DSB response proteins 53Bp1 and Rad51 were recruited to IR-induced foci (IRIF) in H2axS139A, H2axY142A and H2axS139A/Y142A cells. Our results suggest that H2axY142A IR sensitivity is dependent upon the C-terminal residue, S139. PMID:23772364

  10. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis and High Risk Individuals.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma

  11. Cancer of the Uterus (Endometrial Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Cancer of the Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] Home For Patients Search FAQs Cancer of the ... Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] FAQ097, May 2011 PDF Format Cancer of the Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] Gynecologic Problems What ...

  12. Multiscale approach predictions for biological outcomes in ion-beam cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    Ion-beam therapy provides advances in cancer treatment, offering the possibility of excellent dose localization and thus maximising cell-killing within the tumour. The full potential of such therapy can only be realised if the fundamental mechanisms leading to lethal cell damage under ion irradiation are well understood. The key question is whether it is possible to quantitatively predict macroscopic biological effects caused by ion radiation on the basis of physical and chemical effects related to the ion-medium interactions on a nanometre scale. We demonstrate that the phenomenon-based MultiScale Approach to the assessment of radiation damage with ions gives a positive answer to this question. We apply this approach to numerous experiments where survival curves were obtained for different cell lines and conditions. Contrary to other, in essence empirical methods for evaluation of macroscopic effects of ionising radiation, the MultiScale Approach predicts the biodamage based on the physical effects related to ionisation of the medium, transport of secondary particles, chemical interactions, thermo-mechanical pathways of biodamage, and heuristic biological criteria for cell survival. We anticipate this method to give great impetus to the practical improvement of ion-beam cancer therapy and the development of more efficient treatment protocols. PMID:27297618

  13. Multiscale approach predictions for biological outcomes in ion-beam cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov’Yov, Andrey V.

    2016-06-01

    Ion-beam therapy provides advances in cancer treatment, offering the possibility of excellent dose localization and thus maximising cell-killing within the tumour. The full potential of such therapy can only be realised if the fundamental mechanisms leading to lethal cell damage under ion irradiation are well understood. The key question is whether it is possible to quantitatively predict macroscopic biological effects caused by ion radiation on the basis of physical and chemical effects related to the ion-medium interactions on a nanometre scale. We demonstrate that the phenomenon-based MultiScale Approach to the assessment of radiation damage with ions gives a positive answer to this question. We apply this approach to numerous experiments where survival curves were obtained for different cell lines and conditions. Contrary to other, in essence empirical methods for evaluation of macroscopic effects of ionising radiation, the MultiScale Approach predicts the biodamage based on the physical effects related to ionisation of the medium, transport of secondary particles, chemical interactions, thermo-mechanical pathways of biodamage, and heuristic biological criteria for cell survival. We anticipate this method to give great impetus to the practical improvement of ion-beam cancer therapy and the development of more efficient treatment protocols.

  14. Multiscale approach predictions for biological outcomes in ion-beam cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov’yov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Ion-beam therapy provides advances in cancer treatment, offering the possibility of excellent dose localization and thus maximising cell-killing within the tumour. The full potential of such therapy can only be realised if the fundamental mechanisms leading to lethal cell damage under ion irradiation are well understood. The key question is whether it is possible to quantitatively predict macroscopic biological effects caused by ion radiation on the basis of physical and chemical effects related to the ion-medium interactions on a nanometre scale. We demonstrate that the phenomenon-based MultiScale Approach to the assessment of radiation damage with ions gives a positive answer to this question. We apply this approach to numerous experiments where survival curves were obtained for different cell lines and conditions. Contrary to other, in essence empirical methods for evaluation of macroscopic effects of ionising radiation, the MultiScale Approach predicts the biodamage based on the physical effects related to ionisation of the medium, transport of secondary particles, chemical interactions, thermo-mechanical pathways of biodamage, and heuristic biological criteria for cell survival. We anticipate this method to give great impetus to the practical improvement of ion-beam cancer therapy and the development of more efficient treatment protocols. PMID:27297618

  15. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  16. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  17. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  18. Diet and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... DIET AND BREAST CANCER The link between nutrition and breast cancer has been well studied. To reduce risk of breast cancer the American ...

  19. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  20. Radon and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  1. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  2. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Cancer Center History Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners ... Profiles in Cancer Research Outstanding Investigator Award Recipients ...

  3. Endometrial Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  4. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  5. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bladder cancer Breast cancer Colon cancer Kidney cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Sarcoma Wilms tumor Symptoms Symptoms may ... Breast cancer Cancer Chemotherapy Colon cancer Lung cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Radiation therapy Wilms tumor Update Date ...

  6. Analysis of the monosaccharide composition of water-soluble polysaccharides from Sargassum fusiforme by high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodan; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Jiajia; Yu, Ying; Wu, Bin

    2014-02-15

    Sargassum fusiforme (hijiki) is the well-known edible algae, whose polysaccharides have been proved to possess interesting bioactivities like antitumor, antioxidant, antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. A facile and sensitive method based on high-performance liquid chromatography method of pre-column derivatization with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) coupled with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS) has been established for the analysis of the monosaccharide composition of polysaccharides in S. fusiforme. Monosaccharides have been converted into PMP-labelled derivatives with aqueous ammonia as a catalyst at 70 °C for 30 min. The optimisation of the pre-column derivatization process was studied. The LODs of the monosaccharides were in the range from 0.01 to 0.02 nmol. PMP-labelled mixture of monosaccharides has been well separated by a reverse-phase HPLC and detected by on-line ESI-MS method under optimised conditions. The mobile phase of elution system was chosen as acetonitrile (solvent A) and 20mM aqueous ammonium acetate (solvent B) (pH 3.0) with Zorbax XDB-C18 column at 30 °C for the separation of the monosaccharide derivatives. Identification of the monosaccharides composition was carried out by analysis with mass spectral behaviour and chromatography characteristics of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) labelled monosaccharides. All PMP-labelled derivatives display high chemical stabilities, whose regular MS fragmentation is specific for reducing labelled sugars. The result showed that the S. fusiforme polysaccharide consisted of mannose, glucose, galactose, xylose, fucose and glucuronic acid or galacturonic acid, or both uronic acids. PMID:24128572

  7. Histidine-containing host-defence skin peptides of anurans bind Cu2+. An electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and computational modelling study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfang; Andreazza, Hayley J; Pukala, Tara L; Sherman, Patrick J; Calabrese, Antonio N; Bowie, John H

    2011-05-15

    Anuran peptides which contain His, including caerin 1.8 (GLFKVLGSVAKHLLPHVVPVIAEKL-NH(2)), caerin 1.2 (GLLGVLGSVAKHVLPHVVPVIAEHL-NH(2)), Ala(15) maculatin 1.1 (GLFGVLAKVAAHVVAIEHF-NH(2)), fallaxidin 4.1 (GLLSFLPKVIGHLIHPPS-OH), riparin 5.1 (IVSYPDDAGEHAHKMG-NH(2)) and signiferin 2.1 (IIGHLIKTALGMLGL-NH(2)), all form MMet(2+) and (M + Met(2+)-2H(+))(2+) cluster ions (where Met is Cu, Mg and Zn) following electrospray ionisation (ESI) in a Waters QTOF 2 mass spectrometer. Peaks due to Cu(II) complexes are always the most abundant relative to other metal complexes. Information concerning metal(2+) connectivity in a complex has been obtained (at least in part) using b and y fragmentation data from ESI collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID MS/MS). Theoretical calculations, using AMBER version 10, show that MCu(2+) complexes with the membrane active caerin 1.8, Ala(15) maculatin 1.1 and fallaxidin 4.1 are four-coordinate and approximating square planar, with ligands including His and Lys, together with the carbonyl oxygens of particular backbone amide groups. When binding can occur through two His, or one His and one Lys, the His/Lys ligand structure is the more stable for the studied systems. The three-dimensional (3D) structures of the complexes are always different from the previously determined structures of the uncomplexed model peptides (using 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in membrane-mimicking solvents like trifluoroethanol/water). PMID:21488120

  8. The Vitamin D, Ionised Calcium and Parathyroid Hormone Axis of Cerebral Capillary Function: Therapeutic Considerations for Vascular-Based Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Virginie; Takechi, Ryusuke; Pallabage-Gamarallage, Menuka; Giles, Corey; Mamo, John C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterised by brain parenchymal extravasation of plasma proteins may contribute to risk of neurodegenerative disorders, however the mechanisms for increased capillary permeability are not understood. Increasing evidence suggests vitamin D confers central nervous system benefits and there is increasing demand for vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may influence the CNS via modulation of capillary function, however such effects may be indirect as it has a central role in maintaining calcium homeostasis, in concert with calcium regulatory hormones. This study utilised an integrated approach and investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation, parathyroid tissue ablation (PTX), or exogenous infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cerebral capillary integrity. Parenchymal extravasation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) was used as a marker of cerebral capillary permeability. In C57BL/6J mice and Sprague Dawley rats, dietary vitamin D was associated with exaggerated abundance of IgG within cerebral cortex (CTX) and hippocampal formation (HPF). Vitamin D was also associated with increased plasma ionised calcium (iCa) and decreased PTH. A response to dose was suggested and parenchymal effects persisted for up to 24 weeks. Ablation of parathyroid glands increased CTX- and HPF-IgG abundance concomitant with a reduction in plasma iCa. With the provision of PTH, iCa levels increased, however the PTH treated animals did not show increased cerebral permeability. Vitamin D supplemented groups and rats with PTH-tissue ablation showed modestly increased parenchymal abundance of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astroglial activation. PTH infusion attenuated GFAP abundance. The findings suggest that vitamin D can compromise capillary integrity via a mechanism that is independent of calcium homeostasis. The effects of exogenous vitamin D supplementation on capillary function and in the context of prevention of vascular

  9. Increasing sensitivity and decreasing spot size using an inexpensive, removable hydrophobic coating for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation plates.

    PubMed

    Owen, Stacey J; Meier, Felix S; Brombacher, Stephan; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2003-01-01

    Spot size reduction and increased detection sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) of small molecules are accomplished by using an inexpensive and removable hydrophobic coating for MALDI targets, based on 3M Scotch Gard surface treatment. Several variations in sample preparation were explored, such as surface coating technique, identity of the matrix, solvent composition, and the type of metal support plate used. These were investigated on both uncoated and coated surfaces and their impact on spot size, crystal coverage, and sensitivity is presented here. Additionally, crystallisation behaviour obtained on coated plates is compared with that on uncoated plates using scanning electron microscope analysis. To demonstrate the potential of the new coating technique, erythromycin A and valinomycin are studied to determine the increase in detection sensitivity of coated plates in comparison to uncoated plates, and to reveal the suitability of the plates for application in combined high-performance liquid chromatography/MALDI (HPLC/MALDI), where widely varying solvent compositions and droplet volumes are observed. It is shown that enhancements in detection sensitivities correlate very well with the achieved spot size reduction. The versatility of the coated plates is also exhibited by the ease of removing the surface layer, after which the plates can be rigorously cleaned without worry about damaging the hydrophobic surface, followed by a quick reapplication of new hydrophobic coating material. This makes the non-polar coating superior to more expensive commercial hydrophobic-coated targets, which are much more delicate to clean. Furthermore, cleaning and reapplication eliminate potential carry-over effects and the easy application procedure also makes the fabrication of inexpensive, disposable MALDI targets readily possible. PMID:14587091

  10. On-line measurements of α-pinene ozonolysis products using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion-trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warscheid, Bettina; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    An on-line technique to investigate complex organic oxidation reactions in environmental chamber experiments is presented. The method is based on the direct introduction of the chamber air into an atmospheric pressure ion source of a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer. To demonstrate the analytical potential of the method (atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation/mass spectrometry, APCI/MS), the ozonolysis of α-pinene was investigated in a series of experiments performed in various sized reaction chambers at atmospheric pressure and 296 K in synthetic air. Investigations were focussed on the influence of the water vapour concentration on the formation of the predominant oxidation product, pinonaldehyde, derived from the α-pinene/ozone reaction. Quantification of pinonaldehyde was achieved by conducting a standard addition technique. The molar yield of pinonaldehyde was found to depend strongly on the actual water vapour concentration between <1 and 80% relative humidity. Starting with an average yield of 0.23±0.05 at dry conditions, pinonaldehyde formation was approximately doubled by reaching a yield of 0.53±0.05 at a relative humidity of around 60%. Furthermore, the formation mechanism of pinonaldehyde was investigated in greater detail using isotopically labelled water. Applying on-line APCI/MS, pinonaldehyde formation under incorporation of 18O was observed, strongly supporting the reaction of the stabilised Criegee radical with water in the gas phase as suggested by Alvarado et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research 103 (1998) 25541-25551). Furthermore, the mass spectra recorded on-line were used to perform a semi-quantitative estimation of the decomposition pathway of the primary ozonide, indicating a branching ratio of 0.35/0.65.

  11. Real-time Measurement of Secondary Organic Aerosols From The Photo-oxidation of Toluene Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionisation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, F.; Arias, M. C.; Merritt, J. V.; Hastie, D. R.

    A system has been developed to study the chemical composition of secondary or- ganic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of hydrocarbons using real-time atmo- spheric pressure chemical ionisation triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (APCI/MS- MS) analysis. To complement existing work with a smog chamber, a two-litre dynamic reaction cell has been built. This has a residence time of around two minutes (instead of several hours for smog chamber experiments), thus permitting on-line analysis. Sample gases are introduced into the air stream and irradiated by a 1000 W xenon arc lamp. Af- ter dilution, some of the mixture from the reaction cell is introduced in the MS ion source via a heated probe, with the particle number density being determined by a condensation nucleus counter on the remainder. The focus so far has been on SOA from the photo-oxidation of toluene by HO radicals in presence of NO, with the HO radicals being generated by the photolysis of Isopy- lNitrite (IPN). Prior to performing analyses on the SOA, target compounds (detected in the particulate phase in other studies) were selected and three ions designated to make a fingerprint for each compound. Finally, by using either a denuder, a granu- lar bed diffusion battery or a filter, both gas and particulate phases have been studied independently and compared. Preliminary results show that a number of target compounds, such as methylglyoxylic acid, benzaldehyde or cresol, have been detected in both gas and particulate phases. Most of these compounds appear to be present mainly in the gas phase. An exhaustive identification of organic compounds is a part of the on-going work.

  12. A quick and easy method to identify bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pennanec, Xaviera; Dufour, Alain; Haras, Dominique; Réhel, Karine

    2010-02-01

    Concerns with water quality have increased in recent years, in part due to the more frequent contamination of water by pathogens like E. coli and L. pneumophila. Current methods for the typing of bacteria in water samples are based on culture of samples on specific media. These techniques are time-consuming, subject to the impact of interferents and do not totally meet all the requirements of prevention. There is a need for accurate and rapid identification of these microorganisms. This report deals with the detection of bacteria, more precisely of Legionella spp., and the development of an analytical strategy for a rapid and unambiguous identification of these pathogens in water from diverse origins. Therefore, a protein mass mapping using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) of whole bacteria combined with a home-made database of bacteria spectra is applied. A large variety of different bacteria and microorganisms is used to approach the actual composition of samples with numerous interferents. The objective is to propose a universal method for sampling preparation before MALDI MS analysis and optimised spectrometric conditions for reproducible intense peaks. Several experimental factors known to influence signal quality such as time and media of culture have been studied. The proposed method gives promising results for a sure differentiation of Legionella species and subspecies and a rapid identification of bacteria which are the most dangerous or difficult to eradicate. This method is easy to perform with an excellent reproducibility. The analytical protocol and the corresponding database were validated on samples from different origins (cooling tower, plumbing hot water). PMID:20049880

  13. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry: rapid identification of bacteria isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Baillie, S; Ireland, K; Warwick, S; Wareham, D; Wilks, M

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research into the diagnosis and management of cystic fibrosis (CF) over the past decades, sufferers still have a median life expectancy of less than 37 years. Respiratory tract infections have a significant role in increasing the morbidity and mortality of patients with CF via a progressive decline in lung function. Rapid identification of organisms recovered from CF sputum is necessary for effective management of respiratory tract infections; however, standard techniques of identification are slow, technically demanding and expensive. The aim of this study is to asses the suitability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in identifying bacteria isolated from the respiratory tract of patients with CF, and is assessed by testing the accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS in identifying samples from a reference collection of rare CF strains in conjunction with comparing MALDI-TOF MS and standard techniques in identifying clinical isolates from sputum samples of CF patients. MALDI-TOF MS accurately identified 100% of isolates from the reference collection of rare CF pathogens (EuroCare CF collection). The isolate identification given by MALDI-TOF MS agreed with that given by standard techniques for 479/481 (99.6%) clinical isolates obtained from respiratory samples provided by patients with CE In two (0.4%) of 481 samples there was a discrepancy in identification between MALDI-TOF MS and standard techniques. One organism was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by MALDI-TOF but could only be identified by the laboratory's standard methods as of the Pseudomonas genus. The second organism was identified as P. beteli by MALDI-TOF MS and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia by standard methods. This study shows that MALDI-TOF MS is superior to standard techniques in providing cheap, rapid and accurate identification of CF sputum isolates. PMID:24400425

  14. Chemical study of triterpenoid resinous materials in archaeological findings by means of direct exposure electron ionisation mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Modugno, Francesca; Ribechini, Erika; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2006-01-01

    A systematic study of standard triterpenes (alpha-amyrine, oleanolic acid, betulin, lupeol, betulinic acid and lupenone) and of raw resinous materials (frankincense resin, mastic resin and birch bark pitch) was performed using direct exposure electron ionisation mass spectrometry (DE-MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). DE-MS provides a mass spectral fingerprint of organic materials in a few minutes which highlights the compounds that are the main components in the sample. The application of principal component analysis (PCA) on DE-MS data in the mass ranges m/z 181-260 and m/z 331-500, corresponding to the fragmentation of triterpenoid molecules, enabled us to distinguish between different triterpenoid materials such as mastic resin, frankincense resin and birch bark pitch, and to graphically plot the resinous substances in three separate clusters, retaining 89% of the total variance. GC/MS analysis of the same materials has permitted us to elucidate in detail the molecular composition and to identify minor components and species that act as markers of the degradation undergone by the materials. The paper also reports the results for the organic residues contained in an Egyptian censer (5th-7th century AD) which was recovered in the excavation of the Necropolis of Antinoe (Egypt), and for the hafting material found on a Palaeolithic tool recovered at the site of Campitello (Arezzo, Tuscany), dating back to the Mid-Pleistocene period. Although DE-MS was found to be a fast analytical tool, it failed to give any information on the presence of less abundant compounds when applied to mixtures of different materials: only mastic resin was found in the residues from the Roman censer, whereas GC/MS analysis identified the presence of a vegetable oil from Brassicaceae seeds and Pinaceae resin. Birch bark pitch as a pure material was identified in the sample from the Palaeolithic flint flake using both procedures. PMID:16676320

  15. The level of serum ionised calcium, aspartate aminotransferase, insulin, glucose, betahydroxybutyrate concentrations and blood gas parameters in cows with left displacement of abomasum.

    PubMed

    Sen, I; Ok, M; Coskun, A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine concentrations of serum glucose, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), insulin, beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOH) and ionised calcium (Ica) in dairy cows with left displaced abomasum (LDA) and to compare these parameters before and after surgical correction of LDA. Eighteen Swiss-Holstein dairy cows with LDA were used in this study. Clinically healthy post parturient cows (n: 10) from a local dairy farm were used as control group. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein from all the cows. Surgery was performed in cows with LDA. Blood samples from cows with LDA were collected 24 hours after surgery. The abomasum was repositioned followed by an omentopexy. Six of the 18 cows with LDA had clinical ketosis as detected with urine dipstick. The mean concentrations of insulin, BOH, glucose and AST in cows with LDA at admission time were increased compared with the healthy cows. But the mean concentration of ICa at admission time was slightly decreased compared with healthy cows. The mean BOH concentration was decreased 24 hours following surgery compared with values on admission time. However, the mean serum AST levels were increased both at admission time and 24 hours after surgery compared with healthy cows. The levels of blood gas parameters in cows with LDA were not significantly different in comparison with healthy cows, although hyperbasemia in six of 18 cows with LDA was determined. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that serum insulin, glucose, AST and BOH levels were increased in dairy cows with LDA. Serum BOH and ICa levels were decreased 24 hours after surgery compared with values on admission time. All cows with LDA used in this study had subclinical/clinical ketosis. We could say that ketosis might be a risk factor for the displacement of the abomasum. PMID:17203740

  16. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  17. Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Primary liver cancer starts in the liver. Metastatic liver ... and spreads to your liver. Risk factors for primary liver cancer include Having hepatitis B or C ...

  18. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  19. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  20. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  1. Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  2. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  3. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  4. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  5. Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  6. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells grow and die in a controlled way. Cancer cells keep forming without control. Chemotherapy is drug ... Your course of therapy will depend on the cancer type, the chemotherapy drugs used, the treatment goal ...

  7. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial cancer ... In the United States, bladder cancer usually starts from the cells lining the bladder. These cells are called transitional cells. These tumors are classified by the way ...

  8. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  9. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  10. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and cervical cancer cannot be seen with the naked eye. Special tests and tools are needed to ... Pap smears and cervical cancer References Committee on Adolescent Health Care of the American College of Obstetricians ...

  11. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in the cells of the retina. ... from other parts of the body. Treatment for eye cancer varies by the type and by how advanced ...

  12. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  13. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ... and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to ...

  14. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  15. Cancer treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. Targeted treatment zeroes in on specific targets (molecules) in cancer cells. These targets play a role ... Cryotherapy Also called cryosurgery , this therapy uses very cold gas to freeze and kill cancer cells. It ...

  16. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of ovarian cancer Already been diagnosed with ovarian cancer to determine how well treatment is working Other tests that may be done include: Complete blood count and blood chemistry Pregnancy test (serum HCG) CT or MRI of ...

  17. Occupational Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carcinogen List Cancer Clusters Cancer Policy at NIOSH Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) Related Topics Asbestos ... Toxicology Program Report on Carcinogens NIOSH Pocket Guide Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) Recent NIOSH Research ...

  18. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  19. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  20. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... red or processed meats Have colorectal polyps Have inflammatory bowel disease ( Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis ) Have a family history of colon cancer Have a personal history of breast cancer Some inherited diseases also increase the risk ...

  1. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of treatments. They may include surgery, radioactive iodine, hormone treatment, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  2. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  3. Cancer Triptych.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Sandra L

    2016-08-01

    The author uses personal narrative to show how the cold cloak of cancer covered her family during the polar vortex of 2013-2014. The use of a triptych form hinges together related themes of containment, coping, communicative responses, and social support after a cancer diagnosis. This narrative demonstrates the multiple responses and communicative coping strategies to a cancer diagnosis. PMID:26752448

  4. Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of ... undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your ...

  5. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  6. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  7. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it. PMID:27533387

  8. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cells , tiny units that make up all living things. Cancer (also known as malignancy , pronounced: muh-LIG- ... cancer and cancer treatments can disrupt a person's life for a while. People ... to take care of the things they have to get done. For example, teens ...

  9. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysplasia of the cervix, vagina, or vulva • A family history of cervical cancer •Smoking •Certain sexually transmitted infections , such as chlamydia • ... to treat your cancer, you still need cervical cancer screening. Cells are taken from the upper vagina ... smallest units of a structure in the body; the building blocks for all ...

  10. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  11. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  12. Throat or larynx cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long time ...

  13. National Cancer Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  14. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  15. Secondhand Smoke and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  16. Psychological Stress and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  17. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  18. Snapshot of Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  19. Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  20. Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  1. Biological Therapies for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  2. Snapshot of Pediatric Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  3. Head and Neck Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  4. Helicobacter pylori and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  5. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  6. Snapshot of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  7. Throat or larynx cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... or use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Research Clinical Trials Global Health Key ... Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials Global Health Key Initiatives ...

  9. In situ formation and characterisation of singly ionised atomic europium in rare gas matrices—Luminescence spectroscopy and MP2 calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Owen; Davis, Barry; McCaffrey, John G.

    2015-02-07

    , providing a temporary trap for the ionised electron in the matrices.

  10. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS analysis being faster than

  11. Homogeneous sample preparation for automated high throughput analysis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Onnerfjord, P; Ekström, S; Bergquist, J; Nilsson, J; Laurell, T; Marko-Varga, G

    1999-01-01

    This work presents a simple method for obtaining homogeneous sample surfaces in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) for the automated analysis of peptides and proteins. The sample preparation method is based on applying the sample/matrix mixture onto a pre-deposited highly diluted matrix spot. The pre-deposited crystals act as seeds for the new sample containing crystals which become much smaller in size and more evenly distributed than with conventional methods. This 'seed-layer' method was developed, optimised and compared with the dried-droplet method using peptides and proteins in the 1000-20,000 Da range. The seed-layer method increases the surface homogeneity, spot to spot reproducibility and sample washability as compared with the commonly used dried-droplet method. This methodology is applicable to alpha-cyanohydroxycinnamic acid, sinapinic acid and ferulic acid, which all form homogeneous crystal surfaces. Within-spot variation and between-spot variation was investigated using statistics at a 95% confidence level (n = 36). The statistical values were generated from more than 5000 data points collected from 500 spectra. More than 90% of the sample locations results in high intensity spectra with relatively low standard deviations (RSDs). Typically obtained data showed an RSD of 19-35% within a sample spot as well as in-between spots for proteins, and an RSD of < or = 50% for peptides. Linear calibration curves were obtained within one order of magnitude using internal calibration with a point-RSD of 3% (n = 10). The sample homogeneity allows mass spectra (average of 16 laser shots) to be obtained on each individual sample within 15 sec, whereby a 100 spot target plate can be run in 25 min. High density target plates using the seed-layer method were prepared by spotting approximately 100 picoliter droplets onto the target, resulting in sample spots < or = 500 microns in diameter using a flow

  12. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  13. Ionisation induced collapse of minihaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Trevor

    2013-08-01

    In order to analyse the turbine blade life, the damage due to the combined thermal and mechanical loads should be adequately accounted for. This is more challenging when detailed component geometry is limited. Therefore, a compromise between the level of geometric detail and the complexity of the lifing method to be implemented would be necessary. This research focuses on how the life assessment of aero engine turbine blades can be done, considering the balance between available design inputs and adequate level of fidelity. Accordingly, the thesis contributes to developing a generic turbine blade lifing method that is based on the engine thermodynamic cycle; as well as integrating critical design/technological factors and operational parameters that influence the aero engine blade life. To this end, thermo-mechanical fatigue was identified as the critical damage phenomenon driving the life of the turbine blade.. The developed approach integrates software tools and numerical models created using the minimum design information typically available at the early design stages. Using finite element analysis of an idealised blade geometry, the approach captures relevant impacts of thermal gradients and thermal stresses that contribute to the thermo-mechanical fatigue damage on the gas turbine blade. The blade life is evaluated using the Neu/Sehitoglu thermo-mechanical fatigue model that considers damage accumulation due to fatigue, oxidation, and creep. The leading edge is examined as a critical part of the blade to estimate the damage severity for different design factors and operational parameters. The outputs of the research can be used to better understand how the environment and the operating conditions of the aircraft affect the blade life consumption and therefore what is the impact on the maintenance cost and the availability of the propulsion system. This research also finds that the environmental (oxidation) effect drives the blade life and the blade coolant side was the critical location. Furthermore, a parametric and sensitivity study of the Neu/Sehitoglu model parameters suggests that in addition to four previously reported parameters, the sensitivity of the phasing to oxidation damage would be critical to overall blade life..

  14. Determination and separation of bisphenol A, phthalate metabolites and structural isomers of parabens in human urine with conventional high-pressure liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Myridakis, Antonis; Balaska, Eirini; Gkaitatzi, Christina; Kouvarakis, Antonis; Stephanou, Euripides G

    2015-03-01

    Phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA) and parabens (PBs), organic chemicals widely used in everyday products, are considered to be endocrine disruptors. We propose a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of seven phthalate metabolites, six PBs and BPA in human urine. All three categories of the above endocrine disruptors were simultaneously extracted from 1 mL of human urine using solid phase extraction. In addition, with a conventional reversed phase LC column, we achieved for the first time the separation of three pairs of structural isomers, namely iso-/n-butyl paraben, propyl paraben and monobutyl phthalate. LC-MS/MS was operated and tested in both electrospray ionisation (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI). ESI was selected for the analysis due to its superior stability and repeatability. The method limit of detection (mLOD), achieved for a single set of high-performance LC conditions, ranged from 0.01 to 0.84 ng/mL for phthalate metabolites, from 0.06 to 0.24 ng/mL for PBs and was 2.01 ng/mL for BPA. Derivatisation of BPA with dansyl chloride lowered its mLOD to 0.007 ng/mL. Blank contamination was non-detectable. The present method was successfully applied for the analysis of the above-mentioned compounds in 80 male human urine samples. PMID:25644523

  15. Real-time analysis of aromatics in combustion engine exhaust by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOF-MS): a robust tool for chassis dynamometer testing.

    PubMed

    Adam, T W; Clairotte, M; Streibel, T; Elsasser, M; Pommeres, A; Manfredi, U; Carriero, M; Martini, G; Sklorz, M; Krasenbrink, A; Astorga, C; Zimmermann, R

    2012-07-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOF-MS) is a robust method for real-time analysis of monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in complex emissions. A mobile system has been developed which enables direct analysis on site. In this paper, we utilize a multicomponent calibration scheme based on the analytes' photo-ionisation cross-sections relative to a calibrated species. This allows semi-quantification of a great number of components by only calibrating one compound of choice, here toluene. The cross-sections were determined by injecting nebulised solutions of aromatic compounds into the TOF-MS ion source with the help of a HPLC pump. Then, REMPI-TOF-MS was implemented at various chassis dynamometers and test cells and the exhaust of the following vehicles and engines investigated: a compression ignition light-duty (LD) passenger car, a compression ignition LD van, two spark ignition LD passenger cars, 2 two-stroke mopeds, and a two-stroke engine of a string gas trimmer. The quantitative time profiles of benzene are shown. The results indicate that two-stroke engines are a significant source for toxic and cancerogenic compounds. Air pollution and health effects caused by gardening equipment might still be underestimated. PMID:22644155

  16. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  17. Developing an in silico model of the modulation of base excision repair using methoxyamine for more targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Avadhani, Sriya; Liu, Lili; Kinsella, Timothy J; Loparo, Kenneth A

    2013-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a major DNA repair pathway involved in the processing of exogenous non-bulky base damages from certain classes of cancer chemotherapy drugs as well as ionising radiation (IR). Methoxyamine (MX) is a small molecule chemical inhibitor of BER that is shown to enhance chemotherapy and/or IR cytotoxicity in human cancers. In this study, the authors have analysed the inhibitory effect of MX on the BER pathway kinetics using a computational model of the repair pathway. The inhibitory effect of MX depends on the BER efficiency. The authors have generated variable efficiency groups using different sets of protein concentrations generated by Latin hypercube sampling, and they have clustered simulation results into high, medium and low efficiency repair groups. From analysis of the inhibitory effect of MX on each of the three groups, it is found that the inhibition is most effective for high efficiency BER, and least effective for low efficiency repair. PMID:23847811

  18. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

  19. Dose- and time-response for breast cancer risk after radiation therapy for benign breast disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, A.; Rudén, B. I.; Palmgren, J.; Rutqvist, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of the breast to ionising radiation increases the risk of breast cancer, especially among young women. However, some issues remain controversial, for instance the shape of the dose-response curve and the expression of time-related excess. The main purpose of this report was to examine the dose-response curves for radiation-induced breast cancer formulated according to radiobiological target theories. Another purpose was to analyse the time-related excess of breast cancer risk after exposure when dose and age at first exposure were held constant. Breast cancer incidence was analysed in a cohort of 3090 women diagnosed with benign breast disease during 1925-61 (median age 37 years). Of these, 1216 were treated with radiation therapy. The dose range was 0-50 Gy (mean 5.8 Gy). The incidence rate as function of dose was analysed using a linear-quadratic Poisson regression model. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive and multiplicative models were compared in estimating the time-related excess. The analysis, which was based on 278 breast cancer cases, showed a linear dose-response relationship at low to medium dose levels with a cell-killing effect of 5% Gy-1 (95% confidence interval 2-9%). For a given absorbed dose and age at first exposure the time-related excess was proportional to the background rates with a suggestion that the excess remains throughout life. PMID:7547222

  20. Contagious cancer.

    PubMed

    Welsh, James S

    2011-01-01

    Although cancer can on occasion be caused by infectious agents such as specific bacteria, parasites, and viruses, it is not generally considered a transmissible disease. In rare circumstances, however, direct communication from one host to another has been documented. The Tasmanian devil is now threatened with extinction in the wild because of a fatal transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). Another example is canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT or Sticker's sarcoma) in dogs. There is a vast difference in prognosis between these two conditions. DFTD is often fatal within 6 months, whereas most cases of CTVT are eventually rejected by the host dog, who then is conferred lifelong immunity. In man, only scattered case reports exist about such communicable cancers, most often in the setting of organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplants and cancers arising during pregnancy that are transmitted to the fetus. In about one third of cases, transplant recipients develop cancers from donor organs from individuals who were found to harbor malignancies after the transplantation. The fact that two thirds of the time cancer does not develop, along with the fact that cancer very rarely is transmitted from person to person, supports the notion that natural immunity prevents such cancers from taking hold in man. These observations might hold invaluable clues to the immunobiology and possible immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:21212437

  1. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  2. Cell injury, retrodifferentiation and the cancer treatment paradox.

    PubMed

    Uriel, José

    2015-09-01

    This "opinion article" is an attempt to take an overview of some significant changes that have happened in our understanding of cancer status during the last half century and its evolution under the progressive influence of molecular biology. As an active worker in cancer research and developmental biology during most of this period, I would like to comment briefly on these changes and to give my critical appreciation of their outcome as it affects our knowledge of cancer development as well as the current treatment of the disease. A recall of my own contribution to the subject is also included. Two subjects are particularly developed: cell injury and cell-killing therapies. Cell injury, whatever its origin, has acquired the status of a pivotal event for the initiation of cancer emergence. It is postulated that cell injury, a potential case of cellular death, may also be the origin of a process of stepwise cell reversion (retrodifferentiation or retroprogrammation) leading, by division, mature or stem cells to progressive immaturity. The genetic instability and mutational changes that accompanies this process of cell injury and rejuvenation put normal cells in a status favourable to neoplastic transformation or may evolve cancer cells toward clones with higher malignant potentiality. Thus, cell injury suggests lifestyle as the major upstream initiator of cancer development although this not exclude randomness as an unavoidable contributor to the disease. Cell-killing agents (mainly cytotoxic drugs and radiotherapy) are currently used to treat cancer. At the same time, it is agreed that agents with high cell injury potential (ultraviolet light, ionising radiations, tobacco, environmental pollutants, etc.) contribute to the emergence of malignant tumours. This represents a real paradox. In spite of the progress accomplished in cancer survival, one is tempted to suggest that we have very few chances of really cure cancer as long as we continue to treat malignancies

  3. Uterine Cancer: Cancer of the Uterus

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheet ePublications Uterine cancer: Cancer of the uterus fact sheet Print this fact sheet Uterine cancer: Cancer ... U.S. federal government and is in the public domain. This public information is not copyrighted and may ...

  4. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  5. Medical exposure to radiation and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, S J; Lee, C; Berrington de González, A

    2011-05-01

    In 2008, the worldwide estimated age-standardised incidence rates for thyroid cancer incidence were 4.7 and 1.5 per 100,000 women and men, respectively. Thyroid cancer's overall contribution to the worldwide cancer burden is relatively small, but incidence rates have increased over the last three decades throughout the world. This trend has been hypothesised to reflect a combination of technological advances enabling increased detection, but also changes in environmental factors, including population exposure to ionising radiation from fallout, diagnostic tests and treatment for benign and malignant conditions. Studies of the atomic bomb survivors and populations treated with radiotherapy have established radiation as a risk factor for thyroid cancer, particularly from early life exposure. About 0.62 mSv (20%) of the global annual per caput effective radiation dose comes from diagnostic medical and dental radiation for the period of 1997-2007, increased from 0.4 mSv for the years 1991-1996. This international trend of increasing population exposure to medical diagnostic sources of radiation, attributed in large part to the growing use of computed tomography scans, but also interventional radiology procedures, has raised concerns about exposure to radiosensitive organs such as the thyroid. Worldwide, medical and dental X-rays constitute the most common type of diagnostic medical exposures, but their contribution to the cumulative effective dose is relatively low, whereas computed tomography scans account for 7.9% of diagnostic radiology examinations but 47% of the collective effective dose from diagnostic radiation procedures in parts of the world. Although the radiation exposure from computed tomography scans is substantially lower than that from radiotherapy, multiple computed tomography scans could result in non-trivial cumulative doses to the thyroid. Studies are currently underway to assess the incidence of cancer in large cohorts of children who received

  6. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  7. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  8. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  9. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  10. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer of the esophagus-photodynamic; Esophageal cancer-photodynamic; Lung cancer-photodynamic ... the light at the cancer cells. PDT treats cancer in the: Lungs, using a bronchoscope Esophagus, using upper endoscopy Doctors ...

  11. What Is Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about ovarian cancer? What is ovarian cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... section . Other cancers that are similar to epithelial ovarian cancer Primary peritoneal carcinoma Primary peritoneal carcinoma (PPC) is ...

  12. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... pork, lamb, and processed meat (such as hot dogs, sausage, and bacon); and low in high-fat ... ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer ...

  13. What Is Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... our document called Osteosarcoma . Chondrosarcoma: Chondrosarcoma (KON-droh-sar-KOH-muh) is a cancer of cartilage cells. ... AdditionalResources Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & ...

  14. Tests for Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Liver cancer stages Tests for liver cancer If you have some of the signs ... cancer has come back (recurred). Other blood tests Liver function tests (LFTs): Because liver cancer often develops ...

  15. Basic Cancer Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Cancer Terms: Treatment Cancer Terms: After Treatment Online Medical Dictionaries Diagnosing Cancer Managing Your Care Financial Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For ...

  16. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Cancer Terms: Treatment Cancer Terms: After Treatment Online Medical Dictionaries Diagnosing Cancer Managing Your Care Financial Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For ...

  17. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the National Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer. Previous Basic Information Basic Information Basic Information ...

  18. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Photoradiation therapy; Cancer of the esophagus-photodynamic; Esophageal cancer-photodynamic; Lung cancer-photodynamic ... the light at the cancer cells. PDT treats cancer in the: Lungs, using a bronchoscope Esophagus, using upper endoscopy Doctors ...

  19. Quaternary structure of the extracellular haemoglobin of the lugworm Arenicola marina: a multi-angle-laser-light-scattering and electrospray-ionisation-mass-spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Zal, F; Green, B N; Lallier, F H; Vinogradov, S N; Toulmond, A

    1997-01-15

    To elucidate the quaternary structure of the extracellular haemoglobin (Hb) of the marine polychaete Arenicola marina (lugworm) it was subjected to multi-angle laser-light scattering (MALLS) and to electrospray-ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). It was also subjected to SDS/PAGE analysis for comparative purposes. MALLS analysis gave a molecular mass of 3648 +/- 24 kDa and a gyration radius of 11.3 +/- 1.7 nm. Maximum entropy analysis of the multiply charged electrospray spectra of the native, dehaemed, reduced and carbamidomethylated Hb forms, provided its complete polypeptide chain and subunit composition. We found, in the reduced condition, eight globin chains of molecular masses 15952.5 Da (a1), 15974.8 Da (a2), 15920.9 Da (b1), 16020.1 Da (b2), 16036.2 Da (b3), 16664.8 Da (c), 16983.2 Da (d1), 17033.1 Da (d2) and two linker chains L1, 25174.1 Da, and L2, 26829.7 Da. In the native Hb, chains b, c, d occur as five disulphide-bonded trimer subunits T with masses of 49560.4 Da (T1), 49613.9 Da (T2), 49658.6 Da (T3), 49706.8 Da (T4), 49724.5 Da (T5). Linker chains L1 and L2 occur as one disulphide-bonded homodimer 2L1 (D1) of 50323.1 Da and one disulphide-bonded heterodimer L1-L2 (D2) of 51 981.5 Da. Polypeptide chains a and d possess one free cysteine residue and chains d possess an unusual total of five cysteine residues. Semi-quantitative analysis of ESI-MS data allowed us to propose the following model for the one-twelfth protomer: [(3a1)(3a2)2T] (T corresponding to either T3, T4 or T5). From electron micrograph data T1 and T2 are probably located at the centre of the molecule as mentioned in previous studies. The Hb would thus be composed of 198 polypeptide chains with 156 globin chains and 42 linker chains, each twelfth being in contact with 3.5 linker subunits, providing a total mass of 3682 kDa including haems in agreement with the experimental molecular mass determined by MALLS. From ESI-MS relative intensities and the model proposed above, the globin

  20. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are the effects of oral cancer on speech and swallowing? The effects of cancer on speech and swallowing depend on the location and size ... movement. This could result in unclear production of speech sounds made with the lips such as /p/, / ...

  1. Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sex painful and difficult. If found early, vulvar cancer has a high cure rate and the treatment options involve less surgery. ... people may also need radiation therapy. When vulvar cancer is found and treated early, the cure rate is over 90%. The key to a ...

  2. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't heal Bleeding in your mouth Loose teeth Problems or pain with swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  3. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... much higher than in the United States. The value of screening in the United States and other countries with much lower rates of stomach cancer is not clear. The following may help reduce your risk of stomach cancer: DO NOT smoke. Keep a ...

  4. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  5. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason Blood in the stool A lump in the abdomen Imaging tests that create pictures of the small ... help diagnose intestinal cancer and show whether it has spread. Surgery is ...

  6. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the last part of your large intestine where solid waste from food (stool) is stored. Stool leaves your body through the anus when you have a bowel movement. Anal cancer is fairly rare. It spreads ... Squamous cell carcinoma. This is the most common type of anal cancer. It starts in cells that ...

  7. Gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patrlj, Leonardo; Kopljar, Mario; Kliček, Robert; Kolovrat, Marijan; Loncar, Bozo; Busic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer involving gastrointestinal tract, but it is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, accounting for 80-95% of biliary tract cancers. This tumor is a highly lethal disease with an overall 5-year survival of less than 5% and mean survival mere than 6 months. An early diagnosis is essential as this malignancy progresses silently with a late diagnosis. The percentage of patients diagnosed to have gallbladder cancer after simple cholecystectomy for presumed gallbladder stone disease is 0.5-1.5%. Patients with preoperative suspicion of gallbladder cancer should not be treated by laparoscopy. Epidemiological studies have identified striking geographic and ethnic disparities—inordinately high occurrence in American Indians, elevated in Southeast Asia, yet quite low elsewhere in the Americas and the world. Environmental triggers play a critical role in eliciting cancer developing in the gallbladder, best exemplified by cholelithiasis and chronic inflammation from biliary tract and parasitic infections. Improved imaging modalities and improved radical aggressive surgical approach in the last decade has improved outcomes and helped prolong survival in patients with gallbladder cancer. The overall 5-year survival for patients with gallbladder cancer who underwent R0 curative resection was from 21% to 69%. In the future, the development of potential diagnostic markers for disease will yield screening opportunities for those at risk either with ethnic susceptibility or known anatomic anomalies of the biliary tract. PMID:25392833

  8. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer Past ... Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer / Prostate ...

  9. Ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Matulonis, Ursula A; Sood, Anil K; Fallowfield, Lesley; Howitt, Brooke E; Sehouli, Jalid; Karlan, Beth Y

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a single disease and can be subdivided into at least five different histological subtypes that have different identifiable risk factors, cells of origin, molecular compositions, clinical features and treatments. Ovarian cancer is a global problem, is typically diagnosed at a late stage and has no effective screening strategy. Standard treatments for newly diagnosed cancer consist of cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. In recurrent cancer, chemotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors are used, and immunological therapies are currently being tested. High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most commonly diagnosed form of ovarian cancer and at diagnosis is typically very responsive to platinum-based chemotherapy. However, in addition to the other histologies, HGSCs frequently relapse and become increasingly resistant to chemotherapy. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms underlying platinum resistance and finding ways to overcome them are active areas of study in ovarian cancer. Substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that are associated with a high risk of ovarian cancer (such as BRCA1 and BRCA2), as well as a precursor lesion of HGSC called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, which holds promise for identifying individuals at high risk of developing the disease and for developing prevention strategies. PMID:27558151

  10. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Wood, Laura D; Itoi, Takao; Takaori, Kyoichi

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, for which mortality closely parallels incidence. Most patients with pancreatic cancer remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no standard programme for screening patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer (eg, those with a family history of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis). Most pancreatic cancers arise from microscopic non-invasive epithelial proliferations within the pancreatic ducts, referred to as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias. There are four major driver genes for pancreatic cancer: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4. KRAS mutation and alterations in CDKN2A are early events in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration offer high diagnostic ability for pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is regarded as the only potentially curative treatment, and adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine or S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, is given after surgery. FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, folinic acid [leucovorin], irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) are the treatments of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates but have good performance status. PMID:26830752

  11. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  12. Epidemiological studies of Fukushima residents exposed to ionising radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant prefecture--a preliminary review of current plans.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Suminori

    2012-03-01

    It is now more than six months since the beginning of the accident on 11 March 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. The Japanese government and local health authorities have started to collect the information necessary to estimate radiation doses received by those living in the area around the plant, drafted plans for the health care of residents, and started to implement some of them. This paper reviews and discusses the studies necessary for risk evaluation of cancer and non-cancer diseases, including those already planned, mainly from the view point of evaluating health risk using epidemiological approaches. In the long run, it is important to establish a cohort with a control group. Even if the cumulative doses are estimated to be so low that it is difficult to evaluate the risk of cancer and non-cancer diseases, it is necessary to conduct such a study to reassure residents. The health care programme of the Fukushima Prefecture government, including health check-ups of residents, will help to assess indirect effects of radiation exposure, including psychological problems. The success of any studies of radiation epidemiology depends on the collection of accurate information on radiation doses received by the study subjects. However, some of the dosimetry surveys were not conducted in a timely manner. (It should be recognised, though, that such a problem might have been inevitable, considering the chaotic condition after the nuclear accident.) Accurate estimation of the radiation dose received by each resident is not only important for scientific risk evaluation but also to inform each resident about his or her potential risk. Otherwise, residents will bear an undue psychological burden from uncertainties regarding their radiation exposure and its health consequences. One of other important tasks in Fukushima is the improvement of the quality of the regional cancer registry in this prefecture. It is also important to start thyroid cancer

  13. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Attard, Gerhardt; Parker, Chris; Eeles, Ros A; Schröder, Fritz; Tomlins, Scott A; Tannock, Ian; Drake, Charles G; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made in research for prostate cancer in the past decade. There is now greater understanding for the genetic basis of familial prostate cancer with identification of rare but high-risk mutations (eg, BRCA2, HOXB13) and low-risk but common alleles (77 identified so far by genome-wide association studies) that could lead to targeted screening of patients at risk. This is especially important because screening for prostate cancer based on prostate-specific antigen remains controversial due to the high rate of overdiagnosis and unnecessary prostate biopsies, despite evidence that it reduces mortality. Classification of prostate cancer into distinct molecular subtypes, including mutually exclusive ETS-gene-fusion-positive and SPINK1-overexpressing, CHD1-loss cancers, could allow stratification of patients for different management strategies. Presently, men with localised disease can have very different prognoses and treatment options, ranging from observation alone through to radical surgery, with few good-quality randomised trials to inform on the best approach for an individual patient. The survival of patients with metastatic prostate cancer progressing on androgen-deprivation therapy (castration-resistant prostate cancer) has improved substantially. In addition to docetaxel, which has been used for more than a decade, in the past 4 years five new drugs have shown efficacy with improvements in overall survival leading to licensing for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Because of this rapid change in the therapeutic landscape, no robust data exist to inform on the selection of patients for a specific treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer or the best sequence of administration. Moreover, the high cost of the newer drugs limits their widespread use in several countries. Data from continuing clinical and translational research are urgently needed to improve, and, crucially, to personalise management. PMID

  14. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  15. Risks of Endometrial Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  16. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  17. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  18. Lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Kislinger, Thomas; Jurisica, Igor; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput genomic data for both lung development and lung cancer continue to accumulate. Significant molecular intersection between these two processes has been hypothesized due to overlap in phenotypes and genomic variation. Examining the network biology of both cancer and development of the lung may shed functional light on the individual signaling modules involved. Stem cell biology may explain a portion of this network intersection and consequently studying lung organogenesis may have relevance for understanding lung cancer. This review summarizes our understanding of the potential overlapping mechanisms involved in lung development and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:19202349

  19. Profile of phenolic compounds of Brazilian virgin olive oils by rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (RRLC-ESI-TOF-MS).

    PubMed

    Ballus, Cristiano Augusto; Quirantes-Piné, Rosa; Bakhouche, Abdelhakim; da Silva, Luiz Fernando de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Adelson Francisco; Coutinho, Enilton Fick; da Croce, Dorli Mario; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Godoy, Helena Teixeira

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, agronomical researchers began to cultivate several olive varieties in different regions of Brazil to produce virgin olive oil (VOO). Because there has been no reported data regarding the phenolic profile of the first Brazilian VOO, the aim of this work was to determine phenolic contents of these samples using rapid-resolution liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. 25 VOO samples from Arbequina, Koroneiki, Arbosana, Grappolo, Manzanilla, Coratina, Frantoio and MGS Mariense varieties from three different Brazilian states and two crops were analysed. It was possible to quantify 19 phenolic compounds belonging to different classes. The results indicated that Brazilian VOOs have high total phenolic content because the values were comparable with those from high-quality VOOs produced in other countries. VOOs from Coratina, Arbosana and Grappolo presented the highest total phenolic content. These data will be useful in the development and improvement of Brazilian VOO. PMID:25306359

  20. A peptidomic approach for monitoring and characterising peptide cyanotoxins produced in Italian lakes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferranti, Pasquale; Nasi, Antonella; Bruno, Milena; Basile, Adriana; Serpe, Luigi; Gallo, Pasquale

    2011-05-15

    In recent years, the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic freshwaters has been described all over the world, including most European countries. Blooms of cyanobacteria may produce mixtures of toxic secondary metabolites, called cyanotoxins. Among these, the most studied are microcystins, a group of cyclic heptapeptides, because of their potent hepatotoxicity and activity as tumour promoters. Other peptide cyanotoxins have been described whose structure and toxicity have not been thoroughly studied. Herein we present a peptidomic approach aimed to characterise and quantify the peptide cyanotoxins produced in two Italian lakes, Averno and Albano. The procedure was based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis for rapid detection and profiling of the peptide mixture complexity, combined with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of- flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) which provided unambiguous structural identification of the main compounds, as well as accurate quantitative analysis of microcystins. In the case of Lake Averno, a novel variant of microcystin-RR and two novel anabaenopeptin variants (Anabaenopeptins B(1) and Anabaenopeptin F(1)), presenting homoarginine in place of the commonly found arginine, were detected and characterised. In Lake Albano, the peculiar peptide patterns in different years were compared, as an example of the potentiality of the peptidomic approach for fast screening analysis, prior to fine structural analysis and determination of cyanotoxins, which included six novel aeruginosin variants. This approach allows for wide range monitoring of cyanobacteria blooms, and to collect data for evaluating possible health risks to consumers, through the panel of the compounds produced along different years. PMID:21488115

  1. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic ...

  2. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer.gov en español Multimedia Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & Copyright Syndication Services Website Linking U.S. Department of Health ...

  3. Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Member Login Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate ... and is best made in consultation with your health care team. What happens after treatment for endometrial cancer? ...

  4. Cancer Clusters

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts Training Cancer Training at NCI Funding for ... Closeout NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small ...

  5. Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the circulatory system and the lymphatic system , two systems that are located throughout the body. This makes it hard to treat these cancers by operating on just one area. However, in children with ...

  6. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is advanced Other symptoms may include: Chewing problems Mouth sores that may bleed Pain with swallowing Speech difficulties ... Your doctor or dentist will examine your mouth area. The exam may ... bleeding Tests used to confirm oral cancer include: Gum biopsy ...

  7. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... known prevention. Awareness of risk (such as previous radiation therapy to the neck) can allow earlier diagnosis and treatment. Sometimes, people with family histories and genetic mutations related to thyroid cancer will have their thyroid ...

  8. Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... having diabetes. Using estrogen replacement therapy without taking progestin may also increase the risk for endometrial cancer. ... take a combination of estrogen and the hormone progestin. While estrogen stimulates growth of the endometrium, progestin ...

  9. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chance that you could develop breast cancer: Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family history, you cannot control. The more risk factors you have, the more your risk increases. ...

  10. Endometrial cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endometrial biopsy Dilation and curettage ( D and C ) Pap smear (may raise a suspicion for endometrial cancer, but ... for more than 2 years. Frequent pelvic exams, Pap smears and endometrial biopsy may be considered in some ...

  11. Cancer Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... I/II Trials CIP ARRA-Funded Clinical Trials Informatics The Cancer Imaging Archive TCGA Imaging Genomics Quantitative Imaging Network LIDC-IDRI Imaging Informatics Resources News & Events News and Announcements Events – Meetings ...

  12. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... eye. Special tests and tools are needed to spot such conditions: A Pap smear screens for precancers and cancer, but does not make a final diagnosis. The human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test may be ...

  13. Lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... any symptoms. Symptoms depend on the type of cancer you have, but may include: Chest pain Cough that does not go away Coughing up blood Fatigue Losing weight without trying Loss of appetite Shortness of breath ...

  14. Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection or have a history of genital warts. Your health care provider diagnoses vulvar cancer with a physical exam and a biopsy. Treatment varies, depending on your overall health and ...

  15. Aging, cancer, and cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    World population has experienced continuous growth since 1400 A.D. Current projections show a continued increase - but a steady decline in the population growth rate - with the number expected to reach between 8 and 10.5 billion people within 40 years. The elderly population is rapidly rising: in 1950 there were 205 million people aged 60 or older, while in 2000 there were 606 million. By 2050, the global population aged 60 or over is projected to expand by more than three times, reaching nearly 2 billion people [1]. Most cancers are age-related diseases: in the US, 50% of all malignancies occur in people aged 65-95. 60% of all cancers are expected to be diagnosed in elderly patients by 2020 [2]. Further, cancer-related mortality increases with age: 70% of all malignancy-related deaths are registered in people aged 65 years or older [3]. Here we introduce the microscopic aspects of aging, the pro-inflammatory phenotype of the elderly, and the changes related to immunosenescence. Then we deal with cancer disease and its development, the difficulty of treatment administration in the geriatric population, and the importance of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Finally, we aim to analyze the complex interactions of aging with cancer and cancer vaccinology, and the importance of this last approach as a complementary therapy to different levels of prevention and treatment. Cancer vaccines, in fact, should at present be recommended in association to a stronger cancer prevention and conventional therapies (surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy), both for curative and palliative intent, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality associated to cancer progression. PMID:22510392

  16. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo Alonso; Gabilondo-Navarro, Fernando Bernardo

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent tumor found in men worldwide and in Mexico in particular. Age and family history are the main risk factors. The diagnosis is made by prostate biopsy in patients with abnormalities detected in their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels or digital rectal exam (DRE). This article reviews screening and diagnostic methods as well as treatment options for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. PMID:27557386

  17. A ruthenium polypyridyl intercalator stalls DNA replication forks, radiosensitizes human cancer cells and is enhanced by Chk1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gill, Martin R; Harun, Siti Norain; Halder, Swagata; Boghozian, Ramon A; Ramadan, Kristijan; Ahmad, Haslina; Vallis, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes can intercalate DNA with high affinity and prevent cell proliferation; however, the direct impact of ruthenium-based intercalation on cellular DNA replication remains unknown. Here we show the multi-intercalator [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)](2+) (dppz = dipyridophenazine, PIP = 2-(phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) immediately stalls replication fork progression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. In response to this replication blockade, the DNA damage response (DDR) cell signalling network is activated, with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation indicating prolonged replication-associated DNA damage, and cell proliferation is inhibited by G1-S cell-cycle arrest. Co-incubation with a Chk1 inhibitor achieves synergistic apoptosis in cancer cells, with a significant increase in phospho(Ser139) histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) levels and foci indicating increased conversion of stalled replication forks to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Normal human epithelial cells remain unaffected by this concurrent treatment. Furthermore, pre-treatment of HeLa cells with [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)](2+) before external beam ionising radiation results in a supra-additive decrease in cell survival accompanied by increased γ-H2AX expression, indicating the compound functions as a radiosensitizer. Together, these results indicate ruthenium-based intercalation can block replication fork progression and demonstrate how these DNA-binding agents may be combined with DDR inhibitors or ionising radiation to achieve more efficient cancer cell killing. PMID:27558808

  18. A ruthenium polypyridyl intercalator stalls DNA replication forks, radiosensitizes human cancer cells and is enhanced by Chk1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Martin R.; Harun, Siti Norain; Halder, Swagata; Boghozian, Ramon A.; Ramadan, Kristijan; Ahmad, Haslina; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes can intercalate DNA with high affinity and prevent cell proliferation; however, the direct impact of ruthenium-based intercalation on cellular DNA replication remains unknown. Here we show the multi-intercalator [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine, PIP = 2-(phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) immediately stalls replication fork progression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. In response to this replication blockade, the DNA damage response (DDR) cell signalling network is activated, with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation indicating prolonged replication-associated DNA damage, and cell proliferation is inhibited by G1-S cell-cycle arrest. Co-incubation with a Chk1 inhibitor achieves synergistic apoptosis in cancer cells, with a significant increase in phospho(Ser139) histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) levels and foci indicating increased conversion of stalled replication forks to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Normal human epithelial cells remain unaffected by this concurrent treatment. Furthermore, pre-treatment of HeLa cells with [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ before external beam ionising radiation results in a supra-additive decrease in cell survival accompanied by increased γ-H2AX expression, indicating the compound functions as a radiosensitizer. Together, these results indicate ruthenium-based intercalation can block replication fork progression and demonstrate how these DNA-binding agents may be combined with DDR inhibitors or ionising radiation to achieve more efficient cancer cell killing. PMID:27558808

  19. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  20. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Prostate Cancer » More Information » Prostate Cancer Early Detection » American ... Causes Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News ...

  1. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  2. Uterine Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Statistics for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal ( ... Skin Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home Uterine Cancer Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  3. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Targeted therapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are injected ... vein or muscle, or are taken by mouth. Chemotherapy is systemic therapy, which means that the drug ...

  4. American Cancer Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Find Local ACS How the American Cancer Society Fights Childhood Cancer Advances in treatment have improved ... long lasting consequences. Learn how the American Cancer Society is working to save more lives from cancer ...

  5. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  6. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  7. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  8. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  9. Diet and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... daily. Lower your intake of processed meats, smoked, nitrite-cured, and salt-preserved foods; emphasize plant-based ...

  10. Alcohol and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Cancer Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research Alcohol and Cancer Risk On This Page What is ... in the risk of colorectal cancer. Research on alcohol consumption and other cancers: Numerous studies have examined ...

  11. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver cancer is not common in the United States. Liver cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American men, have an increased ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  13. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, such as the lymph nodes, lung, liver, intestine, or bone. Stage IVB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, Medical Illustration Source: National Cancer Institute ...

  14. What Is Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  15. Childhood Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  16. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these signs ...

  17. Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Dating and Intimacy Sexuality and Cancer Treatment: Men ... here Home > Navigating Cancer Care > Dating, Sex, and Reproduction > Cancer During Pregnancy Request Permissions Print to PDF ...

  18. Uterine Cancer Risk Questionnaire

    MedlinePlus

    ... University School of Medicine Uterine cancer (also called endometrial cancer) is one of the most common cancers in ... help protect themselves. To estimate your risk of uterine cancer and learn about ways to lower that risk, ...

  19. Understanding cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. The spread of cancer is called metastasis . Cancer staging is used to help describe the ... cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes (N) Metastasis (M) , or if and how much the cancer ...

  20. Cancer Biomarkers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group promotes research to identify, develop, and validate biological markers for early cancer detection and cancer risk assessment. | Research to identify, develop and validate biomarkers for early cancer detection and risk assessment.

  1. Epigenetic field cancerization in gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yoshifumi; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Kurashige, Junji; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Yoshida, Naoya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic alterations, including aberrant DNA methylation, play an important role in human cancer development. Importantly, epigenetic alterations are reversible and can be targets for therapy or chemoprevention for various types of human cancers. A field for cancerization, or a field defect, is formed by the accumulation of genetic and/or epigenetic alterations in normal-appearing tissues and can correlate with risk of cancer development. Thus, a better understanding of epigenetic field cancerization may represent a useful translational opportunity for cancer risk assessment, including previous history and exposure to carcinogenic factors, and for cancer prevention. In this article, we summarize current knowledge regarding epigenetic field cancerization and its clinical implications in gastrointestinal cancers, including colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and esophageal cancer. PMID:26971491

  2. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Korc, Murray; Apte, Minoti; La Vecchia, Carlo; Johnson, Colin D; Biankin, Andrew V; Neale, Rachel E; Tempero, Margaret; Tuveson, David A; Hruban, Ralph H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, with a dismal overall prognosis that has remained virtually unchanged for many decades. Currently, prevention or early diagnosis at a curable stage is exceedingly difficult; patients rarely exhibit symptoms and tumours do not display sensitive and specific markers to aid detection. Pancreatic cancers also have few prevalent genetic mutations; the most commonly mutated genes are KRAS, CDKN2A (encoding p16), TP53 and SMAD4 - none of which are currently druggable. Indeed, therapeutic options are limited and progress in drug development is impeded because most pancreatic cancers are complex at the genomic, epigenetic and metabolic levels, with multiple activated pathways and crosstalk evident. Furthermore, the multilayered interplay between neoplastic and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment challenges medical treatment. Fewer than 20% of patients have surgically resectable disease; however, neoadjuvant therapies might shift tumours towards resectability. Although newer drug combinations and multimodal regimens in this setting, as well as the adjuvant setting, appreciably extend survival, ∼80% of patients will relapse after surgery and ultimately die of their disease. Thus, consideration of quality of life and overall survival is important. In this Primer, we summarize the current understanding of the salient pathophysiological, molecular, translational and clinical aspects of this disease. In addition, we present an outline of potential future directions for pancreatic cancer research and patient management. PMID:27158978

  3. Ovarian Cancer Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death. Around one in every 60 ... States, ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death. Are some women more at ...

  4. Surgery for Pre-Cancers and Cancers of the Cervix

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiation therapy for cervical cancer Surgery for cervical cancer Cryosurgery A metal probe cooled with liquid nitrogen ... in Cervical Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

  5. OVARIAN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kathleen R.; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian carcinomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms traditionally sub-classified based on type and degree of differentiation. Although current clinical management of ovarian carcinoma largely fails to take this heterogeneity into account, it is becoming evident that each major histological type has characteristic genetic defects that deregulate specific signaling pathways in the tumor cells. Moreover, within the most common histological types, the molecular pathogenesis of low-grade versus high-grade tumors appears to be largely distinct. Mouse models of ovarian carcinoma have been developed that recapitulate many of the morphological features, biological behavior, and gene expression patterns of selected subtypes of ovarian cancer. Such models will likely prove useful for studying ovarian cancer biology and for pre-clinical testing of molecularly targeted therapeutics, which may ultimately lead to better clinical outcomes for women with ovarian cancer. PMID:18842102

  6. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer? Next Topic Thyroid cancer risk factors Key statistics for thyroid cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  7. Cancer in Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  8. Vitamin D and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  9. American Institute for Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... CancerResource Where to Find Help Food for the Fight DVD Estate Planner Publications Reduce Your Cancer Risk ... By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia ...

  10. Cancer Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The patient shown is undergoing cancer radiation treatment in a hospital-like atmosphere but he is not in a hospital. The treatment room is at NASA's Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. It is a converted portion of the Center's cyclotron facility, originally designed for radiation studies related to nuclear propulsion for aircraft and spacecraft. Under an agreement between the Center and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the 50 million volt cyclotron is now being used to evaluate the effectiveness of "fast neutron" therapy in the treatment of cancerous tumors.

  11. Lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Akhurst, Tim; MacManus, Michael; Hicks, Rodney J

    2015-04-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) plays a key role in the evaluation of undiagnosed lung nodules, when primary lung cancer is strongly suspected, or when it has already been diagnosed by other techniques. Although technical factors may compromise characterization of small or highly mobile lesions, lesions without apparent FDG uptake can generally be safely observed, whereas FDG-avid lung nodules almost always need further evaluation. FDG-PET/CT is now the primary staging imaging modality for patients with lung cancer who are being considered for curative therapy with either surgery or definitive radiation therapy. PMID:25829084

  12. Penile Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter E.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Herr, Harry W.; Inman, Brant A.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michalski, Jeff; Pagliaro, Lance; Pal, Sumanta K.; Patterson, Anthony; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Pohar, Kamal S.; Porter, Michael P.; Richie, Jerome P.; Sexton, Wade J.; Shipley, William U.; Small, Eric J.; Trump, Donald L.; Wile, Geoffrey; Wilson, Timothy G.; Dwyer, Mary; Ho, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis represents approximately 0.5% of all cancers among men in the United States and other developed countries. Although rare, it is associated with significant disfigurement, and only half of the patients survive beyond 5 years. Proper evaluation of both the primary lesion and lymph nodes is critical, because nodal involvement is the most important factor of survival. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Penile Cancer provide recommendations on the diagnosis and management of this devastating disease based on evidence and expert consensus. PMID:23667209

  13. Cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Koh, Wui-Jin; Greer, Benjamin E; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Apte, Sachin M; Campos, Susana M; Chan, John; Cho, Kathleen R; Cohn, David; Crispens, Marta Ann; DuPont, Nefertiti; Eifel, Patricia J; Gaffney, David K; Giuntoli, Robert L; Han, Ernest; Huh, Warner K; Lurain, John R; Martin, Lainie; Morgan, Mark A; Mutch, David; Remmenga, Steven W; Reynolds, R Kevin; Small, William; Teng, Nelson; Tillmanns, Todd; Valea, Fidel A; McMillian, Nicole R; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-03-01

    These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Cervical Cancer focus on early-stage disease, because it occurs more frequently in the United States. After careful clinical evaluation and staging, the primary treatment of early-stage cervical cancer is either surgery or radiotherapy. These guidelines include fertility-sparing and non-fertility-sparing treatment for those with early-stage disease, which is disease confined to the uterus. A new fertility-sparing algorithm was added for select patients with stage IA and IB1 disease.. PMID:23486458

  14. Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Benjamin R; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-09-01

    Esophageal cancer carries a poor prognosis among gastrointestinal malignancies. Although esophageal squamous cell carcinoma predominates worldwide, Western nations have seen a marked rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma that parallels the obesity epidemic. Efforts directed toward early detection have been difficult, given that dysplasia and early cancer are generally asymptomatic. However, significant advances have been made in the past 10 to 15 years that allow for endoscopic management and often cure in early stage esophageal malignancy. New diagnostic imaging technologies may provide a means by which cost-effective, early diagnosis of dysplasia allows for definitive therapy and ultimately improves the overall survival among patients. PMID:27546839

  15. Ovarian Cancer Identification from Mass Spectra by Kernel Fisher Discriminant Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bailing; Pham, Tuan D.; Zhang, Yanchun

    2007-11-01

    With the development of mass spectrometry technology, such as surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionisation time of flight (SELDI-ToF-MS), it has become possible to diagnose proteomic signatures for different human cancers. Among the many research issues, feature selection and classification of proteomic patterns in serum are very typical in the discrimination of cancer patients from normal individuals. In the past several years, many machine learning methods have been proposed with encouraging results. Most of the published works, however, are based on the direct application of original mass spectra, together with dimension reduction methods like PCA or feature selection methods like T-tests. Because only the peaks of MS data correspond to potential biomarkers, it is more important to study classification methods using the detected peaks, particularly from biology point of view. This paper investigates ovarian cancer identification from the detected MS peaks by applying the Kernel Fisher Discriminant Analysis (KFDA), which has been shown to be effective for classifying high-dimensional data. Comparing with several state-of-the-art methods such as SVM and random forest, KFDA gives the best performance, achieving an accuracy of 96% sensitivity of 97% and specificity of 95% in 10-fold cross-validations.

  16. Childhood cancer and residential exposure to highways: a nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Spycher, Ben D; Feller, Martin; Röösli, Martin; Ammann, Roland A; Diezi, Manuel; Egger, Matthias; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2015-12-01

    Children living near highways are exposed to higher concentrations of traffic-related carcinogenic pollutants. Several studies reported an increased risk of childhood cancer associated with traffic exposure, but the published evidence is inconclusive. We investigated whether cancer risk is associated with proximity of residence to highways in a nation-wide cohort study including all children aged <16 years from Swiss national censuses in 1990 and 2000. Cancer incidence was investigated in time to event analyses (1990-2008) using Cox proportional hazards models and incidence density analyses (1985-2008) using Poisson regression. Adjustments were made for socio-economic factors, ionising background radiation and electromagnetic fields. In time to event analysis based on 532 cases the adjusted hazard ratio for leukaemia comparing children living <100 m from a highway with unexposed children (≥500 m) was 1.43 (95 % CI 0.79, 2.61). Results were similar in incidence density analysis including 1367 leukaemia cases (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.57; 95 % CI 1.09, 2.25). Associations were similar for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (IRR 1.64; 95 % CI 1.10, 2.43) and stronger for leukaemia in children aged <5 years (IRR 1.92; 95 % CI 1.22, 3.04). Little evidence of association was found for other tumours. Our study suggests that young children living close to highways are at increased risk of developing leukaemia. PMID:26520639

  17. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys. They are fist-sized organs on either side of your backbone above your waist. The tubes inside filter and ... blood, taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney cancer forms in the lining of tiny tubes ...

  18. Cancer Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominiecki, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    University of Colorado's Virtual Student Fellowship available at and developed by Bakemeier, Richard F. This website is designed to give students applying for a fellowship an overview of basic topics in biology and how they are used by cancer researchers to develop new treatments.

  19. Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially if found early. Treatment options include surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy. Regular exams after treatment are important. Treatments may also cause infertility. If you may want children later on, you should consider sperm banking before treatment. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  20. Cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients’ immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes. PMID:25904595