Science.gov

Sample records for reached maximum growth

  1. Occurrence and Impact of Insects in Maximum Growth Plantations

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.T.; Berisford, C.W.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of the relationships between intensive management practices and insect infestation using maximum growth potential studies of loblolly pine constructed over five years using a hierarchy of cultural treatments-monitoring differences in growth and insect infestation levels related to the increasing management intensities. This study shows that tree fertilization can increase coneworm infestation and demonstrated that tip moth management tree growth, at least initially.

  2. Growth and maximum size of tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Carl G; O'Malley, Joseph M; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Dale, Jonathan J; Hutchinson, Melanie R; Anderson, James M; Royer, Mark A; Holland, Kim N

    2014-01-01

    Tiger sharks (Galecerdo cuvier) are apex predators characterized by their broad diet, large size and rapid growth. Tiger shark maximum size is typically between 380 & 450 cm Total Length (TL), with a few individuals reaching 550 cm TL, but the maximum size of tiger sharks in Hawaii waters remains uncertain. A previous study suggested tiger sharks grow rather slowly in Hawaii compared to other regions, but this may have been an artifact of the method used to estimate growth (unvalidated vertebral ring counts) compounded by small sample size and narrow size range. Since 1993, the University of Hawaii has conducted a research program aimed at elucidating tiger shark biology, and to date 420 tiger sharks have been tagged and 50 recaptured. All recaptures were from Hawaii except a single shark recaptured off Isla Jacques Cousteau (2413'17?N 10952'14?W), in the southern Gulf of California (minimum distance between tag and recapture sites ?=? approximately 5,000 km), after 366 days at liberty (DAL). We used these empirical mark-recapture data to estimate growth rates and maximum size for tiger sharks in Hawaii. We found that tiger sharks in Hawaii grow twice as fast as previously thought, on average reaching 340 cm TL by age 5, and attaining a maximum size of 403 cm TL. Our model indicates the fastest growing individuals attain 400 cm TL by age 5, and the largest reach a maximum size of 444 cm TL. The largest shark captured during our study was 464 cm TL but individuals >450 cm TL were extremely rare (0.005% of sharks captured). We conclude that tiger shark growth rates and maximum sizes in Hawaii are generally consistent with those in other regions, and hypothesize that a broad diet may help them to achieve this rapid growth by maximizing prey consumption rates. PMID:24416287

  3. A Comparison of Scoring Options for Omitted and Not-Reached Items through the Recovery of IRT Parameters When Utilizing the Rasch Model and Joint Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Michael; Sharairi, Sid; Swift, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper utilized the Rasch model and Joint Maximum Likelihood Estimation to study different scoring options for omitted and not-reached items. Three scoring treatments were studied. The first method treated omitted and not-reached items as "ignorable/blank". The second treatment, scored omits as incorrect with "0" and left not-reached as blank

  4. Allometries of Maximum Growth Rate versus Body Mass at Maximum Growth Indicate That Non-Avian Dinosaurs Had Growth Rates Typical of Fast Growing Ectothermic Sauropsids

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Jan; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2014-01-01

    We tested if growth rates of recent taxa are unequivocally separated between endotherms and ectotherms, and compared these to dinosaurian growth rates. We therefore performed linear regression analyses on the log-transformed maximum growth rate against log-transformed body mass at maximum growth for extant altricial birds, precocial birds, eutherians, marsupials, reptiles, fishes and dinosaurs. Regression models of precocial birds (and fishes) strongly differed from Case’s study (1978), which is often used to compare dinosaurian growth rates to those of extant vertebrates. For all taxonomic groups, the slope of 0.75 expected from the Metabolic Theory of Ecology was statistically supported. To compare growth rates between taxonomic groups we therefore used regressions with this fixed slope and group-specific intercepts. On average, maximum growth rates of ectotherms were about 10 (reptiles) to 20 (fishes) times (in comparison to mammals) or even 45 (reptiles) to 100 (fishes) times (in comparison to birds) lower than in endotherms. While on average all taxa were clearly separated from each other, individual growth rates overlapped between several taxa and even between endotherms and ectotherms. Dinosaurs had growth rates intermediate between similar sized/scaled-up reptiles and mammals, but a much lower rate than scaled-up birds. All dinosaurian growth rates were within the range of extant reptiles and mammals, and were lower than those of birds. Under the assumption that growth rate and metabolic rate are indeed linked, our results suggest two alternative interpretations. Compared to other sauropsids, the growth rates of studied dinosaurs clearly indicate that they had an ectothermic rather than an endothermic metabolic rate. Compared to other vertebrate growth rates, the overall high variability in growth rates of extant groups and the high overlap between individual growth rates of endothermic and ectothermic extant species make it impossible to rule out either of the two thermoregulation strategies for studied dinosaurs. PMID:24586409

  5. Allometries of maximum growth rate versus body mass at maximum growth indicate that non-avian dinosaurs had growth rates typical of fast growing ectothermic sauropsids.

    PubMed

    Werner, Jan; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2014-01-01

    We tested if growth rates of recent taxa are unequivocally separated between endotherms and ectotherms, and compared these to dinosaurian growth rates. We therefore performed linear regression analyses on the log-transformed maximum growth rate against log-transformed body mass at maximum growth for extant altricial birds, precocial birds, eutherians, marsupials, reptiles, fishes and dinosaurs. Regression models of precocial birds (and fishes) strongly differed from Case's study (1978), which is often used to compare dinosaurian growth rates to those of extant vertebrates. For all taxonomic groups, the slope of 0.75 expected from the Metabolic Theory of Ecology was statistically supported. To compare growth rates between taxonomic groups we therefore used regressions with this fixed slope and group-specific intercepts. On average, maximum growth rates of ectotherms were about 10 (reptiles) to 20 (fishes) times (in comparison to mammals) or even 45 (reptiles) to 100 (fishes) times (in comparison to birds) lower than in endotherms. While on average all taxa were clearly separated from each other, individual growth rates overlapped between several taxa and even between endotherms and ectotherms. Dinosaurs had growth rates intermediate between similar sized/scaled-up reptiles and mammals, but a much lower rate than scaled-up birds. All dinosaurian growth rates were within the range of extant reptiles and mammals, and were lower than those of birds. Under the assumption that growth rate and metabolic rate are indeed linked, our results suggest two alternative interpretations. Compared to other sauropsids, the growth rates of studied dinosaurs clearly indicate that they had an ectothermic rather than an endothermic metabolic rate. Compared to other vertebrate growth rates, the overall high variability in growth rates of extant groups and the high overlap between individual growth rates of endothermic and ectothermic extant species make it impossible to rule out either of the two thermoregulation strategies for studied dinosaurs. PMID:24586409

  6. Effects of lag and maximum growth in contaminant transport and biodegradation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.D.; Dawson, C.N.

    1992-06-01

    The effects of time lag and maximum microbial growth on biodegradation in contaminant transport are discussed. A mathematical model is formulated that accounts for these effects, and a numerical case study is presented that demonstrates how lag influences biodegradation.

  7. Maximum photosynthetic efficiency of biomass growth: a criticism of some measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.K.; Pirt, S.J.

    1982-02-01

    The yield of biomass produced in a photosynthetic culture is an expression of the photosynthetic efficiency. Microbial cells consume energy for both growth and for maintenance. The bioenergetics of Chlorella cultures and the maximum growth yields obtained by various researchers are examined in this paper.

  8. Maximum Growth Potential and Periods of Resource Limitation in Apple Tree

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Francesco; DeJong, Theodore; Franceschi, Pietro; Tagliavini, Massimo; Gianelle, Damiano

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of seasonal maximum potential growth rates are important for assessing periods of resource limitations in fruit tree species. In this study we assessed the periods of resource limitation for vegetative (current year stems, and woody biomass) and reproductive (fruit) organs of a major agricultural crop: the apple tree. This was done by comparing relative growth rates (RGRs) of individual organs in trees with reduced competition for resources to trees grown under standard field conditions. Special attention was dedicated to disentangling patterns and values of maximum potential growth for each organ type. The period of resource limitation for vegetative growth was much longer than in another fruit tree species (peach): from late May until harvest. Two periods of resource limitation were highlighted for fruit: from the beginning of the season until mid-June, and about 1 month prior to harvest. By investigating the variability in individual organs growth we identified substantial differences in RGRs among different shoot categories (proleptic and epicormic) and within each group of monitored organs. Qualitatively different and more accurate values of growth rates for vegetative organs, compared to the use of the simple compartmental means, were estimated. Detailed, source-sink based tree growth models, commonly in need of fine parameter tuning, are expected to benefit from the results produced by these analyses. PMID:26973676

  9. Maximum Growth Potential and Periods of Resource Limitation in Apple Tree.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Francesco; DeJong, Theodore; Franceschi, Pietro; Tagliavini, Massimo; Gianelle, Damiano

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of seasonal maximum potential growth rates are important for assessing periods of resource limitations in fruit tree species. In this study we assessed the periods of resource limitation for vegetative (current year stems, and woody biomass) and reproductive (fruit) organs of a major agricultural crop: the apple tree. This was done by comparing relative growth rates (RGRs) of individual organs in trees with reduced competition for resources to trees grown under standard field conditions. Special attention was dedicated to disentangling patterns and values of maximum potential growth for each organ type. The period of resource limitation for vegetative growth was much longer than in another fruit tree species (peach): from late May until harvest. Two periods of resource limitation were highlighted for fruit: from the beginning of the season until mid-June, and about 1 month prior to harvest. By investigating the variability in individual organs growth we identified substantial differences in RGRs among different shoot categories (proleptic and epicormic) and within each group of monitored organs. Qualitatively different and more accurate values of growth rates for vegetative organs, compared to the use of the simple compartmental means, were estimated. Detailed, source-sink based tree growth models, commonly in need of fine parameter tuning, are expected to benefit from the results produced by these analyses. PMID:26973676

  10. Conifers in cold environments synchronize maximum growth rate of tree-ring formation with day length.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Sergio; Deslauriers, Annie; Anfodillo, Tommaso; Morin, Hubert; Saracino, Antonio; Motta, Renzo; Borghetti, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Intra-annual radial growth rates and durations in trees are reported to differ greatly in relation to species, site and environmental conditions. However, very similar dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation are observed in temperate and boreal zones. Here, we compared weekly xylem cell production and variation in stem circumference in the main northern hemisphere conifer species (genera Picea, Pinus, Abies and Larix) from 1996 to 2003. Dynamics of radial growth were modeled with a Gompertz function, defining the upper asymptote (A), x-axis placement (beta) and rate of change (kappa). A strong linear relationship was found between the constants beta and kappa for both types of analysis. The slope of the linear regression, which corresponds to the time at which maximum growth rate occurred, appeared to converge towards the summer solstice. The maximum growth rate occurred around the time of maximum day length, and not during the warmest period of the year as previously suggested. The achievements of photoperiod could act as a growth constraint or a limit after which the rate of tree-ring formation tends to decrease, thus allowing plants to safely complete secondary cell wall lignification before winter. PMID:16608455

  11. Growth, yield and photosynthesis of Panicum maximum and Stylosanthes hamata under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, R K; Baig, M J; Tiwari, H S; Roy, Sharmila

    2010-07-01

    Plant height, biomass production, assimilatory functions and chlorophyll accumulation of Panicum maximum and Stylosanthes hamata in intercropping systems was influenced significantly under elevated CO2 (600 +/- 50 ppm) in open top chambers (OTCs). The plant height increased by 32.0 and 49.0% over the control in P. maximum and S. hamata respectively in intercropping system under elevated CO2 over open field grown crops (Ca). P. maximum and S. hamata produced 67 and 85% higher fresh and dry biomass respectively under elevated CO2. Rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance increased in both the crop species in intercropping systems under elevated CO2. The canopy photosynthesis (photosynthesis x leaf area index) of these crop species increased significantly under elevated CO2 over the open grown crops. The chlorophyll a and b accumulation were also higher in the leaves of both the crop species as grown in OTC with elevated CO2. The increased chlorophyll content, leaf area index and canopy photosynthesis led to higher growth and biomass production in these crop species under elevated CO2. The total carbon sequestration in crop biomass and soils during the three years was 21.53 Mg C/ha under elevated CO2. The data revealed that P. maximum and S. hamata intercropping system is the potential as a sink for the increasing level of CO2 in the atmosphere in the semi-arid tropics. PMID:21186734

  12. Have the “mega-journals” reached the limits to growth?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A “mega-journal” is a new type of scientific journal that publishes freely accessible articles, which have been peer reviewed for scientific trustworthiness, but leaves it to the readers to decide which articles are of interest and importance to them. In the wake of the phenomenal success of PLOS ONE, several other publishers have recently started mega-journals. This article presents the evolution of mega-journals since 2010 in terms of article publication rates. The fastest growth seems to have ebbed out at around 35,000 annual articles for the 14 journals combined. Acceptance rates are in the range of 50–70%, and speed of publication is around 3–5 months. Common features in mega-journals are alternative impact metrics, easy reusability of figures and data, post-publication discussions and portable reviews from other journals. PMID:26038735

  13. Persistent growth of CO2 emissions and implications for reaching climate targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlingstein, P.; Andrew, R. M.; Rogelj, J.; Peters, G. P.; Canadell, J. G.; Knutti, R.; Luderer, G.; Raupach, M. R.; Schaeffer, M.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Le Qur, C.

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to limit climate change below a given temperature level require that global emissions of CO2 cumulated over time remain below a limited quota. This quota varies depending on the temperature level, the desired probability of staying below this level and the contributions of other gases. In spite of this restriction, global emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion and cement production have continued to grow by 2.5% per year on average over the past decade. Two thirds of the CO2 emission quota consistent with a 2 C temperature limit has already been used, and the total quota will likely be exhausted in a further 30 years at the 2014 emissions rates. We show that CO2 emissions track the high end of the latest generation of emissions scenarios, due to lower than anticipated carbon intensity improvements of emerging economies and higher global gross domestic product growth. In the absence of more stringent mitigation, these trends are set to continue and further reduce the remaining quota until the onset of a potential new climate agreement in 2020. Breaking current emission trends in the short term is key to retaining credible climate targets within a rapidly diminishing emission quota.

  14. 19. Maximum Crystal Growth Rate and Its Corresponding State in Polymeric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okui, N.; Umemoto, S.

    The temperature dependence of crystal growth rate (G) shows a bell shape with the maximum growth rate Gmax. The activation energy for the molecular transport in G could be expressed in terms of equation of either Arrhenius or WLF. The Gmax showed remarkable molecular weight dependence. The plots of G/Gmax against T/Tcmax showed a single master curve without molecular weight dependence. The ratio of Go/Gmax gave a constant value for each polymer. Plots of ln (G/G_{max})/ln (G_o/G_{max}) against T/Tcmax for various polymers showed the universal curve. The molecular weight dependence of Gmax was expressed as G_{max} ~ MW(alpha), ? was a constant but depending on the morphological features on the crystallization. The value of ? was a function of the adsorption mechanism of polymer molecules on the crystal growth front and its diffusion mechanism. The ratio of Tcmax/Tmo was formulated. Tcmax was also correlated to many other thermodynamic transition temperatures.

  15. Phylogenetic prediction of the maximum per capita rate of population growth

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, William F.; Pearson, Yanthe E.; Larsen, Elise A.; Lynch, Heather J.; Turner, Jessica B.; Staver, Hilary; Noble, Andrew E.; Bewick, Sharon; Goldberg, Emma E.

    2013-01-01

    The maximum per capita rate of population growth, r, is a central measure of population biology. However, researchers can only directly calculate r when adequate time series, life tables and similar datasets are available. We instead view r as an evolvable, synthetic life-history trait and use comparative phylogenetic approaches to predict r for poorly known species. Combining molecular phylogenies, life-history trait data and stochastic macroevolutionary models, we predicted r for mammals of the Caniformia and Cervidae. Cross-validation analyses demonstrated that, even with sparse life-history data, comparative methods estimated r well and outperformed models based on body mass. Values of r predicted via comparative methods were in strong rank agreement with observed values and reduced mean prediction errors by approximately 68 per cent compared with two null models. We demonstrate the utility of our method by estimating r for 102 extant species in these mammal groups with unknown life-history traits. PMID:23720545

  16. The time of maximum post-ischemic hyperperfusion indicates infarct growth following transient experimental ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Susanne; Artmann, Judith; Luft, Andreas R; Buxton, Richard B; Weller, Michael; Wong, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    After recanalization, cerebral blood flow (CBF) can increase above baseline in cerebral ischemia. However, the significance of post-ischemic hyperperfusion for tissue recovery remains unclear. To analyze the course of post-ischemic hyperperfusion and its impact on vascular function, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL) and measured CBF quantitatively during and after a 60 minute transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in adult rats. We added a 5% CO2 - challenge to analyze vasoreactivity in the same animals. Results from MRI were compared to histological correlates of angiogenesis. We found that CBF in the ischemic area recovered within one day and reached values significantly above contralateral thereafter. The extent of hyperperfusion changed over time, which was related to final infarct size: early (day 1) maximal hyperperfusion was associated with smaller lesions, whereas a later (day 4) maximum indicated large lesions. Furthermore, after initial vasoparalysis within the ischemic area, vasoreactivity on day 14 was above baseline in a fraction of animals, along with a higher density of blood vessels in the ischemic border zone. These data provide further evidence that late post-ischemic hyperperfusion is a sequel of ischemic damage in regions that are likely to undergo infarction. However, it is transient and its resolution coincides with re-gaining of vascular structure and function. PMID:23741488

  17. Pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster reaches its maximum in Ethiopia and correlates most strongly with ultra-violet radiation in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pigmentation has a long history of investigation in evolutionary biology. In Drosophila melanogaster, latitudinal and altitudinal clines have been found but their underlying causes remain unclear. Moreover, most studies were conducted on cosmopolitan populations which have a relatively low level of genetic structure and diversity compared to sub-Saharan African populations. We investigated: 1) the correlation between pigmentation traits within and between the thorax and the fourth abdominal segment, and 2) their associations with different geographical and ecological variables, using 710 lines belonging to 30 sub-Saharan and cosmopolitan populations. Results Pigmentation clines substantially differed between sub-Saharan and cosmopolitan populations. While positive correlations with latitude have previously been described in Europe, India and Australia, in agreement with Bogert's rule or the thermal melanism hypothesis, we found a significant negative correlation in Africa. This correlation persisted even after correction for altitude, which in its turn showed a positive correlation with pigmentation independently from latitude. More importantly, we found that thoracic pigmentation reaches its maximal values in this species in high-altitude populations of Ethiopia (1,600-3,100m). Ethiopian flies have a diffuse wide thoracic trident making the mesonotum and the head almost black, a phenotype that is absent from all other sub-Saharan or cosmopolitan populations including high-altitude flies from Peru (~3,400m). Ecological analyses indicated that the variable most predictive of pigmentation in Africa, especially for the thorax, was ultra-violet (UV) intensity, consistent with the so-called Gloger's rule invoking a role of melanin in UV protection. Conclusion Our data suggest that different environmental factors may shape clinal variation in tropical and temperate regions, and may lead to the evolution of different degrees of melanism in different high altitude populations in the tropics. PMID:25115161

  18. On-line estimation of the maximum specific growth rate of nitrifiers in activated sludge systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z.; Bogaert, H.; Devisscher, M.; Vanrolleghem, P.; Verstraete, W.

    1999-11-05

    The on-line estimation of the maximum specific growth rate of autotrophic biomass is addressed in this article. A general nitrification process model, which is valid for any realistic flow pattern, is used to develop the estimation algorithm. Depending on the measurements available, two estimation equations are derived. While both require measuring the nitrification activity of the activated sludge, one requires the additional measurement of the nitrifiable nitrogen concentrations at the two ends of the bioreactor, and the other requires the nitrate nitrogen concentrations at the same location. The algorithm alo requires some stoichlometric and kinetic parameters. However, sensitivity analysis shows that the estimate is insensitive to the parameters other than the autotrophoc decay rate. Compared to the existing algorithms, the algorithm developed in this article does not rely on the assumption of ideal flow pattern in the plant and does not require an error-prone estimate of the autotrophic biomass concentration. Experimental and simulation studies show that the algorithm performs well and is robust to influence variations and accidental sludge losses.

  19. Maximum likelihood estimation of population growth rates based on the coalescent.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhner, M K; Yamato, J; Felsenstein, J

    1998-01-01

    We describe a method for co-estimating 4Nemu (four times the product of effective population size and neutral mutation rate) and population growth rate from sequence samples using Metropolis-Hastings sampling. Population growth (or decline) is assumed to be exponential. The estimates of growth rate are biased upwards, especially when 4Nemu is low; there is also a slight upwards bias in the estimate of 4Nemu itself due to correlation between the parameters. This bias cannot be attributed solely to Metropolis-Hastings sampling but appears to be an inherent property of the estimator and is expected to appear in any approach which estimates growth rate from genealogy structure. Sampling additional unlinked loci is much more effective in reducing the bias than increasing the number or length of sequences from the same locus. PMID:9584114

  20. Comparison of maximum specific growth rates and lag times estimated from absorbance and viable count data by different mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Dalgaard, P; Koutsoumanis, K

    2001-01-01

    Maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)) and lag time (lambda) were estimated from viable count and absorbance data and compared for different microorganisms, incubation systems and growth conditions. Data from 176 growth curves and 120 absorbance detection times of serially diluted cultures were evaluated using different mathematical growth models. Accurate estimates of mu(max) and lambda were obtained from individual absorbance growth curves by using the Richard model, with values of the parameter m fixed to 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 to describing different degrees of growth dampening, as well as from absorbance detection times of serially diluted cultures. It is suggested to apply the two techniques complementarily for accurate, rapid and inexpensive estimation of microbial growth parameter values from absorbance data. In contrast, considerable limitations were demonstrated for the ability of the Exponential, the Gompertz and the Logistic models to estimate mu(max) and lambda values accurately from absorbance data. Limitations of these models were revealed due the wide range of growth conditions studies. PMID:11118653

  1. Comparison of maximum specific growth rates and lag times estimated from absorbance and viable count data by different mathematical models.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Dalgaard P; Koutsoumanis K

    2001-01-01

    Maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)) and lag time (lambda) were estimated from viable count and absorbance data and compared for different microorganisms, incubation systems and growth conditions. Data from 176 growth curves and 120 absorbance detection times of serially diluted cultures were evaluated using different mathematical growth models. Accurate estimates of mu(max) and lambda were obtained from individual absorbance growth curves by using the Richard model, with values of the parameter m fixed to 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 to describing different degrees of growth dampening, as well as from absorbance detection times of serially diluted cultures. It is suggested to apply the two techniques complementarily for accurate, rapid and inexpensive estimation of microbial growth parameter values from absorbance data. In contrast, considerable limitations were demonstrated for the ability of the Exponential, the Gompertz and the Logistic models to estimate mu(max) and lambda values accurately from absorbance data. Limitations of these models were revealed due the wide range of growth conditions studies.

  2. Physiological and growth responses of C3 and C4 plants at the Pleistocene glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, B.R.

    1995-06-01

    A C3 plant (Abutilon theophrasti) and a C4 plant (Amaranthus retroflexus) were grown from seed in the Duke University Phytotron under four CO2 concentrations (15 Pa, below the Pleistocene minimum), 27 Pa (pre-industrial), 35 Pa (current), and 70 Pa (future) to examine photosynthetic, growth and reproduction responses of annual plants to historic and future levels of CO2. Net photosynthesis and growth were greatly inhibited at 15 Pa and greatly stimulated at 70 Pa. in the C3 Abutilon but only slightly affected in the C4 Amaranthus. Flower bud initiation was not affected by CO2 treatment in either species but all flower buds in 15 Pa CO2 aborted in the C3 within two days of appearance while no inhibition of reproduction was observed at low CO2 in the C4. Differences in physiology, growth and reproduction to the low levels of atmospheric CO2 of the Pleistocene suggest that competitive interactions of C3 and C4 annuals have changed through geologic time. A major question concerning the survival and evolution of obligate C3 annuals during the CO2 minima of the Pleistocene is raised by the results of this study.

  3. REACH Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucklee, Joanne

    In an effort to provide support for employees and their families, Red Deer College (RDC) developed the Resources, Employees, Assistance, Counselling, and Health (REACH) program. The program is administered by a committee of five people who represent the five major employee groups at the college (i.e., senior administration, middle administration,

  4. Ecotypic variation in growth responses to simulated herbivory: trade-off between maximum relative growth rate and tolerance to defoliation in an annual plant

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Iván D.; Tapia-López, Rosalinda; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that slow-growing plants are more likely to maximize above-ground biomass and fitness when defoliated by herbivores than those with an already high relative growth rate (RGR). Some populations of the annual herb Datura stramonium L. can tolerate foliar damage better than others. The physiological basis of this difference is examined here in a comparative study of two ecotypes that differ in tolerance and maximum growth rate, using a growth analytical approach. One hundred and fifty-four plants of each ecotype grown under controlled conditions were suddenly defoliated (35 % of total leaf area removed) and a similar sample size of plants remained undefoliated (control). Ontogenetic plastic changes in RGR and its growth components [net assimilation rate (NAR), specific leaf area and leaf weight ratio (LWR)] after defoliation were measured to determine whether these plastic changes maximize plant growth and fitness. Different ontogenetic phases of the response were discerned and increased RGR of defoliated plants was detected at the end of the experimental period, but brought about by a different growth component (NAR or LWR) in each ecotype. These changes in RGR are putatively related to increases in fitness in defoliated environments. At the intra-specific scale, data showed a trade-off between the ability to grow under benign environmental conditions and the ability to tolerate resource limitation due to defoliation. PMID:25725085

  5. Ecotypic variation in growth responses to simulated herbivory: trade-off between maximum relative growth rate and tolerance to defoliation in an annual plant.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Iván D; Tapia-López, Rosalinda; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that slow-growing plants are more likely to maximize above-ground biomass and fitness when defoliated by herbivores than those with an already high relative growth rate (RGR). Some populations of the annual herb Datura stramonium L. can tolerate foliar damage better than others. The physiological basis of this difference is examined here in a comparative study of two ecotypes that differ in tolerance and maximum growth rate, using a growth analytical approach. One hundred and fifty-four plants of each ecotype grown under controlled conditions were suddenly defoliated (35 % of total leaf area removed) and a similar sample size of plants remained undefoliated (control). Ontogenetic plastic changes in RGR and its growth components [net assimilation rate (NAR), specific leaf area and leaf weight ratio (LWR)] after defoliation were measured to determine whether these plastic changes maximize plant growth and fitness. Different ontogenetic phases of the response were discerned and increased RGR of defoliated plants was detected at the end of the experimental period, but brought about by a different growth component (NAR or LWR) in each ecotype. These changes in RGR are putatively related to increases in fitness in defoliated environments. At the intra-specific scale, data showed a trade-off between the ability to grow under benign environmental conditions and the ability to tolerate resource limitation due to defoliation. PMID:25725085

  6. Controls on the Growth and Maximum Size of Fault Arrays and Fault Segments--Insights from Experimental Clay Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlische, R. W.; Withjack, M. O.; Ackermann, R. V.; Clifton, A. E.

    2003-12-01

    We have used a series of scaled experimental models with clay to study the nucleation, growth and linkage of fault arrays and their constituent fault segments. We have varied the clay thickness and the magnitude, rate, width, and obliquity of deformation. We have also varied the basal boundary conditions: 1) focussed deformation associated with the edges of moving metal plates or metal blocks, simulating the effects of fault reactivation on a cover sequence, and 2) deformation above a rubber sheet, simulating distributed deformation. For small amounts of strain, the lengths of fault arrays and segments increase with increasing deformation and increase with decreasing deformation rate. Most fault arrays and segments ultimately achieve a `maximum' length. This length depends on mechanical-layer thickness (increasing as thickness increases), deformation-zone width (increasing as width increases), and obliquity (decreasing as obliquity increases). Mechanical-layer thickness and deformation-zone width have an especially strong influence on the 'maximum' length of fault segments. The length of the fault array that develops during fault reactivation is strongly controlled by the length of the underlying reactivated fault, whereas the length of the constituent fault segments is controlled by the factors discussed above. Although a hard-linked fault array ultimately develops from these segments (given enough displacement on the reactivated fault), evidence of the location of former segment boundaries is long-lived. This evidence includes breached relay ramps, fault-displacement folds, and fault strands. The persistence of these features decreases with increasing displacement on the reactivated fault, decreasing thickness of the cover sequence, and decreasing obliquity. As most fault populations have a 'maximum' length, we expect that power-law size distributions will be uncommon. Our experimental models indicate that an exponential size distribution describes most fault populations. An exception is fault populations that form during orthogonal deformation at low strains. At higher strains, these fault populations also exhibit an exponential size distribution, with a power-law to exponential transition occurring at higher strains in thicker mechanical layers. As the maximum length of faults is limited in the experimental models, we expect that the scaling law between length and displacement will change with increasing strain. This may contribute to the large scatter in experimental and natural length-displacement data.

  7. Interannual physiological and growth responses of glacial Juniperus to changes in atmospheric [CO2] since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhart, L. M.; Harris, J. M.; Ward, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, atmospheric [CO2] was as low as 180 ppm and has currently risen to a modern value of 393 ppm as a result of fossil fuel combustion and deforestation. In order to understand how changing [CO2] influenced trees over the last 50,000 years, we analyzed carbon isotope ratios and width of individual tree rings from glacial Juniperus specimens preserved in the Rancho La Brea tar pits in southern California (aged 14-49 kyr BP). Modern trees were also analyzed to compare effects of changing precipitation, temperature and atmospheric [CO2] on physiology and growth. To assess physiological responses, we calculated ci/ca (intercellular [CO2]/atmospheric [CO2]) for each annual ring of each tree. This ratio incorporates numerous aspects of plant physiology, including stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. In addition, we measured ring widths for each sample, and standardized these measurements into indices in order to compare across individuals. Mean ci/ca values remained constant throughout 50,000 years despite major environmental changes, indicating a long-term physiological set point for ci/ca in this group. Constant ci/ca ratios would be maintained through offsetting changes in stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Glacial Juniperus never experienced ci values below 90 ppm, suggesting a survival compensation point for Juniperus. In addition, glacial trees showed significantly reduced interannual variation in ci/ca, even though interannual climatic variability was as high during the LGM in this region as it is today. A lack of variability in ci/ca of glacial trees suggests that tree physiology was dominated by low [CO2], which shows low interannual variation. Modern trees showed high interannual variation in ci/ca, since water availability dominates current physiological responses and varies greatly from year to year. Interestingly, interannual variation in ring width index did not show significant differences between glacial and modern trees, suggesting these trees were adapted to maintain growth under low [CO2]. These adaptations may constrain the ability of modern trees to fully utilize increases in atmospheric [CO2]. These results have significant implications for our understanding of the adaptations of trees to changing [CO2] and indicate that the environmental factors that most strongly influence plant physiology may have changed over geologic time scales.

  8. Temperature profiles of ethanol tolerance: effects of ethanol on the minimum and the maximum temperatures for growth of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Sa-Correia, I.; Van Uden, N.

    1983-06-01

    Difficulties experienced by brewers with yeast performance in the brewing of lager at low temperatures has led the authors to study the effect of ethanol on the minimum temperature for growth (T. min). It has been found that both the maximum temperature (T max) and T min were adversely affected by ethanol and that ethanol tolerance prevailed at intermediate temperatures. (Refs. 8).

  9. AEROSOL NUCLEATION AND GROWTH DURING LAMINAR TUBE FLOW: MAXIMUM SATURATIONS AND NUCLEATION RATES. (R827354C008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approximate method of estimating the maximum saturation, the nucleation rate, and the total number nucleated per second during the laminar flow of a hot vapourgas mixture along a tube with cold walls is described. The basis of the approach is that the temperature an...

  10. On Some Growth Properties of Entire Functions Using Their Maximum Moduli Focusing (p, q)th Relative Order

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Ruiz, Luis Manuel; Datta, Sanjib Kumar; Biswas, Tanmay; Mondal, Golok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We discuss some growth rates of composite entire functions on the basis of the definition of relative (p, q)th order (relative (p, q)th lower order) with respect to another entire function which improve some earlier results of Roy (2010) where p and q are any two positive integers. PMID:25530991

  11. Diet, consumption, and growth of juvenile fringed flounder ( Etropus crossotus); a test of the 'maximum growth/optimum food hypothesis' in a subtropical nursery area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Marcel J. M.

    2003-11-01

    Recent somatic growth of juvenile fringed flounder ( Etropus crossotus) collected in North Inlet (South Carolina, USA) was determined based on the width of the 24 most recently deposited daily increments in sagittal otoliths. Growth rates were estimated using previously published data on the experimentally validated relationship between the daily increment width and the somatic growth. A comparison of the realised growth with experimental data indicated that growth rates in the field were near optimum values determined under ad libitum food conditions. Gut contents analysis of field collected fringed flounder indicated that food consisted predominantly of zooplankton and motile epibenthic prey with calanoid copepods, in particular Pseudodiaptomus coronatus, as the most important food items. There was no clear ontogenetic shift in prey with increasing fish size. Copepods and their eggs remained a significant prey item in even the largest fish examined (>9 cm SL), while larger prey items like polychaete worms, cumaceans, bivalves, and mysids were found in the stomachs of smaller fish. The prey organisms were abundantly available during the period of highest settlement (May through September). Growth rates, biomass, consumption estimates, and prey availability in North Inlet indicated that growth of juvenile fringed flounder is not limited by food, but predominantly determined by water temperature. During the summer months temperature and food supply in North Inlet are near optimal for juvenile fringed flounder. This allows this short-lived species to grow rapidly to attain a mature size and migrate to near-shore waters to reproduce within one growing season.

  12. Variation of maximum tree height and annual shoot growth of Smith fir at various elevations in the Sygera Mountains, southeastern Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yafeng; ?ufar, Katarina; Eckstein, Dieter; Liang, Eryuan

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about tree height and height growth (as annual shoot elongation of the apical part of vertical stems) of coniferous trees growing at various altitudes on the Tibetan Plateau, which provides a high-elevation natural platform for assessing tree growth performance in relation to future climate change. We here investigated the variation of maximum tree height and annual height increment of Smith fir (Abies georgei var. smithii) in seven forest plots (30 m40 m) along two altitudinal transects between 3,800 m and 4,200/4,390 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the Sygera Mountains, southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Four plots were located on north-facing slopes and three plots on southeast-facing slopes. At each site, annual shoot growth was obtained by measuring the distance between successive terminal bud scars along the main stem of 25 trees that were between 2 and 4 m high. Maximum/mean tree height and mean annual height increment of Smith fir decreased with increasing altitude up to the tree line, indicative of a stress gradient (the dominant temperature gradient) along the altitudinal transect. Above-average mean minimum summer (particularly July) temperatures affected height increment positively, whereas precipitation had no significant effect on shoot growth. The time series of annual height increments of Smith fir can be used for the reconstruction of past climate on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. In addition, it can be expected that the rising summer temperatures observed in the recent past and anticipated for the future will enhance Smith fir's growth throughout its altitudinal distribution range. PMID:22396738

  13. Variation of Maximum Tree Height and Annual Shoot Growth of Smith Fir at Various Elevations in the Sygera Mountains, Southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; ?ufar, Katarina; Eckstein, Dieter; Liang, Eryuan

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about tree height and height growth (as annual shoot elongation of the apical part of vertical stems) of coniferous trees growing at various altitudes on the Tibetan Plateau, which provides a high-elevation natural platform for assessing tree growth performance in relation to future climate change. We here investigated the variation of maximum tree height and annual height increment of Smith fir (Abies georgei var. smithii) in seven forest plots (30 m40 m) along two altitudinal transects between 3,800 m and 4,200/4,390 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the Sygera Mountains, southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Four plots were located on north-facing slopes and three plots on southeast-facing slopes. At each site, annual shoot growth was obtained by measuring the distance between successive terminal bud scars along the main stem of 25 trees that were between 2 and 4 m high. Maximum/mean tree height and mean annual height increment of Smith fir decreased with increasing altitude up to the tree line, indicative of a stress gradient (the dominant temperature gradient) along the altitudinal transect. Above-average mean minimum summer (particularly July) temperatures affected height increment positively, whereas precipitation had no significant effect on shoot growth. The time series of annual height increments of Smith fir can be used for the reconstruction of past climate on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. In addition, it can be expected that the rising summer temperatures observed in the recent past and anticipated for the future will enhance Smith fir's growth throughout its altitudinal distribution range. PMID:22396738

  14. Strong solution required for maximum reach of ORT.

    PubMed

    1995-06-01

    The Minister of State for Health and Family Welfare told participants at the National Symposium on Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) in New Delhi, India, that early use of home available fluids (HAFs), oral rehydration solution (ORS), and continued feeding prevent deaths related to diarrheal disease. Diarrhea is responsible for 20% of all child deaths in India. The concept of ORT has been known since the 15th century BC. ORT is a simple, inexpensive, and very accessible remedy for the prevention and treatment of dehydration, whatever the cause. The median diarrhea incidence during the mid-1980s ranged from 1.5 to 4.7 episodes per child per year in 11 states of India. Six years after the launching of the National ORT Programme, the mean 1991 incidence ranged from 1.2 to 3.5 episodes/child/year. The incidence in slum areas was 10.5 episodes/child/year. During 1983-1993, ORT use stood at only 37% (96% in Uruguay). The Health Ministry aims to increase coverage to 80% by 1995. Reasons for limited ORT use in India include lack of ORT awareness among physicians and other health providers, doubt of ORT's efficacy, physician preference for anti-diarrheals, misconceptions, poor accessibility to ORS, and poor acceptance of HAFs. The new rice-based ORS (Super-ORS) has slightly better nutritive value than other ORS and reduces total stool output in persons with acute diarrhea. The reduction in total stool output is especially substantial in adult cholera patients but not in child cholera patients. Amino-acids have not improved the efficacy of ORS. Sodium imbalances in ORS can cause hyper- or hyponatremia and even death. High levels of glucose in ORS causes osmotic diarrhea. Any ORS-product with mono- or polysaccharide or saccharine should be banned. ORT education and training should target general practitioners, since they see more than 60% of all reported diarrhea cases. PMID:12179190

  15. FOSTERING MAXIMUM GROWTH IN CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOWER, ELI M.

    SINCE SYMBOLS ARE SEEN AS REPRESENTATIVES OF THINGS, ACTION, RELATIONSHIPS, AND FEELINGS, YOUNG CHILDREN NEED TO LEARN TO PROCESS SYMBOLS. THE QUALITY OF A CHILD'S EDUCATION IN MANAGING AND UTILIZING SYMBOLS WILL AFFECT HIS ABILITY TO WORK, LOVE, AND GROW. SOME MAJOR IDEAS IN OUR CONCEPTUALIZATIONS OF MAN AND HIS DEVELOPMENT HAVE BEEN UPROOTED IN

  16. Reaching peak emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Robert B.; Canadell, Josep G.; Le Quéré, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry ceased in the past two years, despite continued economic growth. Decreased coal use in China was largely responsible, coupled with slower global growth in petroleum and faster growth in renewables.

  17. Maximum Jailbreak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, B.

    First formulated one hundred and fifty years ago by the heretical scholar Nikolai Federov, the doctrine of cosmism begins with an absolute refusal to treat the most basic factors conditioning life on Earth gravity and death as necessary constraints on action. As manifest through the intoxicated cheers of its early advocates that humans should storm the heavens and conquer death, cosmism's foundational gesture was to conceive of the earth as a trap. Its duty was therefore to understand the duty of philosophy, economics and design to be the creation of means to escape it. This could be regarded as a jailbreak at the maximum possible scale, a heist in which the human species could steal itself from the vault of the Earth. After several decades of relative disinterest new space ventures are inspiring scientific, technological and popular imaginations, this essay explores what kind of cosmism might be constructed today. In this paper cosmism's position as a means of escape is both reviewed and evaluated by reflecting on the potential of technology that actually can help us achieve its aims and also through the lens and state-ofthe-art philosophy of accelerationism, which seeks to outrun modern tropes by intensifying them.

  18. Clonal Clustering Using 10-Gene Multilocus Sequence Typing Reveals an Association Between Genotype and Listeria monocytogenes Maximum Growth Rate in Defined Medium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Silin; Wiedmann, Martin; Gardner, Alexandra L; Brown, Ana' M; Boor, Kathryn J; Bergholz, Teresa M

    2015-12-01

    We used a 10-gene (10G) multilocus sequence typing scheme to investigate the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of 124 Listeria monocytogenes strains across major lineages, major serotypes, and seven epidemic clones that have been previously associated with outbreaks. The 124 isolates proved to be diverse, with a total of 81 sequence types (10G-STs) belonging to 13 clonal complexes (CCs), where all STs of the same CC differ from one another in up to 3 of the 10 alleles (named as 10G-triple-locus-variant-clonal-complexes [10G-TLV-CCs]). Phenotypic characterization for 105 of the 124 strains showed that L. monocytogenes had variable maximum growth rate (?max) in a defined medium at 16C, and classification by lineage or serotype was not able to reflect the genetic basis for the difference of this phenotype. Among the six major 10G-TLV-CCs, 10G-TLV-CC4 that included lineage I strains had significantly lower ?max (Tukey honestly significant difference adjusted [adj.] p?growth of these L. monocytogenes isolates under nutrient-limited conditions among some of the CCs. However, the other three (10G-TLV-CC2, 6, and 10) of the six major 10G-TLV-CCs containing either lineage I or lineage II strains did not show significantly different ?max compared to the others (adj. p?

  19. Reaching affects saccade trajectories.

    PubMed

    Tipper, S P; Howard, L A; Paul, M A

    2001-01-01

    The pre-motor theory suggests that, when attention is oriented to a location, the motor systems that are involved in achieving current behavioural goals are activated. For example, when a task requires accurate reaching, attention to a location activates the motor circuits controlling saccades and manual reaches. These actions involve separate neural systems for the control of eye and hand, but we believe that the selection processes acting on neural population codes within these systems are similar and can affect each other. The attentional effect can be revealed in the subsequent movement. The present study shows that the path the eye takes as it saccades to a target is affected by whether a reach to the target is also produced. This effect is interpreted as the influence of a hand-centred frame used in reaching on the spatial frame of reference required for the saccade. PMID:11206286

  20. Reaching for the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Dorothy Givens

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Mae Jemison is the world's first woman astronaut of color who continues to reach for the stars. Jemison was recently successful in leading a team that has secured a $500,000 federal grant to make interstellar space travel a reality. The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence (named after Jemison's mother) was selected in June by the Defense…

  1. Reaching for the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper-Davis, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    Describes "Reaching for the Stars," a program which develops teaming and mentoring skills in senior physics students. Phase 1 requires student pairs to design a rocket; Phase 2 pairs seniors with gifted second graders who build the rocket from written instructions; and in Phase 3, pairs of seniors create a children's storybook explaining one of

  2. Reaching Black Men. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gassman, Marybeth

    2010-01-01

    Journalist Elizabeth Redden brings to the surface several salient issues in her article entitled, "Reaching Black Men." First, she illuminates that fact that access is not enough when it comes to educating African American men. Second, she points to the importance of having campus-wide initiatives to support the success of Black men. And lastly,

  3. REACH. Refrigeration Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Rufus; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of refrigeration. The instructional units focus on refrigeration fundamentals, tubing and pipe, refrigerants, troubleshooting, window air conditioning, and…

  4. REACH. Major Appliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Charles; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of major appliances. The instructional units focus on installation of appliances, troubleshooting washing machines, troubleshooting electric dryers,…

  5. REACH. Electricity Units. Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gene; Sappe, Hoyt

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals and electric motors. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit sheet,…

  6. REACH. Heating Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Carter; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized units in the area of heating. The instructional units focus on electric heating systems, gas heating systems, and oil burning systems. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit…

  7. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  8. [Bluetongue disease reaches Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, M; Griot, C; Chaignat, V; Perler, L; Thr, B

    2008-02-01

    Since 2006 bluetongue disease is rapidly spreading across Europe and reached Switzerland in October 2007. In the present article a short overview about the disease and the virus is given, and the first three clinical bluetongue disease cases in cattle, and the respective laboratory findings are presented. PMID:18369049

  9. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and

  10. REACH. Refrigeration Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Rufus; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of refrigeration. The instructional units focus on refrigeration fundamentals, tubing and pipe, refrigerants, troubleshooting, window air conditioning, and

  11. Reaching Your Fitness Goals

    MedlinePLUS

    Everyday Fitness Ideas from the National Institute on Aging at NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Reaching Your Fitness Goals Youll begin to see results in ... longer, and more easily. As you increase your fitness level, you also might find that you need ...

  12. "Brown's" Far Reaching Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    Although the 1954 "Brown v. Board of Education" U.S. Supreme Court decision changed the face of American education forever, few individuals at that time could have fully realized its far-reaching implications. Certainly, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Director Thurgood Marshall in his arguments was focusing on

  13. REACH. Electricity Units. Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gene; Sappe, Hoyt

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals and electric motors. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit sheet,

  14. Reaching for the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Dorothy Givens

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Mae Jemison is the world's first woman astronaut of color who continues to reach for the stars. Jemison was recently successful in leading a team that has secured a $500,000 federal grant to make interstellar space travel a reality. The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence (named after Jemison's mother) was selected in June by the Defense

  15. Pretoria Centre Reaches Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Bosman

    2014-08-01

    On 5 July 2014 six members of the Pretoria Centre of ASSA braved the light pollution of one of the shopping malls in Centurion to reach out to shoppers a la John Dobson and to show them the moon, Mars and Saturn. Although the centre hosts regular monthly public observing evenings, it was felt that we should take astronomy to the people rather than wait for the people to come to us.

  16. Effects of High-Flow Experiments from Glen Canyon Dam on Abundance, Growth, and Survival Rates of Early Life Stages of Rainbow Trout in the Lees Ferry Reach of the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korman, Josh; Kaplinski, Matthew; Melis, Theodore S.

    2010-01-01

    High-flow experiments (HFEs) from Glen Canyon Dam are primarily intended to conserve fine sediment and improve habitat conditions for native fish in the Colorado River as it flows through Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. These experimental flows also have the potential to affect the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population in the Lees Ferry tailwater reach immediately below the dam, which supports a highly valued recreational fishery and likely influences the abundance of rainbow trout in Grand Canyon. Understanding how flow regimes affect the survival and growth of juvenile rainbow trout is critical to interpreting trends in adult abundance. This study reports on the effects of HFEs in 2004 and 2008 on early life stages of rainbow trout in the Lees Ferry reach on the basis of monthly sampling of redds (egg nests) and the abundance of the age-0 trout (fertilization to about 1 to 2 months from emergence) and their growth during a 7-year period between 2003 and 2009. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the March 2008 HFE resulted in a large increase in early survival rates of age-0 trout because of an improvement in habitat conditions. A stock-recruitment analysis demonstrated that age-0 abundance in July 2008 was more than fourfold higher than expected, given the number of viable eggs that produced these fish. A hatch-date analysis showed that early survival rates were much higher for cohorts that hatched about 1 month after the 2008 HFE (about April 15, 2008) relative to those fish that hatched before this date. These cohorts, fertilized after the 2008 HFE, would have emerged into a benthic invertebrate community that had recovered, and was possibly enhanced by, the HFE. Interannual differences in growth of age-0 trout, determined on the basis of otolith microstructure, support this hypothesis. Growth rates in the summer and fall of 2008 (0.44 mm/day) were virtually the same as in 2006 (0.46 mm/day), the highest recorded during 6 years, even though abundance was eightfold greater in 2008. We speculate that the 60-hour-long 2008 HFE (with peak magnitude about twice that of the annual peak flow during the previous 4 years) increased interstitial spaces in the gravel bed substrate and food availability or quality, leading to higher early survival of recently emerged trout and better growth of these fish through summer and fall. Abundance in 2009 was more than twofold higher than expected, given the estimated number of viable eggs deposited in that year, perhaps indicating that the effect of the 2008 HFE on early life stages was somewhat persistent. In a 3-week interval that spanned the November 2004 HFE, abundance of age-0 trout that were approximately 7 months old from hatch experienced about a threefold decline, compared to the approximately twofold decrease observed between November and December 2008. Abundance of age-0 trout that were approximately 10 months old from hatch was very similar across sampling trips that spanned the March 2008 HFE. It is uncertain whether the decline in abundance after the November 2004 HFE was the result of higher flow-induced mortality or higher flow-induced downstream dispersal. A focused monitoring effort in Marble Canyon (the reach immediately downstream of the Lees Ferry tailwater) before and after future HFEs is recommended to resolve this uncertainty. Relatively detailed monitoring of early life stages-such as the program described in this study-is essential to establish linkages between Glen Canyon Dam operations, or possibly other factors, and trends in the abundance of important nonnative and native fish populations living downstream within Grand Canyon National Park.

  17. Effects of Experimental High Flow Releases and Increased Fluctuations in Flow from Glen Canyon Dam on Abundance, Growth, and Survival Rates of Early Life Stages of Rainbow Trout in the Lee's Ferry Reach of the Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Josh

    2010-05-01

    The abundance of adult fish populations is controlled by the growth and survival rates of early life stages. Evaluating the effects of flow regimes on early life stages is therefore critical to determine how these regimes affect the abundance of adult populations. Experimental high flow releases from Glen Canyon Dam, primarily intended to conserve fine sediment and improve habitat conditions for native fish in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, AZ, have been conducted in 1996, 2004, and 2008. These flows potentially affect the Lee's Ferry reach rainbow trout population, located immediately downstream of the dam, which supports a highly valued fishery and likely influences the abundance of rainbow trout in Grand Canyon. Due to concerns about negative effects of high trout abundance on endangered native fish, hourly variation in flow from Glen Canyon Dam was experimentally increased between 2003 and 2005 to reduce trout abundance. This study reports on the effects of experimental high flow releases and fluctuating flows on early life stages of rainbow trout in the Lee's Ferry reach based on monthly sampling of redds (egg nests) and the abundance and growth of age-0 trout between 2003 and 2009. Data on spawn timing, spawning elevations, and intergravel temperatures were integrated in a model to estimate the magnitude and seasonal trend in incubation mortality resulting from redd dewatering due to fluctuations in flow. Experimental fluctuations from January through March promoted spawning at higher elevations where the duration of dewatering was longer and intergravel temperatures exceeded lethal thresholds. Flow-dependent incubation mortality rates were 24% (2003) and 50% (2004) in years with higher flow fluctuations, compared to 5-11% under normal operations (2006-2009). Spatial and temporal predictions of mortality were consistent with direct observations of egg mortality determined from the excavation of 125 redds. The amount of variation in backcalculated hatch date distributions predicted by flow-independent (84-93%) and flow-dependent (82-91%) incubation loss models were similar. Age-0 abundance was generally independent of viable egg deposition, except in one year when egg deposition was 10-fold lower due to reduced spawning activity. There was no evidence from the hatch date or stock-recruitment analysis that flow-dependent incubation losses, although large in experimental years, affected the abundance of the age-0 population. The data indicate that strong compensation in survival rates shortly after emergence mitigated the impact of flow-dependent losses. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrated that the March 2008 high flow experiment (HFE) resulted in a large increase in early survival rates (fertilization to ~1-2 months from emergence) of age-0 trout due an improvement in habitat conditions. A stock-recruitment analysis indicated that age-0 abundance in July 2008 was over four-fold higher than expected given the number of viable redds that produced these fish. A hatch date analysis indicated that early survival rates were much higher for cohorts that emerged about two months after the HFE. These cohorts, which were fertilized after the HFE, were not exposed to high flows and emerged into better quality habitat. Inter annual differences in growth of age-0 trout based on otolith microstructure support this hypothesis. Growth rates in the summer and fall of 2008 (0.44 mm·day-1) were virtually the same as in 2006 (0.46 mm·day-1), the highest recorded over six years, even though abundance was eight-fold greater in 2008. I speculate that high flows in 2008 increased interstitial spaces in the substrate and food availability or quality, leading to higher early survival of recently emerged trout and better growth during summer and fall. Abundance in 2009 was over two-fold higher than expected, possibly indicating that the effect of the HFE on early life stages was somewhat persistent.

  18. Europe reaches the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    A complex package of tests on new technologies was successfully performed during the cruise to the Moon, while the spacecraft was getting ready for the scientific investigations which will come next. These technologies pave the way for future planetary missions. SMART-1 reached its closest point to the lunar surface so far - its first perilune - at an altitude of about 5000 kilometres at 18:48 Central European Time (CET) on 15 November. Just hours before that, at 06:24 CET, SMART-1s solar-electric propulsion system (or ion engine) was started up and is now being fired for the delicate manoeuvre that will stabilise the spacecraft in lunar orbit. During this crucial phase, the engine will run almost continuously for the next four days, and then for a series of shorter burns, allowing SMART-1 to reach its final operational orbit by making ever-decreasing loops around the Moon. By about mid-January, SMART-1 will be orbiting the Moon at altitudes between 300 kilometres (over the lunar south pole) and 3000 kilometres (over the lunar north pole), beginning its scientific observations. The main purpose of the first part of the SMART-1 mission, concluding with the arrival at the Moon, was to demonstrate new spacecraft technologies. In particular, the solar-electric propulsion system was tested over a long spiralling trip to the Moon of more than 84 million kilometres. This is a distance comparable to an interplanetary cruise. For the first time ever, gravity-assist manoeuvres, which use the gravitational pull of the approaching Moon, were performed by an electrically-propelled spacecraft. The success of this test is important to the prospects for future interplanetary missions using ion engines. SMART-1 has demonstrated new techniques for eventually achieving autonomous spacecraft navigation. The OBAN experiment tested navigation software on ground computers to determine the exact position and velocity of the spacecraft using images of celestial objects taken by the AMIE camera on SMART-1 as references. Once used on board future spacecraft, the technique demonstrated by OBAN will allow spacecraft to know where they are in space and how fast they are moving, limiting the need for intervention by ground control teams. SMART-1 also carried out deep-space communication tests, with the KaTE and RSIS experiments, consisting of testing radio transmissions at very high frequencies compared to traditional radio frequencies. Such transmissions will allow the transfer of ever-increasing volumes of scientific data from future spacecraft. With the Laser Link experiment, SMART-1 tested the feasibility of pointing a laser beam from Earth at a spacecraft moving at deep-space distances for future communication purposes. During the cruise, to prepare for the lunar science phase, SMART-1 made preliminary tests on four miniaturised instruments, which are being used for the first time in space: the AMIE camera, which has already imaged Earth, the Moon and two total lunar eclipses from space, the D-CIXS and XSM X-ray instruments, and the SIR infrared spectrometer. In all, SMART-1 clocked up 332 orbits around Earth. It fired its engine 289 times during the cruise phase, operating for a total of about 3700 hours. Only 59 kilograms of xenon propellant were used (out of 82 kilograms). Overall, the engine performed extremely well, enabling the spacecraft to reach the Moon two months earlier than expected. The extra fuel available also allowed the mission designers to significantly reduce the altitude of the final orbit around the Moon. This closer approach to the surface will be even more favourable for the science observations that start in January. The extra fuel will also be used to boost the spacecraft back into a stable orbit, after six months of operations around the Moon, in June, if the scientific mission is extended.

  19. The most rapid possible growth of the maximum modulus of a canonical product of noninteger order with a prescribed majorant of the counting function of zeros

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Anton Yu

    2013-05-31

    Asymptotically sharp estimates for the logarithm of the maximum modulus of a canonical product are obtained in the case when the counting function of zeros has a prescribed majorant, while the arguments of the zeros can be arbitrary. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  20. Reaching Beyond The Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Mariah; Rosenthal, L.; Gaughan, A.; Hopkins, E.

    2014-01-01

    Strawbridge Observatory at Haverford College is home to a undergraduate-led public observing program. Our program holds ~once monthly public events throughout the academic year that take advantage of eyepiece observing on our 16-inch and 12-inch telescopes as well as of the classroom, library, and projection system. These resources allow us to organize a variety of astronomy related activities that are engaging for individuals of all ages: accessible student talks, current film screenings and even arts and crafts for the families who attend with young children. These events aim to spark curiosity in others about scientific discovery and about the remarkable nature of the world in which we live. In addition to exciting local families about astronomy, this program has excited Haverford students from a range of disciplines about both science and education. Being entirely student led means that we are able to take the initiative in planning, coordinating and running all events, fostering an atmosphere of collaboration, experimentation and commitment amongst our volunteers. Additionally, this program is one of the few at Haverford that regularly reaches beyond the campus walls to promote and build relationships with the outside community. In light of this, our program presents a distinctive and enlightening opportunity for student volunteers: we get to use our scientific backgrounds to educate a general audience, while also learning from them about how to communicate and inspire in others the excitement we feel about the subject of astronomy. The work on this project has been supported by NSF AST-1151462.

  1. Reaching for the Unreachable: Reorganization of Reaching with Walking

    PubMed Central

    Grzyb, Beata J.; Smith, Linda B.; del Pobil, Angel P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that reaching and walking behaviors may be linked developmentally as reaching changes at the onset of walking. Here we report new evidence on an apparent loss of the distinction between the reachable and nonreachable distances as children start walking. The experiment compared nonwalkers, walkers with help, and independent walkers in a reaching task to targets at varying distances. Reaching attempts, contact, leaning, and communication behaviors were recorded. Most of the children reached for the unreachable objects the first time it was presented. Nonwalkers, however, reached less on the subsequent trials showing clear adjustment of their reaching decisions with the failures. On the contrary, walkers consistently attempted reaches to targets at unreachable distances. We suggest that these reaching errors may result from inappropriate integration of reaching and locomotor actions, attention control and near/far visual space. We propose a reward-mediated model implemented on a NAO humanoid robot that replicates the main results from our study showing an increase in reaching attempts to nonreachable distances after the onset of walking. PMID:26110046

  2. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harremoes, P.; Topse, F.

    2001-09-01

    In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over the development of natural languages. In fact, we are able to relate our theoretical findings to the empirically found Zipf's law which involves statistical aspects of words in a language. The apparent irregularity inherent in models with entropy loss turns out to imply desirable stability properties of languages.

  3. Observed reach trajectory influences executed reach kinematics in prehension.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Robert M; Edwards, Martin G

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the observation of action can modulate motor performance. This literature has focused on manipulating the observed goal of the action, rather than examining whether action observation effects could be elicited by changing observed kinematics alone. In the study presented here, observed reach trajectory kinematics unrelated to the goal of the action were manipulated in order to examine whether observed movement kinematics alone could influence the action of the observer. Participants observed an experimenter grasp a target object using either a normal or an exaggeratedly high reaching action (as though reaching over an invisible obstacle). When participants observed the experimenter perform actions with a high reach trajectory, their own movements took on aspects of the observed action, showing greater wrist height throughout their reaching trajectory than under conditions in which they observed normal reaching actions. The data are discussed in relation to previous findings which suggest that kinematic aspects of observed movements can prime action through kinematic or intention based matching processes. PMID:21287427

  4. An Assessment of EU 2020 Strategy: Too Far to Reach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colak, Mehmet Selman; Ege, Aylin

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, EU adopted a new growth strategy which includes three growth priorities and five headline targets to be reached by 2020. The aim of this paper is to investigate the current performance of the EU member and candidate states in achieving these growth priorities and the overall strategy target by allocating the headline targets into the…

  5. Estimation of alga growth stage and lipid content growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embaye, Tsegereda N. (Inventor); Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Method and system for estimating a growth stage of an alga in an ambient fluid. Measured light beam absorption or reflection values through or from the alga and through an ambient fluid, in each of two or more wavelength sub-ranges, are compared with reference light beam absorption values for corresponding wavelength sub-ranges for in each alga growth stage to determine (1) which alga growth stage, if any, is more likely and (2) whether estimated lipid content of the alga is increasing or has peaked. Alga growth is preferably terminated when lipid content has approximately reached a maximum value.

  6. Maximum a Posteriori Maximum Entropy Signal Denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghouane, Abd-Krim; Knockaert, Luc

    2007-11-01

    When fitting wavelet based models, shrinkage of the empirical wavelet coefficients is an effective tool for signal denoising. Based on different approaches, different shrinkage functions have been proposed in the literature. The shrinkage functions derived using Bayesian estimation theory depend on the prior used on the wavelet coefficients. However, no simple and direct method exists for the choice of the prior. In this paper a new method based on maximum entropy considerations is proposed for the construction of the prior on the wavelet coefficients. The new shrinkage function is obtained by coupling this prior to maximum a posteriori arguments. A comparison with classical shrinkage functions is given in a simulation example of image denoising in order to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed thresholding method.

  7. Reaching ignition in the tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-06-01

    This review covers the following areas: (1) the physics of burning plasmas, (2) plasma physics requirements for reaching ignition, (3) design studies for ignition devices, and (4) prospects for an ignition project. (MOW)

  8. Maximum power tracking

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, G.

    1983-03-01

    By definition, a maximum power tracking device causes the photovoltaic array to operate on the locus of maximum power points within a specified accuracy. There are limitations to the application of maximum power tracking. A prerequisite is that the load be capable of absorbing all of the power availble at all times. Battery chargers, electrical heaters, water pumps, and most significantly, returning power to the utility grid, are prime examples of applications that are adaptable to maximum power tracking. Maximum power tracking is available to either dc or ac loads. An inverter equipped with a means of changing input voltage by controlling its input impedance can deliver maximum power to ac loads. The inverter can be fixed or variable frequency and fixed or variable voltage, but must be compatible with the ac load. The discussion includes applications, techniques, and cost factors.

  9. Variability and Constancy in Cellular Growth of Arabidopsis Sepals.

    PubMed

    Tauriello, Gerardo; Meyer, Heather M; Smith, Richard S; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2015-12-01

    Growth of tissues is highly reproducible; yet, growth of individual cells in a tissue is highly variable, and neighboring cells can grow at different rates. We analyzed the growth of epidermal cell lineages in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) sepal to determine how the growth curves of individual cell lineages relate to one another in a developing tissue. To identify underlying growth trends, we developed a continuous displacement field to predict spatially averaged growth rates. We showed that this displacement field accurately describes the growth of sepal cell lineages and reveals underlying trends within the variability of in vivo cellular growth. We found that the tissue, individual cell lineages, and cell walls all exhibit growth rates that are initially low, accelerate to a maximum, and decrease again. Accordingly, these growth curves can be represented by sigmoid functions. We examined the relationships among the cell lineage growth curves and surprisingly found that all lineages reach the same maximum growth rate relative to their size. However, the cell lineages are not synchronized; each cell lineage reaches this same maximum relative growth rate but at different times. The heterogeneity in observed growth results from shifting the same underlying sigmoid curve in time and scaling by size. Thus, despite the variability in growth observed in our study and others, individual cell lineages in the developing sepal follow similarly shaped growth curves. PMID:26432876

  10. The Waldmeier rule and early diagnostics of the maximum of the current solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Kuleshova, A. I.

    2012-10-01

    The well known Waldmeier rule and its modifications applied to forecasting of the solar activity are discussed. The maximum annual mean rate of the increase in the magnetic flux observed on the growth branch of the cycle is proposed as a predicting (diagnosing) parameter for the amplitude of the cycle currently in progress. The maximum Wolf number of the current (24th) cycle is estimated to reach 104 (12) or more, and to occur in 2013 or later. The yearly average Wolf numbers observed during the 24th cycle are presented.

  11. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2014-02-18

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law. PMID:24477692

  12. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Adam S.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2014-01-01

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law. PMID:24477692

  13. Reaching All Students with Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Gilbert, Ed.; Driscoll, Mark, Ed.

    The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics'"Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics" and "Professional Standards for Teaching Mathematics" reflect the belief that all students can learn a significant core of high-quality mathematics. Recognizing the magnitude of the task of reaching all students, this book was put together

  14. REACH. Residential Electrical Wiring Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansley, Jimmy; Ennis, Mike

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of residential electrical wiring. The instructional units focus on grounded outlets, service entrance, and blueprint reading. Each unit follows a typical format…

  15. Project REACH. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Alan L.; And Others

    This document describes a pilot adult literacy program called Project REACH (Reading, Education, Achievement), which was begun in 1987 in New York by the Governor's Office for Employee Relations (GOER) and the Civil Service Employees' Association (CSEA). Following an executive summary, an introduction sets the stage by explaining the need for the

  16. PNW RIVER REACH FILE DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Federal and state agencies, and NW Indian Tribes has produced a 1:100,000-scale River Reach data layer for the Pacific Northwest that will serve water-resource management applications for the next decade or more. The Pacific N...

  17. Feeding a diet contaminated with ochratoxin A for chickens at the maximum level recommended by the EU for poultry feeds (0.1 mg/kg). 1. Effects on growth and slaughter performance, haematological and serum traits.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, L; Salamano, G; Mellia, E; Gennero, M S; Doglione, L; Cavallarin, L; Tarantola, M; Forneris, G; Schiavone, A

    2013-05-01

    The European Commission Recommendation 2006/576/EC, suggests that the maximum level of Ochratoxin A (OTA) in poultry feeds should be set at 0.1 mg OTA/kg. Thirty-six one-day-old male Hubburd broiler chickens were divided into two groups, a Control (basal diet) and an Ochratoxin A (basal diet + 0.1 mg OTA/kg) group. The growth and slaughter performance traits were recorded. The liver, spleen, bursa of Fabricius and thymus weights were measured. The erythrocyte and leukocyte numbers were assayed in blood samples, and the heterophils to lymphocytes (H/L) ratio was determined. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), lysozyme, the total protein and the electrophoretic pattern were evaluated in serum samples. Liver enzymes (alanino aminotransferase, ALT and aspartate aminotransferase, AST) and kidney function parameters (uric acid and creatinine) were quantified. The results revealed that feeding a 0.1 mg OTA/kg contaminated diet to chicks caused a decrease in the absolute thymus weight (p < 0.05) and a lower total protein (p < 0.01), albumin (p < 0.01), alpha (p < 0.05), beta (p = 0.001) and gamma (p = 0.001) globulins serum concentration in the Ochratoxin A group. Moreover, the albumin-to-globulin (A/G) ratio of the OTA-treated animals resulted to be higher (p < 0.05). Feeding broiler chickens, a diet contaminated with the maximum level admitted by the European Commission Recommendation (0.1 mg OTA/kg), did not affect the animal performance, slaughter traits, organ weights, haematological parameters, liver enzyme or renal function parameters concentrations but had an overall immunosuppressant effect, with reduction in the thymus weight and of the total serum protein, albumin, alpha, beta and gamma globulins concentration. PMID:23639013

  18. Records Reaching Recording Data Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresik, G. W. L.; Siebe, S.; Drewello, R.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies) is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  19. Environmental Degradation, Disproportionality, and the Double Diversion: Reaching out, Reaching ahead, and Reaching beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenburg, William R.

    2006-01-01

    Rather than seeking ivory-tower isolation, members of the Rural Sociological Society have always been distinguished by a willingness to work with specialists from a broad range of disciplines, and to work on some of the world's most challenging problems. What is less commonly recognized is that the willingness to reach beyond disciplinary

  20. Mirror versus parallel bimanual reaching

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In spite of their importance to everyday function, tasks that require both hands to work together such as lifting and carrying large objects have not been well studied and the full potential of how new technology might facilitate recovery remains unknown. Methods To help identify the best modes for self-teleoperated bimanual training, we used an advanced haptic/graphic environment to compare several modes of practice. In a 2-by-2 study, we compared mirror vs. parallel reaching movements, and also compared veridical display to one that transforms the right hand’s cursor to the opposite side, reducing the area that the visual system has to monitor. Twenty healthy, right-handed subjects (5 in each group) practiced 200 movements. We hypothesized that parallel reaching movements would be the best performing, and attending to one visual area would reduce the task difficulty. Results The two-way comparison revealed that mirror movement times took an average 1.24 s longer to complete than parallel. Surprisingly, subjects’ movement times moving to one target (attending to one visual area) also took an average of 1.66 s longer than subjects moving to two targets. For both hands, there was also a significant interaction effect, revealing the lowest errors for parallel movements moving to two targets (p < 0.001). This was the only group that began and maintained low errors throughout training. Conclusion Combined with other evidence, these results suggest that the most intuitive reaching performance can be observed with parallel movements with a veridical display (moving to two separate targets). These results point to the expected levels of challenge for these bimanual training modes, which could be used to advise therapy choices in self-neurorehabilitation. PMID:23837908

  1. Physics Reach at Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Maria

    2007-11-27

    The physics reach at future colliders is discussed, with focus on the Higgs sector. First we present the Standard Model and some results obtained at the existing high-energy hadron collider, Tevatron, together with the corresponding expectations for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which starts operating in 2008. Then we discuss important low energy measurements: the anomalous magnetic moment for muon and the leptonic B-decay together with b{yields}s{gamma}. Finally the potential of the planned e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) and its possible option Photon Linear Collider (PLC), e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma}, is shortly presented.

  2. Reaching the Retarded Through Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Bernice B.; Shultz, Joyce B.

    Included in the manual on art are suggestions concerning growth through a good classroom climate, orderly arrangements, displays, and a good visual experience; a view of development through art, concept differentiation, motor and sensory skills, self fulfillment and thought processes, and art as therapy; and the art program itself. The program

  3. Maximum Likelihood Additivity Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takane, Yoshio

    1982-01-01

    A maximum likelihood estimation procedure was developed to fit weighted and unweighted additive models of conjoint data obtained by categorical rating, paired comparisons or directional ranking methods. Practical uses of the procedure are presented to demonstrate various advantages of the procedure as a statistical method. (Author/JKS)

  4. Maximum Likelihood Additivity Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takane, Yoshio

    A maximum likelihood estimation procedure is developed for the simple and the weighted additive models. The data are assumed to be taken by either one of the following methods: (1) categorical ratings--the subject is asked to rate a set of stimuli with respect to an attribute of the stimuli on rating scales with a relatively few observation…

  5. Accessible Buildings for People with Walking and Reaching Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinfeld, Edward; And Others

    Research was reviewed and conducted regarding the accessibility of buildings for physically disabled persons. Data was produced regarding anthropometrics (eye level and reach limits for ambulant, semiambulant, and wheelchair bound persons); wheelchair maneuvers; speed and distance (maximum travel distances for people with limitations of stamina);…

  6. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000?C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) delivers high quality ZnMgO-ZnO quantum well structures. Other thin film techniques such as PLD or MOCVD are also widely used. The main problem at present is to consistently achieve reliable p-type doping. For this topic, see also Chap. 5. In the past years, there have been numerous publications on p-type doping of ZnO, as well as ZnO p-n junctions and light emitting diodes (LEDs). However, a lot of these reports are in one way or the other inconsistent or at least incomplete. It is quite clear from optical data that once a reliable hole injection can be achieved, high brightness ZnO LEDs should be possible. In contrast to that expectation, none of the LEDs reported so far shows efficient light emission, as would be expected from a reasonable quality ZnO-based LED. See also Chap. 13. As a matter of fact, there seems to be no generally accepted and reliable technique for p-type doping available at present. The reason for this is the unfavorable position of the band structure of ZnO relative to the vacuum level, with a very low lying valence band. See also Fig. 5.1. This makes the incorporation of electrically active acceptors difficult. Another difficulty is the huge defect density in ZnO. There are many indications that defects play a major role in transport and doping. In order to solve the doping problem, it is generally accepted that the quality of the ZnO material grown by the various techniques needs to be improved. Therefore, the optimization of ZnO epitaxy is thought to play a key role in the further development of this material system. Besides being used as an active material in optoelectronic devices, ZnO plays a major role as transparent contact material in thin film solar cells. Polycrystalline, heavily n-type doped ZnO is used for this, combining a high electrical conductivity with a good optical transparency. In this case, ZnO thin films are fabricated by large area growth techniques such as sputtering. For this and other applications, see also Chap. 13.

  7. Infrastructure for Reaching Disadvantaged Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Hovenga, Evelyn J. S.; Hovel, Joe; Klotz, Jeanette; Robins, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Both consumers and health service providers need access to up-to-date information, including patient and practice guidelines, that allows them to make decisions in partnership about individual and public health in line with the primary health care model of health service delivery. Only then is it possible for patient preferences to be considered while the health of the general population is improved. The Commonwealth Government of Australia has allocated $250 million over five years, starting July 1, 1997, to support activities and projects designed to meet a range of telecommunication needs in regional, rural, and remote Australia. This paper defines rural and remote communities, then reviews rural and remote health services, information, and telecommunication technology infrastructures and their use in Australia to establish the current state of access to information tools by rural and remote communities and rural health workers in Australia today. It is argued that a suitable telecommunication infrastructure is needed to reach disadvantaged persons in extremely remote areas and that intersectoral support is essential to build this infrastructure. In addition, education will make its utilization possible. PMID:9609497

  8. Reaching for the red planet

    PubMed

    David, L

    1996-05-01

    The distant shores of Mars were reached by numerous U.S. and Russian spacecraft throughout the 1960s to mid 1970s. Nearly 20 years have passed since those successful missions which orbited and landed on the Martian surface. Two Soviet probes headed for the planet in July, 1988, but later failed. In August 1993, the U.S. Mars Observer suddenly went silent just three days before it was to enter orbit around the planet and was never heard from again. In late 1996, there will be renewed activity on the launch pads with three probes departing for the red planet: 1) The U.S. Mars Global Surveyor will be launched in November on a Delta II rocket and will orbit the planet for global mapping purposes; 2) Russia's Mars '96 mission, scheduled to fly in November on a Proton launcher, consists of an orbiter, two small stations which will land on the Martian surface, and two penetrators that will plow into the terrain; and finally, 3) a U.S. Discovery-class spacecraft, the Mars Pathfinder, has a December launch date atop a Delta II booster. The mission features a lander and a microrover that will travel short distances over Martian territory. These missions usher in a new phase of Mars exploration, setting the stage for an unprecedented volley of spacecraft that will orbit around, land on, drive across, and perhaps fly at low altitudes over the planet. PMID:11538726

  9. Metasurface holograms reaching 80% efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guoxing; Mühlenbernd, Holger; Kenney, Mitchell; Li, Guixin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2015-05-01

    Surfaces covered by ultrathin plasmonic structures—so-called metasurfaces—have recently been shown to be capable of completely controlling the phase of light, representing a new paradigm for the design of innovative optical elements such as ultrathin flat lenses, directional couplers for surface plasmon polaritons and wave plate vortex beam generation. Among the various types of metasurfaces, geometric metasurfaces, which consist of an array of plasmonic nanorods with spatially varying orientations, have shown superior phase control due to the geometric nature of their phase profile. Metasurfaces have recently been used to make computer-generated holograms, but the hologram efficiency remained too low at visible wavelengths for practical purposes. Here, we report the design and realization of a geometric metasurface hologram reaching diffraction efficiencies of 80% at 825 nm and a broad bandwidth between 630 nm and 1,050 nm. The 16-level-phase computer-generated hologram demonstrated here combines the advantages of a geometric metasurface for the superior control of the phase profile and of reflectarrays for achieving high polarization conversion efficiency. Specifically, the design of the hologram integrates a ground metal plane with a geometric metasurface that enhances the conversion efficiency between the two circular polarization states, leading to high diffraction efficiency without complicating the fabrication process. Because of these advantages, our strategy could be viable for various practical holographic applications.

  10. Metasurface holograms reaching 80% efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoxing; Mhlenbernd, Holger; Kenney, Mitchell; Li, Guixin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2015-04-01

    Surfaces covered by ultrathin plasmonic structures--so-called metasurfaces--have recently been shown to be capable of completely controlling the phase of light, representing a new paradigm for the design of innovative optical elements such as ultrathin flat lenses, directional couplers for surface plasmon polaritons and wave plate vortex beam generation. Among the various types of metasurfaces, geometric metasurfaces, which consist of an array of plasmonic nanorods with spatially varying orientations, have shown superior phase control due to the geometric nature of their phase profile. Metasurfaces have recently been used to make computer-generated holograms, but the hologram efficiency remained too low at visible wavelengths for practical purposes. Here, we report the design and realization of a geometric metasurface hologram reaching diffraction efficiencies of 80% at 825?nm and a broad bandwidth between 630?nm and 1,050?nm. The 16-level-phase computer-generated hologram demonstrated here combines the advantages of a geometric metasurface for the superior control of the phase profile and of reflectarrays for achieving high polarization conversion efficiency. Specifically, the design of the hologram integrates a ground metal plane with a geometric metasurface that enhances the conversion efficiency between the two circular polarization states, leading to high diffraction efficiency without complicating the fabrication process. Because of these advantages, our strategy could be viable for various practical holographic applications. PMID:25705870

  11. The Performance of Left-Handed Participants on a Preferential Reaching Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamolo, Carla M.; Roy, Eric A.; Bryden, Pamela J.; Rohr, Linda E.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research in our laboratory has examined the distribution of preferred hand (PH) reaches in working space with right-handed participants. In one study, we examined the effects of tool position and task demands on the frequency of PH reaches with right-handers (Mamolo, Roy, Bryden, & Rohr, 2004). We found that PH reaches were at a maximum

  12. Tuning in to Another Person's Action Capabilities: Perceiving Maximal Jumping-Reach Height from Walking Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramenzoni, Veronica; Riley, Michael A.; Davis, Tehran; Shockley, Kevin; Armstrong, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the ability to perceive the maximum height to which another actor could jump to reach an object. Experiment 1 determined the accuracy of estimates for another actor's maximal reach-with-jump height and compared these estimates to estimates of the actor's standing maximal reaching height and to estimates of the…

  13. Tuning in to Another Person's Action Capabilities: Perceiving Maximal Jumping-Reach Height from Walking Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramenzoni, Veronica; Riley, Michael A.; Davis, Tehran; Shockley, Kevin; Armstrong, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the ability to perceive the maximum height to which another actor could jump to reach an object. Experiment 1 determined the accuracy of estimates for another actor's maximal reach-with-jump height and compared these estimates to estimates of the actor's standing maximal reaching height and to estimates of the

  14. Maximum Entropy Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumar, N.

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, the construction of scattered data approximants is studied using the principle of maximum entropy. For under-determined and ill-posed problems, Jaynes's principle of maximum information-theoretic entropy is a means for least-biased statistical inference when insufficient information is available. Consider a set of distinct nodes {xi}i=1n in Rd, and a point p with coordinate x that is located within the convex hull of the set {xi}. The convex approximation of a function u(x) is written as: uh(x) = ?i=1n ?i(x)ui, where {?i}i=1n ? 0 are known as shape functions, and uh must reproduce affine functions (d = 2): ?i=1n ?i = 1, ?i=1n ?ixi = x, ?i=1n ?iyi = y. We view the shape functions as a discrete probability distribution, and the linear constraints as the expectation of a linear function. For n > 3, the problem is under-determined. To obtain a unique solution, we compute ?i by maximizing the uncertainty H(?) = - ?i=1n ?i log ?i, subject to the above three constraints. In this approach, only the nodal coordinates are used, and neither the nodal connectivity nor any user-defined parameters are required to determine ?ithe defining characteristics of a mesh-free Galerkin approximant. Numerical results for {?i}i=1n are obtained using a convex minimization algorithm, and shape function plots are presented for different nodal configurations.

  15. Variability and Constancy in Cellular Growth of Arabidopsis Sepals1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tauriello, Gerardo; Meyer, Heather M.; Smith, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Growth of tissues is highly reproducible; yet, growth of individual cells in a tissue is highly variable, and neighboring cells can grow at different rates. We analyzed the growth of epidermal cell lineages in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) sepal to determine how the growth curves of individual cell lineages relate to one another in a developing tissue. To identify underlying growth trends, we developed a continuous displacement field to predict spatially averaged growth rates. We showed that this displacement field accurately describes the growth of sepal cell lineages and reveals underlying trends within the variability of in vivo cellular growth. We found that the tissue, individual cell lineages, and cell walls all exhibit growth rates that are initially low, accelerate to a maximum, and decrease again. Accordingly, these growth curves can be represented by sigmoid functions. We examined the relationships among the cell lineage growth curves and surprisingly found that all lineages reach the same maximum growth rate relative to their size. However, the cell lineages are not synchronized; each cell lineage reaches this same maximum relative growth rate but at different times. The heterogeneity in observed growth results from shifting the same underlying sigmoid curve in time and scaling by size. Thus, despite the variability in growth observed in our study and others, individual cell lineages in the developing sepal follow similarly shaped growth curves. PMID:26432876

  16. The Solar Maximum observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The successful retrieval and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite by Shuttle astronauts in April 1984 permitted continuance of solar flare observations that began in 1980. The SMM carries a soft X ray polychromator, gamma ray, UV and hard X ray imaging spectrometers, a coronagraph/polarimeter and particle counters. The data gathered thus far indicated that electrical potentials of 25 MeV develop in flares within 2 sec of onset. X ray data show that flares are composed of compressed magnetic loops that have come too close together. Other data have been taken on mass ejection, impacts of electron beams and conduction fronts with the chromosphere and changes in the solar radiant flux due to sunspots.

  17. Introduction to maximum entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Sivia, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle has been successfully used in image reconstruction in a wide variety of fields. We review the need for such methods in data analysis and show, by use of a very simple example, why MaxEnt is to be preferred over other regularizing functions. This leads to a more general interpretation of the MaxEnt method, and its use is illustrated with several different examples. Practical difficulties with non-linear problems still remain, this being highlighted by the notorious phase problem in crystallography. We conclude with an example from neutron scattering, using data from a filter difference spectrometer to contrast MaxEnt with a conventional deconvolution. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Maximum gravitational recoil.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Manuela; Lousto, Carlos O; Zlochower, Yosef; Merritt, David

    2007-06-01

    Recent calculations of gravitational radiation recoil generated during black-hole binary mergers have reopened the possibility that a merged binary can be ejected even from the nucleus of a massive host galaxy. Here we report the first systematic study of gravitational recoil of equal-mass binaries with equal, but counteraligned, spins parallel to the orbital plane. Such an orientation of the spins is expected to maximize the recoil. We find that recoil velocity (which is perpendicular to the orbital plane) varies sinusoidally with the angle that the initial spin directions make with the initial linear momenta of each hole and scales up to a maximum of approximately 4000 km s-1 for maximally rotating holes. Our results show that the amplitude of the recoil velocity can depend sensitively on spin orientations of the black holes prior to merger. PMID:17677894

  19. What causes cooling water temperature gradients in forested stream reaches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, G.; Malcolm, I. A.; Sadler, J. P.; Hannah, D. M.

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that shading by riparian vegetation may reduce maximum water temperature and provide refugia for temperature sensitive aquatic organisms. Longitudinal cooling gradients have been observed during the daytime for stream reaches shaded by coniferous trees downstream of clear cuts, or deciduous woodland downstream of open moorland. However, little is known about the energy exchange processes that drive such gradients, especially in semi-natural woodland contexts, and in the absence of potentially confounding cool groundwater inflows. To address this gap, this study quantified and modelled variability in stream temperature and heat fluxes along an upland reach of the Girnock Burn (a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland) where riparian landuse transitions from open moorland to semi-natural forest. Observations were made along a 1050 m reach using a spatially-distributed network of ten water temperature micro-loggers, three automatic weather stations and >200 hemispherical photographs, which were used to estimate incoming solar radiation. These data parameterised a high-resolution energy flux model, incorporating flow-routing, which predicted spatio-temporal variability in stream temperature. Variability in stream temperature was controlled largely by energy fluxes at the water column-atmosphere interface. Predominantly net energy gains occurred along the reach during daylight hours, and heat exchange across the bed-water column interface accounted for <1% of the net energy budget. For periods when daytime net radiation gains were high (under clear skies), differences between water temperature observations decreased in the streamwise direction; a maximum difference of 2.5 °C was observed between the upstream reach boundary and 1050 m downstream. Furthermore, daily maximum water temperature at 1050 m downstream was ≤1°C cooler than at the upstream reach boundary and lagged the occurrence of daily maximum water temperature upstream by >1h. Temperature gradients were not generated by cooling of stream water, but rather by a combination of reduced rates of heating in the woodland reach and advection of cooler (overnight and early morning) water from the upstream moorland catchment. Longitudinal thermal gradients were indistinct at night and on days when net radiation gains were low (under over-cast skies), thus when changes in net energy gains or losses did not vary significantly in space and time, and heat advected into the reach was reasonably consistent. The findings of the study and the modelling approach employed are useful tools for assessing optimal planting strategies for mitigating against ecologically damaging stream temperature maxima.

  20. ALMA Telescope Reaches New Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    The ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) astronomical observatory took another step forward and upward, as one of its state-of-the-art antennas was carried for the first time to Chile's 16,500-foot-high plateau of Chajnantor on the back of a giant, custom-built transporter. The 40-foot-diameter antenna, weighing about 100 tons, was moved to ALMA's high-altitude Array Operations Site, where the extremely dry and rarefied air is ideal for observing the Universe. The conditions at the Array Operations Site on Chajnantor, while excellent for astronomy, are also very harsh. Only about half as much oxygen is available as at sea level, making it very difficult to work there. This is why ALMA's antennas are assembled and tested at the lower 9,500-foot altitude of the ALMA Operations Support Facility (OSF). It was from this relatively hospitable base camp that the ALMA antenna began its journey to the high Chajnantor site. "The successful transport of the first ALMA Antenna to the high site marks the start of the next phase of the project. Now that we are starting to move the ALMA antennas to the high site, the real work begins and the exciting part is just beginning," said Adrian Russell, North American ALMA Project Manager. The antenna's trip began when one of the two ALMA transporters lifted the antenna onto its back, carrying its heavy load along the 17-mile road from the Operations Support Facility up to the Array Operations Site. While the transporter is capable of speeds of up to 8 miles per hour when carrying an antenna, this first journey was made more slowly to ensure that everything worked as expected, taking about seven hours. The ALMA antennas use state-of-the-art technology, and are the most advanced submillimeter-wavelength antennas ever made. They are designed to operate fully exposed in the harsh conditions of the Array Operations Site, to survive strong winds and extreme temperatures, to point precisely enough that they could pick out a golf ball at a distance of nine miles, and to keep their smooth reflecting surfaces accurate to less than the thickness of a human hair. Once the transporter reached the high plateau it carried the antenna to a concrete pad -- a docking station with connections for power and fiber optics -- and positioned it with an accuracy of a small fraction of an inch. The transporter is guided by a laser steering system and, just like some cars, also has ultrasonic collision detectors. These sensors ensure the safety of the state-of-the-art antennas as the transporter drives them across what will soon be a rather crowded plateau. Ultimately, ALMA will have at least 66 antennas distributed over about 200 pads, spread over distances of up to 11.5 miles and operating as a single, giant telescope. Even when ALMA is fully operational, the transporters will be used to move the antennas between pads to reconfigure the telescope for different kinds of observations. This first ALMA antenna at the high site will soon be joined by others, and the ALMA team looks forward to making their first observations from the Chajnantor plateau. They plan to link three antennas by early 2010, and to make the first scientific observations with ALMA in the second half of 2011. ALMA will help astronomers answer important questions about our cosmic origins. The telescope will observe the Universe using light with millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, between infrared light and radio waves in the electromagnetic spectrum. Light at these wavelengths comes from some of the coldest, and from some of the most distant objects in the cosmos. These include cold clouds of gas and dust where new stars are being born, or remote galaxies towards the edge of the observable universe. The Universe is relatively unexplored at submillimeter wavelengths, as the telescopes need extremely dry atmospheric conditions, such as those at Chajnantor, and advanced detector technology. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international astronomy facility, is a partnership of Europe, North America and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is the North American partner in ALMA. ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence, is a revolutionary telescope, comprising an array of 66 giant 40-foot and 23-foot diameter antennas. Russell noted that the first antenna's move to the high site illustrates the international nature of the project. "A Japanese antenna with North American electronics was carried by a European transporter," he explained.

  1. ALMA telescope reaches new heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    The ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) astronomical observatory has taken another step forward - and upwards. One of its state-of-the-art antennas was carried for the first time to the 5000m plateau of Chajnantor, in the Chilean Andes, on the back of a custom-built giant transporter. The antenna, which weighs about 100 tons and has a diameter of 12 metres, was transported up to the high-altitude Array Operations Site, where the extremely dry and rarefied air is ideal for ALMA's observations of the Universe. The conditions at the Array Operations Site on Chajnantor, while excellent for astronomy, are also very harsh. Only half as much oxygen is available as at sea level, making it very difficult to work there. This is why ALMA's antennas are assembled and tested at the lower 2900 m altitude of the ALMA Operations Support Facility. It was from this relatively hospitable base camp that the ALMA antenna began its journey to the high Chajnantor site. "This is an important moment for ALMA. We are very happy that the first transport of an antenna to the high site went flawlessly. This achievement was only possible through contributions from all international ALMA partners: this particular antenna is provided by Japan, the heavy-lift transporter by Europe, and the receiving electronics inside the antenna by North America, Europe, and Asia", said Wolfgang Wild, European ALMA Project Manager. The trip began when one of the two ALMA transporters, named Otto, lifted the antenna onto its back. It then carried its heavy load along the 28 km road from the Operations Support Facility up to the Array Operations Site. While the transporter is capable of speeds of up to 12 km/hour when carrying an antenna, this first journey was made more slowly to ensure that everything worked as expected, taking about seven hours. The ALMA antennas are the most advanced submillimetre-wavelength antennas ever made. They are designed to operate fully exposed in the harsh conditions of the Array Operations Site. This means surviving strong winds and temperatures between +20 and -20 Celsius whilst being able to point precisely enough that they could pick out a golf ball at a distance of 15 km, and to keep their smooth reflecting surfaces accurate to better than 25 micrometres (less than the typical thickness of a human hair). Once the transporter reached the high plateau it carried the antenna to a concrete pad - a docking station with connections for power and fibre optics - and positioned it with an accuracy of a few millimetres. The transporter is guided by a laser steering system and, just like some cars today, also has ultrasonic collision detectors. These sensors ensure the safety of the state-of-the-art antennas as the transporter drives them across what will soon be a rather crowded plateau. Ultimately, ALMA will have at least 66 antennas distributed over about 200 pads, spread over distances of up to 18.5 km and operating as a single, giant telescope. Even when ALMA is fully operational, the transporters will be used to move the antennas between pads to reconfigure the telescope for different kinds of observations. "Transporting our first antenna to the Chajnantor plateau is a epic feat which exemplifies the exciting times in which ALMA is living. Day after day, our global collaboration brings us closer to the birth of the most ambitious ground-based astronomical observatory in the world", said Thijs de Graauw, ALMA Director. This first ALMA antenna at the high site will soon be joined by others and the ALMA team looks forward to making their first observations from the Chajnantor plateau. They plan to link three antennas by early 2010, and to make the first scientific observations with ALMA in the second half of 2011. ALMA will help astronomers answer important questions about our cosmic origins. The telescope will observe the Universe using light with millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths, between infrared light and radio waves in the electromagnetic spectrum. Light at these wavelengths comes from some of the coldest, but also from some of the most distant objects in the cosmos. These include cold clouds of gas and dust where new stars are being born and remote galaxies towards the edge of the observable universe. The Universe is relatively unexplored at submillimetre wavelengths, as the telescopes need extremely dry atmospheric conditions, such as those at Chajnantor, and advanced detector technology. More information The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international astronomy facility, is a partnership of Europe, North America and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. ESO is the European partner in ALMA. ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence, is a revolutionary telescope, comprising an array of 66 giant 12-metre and 7-metre diameter antennas observing at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. ALMA will start scientific observations in 2011. ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning a 42-metre European Extremely Large optical/near-infrared Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become "the world's biggest eye on the sky".

  2. Generalized Maximum Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John

    2005-01-01

    A long standing mystery in using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) is how to deal with constraints whose values are uncertain. This situation arises when constraint values are estimated from data, because of finite sample sizes. One approach to this problem, advocated by E.T. Jaynes [1], is to ignore this uncertainty, and treat the empirically observed values as exact. We refer to this as the classic MaxEnt approach. Classic MaxEnt gives point probabilities (subject to the given constraints), rather than probability densities. We develop an alternative approach that assumes that the uncertain constraint values are represented by a probability density {e.g: a Gaussian), and this uncertainty yields a MaxEnt posterior probability density. That is, the classic MaxEnt point probabilities are regarded as a multidimensional function of the given constraint values, and uncertainty on these values is transmitted through the MaxEnt function to give uncertainty over the MaXEnt probabilities. We illustrate this approach by explicitly calculating the generalized MaxEnt density for a simple but common case, then show how this can be extended numerically to the general case. This paper expands the generalized MaxEnt concept introduced in a previous paper [3].

  3. Distribution of the time at which N vicious walkers reach their maximal height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambeau, Joachim; Schehr, Grgory

    2011-06-01

    We study the extreme statistics of N nonintersecting Brownian motions (vicious walkers) over a unit time interval in one dimension. Using path-integral techniques we compute exactly the joint distribution of the maximum M and of the time ?M at which this maximum is reached. We focus in particular on nonintersecting Brownian bridges (watermelons without wall) and nonintersecting Brownian excursions (watermelons with a wall). We discuss in detail the relationships between such vicious walkers models in watermelon configurations and stochastic growth models in curved geometry on the one hand and the directed polymer in a disordered medium (DPRM) with one free end point on the other hand. We also check our results using numerical simulations of Dysons Brownian motion and confront them with numerical simulations of the polynuclear growth model (PNG) and of a model of DPRM on a discrete lattice. Some of the results presented here were announced in a recent letter [J. Rambeau and G. Schehr, Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/91/60006 91, 60006 (2010)].

  4. Dynamic push-pull characteristics at three hand-reach envelopes: applications for the workplace.

    PubMed

    Cal-Benzoor, Maya; Dickstein, Ruth; Arnon, Michal; Ayalon, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Pushing and pulling are common tasks in the workplace. Overexertion injuries related to manual pushing and pulling are often observed, and therefore the understanding of work capacity is important for efficient and safe workstation design. The purpose of the present study was to describe workloads obtained during different reach envelopes during a seated push-pull task. Forty-five women performed an isokinetic push-pull sequence at two velocities. Strength, work and agonist/antagonist muscle ratio were calculated for the full range of motion (ROM). We then divided the ROM into three reach envelopes - neutral, medium, and maximum reach. The work capacity for each direction was determined and the reach envelope work data were compared. Push capability was best at medium reach envelope and pulling was best at maximum reach envelope. Push/pull strength ratio was approximately 1. A recommendation was made to avoid strenuous push-pull tasks at neutral reach envelopes. PMID:26360213

  5. REACH: impact on the US cosmetics industry?

    PubMed

    Pouillot, Anne; Polla, Barbara; Polla, Ada

    2009-03-01

    The Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of Chemicals (REACH) is a recent European regulation on chemical substances meant to protect human health and the environment. REACH imposes the "precautionary principle" where additional data and definitive action are required when uncertainty is identified. The cosmetics industry is only partially concerned by REACH: while the stages of registration and evaluation apply to cosmetics, those of authorization and restriction most likely will not, as cosmetic ingredients are already subject to regulation by various agencies and directives. REACH has potential benefits to the industry including the possibility of reassuring consumers and improving their image of chemicals and cosmetics. However, REACH also has potential disadvantages, mainly with regard to impeding innovation. The American cosmetics industry will be affected by REACH, because all US manufacturers who export substances to Europe will have to fully comply with REACH. PMID:19250158

  6. Biology, not environment, drives major patterns in maximum tetrapod body size through time

    PubMed Central

    Sookias, Roland B.; Benson, Roger B. J.; Butler, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic and biological factors have been hypothesized as controlling maximum body size of tetrapods and other animals through geological time. We analyse the effects of three abiotic factors—oxygen, temperature and land area—on maximum size of Permian–Jurassic archosauromorphs and therapsids, and Cenozoic mammals, using time series generalized least-squares regression models. We also examine maximum size growth curves for the Permian–Jurassic data by comparing fits of Gompertz and logistic models. When serial correlation is removed, we find no robust correlations, indicating that these environmental factors did not consistently control tetrapod maximum size. Gompertz models—i.e. exponentially decreasing rate of size increase at larger sizes—fit maximum size curves far better than logistic models. This suggests that biological limits such as reduced fecundity and niche space availability become increasingly limiting as larger sizes are reached. Environmental factors analysed may still have imposed an upper limit on tetrapod body size, but any environmentally imposed limit did not vary substantially during the intervals examined despite variation in these environmental factors. PMID:22513278

  7. Neural coordination during reach-to-grasp.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Mukta; Kording, Konrad; Saleh, Maryam; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G

    2015-09-01

    When reaching to grasp, we coordinate how we preshape the hand with how we move it. To ask how motor cortical neurons participate in this coordination, we examined the interactions between reach- and grasp-related neuronal ensembles while monkeys reached to grasp a variety of different objects in different locations. By describing the dynamics of these two ensembles as trajectories in a low-dimensional state space, we examined their coupling in time. We found evidence for temporal compensation across many different reach-to-grasp conditions such that if one neural trajectory led in time the other tended to catch up, reducing the asynchrony between the trajectories. Granger causality revealed bidirectional interactions between reach and grasp neural trajectories beyond that which could be attributed to the joint kinematics that were consistently stronger in the grasp-to-reach direction. Characterizing cortical coordination dynamics provides a new framework for understanding the functional interactions between neural populations. PMID:26224773

  8. From Hard to Reach to How to Reach: A Systematic Review of the Literature on Hard-to-Reach Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boag-Munroe, Gill; Evangelou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature relating to hard-to-reach families which has been published over the last 12 years in the UK, USA, Canada and Australia. The purpose of the review was twofold: to gain insights to understandings of the term "hard-to-reach" within these services--education, health and social--which might be aiming to

  9. Revealing the maximum strength in nanotwinned copper.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Chen, X; Huang, X; Lu, K

    2009-01-30

    The strength of polycrystalline materials increases with decreasing grain size. Below a critical size, smaller grains might lead to softening, as suggested by atomistic simulations. The strongest size should arise at a transition in deformation mechanism from lattice dislocation activities to grain boundary-related processes. We investigated the maximum strength of nanotwinned copper samples with different twin thicknesses. We found that the strength increases with decreasing twin thickness, reaching a maximum at 15 nanometers, followed by a softening at smaller values that is accompanied by enhanced strain hardening and tensile ductility. The strongest twin thickness originates from a transition in the yielding mechanism from the slip transfer across twin boundaries to the activity of preexisting easy dislocation sources. PMID:19179523

  10. The sun and heliosphere at solar maximum.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Marsden, R G; Balogh, A; Gloeckler, G; Geiss, J; McComas, D J; McKibben, R B; MacDowall, R J; Lanzerotti, L J; Krupp, N; Krueger, H; Landgraf, M

    2003-11-14

    Recent Ulysses observations from the Sun's equator to the poles reveal fundamental properties of the three-dimensional heliosphere at the maximum in solar activity. The heliospheric magnetic field originates from a magnetic dipole oriented nearly perpendicular to, instead of nearly parallel to, the Sun's rotation axis. Magnetic fields, solar wind, and energetic charged particles from low-latitude sources reach all latitudes, including the polar caps. The very fast high-latitude wind and polar coronal holes disappear and reappear together. Solar wind speed continues to be inversely correlated with coronal temperature. The cosmic ray flux is reduced symmetrically at all latitudes. PMID:14615526

  11. Calibrating Reach Distance to Visual Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mon-Williams, Mark; Bingham, Geoffrey P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the calibration of reach distance by gradually distorting the haptic feedback obtained when participants grasped visible target objects. The authors found that the modified relationship between visually specified distance and reach distance could be captured by a straight-line mapping function. Thus, the relation could be

  12. Interference of Different Types of Seats on Postural Control System during a Forward-Reaching Task in Individuals with Paraplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Abreu, Daniela Cristina Carvalho; Takara, Kelly; Metring, Nathalia Lopes; Reis, Julia Guimaraes; Cliquet, Alberto, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the influence of different types of wheelchair seats on paraplegic individuals' postural control using a maximum anterior reaching test. Balance evaluations during 50, 75, and 90% of each individual's maximum reach in the forward direction using two different cushions on seat (one foam and one gel) and a no-cushion condition…

  13. Interference of Different Types of Seats on Postural Control System during a Forward-Reaching Task in Individuals with Paraplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Abreu, Daniela Cristina Carvalho; Takara, Kelly; Metring, Nathalia Lopes; Reis, Julia Guimaraes; Cliquet, Alberto, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the influence of different types of wheelchair seats on paraplegic individuals' postural control using a maximum anterior reaching test. Balance evaluations during 50, 75, and 90% of each individual's maximum reach in the forward direction using two different cushions on seat (one foam and one gel) and a no-cushion condition

  14. The effect of fluid flow on coiled tubing reach

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalla, K.; Walton, I.C.

    1996-12-31

    A critical parameter to the success of many coiled tubing (CT) operations in highly deviated or horizontal wells is the depth penetration that can be attained before the CT buckles and locks up. Achieving a desired depth is always critical in CT operations and attaining an additional reach of a few hundred feet can be crucial. This paper addresses the effect of fluid flow in the CT and in the CT/wellbore annulus on the state of force and stress in the CT, and thereby predicts its effect on the reach attainable by the CT. The flow of fluid through the CT and annulus between the CT and borehole modifies the pressures and the effective force which governs the mechanical stability of the CT. The net force per unit length due to fluid flow in the coiled tubing and annulus between the coiled tubing casing/well is calculated in terms of the shear stress and its effect on the onset of buckling and lockup is determined. The model is then implemented in a full tubing forces calculation and the effect of flowing fluids and producing fluids on reach is analyzed. The new model is utilized in the design of commercial jobs. The exact analytic model shows that fluid flow inside the CT has zero impact on reach, that downward flow in the annulus has a favourable impact, and upward flow in the annulus reduces the maximum attainable reach. Using the full tubing forces model, a coiled tubing job can be designed taking into account the flow of a fluid with a specified rheology, density and flow rate. Thus the feasibility of attaining a given reach can be more accurately determined. Results are presented in the form of the surface weight for commercial wells and compared to field jobs.

  15. Reaching higher goals by means of a reflecting wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faella, O.; De Luca, R.

    2015-05-01

    A student realizes that a point particle that is able to rise at a given point P0 at height H when launched vertically from the origin O of a Cartesian plane at a fixed initial speed V0 cannot reach, by means of a direct shot from a small spring cannon, a point P positioned at the same height H and distance d from P0, with 0 < d ? R, where R is the maximum horizontal distance attainable with an optimum throw at an angle of 45. However, the student realizes that, in the absence of air resistance, conservation of energy does not prevent this possibility. Therefore, in order to reach point P, the student uses a perfectly reflecting surface, opportunely inclined with respect to the horizontal. The full story of how this is done will be narrated in this article.

  16. "Operation REACH". Building public-private partnerships for public health.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Society for Family Health (SFH) has embarked on an ambitious program entitled "Operation REACH," which aims to utilize the large volunteer network of community health workers and traditional birth attendants who are attached to almost all rural health centers to distribute socially marketed products. These volunteer community-based distributors (CBDs) attached to the Ministry of Health are an important source of distribution of the SFH products, particularly SafePlan oral contraceptive pills, in areas where traditional private sector outlets are limited. As part of Project REACH, CBDs will be trained to distribute MAXIMUM, SafePlan, and Prolact VFTs--the three products that are socially marketed by SFH. This distribution mechanism could also be utilized when new products, such as the female condom, are added to the SFH portfolio. PMID:12348039

  17. Growth of (101) Faces of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals: Measured Growth Rate Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Earlier extensive measurements of the growth rates of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme crystals had shown unexpected dependencies on the supersaturation. In this study similar growth rate measurements were done for the (101) faces of the crystals. The data show a similar dependence on the supersaturation, becoming appreciable only at high supersaturations, reaching a maximum value and then decreasing. As reported in earlier studies, the (101) growth rates are larger at low supersaturations than the (110) growth rates at the same conditions, and smaller at high supersaturations. These trends suggest that the growth mechanism of the (101) is similar to that of the (110) face, involving the addition of lysozyme aggregates formed in solution, but with a growth unit smaller than that of the (110) face.

  18. Growth of (101) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals: measured growth-rate trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, E. L.; Nadarajah, A.; Pusey, M. L.

    1999-01-01

    Previous extensive measurements of the growth rates of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme crystals have shown unexpected dependencies on the supersaturation. In this study, similar growth-rate measurements were performed for the (101) faces of the crystals. The data show a similar dependence on the supersaturation, becoming appreciable only at high supersaturations, reaching a maximum value and then decreasing. The (101) growth rates are larger at low supersaturations than the (110) growth rates under the same conditions and are smaller at high supersaturations. These trends suggest that the growth mechanism of the (101) face is similar to that of the (110) face: both processes involve the addition of multimeric growth units formed in solution, but the average size of the units for the (101) face is likely to be smaller than for the (110) face.

  19. Reaching the Overlooked Student in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esslinger, Keri; Esslinger, Travis; Bagshaw, Jarad

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the use of live action role-playing, or "LARPing," as a non-traditional activity that has the potential to reach students who are not interested in traditional physical education.

  20. Principles of maximum entropy and maximum caliber in statistical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressé, Steve; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Lee, Julian; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-07-01

    The variational principles called maximum entropy (MaxEnt) and maximum caliber (MaxCal) are reviewed. MaxEnt originated in the statistical physics of Boltzmann and Gibbs, as a theoretical tool for predicting the equilibrium states of thermal systems. Later, entropy maximization was also applied to matters of information, signal transmission, and image reconstruction. Recently, since the work of Shore and Johnson, MaxEnt has been regarded as a principle that is broader than either physics or information alone. MaxEnt is a procedure that ensures that inferences drawn from stochastic data satisfy basic self-consistency requirements. The different historical justifications for the entropy S=-∑ipilog⁡pi and its corresponding variational principles are reviewed. As an illustration of the broadening purview of maximum entropy principles, maximum caliber, which is path entropy maximization applied to the trajectories of dynamical systems, is also reviewed. Examples are given in which maximum caliber is used to interpret dynamical fluctuations in biology and on the nanoscale, in single-molecule and few-particle systems such as molecular motors, chemical reactions, biological feedback circuits, and diffusion in microfluidics devices.

  1. An analysis of the proposed REACH regulation.

    PubMed

    Petry, Thomas; Knowles, Ruth; Meads, Richard

    2006-02-01

    In October 2003, the European Commission produced its first draft of its new chemicals legislation, known as REACH. At its core, REACH will require producers and users of chemical substances to register any use in a volume-triggered system. Mandatory submission of chemical assessment reports containing information on the hazards, exposures and risks associated with the uses of the chemical substances will be reviewed by government appointed expert committees. The marketing of substances considered to be of very high concern will require authorisation. This paper analyses issues related to the architecture of the proposed REACH regulation in light of its origins, drivers, its impacts on businesses and possible unintended consequences on other industries outside the chemical industry. Since the design of REACH reflects a range of different sources, goals and ideas, a number of its provisions are ambiguous in their current form. This creates uncertainty as to the implementation of the regulation. Regulatory certainty is, however, an essential pre-condition for the effective functioning of a modern market economy. As currently drafted, REACH could pose a challenge to the operation of the market economy in the EU. PMID:16249048

  2. REACH. Teacher's Guide, Volume III. Task Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James Lee; And Others

    Designed for use with individualized instructional units (CE 026 345-347, CE 026 349-351) in the electromechanical cluster, this third volume of the postsecondary teacher's guide presents the task analysis which was used in the development of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air Conditioning, Heating) curriculum. The major blocks of

  3. REACH. Teacher's Guide Volume II. Check Points.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    Designed for use with individualized instructional units (CE 026 345-347, CE 026 349-351) in the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this second volume of the postsecondary teacher guide contains the check points which the instructor may want to refer to when the unit sheet directs the…

  4. REACH. Teacher's Guide, Volume III. Task Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James Lee; And Others

    Designed for use with individualized instructional units (CE 026 345-347, CE 026 349-351) in the electromechanical cluster, this third volume of the postsecondary teacher's guide presents the task analysis which was used in the development of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air Conditioning, Heating) curriculum. The major blocks of…

  5. REACH. Electricity Units, Post-Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gene; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this postsecondary student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals, electric motors, electrical components, and controls and installation.…

  6. Polishing Difficult-To-Reach Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1990-01-01

    Springy abrasive tool used to finish surfaces of narrow cavities made by electrical-discharge machining. Robot arm moves vibrator around perimeters of cavities, polishing walls of cavities as it does so. Tool needed because such cavities inaccessible or at least difficult to reach with most surface-finishing tools.

  7. Women Reaching Women. Volunteer Coordinator's Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pola, Yvonne; Ihlenfeld, Gayle

    Based on the experiences of the Women Reaching Women chapters in Wisconsin, this manual provides information on beginning and implementing a volunteer program to train women to help female drug and alcohol abusers. The materials are designed for volunteer coordinators who may be paid or unpaid persons. The manual, containing four sections, is…

  8. What Determines Limb Selection for Reaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbig, Casi Rabb; Gabbard, Carl

    2004-01-01

    While motor dominance appears to drive limb selection for reaching movements at the midline and ipsilateral (dominant) side, this study examined the possible determinants associated with what drives the programming of movements in response to stimuli presented in contralateral space. Experiment 1 distinguished between object proximity and a

  9. Science Experiments: Reaching Out to Our Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Maureen; Tschirhart, Lori; Wright, Stephanie; Barrett, Laura; Parsons, Matthew; Whang, Linda

    2008-01-01

    As more users access library services remotely, it has become increasingly important for librarians to reach out to their user communities and promote the value of libraries. Convincing the faculty and students in the sciences of the value of libraries and librarians can be a particularly "hard sell" as more and more of their primary journal

  10. Reaching Rural Women: Case Studies and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colle, Royal D.; Fernandez de Colle, Susana

    Although not often considered in the past by planners because their economic contributions are not performed for money, rural women are contributors to the development of their countries. The urgency of reaching women with important information to break the cycle of poverty is now being recognized by the major development agencies. While there are

  11. Project Reach: Final Report--Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Samuel D.

    The second year of Project Reach, a Federally funded two-year program, pursued two tactics for increasing the adult basic education (ABE) program relevance and effectiveness in South Bend, Indiana: (1) the training/hiring of ABE students as media paraprofessionals, and (2) a media enrollment campaign of various media promotions (television/radio

  12. Pumpdown assistance extends coiled tubing reach

    SciTech Connect

    Tailby, R.J. )

    1992-07-01

    One of the most challenging coiled tubing applications to emerge in the last few years is horizontal well maintenance. When wireline cannot be used, techniques that offer some of the same flexibility, availability and relatively low cost must be used. During this same period, however, drilling technology has also made huge strides in horizontal and extended-reach areas. Wells are now being drilled with horizontal lengths in excess of 6,000 ft and measured depths of more than 22,000 ft. This paper reports that although horizontal wells are definitely here to stay, many operators have had to reevaluate their positions after being confronted with the problem of recompleting these wells to eliminate excessive water or gas production. A full workover with workstring using either a drilling rig or snubbing unit can be expensive and may lead to lost production because of limited rig availability. Coiled tubing has successfully been used in most cases thus far, but it has length and horizontal reach limitations that drilling technology will soon overtake. Within the constraints of current technology and tube capabilities, coiled tubing does not have the buckling resistance or reel capacity to service today's longest horizontal and extended reach wells or those planned and foreseen in the future. Even if coiled tubing can reach TD, operations requiring downward force are severely restricted.

  13. What Determines Limb Selection for Reaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbig, Casi Rabb; Gabbard, Carl

    2004-01-01

    While motor dominance appears to drive limb selection for reaching movements at the midline and ipsilateral (dominant) side, this study examined the possible determinants associated with what drives the programming of movements in response to stimuli presented in contralateral space. Experiment 1 distinguished between object proximity and a…

  14. Project: "Teach 'n' Reach" Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Arleen

    The first of five volumes for Project Teach 'n' Reach, designed to help teachers of grades 1-6 in regular classrooms to teach about various kinds of handicapping conditions, is a teacher's guide. Performance objectives, activities, worksheets, and resources are listed for the use of these teachers in the implementation of their social-science and

  15. A Rotation Invariant in 3-D Reaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Suvobrata; Turvey, M. T.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors investigated changes in hand orientation during a 3-D reaching task that imposed specific position and orientation requirements on the hand's initial and final postures. Instantaneous hand orientation was described using 3-element rotation vectors representing current orientation as a rotation from a fixed reference

  16. REACH. Electricity Units, Post-Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gene; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this postsecondary student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals, electric motors, electrical components, and controls and installation.

  17. The REACH Youth Program Learning Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra Health Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Believing in the value of using video documentaries and data as learning tools, members of the REACH technical assistance team collaborated to develop this toolkit. The learning toolkit was designed using and/or incorporating components of the "Engaging Youth in Community Change: Outcomes and Lessons Learned from Sierra Health Foundation's REACH…

  18. Estimation of the growth curve and heritability of the growth rate for giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) cubs.

    PubMed

    Che, T D; Wang, C D; Jin, L; Wei, M; Wu, K; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, H M; Li, D S

    2015-01-01

    Giant panda cubs have a low survival rate during the newborn and early growth stages. However, the growth and developmental parameters of giant panda cubs during the early lactation stage (from birth to 6 months) are not well known. We examined the growth and development of giant panda cubs by the Chapman growth curve model and estimated the heritability of the maximum growth rate at the early lactation stage. We found that 83 giant panda cubs reached their maximum growth rate at approximately 75-120 days after birth. The body weight of cubs at 75 days was 4285.99 g. Furthermore, we estimated that the heritability of the maximum growth rate was moderate (h(2) = 0.38). Our study describes the growth and development of giant panda cubs at the early lactation stage and provides valuable growth benchmarks. We anticipate that our results will be a starting point for more detailed research on increasing the survival rate of giant panda cubs. Feeding programs for giant panda cubs need further improvement. PMID:25867378

  19. The Maximum Density of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses a series of experiments performed by Thomas Hope in 1805 which show the temperature at which water has its maximum density. Early data cast into a modern form as well as guidelines and recent data collected from the author provide background for duplicating Hope's experiments in the classroom. (JN)

  20. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D?browski, Mariusz P.; Gohar, H.

    2015-09-01

    We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension Fmax =c4 / 4 G represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  1. Maximum cooling and maximum efficiency of thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartibu, L. K.

    2016-01-01

    This work provides valid experimental evidence on the difference between design for maximum cooling and maximum efficiency for thermoacoustic refrigerators. In addition, the influence of the geometry of the honeycomb ceramic stack on the performance of thermoacoustic refrigerators is presented as it affects the cooling power. Sixteen cordierite honeycomb ceramic stacks with square cross sections having four different lengths of 26, 48, 70 and 100 mm are considered. Measurements are taken at six different locations of the stack hot ends from the pressure antinode, namely 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 mm respectively. Measurement of temperature difference across the stack ends at steady state for different stack geometries are used to compute the cooling load and the coefficient of performance. The results obtained with atmospheric air showed that there is a distinct optimum depending on the design goal.

  2. Inactivation of Parietal Reach Region Affects Reaching But Not Saccade Choices in Internally Guided Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Bonaiuto, James; Kagan, Igor; Andersen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) has traditionally been considered important for awareness, spatial perception, and attention. However, recent findings provide evidence that the PPC also encodes information important for making decisions. These findings have initiated a running argument of whether the PPC is critically involved in decision making. To examine this issue, we reversibly inactivated the parietal reach region (PRR), the area of the PPC that is specialized for reaching movements, while two monkeys performed a memory-guided reaching or saccade task. The task included choices between two equally rewarded targets presented simultaneously in opposite visual fields. Free-choice trials were interleaved with instructed trials, in which a single cue presented in the peripheral visual field defined the reach and saccade target unequivocally. We found that PRR inactivation led to a strong reduction of contralesional choices, but only for reaches. On the other hand, saccade choices were not affected by PRR inactivation. Importantly, reaching and saccade movements to single instructed targets remained largely intact. These results cannot be explained as an effector-nonspecific deficit in spatial attention or awareness, since the temporary “lesion” had an impact only on reach choices. Hence, the PPR is a part of a network for reach decisions and not just reach planning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT There has been an ongoing debate on whether the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) represents only spatial awareness, perception, and attention or whether it is also involved in decision making for actions. In this study we explore whether the parietal reach region (PRR), the region of the PPC that is specialized for reaches, is involved in the decision process. We inactivated the PRR while two monkeys performed reach and saccade choices between two targets presented simultaneously in both hemifields. We found that inactivation affected only the reach choices, while leaving saccade choices intact. These results cannot be explained as a deficit in attention, since the temporary lesion affected only the reach choices. Thus, PRR is a part of a network for making reach decisions. PMID:26290248

  3. Olefins and chemical regulation in Europe: REACH.

    PubMed

    Penman, Mike; Banton, Marcy; Erler, Steffen; Moore, Nigel; Semmler, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) is the European Union's chemical regulation for the management of risk to human health and the environment (European Chemicals Agency, 2006). This regulation entered into force in June 2007 and required manufacturers and importers to register substances produced in annual quantities of 1000 tonnes or more by December 2010, with further deadlines for lower tonnages in 2013 and 2018. Depending on the type of registration, required information included the substance's identification, the hazards of the substance, the potential exposure arising from the manufacture or import, the identified uses of the substance, and the operational conditions and risk management measures applied or recommended to downstream users. Among the content developed to support this information were Derived No-Effect Levels or Derived Minimal Effect Levels (DNELs/DMELs) for human health hazard assessment, Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNECs) for environmental hazard assessment, and exposure scenarios for exposure and risk assessment. Once registered, substances may undergo evaluation by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) or Member State authorities and be subject to requests for additional information or testing as well as additional risk reduction measures. To manage the REACH registration and related activities for the European olefins and aromatics industry, the Lower Olefins and Aromatics REACH Consortium was formed in 2008 with administrative and technical support provided by Penman Consulting. A total of 135 substances are managed by this group including 26 individual chemical registrations (e.g. benzene, 1,3-butadiene) and 13 categories consisting of 5-26 substances. This presentation will describe the content of selected registrations prepared for 2010 in addition to the significant post-2010 activities. Beyond REACH, content of the registrations may also be relevant to other European activities, for example consideration of worker DNELs/DMELs for occupational exposure level setting, discussion of this aspect will be presented for 1,3-butadiene. PMID:25861726

  4. Virtual arm's reach influences perceived distances but only after experience reaching.

    PubMed

    Linkenauger, Sally A; Blthoff, Heinrich H; Mohler, Betty J

    2015-04-01

    Considerable empirical evidence has shown influences of the action capabilities of the body on the perception of sizes and distances. Generally, as one's action capabilities increase, the perception of the relevant distance (over which the action is to be performed) decreases and vice versa. As a consequence, it has been proposed that the body's action capabilities act as a perceptual ruler, which is used to measure perceived sizes and distances. In this set of studies, we investigated this hypothesis by assessing the influence of arm's reach on the perception of distance. By providing participant with a self-representing avatar seen in a first-person perspective in virtual reality, we were able to introduce novel and completely unfamiliar alterations in the virtual arm's reach to evaluate their impact on perceived distance. Using both action-based and visual matching measures, we found that virtual arm's reach influenced perceived distance in virtual environments. Due to the participants' inexperience with the reach alterations, we also were able to assess the amount of experience with the new arm's reach required to influence perceived distance. We found that minimal experience reaching with the virtual arm can influence perceived distance. However, some reaching experience is required. Merely having a long or short virtual arm, even one that is synchronized to one's movements, is not enough to influence distance perception if one has no experience reaching. PMID:25446965

  5. Distance Reached in the Anteromedial Reach Test as a Function of Learning and Leg Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Nicholas P.; Rushton, Alison B.; Wright, Chris C.; Batt, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    The Anteromedial Reach Test (ART) is a new outcome measure for assessing dynamic knee stability in anterior cruciate ligament-injured patients. The effect of learning and leg length on distance reached in the ART was examined. Thirty-two healthy volunteers performed 15 trials of the ART on each leg. There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.44-0.50)…

  6. Distance Reached in the Anteromedial Reach Test as a Function of Learning and Leg Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Nicholas P.; Rushton, Alison B.; Wright, Chris C.; Batt, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    The Anteromedial Reach Test (ART) is a new outcome measure for assessing dynamic knee stability in anterior cruciate ligament-injured patients. The effect of learning and leg length on distance reached in the ART was examined. Thirty-two healthy volunteers performed 15 trials of the ART on each leg. There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.44-0.50)

  7. Solar maximum: Solar array degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    The 5-year in-orbit power degradation of the silicon solar array aboard the Solar Maximum Satellite was evaluated. This was the first spacecraft to use Teflon R FEP as a coverglass adhesive, thus avoiding the necessity of an ultraviolet filter. The peak power tracking mode of the power regulator unit was employed to ensure consistent maximum power comparisons. Telemetry was normalized to account for the effects of illumination intensity, charged particle irradiation dosage, and solar array temperature. Reference conditions of 1.0 solar constant at air mass zero and 301 K (28 C) were used as a basis for normalization. Beginning-of-life array power was 2230 watts. Currently, the array output is 1830 watts. This corresponds to a 16 percent loss in array performance over 5 years. Comparison of Solar Maximum Telemetry and predicted power levels indicate that array output is 2 percent less than predictions based on an annual 1.0 MeV equivalent election fluence of 2.34 x ten to the 13th power square centimeters space environment.

  8. Phytoplankton maxima in the tidal freshwater reaches of two coastal plain estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuchardt, B.; Schirmer, M.

    1991-02-01

    Seasonal and spatial patterns of phytoplankton biomass are found to be very similar in the tidal freshwater reaches of the Weser and Elbe estuaries. The phytoplankton communities are dominated by riverine populations in spring and early summer, introduced from upstream into the tidal freshwater reaches, with seaward-decreasing chlorophyll a concentrations minimizing within the turbidity maximum region. During late summer and autumn a chlorophyll a maximum occurs in both estuaries within the tidal freshwater reaches, formed mainly by the autochthonous species Actinocyclus normanii. Peak abundance clearly occurs upstream of the turbidity maximum. Phytoplankton biomass in the estuaries of the Weser and Elbe during this time is higher in the tidal freshwater reaches in the river than in the middle and outer reaches of the estuaries. The suspected controlling mechanisms of these maxima are discussed. It is concluded that river discharge and water residence time are key factors. The tidal freshwater reaches are considered to be important sites of biogeochemical reactions and should be integrated into estuarine definitions and estuarine ecological research.

  9. Prediction of visually perceived location using reaching action and effect of reaching distance on it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Takazawa, Keigo; Uehira, Kazutake; Unno, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    We examined what effect the reaching distance had on the prediction of a visually perceived location using reaching action. A system presenting a virtual object must execute the process of interaction when a body is directly at the visually perceived location of the virtual object to enable direct interaction between an observer's body and the virtual object. Conventional techniques assume that the visually perceived location is the same as the location defined by binocular disparity. However, both locations are often different. We proposed a new technique in our previous studies to predict the visually perceived location using an observer's action. We also demonstrated prediction using an action where an observer reached out to a virtual object. This study was an examination into the range of applications of our proposed approach. An observer in an experiment reached out to a virtual object, and the reaching distance was the experimental variable. The results did not support the effect of the reaching distance on prediction. We demonstrated that our technique could be applied to a wide range of reaching distances.

  10. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    SciTech Connect

    FOGWELL, T.W.

    2003-07-11

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY2002 to support development of a complete data layer describing riparian vegetation cover types on the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford Site boundaries. Included with this report are the preliminary riparian vegetation maps and the associated metadata for that GIS layer.

  11. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2010-01-08

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  12. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  13. SNS target reaches end-of-life

    SciTech Connect

    Ekkebus, Allen E

    2011-01-01

    On Sunday, April 3, 2011, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) target reached an end-of-life condition, so user operations were shut down to change the stainless steel target housing the liquid mercury. This is the third change out of the target vessel; it is an expected event and took about two weeks. We took advantage of this time to do maintenance work that was planned for the longer summer shutdown. This will shorten that shutdown and recover the neutron production time. SNS restarted user operations on April 20.

  14. Feldenkrais sensory imagery and forward reach.

    PubMed

    Dunn, P A; Rogers, D K

    2000-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sensory imagery on subsequent movement, a unilateral Fleldenkrais lesson of imaging a soft bristle brush passing over one half of the body and in which no movement occurred, was given to 12 naive subjects. Forward flexion for each side of the body was measured at a sit-and-reach box. For 8 and 10 subjects who reported the perception of a side as being longer and lighter following the sensory imagery, there was also a significant increase in the forward flexion range on that side. PMID:11153843

  15. Information Superhighways: Will They Reach Community Colleges?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    Traces the growth of national information networks from the original network (ARPAnet) to the Internet and the National Research and Education Network (NREN). Reviews the debate on national networking, including issues related to the technology itself and policies that will shape it, and whether community colleges stand to gain or lose after the

  16. NASA's Astronomy Education Program: Reaching Diverse Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Hashima; Smith, Denise Anne; Hertz, Paul; Meinke, Bonnie

    2015-08-01

    An overview will be given of the rich programs developed by NASA to inject the science from it's Astrophysics missions into STEM activities targeted to diverse audiences. For example, Astro4Girls was started as a pilot program during IYA2009. This program partners NASA astrophysics education programs with public libraries to provide NASA-themed hands-on education activities for girls and their families, and has been executed across the country. School curricula and NASA websites have been translated in Spanish; Braille books have been developed for the visually impaired; programs have been developed for the hearing impaired. Special effort has been made to reach underrepresented minorities. Audiences include students, teachers, and the general public through formal and informal education settings, social media and other outlets. NASA Astrophysics education providers include teams embedded in its space flight missions; professionals selected though peer reviewed programs; as well as the Science Mission Directorate Astrophysics Education forum. Representative examples will be presented to demonstrate the reach of NASA education programs, as well as an evaluation of the effectiveness of these programs.

  17. Can donated media placements reach intended audiences?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer; Polonec, Lindsey

    2013-09-01

    Donated media placements for public service announcements (PSAs) can be difficult to secure, and may not always reach intended audiences. Strategies used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign (SFL) to obtain donated media placements include producing a diverse mix of high-quality PSAs, co-branding with state and tribal health agencies, securing celebrity involvement, monitoring media trends to identify new distribution opportunities, and strategically timing the release of PSAs. To investigate open-ended recall of PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, CDC conducted 12 focus groups in three U.S. cities with men and women either nearing age 50 years, when screening is recommended to begin, or aged 50-75 years who were not in compliance with screening guidelines. In most focus groups, multiple participants recalled exposure to PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, and most of these individuals reported having seen SFL PSAs on television, in transit stations, or on the sides of public buses. Some participants reported exposure to SFL PSAs without prompting from the moderator, as they explained how they learned about the disease. Several participants reported learning key campaign messages from PSAs, including that colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 50 years and screening can find polyps so they can be removed before becoming cancerous. Donated media placements can reach and educate mass audiences, including millions of U.S. adults who have not been screened appropriately for colorectal cancer. PMID:23720533

  18. How do microorganisms reach the stratosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, M.; Alharbi, S.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    2006-04-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that bacteria and fungi are present in the stratosphere. Since the tropopause is generally regarded as a barrier to the upward movement of particles it is difficult to see how such microorganisms can reach heights above 17 km. Volcanoes provide an obvious means by which this could be achieved, but these occur infrequently and any microorganisms entering the stratosphere from this source will rapidly fall out of the stratosphere. Here, we suggest mechanisms by which microorganisms might reach the stratosphere on a more regular basis; such mechanisms are, however, likely only to explain how micrometre to submicrometre particles could be elevated into the stratosphere. Intriguingly, clumps of bacteria of size in excess of 10 ?m have been found in stratospheric samples. It is difficult to understand how such clumps could be ejected from the Earth to this height, suggesting that such bacterial masses may be incoming to Earth. We suggest that the stratospheric microflora is made up of two components: (a) a mixed population of bacteria and fungi derived from Earth, which can occasionally be cultured; and (b) a population made up of clumps of, viable but non-culturable, bacteria which are too large to have originated from Earth; these, we suggest, have arrived in the stratosphere from space. Finally, we speculate on the possibility that the transfer of bacteria from the Earth to the highly mutagenic stratosphere may have played a role in bacterial evolution.

  19. Mass reach scaling for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2015-04-01

    The primary goal of any future hadron collider is to discover new physics (NP) associated with a high mass scale, , beyond the range of the LHC. In order to maintain the same relative mass reach for rate-limited NP, , as increases, Richter recently reminded us that the required integrated luminosity obtainable at future hadron colliders (FHC) must grow rapidly, , in the limit of naive scaling. This would imply, e.g., a 50-fold increase in the required integrated luminosity when going from the 14 TeV LHC to a FHC with TeV, an increase that would prove quite challenging on many different fronts. In this paper we point out, due to the scaling violations associated with the evolution of the parton density functions (PDFs) and the running of the strong coupling, , that the actual luminosity necessary in order to maintain any fixed value of the relative mass reach is somewhat greater than this scaling result indicates. However, the actual values of the required luminosity scaling are found to be dependent upon the detailed nature of the NP being considered. Here we elucidate this point explicitly by employing several specific benchmark examples of possible NP scenarios and briefly discuss the (relatively weak) search impact in each case if these luminosity goals are not met.

  20. Maximum life spur gear design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Mackulin, M. J.; Coe, H. H.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Optimization procedures allow one to design a spur gear reduction for maximum life and other end use criteria. A modified feasible directions search algorithm permits a wide variety of inequality constraints and exact design requirements to be met with low sensitivity to initial guess values. The optimization algorithm is described, and the models for gear life and performance are presented. The algorithm is compact and has been programmed for execution on a desk top computer. Two examples are presented to illustrate the method and its application.

  1. Maximum freeze-out baryon density in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Jorgen; Cleymans, Jean

    2006-07-11

    Using simple parametrizations of the thermodynamicfreeze-out parameters vextracted from the data over a wide beam-energyrange, we reexpress the hadronic freeze-out line in terms of theunderlying dynamical quantities, the net baryon density rhoB and theenergy density epsilon, which are subject to local conservation laws.This analysis makes it apparent that rhoB exhibits a maximum as thecollision energy is decreased. This maximum freeze-out density hasmu=400-500 MeV, which is above the critical value, and it is reached fora fixed-target bombarding energy of 20-30 A GeV.

  2. The efficiency of electrokinetic pumping at a condition of maximum.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.

    2004-08-01

    Numerical methods are employed to examine the work, electric power input, and efficiency of electrokinetic pumps at a condition corresponding to maximum pump work. These analyses employ the full Poisson-Boltzmann equations and account for both convective and conductive electric currents, including surface conductance. We find that efficiencies at this condition of maximum work depend on three dimensionless parameters, the normalized zeta potential, normalized Debye layer thickness, and a fluid property termed the Levine number indicating the nominal ratio of convective to conductive electric currents. Efficiencies at maximum work exhibit a maximum for an optimum Debye layer thickness when the zeta potential and Levine number are fixed. This maximum efficiency increases with the square of the zeta potential when the zeta potential is small, but reaches a plateau as the zeta potential becomes large. The maximum efficiency in this latter regime is thus independent of the zeta potential and depends only on the Levine number. Simple analytical expressions describing this maximum efficiency in terms of the Levine number are provided. Geometries of a circular tube and planar channel are examined.

  3. Maximum-information photoelectron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Lux, C.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-07-01

    Photoelectron interferograms, manifested in photoelectron angular distributions (PADs), are high-information, coherent observables. In order to obtain the maximum information from angle-resolved photoionization experiments it is desirable to record the full, three-dimensional (3D), photoelectron momentum distribution. Here we apply tomographic reconstruction techniques to obtain such 3D distributions from multiphoton ionization of potassium atoms, and fully analyze the energy and angular content of the 3D data. The PADs obtained as a function of energy indicate good agreement with previous 2D data and detailed analysis [Hockett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 223001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.223001] concerning the main spectral features, but also indicate unexpected symmetry breaking in certain regions of momentum space, thus revealing additional continuum interferences which cannot otherwise be observed. These observations reflect the presence of additional ionization pathways and, most generally, illustrate the power of maximum-information measurements of coherent observables for quantum metrology of complex systems.

  4. Economics and Maximum Entropy Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2003-04-01

    Price differentials, sales volume and profit can be seen as analogues of temperature difference, heat flow and work or entropy production in the climate system. One aspect in which economic systems exhibit more clarity than the climate is that the empirical and/or statistical mechanical tendency for systems to seek a maximum in production is very evident in economics, in that the profit motive is very clear. Noting the common link between 1/f noise, power laws and Self-Organized Criticality with Maximum Entropy Production, the power law fluctuations in security and commodity prices is not inconsistent with the analogy. There is an additional thermodynamic analogy, in that scarcity is valued. A commodity concentrated among a few traders is valued highly by the many who do not have it. The market therefore encourages via prices the spreading of those goods among a wider group, just as heat tends to diffuse, increasing entropy. I explore some empirical price-volume relationships of metals and meteorites in this context.

  5. 2015 Antarctic Maximum Sea Ice Extent Breaks Streak of Record Highs - Duration: 49 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Antarctic sea ice likely reached its annual maximum extent on Oct. 6, barring a late season surge. This video shows the evolution of the sea ice cover of the Southern Ocean from its minimum yearly ...

  6. Reaching Consensus by Allowing Moments of Indecision

    PubMed Central

    Svenkeson, A.; Swami, A.

    2015-01-01

    Group decision-making processes often turn into a drawn out and costly battle between two opposing subgroups. Using analytical arguments based on a master equation description of the opinion dynamics occurring in a three-state model of cooperatively interacting units, we show how the capability of a social group to reach consensus can be enhanced when there is an intermediate state for indecisive individuals to pass through. The time spent in the intermediate state must be relatively short compared to that of the two polar states in order to create the beneficial effect. Furthermore, the cooperation between individuals must not be too low, as the benefit to consensus is possible only when the cooperation level exceeds a specific threshold. We also discuss how zealots, agents that remain in one state forever, can affect the consensus among the rest of the population by counteracting the benefit of the intermediate state or making it virtually impossible for an opposition to form. PMID:26439503

  7. How do bacteria reach the stratosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, M.

    2007-09-01

    Culturable bacteria have recently been found in the stratosphere (at heights up to 41km). How do such bacteria cross the tropopause to reach such heights? Although possible mechanisms are suggested here, such transfer remains difficult to explain. It is however, likely to more easily achieved by sub-micron bacteria. Such small forms have been found in terrestrial environments and have the potential to seed the stratosphere. Large, ten micron clumps of bacteria have also been found in the stratosphere and it is suggested that these are incoming to Earth from space. Finally, the possibility will be discussed that the presence of bacteria in the stratosphere has led to an increase in the rate of evolution.

  8. Reaching Consensus by Allowing Moments of Indecision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenkeson, A.; Swami, A.

    2015-10-01

    Group decision-making processes often turn into a drawn out and costly battle between two opposing subgroups. Using analytical arguments based on a master equation description of the opinion dynamics occurring in a three-state model of cooperatively interacting units, we show how the capability of a social group to reach consensus can be enhanced when there is an intermediate state for indecisive individuals to pass through. The time spent in the intermediate state must be relatively short compared to that of the two polar states in order to create the beneficial effect. Furthermore, the cooperation between individuals must not be too low, as the benefit to consensus is possible only when the cooperation level exceeds a specific threshold. We also discuss how zealots, agents that remain in one state forever, can affect the consensus among the rest of the population by counteracting the benefit of the intermediate state or making it virtually impossible for an opposition to form.

  9. Reach and get capability in a computing environment

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2012-06-05

    A reach and get technique includes invoking a reach command from a reach location within a computing environment. A user can then navigate to an object within the computing environment and invoke a get command on the object. In response to invoking the get command, the computing environment is automatically navigated back to the reach location and the object copied into the reach location.

  10. System for memorizing maximum values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention discloses a system capable of memorizing maximum sensed values. The system includes conditioning circuitry which receives the analog output signal from a sensor transducer. The conditioning circuitry rectifies and filters the analog signal and provides an input signal to a digital driver, which may be either linear or logarithmic. The driver converts the analog signal to discrete digital values, which in turn triggers an output signal on one of a plurality of driver output lines n. The particular output lines selected is dependent on the converted digital value. A microfuse memory device connects across the driver output lines, with n segments. Each segment is associated with one driver output line, and includes a microfuse that is blown when a signal appears on the associated driver output line.

  11. On the maximum scatter TSP

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, E.M.; Chiang, Yi-Jen; Mitchell, J.S.B.

    1997-06-01

    We study the problem of computing a Hamiltonian tour (cycle) or path on a set of points in order to maximize the minimum edge length in the tour or path. This {open_quotes}maximum scatter{close_quotes} TSP is closely related to the bottleneck TSP, and is motivated by applications in manufacturing (e.g., sequencing of rivet operations) and medical imaging. In this paper, we give the first algorithmic study of these problems, including complexity results, approximation algorithms, and exact algorithms for special cases. In an attempt to model more accurately the real problems that arise in practice, we also generalize the basic problem to consider a more general measure of {open_quote}scatter{close_quote} in which points on a tour or path should be far not only from their immediate predecessor and successor, but also from other near-neighbors along the tour or path.

  12. Discrimination networks for maximum selection.

    PubMed

    Jain, Brijnesh J; Wysotzki, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    We construct a novel discrimination network using differentiating units for maximum selection. In contrast to traditional competitive architectures like MAXNET the discrimination network does not only signal the winning unit, but also provides information about its evidence. In particular, we show that a discrimination network converges to a stable state within finite time and derive three characteristics: intensity normalization (P1), contrast enhancement (P2), and evidential response (P3). In order to improve the accuracy of the evidential response we incorporate distributed redundancy into the network. This leads to a system which is not only robust against failure of single units and noisy data, but also enables us to sharpen the focus on the problem given in terms of a more accurate evidential response. The proposed discrimination network can be regarded as a connectionist model for competitive learning by evidence. PMID:14690714

  13. System for Memorizing Maximum Values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The invention discloses a system capable of memorizing maximum sensed values. The system includes conditioning circuitry which receives the analog output signal from a sensor transducer. The conditioning circuitry rectifies and filters the analog signal and provides an input signal to a digital driver, which may be either liner or logarithmic. The driver converts the analog signal to discrete digital values, which in turn triggers an output signal on one of a plurality of driver output lines n. The particular output lines selected is dependent on the converted digital value. A microfuse memory device connects across the driver output lines, with n segments. Each segment is associated with one driver output line, and includes a microfuse that is blown when a signal appears on the associated driver output line.

  14. Reaching Non-Traditional Audiences During IYA2009 in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesser, J. E.; Lane, D.; Langill, P. P.; Percy, J. R.

    2008-11-01

    Canada's far reaching plans for IYA2009 are highly inter-related. Unification arises from the major focus on maximizing the number and diversity of Canadians who will experience sometime in 2009 a moment of personal astronomical discovery, the Galileo Moment, through participation in astronomical observation or broadly defined activities with significant astronomical content that evoke awe and wonder. Among the latter are three broad themes: a) programmes involving Aboriginal children, youth and elders, b) partnerships with arts and cultural organizations, and c) astronomical imagery exhibits in high-traffic areas. Delivery of these programs rests upon our strong partnership between amateur [Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Fdration des astronomes amateurs du Qubec and, we hope, independent clubs] and professional astronomers [Canadian Astronomical Society, including many active, enthusiastic graduate students] and collaborations with diverse sectors of society, the growth of which is encouraging. Our developing ideas and their implementation may be followed at http://www.astronomy2009.ca.

  15. Reaching Non-Traditional Audiences During IYA2009 in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesser, James E.; Lane, D.; Langill, P. P. L.; Percy, J. R.; Canada Committee, IYA

    2008-05-01

    Canada's far reaching plans for IYA2009 are highly inter-related. Unification arises from the major focus on maximizing the number and diversity of Canadians who will experience sometime in 2009 a moment of personal astronomical discovery, the Galileo Moment, through participation in astronomical observation or broadly defined activities with significant astronomical content that evoke awe and wonder. Among the latter are three broad themes that we will describe: a) programmes involving Aboriginal children, youth and elders, b) partnerships with arts and cultural organizations, and c) astronomical imagery exhibits in high-traffic areas. Delivery of these programs rests upon our strong partnership between amateur [Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Fdration des astronomes amateurs du Qubec and, we hope, independent clubs] and professional astronomers (Canadian Astronomical Society, including many active, enthusiastic graduate students) and collaborations with diverse sectors of society, the growth of which is encouraging. Our developing ideas and their implementation may be followed at www.astronomy2009.ca.

  16. Toxicological comments to the discussion about REACH.

    PubMed

    Greim, Helmut; Arand, Michael; Autrup, Herman; Bolt, Hermann M; Bridges, James; Dybing, Erik; Glomot, Rmi; Foa, Vito; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf

    2006-03-01

    It is the ultimate goal of the intended REACH process (Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals) of the European Union to identify substances of hazardous properties and to evaluate the risks of human and environmental exposure. During the last few months there has been a controversial discussion as to what extent in vitro studies and consideration of structure activity relationship provide sufficient information to waive repeated exposure studies. Industry as well as certain regulatory agencies or NGOs support this approach and propose that repeated dose studies may only be required beyond 100 t/a. From a toxicological point of view it has to be stressed that this discussion primarily considers the cost reduction and protection of animals, whereas protection of human health and the environment are secondary. In vitro studies only allow identification of specific hazardous properties which can be detected by the specific test system. Moreover, appropriate information on the dose response of adverse effects, identification of thresholds and NOELs that are essential for risk characterization cannot be obtained from these studies. Consequently, identification of all relevant hazardous properties and endpoints of adverse effects can only be determined in the intact animal by repeated dose studies such as 28-day or 90-day studies. In the absence of such information the hazard identification is incomplete and there is no basis for appropriate risk assessment of human exposure. Thus, any waiving of repeated dose studies in animals bears the probability of unforeseen effects in case of acute or continuous human exposure. From this the undersigning European Toxicologists conclude: 1. The intention of REACH is to identify hazardous properties in order that a reliable risk assessment can be made and measures taken to deal with chemicals posing a significant risk. 2. The recent debate has centered on ways in which the well established in vivo methods for risk assessment can be bypassed. 3. The evidence that the available alternatives would support such replacement is weak. Progress to improve their value for risk assessment purposes is bound to be slow because the issues are very complex. As a group of European Toxicologists we strongly support the need for more research support in these areas, but we believe that over claims for progress is damaging their development. 4. Under the circumstances only two options are available: to reduce very substantially the estimation of hazard and risk with inevitable adverse consequences for human health and environmental protection, or to continue the existing methods until properly validated new methods are available. PMID:16411136

  17. Recovery of Three Arctic Stream Reaches From Experimental Nutrient Enrichment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. C.; Benstead, J. P.; Deegan, L. A.; Peterson, B. J.; Bowden, W. B.; Huryn, A. D.; Slavik, K.; Hershey, A. E.

    2005-05-01

    We examined multi-year patterns in community recovery from experimental low-concentration nutrient (N+P and P only) enrichment in three reaches of two Arctic tundra streams (Kuparuk River and Oksrukuyik Creek) on the North Slope of Alaska (USA). Rates of recovery varied among community components and depended on duration of enrichment (2 to 13 consecutive growing seasons). Biomass and C:P ratio of epilithic algae returned to reference levels rapidly (within 2 years), regardless of enrichment duration. Bryophyte cover, which increased greatly after long-term enrichment (>8 years), recovered to reference levels only after 7 years, when a storm scoured most remnant moss in the recovering reach. Persistence of bryophytes slowed recovery rates of insect taxa that had either been positively (e.g., Ephemerella, most chironomid taxa) or negatively (e.g., Orthocladius rivulorum) affected by this shift in dominant primary producer and its consequence for benthic habitat. Growth of Arctic grayling (adults and young-of-year), the top predator, returned to reference rates within two years. Recovery of these Arctic stream ecosystems from nutrient enrichment was consequently controlled largely by interactions between duration of enrichment and physical disturbance, mediated through physical habitat shifts caused by bryophytes.

  18. ESO telbib: Linking In and Reaching Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothkopf, U.; Meakins, S.

    2015-04-01

    Measuring an observatory's research output is an integral part of its science operations. Like many other observatories, ESO tracks scholarly papers that use observational data from ESO facilities and uses state-of-the-art tools to create, maintain, and further develop the Telescope Bibliography database (telbib). While telbib started out as a stand-alone tool mostly used to compile lists of papers, it has by now developed into a multi-faceted, interlinked system. The core of the telbib database is links between scientific papers and observational data generated by the La Silla Paranal Observatory residing in the ESO archive. This functionality has also been deployed for ALMA data. In addition, telbib reaches out to several other systems, including ESO press releases, the NASA ADS Abstract Service, databases at the CDS Strasbourg, and impact scores at Altmetric.com. We illustrate these features to show how the interconnected telbib system enhances the content of the database as well as the user experience.

  19. Media perspective - new opportunities for reaching audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haswell, Katy

    2007-08-01

    The world of media is experiencing a period of extreme and rapid change with the rise of internet television and the download generation. Many young people no longer watch standard TV. Instead, they go on-line, talking to friends and downloading pictures, videos, music clips to put on their own websites and watch/ listen to on their laptops and mobile phones. Gone are the days when TV controllers determined what you watched and when you watched it. Now the buzzword is IPTV, Internet Protocol Television, with companies such as JOOST offering hundreds of channels on a wide range of subjects, all of which you can choose to watch when and where you wish, on your high-def widescreen with stereo surround sound at home or on your mobile phone on the train. This media revolution is changing the way organisations get their message out. And it is encouraging companies such as advertising agencies to be creative about new ways of accessing audiences. The good news is that we have fresh opportunities to reach young people through internet-based media and material downloaded through tools such as games machines, as well as through the traditional media. And it is important for Europlanet to make the most of these new and exciting developments.

  20. Gravitational wave detector with cosmological reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Sheila; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan W.; Barsotti, Lisa; Mavalvala, Nergis; Evans, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Twenty years ago, construction began on the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). Advanced LIGO, with a factor of 10 better design sensitivity than Initial LIGO, will begin taking data this year, and should soon make detections a monthly occurrence. While Advanced LIGO promises to make first detections of gravitational waves from the nearby universe, an additional factor of 10 increase in sensitivity would put exciting science targets within reach by providing observations of binary black hole inspirals throughout most of the history of star formation, and high signal to noise observations of nearby events. Design studies for future detectors to date rely on significant technological advances that are futuristic and risky. In this paper we propose a different direction. We resurrect the idea of using longer arm lengths coupled with largely proven technologies. Since the major noise sources that limit gravitational wave detectors do not scale trivially with the length of the detector, we study their impact and find that 40 km arm lengths are nearly optimal, and can incorporate currently available technologies to detect gravitational wave sources at cosmological distances (z ?7 ) .

  1. Using New Media to Reach Broad Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, P. L.

    2008-06-01

    The International Year of Astronomy New Media Working Group (IYA NMWG) has a singular mission: To flood the Internet with ways to learn about astronomy, interact with astronomers and astronomy content, and socially network with astronomy. Within each of these areas, we seek to build lasting programs and partnerships that will continue beyond 2009. Our weapon of choice is New Media. It is often easiest to define New Media by what it is not. Television, radio, print and their online redistribution of content are not New Media. Many forms of New Media start as user provided content and content infrastructures that answer that individual's creative whim in a way that is adopted by a broader audience. Classic examples include Blogs and Podcasts. This media is typically distributed through content specific websites and RSS feeds, which allow syndication. RSS aggregators (iTunes has audio and video aggregation abilities) allow subscribers to have content delivered to their computers automatically when they connect to the Internet. RSS technology is also being used in such creative ways as allowing automatically updating Google-maps that show the location of someone with an intelligent GPS system, and in sharing 100 word microblogs from anyone (Twitters) through a single feed. In this poster, we outline how the IYA NMWG plans to use New Media to reach target primary audiences of astronomy enthusiasts, image lovers, and amateur astronomers, as well as secondary audiences, including: science fiction fans, online gamers, and skeptics.

  2. Reaching the Next Generation of Marine Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, J.

    2009-04-01

    The next generation of marine scientists are today at primary school, secondary school or at college. To encourage them in their career, and to introduce those who are as yet undecided to the wonders of marine science, the Irish Marine Institute has devised a series of three overlapping outreach programmes to reach children at all three levels. Beginning at primary school, the "Explorers" programme offers a range of resources to teachers to enable them to teach marine-related examples as part of the science or geography modules of the SESE curriculum. These include teacher training, expert visits to schools, the installation and stocking of aquaria, field trips and downloadable lesson plans. For older pupils, the "Follow the Fleet" programme is a web-based education asset that allows users to track individual merchant ships and research vessels across the world, to interact with senior crew members of ships and to learn about their cargoes, the ports they visit and the sea conditions along the way. Finally, the "Integrated Marine Exploration Programme (IMEP)" takes secondary school pupils and university students to sea aboard the Marine Institute's research vessels to give them a taste of life as a marine scientist or to educate them in the practical day-to-day sampling and data processing tasks that make up a marine scientist's job.

  3. Maximum entropy production in daisyworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunu, Haley A.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2012-05-01

    Daisyworld was first introduced in 1983 by Watson and Lovelock as a model that illustrates how life can influence a planet's climate. These models typically involve modeling a planetary surface on which black and white daisies can grow thus influencing the local surface albedo and therefore also the temperature distribution. Since then, variations of daisyworld have been applied to study problems ranging from ecological systems to global climate. Much of the interest in daisyworld models is due to the fact that they enable one to study self-regulating systems. These models are nonlinear, and as such they exhibit sensitive dependence on initial conditions, and depending on the specifics of the model they can also exhibit feedback loops, oscillations, and chaotic behavior. Many daisyworld models are thermodynamic in nature in that they rely on heat flux and temperature gradients. However, what is not well-known is whether, or even why, a daisyworld model might settle into a maximum entropy production (MEP) state. With the aim to better understand these systems, this paper will discuss what is known about the role of MEP in daisyworld models.

  4. Changes in biologically active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    PubMed

    Madronich, S; McKenzie, R L; Björn, L O; Caldwell, M M

    1998-10-01

    Stratospheric ozone levels are near their lowest point since measurements began, so current ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their maximum. Total stratospheric content of ozone-depleting substances is expected to reach a maximum before the year 2000. All other things being equal, the current ozone losses and related UV-B increases should be close to their maximum. Increases in surface erythemal (sunburning) UV radiation relative to the values in the 1970s are estimated to be: about 7% at Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in winter/spring; about 4% at Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in summer/fall; about 6% at Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes on a year-round basis; about 130% in the Antarctic in spring; and about 22% in the Arctic in spring. Reductions in atmospheric ozone are expected to result in higher amounts of UV-B radiation reaching the Earth's surface. The expected correlation between increases in surface UV-B radiation and decreases in overhead ozone has been further demonstrated and quantified by ground-based instruments under a wide range of conditions. Improved measurements of UV-B radiation are now providing better geographical and temporal coverage. Surface UV-B radiation levels are highly variable because of cloud cover, and also because of local effects including pollutants and surface reflections. These factors usually decrease atmospheric transmission and therefore the surface irradiances at UV-B as well as other wavelengths. Occasional cloud-induced increases have also been reported. With a few exceptions, the direct detection of UV-B trends at low- and mid-latitudes remains problematic due to this high natural variability, the relatively small ozone changes, and the practical difficulties of maintaining long-term stability in networks of UV-measuring instruments. Few reliable UV-B radiation measurements are available from pre-ozone-depletion days. Satellite-based observations of atmospheric ozone and clouds are being used, together with models of atmospheric transmission, to provide global coverage and long-term estimates of surface UV-B radiation. Estimates of long-term (1979-1992) trends in zonally averaged UV irradiances that include cloud effects are nearly identical to those for clear-sky estimates, providing evidence that clouds have not influenced the UV-B trends. However, the limitations of satellite-derived UV estimates should be recognized. To assess uncertainties inherent in this approach, additional validations involving comparisons with ground-based observations are required. Direct comparisons of ground-based UV-B radiation measurements between a few mid-latitude sites in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres have shown larger differences than those estimated using satellite data. Ground-based measurements show that summertime erythemal UV irradiances in the Southern Hemisphere exceed those at comparable latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere by up to 40%, whereas corresponding satellite-based estimates yield only 10-15% differences. Atmospheric pollution may be a factor in this discrepancy between ground-based measurements and satellite-derived estimates. UV-B measurements at more sites are required to determine whether the larger observed differences are globally representative. High levels of UV-B radiation continue to be observed in Antarctica during the recurrent spring-time ozone hole. For example, during ozone-hole episodes, measured biologically damaging radiation at Palmer Station, Antarctica (64 degrees S) has been found to approach and occasionally even exceed maximum summer values at San Diego, CA, USA (32 degrees N). Long-term predictions of future UV-B levels are difficult and uncertain. Nevertheless, current best estimates suggest that a slow recovery to pre-ozone depletion levels may be expected during the next half-century. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:9894350

  5. Perspectives of women with disabilities on reaching those who are hard to reach.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Ott, Barbara B; Zimmerman, Vanessa; Duffin, Janice

    2007-06-01

    Healthcare needs of women with disabilities are often neglected, even for women who are well connected to the community and to the healthcare system. So-called "hard-to-reach" women, whose degree of disability impedes use of community resources, have even greater difficulty obtaining health care. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the perceptions of women with mobility and sensory limitations about several healthcare issues that may affect them: barriers to obtaining care, sources of information about health issues, ways to improve access to care, and ways to help hard-to-reach women overcome barriers to health care and health information. Researchers conducted six focus groups, comprising 43 women with limitations of mobility, hearing, or vision. To validate the women's input, researchers conducted two additional focus groups: the first comprised female physicians with special interest in the health care of women with disabilities, and the second included professional administrative staff of agencies that provide services for people with disabilities. In several cases, members of the physician and agency focus groups were themselves women with disabilities. In addition, 16 women with disabilities participated in an online survey; their responses were used to validate the findings of the face-to-face focus groups. Transcribed data were content analyzed and 10 themes identified. Seven of those themes are discussed in this article: communication barriers; lack of knowledge and awareness among healthcare providers; access issues; working the system; system issues; outreach to healthcare providers; and reaching hard-to-reach women. The findings of this study can provide direction to development of more effective outreach to hard-to-reach women with disabilities, resulting in better integration of healthcare services for this population. PMID:17591412

  6. Determination Of The Maximum Explosion Pressure And The Maximum Rate Of Pressure Rise During Explosion Of Wood Dust Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuracina, Richard; Szabov, Zuzana; ?ekan, Pavol

    2015-06-01

    The article deals with the measurement of maximum explosion pressure and the maximum rate of exposure pressure rise of wood dust cloud. The measurements were carried out according to STN EN 14034-1+A1:2011 Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds. Part 1: Determination of the maximum explosion pressure pmax of dust clouds and the maximum rate of explosion pressure rise according to STN EN 14034-2+A1:2012 Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds - Part 2: Determination of the maximum rate of explosion pressure rise (dp/dt)max of dust clouds. The wood dust cloud in the chamber is achieved mechanically. The testing of explosions of wood dust clouds showed that the maximum value of the pressure was reached at the concentrations of 450 g / m3 and its value is 7.95 bar. The fastest increase of pressure was observed at the concentrations of 450 g / m3 and its value was 68 bar / s.

  7. Maximum entropy principal for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Bilich, F.; Da Silva, R.

    2008-11-06

    In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

  8. When could global warming reach 4C?

    PubMed

    Betts, Richard A; Collins, Matthew; Hemming, Deborah L; Jones, Chris D; Lowe, Jason A; Sanderson, Michael G

    2011-01-13

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) assessed a range of scenarios of future greenhouse-gas emissions without policies to specifically reduce emissions, and concluded that these would lead to an increase in global mean temperatures of between 1.6C and 6.9C by the end of the twenty-first century, relative to pre-industrial. While much political attention is focused on the potential for global warming of 2C relative to pre-industrial, the AR4 projections clearly suggest that much greater levels of warming are possible by the end of the twenty-first century in the absence of mitigation. The centre of the range of AR4-projected global warming was approximately 4C. The higher end of the projected warming was associated with the higher emissions scenarios and models, which included stronger carbon-cycle feedbacks. The highest emissions scenario considered in the AR4 (scenario A1FI) was not examined with complex general circulation models (GCMs) in the AR4, and similarly the uncertainties in climate-carbon-cycle feedbacks were not included in the main set of GCMs. Consequently, the projections of warming for A1FI and/or with different strengths of carbon-cycle feedbacks are often not included in a wider discussion of the AR4 conclusions. While it is still too early to say whether any particular scenario is being tracked by current emissions, A1FI is considered to be as plausible as other non-mitigation scenarios and cannot be ruled out. (A1FI is a part of the A1 family of scenarios, with 'FI' standing for 'fossil intensive'. This is sometimes erroneously written as A1F1, with number 1 instead of letter I.) This paper presents simulations of climate change with an ensemble of GCMs driven by the A1FI scenario, and also assesses the implications of carbon-cycle feedbacks for the climate-change projections. Using these GCM projections along with simple climate-model projections, including uncertainties in carbon-cycle feedbacks, and also comparing against other model projections from the IPCC, our best estimate is that the A1FI emissions scenario would lead to a warming of 4C relative to pre-industrial during the 2070s. If carbon-cycle feedbacks are stronger, which appears less likely but still credible, then 4C warming could be reached by the early 2060s in projections that are consistent with the IPCC's 'likely range'. PMID:21115513

  9. XMM classroom competitions : reaching for the stars!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    Partnered by a unique education network 'European Schoolnet'(*), ESA is today launching these three competitions for schools (age range: 8 to final year) in its Member States: draw a telescope, describe the benefits of space-based astronomy or produce an astronomy observation proposal. Details can be found on the special competition website : http://sci.esa.int/xmm/competition "Draw me a telescope!" This competition for 8 to 12 year-olds asks the class to draw a telescope (inside a 20 - 50 cm diameter circle). The 14 winning entries, one per Member State, will be included in a specially-designed official XMM mission logo to go on the Ariane-5 launcher fairing for official unveiling on launch day. A representative of each winning class will be invited to Kourou for the launch. Deadline for entries : 8 October 1999. For full information on how to enter see : http://sci.esa.int/xmm/competition "What's new, Mr Galileo?" The essay competition for 13 to 15 year-olds challenges an English class, writing in the international language of space, to submit a single page (500 words maximum) description of space-based astronomy and its benefits for humanity. The 14 winners, one per Member States, will be invited to Kourou to visit the Guiana Space Centre, Europe's spaceport, and witness final XMM launch preparations. Deadline for entries : 15 October 1999. For full information on how to enter see : http://sci.esa.int/xmm/competition. "Stargazing" In the final-year class competition, ESA is providing a unique opportunity to use the XMM telescope. Here, the physics class, assisted by the scientific community, has to submit an observation project. The 14 winning proposals will be put into practice in 2000 at a summer camp. Further details will be announced once XMM is in orbit. Note to editors: The X-ray Multi-Mirror mission is the second Cornerstone of ESA's Horizon 2000 Plus science programme. The telescope will revolutionise cosmic X-ray astronomy by harvesting far more X-rays per hour than any previous mission. Its large effective collecting area (120 m2 of mirror, 4500 cm2 of X-ray collecting area) and highly eccentric orbit will allow long-duration observation of unprecedented sensitivity. This enormous capability will enable astronomers to analyse many strong sources of cosmic X-rays very quickly and also discover and characterise many faint sources.

  10. The Southern Glacial Maximum 65,000 years ago and its Unfinished Termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joerg M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Denton, George H.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Birkel, Sean; Doughty, Alice M.; Kelley, Sam; Barrell, David J. A.; Finkel, Robert C.; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Ninneman, Ulysses S.; Barker, Stephen; Schwartz, Roseanne; Andersen, Bjorn G.; Schluechter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Glacial maxima and their terminations provide key insights into inter-hemispheric climate dynamics and the coupling of atmosphere, surface and deep ocean, hydrology, and cryosphere, which is fundamental for evaluating the robustness of earth's climate in view of ongoing climate change. The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼26-19 ka ago) is widely seen as the global cold peak during the last glacial cycle, and its transition to the Holocene interglacial, dubbed 'Termination 1 (T1)', as the most dramatic climate reorganization during this interval. Climate records show that over the last 800 ka, ice ages peaked and terminated on average every 100 ka ('100 ka world'). However, the mechanisms pacing glacial-interglacial transitions remain controversial and in particular the hemispheric manifestations and underlying orbital to regional driving forces of glacial maxima and subsequent terminations remain poorly understood. Here we show evidence for a full glacial maximum in the Southern Hemisphere 65.1 ± 2.7 ka ago and its 'Unfinished Termination'. Our 10Be chronology combined with a model simulation demonstrates that New Zealand's glaciers reached their maximum position of the last glacial cycle during Marine Isotope Stage-4 (MIS-4). Southern ocean and greenhouse gas records indicate coeval peak glacial conditions, making the case for the Southern Glacial Maximum about halfway through the last glacial cycle and only 15 ka after the last warm period (MIS-5a). We present the hypothesis that subsequently, driven by boreal summer insolation forcing, a termination began but remained unfinished, possibly because the northern ice sheets were only moderately large and could not supply enough meltwater to the North Atlantic through Heinrich Stadial 6 to drive a full termination. Yet the Unfinished Termination left behind substantial ice on the northern continents (about 50% of the full LGM ice volume) and after another 45 ka of cooling and ice sheet growth the earth was at inter-hemispheric Last Glacial Maximum configuration, when similar orbital forcing hit maximum-size northern ice sheets and ushered in T1 and thus the ongoing interglacial. This argument highlights the critical role of full glacial conditions in both hemispheres for terminations and implies that the Southern Hemisphere climate could transition from interglacial to full glacial conditions in about 15,000 years, while the Northern Hemisphere and its continental ice-sheets required half a glacial cycle.

  11. Development of the southern reaches of Laurentia

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.C. Jr. . Federal Center)

    1993-02-01

    Laurentia, the Late Proterozoic continental fragment that now forms the core of North America, has a long and complex history, much of which involves development along its southern margin. The southernmost parts of the Archean continental core are the Wyoming and Superior cratons, both of which contain gneisses that record crust-forming events in the interval 3.8--3.1 Ga as well as greenstone belts that reflect continental growth in the interval 2.8--2.6 Ga. Each of these cratonic elements was assembled and stabilized prior to deposition of passive margin sequences along their southern flanks during the interval [approximately]2.5--1.9 Ga. Between [approximately]1.8 Ga and 1.6 Ga arc-related sedimentary and volcanic rocks were accreted to the southern margin of the Laurentian core during a complex series of tectonic episodes that included events locally referred to as the Penokean, Ivanpah, Yavapai, and Mazatzal orogenies, resulting in the addition of a belt of continental crust at least 1,000 km wide. Voluminous highly evolved granite and rhyolite were emplaced along this southern marginal belt between [approximately] 1.45 and 1.35 Ga under conditions of general tectonic stability, or perhaps dispersed regional extension. This same interval was also marked by onset of deposition of thick Middle Proterozoic sedimentary sequences along the western and southern margins of Laurentia. The eastern margin of Laurentia contains the complexly deformed and metamorphosed rocks of the 1.25 to 1.1 Ga Grenville orogen which, according to recent reconstructions, may record a collision with cratonic elements in western South America. The 2,000 km-long Midcontinent rift system in central Laurentia opened and filled with basalt and sediments at about the same time as the end of Grenville activity.

  12. Fifth Space Weather Enterprise Forum Reaches New Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Samuel P.; Babcock, Michael R.; Bonadonna, Michael F.

    2011-09-01

    As the world's commercial infrastructure grows more dependent on sensitive electronics and space-based technologies, the global economy is becoming increasingly vulnerable to solar storms. Experts from the federal government, academia, and the private sector met to discuss the societal effects of major solar storms and other space weather at the fifth annual Space Weather Enterprise Forum (SWEF), held on 21 June 2011 at the National Press Club in Washington, D. C. More than 200 members of the space weather community attended this year's SWEF, which focused on the consequences of severe space weather for national security, critical infrastructure, and human safety. Participants also addressed the question of how to prepare for and mitigate those consequences as the current solar cycle approaches and reaches its peak, expected in 2013. This year's forum included details of plans for a "Unified National Space Weather Capability," a new interagency initiative which will be implemented over the next two years, designed to improve forecasting, warning, and other services ahead of the coming solar maximum.

  13. Flow model for open-channel reach or network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Formulation of a one-dimensional model for simulating unsteady flow in a single open-channel reach or in a network of interconnected channels is presented. The model is both general and flexible in that it can be used to simulate a wide range of flow conditions for various channel configurations. It is based on a four-point (box), implicit, finite-difference approximation of the governing nonlinear flow equations with user-definable weighting coefficients to permit varying the solution scheme from box-centered to fully forward. Unique transformation equations are formulated that permit correlation of the unknowns at the extremities of the channels, thereby reducing coefficient matrix and execution time requirements. Discharges and water-surface elevations computed at intermediate locations within a channel are determined following solution of the transformation equations. The matrix of transformation and boundary-condition equations is solved by Gauss elimination using maximum pivot strategy. Two diverse applications of the model are presented to illustrate its broad utility. (USGS)

  14. Maximum Flux Transition Paths of Conformational Change

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruijun; Shen, Juanfang; Skeel, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Given two metastable states A and B of a biomolecular system, the problem is to calculate the likely paths of the transition from A to B. Such a calculation is more informative and more manageable if done for a reduced set of collective variables chosen so that paths cluster in collective variable space. The computational task becomes that of computing the center of such a cluster. A good way to define the center employs the concept of a committor, whose value at a point in collective variable space is the probability that a trajectory at that point will reach B before A. The committor foliates the transition region into a set of isocommittors. The maximum flux transition path is defined as a path that crosses each isocommittor at a point which (locally) has the highest crossing rate of distinct reactive trajectories. This path is based on the same principle as the minimum resistance path of Berkowitz et al (1983), but it has two advantages: (i) the path is invariant with respect to a change of coordinates in collective variable space and (ii) the differential equations that define the path are simpler. It is argued that such a path is nearer to an ideal path than others that have been proposed with the possible exception of the finite-temperature string method path. To make the calculation tractable, three approximations are introduced, yielding a path that is the solution of a nonsingular two-point boundary-value problem. For such a problem, one can construct a simple and robust algorithm. One such algorithm and its performance is discussed. PMID:20890401

  15. Maximum vehicle cabin temperatures under different meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Meentemeyer, Vernon; Dowd, John

    2009-05-01

    A variety of studies have documented the dangerously high temperatures that may occur within the passenger compartment (cabin) of cars under clear sky conditions, even at relatively low ambient air temperatures. Our study, however, is the first to examine cabin temperatures under variable weather conditions. It uses a unique maximum vehicle cabin temperature dataset in conjunction with directly comparable ambient air temperature, solar radiation, and cloud cover data collected from April through August 2007 in Athens, GA. Maximum cabin temperatures, ranging from 41-76C, varied considerably depending on the weather conditions and the time of year. Clear days had the highest cabin temperatures, with average values of 68C in the summer and 61C in the spring. Cloudy days in both the spring and summer were on average approximately 10C cooler. Our findings indicate that even on cloudy days with lower ambient air temperatures, vehicle cabin temperatures may reach deadly levels. Additionally, two predictive models of maximum daily vehicle cabin temperatures were developed using commonly available meteorological data. One model uses maximum ambient air temperature and average daily solar radiation while the other uses cloud cover percentage as a surrogate for solar radiation. From these models, two maximum vehicle cabin temperature indices were developed to assess the level of danger. The models and indices may be useful for forecasting hazardous conditions, promoting public awareness, and to estimate past cabin temperatures for use in forensic analyses.

  16. Maximum vehicle cabin temperatures under different meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Grundstein, Andrew; Meentemeyer, Vernon; Dowd, John

    2009-05-01

    A variety of studies have documented the dangerously high temperatures that may occur within the passenger compartment (cabin) of cars under clear sky conditions, even at relatively low ambient air temperatures. Our study, however, is the first to examine cabin temperatures under variable weather conditions. It uses a unique maximum vehicle cabin temperature dataset in conjunction with directly comparable ambient air temperature, solar radiation, and cloud cover data collected from April through August 2007 in Athens, GA. Maximum cabin temperatures, ranging from 41-76 degrees C, varied considerably depending on the weather conditions and the time of year. Clear days had the highest cabin temperatures, with average values of 68 degrees C in the summer and 61 degrees C in the spring. Cloudy days in both the spring and summer were on average approximately 10 degrees C cooler. Our findings indicate that even on cloudy days with lower ambient air temperatures, vehicle cabin temperatures may reach deadly levels. Additionally, two predictive models of maximum daily vehicle cabin temperatures were developed using commonly available meteorological data. One model uses maximum ambient air temperature and average daily solar radiation while the other uses cloud cover percentage as a surrogate for solar radiation. From these models, two maximum vehicle cabin temperature indices were developed to assess the level of danger. The models and indices may be useful for forecasting hazardous conditions, promoting public awareness, and to estimate past cabin temperatures for use in forensic analyses. PMID:19234721

  17. Sex education in the Cameroon. Reaching schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    1988-03-01

    Four methods were used to learn about the sexual behavior, knowledge and use of contraception, and sexually transmitted diseases (STD) among 230 students aged 11-16 years in two bilingual schools in Yaounde. First, students discussed letters to an aunt explaining a teen's sexually-related problem. Premarital sex and the fear of STDs were at issue. Second, students filled in missing information on a line drawing relating to pregnancy. Most participants knew that a baby depends upon its mother for development and growth, but some were unclear on the nature of the biological connection to the uterus. Third, students completed a questionnaire upon which they indicated their agreement or lack thereof with statements on aspects of sex behavior. While both sexes indicated that love is more important than sex, they also find it necessary to have sex before marriage in order to gain experience and to know the other person better. Finally, students completed an anonymous questionnaire which produced the following results: 24% had experienced sexual intercourse; the most common age for initiating sexual activity was 15 and 13 years for boys and girls, respectively; 48% had heard about contraceptives; and 27% believed that contraceptives were dangerous and could permanently end one's fertility. Despite these students' limited amount of accurate knowledge about sexual matters, they are ready to confront real-life sexual situations. 130 parents, 110 teachers, and 26 health workers involved in clinics for family planning and STDs were also interviewed in the study. Contrary to the view of adults that adolescents should not discuss sexual matters, the youths initiated important discussions about their sexuality. 90% were interested in knowing about safer sex and STDs. Most parents believe that their children become sexually active later in life than they really do, with both parents and teachers supporting the withholding of information on birth control from adolescents out of fear that such knowledge will encourage them to experiment with sex. Young people instead need free and open access to family planning information and services to help them avoid unwanted pregnancy and infections with STDs. Moreover, the government campaign against HIV must start emphasizing condom use. PMID:12315650

  18. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the issues relating to the problem posed by population explosion in the developing countries and economic growth in the contemporary world covers the following: predictions of economic and social trends; the Malthusian theory of population; the classical or stationary theory of population; the medical triage model; ecological disaster; the Global 2000 study; the limits to growth; critiques of the Limits to Growth model; nonrenewable resources; food and agriculture; population explosion and stabilization; space and ocean colonization; and the limits perspective. The Limits to Growth model, a general equilibrium anti-growth model, is the gloomiest economic model ever constructed. None of the doomsday models, the Malthusian theory, the classical stationary state, the neo-Malthusian medical triage model, the Global 2000 study, are so far reaching in their consequences. The course of events that followed the publication of the "Limits to Growth" in 1972 in the form of 2 oil shocks, food shock, pollution shock, and price shock seemed to bear out formally the gloomy predictions of the thesis with a remarkable speed. The 12 years of economic experience and the knowledge of resource trends postulate that even if the economic pressures visualized by the model are at work they are neither far reaching nor so drastic. Appropriate action can solve them. There are several limitations to the Limits to Growth model. The central theme of the model, which is overshoot and collapse, is unlikely to be the course of events. The model is too aggregative to be realistic. It exaggerates the ecological disaster arising out of the exponential growth of population and industry. The gross underestimation of renewable resources is a basic flaw of the model. The most critical weakness of the model is its gross underestimation of the historical trend of technological progress and the technological possiblities within industry and agriculture. The model does correctly emphasize the exponential growth of population as the source of several complications for economic growth and human welfare. Stabilization of population by reducing fertility is conducive for improving the quality of population and also advances the longterm management of the population growth and work force utilization. The perspective of longterm economic management involves populatio n planning, control of environmental pollution, conservation of scarce resources, exploration of resources, realization of technological possibilities in agriculture and industry and in farm and factory, and achievement of economic growth and its equitable distribution. PMID:12314595

  19. 20 CFR 229.48 - Family maximum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Family maximum. 229.48 Section 229.48 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE Computation of the Overall Minimum Rate § 229.48 Family maximum. (a) Family maximum defined. Under the Social Security...

  20. Cancer costs projected to reach at least $158 billion in 2020

    Cancer.gov

    Based on growth and aging of the U.S. population, medical expenditures for cancer in the year 2020 are projected to reach at least $158 billion (in 2010 dollars) – an increase of 27 percent over 2010. If newly developed tools for cancer diagnosis, treatme

  1. Education, Out-reach and In-reach Infrastructure Support for the Hydrologic Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannigan, R.; McCaffrey, M.

    2002-05-01

    The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, incorporated (CUAHSI) is designed as an infrastructure support mechanism for research in the hydrologic sciences. Education, Out-reach and In-reach (EOI) is one of the five support thrusts of CUAHSI. EOI interfaces intimately with the other four thrusts (Hydrologic Science, Hydrologic Observatories, Hydrologic Information Systems, Hydrologic Measurement Technology). In addition, the EOI infrastructure will provide additional support to the scientific and educational communities as well as the general public. The EOI infrastructure aims to support scientists, educators, students and other interested parties through a variety of mechanisms including summer institutes, instrumentation training, student fellowships and institutional linkages. EOI's overall goal is to develop strategies, which have a broad impact and national significance. All EOI programs will link to CUAHSI science driven initiatives and will be evaluated in the basis of the impact of the program to the intended audience(s) and attainment of measurable outcomes. EOI, in addition to providing opportunities to the hydrologic science community, the broader scientific and education communities and the general public, will consistently interact with key members of pertinent communities to make them aware of available programs and to insure their participation by the interactive development of programs and opportunities. Potential activities include summer institutes at CUAHSI member universities for scientists, educators and students to exchange new ideas and learn new techniques. Potential exists for graduate student fellowships in support of research activities linked to CUAHSI science plans. Outreach to the general public and policy-makers may include distinguished speakers presenting general hydrologic science information and highlighting CUAHSI related research initiatives. In-reach is also a priority for EOI, and opportunities may include training seminars for hydrologic scientists interested in learning to use new technologies and forums designed to inform CUAHSI participants of emerging research, best educational practices or relevant policy issues. Ultimately EOI initiatives are designed to serve the community and provide opportunities suggested by the needs of the community.

  2. Reach and its Impact: NASA and US Aerospace Communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    REACH is a European law that threatens to impact materials used within the US aerospace communities, including NASA. The presentation briefly covers REACH and generally, its perceived impacts to NASA and the aerospace community within the US.

  3. Far-Reaching Impacts of African Dust- A Calipso Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Yuan, Tianle; Bian, Huisheng; Prospero, Joseph; Omar, Ali; Remer, Lorraine; Winker, David; Yang, Yuekui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhibo

    2014-01-01

    African dust can transport across the tropical Atlantic and reach the Amazon basin, exerting far-reaching impacts on climate in downwind regions. The transported dust influences the surface-atmosphere interactions and cloud and precipitation processes through perturbing the surface radiative budget and atmospheric radiative heating and acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei. Dust also influences biogeochemical cycle and climate through providing nutrients vital to the productivity of ocean biomass and Amazon forests. Assessing these climate impacts relies on an accurate quantification of dust transport and deposition. Currently model simulations show extremely large diversity, which calls for a need of observational constraints. Kaufman et al. (2005) estimated from MODIS aerosol measurements that about 144 Tg of dust is deposited into the tropical Atlantic and 50 Tg of dust into the Amazon in 2001. This estimated dust import to Amazon is a factor of 3-4 higher than other observations and models. However, several studies have argued that the oversimplified characterization of dust vertical profile in the study would have introduced large uncertainty and very likely a high bias. In this study we quantify the trans-Atlantic dust transport and deposition by using 7 years (2007-2013) observations from CALIPSO lidar. CALIPSO acquires high-resolution aerosol extinction and depolarization profiles in both cloud-free and above-cloud conditions. The unique CALIPSO capability of profiling aerosols above clouds offers an unprecedented opportunity of examining uncertainties associated with the use of MODIS clear-sky data. Dust is separated from other types of aerosols using the depolarization measurements. We estimated that on the basis of 7-year average, 118142 Tg of dust is deposited into the tropical Atlantic and 3860 Tg of dust into the Amazon basin. Substantial interannual variations are observed during the period, with the maximum to minimum ratio of about 1.6 and 2.5 for the deposition to the tropical Atlantic and Amazon, respectively. The MODIS-based estimates appear to fall within the range of CALIPSO-based estimates; and the difference between MODIS and CALIPSO estimates can be largely attributed to the interannual variability, which is corroborated by long-term surface dust concentration observations in the tropical Atlantic. Considering that CALIPSO generally tends to underestimate the aerosol loading, our estimate is likely to represent a low bound for the dust transport and deposition estimate. The finding suggests that models have substantial biases and considerable effort is needed to improve model simulations of dust cycle.

  4. Temporal and spatial evolution of the Antarctic sea ice prior to the September 2012 record maximum extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, John; Hosking, J. Scott; Phillips, Tony; Marshall, Gareth J.

    2013-11-01

    24 September 2012 the Antarctic sea ice extent (SIE) reached a new annual daily maximum (ADM) for the satellite era of 19.72 106 km2. The largest positive SIE anomalies compared to the mean of all ADMs were found over the northern Amundsen Sea, off the coast of Wilkes Land, with smaller positive anomalies off the Dronning Maud Land coast (30W to 30E). The SIE at the ADM is significantly correlated with the extents for the previous 80 days, but the ice growth during the winter of 2012 was close to the climatological rate, and 1 month before the ADM, the SIE was near the recent mean. Deep depressions in the circumpolar trough since late August 2012 resulted in strong southerly flow and marked northward sea ice advection. The linear trend in SIE suggests that it contributed ~40% to the 2012 anomaly, with depression activity adding ~60%.

  5. Improving predictability of time series using maximum entropy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chliamovitch, G.; Dupuis, A.; Golub, A.; Chopard, B.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss how maximum entropy methods may be applied to the reconstruction of Markov processes underlying empirical time series and compare this approach to usual frequency sampling. It is shown that, in low dimension, there exists a subset of the space of stochastic matrices for which the MaxEnt method is more efficient than sampling, in the sense that shorter historical samples have to be considered to reach the same accuracy. Considering short samples is of particular interest when modelling smoothly non-stationary processes, which provides, under some conditions, a powerful forecasting tool. The method is illustrated for a discretized empirical series of exchange rates.

  6. ERF1 -- Enhanced River Reach File 1.2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, Richard B.; Brakebill, John W.; Brew, Robert E.; Smith, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's River Reach File 1 (RF1) to ensure the hydrologic integrity of the digital reach traces and to quantify the mean water time of travel in river reaches and reservoirs [see USEPA (1996) for a description of the original RF1].

  7. Motor planning poststroke: impairment in vector-coded reach plans.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, John-Ross; Hudson, Todd E; Abdou, Andrew; Rashbaum, Ira G; George, Ajax E; Raghavan, Preeti; Landy, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Healthy individuals appear to use both vector-coded reach plans that encode movements in terms of their desired direction and extent, and target-coded reach plans that encode the desired endpoint position of the effector. We examined whether these vector and target reach-planning codes are differentially affected after stroke. Participants with stroke and healthy controls made blocks of reaches that were grouped by target location (providing target-specific practice) and by movement vector (providing vector-specific practice). Reach accuracy was impaired in the more affected arm after stroke, but not distinguishable for target- versus vector-grouped reaches. Reach velocity and acceleration were not only impaired in both the less and more affected arms poststroke, but also not distinguishable for target- versus vector-grouped reaches. As previously reported in controls, target-grouped reaches yielded isotropic (circular) error distributions and vector-grouped reaches yielded error distributions elongated in the direction of the reach. In stroke, the pattern of variability was similar. However, the more affected arm showed less elongated error ellipses for vector-grouped reaches compared to the less affected arm, particularly in individuals with right-hemispheric stroke. The results suggest greater impairment to the vector-coded movement-planning system after stroke, and have implications for the development of personalized approaches to poststroke rehabilitation: Motor learning may be enhanced by practice that uses the preserved code or, conversely, by retraining the more impaired code to restore function. PMID:26660558

  8. Modulation of hand aperture during reaching in persons with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Victoria; Hayes, Heather B; Buetefisch, Cathrin; Wolf, Steven L; Trumbower, Randy D

    2014-01-01

    The intact neuromotor system prepares for object grasp by first opening the hand to an aperture that is scaled according to object size and then closing the hand around the object. After cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), hand function is significantly impaired, but the degree to which object-specific hand aperture scaling is affected remains unknown. Here we hypothesized that persons with incomplete cervical SCI have a reduced maximum hand opening capacity but exhibit novel neuromuscular coordination strategies that permit object-specific hand aperture scaling during reaching. To test this hypothesis, we measured hand kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) from seven muscles of the hand and wrist during attempts at maximum hand opening as well as reaching for four balls of different diameters. Our results showed that persons with SCI exhibited significantly reduced maximum hand aperture compared to able-bodied (AB) controls. However, persons with SCI preserved the ability to scale peak hand aperture with ball size during reaching. Persons with SCI also used distinct muscle coordination patterns that included increased co-activity of flexors and extensors at the wrist and hand compared to AB controls. These results suggest that motor planning for aperture modulation is preserved even though execution is limited by constraints on hand opening capacity and altered muscle co-activity. Thus, persons with incomplete cervical SCI may benefit from rehabilitation aimed at increasing hand opening capacity and reducing flexor-extensor co-activity at the wrist and hand. PMID:25511164

  9. Seeking the epoch of maximum luminosity for dusty quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z ≳ 3 with maximum luminosity νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) ≳ 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}; luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc{sup –3} having νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) > 10{sup 46.6} erg s{sup –1} for all 2 reached their maximum luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm)/νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define 'obscured' quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  10. Seeking the Epoch of Maximum Luminosity for Dusty Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL ν(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z >~ 3 with maximum luminosity νL ν(7.8 μm) >~ 1047 erg s-1 luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc-3 having νL ν(7.8 μm) > 1046.6 erg s-1 for all 2 reached their maximum luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL ν(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL ν(0.25 μm)/νL ν(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define "obscured" quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ~ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ~ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  11. What causes cooling water temperature gradients in a forested stream reach?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, G.; Malcolm, I. A.; Sadler, J. P.; Hannah, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have suggested that shading by riparian vegetation may reduce maximum water temperatures and provide refugia for temperature-sensitive aquatic organisms. Longitudinal cooling gradients have been observed during the daytime for stream reaches shaded by coniferous trees downstream of clear cuts or deciduous woodland downstream of open moorland. However, little is known about the energy exchange processes that drive such gradients, especially in semi-natural woodland contexts without confounding cool groundwater inflows. To address this gap, this study quantified and modelled variability in stream temperature and heat fluxes along an upland reach of the Girnock Burn (a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland) where riparian land use transitions from open moorland to semi-natural, predominantly deciduous woodland. Observations were made along a 1050 m reach using a spatially distributed network of 10 water temperature data loggers, 3 automatic weather stations and 211 hemispherical photographs that were used to estimate incoming solar radiation. These data parameterised a high-resolution energy flux model incorporating flow routing, which predicted spatio-temporal variability in stream temperature. Variability in stream temperature was controlled largely by energy fluxes at the water-column-atmosphere interface. Net energy gains occurred along the reach, predominantly during daylight hours, and heat exchange across the bed-water-column interface accounted for <1% of the net energy budget. For periods when daytime net radiation gains were high (under clear skies), differences between water temperature observations increased in the streamwise direction; a maximum instantaneous difference of 2.5 °C was observed between the upstream reach boundary and 1050 m downstream. Furthermore, daily maximum water temperature at 1050 m downstream was ≤1 °C cooler than at the upstream reach boundary and lagged by >1 h. Temperature gradients were not generated by cooling of stream water but rather by a combination of reduced rates of heating in the woodland reach and advection of cooler (overnight and early morning) water from the upstream moorland catchment. Longitudinal thermal gradients were indistinct at night and on days when net radiation gains were low (under overcast skies), thus when changes in net energy gains or losses did not vary significantly in space and time, and heat advected into the reach was reasonably consistent. The findings of the study and the modelling approach employed are useful tools for assessing optimal planting strategies for mitigating against ecologically damaging stream temperature maxima.

  12. Development of microgravity, full body functional reach envelope using 3-D computer graphic models and virtual reality technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1994-01-01

    In microgravity conditions mobility is greatly enhanced and body stability is difficult to achieve. Because of these difficulties, optimum placement and accessibility of objects and controls can be critical to required tasks on board shuttle flights or on the proposed space station. Anthropometric measurement of the maximum reach of occupants of a microgravity environment provide knowledge about maximum functional placement for tasking situations. Calculations for a full body, functional reach envelope for microgravity environments are imperative. To this end, three dimensional computer modeled human figures, providing a method of anthropometric measurement, were used to locate the data points that define the full body, functional reach envelope. Virtual reality technology was utilized to enable an occupant of the microgravity environment to experience movement within the reach envelope while immersed in a simulated microgravity environment.

  13. Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Martin; Gerber, Sylvain; Wills, Matthew Albion

    2013-01-01

    There are few putative macroevolutionary trends or rules that withstand scrutiny. Here, we test and verify the purported tendency for animal clades to reach their maximum morphological variety relatively early in their evolutionary histories (early high disparity). We present a meta-analysis of 98 metazoan clades radiating throughout the Phanerozoic. The disparity profiles of groups through time are summarized in terms of their center of gravity (CG), with values above and below 0.50 indicating top- and bottom-heaviness, respectively. Clades that terminate at one of the big five mass extinction events tend to have truncated trajectories, with a significantly top-heavy CG distribution overall. The remaining 63 clades show the opposite tendency, with a significantly bottom-heavy mean CG (relatively early high disparity). Resampling tests are used to identify groups with a CG significantly above or below 0.50; clades not terminating at a mass extinction are three times more likely to be significantly bottom-heavy than top-heavy. Overall, there is no clear temporal trend in disparity profile shapes from the Cambrian to the Recent, and early high disparity is the predominant pattern throughout the Phanerozoic. Our results do not allow us to distinguish between ecological and developmental explanations for this phenomenon. To the extent that ecology has a role, however, the paucity of bottom-heavy clades radiating in the immediate wake of mass extinctions suggests that early high disparity more probably results from the evolution of key apomorphies at the base of clades rather than from physical drivers or catastrophic ecospace clearing. PMID:23884651

  14. Evaluation of Logjam Scour in the Context of Reach-scale River Channel Adjustments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrahan, T. P.; Vernon, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    River channel modifications for protection, enhancement and restoration often include flow resistance elements such as large wood and rock structures. Evaluating the effectiveness of these modifications in achieving design objectives can be confounded by river channel adjustments occurring at larger spatial scales throughout the reach of interest. Engineered logjams are one example where the design objectives typically include riverbed scour and the creation of pools. We surveyed riverbed elevations before and after the installation of engineered logjams, and compared those measurements to predictions from empirical scour equations. Riverbed elevations throughout the reach were also surveyed along cross-sections before and after restoration activities. River channel expansion and contraction throughout the reach was measured by mapping the unvegetated channel boundary for a period of years before and after restoration. Maximum riverbed scour immediately adjacent to the engineered logjams was 1.27 m, while maximum riverbed aggradation was 1.88 m. General riverbed scour and aggradation throughout the study reached was much larger, ranging from 2.71 m of scour to 2.96 m of aggradation. Over a period of 4 years, the channel expanded throughout the area of logjam installation, with increases in channel width ranging from 25.2 m to 58.2 m. Results from this study highlight the importance of considering large scale interactions between vegetation and river morphodynamics in the planning and implementation of river channel modifications.

  15. Age-Related Differences in Maintenance of Balance During Forward Reach to the Floor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background. Downward reaching may lead to falls in older adults, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study assessed differences between younger and older adults in postural control and losses of balance when performing a forward reach to the floor in 2 possible real-world situations, with and without full foot contact with the floor. Methods. Healthy younger (n = 13) and older (n = 12) women reached as fast as possible to a target placed at their maximal forward reaching distance on floor, either standing on their whole foot or on the shortest base of support (BOS) that they were willing to perform a toe touch with. Results. Compared with younger women, older women used a 50% larger BOS when stooping down to touch their toes and had 22% less maximal forward reaching distance on the floor. Older women were twice as likely to lose their balance as younger women while performing a rapid forward floor reach (χ2(2) = 3.9; p < .05; relative risk = 1.91; 95% CI = 0.99–3.72). Postural sway, measured as center of pressure excursions and center of pressure root mean square error, did not differ between younger and older women anteriorly, but posteriorly, older women decreased their sway in full foot BOS and increased their sway in forefoot BOS (Age × BOS, p < .05). Leg strength was reduced in older versus younger women and was correlated with maximal reach distance (r = .65–.71). Conclusions. Healthy older women performing a rapid maximum forward reach on the floor, particularly when using their forefoot for support, are at an increased risk for losing their balance. PMID:23292289

  16. Behavioral inflexibility and motor dedifferentiation in persons with Parkinson's disease: bilateral coordination deficits during a unimanual reaching task.

    PubMed

    Amano, Shinichi; Hong, S Lee; Sage, Jacob I; Torres, Elizabeth B

    2015-01-12

    We evaluated kinematics of people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and age-matched controls during cued and uncued reaching movements. Maximum hand velocity, its variability and shoulder-to-shoulder coupling, quantified by phase locking value (PLV), were compared between PD (n=14) and Control (n=4). The PD group achieved significantly lower maximum hand velocities during the reaching movement in comparison to the Control group (p=0.05), whereas the Control group exhibited significantly greater variability (i.e., larger SDs) of maximum hand velocities across the blocks than the PD group (p=0.01). Persons with PD exhibited higher PLVs than the healthy elderly individuals when performing reaching movements with their dominant side (p=0.05), while the PLVs did not differ between groups when the movements were performed with their non-dominant hand. The present study suggests that persons with PD have a reduced ability to: (1) modulate maximum reaching velocity; and (2) alter coordination across the shoulders to different reaching actions. In persons with PD, the velocity-oriented (dominant) limb becomes slowed and less flexible, to the point that its movement dynamics are effectively similar to that of the position-oriented (non-dominant) limb. PMID:25451729

  17. Maximal lateral reaching distance on the affected side using the multi-directional reach test in persons with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Won-Jeong; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Jeon, Seo-Hyun; Chung, Yijung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the relationship between maximal lateral reaching distance on the affected side and weight shifting using the Multi-directional Reach Test in persons with stoke. [Subjects] Fifty-one chronic stroke participants were recruited from two rehabilitation hospitals. This study administered the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up-and-Go, Trunk Impairment Scale, Modified Barthel Index and measured different maximal reaching distances. [Results] The maximal lateral reaching distance on the affected side was correlated with the BBS (r=0.571), TUG (r=?0.478), TIS (r=0.561), and MBI scores (r=0.499), the lateral reaching distance in all directions on the non-affected side (r=0.785), the maximal backward reaching distance (r=0.723), and the maximal forward reaching distance (r=0.673). The maximal reaching distance on the affected side was also affected by that on the non-affected side, in addition to the maximal backward reaching distance and MBI score. The final step model of stepwise multiple regression was explained 69.5%. [Conclusion] Maximal lateral reaching distance on the affected side as determined by the Multi-directional Reach Test is a good method of assessing functional performance in stroke patients. Data regarding maximal reaching distance on the non-affected side can be used to measure functional impairment on the affected side in clinical settings. PMID:26504275

  18. Recovery of three arctic stream reaches from experimental nutrient enrichment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benstead, J.P.; Green, A.C.; Deegan, Linda A.; Peterson, B.J.; Slavik, K.; Bowden, W.B.; Hershey, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    1. Nutrient enrichment and resulting eutrophication is a widespread anthropogenic influence on freshwater ecosystems, but recovery from nutrient enrichment is poorly understood, especially in stream environments. We examined multi-year patterns in community recovery from experimental low-concentration nutrient enrichment (N + P or P only) in three reaches of two Arctic tundra streams (Kuparuk River and Oksrukuyik Creek) on the North Slope of Alaska (U.S.A.). 2. Rates of recovery varied among community components and depended on duration of enrichment (2-13 consecutive growing seasons). Biomass of epilithic algae returned to reference levels rapidly (within 2 years), regardless of nutrients added or enrichment duration. Aquatic bryophyte cover, which increased greatly in the Kuparuk River only after long-term enrichment (8 years), took 8 years of recovery to approach reference levels, after storms had scoured most remnant moss in the recovering reach. 3. Multi-year persistence of bryophytes in the Kuparuk River appeared to prevent recovery of insect populations that had either been positively (e.g. the mayfly Ephemerella, most chironomid midge taxa) or negatively (e.g. the tube-building chironomid Orthocladius rivulorum) affected by this shift in dominant primary producer. These lags in recovery (of >3 years) were probably driven by the persistent effect of bryophytes on physical benthic habitat. 4. Summer growth rates of Arctic grayling (both adults and young-of-year) in Oksrukuyik Creek (fertilised for 6 years with no bryophyte colonisation), which were consistently increased by nutrient addition, returned to reference rates within 1-2 years. 5. Rates of recovery of these virtually pristine Arctic stream ecosystems from low-level nutrient enrichment appeared to be controlled largely by duration of enrichment, mediated through physical habitat shifts caused by eventual bryophyte colonisation, and subsequent physical disturbance that removed bryophytes. Nutrient enrichment of oligotrophic Arctic stream ecosystems caused by climate change or local anthropogenic activity may have dramatic and persistent consequences if it results in the colonisation of long-lived primary producers that alter physical habitat. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  19. Temperature effects on growth, maturation, and lifespan of the california sea hare (Aplysia californica).

    PubMed

    Stommes, Dustin; Fieber, Lynne A; Beno, Christina; Gerdes, Robert; Capo, Thomas R

    2005-05-01

    We conducted a hatchery growth study to describe the variability in growth rates, spawning, and mortality of Aplysia californica in regard to rearing temperature. Animals were housed at a standard hatchery density of five animals per cage, at temperatures of 13, 15, 18, and 21 degrees Celsius. Animals reared at 13 or 15 degrees C grew as much as four times as large, lived twice as long, matured later, and spawned longer than did animals reared at 18 or 21 degrees C. At age 170 to 205 days the fastest growth rates occurred at 18 and 21 degrees C, and the slowest at 13 degrees C. As animals at 18 and 21 degrees C reached sexual maturity at ages 190 to 197 days, or approximately 60% through their lifespans, their growth rates slowed such that by age 260 days, the fastest growth rate was at 13 degrees C, and the slowest was at 21 degrees C. Animals reared at 13 and 15 degrees C reached sexual maturity at 242 and 208 days, respectively, or at approximately 40% of their life spans. Lifespan and maximum average animal weight were significantly inversely correlated with temperature (P maximum animal weight was reached when this age was expressed as a percentage of the life span: animals reached their maximum weight at approximately 80% of their life span. Aging rate was highest for animals reared at 21 degrees C, while the mortality rate doubling time was lowest at this temperature. This would be expected for the accelerated lifecycle observed at higher temperatures. PMID:15934721

  20. Postural control during standing reach in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao-Ling; Yeh, Chun-Fu; Howe, Tsu-Hsin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the dynamic postural control of children with Down syndrome (DS). Specifically, we compared postural control and goal-directed reaching performance between children with DS and typically developing children during standing reach. Standing reach performance was analyzed in three main phases using the kinematic and kinetic data collected from a force plate and a motion capture system. Fourteen children with DS, age and gender matched with fourteen typically developing children, were recruited for this study. The results showed that the demand of the standing reach task affected both dynamic postural control and reaching performance in children with DS, especially in the condition of beyond arm's length reaching. More postural adjustment strategies were recruited when reaching distance was beyond arm's length. Children with DS tended to use inefficient and conservative strategies for postural stability and reaching. That is, children with DS perform standing reach with increased reaction and execution time and decreased amplitudes of center of pressure displacements. Standing reach resembled functional balance that is required in daily activities. It is suggested to be considered as a part of strength and balance training program with graded task difficulty. PMID:25590172

  1. [A growth study of Prioria copaifera (Caesalpinaceae) using dendrochronological techniques].

    PubMed

    Giraldo Jiménez, Jorge Andrés; del Valle Arango, Jorge Ignacio

    2011-12-01

    The Cativo (Prioria copaifera) forms very homogeneous forests called cativales in the flooded plains of some rivers from Costa Rica to Colombia. For over 70 years Cativo has been the main base of the timber industry in the Colombian Darien area. Because of high productivity and high-dominance of Cativo trees, they represent one of the most prone tropical forests for sustainable forest management. The objective of this research is to model diameter and timber volume growth and growth rates (absolute, mean and relative) of Cativo as a function of age, using tree ring data derived from dendrochronologycal techniques. We evaluated the annual nature of the tree rings by radiocarbon analysis and crossdating techniques. Besides, the diameter and volume growth was modeled using von Bertalanffy's model. As of our results, we estimated the life span of Cativo in 614 years as the time required to reach 99% of the asymptotic diameter. By the mean value we have found that the mean rate of diameter growth is 0.31cm/y. The species requires 90 years to reach 40cm in diameter, the regulated cut diameter in Colombia. We find that Cativo reaches maximum current annual increment (ICA) in diameter at 40 years and in volume at 90 years with rates of 0.5cm/y and 0.032m3/y per tree, respectively. The maximum diameter mean annual increments (MAI) are achieved at 80 years and for the volume at 140 year, with growth rates of 0.45cm/y and 0.018m3/y per tree, respectively. The generated information is useful for the sustainable management of Cativò forests. PMID:22208095

  2. 20 CFR 229.48 - Family maximum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Computation of the family maximum—(1) The employee attains retirement age prior to 1979. The maximum is the... month the benefit is payable. (2) The employee attains retirement age in 1979. (i) The maximum is... rounded to the next lower multiple of $0.10. (3) The employee attains retirement age after 1979....

  3. 20 CFR 229.48 - Family maximum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Computation of the family maximum—(1) The employee attains retirement age prior to 1979. The maximum is the... month the benefit is payable. (2) The employee attains retirement age in 1979. (i) The maximum is... rounded to the next lower multiple of $0.10. (3) The employee attains retirement age after 1979....

  4. 24 CFR 200.15 - Maximum mortgage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maximum mortgage. 200.15 Section... Generally Applicable to Multifamily and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Eligible Mortgage 200.15 Maximum mortgage. Mortgages must...

  5. 24 CFR 200.15 - Maximum mortgage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Maximum mortgage. 200.15 Section... Generally Applicable to Multifamily and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Eligible Mortgage 200.15 Maximum mortgage. Mortgages must...

  6. 24 CFR 200.15 - Maximum mortgage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Maximum mortgage. 200.15 Section... Generally Applicable to Multifamily and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Eligible Mortgage 200.15 Maximum mortgage. Mortgages must...

  7. 24 CFR 200.15 - Maximum mortgage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum mortgage. 200.15 Section... Generally Applicable to Multifamily and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Eligible Mortgage 200.15 Maximum mortgage. Mortgages must...

  8. 24 CFR 200.15 - Maximum mortgage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maximum mortgage. 200.15 Section... Generally Applicable to Multifamily and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Eligible Mortgage 200.15 Maximum mortgage. Mortgages must...

  9. 34 CFR 674.12 - Loan maximums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loan maximums. 674.12 Section 674.12 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM General Provisions 674.12 Loan maximums. (a)...

  10. 13 CFR 130.440 - Maximum grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum grant. 130.440 Section 130... § 130.440 Maximum grant. No recipient shall receive an SBDC grant exceeding the greater of the minimum statutory amount, or its pro rata share of all SBDC grants as determined by the statutory formula set...

  11. 13 CFR 130.440 - Maximum grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum grant. 130.440 Section 130... § 130.440 Maximum grant. No recipient shall receive an SBDC grant exceeding the greater of the minimum statutory amount, or its pro rata share of all SBDC grants as determined by the statutory formula set...

  12. 13 CFR 130.440 - Maximum grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum grant. 130.440 Section 130... § 130.440 Maximum grant. No recipient shall receive an SBDC grant exceeding the greater of the minimum statutory amount, or its pro rata share of all SBDC grants as determined by the statutory formula set...

  13. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum grants. 1778.11 Section 1778.11 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not... the filing of an application. (b) Grants made for repairs, partial replacement, or...

  14. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum grants. 1778.11 Section 1778.11 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not... the filing of an application. (b) Grants made for repairs, partial replacement, or...

  15. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness or severe injury to... them to be transported or shipped is liable for a civil penalty of not more than $55,000 and not less than $250 for each violation, except the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results...

  16. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness or severe injury to... them to be transported or shipped is liable for a civil penalty of not more than $55,000 and not less than $250 for each violation, except the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results...

  17. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness or severe injury to... them to be transported or shipped is liable for a civil penalty of not more than $55,000 and not less than $250 for each violation, except the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results...

  18. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Maximum grants. 1778.11 Section 1778.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not to exceed $500,000 may be made...

  19. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum grants. 1778.11 Section 1778.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not to exceed $500,000 may be made...

  20. 14 CFR 65.47 - Maximum hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum hours. 65.47 Section 65.47 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators 65.47 Maximum hours. Except in an emergency, a certificated...

  1. Magnetic field generated resistivity maximum in graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Kreps, L. W.; Rojeski, M.; Vold, T.; Devaty, R.

    1976-01-01

    In a zero magnetic field, the electrical resistivity of highly oriented pyrolytic (polycrystalline) graphite drops smoothly with decreasing temperature, becoming constant below 4 K. However, in a fixed applied magnetic field, the resistivity goes through a maximum as a function of temperature, with a larger maximum for a larger field intensity. The temperature of the maximum increases with field intensity, but saturates to a constant value near 25 K (the exact temperature depends on the sample) at high intensity. In single-crystal graphite, a maximum in resistivity as a function of temperature is also present, but has the effects of Landau level quantization superimposed. Several possible explanations for the resistivity maximum are proposed, but a complete explanation awaits detailed calculations involving the energy band structure of graphite, and the particular scattering mechanisms involved.

  2. Magnetic field generated resistivity maximum in graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollam, J. A.; Kreps, L. W.; Rojeski, M.; Vold, T.; Devaty, R.

    1976-01-01

    In zero magnetic field, B, the electrical resistivity, rho(O,T) of highly oriented pyrolytic (polycrystalline) graphite drops smoothly with decreasing T, becoming constant below 4 K. However, in a fixed applied magnetic field B, the resistivity rho(B,T) goes through a maximum as a function of T, with larger maximum for larger B. The temperature of the maximum increases with B, but saturates to a constant value near 25 K (exact T depends on sample) at high B. In single crystal graphite a maximum in rho(B,T) as a function of T is also present, but has the effects of Landau level quantization superimposed. Several possible explanations for the rho(B,T) maximum are proposed, but a complete explanation awaits detailed calculations involving the energy band structure of graphite, and the particular scattering mechanisms involved.

  3. Integrated modelling of island growth, stabilization and mode locking: consequences for NTM control on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Brand, H.; de Baar, M. R.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; Westerhof, E.

    2012-09-01

    Full suppression of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) should be reached before mode locking (stop of rotation) makes suppression impossible. For an ITER scenario 2 plasma, the similar time scales for locking and island growth necessitate the combined modelling of the growth of the mode and its slow down due to wall induced drag. Using such a model, the maximum allowed latency between the seeding of the mode and the start of ECCD deposition and maximum deviation in the radial position are determined. The maximum allowed latency is determined for two limiting models for island growth; the polarization model with wmarg = 2 cm, representing the worst case, and the transport model with wmarg = 6 cm, representing the best case. NTMs with seed island widths up to 9.5 cm and 12 cm for the 2/1 and the 3/2 NTM, respectively, are suppressible. The maximum allowed latency is 1.05 s and 2.95 s for the 2/1 and 3/2 NTM, respectively, for the worst case model. Radial misalignment should not exceed 7-10 mm for the 2/1 NTM and 5-16 mm for the 3/2 NTM depending on the model for island growth. As long as the alignment suffices, it does not reduce the maximum allowed latency. Mode locking has serious implications for any real-time NTM control system on ITER that aims to suppress NTMs by ECCD.

  4. A Last Glacial Maximum through middle Holocene stalagmite record of coastal Western Australia climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denniston, Rhawn F.; Asmerom, Yemane; Lachniet, Matthew; Polyak, Victor J.; Hope, Pandora; An, Ni; Rodzinyak, Kristyn; Humphreys, William F.

    2013-10-01

    Stable isotope profiles of 230Th-dated stalagmites from cave C126, Cape Range Peninsula, Western Australia, provide the first high-resolution, continental paleoclimate record spanning the Last Glacial Maximum, deglaciation, and early to middle Holocene from the Indian Ocean sector of Australia. Today, rainfall at Cape Range is sparse, highly variable, and is divided more or less equally between winter and summer rains, with winter precipitation linked to northwest cloud bands and cold fronts derived from the southern mid- to high-latitudes, and summer precipitation due primarily to tropical cyclone activity. Influences of the Indo-Australian summer monsoon at Cape Range are minimal as this region lies south of the modern monsoon margin. The interaction of these atmospheric systems helps shape the environment at Cape Range, and thus C126 stalagmite-based paleoclimatic reconstructions should reflect variability in moisture source driven by changing ocean and atmospheric conditions. The C126 record reveals slow stalagmite growth and isotopically heavy oxygen isotope values during the Last Glacial Maximum, followed by increased growth rates and decreased oxygen isotopic ratios at 19 ka, reaching a ?18O minimum from 17.5 to 16.0 ka, coincident with Heinrich Stadial 1. The origin of this oxygen isotopic shift may reflect enhanced moisture and lower oxygen isotopic ratios due to amount effect-driven changes in rainfall ?18O values from an increase in rainfall derived from tropical cyclones or changes in northwest cloud band activity, although the controls on both systems are poorly constrained for this time period. Alternatively, lower C126 stalagmite ?18O values may have been driven by more frequent or more intense frontal systems associated with southerly-derived moisture sources, possibly in relation to meridional shifts in positioning of the southern westerlies which have been linked to southern Australia megalake highstands at this time. Finally, we also consider the possibility of contributions of tropical moisture derived from the Indo-Australian summer monsoon. The Intertropical Convergence Zone and associated monsoon trough shifted southward during Heinrich events and other periods of high northern latitude cooling, and although clearly weakened during glacial periods, rainfall with low ?18O values associated with the monsoon today suggests that even small contributions from this moisture source could have accounted for some of the observed oxygen isotopic decrease. Despite a pronounced isotopic excursion coincident with Heinrich Stadial 1, no identifiable anomaly is associated with Heinrich Stadial 2. The Holocene is also characterized by overall low ?18O values and rapid growth rates, with decreasing oxygen isotopic values during the earliest Holocene and at 6.5 ka, roughly coincident with southern Australia megalake highstands. The origins of these stalagmite oxygen isotopic shifts do not appear to reflect increases in mean annual temperature but are tied here largely to changes in the ?18O values of precipitation and may reflect a more southerly influence of the Indo-Australian summer monsoon at this time. C126 stalagmite carbon isotopic ratios offer an important complement to the oxygen isotopic time series. Stalagmite ?13C values averaged -5 during the Last Glacial Maximum and early deglaciation, and reached a plateau during the oxygen isotopic minimum at 17.5 ka. However, ?13C values decreased sharply to -12 between 11 and 8 ka, a shift interpreted to reflect increases in plant density in response to the onset of interglacial conditions. Stalagmite ?13C values at 6 ka are lower than expected for the modern C4-dominated vegetation and thin soils of Cape Range, suggesting that a more C3-rich environment was present during elevated rainfall conditions of the early and middle Holocene. The Cape Range stalagmite time series thus reveals for the first time the millennial-scale sensitivity of the moisture source variations in northwestern Australia, a result that has implications for precipitation dyna

  5. Studying reach-scale spatial hydrology in ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callow, J. N.; Boggs, G. S.

    2013-07-01

    Dryland regions are home to some of the most poorly gauged rivers on Earth. Consequently, these regions lack a detailed understanding of the hydrology, are associated with underdevelopment and significant socio-economic disadvantage, though there is increasing pressure to develop the water resources in these areas. However, this is often limited by a lack of data from which to understand regional hydrology and water-dependent processes and make informed water resource management decisions. This paper presents a novel approach to directly map, from remotely sensed imagery, the five flow types and six hydrological metrics defined as the most significant determinants of ecological condition of dryland rivers (Flow (duration of flow), Amplitude (last maximum depth), Pulse Shape (duration of rising limb and falling limb), Duration (present length of inundation), Connection (duration of present downstream connection)). At fourteen "virtual" gauging stations in two rivers (Newcastle Creek and Playford River) on the Barkly Tablelands, northern Australia, daily classified Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery was used to map flow types and metrics at 250 m resolution, across 1996 km2. The performance of the "virtual" gauging stations is validated against traditionally gauged data at two locations and confirms that hydrological data significant for ecology can be extracted from daily flood mapping using remotely sensed MODIS imagery. Results found a pronounced downstream trend in flow characteristics from more ephemeral uplands to seasonally-inundated lowlands. Significant between reach variability in the Duration and Connection is also noted, which is related to cross section morphology and river position. It is suggested that this approach could be applied to other poorly or ungauged large, dryland rivers, where the requirements, including limited cloud cover, long (weeks to months) flood pulses, inundation widths of greater than 2 km, and lateral floodplain gradients of less than approximately 0.005 m/m are met. This novel approach for the measurement of ungauged basins offers significant potential to allow research relevant to hydrology and water-dependent processes where traditional approaches to dryland river hydrology are limited by the lack of gauging infrastructure, or by complex multi-channel and low-gradient geomorphology.

  6. Erich Regener and the ionisation maximum of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, P.; Watson, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the 1930s the German physicist Erich Regener (1881-1955) did important work on the measurement of the rate of production of ionisation deep under water and in the atmosphere. Along with one of his students, Georg Pfotzer, he discovered the altitude at which the production of ionisation in the atmosphere reaches a maximum, often, but misleadingly, called the Pfotzer maximum. Regener was one of the first to estimate the energy density of cosmic rays, an estimate that was used by Baade and Zwicky to bolster their postulate that supernovae might be their source. Yet Regener's name is less recognised by present-day cosmic ray physicists than it should be, largely because in 1937 he was forced to take early retirement by the National Socialists as his wife had Jewish ancestors. In this paper we briefly review his work on cosmic rays and recommend an alternative naming of the ionisation maximum. The influence that Regener had on the field through his son, his son-in-law, his grandsons and his students, and through his links with Rutherford's group in Cambridge, is discussed in an appendix. Regener was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics by Schrödinger in 1938. He died in 1955 at the age of 73.

  7. Effects of pH and temperature on growth and glycerol production kinetics of two indigenous wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Seda Karasu; Yesim Ozbas, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The study was performed in a batch system in order to determine the effects of pH and temperature on growth and glycerol production kinetics of two indigenous wine yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kalecik 1 and Narince 3. The highest values of dry mass and specific growth rate were obtained at pH 4.00 for both of the strains. Maximum specific glycerol production rates were obtained at pH 5.92 and 6.27 for the strains Kalecik 1 and Narince 3, respectively. Kalecik 1 strain produced maximum 8.8 gL?1 of glycerol at pH 6.46. Maximum glycerol concentration obtained by the strain Narince 3 was 9.1 gL?1 at pH 6.48. Both yeasts reached maximum specific growth rate at 30C. Optimum temperature range for glycerol production was determined as 25-30C for the strain Kalecik 1. The strain Narince 3 reached maximum specific glycerol production rate at 30C. Maximum glycerol concentrations at 30C were obtained as 8.5 and 7.6 gL?1 for Kalecik 1 and Narince 3, respectively. PMID:24031225

  8. Validating CAR - A comparison study of experimentally-derived and computer-generated reach envelopes. [Crewstation Assessment of Reach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R.; Bennett, J.; Stokes, J.

    1982-01-01

    In the present investigation, Crewstation Assessment of Reach (CAR) results in the form of male hand reach envelopes were generated and compared with an anthropometric survey performed by Kennedy (1978) to determine the extent of the validity of the CAR model with respect to experimentally-derived anthropometric data. The CAR-generated reach envelopes extensively matched the Kennedy envelopes. The match was particularly good in the areas to the front and side from which the reach originated. Attention is given to the crewstation model, the operator sample population, the CAR analysis, aspects of validation methodology, and the modeling of experimental parameters.

  9. The REACH Center and Multicultural (Multi-ethnic) Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Rohn

    This paper is a summary of an awareness session on the nationally validated programs of the Respecting Ethnic and Cultural Heritage (REACH) Center for Global and Multicultural Education. The REACH curricula are designed to be infused into the K-12 programs of U.S. schools. The learner outcomes of the curricula are positive self concepts,

  10. The Transition to Reaching: Mapping Intention and Intrinsic Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelen, Esther; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Weekly observations of 4 infants in a standard arm-extended reaching task demonstrated that the infants first reached at ages ranging from 12 to 22 weeks. Results suggest that the infant central nervous system does not contain programs that detail hand trajectory or muscle activation patterns; rather, these patterns are the consequence of the

  11. Torque and drag: Two factors in extended-reach drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Aarrestad, T.V.; Blikra, H. )

    1994-09-01

    This paper addresses the various aspects of torque and drag problems encountered in drilling extended-reach wells. It discusses how to use torque and drag calculations and measurements to plan long-reach well profiles, to execute drilling operations that minimize torque and drag effects, to monitor hole cleaning, and to plan jarring operations.

  12. RACIAL AND ETHNIC APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY HEALTH (REACH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 is the cornerstone of CDC's efforts to eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health. Launched in 1999, REACH 2010 is designed to eliminate disparities in the following six priority areas: cardiovascular disease, i...

  13. A dual method for maximum entropy restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    A simple iterative dual algorithm for maximum entropy image restoration is presented. The dual algorithm involves fewer parameters than conventional minimization in the image space. Minicomputer test results for Fourier synthesis with inadequate phantom data are given.

  14. 14 CFR 65.47 - Maximum hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators 65.47 Maximum hours. Except in an emergency, a certificated air traffic control tower operator must be relieved of all...

  15. 14 CFR 65.47 - Maximum hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators 65.47 Maximum hours. Except in an emergency, a certificated air traffic control tower operator must be relieved of all...

  16. 14 CFR 65.47 - Maximum hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators 65.47 Maximum hours. Except in an emergency, a certificated air traffic control tower operator must be relieved of all...

  17. 14 CFR 65.47 - Maximum hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators 65.47 Maximum hours. Except in an emergency, a certificated air traffic control tower operator must be relieved of all...

  18. [Growth modeling of Albizia niopoides (Mimosaceae) using dendrochronological methods].

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Víctor David; del Valle, Jorge Ignacio

    2012-09-01

    The annual growth rings in tropical trees are fairly common, but their study is relatively recent. Growth rings were found in trees of Albizia niopoides from the Porce River Canyon, Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. A total of 33 cross-sections were collected from trees distributed throughout the study area from 664-870masl. Cross-dating, spaguetti plot and 14C analyses were used to demonstrate ring annuality, assuming as hypothesis that these are real annual growth rings. A combination of descriptive analysis of time series (smoothing and pre-whitening) to filter climate noise and nonlinear regression with weighted residuals was used to fit the diameter to Korfs growth model, in which the coefficient of determination reaches values close to 100%. The positive residual autocorrelation of order 1, although not significant, is explained by the existence of energy reserves in the stem and by the accumulation of diameter increments required for the construction of the diameter growth model. The current and mean annual maximum increment rates are 1.03 and 0.94cm/year at ages 18 and 46 years old, respectively. These trees are classified within the group of fast growing species which can reach a cut diameter of over 50cm in approximately 52 years. PMID:23025084

  19. Maximum-Likelihood Detection Of Noncoherent CPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Simon, Marvin K.

    1993-01-01

    Simplified detectors proposed for use in maximum-likelihood-sequence detection of symbols in alphabet of size M transmitted by uncoded, full-response continuous phase modulation over radio channel with additive white Gaussian noise. Structures of receivers derived from particular interpretation of maximum-likelihood metrics. Receivers include front ends, structures of which depends only on M, analogous to those in receivers of coherent CPM. Parts of receivers following front ends have structures, complexity of which would depend on N.

  20. Maximum confidence measurements via probabilistic quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Hai; Yu, Long-Bao; Cao, Zhuo-Liang; Ye, Liu

    2013-03-01

    Probabilistic quantum cloning (PQC) cannot copy a set of linearly dependent quantum states. In this paper, we show that if incorrect copies are allowed to be produced, linearly dependent quantum states may also be cloned by the PQC. By exploiting this kind of PQC to clone a special set of three linearly dependent quantum states, we derive the upper bound of the maximum confidence measure of a set. An explicit transformation of the maximum confidence measure is presented.

  1. Utility Function from Maximum Entropy Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darooneh, Amir H.

    2006-03-01

    Recently we used the maximum entropy principle for finding the price density in a multi agent insurance market. The result is similar to what the Buhlmann had obtained by maximizing the utility function. Here we begin with the price density that is derived by applying the maximum entropy principle to a conservative economic system (exchange market), then reverse the Buhlmann calculation to find the utility function and the risk aversion of agents with respect to this density.

  2. The measurement of maximum cylinder pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Chester W

    1929-01-01

    The work presented in this report was undertaken at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine a suitable method for measuring the maximum pressures occurring in aircraft engine cylinders. The study and development of instruments for the measurement of maximum cylinder pressures has been conducted in connection with carburetor and oil engine investigations on a single cylinder aircraft-type engine. Five maximum cylinder-pressure devices have been designed, and tested, in addition to the testing of three commercial indicators. Values of maximum cylinder pressures are given as obtained with various indicators for the same pressures and for various kinds and values of maximum cylinder pressures, produced chiefly by variation of the injection advance angle in high-speed oil engine. The investigations indicate that the greatest accuracy in determining maximum cylinder pressures can be obtained with an electric, balanced-pressure, diaphragm or disk-type indicator so constructed as to have a diaphragm or disk of relatively large area and minimum seat width and mass.

  3. Proprioceptive Body Illusions Modulate the Visual Perception of Reaching Distance

    PubMed Central

    Petroni, Agustin; Carbajal, M. Julia; Sigman, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiology of reaching has been extensively studied in human and non-human primates. However, the mechanisms that allow a subject to decidewithout engaging in explicit actionwhether an object is reachable are not fully understood. Some studies conclude that decisions near the reach limit depend on motor simulations of the reaching movement. Others have shown that the body schema plays a role in explicit and implicit distance estimation, especially after motor practice with a tool. In this study we evaluate the causal role of multisensory body representations in the perception of reachable space. We reasoned that if body schema is used to estimate reach, an illusion of the finger size induced by proprioceptive stimulation should propagate to the perception of reaching distances. To test this hypothesis we induced a proprioceptive illusion of extension or shrinkage of the right index finger while participants judged a series of LEDs as reachable or non-reachable without actual movement. Our results show that reach distance estimation depends on the illusory perceived size of the finger: illusory elongation produced a shift of reaching distance away from the body whereas illusory shrinkage produced the opposite effect. Combining these results with previous findings, we suggest that deciding if a target is reachable requires an integration of body inputs in high order multisensory parietal areas that engage in movement simulations through connections with frontal premotor areas. PMID:26110274

  4. Visual information throughout a reach determines endpoint precision.

    PubMed

    Ma-Wyatt, Anna; McKee, Suzanne P

    2007-05-01

    People make rapid, goal-directed movements to interact with their environment. Because these movements have consequences, it is important to be able to control them with a high level of precision and accuracy. Our hypothesis is that vision guides rapid hand movements, thereby enhancing their accuracy and precision. To test this idea, we asked observers to point to a briefly presented target (110 ms). We measured the impact of visual information on endpoint precision by using a shutter to close off view of the hand 50, 110 and 250 ms into the reach. We found that precision was degraded if the view of the hand was restricted at any time during the reach, despite the fact that the target disappeared long before the reach was completed. We therefore conclude that vision keeps the hand on the planned trajectory. We then investigated the effects of a perturbation of target position during the reach. For these experiments, the target remained visible until the reach was completed. The target position was shifted at 110, 180 or 250 ms into the reach. Early shifts in target position were easily compensated for, but late shifts led to a shift in the mean position of the endpoints; observers pointed to the center of the two locations, as a kind of best bet on the position of the target. Visual information is used to guide the hand throughout a reach and has a significant impact on endpoint precision. PMID:17109109

  5. Environmental stressors afflicting tailwater stream reaches across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Krogman, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    The tailwater is the reach of a stream immediately below an impoundment that is hydrologically, physicochemically and biologically altered by the presence and operation of a dam. The overall goal of this study was to gain a nationwide awareness of the issues afflicting tailwater reaches in the United States. Specific objectives included the following: (i) estimate the percentage of reservoirs that support tailwater reaches with environmental conditions suitable for fish assemblages throughout the year, (ii) identify and quantify major sources of environmental stress in those tailwaters that do support fish assemblages and (iii) identify environmental features of tailwater reaches that determine prevalence of key fish taxa. Data were collected through an online survey of fishery managers. Relative to objective 1, 42% of the 1306 reservoirs included in this study had tailwater reaches with sufficient flow to support a fish assemblage throughout the year. The surface area of the reservoir and catchment most strongly delineated reservoirs maintaining tailwater reaches with or without sufficient flow to support a fish assemblage throughout the year. Relative to objective 2, major sources of environmental stress generally reflected flow variables, followed by water quality variables. Relative to objective 3, zoogeography was the primary factor discriminating fish taxa in tailwaters, followed by a wide range of flow and water quality variables. Results for objectives 1–3 varied greatly among nine geographic regions distributed throughout the continental United States. Our results provide a large-scale view of the effects of reservoirs on tailwater reaches and may help guide research and management needs.

  6. Object size modulates fronto-parietal activity during reaching movements.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Vincenza; De Sanctis, Teresa; Straulino, Elisa; Begliomini, Chiara; Castiello, Umberto

    2014-05-01

    In both monkeys and humans, reaching-related sensorimotor transformations involve the activation of a wide fronto-parietal network. Recent neurophysiological evidence suggests that some components of this network host not only neurons encoding the direction of arm reaching movements, but also neurons whose involvement is modulated by the intrinsic features of an object (e.g. size and shape). To date, it has yet to be investigated whether a similar modulation is evident in the human reaching-related areas. To fill this gap, we asked participants to reach towards either a small or a large object while kinematic and electroencephalographic signals were recorded. Behavioral results showed that the precision requirements were taken into account and the kinematics of reaching was modulated depending on the object size. Similarly, reaching-related neural activity at the level of the posterior parietal and premotor cortices was modulated by the level of accuracy determined by object size. We therefore conclude that object size is engaged in the neural computations for reach planning and execution, consistent with the results from physiological studies in non-human primates. PMID:24593322

  7. Maximum cell productivity by repeated fed-batch culture for constant yield case

    SciTech Connect

    Weigand, W.A.

    1981-02-01

    Optimal operation of repeatedly fed-batch fermentation was determined by the continuous maximum principle for the constant yield case. The objective of maximum cell productivity for a fixed final cell concentration was achieved by finding the substrate feeding policy that minimized the processing time. Analytical criteria for the optimal filling policy show that an exponential policy is optimum when the specific growth rate has a maximum, and also that operation in the simple repeated batch model is optimum when the specific growth rate is optimum when the specific growth rate is monotonic increasing. Comparisons between optimal repeated fed-batch culture and other modes of operation were made for the case of substrate-inhibited growth. Cell productivity by repeated fed-batch exceeds both repeated batch and continuous operation for the case of low residual substrate concentration.

  8. Deficits of reaching in subjects with left hemiparesis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Trombly, C A

    1992-10-01

    Therapy to restore functional movement of stroke patients is based on assumptions about the deficits that occur in motor control as a result of stroke. Success has been limited, perhaps as a result of insufficient information concerning the characteristics of movement after stroke. In this pilot study, the Waterloo Spatial Motion Analysis Recording Technique (WATSMART), an optoelectric motion analysis system, was used with surface electromyography to measure voluntary reaching in the impaired and unimpaired arms of 5 subjects with left hemiparesis. The ability to reach in a smooth coordinated way was significantly poorer in the impaired arms than in the unimpaired arms, for which scores were essentially normal. The patients were less able to activate the muscles of the impaired arm and, as a result, used a greater percentage of the maximum activity they could generate to complete the unresisted reaching task. The electromyographic differences between arms, however, did not reach significance. The results corroborate previous findings and show that movement deficits of particular patients can be diagnosed precisely with kinematic analysis and electromyography. If greater precision in diagnosis were available clinically, more effective therapy might be developed. PMID:1463060

  9. Time course of epiphyseal growth plate fusion in rat tibiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. A.; Ritman, E. L.; Turner, R. T.

    2003-01-01

    Although the rat is the most common animal model used in studying osteoporosis, it is often used inappropriately. Osteoporosis is a disease that most commonly occurs in humans long after growth plate fusion with the associated cessation of longitudinal bone growth, but there has been a question as to when or to what extent the rat growth plate fuses. To investigate this question, we used microcomputed X-ray tomography, at voxel resolutions ranging from (5.7 micro m)(3) to (11 micro m)(3), to image the proximal epiphyseal growth plates of both male (n = 19) and female (n = 15) rat tibiae, ranging in age from 2 to 25 months. The three-dimensional images were used to evaluate fusion of the epiphyseal growth plate by quantitating the amount of cancellous bone that has bridged across the growth plate. The results suggest that the time course of fusion of the epiphyseal growth plate follows a sigmoidal pattern, with 10% of the maximum number of bridges having formed by 3.9 months in the male tibiae and 5.8 months in the female tibiae, 50% of the maximum number of bridges having formed by 5.6 months in the male tibiae and 5.9 months in the female tibiae, and 90% of the total maximum of bridges have formed by 7.4 months for the males and 6.5 months for the females. The total volume of bridges per tibia at the age at which the maximum number of bridges per tibia has first formed is 0.99 mm(3)/tibia for the males and 0.40 mm(3)/tibia for the females. After the maximum number of bridges (-290 for females, -360 for males) have formed the total volume of bridges per tibia continues to increase for an additional 7.0 months in the males and 17.0 months for the females until they reach maximum values (-1.5 mm(3)/tibia for the males and -2.2 mm(3)/tibia for the females).

  10. Maximum magnitude earthquakes induced by fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarr, A.

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of numerous case histories of earthquake sequences induced by fluid injection at depth reveals that the maximum magnitude appears to be limited according to the total volume of fluid injected. Similarly, the maximum seismic moment seems to have an upper bound proportional to the total volume of injected fluid. Activities involving fluid injection include (1) hydraulic fracturing of shale formations or coal seams to extract gas and oil, (2) disposal of wastewater from these gas and oil activities by injection into deep aquifers, and (3) the development of enhanced geothermal systems by injecting water into hot, low-permeability rock. Of these three operations, wastewater disposal is observed to be associated with the largest earthquakes, with maximum magnitudes sometimes exceeding 5. To estimate the maximum earthquake that could be induced by a given fluid injection project, the rock mass is assumed to be fully saturated, brittle, to respond to injection with a sequence of earthquakes localized to the region weakened by the pore pressure increase of the injection operation and to have a Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution with a b value of 1. If these assumptions correctly describe the circumstances of the largest earthquake, then the maximum seismic moment is limited to the volume of injected liquid times the modulus of rigidity. Observations from the available case histories of earthquakes induced by fluid injection are consistent with this bound on seismic moment. In view of the uncertainties in this analysis, however, this should not be regarded as an absolute physical limit.

  11. Maximum permissible voltage of YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, J.; Lin, B.; Sheng, J.; Xu, J.; Jin, Z.; Hong, Z.; Wang, D.; Zhou, H.; Shen, X.; Shen, C.

    2014-06-01

    Superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) could reduce short circuit currents in electrical power system. One of the most important thing in developing SFCL is to find out the maximum permissible voltage of each limiting element. The maximum permissible voltage is defined as the maximum voltage per unit length at which the YBCO coated conductors (CC) do not suffer from critical current (Ic) degradation or burnout. In this research, the time of quenching process is changed and voltage is raised until the Ic degradation or burnout happens. YBCO coated conductors test in the experiment are from American superconductor (AMSC) and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). Along with the quenching duration increasing, the maximum permissible voltage of CC decreases. When quenching duration is 100 ms, the maximum permissible of SJTU CC, 12 mm AMSC CC and 4 mm AMSC CC are 0.72 V/cm, 0.52 V/cm and 1.2 V/cm respectively. Based on the results of samples, the whole length of CCs used in the design of a SFCL can be determined.

  12. Cell Development obeys Maximum Fisher Information

    PubMed Central

    Frieden, B. Roy; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10?m and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6?m. The NM contains ? 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order ?I = 0 and approximate 2nd-order ?2I ? 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 14 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the flux value F ?1016 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL ? IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information ? non-equilibrium, one condition for life. PMID:23747917

  13. An inverse dynamic analysis on the influence of upper limb gravity compensation during reaching.

    PubMed

    Essers, J M N Hans; Meijer, Kenneth; Murgia, Alessio; Bergsma, Arjen; Verstegen, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Several studies have been conducted to investigate the influence of arm supports in an attempt to restore arm function. Lowering the load allows the user to employ the residual muscle force for movement as well as for posture stabilization. In this pilot study three conditions were investigated during a reaching task performed by three healthy subjects and three MD subjects: a control condition involving reaching; a similar movement with gravity compensation using braces to support the forearm; an identical reaching movement in simulated zero-gravity. In the control condition the highest values of shoulder moments were present, with a maximum of about 6 Nm for shoulder flexion and abduction. In the gravity compensation and zero gravity conditions the maximum shoulder moments were decreased by more than 70% and instead of increasing during reaching, they remained almost unvaried, fluctuating around an offset value less than 1 Nm. Similarly, the elbow moments in the control condition were the highest with a peak around 3.3 Nm for elbow flexion, while the moments were substantially reduced in the remaining two conditions, fluctuating around offset values between 0 to 0.5 Nm. In conclusion, gravity compensation by lower arm support is effective in healthy subjects and MD subjects and lowers the amount of shoulder and elbow moments by an amount comparable to a zero gravity environment. However the influence of gravity compensation still needs to be investigated on more people with MDs in order to quantify any beneficial effect on this population. PMID:24187187

  14. Optic ataxia: from Balint's syndrome to the parietal reach region.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Richard A; Andersen, Kristen N; Hwang, Eun Jung; Hauschild, Markus

    2014-03-01

    Optic ataxia is a high-order deficit in reaching to visual goals that occurs with posterior parietal cortex (PPC) lesions. It is a component of Balint's syndrome that also includes attentional and gaze disorders. Aspects of optic ataxia are misreaching in the contralesional visual field, difficulty preshaping the hand for grasping, and an inability to correct reaches online. Recent research in nonhuman primates (NHPs) suggests that many aspects of Balint's syndrome and optic ataxia are a result of damage to specific functional modules for reaching, saccades, grasp, attention, and state estimation. The deficits from large lesions in humans are probably composite effects from damage to combinations of these functional modules. Interactions between these modules, either within posterior parietal cortex or downstream within frontal cortex, may account for more complex behaviors such as hand-eye coordination and reach-to-grasp. PMID:24607223

  15. Helping the Library Reach Out to the Future

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Helping the Library Reach Out to the Future Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Encouraging future medical researchers: (l-r) NLM Director Dr. Donald ...

  16. New Stream-Reach Hydropower Development (NSD) Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-25

    This fact sheet explores the more than 65 gigawatts (GW) of sustainable hydropower potential in U.S. stream-reaches, according to the hydropower resource assessment funded by DOE and executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  17. A maximum likelihood approach to estimating correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Eric Jones; Rozo, Eduardo

    2013-12-10

    We define a maximum likelihood (ML for short) estimator for the correlation function, ?, that uses the same pair counting observables (D, R, DD, DR, RR) as the standard Landy and Szalay (LS for short) estimator. The ML estimator outperforms the LS estimator in that it results in smaller measurement errors at any fixed random point density. Put another way, the ML estimator can reach the same precision as the LS estimator with a significantly smaller random point catalog. Moreover, these gains are achieved without significantly increasing the computational requirements for estimating ?. We quantify the relative improvement of the ML estimator over the LS estimator and discuss the regimes under which these improvements are most significant. We present a short guide on how to implement the ML estimator and emphasize that the code alterations required to switch from an LS to an ML estimator are minimal.

  18. Early local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline A; Seltzer, Geoffrey O; Farber, Daniel L; Rodbell, Donald T; Finkel, Robert C

    2005-04-29

    The local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes was earlier and less extensive than previously thought, based on 106 cosmogenic ages (from beryllium-10 dating) from moraines in Peru and Bolivia. Glaciers reached their greatest extent in the last glacial cycle approximately 34,000 years before the present and were retreating by approximately 21,000 years before the present, implying that tropical controls on ice volumes were asynchronous with those in the Northern Hemisphere. Our estimates of snowline depression reflect about half the temperature change indicated by previous widely cited figures, which helps resolve the discrepancy between estimates of terrestrial and marine temperature depression during the last glacial cycle. PMID:15860623

  19. Temporal and temperature effects on the maximum rate of rewarming from hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Jenifer C.; Velickovska, Vanja; Shmereva, Anastacia; van Breukelen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    During hibernation animals oscillate from near ambient (Ta) to euthermic body temperatures (Tb). As animals arouse, the rate of rewarming (RRW) might be expected to simply increase as a function of time. We monitored the Tb of golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis) housed at 4, 8, 12, and 16 C during natural arousals. The maximum RRW, the time required to reach a maximum RRW, and the relative time index all demonstrated negative relationships with Ta. The Tb corresponding to maximal RRW demonstrated a positive relationship with Ta. Squirrels reached maximal RRW when they had generated 30 to 40% of the heat required to reach a euthermic Tb. These data suggest that arousal is more constrained than expected and that both time and temperature influence the RRW. PMID:17948068

  20. The Maximum Mass of Rotating Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, M.; Gondek-Rosiń; ska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2012-12-01

    Strange quark stars are considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars as compact objects (e.g. Weber 2003). A hot compact star (a proto-neutron star or a strange star) born in a supernova explosion or a remnant of neutron stars binary merger are expected to rotate differentially and be important sources of gravitational waves. We present results of the first relativistic calculations of differentially rotating strange quark stars for broad ranges of degree of differential rotation and maximum densities. Using a highly accurate, relativistic code we show that rotation may cause a significant increase of maximum allowed mass of strange stars, much larger than in the case of neutron stars with the same degree of differential rotation. Depending on the maximum allowed mass a massive neutron star (strange star) can be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation or collapse to a black hole.

  1. Maximum interlabial pressures in normal speakers.

    PubMed

    Hinton, V A; Arokiasamy, W M

    1997-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that typical speech movements do not involve large muscular forces and that normal speakers use less than 20% of the maximum orofacial muscle contractile forces that are available (e.g., Amerman, 1993; Barlow & Abbs, 1984; Barlow & Netsell, 1986; DePaul & Brooks, 1993). However, no direct evidence for this hypothesis has been provided. This study investigated the percentage of maximum interlabial contact pressures (force per unit area) typically used during speech production. The primary conclusion of this study is that normal speakers typically use less than 20% of the available interlabial contact pressure, whether or not the jaw contributes to bilabial closure. Production of the phone [p] at conversational rate and intensity generated an average of 10.56% of maximum available interlabial pressure (MILP) when jaw movement was not restricted and 14.62% when jaw movement was eliminated. PMID:9130207

  2. Project Completion Report on China's Room AC Reach Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang

    2005-03-10

    After much anticipation and hard work, China's reach standard for room air-conditioners was announced in September 2004, with the first tier going into effect on March 1, 2005 and the reach standard taking effect on January 1, 2009. This is a major milestone in the development of minimum energy efficiency standards in China: finally China has set a minimum standard that is meaningful and stringent. According to our preliminary analysis, the majority of room ACs products on the Chinese market in 2004 would not meet the 2009 reach standard requirement. In addition to setting the minimum requirement, China's new AC standard also include classification requirement for the newly established Energy Information Label, as well as the certification requirement for CECP's Energy Conservation Label. Highlights of the 2009 reach standard include: (1) The Chinese Reach Standard for Room AC in 2009 is tighter than American counterpart, and almost matches the efficiency of American Central Air-Conditioners; and (2) Summer peak demand reduction in 2020 due to the reach standard exceeds the capacity of the Three Gorges Project.

  3. Extended reach and complex designer wells demonstrate innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Soerheim, J.O. ); Skogseth, O. )

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of Statoil's first extended reach efforts was to eliminate subsea wells or reduce the number of subsea templates needed for field development. As a results, total costs were reduced considerably since most extended reach/designer wells drilled today have a complex well profile making it possible to drain several fault blocks and cover a large part of the reservoirs with one well. This has increased the oil reserves and productivity from a field. Also, the number of wells from a platform has been reduced, which has been a major cost reducing factor. To describe well type and degree of difficulty, wells have often been categorized as horizontal, designer, extended reach or mega reach wells. At the Statfjord and Gullfaks fields, many wells cover several categories. The trend at Gullfaks and Statfjord is to drill more complex multi-purpose wells with several targets. In the future, more extended reach wells will exist, which in addition to having a high inclination, will turn in the horizontal plane (up to 180[degree] in azimuth). One practical results of Statoil's extended reach experience is the Sleipner West development, where the number of platforms has been reduced to one. During early planning in 1980, this field was originally schedule for three platforms.

  4. Density estimation by maximum quantum entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.; Wallstrom, T.; Martz, H.F.

    1993-11-01

    A new Bayesian method for non-parametric density estimation is proposed, based on a mathematical analogy to quantum statistical physics. The mathematical procedure is related to maximum entropy methods for inverse problems and image reconstruction. The information divergence enforces global smoothing toward default models, convexity, positivity, extensivity and normalization. The novel feature is the replacement of classical entropy by quantum entropy, so that local smoothing is enforced by constraints on differential operators. The linear response of the estimate is proportional to the covariance. The hyperparameters are estimated by type-II maximum likelihood (evidence). The method is demonstrated on textbook data sets.

  5. Estimating Maximum Discharge of Geothermal Wells

    SciTech Connect

    James, Russell

    1980-12-16

    We cannot tell how 'good' a well is unless we can estimate the maximum flow possible under such ideal conditions as complete permeability a t the production horizon and boiling point throughout the depth of the reservoir. Calculated Lip pressures for vertical wide-open discharge under these conditions are surprisingly independent of the kind of fluid tapped by the well, whether dry saturated steam or saturated hot water. The status of an actual well can be established by comparing the measured Lip pressure with the calculated theoretical maximum. Discharges are simply determined from the values of Lip pressure and supply fluid enthalpy.

  6. Maximum predictive power and the superposition principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summhammer, Johann

    1994-01-01

    In quantum physics the direct observables are probabilities of events. We ask how observed probabilities must be combined to achieve what we call maximum predictive power. According to this concept the accuracy of a prediction must only depend on the number of runs whose data serve as input for the prediction. We transform each probability to an associated variable whose uncertainty interval depends only on the amount of data and strictly decreases with it. We find that for a probability which is a function of two other probabilities maximum predictive power is achieved when linearly summing their associated variables and transforming back to a probability. This recovers the quantum mechanical superposition principle.

  7. Maximum likelihood clustering with dependent feature trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The decomposition of mixture density of the data into its normal component densities is considered. The densities are approximated with first order dependent feature trees using criteria of mutual information and distance measures. Expressions are presented for the criteria when the densities are Gaussian. By defining different typs of nodes in a general dependent feature tree, maximum likelihood equations are developed for the estimation of parameters using fixed point iterations. The field structure of the data is also taken into account in developing maximum likelihood equations. Experimental results from the processing of remotely sensed multispectral scanner imagery data are included.

  8. Reaching for the Sky: The Growth of Mountain Tourism in Switzerland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, Jennifer Truran

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the beginnings of Swiss tourism, its barriers, and the development and role of transportation in mountain tourism. Considers the environmental problems caused by mountain tourism in Switzerland and provides seven teaching ideas. (CMK)

  9. Expanding the Reach of Youth Mentoring: Partnering with Youth for Personal Growth and Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Belle; Spencer, Renee; West, Jennifer; Rappaport, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The goals of youth mentoring have broadened from redressing youth problems to promoting positive youth development. Yet, many of the principles associated with contemporary conceptualizations of development found in the positive youth development (PYD) and community psychology (CP) literature have yet to be fully integrated into mentoring research

  10. Random walk with random resetting to the maximum position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Satya N.; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Schehr, Grégory

    2015-11-01

    We study analytically a simple random walk model on a one-dimensional lattice, where at each time step the walker resets to the maximum of the already visited positions (to the rightmost visited site) with a probability r , and with probability (1 -r ) , it undergoes symmetric random walk, i.e., it hops to one of its neighboring sites, with equal probability (1 -r )/2 . For r =0 , it reduces to a standard random walk whose typical distance grows as √{n } for large n . In the presence of a nonzero resetting rate 0 maximum and the average position grow ballistically for large n , with a common speed v (r ) . Moreover, the fluctuations around their respective averages grow diffusively, again with the same diffusion coefficient D (r ) . We compute v (r ) and D (r ) explicitly. We also show that the probability distribution of the difference between the maximum and the location of the walker becomes stationary as n →∞ . However, the approach to this stationary distribution is accompanied by a dynamical phase transition, characterized by a weakly singular large deviation function. We also show that r =0 is a special "critical" point, for which the growth laws are different from the r →0 case and we calculate the exact crossover functions that interpolate between the critical (r =0 ) and the off-critical (r →0 ) behavior for finite but large n .

  11. Aging, Maturation and Growth of Sauropodomorph Dinosaurs as Deduced from Growth Curves Using Long Bone Histological Data: An Assessment of Methodological Constraints and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Griebeler, Eva Maria; Klein, Nicole; Sander, P Martin

    2013-01-01

    Information on aging, maturation, and growth is important for understanding life histories of organisms. In extinct dinosaurs, such information can be derived from the histological growth record preserved in the mid-shaft cortex of long bones. Here, we construct growth models to estimate ages at death, ages at sexual maturity, ages at which individuals were fully-grown, and maximum growth rates from the growth record preserved in long bones of six sauropod dinosaur individuals (one indeterminate mamenchisaurid, two Apatosaurus sp., two indeterminate diplodocids, and one Camarasaurus sp.) and one basal sauropodomorph dinosaur individual (Plateosaurus engelhardti). Using these estimates, we establish allometries between body mass and each of these traits and compare these to extant taxa. Growth models considered for each dinosaur individual were the von Bertalanffy model, the Gompertz model, and the logistic model (LGM), all of which have inherently fixed inflection points, and the Chapman-Richards model in which the point is not fixed. We use the arithmetic mean of the age at the inflection point and of the age at which 90% of asymptotic mass is reached to assess respectively the age at sexual maturity or the age at onset of reproduction, because unambiguous indicators of maturity in Sauropodomorpha are lacking. According to an AIC-based model selection process, the LGM was the best model for our sauropodomorph sample. Allometries established are consistent with literature data on other Sauropodomorpha. All Sauropodomorpha reached full size within a time span similar to scaled-up modern mammalian megaherbivores and had similar maximum growth rates to scaled-up modern megaherbivores and ratites, but growth rates of Sauropodomorpha were lower than of an average mammal. Sauropodomorph ages at death probably were lower than that of average scaled-up ratites and megaherbivores. Sauropodomorpha were older at maturation than scaled-up ratites and average mammals, but younger than scaled-up megaherbivores. PMID:23840575

  12. Aging, Maturation and Growth of Sauropodomorph Dinosaurs as Deduced from Growth Curves Using Long Bone Histological Data: An Assessment of Methodological Constraints and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Griebeler, Eva Maria; Klein, Nicole; Sander, P. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Information on aging, maturation, and growth is important for understanding life histories of organisms. In extinct dinosaurs, such information can be derived from the histological growth record preserved in the mid-shaft cortex of long bones. Here, we construct growth models to estimate ages at death, ages at sexual maturity, ages at which individuals were fully-grown, and maximum growth rates from the growth record preserved in long bones of six sauropod dinosaur individuals (one indeterminate mamenchisaurid, two Apatosaurus sp., two indeterminate diplodocids, and one Camarasaurus sp.) and one basal sauropodomorph dinosaur individual (Plateosaurus engelhardti). Using these estimates, we establish allometries between body mass and each of these traits and compare these to extant taxa. Growth models considered for each dinosaur individual were the von Bertalanffy model, the Gompertz model, and the logistic model (LGM), all of which have inherently fixed inflection points, and the Chapman-Richards model in which the point is not fixed. We use the arithmetic mean of the age at the inflection point and of the age at which 90% of asymptotic mass is reached to assess respectively the age at sexual maturity or the age at onset of reproduction, because unambiguous indicators of maturity in Sauropodomorpha are lacking. According to an AIC-based model selection process, the LGM was the best model for our sauropodomorph sample. Allometries established are consistent with literature data on other Sauropodomorpha. All Sauropodomorpha reached full size within a time span similar to scaled-up modern mammalian megaherbivores and had similar maximum growth rates to scaled-up modern megaherbivores and ratites, but growth rates of Sauropodomorpha were lower than of an average mammal. Sauropodomorph ages at death probably were lower than that of average scaled-up ratites and megaherbivores. Sauropodomorpha were older at maturation than scaled-up ratites and average mammals, but younger than scaled-up megaherbivores. PMID:23840575

  13. The role of kinematic redundancy in adaptation of reaching

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeng-Feng; Latash, Mark L.

    2006-01-01

    Although important differences exist between learning a new motor skill and adapting a well-learned skill to new environmental constraints, studies of force field adaptation have been used frequently in recent years to identify processes underlying learning. Most of these studies have been of reaching tasks that were each hand position was specified by a unique combination of joint angles. At the same time, evidence has been provided from a variety of tasks that the central nervous system takes advantage of the redundancy available to it when planning and executing functional movements. The current study attempted to determine whether a change in the use of joint motion redundancy is associated with the adaptation process. Both experimental and control subjects performed 160 trials of reaching in each of four adaptation phases, while holding the handle of a robot manipulandum. During the first and last adaptation phases, the robot motors were turned off. During phases 2 and 3 the motors produced a velocity-dependent force field to which experimental subjects had to adapt to regain relatively straight line hand movements during reaching to a target, while the motors remained off for the control group. The uncontrolled manifold (UCM) method was used to partition the variance of planar claviclescapular, shoulder, elbow and wrist joint movements into two orthogonal components, one (VUCM) that reflected combinations of joint angles that were equivalent with respect to achieving the average hand path and another (VORT) that took the hand away from its average path. There was no change in either variance component for the control group performing 640 non-perturbed reaches across four pseudo-adaptation phases. The experimental group showed adaptation to reaching in the force field that was accompanied initially by an increase in both components of variance, followed by a smaller decrease of VUCM than VORT during 320 practice reaches in the force field. After initial re-adaptation to reaching to the null field, VUCM was higher in experimental than in control subjects after performing a comparable number of reaches. VUCM was also larger in the experimental group after re-adaptation when compared to the 160 null field reaching trials performed prior to initial force field introduction. The results suggest that the central nervous system makes use of kinematic redundancy, or flexibility of motor patterns, to adapt reaching performance to unusual force fields, a fact that has implications for the hypothesis that motor adaptation requires learning of formal models of limb and environmental dynamics. PMID:16874517

  14. Prediction of the maximum annual mean sunspot number in the coming solar maximum epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, R. P.

    1987-09-01

    Using an earlier correlation analysis between the annual sunspot numbers at sunspot maximum epochs and the minimum annual aa index in the immediately preceding years (Kane, 1978), the minimum annual aa index during 1985-86 is determined. The value obtained (21.6) implies a maximum annual sunspot number of aobut 190 + or - 40 in the coming solar maximum epoch, in about 1988-89.

  15. Maximum Sunspot Numbers and Active Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Heon-Young

    2013-09-01

    Parameters associated with solar minimum have been studied to relate them to solar activity at solar maximum so that one could possibly predict behaviors of an upcoming solar cycle. The number of active days has been known as a reliable indicator of solar activity around solar minimum. Active days are days with sunspots reported on the solar disk. In this work, we have explored the relationship between the sunspot numbers at solar maximum and the characteristics of the monthly number of active days. Specifically, we have statistically examined how the maximum monthly sunspot number of a given solar cycle is correlated with the slope of the linear relationship between monthly sunspot numbers and the monthly number of active days for the corresponding solar cycle. We have calculated the linear correlation coefficient r and the Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient rs for data sets prepared under various conditions. Even though marginal correlations are found, they turn out to be insufficiently significant (r ~ 0.3). Nonetheless, we have confirmed that the slope of the linear relationship between monthly sunspot numbers and the monthly number of active days is less steep when solar cycles belonging to the "Modern Maximum" are considered compared with rests of solar cycles. We conclude, therefore, that the slope of the linear relationship between monthly sunspot numbers and the monthly number of active days is indeed dependent on the solar activity at its maxima, but that this simple relationship should be insufficient as a valid method to predict the following solar activity amplitude.

  16. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Overview of Pay System § 9701.312 Maximum rates. (a) DHS may...

  17. Maximum rotation frequency of strange stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zdunik, J.L.; Haensel, P. )

    1990-07-15

    Using the MIT bag model of strange-quark matter, we calculate the maximum angular frequency of the uniform rotation of strange stars. After studying a broad range of the MIT bag-model parameters, we obtain an upper bound of 12.3 kHz.

  18. Menu Plans: Maximum Nutrition for Minimum Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that menu planning is the key to getting maximum nutrition in day care meals and snacks for minimum cost. Explores United States Department of Agriculture food pyramid guidelines for children and tips for planning menus and grocery shopping. Includes suggested meal patterns and portion sizes. (HTH)

  19. Maximum Possible Transverse Velocity in Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medhekar, Sarang

    1991-01-01

    Using a physical picture, an expression for the maximum possible transverse velocity and orientation required for that by a linear emitter in special theory of relativity has been derived. A differential calculus method is also used to derive the expression. (Author/KR)

  20. 20 CFR 229.48 - Family maximum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... total wages (see 20 CFR 404.203(m)) for the second year before the individual dies or becomes eligible... Minimum PIA. The divorced spouse overall minimum is never reduced because of the family maximum. (b... Minimum PIA, and no more than 150 percent of the employee's Overall Minimum PIA. (d) Reduction for...

  1. 20 CFR 229.48 - Family maximum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... total wages (see 20 CFR 404.203(m)) for the second year before the individual dies or becomes eligible... Minimum PIA. The divorced spouse overall minimum is never reduced because of the family maximum. (b... Minimum PIA, and no more than 150 percent of the employee's Overall Minimum PIA. (d) Reduction for...

  2. Weak scale from the maximum entropy principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2015-03-01

    The theory of the multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model (SM) are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the S3 universe at the final stage S_rad becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the SM, we can check whether S_rad actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard S_rad at the final stage as a function of the weak scale (the Higgs expectation value) vh, and show that it becomes maximum around vh = {{O}} (300 GeV) when the dimensionless couplings in the SM, i.e., the Higgs self-coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by vh ˜ T_{BBN}2 / (M_{pl}ye5), where ye is the Yukawa coupling of electron, T_BBN is the temperature at which the Big Bang nucleosynthesis starts, and M_pl is the Planck mass.

  3. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Overview of Pay System 9701.312 Maximum rates. (a) DHS may...

  4. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... them to be transported or shipped is liable for a civil penalty of not more than $75,000 for each violation, except the maximum civil penalty is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness... civil penalty is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness or severe injury to...

  5. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... them to be transported or shipped is liable for a civil penalty of not more than $75,000 for each violation, except the maximum civil penalty is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness... civil penalty is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness or severe injury to...

  6. Integrating Correlated Bayesian Networks Using Maximum Entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2011-08-30

    We consider the problem of generating a joint distribution for a pair of Bayesian networks that preserves the multivariate marginal distribution of each network and satisfies prescribed correlation between pairs of nodes taken from both networks. We derive the maximum entropy distribution for any pair of multivariate random vectors and prescribed correlations and demonstrate numerical results for an example integration of Bayesian networks.

  7. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... quantity of potable water, or an anticipated acute shortage or significant decline, cannot exceed $150,000... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not to exceed $500,000 may be made to alleviate a significant decline in quantity or quality of...

  8. Comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Stanwood W; Lee, Stephen M

    1922-01-01

    Thin metal diaphragms form a satisfactory means for comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines. The diaphragm is clamped between two metal washers in a spark plug shell and its thickness is chosen such that, when subjected to explosion pressure, the exposed portion will be sheared from the rim in a short time.

  9. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Overview of Pay System 9701.312 Maximum rates. (a) DHS may...

  10. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum rates. 9701.312 Section 9701.312 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN...

  11. Maximum entropy analysis of hydraulic pipe networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrip, Steven H.; Niven, Robert K.; Abel, Markus; Schlegel, Michael

    2014-12-01

    A Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) method is developed to infer mean external and internal flow rates and mean pressure gradients (potential differences) in hydraulic pipe networks, without or with sufficient constraints to render the system deterministic. The proposed method substantially extends existing methods for the analysis of flow networks (e.g. Hardy-Cross), applicable only to deterministic networks.

  12. Maximum entropy analysis of flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Robert K.; Abel, Markus; Schlegel, Michael; Waldrip, Steven H.

    2014-12-01

    This study examines a generalised maximum entropy (MaxEnt) analysis of a flow network, involving flow rates and potential differences on the network, connected by resistance functions. The analysis gives a generic derivation based on an explicit form of the resistance functions. Accounting for the constraints also leads to an extended form of Gibbs' phase rule, applicable to flow networks.

  13. Possible dynamical explanations for Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production

    SciTech Connect

    Virgo, Nathaniel Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-12-05

    Throughout the history of non-equilibrium thermodynamics a number of theories have been proposed in which complex, far from equilibrium flow systems are hypothesised to reach a steady state that maximises some quantity. Perhaps the most celebrated is Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production for the horizontal heat flux in Earth's atmosphere, for which there is some empirical support. There have been a number of attempts to derive such a principle from maximum entropy considerations. However, we currently lack a more mechanistic explanation of how any particular system might self-organise into a state that maximises some quantity. This is in contrast to equilibrium thermodynamics, in which models such as the Ising model have been a great help in understanding the relationship between the predictions of MaxEnt and the dynamics of physical systems. In this paper we show that, unlike in the equilibrium case, Paltridge-type maximisation in non-equilibrium systems cannot be achieved by a simple dynamical feedback mechanism. Nevertheless, we propose several possible mechanisms by which maximisation could occur. Showing that these occur in any real system is a task for future work. The possibilities presented here may not be the only ones. We hope that by presenting them we can provoke further discussion about the possible dynamical mechanisms behind extremum principles for non-equilibrium systems, and their relationship to predictions obtained through MaxEnt.

  14. Possible dynamical explanations for Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo, Nathaniel; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the history of non-equilibrium thermodynamics a number of theories have been proposed in which complex, far from equilibrium flow systems are hypothesised to reach a steady state that maximises some quantity. Perhaps the most celebrated is Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production for the horizontal heat flux in Earth's atmosphere, for which there is some empirical support. There have been a number of attempts to derive such a principle from maximum entropy considerations. However, we currently lack a more mechanistic explanation of how any particular system might self-organise into a state that maximises some quantity. This is in contrast to equilibrium thermodynamics, in which models such as the Ising model have been a great help in understanding the relationship between the predictions of MaxEnt and the dynamics of physical systems. In this paper we show that, unlike in the equilibrium case, Paltridge-type maximisation in non-equilibrium systems cannot be achieved by a simple dynamical feedback mechanism. Nevertheless, we propose several possible mechanisms by which maximisation could occur. Showing that these occur in any real system is a task for future work. The possibilities presented here may not be the only ones. We hope that by presenting them we can provoke further discussion about the possible dynamical mechanisms behind extremum principles for non-equilibrium systems, and their relationship to predictions obtained through MaxEnt.

  15. Humans trade off viewing time and movement duration to improve visuomotor accuracy in a fast reaching task.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Peter W; Schrater, Paul R

    2007-06-27

    Previous research has shown that the brain uses statistical knowledge of both sensory and motor accuracy to optimize behavioral performance. Here, we present the results of a novel experiment in which participants could control both of these quantities at once. Specifically, maximum performance demanded the simultaneous choices of viewing and movement durations, which directly impacted visual and motor accuracy. Participants reached to a target indicated imprecisely by a two-dimensional distribution of dots within a 1200 ms time limit. By choosing when to reach, participants selected the quality of visual information regarding target location as well as the remaining time available to execute the reach. New dots, and consequently more visual information, appeared until the reach was initiated; after reach initiation, no new dots appeared. However, speed accuracy trade-offs in motor control make early reaches (much remaining time) precise and late reaches (little remaining time) imprecise. Based on each participant's visual- and motor-only target-hitting performances, we computed an "ideal reacher" that selects reach initiation times that minimize predicted reach endpoint deviations from the true target location. The participant's timing choices were qualitatively consistent with ideal predictions: choices varied with stimulus changes (but less than the predicted magnitude) and resulted in near-optimal performance despite the absence of direct feedback defining ideal performance. Our results suggest visual estimates, and their respective accuracies are passed to motor planning systems, which in turn predict the precision of potential reaches and control viewing and movement timing to favorably trade off visual and motor accuracy. PMID:17596447

  16. Reach-Scale Channel Geometry of a Mountain River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E.; Kuzma, J.; Brown, N.

    2002-12-01

    N. St. Vrain Creek drains 250 km2 of the Colorado Front Range. The basin is underlain by granitic rocks, and the upper half was glaciated. We used 25 study reaches to examine controls on reach-scale channel geometry. Variables measured included channel geometry (width, depth, gradient, bedforms), grain size, and mean velocity. Drainage area at each study reach ranged from 2.2-245 km2, and gradient from 0.013-0.147 m/m. The increase in discharge with drainage area is strongly linear. Channel types included cascade, step-pool, plane-bed and pool-riffle. We examined correlations among (1) the reach-scale response variables bankfull width (w), hydraulic radius (R), mean velocity (v), Darcy-Weisbach ff, bedform wavelength (bw) and amplitude (a), grain size, relative roughness (R/D84) and shear stress (ss), and (2) potential control variables that change progressively downstream (drainage area, discharge) or that are reach-specific (bed gradient). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that response variables correlate most strongly with local gradient because of the segmented nature of mountain channels. Results from linear regression analyses indicate that most response variables(R/D84, D50, D84, ff, ss) correlate best with gradient, although w, w/d ratio, and bw correlate best with discharge. Multiple regression analyses using Mallow's Cp selection criterion produced similar results in that most response variables correlate strongly with gradient, although the specific variables differ from those selected with linear regressions: w, a, v, ff and ss correlate with gradient, whereas R, bw and v correlate with discharge. These results suggest that the hypothesis is partially supported: channel bed gradient is likely to be a good predictor for many reach-scale response variables along mountain rivers, but discharge is also a good predictor for some response variables. Thus, although subject to strong constraints imposed by changes in gradient and grain size supplied by processes such as glaciation and rockfall, adjustments in the channel geometry and hydraulics of mountain rivers at the reach-scale produce discernible patterns analogous to those in fully alluvial rivers. Mountain rivers may differ in that imposed reach-scale gradient is an especially important control on reach-scale channel characteristics.

  17. Visually targeted reaching in horse-head grasshoppers

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Jeremy E.; Ott, Swidbert R.; Rogers, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Visually targeted reaching to a specific object is a demanding neuronal task requiring the translation of the location of the object from a two-dimensionsal set of retinotopic coordinates to a motor pattern that guides a limb to that point in three-dimensional space. This sensorimotor transformation has been intensively studied in mammals, but was not previously thought to occur in animals with smaller nervous systems such as insects. We studied horse-head grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Proscopididae) crossing gaps and found that visual inputs are sufficient for them to target their forelimbs to a foothold on the opposite side of the gap. High-speed video analysis showed that these reaches were targeted accurately and directly to footholds at different locations within the visual field through changes in forelimb trajectory and body position, and did not involve stereotyped searching movements. The proscopids estimated distant locations using peering to generate motion parallax, a monocular distance cue, but appeared to use binocular visual cues to estimate the distance of nearby footholds. Following occlusion of regions of binocular overlap, the proscopids resorted to peering to target reaches even to nearby locations. Monocular cues were sufficient for accurate targeting of the ipsilateral but not the contralateral forelimb. Thus, proscopids are capable not only of the sensorimotor transformations necessary for visually targeted reaching with their forelimbs but also of flexibly using different visual cues to target reaches. PMID:22764161

  18. Unconstrained three-dimensional reaching in Rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Courtine, Gregoire; Liu, James J.; McKay, Heather L.; Moseanko, Rod; Bernot, Timothy J.; Roy, Roland R.; Zhong, Hui; Tuszynski, Mark H.; Reggie Edgerton, V.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand normative behavior for quantitative evaluation of motor recovery after injury, we studied arm movements by non-injured Rhesus monkeys during a food-retrieval task. While seated, monkeys reached, grasped, and retrieved food items. We recorded three-dimensional kinematics and muscle activity, and used inverse dynamics to calculate joint moments due to gravity, segmental interactions, and to the muscles and tissues of the arm. Endpoint paths showed curvature in three dimensions, suggesting that maintaining straight paths was not an important constraint. Joint moments were dominated by gravity. Generalized muscle and interaction moments were less than half of the gravitational moments. The relationships between shoulder and elbow resultant moments were linear during both reach and retrieval. Although both reach and retrieval required elbow flexor moments, an elbow extensor (triceps brachii) was active during both phases. Antagonistic muscles of both the elbow and hand were co-activated during reach and retrieval. Joint behavior could be described by lumped-parameter models analogous to torsional springs at the joints. Minor alterations to joint quasi-stiffness properties, aided by interaction moments, result in reciprocal movements that evolve under the influence of gravity. The strategies identified in monkeys to reach, grasp, and retrieve items will allow the quantification of prehension during recovery after a spinal cord injury and the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. PMID:21170707

  19. Growth modelling of heat-resistant fungi: the effect of water activity.

    PubMed

    Valík, L; Piecková, E

    2001-01-22

    Growth of three strains of heat-resistant fungi, Byssochlamys fulva, Neosartorya fischeri and Talaromyces avellaneus, was studied at 25 degrees C at eight or nine water activities (a(w)) adjusted with sucrose between 0.995 and 0.85. The flexible growth model of Baranyi describing the change in colony diameter (mm) with respect to time was first fitted to measured growth data and from the fitted curves the maximum colony growth rates were estimated. These values were fitted with respect to a(w) to predict colony growth rates at any a(w) within the range tested. Optimum a(w) values of 0.986, 0.985, and 0.990 for growth, and maximum colony growth rates of 12.6, 13.2 and 20.2 mm d(-1), respectively, were calculated. The time to reach a colony diameter of 3 mm and the optimum a(w) for each strain were also calculated. The results can be applied to the prevention of spoilage of canned fruit or juices and other heat processed fruit based products. PMID:11205942

  20. Growth of byssochlamys nivea in pineapple juice under the effect of water activity and ascospore age.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, M; Miorelli, S; Massaguer, P R; Aragão, G M F

    2011-01-01

    The study of thermal resistant mould, including Byssochlamys nivea, is of extreme importance since it has been associated with fruit and fruit products. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of water activity (aw) and ascospore age (I) on the growth of Byssochlamys nivea in pineapple juice. Mold growth was carried out under different conditions of water activity (aw) (0.99, 0.96, 0.95, 0.93, 0.90) and ascospore age (I) (30, 51, 60, 69, 90 days). Growth parameters as length of adaptation phase (λ), maximum specific growth rate (µmax) and maximum diameter reached by the colony (A) were obtained through the fit of the Modified Gompertz model to experimental data (measuring radial colony diameter). Statistica 6.0 was used for statistical analyses (significance level α = 0.05). The results obtained clearly showed that water activity is statistically significant and that it influences all growth parameters, while ascospore age does not have any statistically significant influence on growth parameters. Also, these data showed that by increasing aw from 0.90 to 0.99, the λ value substantially decreased, while µmax and A values rose. The data contributed for the understanding of the behavior of B. nivea in pineapple juice. Therefore, it provided mathematical models that can well predict growth parameters, also helping on microbiological control and products' shelf life determination. PMID:24031622

  1. Growth of Byssochlamys Nivea in Pineapple Juice Under the Effect of Water Activity and Ascospore Age

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, M.; Miorelli, S.; Massaguer, P.R.; Aragão, G.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    The study of thermal resistant mould, including Byssochlamys nivea, is of extreme importance since it has been associated with fruit and fruit products. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of water activity (aw) and ascospore age (I) on the growth of Byssochlamys nivea in pineapple juice. Mold growth was carried out under different conditions of water activity (aw) (0.99, 0.96, 0.95, 0.93, 0.90) and ascospore age (I) (30, 51, 60, 69, 90 days). Growth parameters as length of adaptation phase (λ), maximum specific growth rate (µmax) and maximum diameter reached by the colony (A) were obtained through the fit of the Modified Gompertz model to experimental data (measuring radial colony diameter). Statistica 6.0 was used for statistical analyses (significance level α = 0.05). The results obtained clearly showed that water activity is statistically significant and that it influences all growth parameters, while ascospore age does not have any statistically significant influence on growth parameters. Also, these data showed that by increasing aw from 0.90 to 0.99, the λ value substantially decreased, while µmax and A values rose. The data contributed for the understanding of the behavior of B. nivea in pineapple juice. Therefore, it provided mathematical models that can well predict growth parameters, also helping on microbiological control and products’ shelf life determination. PMID:24031622

  2. Theoretical Analysis of Maximum Flow Declination Rate versus Maximum Area Declination Rate in Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Maximum flow declination rate (MFDR) in the glottis is known to correlate strongly with vocal intensity in voicing. This declination, or negative slope on the glottal airflow waveform, is in part attributable to the maximum area declination rate (MADR) and in part to the overall inertia of the air column of the vocal tract (lungs to…

  3. 75 FR 43840 - Inflation Adjustment of the Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalties for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    .... The aggravated maximum penalty is available only for a violation that results in death, serious... materials violation was $275. 69 FR 30590, May 28, 2004. To implement these SAFETEA-LU amendments to the maximum and minimum penalties, FRA issued a final rule that was published on December 26, 2006, 71...

  4. 76 FR 1504 - Pipeline Safety: Establishing Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure or Maximum Operating Pressure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ...PHMSA is issuing an Advisory Bulletin to remind operators of gas and hazardous liquid pipeline facilities of their responsibilities, under Federal integrity management (IM) regulations, to perform detailed threat and risk analyses that integrate accurate data and information from their entire pipeline system, especially when calculating Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure (MAOP) or Maximum......

  5. Theoretical Analysis of Maximum Flow Declination Rate versus Maximum Area Declination Rate in Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Maximum flow declination rate (MFDR) in the glottis is known to correlate strongly with vocal intensity in voicing. This declination, or negative slope on the glottal airflow waveform, is in part attributable to the maximum area declination rate (MADR) and in part to the overall inertia of the air column of the vocal tract (lungs to

  6. 50 CFR 259.34 - Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit. 259.34 Section 259.34 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Capital Construction Fund Agreement §...

  7. River channel change during the last 50 years in the middle Yangtze River, the Jianli reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Luqian; Lu, XiXi; Chen, Zhongyuan

    2007-03-01

    Intensive anthropogenic disturbances have affected the channel of the middle Yangtze River since the 1950s. This paper selects the Jianli reach as an example to examine human impact on channel change in the middle Yangtze River. 1:100,000 channel distribution maps from 1951, 1961 and 1975 and 1:25,000 navigation charts from 1981 and 1997 were employed to reconstruct channel change in the study reach. The result indicates that the channel, under the constraint of levees along the riverbanks, underwent a minor widening but frequent bank failure due to susceptible bank structure and increase in water discharge. The bank failure promoted bar growth in the channel. Cross-section changes and quantitative calculations of erosion and deposition based on the DEM derived from navigation charts present a pattern of over-bank sedimentation and riverbed incision. The stage and duration of floods have increased following levee construction and bank revetment.

  8. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    PubMed

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope. PMID:26159097

  9. Maximum constrained sparse coding for image representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Danpei; Jiang, Zhiguo

    2015-12-01

    Sparse coding exhibits good performance in many computer vision applications by finding bases which capture highlevel semantics of the data and learning sparse coefficients in terms of the bases. However, due to the fact that bases are non-orthogonal, sparse coding can hardly preserve the samples' similarity, which is important for discrimination. In this paper, a new image representing method called maximum constrained sparse coding (MCSC) is proposed. Sparse representation with more active coefficients means more similarity information, and the infinite norm is added to the solution for this purpose. We solve the optimizer by constraining the codes' maximum and releasing the residual to other dictionary atoms. Experimental results on image clustering show that our method can preserve the similarity of adjacent samples and maintain the sparsity of code simultaneously.

  10. Zipf's law, power laws and maximum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2013-04-01

    Zipf's law, and power laws in general, have attracted and continue to attract considerable attention in a wide variety of disciplinesfrom astronomy to demographics to software structure to economics to linguistics to zoology, and even warfare. A recent model of random group formation (RGF) attempts a general explanation of such phenomena based on Jaynes' notion of maximum entropy applied to a particular choice of cost function. In the present paper I argue that the specific cost function used in the RGF model is in fact unnecessarily complicated, and that power laws can be obtained in a much simpler way by applying maximum entropy ideas directly to the Shannon entropy subject only to a single constraint: that the average of the logarithm of the observable quantity is specified.

  11. Maximum likelihood estimation of turbulence spectrum parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the integral scale and intensity of a generic turbulence record is treated as a statistical problem of parameter estimation. Properties of parameter estimators and the method of maximum likelihood are reviewed. Likelihood equations are derived for estimation of the integral scale and intensity applicable to a general class of turbulence spectra that includes the von Karman and Dryden transverse and longitudinal spectra as special cases. The method is extended to include the Bullen transverse and longitudinal spectra. Coefficients of variation are given for maximum likelihood estimates of the integral scale and intensity of the von Karman spectra. Application of the method is illustrated by estimating the integral scale and intensity of an atmospheric turbulence vertical velocity record assumed to be governed by the von Karman transverse spectrum.

  12. MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION FOR SOCIAL NETWORK DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tom A.B.; Koskinen, Johan; Schweinberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A model for network panel data is discussed, based on the assumption that the observed data are discrete observations of a continuous-time Markov process on the space of all directed graphs on a given node set, in which changes in tie variables are independent conditional on the current graph. The model for tie changes is parametric and designed for applications to social network analysis, where the network dynamics can be interpreted as being generated by choices made by the social actors represented by the nodes of the graph. An algorithm for calculating the Maximum Likelihood estimator is presented, based on data augmentation and stochastic approximation. An application to an evolving friendship network is given and a small simulation study is presented which suggests that for small data sets the Maximum Likelihood estimator is more efficient than the earlier proposed Method of Moments estimator. PMID:25419259

  13. Regions of constrained maximum likelihood parameter identifiability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.-H.; Herget, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    This paper considers the parameter identification problem of general discrete-time, nonlinear, multiple-input/multiple-output dynamic systems with Gaussian-white distributed measurement errors. Knowledge of the system parameterization is assumed to be known. Regions of constrained maximum likelihood (CML) parameter identifiability are established. A computation procedure employing interval arithmetic is proposed for finding explicit regions of parameter identifiability for the case of linear systems. It is shown that if the vector of true parameters is locally CML identifiable, then with probability one, the vector of true parameters is a unique maximal point of the maximum likelihood function in the region of parameter identifiability and the CML estimation sequence will converge to the true parameters.

  14. Maximum-entropy description of animal movement.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Chris H; Suba??, Yi?it; Calabrese, Justin M

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a class of maximum-entropy states that naturally includes within it all of the major continuous-time stochastic processes that have been applied to animal movement, including Brownian motion, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, a recently discovered hybrid of the previous models, and a new model that describes central-place foraging. We are also able to predict a further hierarchy of new models that will emerge as data quality improves to better resolve the underlying continuity of animal movement. Finally, we also show that Langevin equations must obey a fluctuation-dissipation theorem to generate processes that fall from this class of maximum-entropy distributions when the constraints are purely kinematic. PMID:25871054

  15. Pareto versus lognormal: A maximum entropy test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bee, Marco; Riccaboni, Massimo; Schiavo, Stefano

    2011-08-01

    It is commonly found that distributions that seem to be lognormal over a broad range change to a power-law (Pareto) distribution for the last few percentiles. The distributions of many physical, natural, and social events (earthquake size, species abundance, income and wealth, as well as file, city, and firm sizes) display this structure. We present a test for the occurrence of power-law tails in statistical distributions based on maximum entropy. This methodology allows one to identify the true data-generating processes even in the case when it is neither lognormal nor Pareto. The maximum entropy approach is then compared with other widely used methods and applied to different levels of aggregation of complex systems. Our results provide support for the theory that distributions with lognormal body and Pareto tail can be generated as mixtures of lognormally distributed units.

  16. Maximum Likelihood Analysis in the PEN Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Martin

    2013-10-01

    The experimental determination of the ?+ -->e+ ? (?) decay branching ratio currently provides the most accurate test of lepton universality. The PEN experiment at PSI, Switzerland, aims to improve the present world average experimental precision of 3 . 3 10-3 to 5 10-4 using a stopped beam approach. During runs in 2008-10, PEN has acquired over 2 107 ?e 2 events. The experiment includes active beam detectors (degrader, mini TPC, target), central MWPC tracking with plastic scintillator hodoscopes, and a spherical pure CsI electromagnetic shower calorimeter. The final branching ratio will be calculated using a maximum likelihood analysis. This analysis assigns each event a probability for 5 processes (?+ -->e+ ? , ?+ -->?+ ? , decay-in-flight, pile-up, and hadronic events) using Monte Carlo verified probability distribution functions of our observables (energies, times, etc). A progress report on the PEN maximum likelihood analysis will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-0970013.

  17. Maximum independent set on diluted triangular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, C. W., IV; Liu, J. W.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2006-05-01

    Core percolation and maximum independent set on random graphs have recently been characterized using the methods of statistical physics. Here we present a statistical physics study of these problems on bond diluted triangular lattices. Core percolation critical behavior is found to be consistent with the standard percolation values, though there are strong finite size effects. A transfer matrix method is developed and applied to find accurate values of the density and degeneracy of the maximum independent set on lattices of limited width but large length. An extrapolation of these results to the infinite lattice limit yields high precision results, which are tabulated. These results are compared to results found using both vertex based and edge based local probability recursion algorithms, which have proven useful in the analysis of hard computational problems, such as the satisfiability problem.

  18. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  19. Tissue Radiation Response with Maximum Tsallis Entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2010-10-08

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is currently based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation, and conditions. Here, we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature.

  20. Maximum entropy production - Full steam ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2012-05-01

    The application of a principle of Maximum Entropy Production (MEP, or less ambiguously MaxEP) to planetary climate is discussed. This idea suggests that if sufficiently free of dynamical constraints, the atmospheric and oceanic heat flows across a planet may conspire to maximize the generation of mechanical work, or entropy. Thermodynamic and information-theoretic aspects of this idea are discussed. These issues are also discussed in the context of dust devils, convective vortices found in strongly-heated desert areas.

  1. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... training program Maximums by grade and step 1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1 (minus 3 steps). L-1... year postgraduate predoctoral GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-6 Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Third year postgraduate predoctoral GS-9-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Fourth year medical...

  2. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... training program Maximums by grade and step 1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1 (minus 3 steps). L-1... year postgraduate predoctoral GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-6 Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Third year postgraduate predoctoral GS-9-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Fourth year medical...

  3. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... training program Maximums by grade and step 1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1 (minus 3 steps). L-1... year postgraduate predoctoral GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-6 Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Third year postgraduate predoctoral GS-9-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Fourth year medical...

  4. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... training program Maximums by grade and step 1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1 (minus 3 steps). L-1... year postgraduate predoctoral GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-6 Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Third year postgraduate predoctoral GS-9-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Fourth year medical...

  5. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... training program Maximums by grade and step 1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1 (minus 3 steps). L-1... year postgraduate predoctoral GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-6 Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Third year postgraduate predoctoral GS-9-1 (minus 3 steps). L-7 Fourth year medical...

  6. Gravity wave and elevated localized ozone maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X.; Berkowitz, C.M.; Zhong, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    During the 1992 field study of Northern Atlantic Regional Experiment, relatively localized O{sub 3} maximum were observed by aircraft flight along a horizontal sampling path between Nantucket and Halifax on several occasions. While sampling at a constant altitude between 1500 and 2000 m, the aircraft encountered a plume having O{sub 3} mixing ratio twice as much as the values that had been measured prior to entering the plume. Concurrent with this increase in O{sub 3} mixing ratio was a pronounced drop in the dew point. This feature occurred over a horizontal distance of approximately 200 km. Prior to descending to a lower elevation, a second O{sub 3} maximum/dew point minimum appeared to be encountered. Several hypotheses concerning the origin of this localized O{sub 3} maximum along a horizontal path are rejected, and the periodic nature of the phenomena suggests that they could be explained by propagating internal gravity wave at the top of the boundary layer. Observational support of this hypothesis are soundings from surrounding stations that had temperature profiles resemble those that are typical for gravity wave occurrence. A simple numerical model is used to simulate the variations of ozone concentration, temperature, and dew point caused by perturbation horizontal and vertical wind fields associated with traveling internal gravity waves and to illustrate how the localized O{sub 3} maximum are formed from downward displacement of air parcels from the free troposphere by these waves. The observed ozone oscillation corresponds reasonable well in amplitude and phase with the simple model prediction.

  7. Maximum entropy analysis of cosmic ray composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Dalibor; Ebr, Jan; Vícha, Jakub; Trávníček, Petr; Nosková, Jana

    2016-03-01

    We focus on the primary composition of cosmic rays with the highest energies that cause extensive air showers in the Earth's atmosphere. A way of examining the two lowest order moments of the sample distribution of the depth of shower maximum is presented. The aim is to show that useful information about the composition of the primary beam can be inferred with limited knowledge we have about processes underlying these observations. In order to describe how the moments of the depth of shower maximum depend on the type of primary particles and their energies, we utilize a superposition model. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we are able to determine what trends in the primary composition are consistent with the input data, while relying on a limited amount of information from shower physics. Some capabilities and limitations of the proposed method are discussed. In order to achieve a realistic description of the primary mass composition, we pay special attention to the choice of the parameters of the superposition model. We present two examples that demonstrate what consequences can be drawn for energy dependent changes in the primary composition.

  8. Continuity of the Maximum-Entropy Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Weis

    2014-09-01

    We study the inverse problem of inferring the state of a finite-level quantum system from expected values of a fixed set of observables, by maximizing a continuous ranking function. We have proved earlier that the maximum-entropy inference can be a discontinuous map from the convex set of expected values to the convex set of states because the image contains states of reduced support, while this map restricts to a smooth parametrization of a Gibbsian family of fully supported states. Here we prove for arbitrary ranking functions that the inference is continuous up to boundary points. This follows from a continuity condition in terms of the openness of the restricted linear map from states to their expected values. The openness condition shows also that ranking functions with a discontinuous inference are typical. Moreover it shows that the inference is continuous in the restriction to any polytope which implies that a discontinuity belongs to the quantum domain of non-commutative observables and that a geodesic closure of a Gibbsian family equals the set of maximum-entropy states. We discuss eight descriptions of the set of maximum-entropy states with proofs of accuracy and an analysis of deviations.

  9. Automatic maximum entropy spectral reconstruction in NMR.

    PubMed

    Mobli, Mehdi; Maciejewski, Mark W; Gryk, Michael R; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2007-10-01

    Developments in superconducting magnets, cryogenic probes, isotope labeling strategies, and sophisticated pulse sequences together have enabled the application, in principle, of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to biomolecular systems approaching 1 megadalton. In practice, however, conventional approaches to NMR that utilize the fast Fourier transform, which require data collected at uniform time intervals, result in prohibitively lengthy data collection times in order to achieve the full resolution afforded by high field magnets. A variety of approaches that involve nonuniform sampling have been proposed, each utilizing a non-Fourier method of spectrum analysis. A very general non-Fourier method that is capable of utilizing data collected using any of the proposed nonuniform sampling strategies is maximum entropy reconstruction. A limiting factor in the adoption of maximum entropy reconstruction in NMR has been the need to specify non-intuitive parameters. Here we describe a fully automated system for maximum entropy reconstruction that requires no user-specified parameters. A web-accessible script generator provides the user interface to the system. PMID:17701276

  10. "SPURS" in the North Atlantic Salinity Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Raymond

    2014-05-01

    The North Atlantic Salinity Maximum is the world's saltiest open ocean salinity maximum and was the focus of the recent Salinity Processes Upper-ocean Regional Study (SPURS) program. SPURS was a joint venture between US, French, Irish, and Spanish investigators. Three US and two EU cruises were involved from August, 1012 - October, 2013 as well as surface moorings, glider, drifter and float deployments. Shipboard operations included underway meteorological and oceanic data, hydrographic surveys and turbulence profiling. The goal is to improve our understanding of how the salinity maximum is maintained and how it may be changing. It is formed by an excess of evaporation over precipitation and the wind-driven convergence of the subtropical gyre. Such salty areas are getting saltier with global warming (a record high SSS was observed in SPURS) and it is imperative to determine the relative roles of surface water fluxes and oceanic processes in such trends. The combination of accurate surface flux estimates with new assessments of vertical and horizontal mixing in the ocean will help elucidate the utility of ocean salinity in quantifying the changing global water cycle.

  11. Flood Frequency Analysis using different flood descriptors - the Warsaw reach of the river Vistula case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamuz, Emilia; Kochanek, Krzysztof; Romanowicz, Renata

    2014-05-01

    Flood frequency analysis (FFA) is customarily performed using annual maximum flows. However, there is a number of different flood descriptors that could be used. Among them are water levels, peaks over the threshold, flood-wave duration, flood volume, etc. In this study we compare different approaches to FFA for their suitability for flood risk assessment. The main goal is to obtain the FFA curve with the smallest possible uncertainty limits, in particular for the distribution tail. The extrapolation of FFA curves is crucial in future flood risk assessment in a changing climate. We compare the FFA curves together with their uncertainty limits obtained using flows, water levels, flood inundation area and volumes for the Warsaw reach of the river Vistula. Moreover, we derive the FFA curves obtained using simulated flows. The results are used to derive the error distribution for the maximum simulated and observed values under different modelling techniques and assess its influence on flood risk predictions for ungauged catchments. MIKE11, HEC-RAS and transfer function model are applied in average and extreme conditions to model flow propagation in the Warsaw Vistula reach. The additional questions we want to answer are what is the range of application of different modelling tools under various flow conditions and how can the uncertainty of flood risk assessment be decreased. This work was partly supported by the projects "Stochastic flood forecasting system (The River Vistula reach from Zawichost to Warsaw)" and "Modern statistical models for analysis of flood frequency and features of flood waves", carried by the Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences on the order of the National Science Centre (contracts Nos. 2011/01/B/ST10/06866 and 2012/05/B/ST10/00482, respectively). The water level and flow data were provided by the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMGW), Poland.

  12. The reach and impact of social marketing and reproductive health communication campaigns in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Van Rossem, Ronan; Meekers, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    Background Like many sub-Saharan African countries, Zambia is dealing with major health issues, including HIV/AIDS, family planning, and reproductive health. To address reproductive health problems and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zambia, several social marketing and health communication programs focusing on reproductive and HIV/AIDS prevention programs are being implemented. This paper describes the reach of these programs and assesses their impact on condom use. Methods This paper assesses the reach of selected radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS and of communications about the socially marketed Maximum condoms in Zambia, as well as their impact on condom use, using data from the 20012002 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey. To control for self-selection and endogeneity, we use a two-stage regression model to estimate the effect of program exposure on the behavioural outcomes. Results Those who were exposed to radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS were more likely to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.16 for men and 1.06 for women). Men highly exposed to Maximum condoms social marketing communication were more likely than those with low exposure to the program to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.48), and to have used a condom at their last sexual intercourse (OR = 1.23). Conclusion Findings suggest that the reproductive health and social marketing campaigns in Zambia reached a large portion of the population and had a significant impact on condom use. The results suggest that future reproductive health communication campaigns that invest in radio programming may be more effective than those investing in television programming, and that future campaigns should seek to increase their impact among women, perhaps by focusing on the specific constrains that prevent females from using condoms. PMID:18088437

  13. Effects of Pictorial Cues on Reaching Depend on the Distinctiveness of Target Objects

    PubMed Central

    Himmelbach, Marc

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate under what conditions learned object sizes influence visuomotor control under preserved stereovision. Using meaningful objects (matchboxes of locally well-known brands in the UK) a previous study has nicely shown that the recognition of these objects influences action programming by means of reach amplitude and grasp pre-shaping even under binocular vision. Using the same paradigm, we demonstrated that short-term learning of colour-size associations was not sufficient to induce any visuomotor effects under binocular viewing conditions. Now we used the same matchboxes, for which the familiarity effect was shown in the UK, with German participants who have never seen these objects before. We addressed the question whether simply a high degree of distinctness, or whether instead actual prior familiarity of these objects, are required to affect motor computations. We found that under monocular and binocular viewing conditions the learned size and location influenced the amplitude of the reaching component significantly. In contrast, the maximum grip aperture remained unaffected for binocular vision. We conclude that visual distinctness is sufficient to form reliable associations in short-term learning to influence reaching even for preserved stereovision. Grasp pre-shaping instead seems to be less susceptible to such perceptual effects. PMID:23382882

  14. Role of TNF alpha and PLF in bone remodeling in a rat model of repetitive reaching and grasping.

    PubMed

    Rani, Shobha; Barbe, Mary F; Barr, Ann E; Litivn, Judith

    2010-10-01

    We have previously developed a voluntary rat model of highly repetitive reaching that provides an opportunity to study effects of non-weight bearing muscular loads on bone and mechanisms of naturally occurring inflammation on upper limb tissues in vivo. In this study, we investigated the relationship between inflammatory cytokines and matricellular proteins (Periostin-like-factor, PLF, and connective tissue growth factor, CTGF) using our model. We also examined the relationship between inflammatory cytokines, PLF and bone formation processes. Rats underwent initial training for 5 weeks, and then performed a high repetition high force (HRHF) task (12 reaches/min, 60% maximum grip force, 2 h/day, 3 days/week) for 6 weeks. We then examined the effect of training or task performance with or without treatment with a rat specific TNFalpha antibody on inflammatory cytokines, osteocalcin (a bone formation marker), PLF, CTGF, and behavioral indicators of pain or discomfort. The HRHF task decreased grip strength and induced forepaw mechanical hypersensitivity in both trained control and 6-week HRHF animals. Two weeks of anti-TNFalpha treatment improved grip strength in both groups, but did not ameliorate forepaw hypersensitivity. Moreover, anti-TNFalpha treatment attenuated task-induced increases in inflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-1alpha, and MIP2 in serum; TNFalpha in forelimb bone and muscles) and serum osteocalcin in 6-week HRHF animals. PLF levels in forelimb bones and flexor digitorum muscles increased significantly in 6-week HRHF animals, increases attenuated by anti-TNFalpha treatment. CTGF levels were unaffected by task performance or anti-TNFalpha treatment in 6-week HRHF muscles. In primary osteoblast cultures, TNFalpha, MIP2 and MIP3a treatment increased PLF levels in a dose dependent manner. Also in primary osteoblast cultures, increased PLF promoted proliferation and differentiation, the latter assessed by measuring Runx2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin mRNA levels; ALP activity; as well as calcium deposition and mineralization. Increased PLF also promoted cell adhesion in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell cultures. Thus, tissue loading in vivo resulted in increased TNFalpha, which increased PLF, which then induced anabolic bone formation, the latter results confirmed in vitro. PMID:20458732

  15. Role of TNF alpha and PLF in bone remodeling in a rat model of repetitive reaching and grasping

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Shobha; Barbe, Mary F; Barr, Ann E; Litivn, Judith

    2011-01-01

    We have previously developed a voluntary rat model of highly repetitive reaching that provides an opportunity to study effects of non-weight bearing muscular loads on bone and mechanisms of naturally occurring inflammation on upper limb tissues in vivo. In this study, we investigated the relationship between inflammatory cytokines and matricellular proteins (Periostin-like-factor, PLF, and connective tissue growth factor, CTGF) using our model. We also examined the relationship between inflammatory cytokines, PLF and bone formation processes. Rats underwent initial training for 5 weeks, and then performed a high repetition high force (HRHF) task (12 reaches/min, 60% maximum grip force, 2 hr/day, 3 days/week) for 6 weeks. We then examined the effect of training or task performance with or without treatment with a rat specific TNF? antibody on inflammatory cytokines, osteocalcin (a bone formation marker), PLF, CTGF, and behavioral indicators of pain or discomfort. The HRHF task decreased grip strength and induced forepaw mechanical hypersensitivity in both trained control and 6-week HRHF animals. Two weeks of anti-TNF? treatment improved grip strength in both groups, but did not ameliorate forepaw hypersensitivity. Moreover, anti-TNF? treatment attenuated task-induced increases in inflammatory cytokines (TNF?, IL-1?, and MIP2 in serum; TNF? in forelimb bone and muscles) and serum osteocalcin in 6-week HRHF animals. PLF levels in forelimb bones and flexor digitorum muscles increased significantly in 6-week HRHF animals, increases attenuated by anti-TNF? treatment. CTGF levels were unaffected by task performance or anti-TNF? treatment in 6-week HRHF muscles. In primary osteoblast cultures, TNF?, MIP2 and MIP3a treatment increased PLF levels in a dose dependent manner. Also in primary osteoblast cultures, increased PLF promoted proliferation and differentiation, the latter assessed by measuring Runx2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin mRNA levels; ALP activity; as well as calcium deposition and mineralization. Increased PLF also promoted cell adhesion in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell cultures. Thus, tissue loading in vivo resulted in increased TNF?, which increased PLF, which then induced anabolic bone formation, the latter results confirmed in vitro. PMID:20458732

  16. Low-Cost Tele-assessment System for Home-Based Evaluation of Reaching Ability Following Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Chi-Lun; Chen, Ya-Ping; Lai, Jin-Shin; Chen, Shih-Ching; Kuo, Te-Son; Jaw, Fu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Tele-assessment techniques can provide healthcare professionals with easily accessible information regarding patients' clinical progress. Recently, kinematic analysis systems have been used to assess rehabilitative outcomes in stroke patients. Kinematic systems, however, are not compatible with tele-assessment. The objective of our study was to develop a tele-assessment system for acquiring kinematic data of forward reaching movements in stroke patients, with an emphasis on cost-effectiveness, portability, and ease of use. Materials and Methods: We selected four healthy control participants and eight hemiplegic stroke patients for our study. The stroke patients were classified as Brunnstrom stage III, stage IV, or stage V. Our tele-assessment system used two three-axes accelerometers, a potentiometer, a multifunctional data acquisition card, and two computers. A standardized kinematic system was applied simultaneously to validate the measurements recorded by our tele-assessment system during five repetitions of forward reaching movements. Results: The correlation coefficients of the reaching displacement, velocity, and acceleration measurements obtained using our tele-assessment system and the standardized kinematic system were 0.956, 0.896, and 0.727, respectively. Differences in the maximum reaching distance and the maximum reaching velocity of forward reaching movements were observed among the study groups. There were no significant differences in the time required to complete the testing session among the study groups. Conclusions: Our tele-assessment system is valid for the evaluation of upper-extremity reaching ability in stroke patients. Further research is needed to investigate the feasibility of the use of the tele-assessment system in patients' homes. PMID:24138613

  17. Growth in Employee Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    A growth in organized school employee groups, particularly teacher groups, may require school boards to develop and maintain an affirmative employee relations program to identify and meet needs before they reach the crisis level and, therefore, prevent the issues from developing around which employee unions must justify their existence.

  18. Priming of Reach and Grasp Actions by Handled Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masson, Michael E. J.; Bub, Daniel N.; Breuer, Andreas T.

    2011-01-01

    Pictures of handled objects such as a beer mug or frying pan are shown to prime speeded reach and grasp actions that are compatible with the object. To determine whether the evocation of motor affordances implied by this result is driven merely by the physical orientation of the object's handle as opposed to higher-level properties of the object,

  19. TeachEach: Classroom Strategies To Reach All Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Steve

    Photographs and text present highlights in the work of three teachers and one teaching team honored by TeachEach, a Northern California privately supported program to recognize and award K-12 teachers or teaching teams who teach and reach all the students in their classrooms. Quotes from the honorees and photographs showing the teachers in action…

  20. Perceiving Children's Behavior and Reaching Limits in a Risk Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordovil, Rita; Santos, Carlos; Barreiros, Joao

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of parents' perception of children's reaching limits in a risk scenario. A sample of 68 parents of 1- to 4-year-olds were asked to make a prior estimate of their children's behavior and action limits in a task that involved retrieving a toy out of the water. The action modes used for

  1. REACH. Teacher's Guide, Volume I. Post-Secondary Program Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James Lee; And Others

    Designed for use with individualized instruction units (CE 026 345-347, and CE 026 349-351) in the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this first volume of the postsecondary teacher's guide is devoted to the establishment of standard instructional procedures. Following an introductory…

  2. REACH. Teacher's Guide, Volume I. Secondary Program Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James Lee; And Others

    Designed for use with individualized instructional units (CE 026 345 and CE 026 348-350) in the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this secondary teacher's guide is devoted to the establishment of standard instructional procedures. Following an introductory section, sections provide…

  3. Control of reaching movements by muscle synergy combinations

    PubMed Central

    d'Avella, Andrea; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the movement of the arm to achieve a goal, such as reaching for an object, is challenging because it requires coordinating many muscles acting on many joints. The central nervous system (CNS) might simplify the control of reaching by directly mapping initial states and goals into muscle activations through the combination of muscle synergies, coordinated recruitment of groups of muscles with specific activation profiles. Here we review recent results from the analysis of reaching muscle patterns supporting such a control strategy. Muscle patterns for point-to-point movements can be reconstructed by the combination of a small number of time-varying muscle synergies, modulated in amplitude and timing according to movement directions and speeds. Moreover, the modulation and superposition of the synergies identified from point-to-point movements captures the muscle patterns underlying multi-phasic movements, such as reaching through a via-point or to a target whose location changes after movement initiation. Thus, the sequencing of time-varying muscle synergies might implement an intermittent controller which would allow the construction of complex movements from simple building blocks. PMID:23626534

  4. The influence of object identity on obstacle avoidance reaching behaviour.

    PubMed

    de Haan, A M; Van der Stigchel, S; Nijnens, C M; Dijkerman, H C

    2014-07-01

    When reaching for target objects, we hardly ever collide with other objects located in our working environment. Behavioural studies have demonstrated that the introduction of non-target objects into the workspace alters both spatial and temporal parameters of reaching trajectories. Previous studies have shown the influence of spatial object features (e.g. size and position) on obstacle avoidance movements. However, obstacle identity may also play a role in the preparation of avoidance responses as this allows prediction of possible negative consequences of collision based on recognition of the obstacle. In this study we test this hypothesis by asking participants to reach towards a target as quickly as possible, in the presence of an empty or full glass of water placed about half way between the target and the starting position, at 8 cm either left or right of the virtual midline. While the spatial features of full and empty glasses of water are the same, the consequences of collision are clearly different. Indeed, when there was a high chance of collision, reaching trajectories veered away more from filled than from empty glasses. This shows that the identity of potential obstacles, which allows for estimating the predicted consequences of collision, is taken into account during obstacle avoidance. PMID:24859673

  5. Reaching Part-Time Distance Students in Diverse Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehair, Kristin J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the model used at the University of Kansas Medical Center to reach graduate students in the School of Nursing. Like many students returning for graduate degrees, distance students are balancing the demands of professional positions, graduate studies, and family life. Topics addressed include: point-of-need assistance,…

  6. Reach for the Stars: Visions for Literacy Coaching Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFord, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This brief by the Literacy Coaching Clearinghouse is about reaching for the stars--stories of vision and commitment from educators in small and large schools. Everyone knows of people who are held up as "visionaries" throughout history: Leonardo Da Vinci, Mahatma Gandhi, Jules Verne, Thomas Edison, Susan Anthony, or John Dewey, to name a few. The…

  7. EFNEP Reaches Refugee Youth Using a Mobile Van

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gossett, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    New groups of refugees settled in apartments far from city services. Their children lacked access to organized after-school activities and the opportunity to practice English. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) wanted to reach and teach the young refugees but lacked the staff and budget to do so. This article discusses how

  8. Reaching Out to the Next Generation of Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claudio, Luz

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need for research scientists to come out of their labs and establish links with communities and the need for scientists of color who can better gain access to the communities most often affected by problems such as environmental hazards. Describes ways to encourage this reaching out and breaking of stereotypes about scientists among

  9. Object Permanence, Reaching, and Locomotion in Infants Who Are Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, S.; Tobin, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    The literature on the effects of congenital blindness on infants' development of motor functions and concepts of object permanence is reviewed. The article questions the idea that infants must first develop an object concept before sound clues alone will elicit reaching. Possible interventions to redress the effects of congenital blindness on

  10. Northeast Florida College Reach Out Program: 1995 Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Robert J.; Drummond, Heather A.

    The College Reach Out Program is an educational program funded by the Florida Legislature designed to motivate and promote students in grades K-12 to complete high school and enroll in some type of postsecondary educational institution. The program is an attempt to help racial/ethnic minorities, low income students, and educationally disadvantaged

  11. Our Global Reach: UNESCO and ICAE as Catalysts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2012-01-01

    Globalization has become a household word, permeating workplaces and communities, while internationalizing the curriculum has become common practice, not just in higher education, but also reaching into the primary grades and outward into program planning efforts in the non-formal sector. Few fields, however, can claim two international bodies…

  12. Numeric Comparison in a Visually-Guided Manual Reaching Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Joo-Hyun; Nakayama, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Nearly all studies on perception and cognition have used discrete responses to infer internal cognitive processes. In the current study, we demonstrate that visually-guided manual reaching can provide new opportunities to access internal processes over time. In each trial, participants were required to compare a single digit Arabic number

  13. Now and Then: The U.S. Reaches 300 Million

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, Judith; Crews, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    Today, the Census Bureau compiles extensive information every year about the people and the economy of the United States. That is how the authors know that in 2006 the United States is going to reach an extraordinary milestone--300 million people. In this article, the authors discuss the "now and then" of the U.S. society. The authors observed

  14. Posterior cortical atrophy: visuomotor deficits in reaching and grasping

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Benjamin P.; Shelton, Paul; Marotta, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by the predominance of higher-order visual disturbances such as optic ataxia, a characteristic of Balint's syndrome. Deficits result from progressive neurodegeneration of occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal cortices. The current study sought to explore the visuomotor functioning of four individuals with PCA by testing their ability to reach out and grasp real objects under various viewing conditions. Experiment 1 had participants reach out and grasp simple, rectangular blocks under visually- and memory-guided conditions. Experiment 2 explored participants' abilities to accurately reach for objects located in their visual periphery. This investigation revealed that PCA patients demonstrate many of the same deficits that have been previously reported in other individuals with optic ataxia, such as magnetic misreachinga pathological reaching bias toward the point of visual fixation when grasping peripheral targets. Unlike many other individuals with optic ataxia, however, the patients in the current study also show symptoms indicative of damage to the more perceptual stream of visual processing, including abolished grip scaling during memory-guided grasping and deficits in face and object identification. These investigations are the first to perform a quantitative analysis of the visuomotor deficits exhibited by patients with PCA. Critically, this study helps characterize common symptoms of PCA, a vital first step for generating effective diagnostic criteria and therapeutic strategies for this understudied neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:23801956

  15. Teacher Evaluation in Practice: Implementing Chicago's REACH Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sporte, Susan E.; Stevens, W. David; Healey, Kaleen; Jiang, Jennie; Hart, Holly

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the perceptions and experiences of teachers and administrators during the first year of REACH implementation, which was in many ways a particularly demanding year. These experiences can be helpful to Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and to other districts across the country as they work to restructure and transform teacher…

  16. 14. RAILROAD BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, MONROE CO., ABERDEEN Reach by foot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. RAILROAD BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, MONROE CO., ABERDEEN Reach by foot from E end of Vine St. St. Louis and San Francisco RR bridge. Bridge built 1887, replaced, 1969. Credit: Evans Memorial Library, Aberdeen, Ms. No date. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  17. "Terms of Engagement" Not "Hard to Reach Parents"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Sara

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings of qualitative research commissioned by the Achievement for All project in a UK local authority. The research investigated how schools should engage parents, including those considered to be "hard to reach". A focus group methodology was adapted to enable parents to provide answers to the research questions. The…

  18. Reaching Part-Time Distance Students in Diverse Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehair, Kristin J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the model used at the University of Kansas Medical Center to reach graduate students in the School of Nursing. Like many students returning for graduate degrees, distance students are balancing the demands of professional positions, graduate studies, and family life. Topics addressed include: point-of-need assistance,

  19. TECH-REACH: A Rehabilitation Technology Information Exchange. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Disability Services, Albertson, NY. Research and Training Inst.

    TECH-REACH, a federally funded rehabilitation technology information exchange program, serves New York City and some surrounding areas. Its mission is to improve the delivery of technology information and rehabilitation services for people with disabilities and the professionals who serve them. The information exchange has gathered and maintained

  20. EFNEP Reaches Refugee Youth Using a Mobile Van

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gossett, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    New groups of refugees settled in apartments far from city services. Their children lacked access to organized after-school activities and the opportunity to practice English. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) wanted to reach and teach the young refugees but lacked the staff and budget to do so. This article discusses how…

  1. Reaching Out With a New Breed of Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Youth Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This publication describes the concept of The National Center for Youth Outreach Workers in reaching out and contacting youth with problems--beyond the confines of an agency, set hours, and limited knowledge of the individual youth. The Center was conceived at a Young Men's Christian Associations' (YMCA) conference in Washington, D. C. in March

  2. Reaching and Helping Unorganized and Disadvantaged People. Courier No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The articles in this issue are mainly concerned with how to reach the poorest and most disadvantaged sections of the population and how best to help once contact has been made. "Nijera Kori in Retrospect: In Search of an Organization of the Rural Poor" (Mohiuddin Ahmad) provides extracts from an evaluation of this grassroots, village-based,

  3. 12. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JAMES WILLIAMS REACHING FOR THE SAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JAMES WILLIAMS REACHING FOR THE SAND RELEASE LEVER WHICH WILL OPEN THE OVERHEAD STORAGE BIN AND PERMIT A SET AMOUNT OF SAND TO BE DEPOSITED INTO THE FLASK PRIOR TO COMPRESSION BY THE MOLDING MACHINE INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Imaginative Play during Childhood: Required for Reaching Full Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    2009-01-01

    At a brisk pace, research findings focused on children's play are finally reaching the light of day in popular media. No longer left sitting in archives of academic journals, the benefits of play to lifelong success have been touted in radio, television, magazines, and newspapers. It gives early childhood professionals a powerful, credible…

  5. The Effects of Motivational Graphing on Students Reaching Educational Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Loren Adair

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to conclude if motivational graphing strategies, when used in Math Response to Intervention (RTI) classes, could increase the students' ability to reach their goals. To complete this investigation the researcher assessed the Math RTI students' ability to count orally within one minute on a biweekly basis.

  6. Object motor representation and reaching-grasping control.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    The following two competing hypotheses were tested in the present study. Is grasp guided by multiple representations of a single object, each of which codes a different grasp motor act according to the physical properties of that item? Conversely, is grasp guided by a single representation that codes all the possible affordances enabled by the object? Subjects reached different objects, but the object part used by subjects to grasp them was identical. In experiments 1 and 2, two familiar objects (fruits) which varied for size and shape were presented. Subjects grasped their stalks whose size and shape were equal. In experiments 3-7 the presented objects were geometrical solids, which varied, respectively, for weight, volume, intrinsic height, centre of mass and shape. Nevertheless, in all experiments the object portion where subjects' fingers grasped it had the same physical features. Finally, experiment 8 was a control experiment in which subjects reached and grasped equal handles of bells of the same shape, but different size. Volume, shape, and familiarity of the object influenced the grasp kinematics, even if the features of the grasped object part did not change. Variation in intrinsic object height and weight influenced final reach kinematics. Variation in centre of mass influenced neither grasp nor reach kinematics. Data are discussed in support of the hypothesis that a single object motor representation, which codes all the object affordances, is involved in grasp kinematic implementation. PMID:11931918

  7. Reaching and Grasping Movements in Infants at Risk: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Campos, Ana Carolina; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2009-01-01

    Although the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on the development of reaching and grasping skills in typical infants has been extensively described in the literature, the effect of such factors on at-risk infants is still poorly understood. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to analyze the scientific publications, from 1980

  8. Longest reach of a cantilever with a tip load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    How does one deliver a weight attached to the end of an elastic rod? The theoretical analysis is not trivial. The longest horizontal reach of the rod depends on its length, rigidity and the angle at the base. This nonlinear elastica cantilever problem is formulated and solved by numerical integration. In some cases it may even be better to shorten the rod.

  9. Variation in reach-scale hydraulic conductivity of streambeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewardson, M. J.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Pella, H.; Thommeret, N.; Valette, L.; Grant, S. B.

    2016-04-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity is an important control on flow within the hyporheic zone, affecting hydrological, ecological, and biogeochemical processes essential to river ecosystem function. Despite many published field measurements, few empirical studies examine the drivers of spatial and temporal variations in streambed hydraulic conductivity. Reach-averaged hydraulic conductivity estimated for 119 surveys in 83 stream reaches across continental France, even of coarse bed streams, are shown to be characteristic of sand and finer sediments. This supports a model where processes leading to the accumulation of finer sediments within streambeds largely control hydraulic conductivity rather than the size of the coarse bed sediment fraction. After describing a conceptual model of relevant processes, we fit an empirical model relating hydraulic conductivity to candidate geomorphic and hydraulic drivers. The fitted model explains 72% of the deviance in hydraulic conductivity (and 30% using an external cross-validation). Reach hydraulic conductivity increases with the amplitude of bedforms within the reach, the bankfull channel width-depth ratio, stream power and upstream catchment erodibility but reduces with time since the last streambed disturbance. The correlation between hydraulic conductivity and time since a streambed mobilisation event is likely a consequence of clogging processes. Streams with a predominantly suspended load and less frequent streambed disturbances are expected to have a lower streambed hydraulic conductivity and reduced hyporheic fluxes. This study suggests a close link between streambed sediment transport dynamics and connectivity between surface water and the hyporheic zone.

  10. Imaginative Play during Childhood: Required for Reaching Full Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    2009-01-01

    At a brisk pace, research findings focused on children's play are finally reaching the light of day in popular media. No longer left sitting in archives of academic journals, the benefits of play to lifelong success have been touted in radio, television, magazines, and newspapers. It gives early childhood professionals a powerful, credible

  11. Reaching a Moveable Visual Target: Dissociations in Brain Tumour Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buiatti, Tania; Skrap, Miran; Shallice, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Damage to the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) can lead to Optic Ataxia (OA), in which patients misreach to peripheral targets. Recent research suggested that the PPC might be involved not only in simple reaching tasks toward peripheral targets, but also in changing the hand movement trajectory in real time if the target moves. The present study

  12. Perceiving Children's Behavior and Reaching Limits in a Risk Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordovil, Rita; Santos, Carlos; Barreiros, Joao

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of parents' perception of children's reaching limits in a risk scenario. A sample of 68 parents of 1- to 4-year-olds were asked to make a prior estimate of their children's behavior and action limits in a task that involved retrieving a toy out of the water. The action modes used for…

  13. Priming of Reach and Grasp Actions by Handled Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masson, Michael E. J.; Bub, Daniel N.; Breuer, Andreas T.

    2011-01-01

    Pictures of handled objects such as a beer mug or frying pan are shown to prime speeded reach and grasp actions that are compatible with the object. To determine whether the evocation of motor affordances implied by this result is driven merely by the physical orientation of the object's handle as opposed to higher-level properties of the object,…

  14. Reaching the Underserved: Complementary Models of Effective Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeStefano, Joseph; Moore, Audrey-Marie Schuh; Balwanz, David; Hartwell, Ash

    2007-01-01

    Many countries that have undergone expansion of access to public education still face significant disparities in school enrollment and attendance rates at sub-national levels, and fail to reach a high proportion of children who are outside of the government system. Completion and student learning have also continued to be system-wide challenges…

  15. Reaching Higher Ground: Parental Outreach Programs at the Postsecondary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Celina; Marquez, Amalia

    2005-01-01

    In this follow-up study to "College Knowledge: What Latino Parents Need to Know and Why They Don't Know It," [see ED469295], the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute examines how postsecondary institutions are mobilizing to address the need for college information among Latino parents. The primary objective of "Reaching Higher Ground" is to profile in

  16. Our Global Reach: UNESCO and ICAE as Catalysts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2012-01-01

    Globalization has become a household word, permeating workplaces and communities, while internationalizing the curriculum has become common practice, not just in higher education, but also reaching into the primary grades and outward into program planning efforts in the non-formal sector. Few fields, however, can claim two international bodies

  17. Reaching and Grasping Movements in Infants at Risk: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Campos, Ana Carolina; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2009-01-01

    Although the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on the development of reaching and grasping skills in typical infants has been extensively described in the literature, the effect of such factors on at-risk infants is still poorly understood. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to analyze the scientific publications, from 1980…

  18. MIDDLE REACH OF THE SNAKE RIVER: WATER QUALITY MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the project was to collect, analyze, assemble, and assess water quality data and resulting chemical/nutrient loads entering and transported in the Middle Snake River Reach of Idaho, between Milner Dam and King Hill. Studies were conducted during the period of 1990 ...

  19. Linking transient storage parameters to exchange mechanisms and reach characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morn, Ida; Wrman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2015-04-01

    A traditional way of investigating transient storage zones in streams and rivers comprises the performance of tracer tests. The information gained from the tests however, is in many ways limited by the geomorphological and hydraulic local conditions under which the test was performed. Consequently, there is a need for more general information about how reach characteristics and combined exchange mechanisms affect transient storage retention that can be expressed by scaling factors between physical, measurable parameters and the integrated total retention in a reach. A large number of tracer tests have been performed in a wide variety of reaches around the world and in this project we are taking advantage of already collected data as well as new tracer test performed within the study, to quantitatively evaluate how different geomorphic and hydraulic conditions affect the retention of solutes in rivers. By advancing existing physically based models on the local-scale with the combinations of exchange mechanisms we theoretically describe the relative magnitude of exchange mechanisms, and combinations of these, under specific hydraulic conditions and show how exchange parameters associated with different mechanisms are correlated physically. Both hyporheic transient storage zones (HTS) and surface transient storage zones (STS) are considered. Combined vertical exchange with the HTS can be evaluated by superimposing the velocity fields associated with stream features of different size described mathematically by harmonic functions, while exchange with other zones can be treated as independent and after evaluating the relative importance of the associated exchange parameters it can be added to the vertical exchange to obtain the total integrated retention. Based on the tracer tests, each tested reach is characterised in terms of its geomorphologic and hydraulic features and related statistically to reach-scale parameters evaluated from the tests with a longitudinal transient storage model. Important geomorphologic and hydraulic features used as classification parameters are those that that can be directly linked to specific management measures implemented in streams to increase natural remediation of nutrients and other contaminants. Only field data from reaches where measurements independent of the tracer tests have been done is included in this study in order to correctly analyse dominating mechanisms and combination of mechanisms and to be able to link the retention times to relevant and measurable reach characteristics.

  20. Efficiency at maximum power of a discrete feedback ratchet.

    PubMed

    Jarillo, Javier; Tangarife, Toms; Cao, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency at maximum power is found to be of the same order for a feedback ratchet and for its open-loop counterpart. However, feedback increases the output power up to a factor of five. This increase in output power is due to the increase in energy input and the effective entropy reduction obtained as a consequence of feedback. Optimal efficiency at maximum power is reached for time intervals between feedback actions two orders of magnitude smaller than the characteristic time of diffusion over a ratchet period length. The efficiency is computed consistently taking into account the correlation between the control actions. We consider a feedback control protocol for a discrete feedback flashing ratchet, which works against an external load. We maximize the power output optimizing the parameters of the ratchet, the controller, and the external load. The maximum power output is found to be upper bounded, so the attainable extracted power is limited. After, we compute an upper bound for the efficiency of this isothermal feedback ratchet at maximum power output. We make this computation applying recent developments of the thermodynamics of feedback-controlled systems, which give an equation to compute the entropy reduction due to information. However, this equation requires the computation of the probability of each of the possible sequences of the controller's actions. This computation becomes involved when the sequence of the controller's actions is non-Markovian, as is the case in most feedback ratchets. We here introduce an alternative procedure to set strong bounds to the entropy reduction in order to compute its value. In this procedure the bounds are evaluated in a quasi-Markovian limit, which emerge when there are big differences between the stationary probabilities of the system states. These big differences are an effect of the potential strength, which minimizes the departures from the Markovianicity of the sequence of control actions, allowing also to minimize the departures from the optimal performance of the system. This procedure can be applied to other feedback ratchets and, more in general, to other control systems. PMID:26871058

  1. ON THE MAXIMUM MASS OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Fryer, Chris L.; Bulik, Tomasz; Ruiter, Ashley; Valsecchi, Francesca; Vink, Jorick S.; Hurley, Jarrod R. E-mail: tb@astrouw.edu.p E-mail: aruiter@nmsu.ed E-mail: jsv@arm.ac.u

    2010-05-10

    We present the spectrum of compact object masses: neutron stars and black holes (BHs) that originate from single stars in different environments. In particular, we calculate the dependence of maximum BH mass on metallicity and on some specific wind mass loss rates (e.g., Hurley et al. and Vink et al.). Our calculations show that the highest mass BHs observed in the Galaxy M{sub bh} {approx} 15 M{sub sun} in the high metallicity environment (Z = Z{sub sun} = 0.02) can be explained with stellar models and the wind mass loss rates adopted here. To reach this result we had to set luminous blue variable mass loss rates at the level of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and to employ metallicity-dependent Wolf-Rayet winds. With such winds, calibrated on Galactic BH mass measurements, the maximum BH mass obtained for moderate metallicity (Z = 0.3 Z{sub sun} = 0.006) is M{sub bh,max} = 30 M{sub sun}. This is a rather striking finding as the mass of the most massive known stellar BH is M{sub bh} = 23-34 M{sub sun} and, in fact, it is located in a small star-forming galaxy with moderate metallicity. We find that in the very low (globular cluster-like) metallicity environment the maximum BH mass can be as high as M{sub bh,max} = 80 M{sub sun} (Z = 0.01 Z{sub sun} = 0.0002). It is interesting to note that X-ray luminosity from Eddington-limited accretion onto an 80 M{sub sun} BH is of the order of {approx}10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} and is comparable to luminosities of some known ultra-luminous X-ray sources. We emphasize that our results were obtained for single stars only and that binary interactions may alter these maximum BH masses (e.g., accretion from a close companion). This is strictly a proof-of-principle study which demonstrates that stellar models can naturally explain even the most massive known stellar BHs.

  2. Efficiency at maximum power of a discrete feedback ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarillo, Javier; Tangarife, Tomás; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency at maximum power is found to be of the same order for a feedback ratchet and for its open-loop counterpart. However, feedback increases the output power up to a factor of five. This increase in output power is due to the increase in energy input and the effective entropy reduction obtained as a consequence of feedback. Optimal efficiency at maximum power is reached for time intervals between feedback actions two orders of magnitude smaller than the characteristic time of diffusion over a ratchet period length. The efficiency is computed consistently taking into account the correlation between the control actions. We consider a feedback control protocol for a discrete feedback flashing ratchet, which works against an external load. We maximize the power output optimizing the parameters of the ratchet, the controller, and the external load. The maximum power output is found to be upper bounded, so the attainable extracted power is limited. After, we compute an upper bound for the efficiency of this isothermal feedback ratchet at maximum power output. We make this computation applying recent developments of the thermodynamics of feedback-controlled systems, which give an equation to compute the entropy reduction due to information. However, this equation requires the computation of the probability of each of the possible sequences of the controller's actions. This computation becomes involved when the sequence of the controller's actions is non-Markovian, as is the case in most feedback ratchets. We here introduce an alternative procedure to set strong bounds to the entropy reduction in order to compute its value. In this procedure the bounds are evaluated in a quasi-Markovian limit, which emerge when there are big differences between the stationary probabilities of the system states. These big differences are an effect of the potential strength, which minimizes the departures from the Markovianicity of the sequence of control actions, allowing also to minimize the departures from the optimal performance of the system. This procedure can be applied to other feedback ratchets and, more in general, to other control systems.

  3. Amplified Erosion above Waterfalls and Oversteepened Bedrock Reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haviv, I.; Enzel, Y.; Whipple, K. X.; Zilberman, E.; Stone, J.; Matmon, A.; Fifield, K. L.

    2005-12-01

    Although waterfalls are abundant along steep bedrock channels, none of the conventional erosion laws can predict incision at the lip of a waterfall where flow is non-uniform and bed slope can be vertical. Considering the expected increase in flow velocity and shear stress at the lip of a vertical waterfall we determine erosion amplification at a waterfall lip as: Elip/Enormal= (1+0.4/Fr2)3n, where Fr is the Froude number and n ranges between 0.5-1.7. This amplification expression suggests that erosion at the lip could be as much as 2-5 times higher than normally expected in a setting with identical hydraulic geometry. It also demonstrates that a freefall is expected to amplify upstream incision rates even when the flow approaching the waterfall is highly supercritical. Utilizing this erosion amplification expression in numerical simulations in conjunction with a standard detachment-limited incision model we demonstrate its impact on reach-scale morphology above waterfalls. These simulations indicate that amplified erosion at the lip of a waterfall can trigger the formation of an oversteepened reach whose length is longer than the flow acceleration zone, provided incision velocity (Vi) at the edge of the flow acceleration zone is higher than the retreat velocity of the waterfall face. Such an oversteepened reach is expected to be more pronounced when Vi increases with increasing slope. The simulations also suggest that oversteepening can eventually lead to quasi steady-state gradients upstream from a waterfall provided Vi decreases with increasing slope. Flow acceleration above waterfalls can thus account, at least partially, for oversteepened bedrock reaches that are prevalent above waterfalls. Such reaches have been reported for the escarpments of southeast Australia, western Dead Sea, and at Niagara Falls. Using the cosmogenic isotope 36Cl we demonstrate that Vi upstream of a waterfall at the Dead Sea western escarpment is high enough for freefall-induced oversteepening to be feasible.

  4. Evaluation of the parameters needed to describe the overall growth, the chemical growth, and the growth of feathers and breast muscles of broilers.

    PubMed

    Gous, R M; Moran, E T; Stilborn, H R; Bradford, G D; Emmans, G C

    1999-06-01

    An experiment was carried out to collect data suitable for testing methods used to describe the potential growth and body composition curves of broilers. Males and females of two commercial broiler strain-crosses were grown to 16 wk of age with birds taken at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 16 wk of age for chemical analysis and for the measurement of feather weight and breast meat (Pectoralis major and Pectoralis minor) weight at these ages. The data were used to test the Gompertz growth equation and the assumption of chemical allometry, as well as to estimate the values of the growth parameters for the different genotypes. Feeding and environmental conditions were intended to be such that potential growth and body composition could be attained. The weights of the chemical components for each of the four genotypes were described in terms of the mature weight of these components, their rates of maturing, and the time taken to reach the maximum rate of growth of each component. Allometric relationships between the weights of the chemical components and that of body protein were estimated. The ratio of ash to protein was essentially constant. Water matured more slowly, and lipid faster, than protein. For males, and for females up to 8 wk, the models were satisfactory. For females after this age, lipid growth was faster than expected from the earlier period, probably in preparation for egg production. There were small, but important, differences in the values of some parameters between the strain-crosses. For each of the four genotypes the changes in weight of feathers and breast meat with time were described in terms of the Gompertz growth function, which described the data very well. The parameters of the function for each component and genotype-mature weight, rate of maturing, and the time taken to reach the maximum rate of growth B were evaluated. For the feathers, the value of the rate parameter was higher than that estimated for the body as a whole. For the two breast muscles, and for their total weight, the value of the rate parameter was similar to that for the body as a whole. There was a simple allometric relationship between the weights of the breast muscles and that of the whole body. As a consequence, the development of the yield of breast meat for a given genotype could be described by the values of the two parameters: mature yield and the allometric exponent. A description of each genotype of interest is seen as an essential first step in using a simulation model either to predict requirements, or to predict the effects of different feeding programs, and environmental conditions, on the performance of broilers. PMID:10438123

  5. Coordinated turn-and-reach movements. I. Anticipatory compensation for self-generated coriolis and interaction torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pigeon, Pascale; Bortolami, Simone B.; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2003-01-01

    When reaching movements involve simultaneous trunk rotation, additional interaction torques are generated on the arm that are absent when the trunk is stable. To explore whether the CNS compensates for such self-generated interaction torques, we recorded hand trajectories in reaching tasks involving various amplitudes and velocities of arm extension and trunk rotation. Subjects pointed to three targets on a surface slightly above waist level. Two of the target locations were chosen so that a similar arm configuration relative to the trunk would be required for reaching to them, one of these targets requiring substantial trunk rotation, the other very little. Significant trunk rotation was necessary to reach the third target, but the arm's radial distance to the body remained virtually unchanged. Subjects reached at two speeds-a natural pace (slow) and rapidly (fast)-under normal lighting and in total darkness. Trunk angular velocity and finger velocity relative to the trunk were higher in the fast conditions but were not affected by the presence or absence of vision. Peak trunk velocity increased with increasing trunk rotation up to a maximum of 200 degrees /s. In slow movements, peak finger velocity relative to the trunk was smaller when trunk rotation was necessary to reach the targets. In fast movements, peak finger velocity was approximately 1.7 m/s for all targets. Finger trajectories were more curved when reaching movements involved substantial trunk rotation; however, the terminal errors and the maximal deviation of the trajectory from a straight line were comparable in slow and fast movements. This pattern indicates that the larger Coriolis, centripetal, and inertial interaction torques generated during rapid reaches were compensated by additional joint torques. Trajectory characteristics did not vary with the presence or absence of vision, indicating that visual feedback was unnecessary for anticipatory compensations. In all reaches involving trunk rotation, the finger movement generally occurred entirely during the trunk movement, indicating that the CNS did not minimize Coriolis forces incumbent on trunk rotation by sequencing the arm and trunk motions into a turn followed by a reach. A simplified model of the arm/trunk system revealed that additional interaction torques generated on the arm during voluntary turning and reaching were equivalent to < or =1.8 g (1 g = 9.81 m/s(2)) of external force at the elbow but did not degrade performance. In slow-rotation room studies involving reaching movements during passive rotation, Coriolis forces as small as 0.2 g greatly deflect movement trajectories and endpoints. We conclude that compensatory motor innervations are engaged in a predictive fashion to counteract impending self-generated interaction torques during voluntary reaching movements.

  6. Global CO2 rise leads to reduced maximum stomatal conductance in Florida vegetation.

    PubMed

    Lammertsma, Emmy I; de Boer, Hugo Jan; Dekker, Stefan C; Dilcher, David L; Lotter, Andr F; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike

    2011-03-01

    A principle response of C3 plants to increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO(2) (CO(2)) is to reduce transpirational water loss by decreasing stomatal conductance (g(s)) and simultaneously increase assimilation rates. Via this adaptation, vegetation has the ability to alter hydrology and climate. Therefore, it is important to determine the adaptation of vegetation to the expected anthropogenic rise in CO(2). Short-term stomatal opening-closing responses of vegetation to increasing CO(2) are described by free-air carbon enrichments growth experiments, and evolutionary adaptations are known from the geological record. However, to date the effects of decadal to centennial CO(2) perturbations on stomatal conductance are still largely unknown. Here we reconstruct a 34% (12%) reduction in maximum stomatal conductance (g(smax)) per 100 ppm CO(2) increase as a result of the adaptation in stomatal density (D) and pore size at maximal stomatal opening (a(max)) of nine common species from Florida over the past 150 y. The species-specific g(smax) values are determined by different evolutionary development, whereby the angiosperms sampled generally have numerous small stomata and high g(smax), and the conifers and fern have few large stomata and lower g(smax). Although angiosperms and conifers use different D and a(max) adaptation strategies, our data show a coherent response in g(smax) to CO(2) rise of the past century. Understanding these adaptations of C3 plants to rising CO(2) after decadal to centennial environmental changes is essential for quantification of plant physiological forcing at timescales relevant for global warming, and they are likely to continue until the limits of their phenotypic plasticity are reached. PMID:21330552

  7. Global CO2 rise leads to reduced maximum stomatal conductance in Florida vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Lammertsma, Emmy I.; de Boer, Hugo Jan; Dekker, Stefan C.; Dilcher, David L.; Lotter, Andr F.; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike

    2011-01-01

    A principle response of C3 plants to increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (CO2) is to reduce transpirational water loss by decreasing stomatal conductance (gs) and simultaneously increase assimilation rates. Via this adaptation, vegetation has the ability to alter hydrology and climate. Therefore, it is important to determine the adaptation of vegetation to the expected anthropogenic rise in CO2. Short-term stomatal openingclosing responses of vegetation to increasing CO2 are described by free-air carbon enrichments growth experiments, and evolutionary adaptations are known from the geological record. However, to date the effects of decadal to centennial CO2 perturbations on stomatal conductance are still largely unknown. Here we reconstruct a 34% (12%) reduction in maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax) per 100 ppm CO2 increase as a result of the adaptation in stomatal density (D) and pore size at maximal stomatal opening (amax) of nine common species from Florida over the past 150 y. The species-specific gsmax values are determined by different evolutionary development, whereby the angiosperms sampled generally have numerous small stomata and high gsmax, and the conifers and fern have few large stomata and lower gsmax. Although angiosperms and conifers use different D and amax adaptation strategies, our data show a coherent response in gsmax to CO2 rise of the past century. Understanding these adaptations of C3 plants to rising CO2 after decadal to centennial environmental changes is essential for quantification of plant physiological forcing at timescales relevant for global warming, and they are likely to continue until the limits of their phenotypic plasticity are reached. PMID:21330552

  8. Cryosphere: Antarctic ice growth and retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Antarctic Ice Sheet change during the last glacial cycle is unclear. The timing of moraine development in the Ross basin suggests that the ice sheet reached maximum thickness under the warming temperatures of the last termination.

  9. Suspended sediment transport in the freshwater reach of the Hudson river estuary in eastern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, G.R.; Nystrom, E.A.; Litten, S.

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of Hudson River sediment into New York Harbor interferes with navigation lanes and requires continuous dredging. Sediment dynamics at the Hudson estuary turbidity maximum (ETM) have received considerable study, but delivery of sediment to the ETM through the freshwater reach of the estuary has received relatively little attention and few direct measurements. An acoustic Doppler current profiler was positioned at the approximate limit of continuous freshwater to develop a 4-year time series of water velocity, discharge, suspended sediment concentration, and suspended sediment discharge. This data set was compared with suspended sediment discharge data collected during the same period at two sites just above the Hudson head-of-tide (the Federal Dam at Troy) that together represent the single largest source of sediment entering the estuary. The mean annual suspended sediment-discharge from the freshwater reach of the estuary was 737,000 metric tons. Unexpectedly, the total suspended sediment discharge at the study site in November and December slightly exceeded that observed during March and April, the months during which rain and snowmelt typically result in the largest sediment discharge to the estuary. Suspended sediment discharge at the study site exceeded that from the Federal Dam, even though the intervening reach appears to store significant amounts of sediment, suggesting that 30-40% of sediment discharge observed at the study site is derived from tributaries to the estuary between the Federal Dam and study site. A simple model of sediment entering and passing through the freshwater reach on a timescale of weeks appears reasonable during normal hydrologic conditions in adjoining watersheds; however, this simple model may dramatically overestimate sediment delivery during extreme tributary high flows, especially those at the end of, or after, the "flushing season" (October through April). Previous estimates of annual or seasonal sediment delivery from tributaries and the Federal Dam to the ETM and harbor may be high for those years with extreme tributary high-flow events. ?? 2008 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation.

  10. Maximum entropy signal restoration with linear programming

    SciTech Connect

    Mastin, G.A.; Hanson, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    Dantzig's bounded-variable method is used to express the maximum entropy restoration problem as a linear programming problem. This is done by approximating the nonlinear objective function with piecewise linear segments, then bounding the variables as a function of the number of segments used. The use of a linear programming approach allows equality constraints found in the traditional Lagrange multiplier method to be relaxed. A robust revised simplex algorithm is used to implement the restoration. Experimental results from 128- and 512-point signal restorations are presented.

  11. Design of toroidal transformers for maximum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The design of the most efficient toroidal transformer that can be built given the frequency, volt-ampere rating, magnetic flux density, window fill factor, and materials is described. With the above all held constant and only the dimensions of the magnetic core varied, the most efficient design occurs when the copper losses equal 60 percent of the iron losses. When this criterion is followed, efficiency is only slightly dependent on design frequency and fill factor. The ratios of inside diameter to outside diameter and height to build of the magnetic core that result in transformers of maximum efficiency are computed.

  12. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  13. Maximum entropy spectral analysis for streamflow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huijuan; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Configurational entropy spectral analysis (CESAS) is developed with spectral power as a random variable for streamflow forecasting. It is found that the CESAS derived by maximizing the configurational entropy yields the same solution as by the Burg entropy spectral analysis (BESA). Comparison of forecasted streamflows by CESAS and BESA shows less than 0.001% difference between the two analyses and thus the two entropy spectral analyses are concluded to be identical. Thus, the Burg entropy spectral analysis and two configurational entropy spectral analyses form the maximum entropy spectral analysis.

  14. Maximum Temperature Detection System for Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankiewicz, Maciej; Kos, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    The paper describes structure and measurement results of the system detecting present maximum temperature on the surface of an integrated circuit. The system consists of the set of proportional to absolute temperature sensors, temperature processing path and a digital part designed in VHDL. Analogue parts of the circuit where designed with full-custom technique. The system is a part of temperature-controlled oscillator circuit - a power management system based on dynamic frequency scaling method. The oscillator cooperates with microprocessor dedicated for thermal experiments. The whole system is implemented in UMC CMOS 0.18 ?m (1.8 V) technology.

  15. Maximum aposteriori joint source/channel coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, Khalid; Gibson, Jerry D.

    1991-01-01

    A maximum aposteriori probability (MAP) approach to joint source/channel coder design is presented in this paper. This method attempts to explore a technique for designing joint source/channel codes, rather than ways of distributing bits between source coders and channel coders. For a nonideal source coder, MAP arguments are used to design a decoder which takes advantage of redundancy in the source coder output to perform error correction. Once the decoder is obtained, it is analyzed with the purpose of obtaining 'desirable properties' of the channel input sequence for improving overall system performance. Finally, an encoder design which incorporates these properties is proposed.

  16. Maximum a posteriori decoder for digital communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altes, Richard A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A system and method for decoding by identification of the most likely phase coded signal corresponding to received data. The present invention has particular application to communication with signals that experience spurious random phase perturbations. The generalized estimator-correlator uses a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator to generate phase estimates for correlation with incoming data samples and for correlation with mean phases indicative of unique hypothesized signals. The result is a MAP likelihood statistic for each hypothesized transmission, wherein the highest value statistic identifies the transmitted signal.

  17. Dynamical maximum entropy approach to flocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Ginelli, Francesco; Mora, Thierry; Piovani, Duccio; Tavarone, Raffaele; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2014-04-01

    We derive a new method to infer from data the out-of-equilibrium alignment dynamics of collectively moving animal groups, by considering the maximum entropy model distribution consistent with temporal and spatial correlations of flight direction. When bird neighborhoods evolve rapidly, this dynamical inference correctly learns the parameters of the model, while a static one relying only on the spatial correlations fails. When neighbors change slowly and the detailed balance is satisfied, we recover the static procedure. We demonstrate the validity of the method on simulated data. The approach is applicable to other systems of active matter.

  18. Stoichiometric identification with maximum likelihood principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Mailier, Johan; Remy, Marcel; Vande Wouwer, Alain

    2013-10-01

    This study presents an effective procedure for the determination of a biologically inspired, black-box model of cultures of microorganisms (including yeasts, bacteria, plant and animal cells) in bioreactors. This procedure is based on sets of experimental data measuring the time-evolution of a few extracellular species concentrations, and makes use of maximum likelihood principal component analysis to determine, independently of the kinetics, an appropriate number of macroscopic reactions and their stoichiometry. In addition, this paper provides a discussion of the geometric interpretation of a stoichiometric matrix and the potential equivalent reaction schemes. The procedure is carefully evaluated within the stoichiometric identification framework of the growth of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus on cheese whey. Using Monte Carlo studies, it is also compared with two other previously published approaches. PMID:22821205

  19. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant levels... Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels § 141.65 Maximum residual disinfectant levels. (a) Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) are as follows: Disinfectant...

  20. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant levels... Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels § 141.65 Maximum residual disinfectant levels. (a) Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) are as follows: Disinfectant...

  1. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant levels... Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels § 141.65 Maximum residual disinfectant levels. (a) Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) are as follows: Disinfectant...

  2. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant levels... Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels § 141.65 Maximum residual disinfectant levels. (a) Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) are as follows: Disinfectant...

  3. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant levels... Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels § 141.65 Maximum residual disinfectant levels. (a) Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) are as follows: Disinfectant...

  4. Reaching to Throw Compared to Reaching to Place: A Comparison across Individuals with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmut, Kate; Byrne, Maia; Barnett, Anna L.

    2013-01-01

    When picking up an object, adults show a longer deceleration phase when the onward action has a greater precision requirement. Tailoring action in this way is thought to need forward modelling in order to predict the consequences of movement. Some evidence suggests that young children also tailor reaching in this way; however, how this skill

  5. Translating the REACH Caregiver Intervention for Use by Area Agency on Aging Personnel: the REACH OUT Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Collins, Irene B.; Schmid, Bettina; Wharton, Tracy; McCallum, Debra; DeCoster, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to translate the evidence-based Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health (REACH) II intervention for use in 4 Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs). A secondary aim was to examine possible moderators of treatment outcome. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental pre-post treatment design with no…

  6. Translating the REACH Caregiver Intervention for Use by Area Agency on Aging Personnel: the REACH OUT Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Collins, Irene B.; Schmid, Bettina; Wharton, Tracy; McCallum, Debra; DeCoster, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to translate the evidence-based Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health (REACH) II intervention for use in 4 Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs). A secondary aim was to examine possible moderators of treatment outcome. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental pre-post treatment design with no

  7. Redesigning Schools to Reach Every Student with Excellent Teachers: Change Management--Key Theories to Consider when Extending Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sharon Kebschull

    2012-01-01

    As schools, their teachers, and outside facilitators redesign jobs and incorporate technology to extend the reach of excellent teachers to more students and develop an Opportunity Culture for all, choosing the right school models is just one part of the task. The human experience--and experience in education--says that even perfect design will not…

  8. Reaching to Throw Compared to Reaching to Place: A Comparison across Individuals with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmut, Kate; Byrne, Maia; Barnett, Anna L.

    2013-01-01

    When picking up an object, adults show a longer deceleration phase when the onward action has a greater precision requirement. Tailoring action in this way is thought to need forward modelling in order to predict the consequences of movement. Some evidence suggests that young children also tailor reaching in this way; however, how this skill…

  9. Maximum of a Fractional Brownian Motion: Analytic Results from Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Mathieu; Wiese, Kay Jrg

    2015-11-20

    Fractional Brownian motion is a non-Markovian Gaussian process X_{t}, indexed by the Hurst exponent H. It generalizes standard Brownian motion (corresponding to H=1/2). We study the probability distribution of the maximum m of the process and the time t_{max} at which the maximum is reached. They are encoded in a path integral, which we evaluate perturbatively around a Brownian, setting H=1/2+?. This allows us to derive analytic results beyond the scaling exponents. Extensive numerical simulations for different values of H test these analytical predictions and show excellent agreement, even for large ?. PMID:26636835

  10. Maximum of a Fractional Brownian Motion: Analytic Results from Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, Mathieu; Wiese, Kay Jrg

    2015-11-01

    Fractional Brownian motion is a non-Markovian Gaussian process Xt, indexed by the Hurst exponent H . It generalizes standard Brownian motion (corresponding to H =1 /2 ). We study the probability distribution of the maximum m of the process and the time tmax at which the maximum is reached. They are encoded in a path integral, which we evaluate perturbatively around a Brownian, setting H =1 /2 +? . This allows us to derive analytic results beyond the scaling exponents. Extensive numerical simulations for different values of H test these analytical predictions and show excellent agreement, even for large ? .

  11. Photobiotreatment: influence of nitrogen and phosphorus ratio in wastewater on growth kinetics of Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Arbib, Z; Ruiz, J; Alvarez-Daz, Pablo; Garrido-Prez, C; Barragan, J; Perales, J A

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant can vary significantly, which could affect the growth kinetic and chemical composition of microalgae when cultivated in this medium. The aim of this work was to study the rate of growth, nutrient removal and carbon dioxide biofixation as well as biomass composition of Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) when it is cultivated in wastewater at different nitrogen and phosphorus ratio, from 1:1 to 35:1. A more homogeneous method for calculating productivities in batch reactors was proposed. The proper N:P ratio for achieving optimum batch biomass productivity ranged between 9 and 13 (263 and 322 mg L(-1) d(-1) respectively). This was also the ratio range for achieving a total N and P removal. Above and below this range (9-13) the maximum biomass concentration changed, instead of the specific growth rate.The maximum carbon dioxide biofixation rate was achieved at N:P ratio between 13 and 22 (553 and 557 mg CO2 L(-1) d(-1) respectively). Lipid and crude protein content, both depend on the aging culture, reaching the maximum lipid content (34%) at the lowest N:P (1:1) and the maximum crude protein content (34.2%) at the highest N:P (35:1). PMID:23819274

  12. Translating the REACH Caregiver Intervention for Use by Area Agency on Aging Personnel: the REACH OUT Program

    PubMed Central

    Burgio, Louis D.; Collins, Irene B.; Schmid, Bettina; Wharton, Tracy; McCallum, Debra; DeCoster, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to translate the evidence-based Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health (REACH) II intervention for use in 4 Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs). A secondary aim was to examine possible moderators of treatment outcome. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental pre–post treatment design with no control group. A partnership was formed between the Alabama Department of Senior Services and the University of Alabama. The partnership trimmed the REACH II intervention used in the clinical trial for feasible use in a social service agency. The condensed REACH intervention, termed REACH OUT, was delivered to 272 dementia caregivers during 4 home visits and 3 phone calls for a period of 4 months. The assessment examined pre–post treatment effects on a number of outcomes, including care recipient risk, mood, memory, and behavior problems; caregiver stress and emotional well-being; caregiver health; and program satisfaction. All aspects of the program except for training, periodic consultation, and data analysis were controlled by the AAA staff. Results: Analyses were conducted on the 236 dyads that completed at least 3 of the 4 planned sessions. Significant positive pre–post effects were found on caregiver subjective burden, social support, caregiver frustration, depression, caregiver health, care recipient behavior problems and mood, and 2 of 4 care recipient risk behaviors. Site of intervention and certain participant characteristics (e.g., caregiver relationship) moderated several pre–post differences. A caregiver survey and interventionist focus group reported high acceptability of the program Implications: This project suggests that the REACH II intervention can be modified for feasible and effective use in AAAs. The next step is to integrate the intervention into usual service delivery to achieve sustainability. PMID:19363008

  13. Vegetation controls on the maximum size of coastal dunes.

    PubMed

    Durn, Orencio; Moore, Laura J

    2013-10-22

    Coastal dunes, in particular foredunes, support a resilient ecosystem and reduce coastal vulnerability to storms. In contrast to dry desert dunes, coastal dunes arise from interactions between biological and physical processes. Ecologists have traditionally addressed coastal ecosystems by assuming that they adapt to preexisting dune topography, whereas geomorphologists have studied the properties of foredunes primarily in connection to physical, not biological, factors. Here, we study foredune development using an ecomorphodynamic model that resolves the coevolution of topography and vegetation in response to both physical and ecological factors. We find that foredune growth is eventually limited by a negative feedback between wind flow and topography. As a consequence, steady-state foredunes are scale invariant, which allows us to derive scaling relations for maximum foredune height and formation time. These relations suggest that plant zonation (in particular for strand "dune-building" species) is the primary factor controlling the maximum size of foredunes and therefore the amount of sand stored in a coastal dune system. We also find that aeolian sand supply to the dunes determines the timescale of foredune formation. These results offer a potential explanation for the empirical relation between beach type and foredune size, in which large (small) foredunes are found on dissipative (reflective) beaches. Higher waves associated with dissipative beaches increase the disturbance of strand species, which shifts foredune formation landward and thus leads to larger foredunes. In this scenario, plants play a much more active role in modifying their habitat and altering coastal vulnerability than previously thought. PMID:24101481

  14. Subsurface Chlorophyll Maximum Layers: Enduring Enigma or Mystery Solved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of subsurface chlorophyll maximum layers (SCMLs) is not a unique ecological response to environmental conditions; rather, a broad range of interacting processes can contribute to the formation of persistent layers of elevated chlorophyll a concentration (Chl) that are nearly ubiquitous in stratified surface waters. Mechanisms that contribute to the formation and maintenance of the SCMLs include a local maximum in phytoplankton growth rate near the nutricline, photoacclimation of pigment content that leads to elevated Chl relative to phytoplankton biomass at depth, and a range of physiologically influenced swimming behaviors in motile phytoplankton and buoyancy control in diatoms and cyanobacteria that can lead to aggregations of phytoplankton in layers, subject to grazing and physical control. A postulated typical stable water structure characterizes consistent patterns in vertical profiles of Chl, phytoplankton biomass, nutrients, and light across a trophic gradient structured by the vertical flux of nutrients and characterized by the average daily irradiance at the nutricline. Hypothetical predictions can be tested using a nascent biogeochemical global ocean observing system. Partial results to date are generally consistent with predictions based on current knowledge, which has strong roots in research from the twentieth century.

  15. Vegetation controls on the maximum size of coastal dunes

    PubMed Central

    Durn, Orencio; Moore, Laura J.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal dunes, in particular foredunes, support a resilient ecosystem and reduce coastal vulnerability to storms. In contrast to dry desert dunes, coastal dunes arise from interactions between biological and physical processes. Ecologists have traditionally addressed coastal ecosystems by assuming that they adapt to preexisting dune topography, whereas geomorphologists have studied the properties of foredunes primarily in connection to physical, not biological, factors. Here, we study foredune development using an ecomorphodynamic model that resolves the coevolution of topography and vegetation in response to both physical and ecological factors. We find that foredune growth is eventually limited by a negative feedback between wind flow and topography. As a consequence, steady-state foredunes are scale invariant, which allows us to derive scaling relations for maximum foredune height and formation time. These relations suggest that plant zonation (in particular for strand dune-building species) is the primary factor controlling the maximum size of foredunes and therefore the amount of sand stored in a coastal dune system. We also find that aeolian sand supply to the dunes determines the timescale of foredune formation. These results offer a potential explanation for the empirical relation between beach type and foredune size, in which large (small) foredunes are found on dissipative (reflective) beaches. Higher waves associated with dissipative beaches increase the disturbance of strand species, which shifts foredune formation landward and thus leads to larger foredunes. In this scenario, plants play a much more active role in modifying their habitat and altering coastal vulnerability than previously thought. PMID:24101481

  16. Efficient heuristics for maximum common substructure search.

    PubMed

    Englert, Pter; Kovcs, Pter

    2015-05-26

    Maximum common substructure search is a computationally hard optimization problem with diverse applications in the field of cheminformatics, including similarity search, lead optimization, molecule alignment, and clustering. Most of these applications have strict constraints on running time, so heuristic methods are often preferred. However, the development of an algorithm that is both fast enough and accurate enough for most practical purposes is still a challenge. Moreover, in some applications, the quality of a common substructure depends not only on its size but also on various topological features of the one-to-one atom correspondence it defines. Two state-of-the-art heuristic algorithms for finding maximum common substructures have been implemented at ChemAxon Ltd., and effective heuristics have been developed to improve both their efficiency and the relevance of the atom mappings they provide. The implementations have been thoroughly evaluated and compared with existing solutions (KCOMBU and Indigo). The heuristics have been found to greatly improve the performance and applicability of the algorithms. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the applied methods and present the experimental results. PMID:25865959

  17. Maximum height and minimum time vertical jumping.

    PubMed

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2015-08-20

    The performance criterion in maximum vertical jumping has typically been assumed to simply raise the center of mass as high as possible. In many sporting activities minimizing movement time during the jump is likely also critical to successful performance. The purpose of this study was to examine maximum height jumps performed while minimizing jump time. A direct dynamics model was used to examine squat jump performance, with dual performance criteria: maximize jump height and minimize jump time. The muscle model had activation dynamics, force-length, force-velocity properties, and a series of elastic component representing the tendon. The simulations were run in two modes. In Mode 1 the model was placed in a fixed initial position. In Mode 2 the simulation model selected the initial squat configuration as well as the sequence of muscle activations. The inclusion of time as a factor in Mode 1 simulations resulted in a small decrease in jump height and moderate time savings. The improvement in time was mostly accomplished by taking off from a less extended position. In Mode 2 simulations, more substantial time savings could be achieved by beginning the jump in a more upright posture. However, when time was weighted more heavily in these simulations, there was a more substantial reduction in jump height. Future work is needed to examine the implications for countermovement jumping and to examine the possibility of minimizing movement time as part of the control scheme even when the task is to jump maximally. PMID:25964210

  18. Estimating Metabolic Fluxes Using a Maximum Network Flexibility Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Megchelenbrink, Wout; Rossell, Sergio; Huynen, Martijn A.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Genome-scale metabolic networks can be modeled in a constraint-based fashion. Reaction stoichiometry combined with flux capacity constraints determine the space of allowable reaction rates. This space is often large and a central challenge in metabolic modeling is finding the biologically most relevant flux distributions. A widely used method is flux balance analysis (FBA), which optimizes a biologically relevant objective such as growth or ATP production. Although FBA has proven to be highly useful for predicting growth and byproduct secretion, it cannot predict the intracellular fluxes under all environmental conditions. Therefore, alternative strategies have been developed to select flux distributions that are in agreement with experimental omics data, or by incorporating experimental flux measurements. The latter, unfortunately can only be applied to a limited set of reactions and is currently not feasible at the genome-scale. On the other hand, it has been observed that micro-organisms favor a suboptimal growth rate, possibly in exchange for a more flexible metabolic network. Instead of dedicating the internal network state to an optimal growth rate in one condition, a suboptimal growth rate is used, that allows for an easier switch to other nutrient sources. A small decrease in growth rate is exchanged for a relatively large gain in metabolic capability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Results Here, we propose Maximum Metabolic Flexibility (MMF) a computational method that utilizes this observation to find the most probable intracellular flux distributions. By mapping measured flux data from central metabolism to the genome-scale models of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that i) indeed, most of the measured fluxes agree with a high adaptability of the network, ii) this result can be used to further reduce the space of feasible solutions iii) this reduced space improves the quantitative predictions made by FBA and contains a significantly larger fraction of the measured fluxes compared to the flux space that was reduced by a uniform sampling approach and iv) MMF can be used to select reactions in the network that contribute most to the steady-state flux space. Constraining the selected reactions improves the quantitative predictions of FBA considerably more than adding an equal amount of flux constraints, selected using a more nave approach. Our method can be applied to any cell type without requiring prior information. Availability MMF is freely available as a MATLAB plugin at: http://cs.ru.nl/~wmegchel/mmf. PMID:26457579

  19. A Maximum-Likelihood Approach to Force-Field Calibration.

    PubMed

    Zaborowski, Bart?omiej; Jagie?a, Dawid; Czaplewski, Cezary; Ha?abis, Anna; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; ?mudzi?ska, Wioletta; O?dziej, Stanis?aw; Karczy?ska, Agnieszka; Omieczynski, Christian; Wirecki, Tomasz; Liwo, Adam

    2015-09-28

    A new approach to the calibration of the force fields is proposed, in which the force-field parameters are obtained by maximum-likelihood fitting of the calculated conformational ensembles to the experimental ensembles of training system(s). The maximum-likelihood function is composed of logarithms of the Boltzmann probabilities of the experimental conformations, calculated with the current energy function. Because the theoretical distribution is given in the form of the simulated conformations only, the contributions from all of the simulated conformations, with Gaussian weights in the distances from a given experimental conformation, are added to give the contribution to the target function from this conformation. In contrast to earlier methods for force-field calibration, the approach does not suffer from the arbitrariness of dividing the decoy set into native-like and non-native structures; however, if such a division is made instead of using Gaussian weights, application of the maximum-likelihood method results in the well-known energy-gap maximization. The computational procedure consists of cycles of decoy generation and maximum-likelihood-function optimization, which are iterated until convergence is reached. The method was tested with Gaussian distributions and then applied to the physics-based coarse-grained UNRES force field for proteins. The NMR structures of the tryptophan cage, a small ?-helical protein, determined at three temperatures (T = 280, 305, and 313 K) by Ha?abis et al. ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 6898 - 6907 ), were used. Multiplexed replica-exchange molecular dynamics was used to generate the decoys. The iterative procedure exhibited steady convergence. Three variants of optimization were tried: optimization of the energy-term weights alone and use of the experimental ensemble of the folded protein only at T = 280 K (run 1); optimization of the energy-term weights and use of experimental ensembles at all three temperatures (run 2); and optimization of the energy-term weights and the coefficients of the torsional and multibody energy terms and use of experimental ensembles at all three temperatures (run 3). The force fields were subsequently tested with a set of 14 ?-helical and two ? + ? proteins. Optimization run 1 resulted in better agreement with the experimental ensemble at T = 280 K compared with optimization run 2 and in comparable performance on the test set but poorer agreement of the calculated folding temperature with the experimental folding temperature. Optimization run 3 resulted in the best fit of the calculated ensembles to the experimental ones for the tryptophan cage but in much poorer performance on the training set, suggesting that use of a small ?-helical protein for extensive force-field calibration resulted in overfitting of the data for this protein at the expense of transferability. The optimized force field resulting from run 2 was found to fold 13 of the 14 tested ?-helical proteins and one small ? + ? protein with the correct topologies; the average structures of 10 of them were predicted with accuracies of about 5 C(?) root-mean-square deviation or better. Test simulations with an additional set of 12 ?-helical proteins demonstrated that this force field performed better on ?-helical proteins than the previous parametrizations of UNRES. The proposed approach is applicable to any problem of maximum-likelihood parameter estimation when the contributions to the maximum-likelihood function cannot be evaluated at the experimental points and the dimension of the configurational space is too high to construct histograms of the experimental distributions. PMID:26263302

  20. Key design requirements for long-reach manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, D.S.; March-Leuba, S.; Babcock, S.M.; Hamel, W.R.

    1993-09-01

    Long-reach manipulators differ from industrial robots and teleoperators typically used in the nuclear industry in that the aspect ratio (length to diameter) of links is much greater and link flexibility, as well as joint or drive train flexibility, is likely to be significant. Long-reach manipulators will be required for a variety of applications in the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. While each application will present specific functional kinematic, and performance requirements an approach for determining the kinematic applicability and performance characteristics is presented, with a focus on waste storage tank remediation. Requirements are identified, kinematic configurations are considered, and a parametric study of link design parameters and their effects on performance characteristics is presented.

  1. Key Design Requirements for Long-Reach Manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    Long-reach manipulators differ from industrial robots and teleoperators typically used in the nuclear industry in that the aspect ratio (length to diameter) of links is much greater and link flexibility, as well as joint or drive train flexibility, is likely to be significant. Long-reach manipulators will be required for a variety of applications in the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. While each application will present specific functional, kinematic, and performance requirements, an approach for determining the kinematic applicability and performance characteristics is presented, with a focus on waste storage tank remediation. Requirements are identified, kinematic configurations are considered, and a parametric study of link design parameters and their effects on performance characteristics is presented.

  2. Finding balance: Virus populations reach equilibrium during the infection process.

    PubMed

    Harper, S J; Cowell, S J; Dawson, W O

    2015-11-01

    Virus populations, mixtures of viral strains or species, are a common feature of viral infection, and influence many viral processes including infection, transmission, and the induction of disease. Yet, little is known of the rules that define the composition and structure of these populations. In this study, we used three distinct strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) to examine the effect of inoculum composition, titer, and order, on the virus population. We found that CTV populations stabilized at the same equilibrium irrespective of how that population was introduced into a host. In addition, both field and experimental observations showed that these equilibria were relatively uniform between individual hosts of the same species and under the same conditions. We observed that the structure of the equilibria reached is determined primarily by the host, with the same inoculum reaching different equilibria in different species, and by the fitness of individual virus variants. PMID:26291064

  3. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  4. Amplified erosion above waterfalls and oversteepened bedrock reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haviv, I.; Enzel, Y.; Whipple, K. X.; Zilberman, E.; Stone, J.; Matmon, A.; Fifield, L. K.

    2006-12-01

    None of the conventional bedrock erosion laws can predict incision immediately upslope of a waterfall lip where the flow is accelerating toward a freefall. Considering the expected increase in flow velocity and shear stress at the lip of a waterfall, we determine erosion amplification at a waterfall lip as ?, where E(?) is the erosion rate at the upstream end of the flow acceleration zone above a waterfall, Fr is the Froude number at this setting, and n ranges between 0.5-1.7. This amplification expression suggests that erosion at the lip could be as much as 2-5 times higher relative to erosion at a normal setting with identical hydraulic geometry. Utilizing this erosion amplification expression in numerical simulations, we demonstrate its impact on reach-scale morphology above waterfalls. Amplified erosion at the lip of a waterfall can trigger the formation of an oversteepened reach whose length is longer than the flow acceleration zone, provided incision wave velocity (Vi) at the upstream edge of the flow acceleration zone is higher than the retreat velocity of the waterfall face. Such an oversteepened reach is expected to be more pronounced when Vi increases with increasing slope. The simulations also suggest that oversteepening can eventually lead to steady state gradients adjacent to a waterfall lip provided Vi decreases with increasing slope. Flow acceleration above waterfalls can thus account, at least partially, for prevalent oversteepened bedrock reaches above waterfalls. Using the cosmogenic isotope Cl-36, we demonstrate that incision wave velocity upstream of a waterfall at the Dead Sea western escarpment is probably high enough for freefall-induced oversteepening to be feasible.

  5. Reaching Higher Goals by Means of a Reflecting Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faella, Orazio; De Luca, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    A student realizes that a point particle that is able to rise at a given point P[subscript 0] at height H when launched vertically from the origin O of a Cartesian plane at a fixed initial speed V[subscript 0] cannot reach, by means of a direct shot from a small spring cannon, a point P positioned at the same height H and distance d from

  6. LATENT DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE ESTIMATION IN HARD-TO-REACH GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Tyler H.; Zheng, Tian

    2015-01-01

    The sampling frame in most social science surveys excludes members of certain groups, known as hard-to-reach groups. These groups, or sub-populations, may be difficult to access (the homeless, e.g.), camouflaged by stigma (individuals with HIV/AIDS), or both (commercial sex workers). Even basic demographic information about these groups is typically unknown, especially in many developing nations. We present statistical models which leverage social network structure to estimate demographic characteristics of these subpopulations using Aggregated relational data (ARD), or questions of the form “How many X’s do you know?” Unlike other network-based techniques for reaching these groups, ARD require no special sampling strategy and are easily incorporated into standard surveys. ARD also do not require respondents to reveal their own group membership. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model for estimating the demographic characteristics of hard-to-reach groups, or latent demographic profiles, using ARD. We propose two estimation techniques. First, we propose a Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm for existing data or cases where the full posterior distribution is of interest. For cases when new data can be collected, we propose guidelines and, based on these guidelines, propose a simple estimate motivated by a missing data approach. Using data from McCarty et al. [Human Organization 60 (2001) 28–39], we estimate the age and gender profiles of six hard-to-reach groups, such as individuals who have HIV, women who were raped, and homeless persons. We also evaluate our simple estimates using simulation studies. PMID:26966475

  7. On stiffening cables of a long reach manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.L.; Santiago, P.

    1996-02-01

    A long reach manipulator will be used for waste remediation in large underground storage tanks. The manipulator`s slenderness makes it flexible and difficult to control. A low-cost and effective method to enhance the manipulator`s stiffness is proposed in this research by using suspension cables. These cables can also be used to accurately measure the position of the manipulator`s wrist.

  8. Hard x-ray Zernike microscopy reaches 30 nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Tung; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Yi, Jaemock; Chu, Yong S; Lee, Wah-Keat; Wang, Cheng-Liang; Kempson, Ivan M; Hwu, Y; Gajdosik, Vincent; Margaritondo, G

    2011-04-01

    Since its invention in 1930, Zernike phase contrast has been a pillar in optical microscopy and more recently in x-ray microscopy, in particular for low-absorption-contrast biological specimens. We experimentally demonstrate that hard-x-ray Zernike microscopy now reaches a lateral resolution below 30 nm while strongly enhancing the contrast, thus opening many new research opportunities in biomedicine and materials science. PMID:21479054

  9. Hard x-ray Zernike microscopy reaches 30 nm resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Yi, J.; Chu, Y.; Lee, W.-K.; Wang, C.; Kempson, I.; Hwu, Y.; Gajdosik, V.; Margaritondo, G.

    2011-03-30

    Since its invention in 1930, Zernike phase contrast has been a pillar in optical microscopy and more recently in x-ray microscopy, in particular for low-absorption-contrast biological specimens. We experimentally demonstrate that hard-x-ray Zernike microscopy now reaches a lateral resolution below 30?nm while strongly enhancing the contrast, thus opening many new research opportunities in biomedicine and materials science.

  10. Hard x-ray Zernike Microscopy Reaches 30 nm Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.T.; Chu, Y.; Chen, T-Y.; Yi, J.; Lee, W-K.; Wang, C-L.; Kempson, I. M.; Hwu, Y.; Gajdosik, V.; Margaritondo, G.

    2011-03-30

    Since its invention in 1930, Zernike phase contrast has been a pillar in optical microscopy and more recently in x-ray microscopy, in particular for low-absorption-contrast biological specimens. We experimentally demonstrate that hard-x-ray Zernike microscopy now reaches a lateral resolution below 30 nm while strongly enhancing the contrast, thus opening many new research opportunities in biomedicine and materials science.

  11. Naturalness reach of the large hadron collider in minimal supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, Ben C.; Hetherington, James P. J.; Parker, M. Andrew; Webber, Bryan R.

    2000-08-01

    We re-analyse the prospects of discovering supersymmetry at the LHC, in order to re-express coverage in terms of a fine-tuning parameter and to extend the analysis to scalar masses (m0) above 2 TeV. We use minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) unification assumptions for the SUSY breaking parameters. The discovery reach at high m0 is of renewed interest because this region has recently been found to have a focus point, leading to relatively low fine-tuning, and because it remains uncertain how much of the region can be ruled out due to lack of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking. The best fine tuning reach is found in a mono-leptonic channel, where for ?>0, A0 = 0 and tan ? = 10 (within the focus point region), and a top mass of 174 GeV, all points in mSUGRA with m0 < 4000 GeV, with a fine tuning measure up to 210 (500) are covered by the search, where the definition of fine-tuning excludes (includes) the contribution from the top Yukawa coupling. Even for arbitrarily high m0, mSUGRA can be discovered through gaugino events, provided the gaugino mass parameter M1/2 < 460 GeV. In this region, the mono-leptonic channel still provides the best reach.

  12. Physicians helping the underserved: the Reach Out program.

    PubMed

    Scott, H D; Bell, J; Geller, S; Thomas, M

    2000-01-01

    In the current health care environment of competition and market forces, concern has arisen that the classic principle of serving disadvantaged persons may not be fulfilled due to pressures from managed care. Reach Out, a $12 million national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, was developed to recruit leaders from among practicing physicians to organize projects to care for the uninsured and underserved. Physician volunteerism was a key component of all projects. Thirty-nine Reach Out projects were implemented and carried out across the United States, with average funding per project of $300000 distributed over a period of 4 years. Seven model types emerged, the most common of which, the free clinic and the referral network, accounted for two thirds of the total. At the program's conclusion, 199584 patients were enrolled and 11252 physicians recruited. Project execution was more complex than initially supposed, and major progress commonly was not evident until the third or fourth year, but at least two thirds of the projects are likely to continue with local support. With strong physician leadership and a funded administrative core, organized community efforts can develop and sustain an effective program. Programs such as Reach Out cannot solve the national problem of access to health care, but they can make a small but important impact on the number of uninsured and underserved persons without access to health care. PMID:10632287

  13. Difficulty-dependent trajectory planning during target-reaching movements.

    PubMed

    Yuan Yang; Rong Song

    2015-08-01

    This study explored how the difficulty of a task influenced motor control during target-reaching movements. During the experiment, twelve healthy subjects were recruited to perform target-reaching tasks with three different target sizes over three distances as quickly and accurately as possible using their index fingers. There were nine levels of difficulty of the tasks, with a combination of three target sizes and three distances, and the difficulty of the tasks could be measured by Fitts' law in terms of the index of difficulty (ID). The kinematic variables to represent movement performance were peak velocity (Vpeak), percentage time to peak velocity (PTPV), normalized jerk score (NJS) and fApEn (fuzzy approximate entropy). The results showed both distance and target size significantly influenced these parameters with the exception of the effect of the target size on Vpeak. Vpeak and fApEn were only linearly related to the ID when the individual target size across movement distances was considered. And a linear relationship between PTPV or NJS and ID was found. The increase in the difficulty of the task could lead to a shift from feedforward to feedback control by the central nerve system. The findings in this study contribute to an understanding of the underlying motor control during target reaching movements and can be applied as a quantitative method of evaluation in the clinic in the future. PMID:26737824

  14. Compensatory arm reaching strategies after stroke: Induced position analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Waller, Sandy McCombe; Kepple, Tom; Whitall, Jill

    2013-01-01

    After stroke, movement patterns of the upper limb (UL) during functional arm reaching change to accommodate altered constraints. These compensatory movement control strategies do not, however, have a one-to-one mapping with posttraining outcomes. In this study, we quantify arm movement control strategies in unilateral and bilateral reaching tasks using induced position analysis. In addition, we assess how those strategies are associated with UL residual impairments and with functional improvement after a specific bilateral arm training intervention. Twelve individuals with chronic stroke were measured while reaching to a box as part of their pre- and posttesting assessments. Other measurements included the Fugl-Meyer Upper Extremity Assessment (FM), Modified Wolf Motor Function Test (WT), and the University of Maryland Arm Questionnaire for Stroke (UMAQS). We identified arm control strategies that did not differ between unilateral and bilateral tasks but did differ by FM impairment level and by predicted gains in WT but not UMAQS. Increased shoulder relative to elbow moment contribution was associated with less impairment and greater gains of speed in functional tasks. These results suggest that one goal of training to achieve better outcomes may be to decrease the abnormal coupling of the shoulder and elbow. PMID:23516085

  15. Isolating parameter sensitivity in reach scale transient storage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmadel, Noah M.; Neilson, Bethany T.; Heavilin, Justin E.; Wörman, Anders

    2016-03-01

    Parameter sensitivity analyses, although necessary to assess identifiability, may not lead to an increased understanding or accurate representation of transient storage processes when associated parameter sensitivities are muted. Reducing the number of uncertain calibration parameters through field-based measurements may allow for more realistic representations and improved predictive capabilities of reach scale stream solute transport. Using a two-zone transient storage model, we examined the spatial detail necessary to set parameters describing hydraulic characteristics and isolate the sensitivity of the parameters associated with transient storage processes. We represented uncertain parameter distributions as triangular fuzzy numbers and used closed form statistical moment solutions to express parameter sensitivity thus avoiding copious model simulations. These solutions also allowed for the direct incorporation of different levels of spatial information regarding hydraulic characteristics. To establish a baseline for comparison, we performed a sensitivity analysis considering all model parameters as uncertain. Next, we set hydraulic parameters as the reach averages, leaving the transient storage parameters as uncertain, and repeated the analysis. Lastly, we incorporated high resolution hydraulic information assessed from aerial imagery to examine whether more spatial detail was necessary to isolate the sensitivity of transient storage parameters. We found that a reach-average hydraulic representation, as opposed to using detailed spatial information, was sufficient to highlight transient storage parameter sensitivity and provide more information regarding the potential identifiability of these parameters.

  16. Growth hormone and early treatment.

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, F; Cavarzere, P; Gaudino, R

    2015-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) not only for GH deficiency (GHD) but also for other childhood growth disorders with growth failure and/or short stature. GHD is the most frequent endocrine disorder presenting with short stature in childhood. During neonatal period, metabolic effects due to congenital GHD require a prompt replacement therapy to avoid possible life-threatening complications. In childhood and adolescence, growth impairment is the most evident effect of GHD and early treatment has the aim of restore normal growth and to reach normal adult height. We reassume in this review the conditions causing GHD and the diagnostic challenge to reach an early diagnosis, and an early treatment, necessary to obtain the best results. Finally, we summarize results obtained in clinical studies about pediatric patients with GHD treated at an early age, in which a marked early catch-up growth and a normalization of adult height were obtained. PMID:25734895

  17. Substrate Utilization by an Oxalate-Consuming Spirillum Species in Relation to Its Growth in Ozonated Water

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooij, D.; Hijnen, W. A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The nutritional versatility of a vibrio-shaped, oxalate-utilizing isolate, strain NOX, obtained from tap water supplied with low concentrations of formate, glyoxylate, and oxalate, was determined by growth experiments with low-molecular-weight carbon compounds at high (grams per liter) and very low (micrograms per liter) concentrations. The organism, which was identified as a Spirillum species, appeared to be specialized in the utilization of a number of carboxylic acids. Yields of 2.9 106 CFU/?g of oxalate C and 1.2 107 CFU/?g of acetate C were obtained from growth experiments in tap water supplied with various low amounts of either oxalate or acetate. A substrate saturation constant of 0.64 ?M oxalate was calculated for strain NOX from the relationship between growth rate and concentration of added oxalate. Maximum colony counts of strain NOX grown in ozonated water (dosages of 2.0 to 3.2 mg of O3 per liter) were 15 to 20 times larger than the maximum colony counts of strain NOX grown in water before ozonation. Based on the nutritional requirements of strain NOX, it was concluded that carboxylic acids were produced by ozonation. Oxalate concentrations were calculated from the maximum colony counts of strain NOX grown in samples of ozonated water in which a non-oxalate-utilizing strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens had already reached maximum growth. The oxalate concentrations obtained by this procedure ranged from 130 to 220 ?g of C/liter. Images PMID:16346493

  18. Riparian shading and groundwater enhance growth potential for smallmouth bass in Ozark streams.

    PubMed

    Whitledge, Gregory W; Rabeni, Charles F; Annis, Gust; Sowa, Scott P

    2006-08-01

    Moderation of stream temperatures by riparian shading and groundwater are known to promote growth and survival of salmonid fishes, but effects of riparian shade and groundwater on to be growth of warmwater stream fishes are poorly understood or assumed to be negligible. We used stream temperature models to relate shading from riparian vegetation and groundwater inflow to summer water temperatures in Missouri Ozark streams and evaluated effects of summer water temperatures on smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu, growth using a bioenergetics model. Bioenergetics model simulations revealed that adult smallmouth bass in non-spring-fed streams have lower growth potential during summer than fish in spring-fed streams, are subject to mass loss when stream temperatures exceed 27 degrees C, and will likely exhibit greater interannual variation in growth during summer if all growth-influencing factors, other than temperature, are identical between the two stream types. Temperature models indicated that increased riparian shading will expand the longitudinal extent of thermal habitat capable of supporting adult smallmouth bass growth in spring-fed stream reaches when mean daily air temperatures exceed 27 degrees C. Optimum growth temperature (22 degrees C) will be present only in spring-fed streams under these conditions. Potential for increasing shade through riparian restoration is greatest for streams <5 m wide and along north-south reaches of larger streams. However, temperature models also indicated that restoring riparian shading to maximum levels throughout a watershed would increase the total stream mileage capable of supporting positive growth of adult smallmouth bass by only 1-6% when air temperatures are at or near average summer maxima; increases in suitable thermal habitat would be greatest in watersheds with higher spring densities. Riparian management for maintenance or restoration of the thermal habitat of adult smallmouth bass during summer should be focused in areas strongly influenced by groundwater. Restoring riparian shading along spring-fed warmwater streams will likely benefit adult smallmouth bass growth and may ultimately influence population sizes. PMID:16937811

  19. Food intake and growth in Macoma balthica (mollusca) in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, H.

    Groups of Macoma balthica were kept during 4-week periods in an experimental set up at a constant temperature and food concentration. Food concentrations (expressed in particulate organic carbon) for the different groups ranged from 0 to 16 mg CI -1. The experiment was repeated 6 times, viz. in different months, and the temperatures were changed accordingly to correspond with levels found in the field. The rates of food intake, water clearance and growth were followed throughout the experiment. The flagellate Isochrysis galbana served as food. With increasing food concentration all 3 rates (food intake, water clearance and growth) increased up to maximum to decrease again at high food concentrations. Such bell-shaped relationships were observed in all seasons. The dependence of growth on food concentration was similar in all seasons. Zero growth or weight losses were observed at food concentrations below 1.3 mg CI -1, and maximum growth rates were reached at food concentrations between 5 and 7 mg CI -1. The daily maintenance ration amounted to about 1.2% of the body weight. Seasonal differences were observed in the relationships of the rates of both water clearance and food intake with food concentration. During the winter and spring the optimum curves for these relationships reached their maximum at food concentrations of 8 to 10 mg CI -1. During summer and early autumn the optimum curves were shifted to lower food concentrations, around 2 to 4 mg CI -1, probably as an adaptation to low food concentrations observed in the field during these periods.

  20. Maximum practical efficiency of helium temperature refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, R. O.

    An ideal refrigerator using a perfect gas working fluid is defined which gives the efficiency of a refrigerator as a function of compressor and expander efficiency, heat exchanger temperature difference, and heat exchanger pressure drop. Although not suited to detailed hardware design, this approach clearly relates the overall cycle efficiency to component efficiencies. In contrast, computer studies of specific cycles using real fluid properties are usually such that the details tend to overshadow major trends. The results of the study show that in an efficient cycle the major losses are in the compressor and the cold and expansion device. For current compressor and expander efficiencies the maximum practical helium temperature refrigerator efficiency is about 37% of Carnot.

  1. Diffusivity Maximum in a Reentrant Nematic Phase

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Tillmann; Mazza, Marco G.; Schoen, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of confined liquid crystals using the GayBerneKihara model. Upon isobaric cooling, the standard sequence of isotropicnematicsmectic A phase transitions is found. Upon further cooling a reentrant nematic phase occurs. We investigate the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient of the fluid in the nematic, smectic and reentrant nematic phases. We find a maximum in diffusivity upon isobaric cooling. Diffusion increases dramatically in the reentrant phase due to the high orientational molecular order. As the temperature is lowered, the diffusion coefficient follows an Arrhenius behavior. The activation energy of the reentrant phase is found in reasonable agreement with the reported experimental data. We discuss how repulsive interactions may be the underlying mechanism that could explain the occurrence of reentrant nematic behavior for polar and non-polar molecules. PMID:22837730

  2. Estimating missing information by maximum likelihood deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Heintzmann, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    The ability of iteratively constrained maximum likelihood (ML) deconvolution to reconstruct out-of-band information is discussed and exemplified by simulations. The frequency dependent relative energy regain, a novel way of quantifying the reconstruction ability, is introduced. The positivity constraint of ML deconvolution allows reconstructing information outside the spatial frequency bandwidth which is set by the optical system. This is demonstrated for noise-free and noisy data. It is also shown that this property depends on the type of object under investigation. An object is constructed where no significant out-of-band reconstruction is possible. It is concluded that in practical situations the amount of possible out-of-band reconstruction depends on the agreement between reality and the model describing "typical objects" incorporated into the algorithm by appropriate penalty functions. PMID:16914319

  3. Lead in soil: Recommended maximum permissible levels

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, S.; Rosenman, K.D.; Shehata, T.

    1989-06-01

    Lead in soil has been recognized as a public health problem, particularly among children. In recent years, attention has been directed to cumulative adverse effects of lead at low levels of intake. Lead-contaminated soil and dust have been identified as important contributors to blood lead levels. Based on available data on blood lead and lead in soil, an approach has been developed to suggest a permissible level of lead in soil, below which there will be reasonable certainty that adverse health effects will not occur. An acceptable level of 600 ppm of lead in soil suggested as a ''safe'' level would contribute no more than 5 micrograms/dl to total blood lead of children under 12 years of age. Maximum permissible levels of lead in soil have been recommended based on the dose-response relationship of lead in soil and blood lead in children.

  4. Maximum entropy model for business cycle synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Muneepeerakul, Rachata; Azaele, Sandro; Wang, Yougui

    2014-11-01

    The global economy is a complex dynamical system, whose cyclical fluctuations can mainly be characterized by simultaneous recessions or expansions of major economies. Thus, the researches on the synchronization phenomenon are key to understanding and controlling the dynamics of the global economy. Based on a pairwise maximum entropy model, we analyze the business cycle synchronization of the G7 economic system. We obtain a pairwise-interaction network, which exhibits certain clustering structure and accounts for 45% of the entire structure of the interactions within the G7 system. We also find that the pairwise interactions become increasingly inadequate in capturing the synchronization as the size of economic system grows. Thus, higher-order interactions must be taken into account when investigating behaviors of large economic systems.

  5. Approximate maximum likelihood decoding of block codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberger, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate maximum likelihood decoding algorithms, based upon selecting a small set of candidate code words with the aid of the estimated probability of error of each received symbol, can give performance close to optimum with a reasonable amount of computation. By combining the best features of various algorithms and taking care to perform each step as efficiently as possible, a decoding scheme was developed which can decode codes which have better performance than those presently in use and yet not require an unreasonable amount of computation. The discussion of the details and tradeoffs of presently known efficient optimum and near optimum decoding algorithms leads, naturally, to the one which embodies the best features of all of them.

  6. Maximum Frictional Charge Generation on Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle, Carlos; Groop, Ellen; Mantovani, James; Buehler, Martin

    2001-03-01

    The maximum amount of charge that a given surface area can hold is limited by the surrounding environmental conditions such as the atmospheric composition, pressure, humidity, and temperature. Above this charge density limit, the surface will discharge to the atmosphere or to a nearby conductive surface that is at a different electric potential. We have performed experiments using the MECA Electrometer, a flight instrument developed jointly by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA Kennedy Space Center to study the electrostatic properties of the Martian soil. The electrometer contains five types of polymers: fiberglass/epoxy, polycarbonate (Lexan), polytetraflouroethylene (Teflon), Rulon J, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, Lucite). We repeatedly rubbed the polymers with another material until each polymer's charge saturation was determined. We will discuss the correlation of our data with the triboelectric series.

  7. Experimental shock metamorphism of maximum microcline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    A series of recovery experiments are conducted to study the behavior of single-crystal perthitic maximum microcline shock-loaded to a peak pressure of 417 kbar. Microcline is found to deform in a manner similar to quartz and other alkali feldspars. It is observed that shock-induced cleavages occur initially at or slightly below the Hugoniot elastic limit (60-85 kbar), that shock-induced rather than thermal disordering begins above the Hugoniot elastic limit, and that all types of planar elements form parallel to crystallographic planes of low Miller indices. When increasing pressure, it is found that bulk density, refractive indices, and birefringence of the recovered material decrease and approach diaplectic glass values, whereas disappearance and weakening of reflections in Debye-Sherrer patterns are due to disordering of the feldspar lattice.

  8. CLASSY: An adaptive maximum likelihood clustering algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennington, R. K.; Rassbach, M. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The CLASSY clustering method alternates maximum likelihood iterative techniques for estimating the parameters of a mixture distribution with an adaptive procedure for splitting, combining, and eliminating the resultant components of the mixture. The adaptive procedure is based on maximizing the fit of a mixture of multivariate normal distributions to the observed data using its first through fourth central moments. It generates estimates of the number of multivariate normal components in the mixture as well as the proportion, mean vector, and covariance matrix for each component. The basic mathematical model for CLASSY and the actual operation of the algorithm as currently implemented are described. Results of applying CLASSY to real and simulated LANDSAT data are presented and compared with those generated by the iterative self-organizing clustering system algorithm on the same data sets.

  9. Minimum and Maximum against k Lies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Michael; Matouek, Ji?; Okamoto, Yoshio; Zumstein, Philipp

    A neat 1972 result of Pohl asserts that ?3n/2 ?- 2 comparisons are sufficient, and also necessary in the worst case, for finding both the minimum and the maximum of an n-element totally ordered set. The set is accessed via an oracle for pairwise comparisons. More recently, the problem has been studied in the context of the Rnyi-Ulam liar games, where the oracle may give up to k false answers. For large k, an upper bound due to Aigner shows that (k+{O}(sqrt{k}))n comparisons suffice. We improve on this by providing an algorithm with at most (k+1+C)n+{O}(k^3) comparisons for some constant C. The known lower bounds are of the form (k + 1 + c k )n - D, for some constant D, where c 0 = 0.5, c_1=23/32= 0.71875, and c_k={?}(2^{-5k/4}) as k? ?.

  10. The 1988 Solar Maximum Mission event list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Licata, J. P.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Information on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1988 pointed observations is presented. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) gamma ray spectrometer; (2) hard x ray burst spectrometer; (3) flat crystal spectrometers; (4) bent crystal spectrometer; (5) ultraviolet spectrometer polarimeter; and (6) coronagraph/polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) x ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts, or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observation. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from sun center are also included.

  11. The 1989 Solar Maximum Mission event list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Licata, J. P.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    This document contains information on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1989 pointed observations. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) Gamma Ray Spectrometer, (2) Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer, (3) Flat Crystal Spectrometer, (4) Bent Crystal Spectrometer, (5) Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter, and (6) Coronagraph/Polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Satellite (GOES) X-ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observations. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from sun center are also included.

  12. Maximum entropy principle for rarefied polyatomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavić, Milana; Ruggeri, Tommaso; Simić, Srboljub

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that the procedure of maximum entropy principle for the closure of the moments equations for rarefied monatomic gases can be extended also to polyatomic gases. The main difference with respect to the usual procedure is the existence of two hierarchies of macroscopic equations for moments of suitable distribution function, in which the internal energy of a molecule is taken into account. The field equations for 14 moments of the distribution function, which include dynamic pressure, are derived. The entropy and the entropy flux are shown to be a generalization of the ones for classical Grad’s distribution. The results are in perfect agreement with the recent macroscopic approach of extended thermodynamics for real gases.

  13. Maximum entropy method helps study multifractal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-11-01

    Many natural phenomena exhibit scaling behavior, in which parts of the system resemble the whole. Topography is one examplein some landscapes, shapes seen on a small scale look similar to shapes seen at larger scales. Some processes with scaling behavior are multifractal processes, in which the scaling parameters are described by probability distributions. Nieves et al. show that a method known as the maximum entropy method, which has been applied in information theory and statistical mechanics, can be applied generally to study the statistics of multifractal processes. The authors note that the method, which could be applied to a wide variety of geophysical systems, makes it possible to infer information on multifractal processes even beyond scales where observations are available. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL048716, 2011)

  14. The 1980 solar maximum mission event listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speich, D. M.; Nelson, J. J.; Licata, J. P.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    Information is contained on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1980 pointed observations. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) Gamma Ray Spectrometer, (2) Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer, (3) Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer, (4) Flat Crystal Spectrometer, (5) Bent Crystal Spectrometer, (6) Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter, and (7) Coronagraph/Polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) x ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observations. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from Sun center are also included.

  15. A general optimization for maximum terminal velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulpetti, G.

    1982-09-01

    A numerical model is developed to determine the maximum velocity which can be attained by a rocket propulsion system. Particular attention is given to the ratio of active mass, that which can be converted to propulsive energy, to inert mass, which remains after the propulsive energy is expended. Calculations are based on the law of conservation of energy applied to a spaceship with chemical, laser-sail, interstellar ramjet, and annihilation engines. Limits on the exhaust velocity of the thrust system are neglected. Specific attention is given to relativistic calculations involving the annihilation reactions, noting that classical propulsion systems have critical mass values significantly lower than the propulsion required by extra-solar system flight. Numerical results are presented of critical values of propellant which produce an optimal jet speed, which is determined to be a constant.

  16. Emitter frequency refinement based on maximum likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Wang, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Frequency estimation via signal sorting is widely recognized as one of the most practical technologies in signal processing. However, the estimated frequencies via signal sorting may be inaccurate and biased due to signal fluctuation under different emitter working modes, problems of transmitter circuit, environmental noises or certain unknown interference sources. Therefore, it has become an important issue to further analyze and refine signal frequencies after signal sorting. To address the above problem, we have brought forward an iterative frequency refinement method based on maximum likelihood. Iteratively, the initial estimated signal frequency values are refined. Experimental results indicate that the refined signal frequencies are more informative than the initial ones. As another advantage of our method, noises and interference sources could be filtered out simultaneously. The efficiency and flexibility enables our method to apply in a wide application area, i.e., communication, electronic reconnaissance and radar intelligence analysis.

  17. ILP-based maximum likelihood genome scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interest in de novo genome assembly has been renewed in the past decade due to rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies which generate relatively short reads resulting in highly fragmented assemblies consisting of contigs. Additional long-range linkage information is typically used to orient, order, and link contigs into larger structures referred to as scaffolds. Due to library preparation artifacts and erroneous mapping of reads originating from repeats, scaffolding remains a challenging problem. In this paper, we provide a scalable scaffolding algorithm (SILP2) employing a maximum likelihood model capturing read mapping uncertainty and/or non-uniformity of contig coverage which is solved using integer linear programming. A Non-Serial Dynamic Programming (NSDP) paradigm is applied to render our algorithm useful in the processing of larger mammalian genomes. To compare scaffolding tools, we employ novel quantitative metrics in addition to the extant metrics in the field. We have also expanded the set of experiments to include scaffolding of low-complexity metagenomic samples. Results SILP2 achieves better scalability throughg a more efficient NSDP algorithm than previous release of SILP. The results show that SILP2 compares favorably to previous methods OPERA and MIP in both scalability and accuracy for scaffolding single genomes of up to human size, and significantly outperforms them on scaffolding low-complexity metagenomic samples. Conclusions Equipped with NSDP, SILP2 is able to scaffold large mammalian genomes, resulting in the longest and most accurate scaffolds. The ILP formulation for the maximum likelihood model is shown to be flexible enough to handle metagenomic samples. PMID:25253180

  18. Maximum magnitude in the Lower Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneste, Kris; Merino, Miguel; Stein, Seth; Vleminckx, Bart; Brooks, Eddie; Camelbeeck, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Estimating Mmax, the assumed magnitude of the largest future earthquakes expected on a fault or in an area, involves large uncertainties. No theoretical basis exists to infer Mmax because even where we know the long-term rate of motion across a plate boundary fault, or the deformation rate across an intraplate zone, neither predict how strain will be released. As a result, quite different estimates can be made based on the assumptions used. All one can say with certainty is that Mmax is at least as large as the largest earthquake in the available record. However, because catalogs are often short relative to the average recurrence time of large earthquakes, larger earthquakes than anticipated often occur. Estimating Mmax is especially challenging within plates, where deformation rates are poorly constrained, large earthquakes are rarer and variable in space and time, and often occur on previously unrecognized faults. We explore this issue for the Lower Rhine Graben seismic zone where the largest known earthquake, the 1756 Dren earthquake, has magnitude 5.7 and should occur on average about every 400 years. However, paleoseismic studies suggest that earthquakes with magnitudes up to 6.7 occurred during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. What to assume for Mmax is crucial for critical facilities like nuclear power plants that should be designed to withstand the maximum shaking in 10,000 years. Using the observed earthquake frequency-magnitude data, we generate synthetic earthquake histories, and sample them over shorter intervals corresponding to the real catalog's completeness. The maximum magnitudes appearing most often in the simulations tend to be those of earthquakes with mean recurrence time equal to the catalog length. Because catalogs are often short relative to the average recurrence time of large earthquakes, we expect larger earthquakes than observed to date to occur. In a next step, we will compute hazard maps for different return periods based on the synthetic catalogs, in order to determine the influence of underestimating Mmax.

  19. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  20. Training-induced changes in the pattern of triceps to biceps activation during reaching tasks after chronic and severe stroke.

    PubMed

    Barker, Ruth Nancy; Brauer, Sandra; Carson, Richard

    2009-07-01

    This exploratory study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms that contributed to improvements in upper limb function following a novel training program. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to examine training-induced changes in the pattern of triceps and biceps activation during reaching tasks in stroke survivors with severe paresis in the chronic stage of recovery. The EMG data were obtained in the context of a single blind randomised clinical trial conducted with 42 stroke survivors with minimal upper limb muscle activity and who were more than 6 months post-stroke. Of the 33 participants who completed the study, 10 received training of reaching using a non-robotic upper limb training device, the SMART Arm, with EMG triggered functional electrical stimulation (EMG-stim), 13 received training of reaching using the SMART Arm alone, and 10 received no intervention. Each intervention group engaged in 12 1-h training sessions over a 4-week period. Clinical and laboratory measures of upper limb function were administered prior to training (0 weeks), at completion (4 weeks) and 2 months (12 weeks) after training. The primary outcome measure was 'upper arm function' which is Item 6 of the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS). Laboratory measures consisted of two multijoint reaching tasks to assess 'maximum isometric force' and 'maximum distance reached'. Surface EMG was used to monitor triceps brachii and biceps brachii during the two reaching tasks. To provide a comparison with normal values, seven healthy adults were tested on one of the reaching tasks according to the same procedure. Study findings demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in upper limb function for stroke participants in the two training groups compared to those who received no training however no difference was found between the two training groups. For the reaching tasks, all stroke participants, when compared to normal healthy adults, exhibited lower triceps and biceps activation and a lower ratio of triceps to biceps activation. Following training, stroke participants demonstrated increased triceps activation and an increased ratio of triceps to biceps activation for the task that was trained. Better performance was associated with greater triceps activation and a higher ratio of triceps to biceps activation. The findings suggest that increased activation of triceps as an agonist and an improved coordination between triceps and biceps could have mediated the observed changes in arm function. The changes in EMG activity were small relative to the changes in arm function indicating that factors, such as the contribution of other muscles of reaching, may also be implicated. PMID:19504088

  1. Fe XIV Synoptic Observations as a Predictor for the Time of Solar Maximum in Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altrock, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In 2012 (Am. Geophys. Union Fall Meeting, Abstract SH12A-05) and 2013 (Solar Phys. Online First, DOI 10.1007/s11207-012-0216-1) Altrock discussed the status of Cycle 24 relative to synoptic observations ofFe XIV from Sacramento Peak (http://nsosp.nso.edu/corona). He found that using earlier cycles, in which solar maximum occurred when Fe XIV emission features associated with the classic "Rush to the Poles" reached latitudes 76 ± 2 degrees, the *northern hemisphere* Fe XIV features predicted a maximum in the north at 2011.6 ± 0.3. This was confirmed by hemispheric sunspot numbers from SIDC (http://www.sidc.be/silso/) and sunspot areas from NASA MSFC http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/greenwch.shtml). The earlier papersalso noted that southern high-latitude Fe XIV emission indicated the possibility of a southern maximum early in 2014. At low latitudes, earlier cycles reached solar maximum when Fe XIV emission features reached latitudes 20 ± 1.7 degrees. In 2013, these features were at 21 and 15 degrees in the north, again indicating that northern maximum had already occurred. In the south, the Fe XIV features were at 24 degrees. Gopalswamy et al. (2012, Ap. J. Let. 750:L42) come to similar conclusions from a study of microwave brightness and prominence eruptions. This paper will extend the previous studies up to 2014 to include the recent extraordinary surge of activity in the southern hemisphere. In particular we will examine in more detail the relationship between hemispheric Fe XIV emission features and both global and hemispheric sunspot numbers to see (i) if the previous studies correctly predicted the times of hemispheric solar maxima and (ii) what we can learn from the inclusion of two more years of data. The observations used herein are the result of a cooperative program of the Air Force Research Laboratory and the National Solar Observatory.

  2. Fe XIV Synoptic Observations as a Predictor for the Time of Solar Maximum in Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altrock, Ph D., R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In 2012 (Am. Geophys. Union Fall Meeting, Abstract SH12A-05) and 2013 (Solar Phys. Online First, DOI 10.1007/s11207-012-0216-1) Altrock discussed the status of Cycle 24 relative to synoptic observations of Fe XIV from Sacramento Peak (http://nsosp.nso.edu/corona). He found that using earlier cycles, in which solar maximum occurred when Fe XIV emission features associated with the classic "Rush to the Poles" reached latitudes 76° ± 2°, the northern hemisphere Fe XIV features predicted a maximum in the north at 2011.6 ± 0.3. This was confirmed by hemispheric sunspot numbers from SIDC (http://www.sidc.be/silso/) and sunspot areas from NASA MSFC (http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/greenwch.shtml). The earlier papers also noted that southern high-latitude Fe XIV emission indicated the possibility of a southern maximum early in 2014. At low latitudes, earlier cycles reached solar maximum when Fe XIV emission features reached latitudes 20° ± 1.7°. In 2013, these features were at 21° and 15° in the north, again indicating that northern maximum had already occurred. In the south, the Fe XIV features were at 24°. Gopalswamy et al. (2012, Ap. J. Let. 750:L42) came to similar conclusions from a study of microwave brightness and prominence eruptions. This paper will extend the previous studies up to 2014 to include the recent extraordinary surge of activity in the southern hemisphere. In particular we will examine in more detail the relationship between hemispheric Fe XIV emission features and both global and hemispheric sunspot numbers to see (i) if the previous studies correctly predicted the times of hemispheric solar maxima and (ii) what we can learn from the inclusion of two more years of data. The observations used herein are the result of a cooperative program of the Air Force Research Laboratory and the National Solar Observatory.

  3. Ethylene and the Growth of Rice Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Satler, Sergio O.; Kende, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Etiolated whole rice seedlings enclosed in sealed vials produced ethylene at a rate of 0.9 picomole per hour per seedling. When 2-centimeter-long shoots were subdivided into 5-millimeter-long sections, the sections containing the tip of the shoot evolved 37% of the total ethylene with the remaining 63% being produced along a gradient decreasing to the base of the shoot. The tip of the coleoptile also had the highest level of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and of the ethylene-forming enzyme activity. Ethylene is one of the factors controlling coleoptile elongation. Decapitation of the seedling reduced ethylene evolution to one-third its original level and inhibited coleoptile growth. In short-term experiments, the growth rate of decapitated seedlings was restored to almost that of intact seedlings by application of ethylene at a concentration of 10 microliters per liter. Apart from ethylene, O2 also participates in the control of coleoptile growth. When rice seedlings were grown in a gas mixture of N2 and O2, the length of the coleoptiles reached a maximum at a concentration of 2.5% O2. Lower and higher concentrations of O2 reduced coleoptile growth. The effect of exogenous ethylene on coleoptile growth was also O2 dependent. PMID:16664369

  4. Extensive glaciation in Transbaikalia, Siberia, at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margold, Martin; Jansen, John D.; Gurinov, Artem L.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Fink, David; Preusser, Frank; Reznichenko, Natalya V.; Mifsud, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Successively smaller glacial extents have been proposed for continental Eurasia during the stadials of the last glacial period leading up to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At the same time the large mountainous region east of Lake Baikal, Transbaikalia, has remained unexplored in terms of glacial chronology despite clear geomorphological evidence of substantial past glaciations. We have applied cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating and optically stimulated luminescence to establish the first quantitative glacial chronology for this region. Based on eighteen exposure ages from five moraine complexes, we propose that large mountain ice fields existed in the Kodar and Udokan mountains during Oxygen Isotope Stage 2, commensurate with the global LGM. These ice fields fed valley glaciers (>100 km in length) reaching down to the Chara Depression between the Kodar and Udokan mountains and to the valley of the Vitim River northwest of the Kodar Mountains. Two of the investigated moraines date to the Late Glacial, but indications of incomplete exposure among some of the sampled boulders obscure the specific details of the post-LGM glacial history. In addition to the LGM ice fields in the highest mountains of Transbaikalia, we report geomorphological evidence of a much more extensive, ice-cap type glaciation at a time that is yet to be firmly resolved.

  5. Maximum gravitational-wave energy emissible in magnetar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Corsi, Alessandra; Owen, Benjamin J.

    2011-05-15

    Recent searches of gravitational-wave data raise the question of what maximum gravitational-wave energies could be emitted during gamma-ray flares of highly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars). The highest energies ({approx}10{sup 49} erg) predicted so far come from a model [K. Ioka, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 327, 639 (2001), http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001MNRAS.327..639I] in which the internal magnetic field of a magnetar experiences a global reconfiguration, changing the hydromagnetic equilibrium structure of the star and tapping the gravitational potential energy without changing the magnetic potential energy. The largest energies in this model assume very special conditions, including a large change in moment of inertia (which was observed in at most one flare), a very high internal magnetic field, and a very soft equation of state. Here we show that energies of 10{sup 48}-10{sup 49} erg are possible under more generic conditions by tapping the magnetic energy, and we note that similar energies may also be available through cracking of exotic solid cores. Current observational limits on gravitational waves from magnetar fundamental modes are just reaching these energies and will beat them in the era of advanced interferometers.

  6. Attenuating reaches and the regional flood response of an urbanizing drainage basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Gillespie, Daniel F.; Smith, James A.; Bates, Paul D.

    The Charlotte, North Carolina metropolitan area has experienced extensive urban and suburban growth and sharply increasing trends in the magnitude and frequency of flooding. The hydraulics and hydrology of flood response in the region are examined through a combination of numerical modeling studies and diagnostic analyses of paired discharge observations from upstream-downstream gaging stations. The regional flood response is shown to strongly reflect urbanization effects, which increase flood peaks and decrease response times, and geologically controlled attenuating reaches, which decrease flood peaks and increase lag times. Attenuating reaches are characterized by systematic changes in valley bottom geometry and longitudinal profile. The morphology of the fluvial system is controlled by the bedrock geology, with pronounced changes occurring at or near contacts between intrusive igneous and metamorphic rocks. Analyses of wave celerity and flood peak attenuation over a range of discharge values for an 8.3 km valley bottom section of Little Sugar Creek are consistent with Knight and Shiono's characterization of the variation of flood wave velocity from in-channel conditions to valley bottom full conditions. The cumulative effect of variation in longitudinal profile, expansions and contractions of the valley bottom, floodplain roughness and sub-basin flood response is investigated using a two-dimensional, depth-averaged, finite element hydrodynamic model coupled with a distributed hydrologic model. For a 10.1 km stream reach of Briar Creek, with drainage area ranging from 13 km 2 at the upstream end of the reach to 49 km 2 at the downstream end, it is shown that flood response reflects a complex interplay of hydrologic and hydraulic processes on hillslopes and valley bottoms.

  7. Historical Site Assessment: Select Hanford Reach National Monument Lands --

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G. ); Dirkes, Roger L. ); Poston, Ted M. ); Hanf, Robert W. )

    2003-07-31

    Consistent with its current mission, the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) plans to transfer ownership of large tracts of the Hanford Site in the next 3 to 5 years. Specifically, DOE-RL plans to transfer ownership of a large portion of the Hanford Reach National Monument to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Before DOE can transfer ownership of these tracts, a radiological clearance of the lands must be performed. Fluor Hanford, Inc., (FHI) is responsible for the radiological clearance for DOE-RL. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is supporting FHI on this effort through various work agreements.

  8. Defining a controller architecture for the Long-Reach Manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E.

    1994-06-01

    To draft a procurement specification for the Long-Reach Manipulator (LRM), the benefits and limitations of the various robotic control system architectures available need to be determined. This report identifies and describes the advantages and potential disadvantages of using an open control system versus a closed (or proprietary) system, focusing on integration of interfaces for sensors, end effectors, tooling, and operator interfaces. In addition, the various controls methodologies of several recent systems are described. Finally, the reasons behind the recommendation to procure an open control system are discussed.

  9. [Kinematic study of reaching-grasping movements in the monkey].

    PubMed

    Fogassi, L; Gallese, V; Gentilucci, M; Chieffi, S; Rizzolatti, G

    1991-07-01

    Kinematics of reaching-grasping movement towards stimuli of three different sizes located at two different distances were studied in one monkey (Macaca nemestrina). Transport and manipulation components were analyzed using the ELITE system. Transport time, peak velocity and deceleration phase of velocity were influenced by stimulus size, whilst acceleration phase remained unmodified. Peak velocity clearly increased with distance, while transport time remained constant (isochrony ). The main parameters of manipulation component were all influenced by stimulus size but they did not vary with distance. A comparison with kinematic data obtained from human subjects was made. PMID:1818597

  10. East Ohio gas 'bridges' service to reach new customers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    A lift bridge across the Cuyahoga River at the eastern end of Whiskey Island provided the most feasible route to five new industrial customers for East Ohio Gas Co. in Cleveland. Previously considered ''unpipeable'', the island was reached by building a line along the stationary bridgework 125 ft above the bridge. The 6-in pipe is protected by a heat-fused epoxy coating; welded joints were covered in the field with heat-shrink sleeves. The line is fully electrically insulated and protected from lightning.

  11. Inverted tapered casing string for a shallow, long reach well

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Exxon Co. U.S.A. recently drilled and completed a shallow, long-reach Gulf of Mexico (GOM) well with a measured/true-vertical depth ratio (MD/TVD) of 2.95. Critical aspects of the planning phase included designing casing and drillstrings. Drag-modeling revealed that, as an alternative to buoyancy assist, designing the production casing as an inverted tapered casing string would enable running it to bottom successfully. By incorporating this design, trip-profile modeling revealed a high probability for casing the production hole with a single string of casing, thereby eliminating the need for a liner.

  12. Disappointment Reach, Australia as seen from STS-67 Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A nearly vertical view of Disappointment Reach and surroundings. Ripple-like patterns extending at right angles to the tidal flow can be discerned on shoals. Relict sand dune patterns, crests unvegetated, are evident on the western side of the estuary. Red mud brought down the Mooramel River on the east side of the estuary does extend into the shallow water of the inter-tidal lagoons. Most of the light-colored water along the coast, represents shoals of lime sediment. Patterns of sediment distribution by tides, waves, streams, and wind combine to create a complex and colorful scene.

  13. Open Learning in India: Evolution, Diversification and Reaching Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Ramesh C.

    2005-01-01

    Distance education has a history of over four decades in India. There has been a vast growth in the number of learners who need education and thus also the corresponding channels of providing education. Due to the constraints of the traditional educational sector, open and distance learning has been found to be a workable alternative strategy in

  14. Reaching Your Development Goals. An Ideas into Action Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, Cynthia D.; Martineau, Jennifer W.

    Current research and practice suggest that those who commit to pursuing goals immediately following a feedback experience are more likely to capitalize on their strengths and set a productive path for growth. Any intentional effort to learn, grow, and change involves seeking challenging assignments, training for targeted skills, and developmental

  15. Near-infrared light curves of Type Ia supernovae: studying properties of the second maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, S.; Leibundgut, B.; Spyromilio, J.; Maguire, K.

    2015-04-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been proposed to be much better distance indicators at near-infrared (NIR) compared to optical wavelengths - the effect of dust extinction is expected to be lower and it has been shown that SNe Ia behave more like `standard candles' at NIR wavelengths. To better understand the physical processes behind this increased uniformity, we have studied the Y, J and H-filter light curves of 91 SNe Ia from the literature. We show that the phases and luminosities of the first maximum in the NIR light curves are extremely uniform for our sample. The phase of the second maximum, the late-phase NIR luminosity and the optical light-curve shape are found to be strongly correlated, in particular more luminous SNe Ia reach the second maximum in the NIR filters at a later phase compared to fainter objects. We also find a strong correlation between the phase of the second maximum and the epoch at which the SN enters the Lira law phase in its optical colour curve (epochs ˜ 15 to 30 d after B-band maximum). The decline rate after the second maximum is very uniform in all NIR filters. We suggest that these observational parameters are linked to the nickel and iron mass in the explosion, providing evidence that the amount of nickel synthesized in the explosion is the dominating factor shaping the optical and NIR appearance of SNe Ia.

  16. Unsteady-state transfer of impurities during crystal growth of sucrose in sugarcane solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, P. M.; Ferreira, A.; Polanco, S.; Rocha, F.; Damas, A. M.; Rein, P.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we present growth rate data of sucrose crystals in the presence of impurities that can be used by both sugar technologists and crystal growth scientists. Growth rate curves measured in a pilot-scale evaporative crystallizer suggest a period of slow growth that follows the seeding of crystals into supersaturated technical solutions. The observed trend was enhanced by adding typical sugarcane impurities such as starch, fructose or dextran to the industrial syrups. Maximum growth rates of sucrose resulted at intermediate rather than high supersaturation levels in the presence of the additives. The effects of the additives on the sucrose solubility and sucrose mass transfer in solution were taken into account to explain the observed crystal growth kinetics. A novel mechanism was identified of unsteady-state adsorption of impurities at the crystal surface and their gradual replacement by the crystallizing solute towards the equilibrium occupation of the active sites for growth. Specifically designed crystallization experiments at controlled supersaturation confirmed this mechanism by showing increasing crystal growth rates with time until reaching a steady-state value for a given supersaturation level and impurity content.

  17. Linear increase in cell volume during the growth cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Kubitschek, H.E.; Clay, K.

    1985-01-01

    Classical observations on the growth of cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe indicate that cell length and volume increase to a maximum value, which is reached about three-quarters of the way through the growth cycle, followed by a constant volume plateau. The authors have reexamined the growth of these cells by phase microscopy. When growth conditions were perturbed by inoculating cells at high density, in the presence of contaminant, or upon agar slips containing the growth medium in 4% agar, all cells grew in the classical pattern. But, at smaller agar concentrations and lower cell densities, many cells grew at a constant rate throughout the entire cell cycle. Also, the frequency of this linear pattern of cell growth increased as growth perturbations were reduced. They interpret these results as evidence for a sensitivity of this microorganism to perturbations of steady-state growth. The constant rate of volume increase throughout the cell cycle in unperturbed cells, when considered along with Mitchison's earlier results for constant dry mass increase, suggests that the buoyant densities of these cells remain constant during the entire cell cycle.

  18. Studies on apple and blueberry fruit constituents: do the polyphenols reach the colon after ingestion?

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kathrin; Kraus, Michael; Scheppach, Wolfgang; Ackermann, Matthias; Ridder, Friederike; Richling, Elke

    2006-04-01

    The aim of our studies was to determine the amount of polyphenols reaching the colon after oral intake of apple juice and blueberries. After a polyphenol-free diet healthy ileostomy volunteers consumed a polyphenol-rich cloudy apple juice while others consumed anthocyanin-rich blueberries. Ileostomy effluent was collected and polyphenols were identified using HPLC-DAD as well as HPLC-ESI-MS/MS; quantification was performed with HPLC-DAD. Most of the orally administered apple polyphenols were absorbed from or metabolized in the small intestine. Between 0 and 33% of the oral dose was recovered in the ileostomy bags with a maximum of excretion after 2 h. A higher amount of the blueberry anthocyanins under study (up to 85%, depending on the sugar moiety) were determined in the ileostomy bags and therefore would reach the colon under physiological circumstances. Such structure-related availability has to be considered when polyphenols are used in model systems to study potential preventive effects in colorectal diseases. PMID:16548015

  19. Transient Storage Parameterization of Wetland-dominated Stream Reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilderotter, S. M.; Lightbody, A.; Kalnejais, L. H.; Wollheim, W. M.

    2014-12-01

    Current understanding of the importance of transient storage in fluvial wetlands is limited. Wetlands that have higher connectivity to the main stream channel are important because they have the potential to retain more nitrogen within the river system than wetlands that receive little direct stream discharge. In this study, we investigated how stream water accesses adjacent fluvial wetlands in New England coastal watersheds to improve parameterization in network-scale models. Break through curves of Rhodamine WT were collected for eight wetlands in the Ipswich and Parker (MA) and Lamprey River (NH) watersheds, USA. The curves were inverse modeled using STAMMT-L to optimize the connectivity and size parameters for each reach. Two approaches were tested, a single dominant storage zone and a range of storage zones represented using a power-law distribution of storage zone connectivity. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to relate transient storage parameters to stream discharge, area, length-to-width ratio, and reach slope. Resulting regressions will enable more accurate parameterization of surface water transient storage in network-scale models.

  20. Integrated testing strategy (ITS) for bioaccumulation assessment under REACH.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Anna; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Benfentati, Emilio; Nendza, Monika; Segner, Helmut; Fernndez, Alberto; Khne, Ralph; Franco, Antonio; Paun, Eduard; Schrmann, Gerrit

    2014-08-01

    REACH (registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals) regulation requires that all the chemicals produced or imported in Europe above 1 tonne/year are registered. To register a chemical, physicochemical, toxicological and ecotoxicological information needs to be reported in a dossier. REACH promotes the use of alternative methods to replace, refine and reduce the use of animal (eco)toxicity testing. Within the EU OSIRIS project, integrated testing strategies (ITSs) have been developed for the rational use of non-animal testing approaches in chemical hazard assessment. Here we present an ITS for evaluating the bioaccumulation potential of organic chemicals. The scheme includes the use of all available data (also the non-optimal ones), waiving schemes, analysis of physicochemical properties related to the end point and alternative methods (both in silico and in vitro). In vivo methods are used only as last resort. Using the ITS, in vivo testing could be waived for about 67% of the examined compounds, but bioaccumulation potential could be estimated on the basis of non-animal methods. The presented ITS is freely available through a web tool. PMID:24806447