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Sample records for reaction zone formations

  1. Fluid pressure and reaction zone formation at a lithological interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Chemical composition variations in reaction zones between two distinct lithologies are generally interpreted in terms of chemical potential gradients and diffusion process. Concentration profiles can then be used to quantify the species diffusion coefficients or the time scale of geological events. However, chemical potential gradients are also functions of temperature and pressure and local variations of these parameters can thus potentially modify the diffusion process. In northern Corsica, a centimeter scale reaction zone formed under blueschist conditions at a serpentinite - marble contact of sedimentary origin. Three sub-zones having chemical compositions evolving from one rock end-member to another divide the reaction zone along sharp interfaces. At the reaction zone - marble interface, marble decarbonation occurs to form wollastonite and carbonaceous matter. Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction and the respective increase in density of 25 % and 7 % in the bulk rock and in the garnet minerals are interpreted as records of a pressure gradient during reaction zone formation. Moreover, the formation of a volatile-free sub-zone in the reaction zone from reaction between the H2O-bearing serpentinite and the CO2-bearing marble released fluids at the contact. The impact of such a release on the fluid pressure was modelled by considering the effects of both the rock compaction and the transport of fluid by hydraulic diffusion. Modelling results indicates that > 0.5 GPa fluid overpressure can be generated at the contact if devolatilization rates are of the order of the one experimentally measured (> 10-5 kg of fluid/m3 of rock/s). The resulting pressure gradient is of the order of magnitude of the one necessary to counter-balance the effect on chemical potential of the chemical composition variations across the contact. Finally, after the reaction has run to completion, the model predicts that fluid rapidly diffuses away from the interface which thus stops

  2. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation due to neighboring nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David P.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Hooper, Ryan J.; Manuel, Michelle V.

    2015-09-01

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. Much of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To enhance the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical model for the purpose of evaluating new foil-substrate combinations for screening and optimization. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and different alloys.

  3. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  4. Detonation Reaction Zones in Condensed Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2005-07-14

    Experimental measurements using nanosecond time resolved embedded gauges and laser interferometric techniques, combined with Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich--von Neumann--Doring (NEZND) theory and Ignition and Growth reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling, have revealed the average pressure/particle velocity states attained in reaction zones of self-sustaining detonation waves in several solid and liquid explosives. The time durations of these reaction zone processes is discussed for explosives based on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitromethane, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), triaminitrinitrobenzene(TATB) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  5. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  6. Three zones for illite formation during burial diagenesis and metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    Reinterpretation of published data for shale cuttings from the Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin identifies three reaction zones for illite formation with increasing depth for well CWRU6. In a shallow zone (1.85 to 3 km), non-expanding illite-like layers formed primarily by the coalescence of smectite 2:1 layers around interlayer K+. In a middle zone (3 to 4 km), illite crystals neoformed from solution as coarser K-bearing phases and smectite were dissolved by organic acids. In the deepest zone (>4 km), illite recrystallized as less stable illite crystals dissolved, and more stable illite crystals grew during mineral ripening. -from Author

  7. Predicting km-scale shear zone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbi, Christopher; Culshaw, Nicholas; Shulman, Deborah; Foley, Maura; Marsh, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Because km-scale shear zones play a first-order role in lithospheric kinematics, accurate conceptual and numerical models of orogenic development require predicting when and where they form. Although a strain-based algorithm in the upper crust for weakening due to faulting appears to succeed (e.g., Koons et al., 2010, doi:10.1029/2009TC002463), a comparable general rule for the viscous crust remains unestablished. Here we consider two aspects of the geological argument for a similar algorithm in the viscous regime, namely (1) whether predicting km-scale shear zone development based on a single parameter (such as strain or shear heating) is reasonable; and (2) whether lithologic variability inherent in most orogenic systems precludes a simple predictive rule. A review of tectonically significant shear zones worldwide and more detailed investigations in the Central Gneiss belt of the Ontario segment of the Grenville Province reveals that most km-scale shear zones occur at lithological boundaries and involve mass transfer, but have fairly little else in common. As examples, the relatively flat-lying Twelve Mile Bay shear zone in the western Central Gneiss belt bounds the Parry Sound domain and is likely the product of both localized anatexis and later retrograde hydration with attendant metamorphism. Moderately dipping shear zones in granitoids of the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone apparently resulted from cooperation among several complementary microstructural processes, such as grain size reduction, enhanced diffusion, and a small degree of metamorphic reaction. Localization into shear zones requires the operation of some spatially restricted processes such as stress concentration, metamorphism/fluid access, textural evolution, and thermal perturbation. All of these could be due in part to strain, but not necessarily linearly related to strain. Stress concentrations, such as those that form at rheological boundaries, may be sufficient to nucleate high strain

  8. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation in tin-bismuth alloys due to nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hooper, R. J.; Davis, C. G.; Johns, P. M.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Nino, J. C.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-06-26

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. In this study, most of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To improve the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical modelmore » for the purpose of predicting heat affected zone size in substrate materials. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and alloys from the Sn-Bi binary system. To accomplish this, phenomenological models for predicting the variation of physical properties (i.e., thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity) with temperature and composition in the Sn-Bi system were utilized using literature data.« less

  9. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation in tin-bismuth alloys due to nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, R. J.; Davis, C. G.; Johns, P. M.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Nino, J. C.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-06-01

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. Most of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To improve the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical model for the purpose of predicting heat affected zone size in substrate materials. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and alloys from the Sn-Bi binary system. To accomplish this, phenomenological models for predicting the variation of physical properties (i.e., thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity) with temperature and composition in the Sn-Bi system were utilized using literature data.

  10. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation in tin-bismuth alloys due to nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, R. J.; Davis, C. G.; Johns, P. M.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Nino, J. C.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-06-26

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. In this study, most of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To improve the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical model for the purpose of predicting heat affected zone size in substrate materials. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and alloys from the Sn-Bi binary system. To accomplish this, phenomenological models for predicting the variation of physical properties (i.e., thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity) with temperature and composition in the Sn-Bi system were utilized using literature data.

  11. Diamond Formation in association with Deep Mantle Dehydration Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, B.

    2009-12-01

    2SiO4 with and fPer + mpv indicate the preservation of UM/LM boundary reaction, which from experimental data is expected to be sharply constrained in depth, though the presence of H2O will broaden the reaction zone due to the potential stability of hydrous ringwoodite. Considerations of the preservation of hydrous peridotitic assemblages in subduction zones (Komabayashi, 2006, AGU monograph), show that an initially cool subducted slab may preserve hydrous assemblages to the lower part of the upper mantle and into the lower mantle. Here stagnation and warming of the slab may cause dehydration with the formation of fluids/melts which provide the potential location for diamond formation. At the top of the Transition Zone, Bercovici and Karato (2003, Nature 245) have suggested the existence of a melt zone. The location of this melt zone at its intersection with the upper surface of a subducting slab, provides an ideal location for the crystallisation of the majorite assemblages from around the top of the Transition Zone. This also accords with the crustal carbon isotope signatures in the host diamonds and the wide variations in REE abundances in the majorites. Deep diamond inclusions provide strong evidence for dehydration zones near the top and bottom of the Transition Zone.

  12. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOEpatents

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  13. Detonation Reaction Zone Measurements of PBX 9501 and PBX 9502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Samuel; Short, Mark; Jackson, Scott

    2013-06-01

    Explosives are often confined by inert materials. During detonation, the high pressures associated with the detonation reaction zone and expansion of products induce motion in the confiner. Classical programmed burn models for conventional high explosives (CHEs) performance do not aim to accurately capture the contribution to CHE drive from the short (100-200 micron) detonation reaction zone, as the drive is dominated by expansion of detonation products. However, the reaction zone lengths of insensitive (millimeter-scale) and non-ideal explosives (millimeter-to-centimeter-scale) are long enough that a significant contribution to the HE work on the confiner occurs within the reaction zone. Thus accurate prediction of the reaction zone flow structure and mechanical state is crucial to accurately model the motion of confiners driven by insensitive and non-ideal explosives. In this work, we have measured particle velocity profiles of detonation reaction zones in PBX 9501 and PBX 9502 slab geometries at the breakout surface using PDV imaging through LiF windows. We compare this data to model predictions in the slab geometry using the Wescott-Stewart-Davis reactive burn model and comment on the model performance.

  14. Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Xie, Xueying; Miller, David Scott

    2009-07-07

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

  15. Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K.

    2008-07-01

    Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

  16. Stability of sharp reaction fronts in porous rocks and implications for non-sharp reaction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangen, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    The flow of reactive fluids in the subsurface, like for instance acids, may create reaction fronts. A sharp reaction front is an idealization of the narrow zone where the reaction takes place. Narrow reaction zones are studied with a one-component reaction transport model, where a first order reaction changes the porosity. The porosity field is coupled to the permeability field, where an increasing porosity leads to an increasing permeability. Therefore, the reaction has a feed-back on the flow field. We have derived 1D approximate solutions for the change in concentration and porosity across the reaction zone. These solutions are used to derive a condition for reaction fronts to be narrow. The condition gives a minimum reaction rate necessary for 90% of the reaction to be restricted to the given area. Sharp fronts are idealizations of narrow fronts that are more amendable for analytical treatment. A condition has recently been derived for the stability of sharp reaction fronts in homogeneous porous medium using linear stability analysis. The condition gives that a perturbation of a flat reaction front of any wave-length becomes unstable if the permeability behind the front increases. The front instability grows faster for short wave lengths than for long wave lengths. Similarly, the perturbations of the front will die out if the permeability behind the front decreases, and short wave length perturbations will die out faster than long wave length perturbations. It is a condition that applies for both 2D and 3D porous media. Numerical experiments are shown that demonstrate the front stability criterion, when the fronts are narrow, but not sharp. The sharp front approximation turns out to be useful for the interpretation of reactions that are not sufficiently fast to give narrow reaction zones, when the reaction alters the porosity- and the permeability fields. Dissolution is an important example of reactions that increase the porosity and therefore the permeability

  17. A library of prompt detonation reaction zone data

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Tables are given listing literature data that allows calculation of sonic reaction zones at or near steady-state for promptly detonating explosive cylinders. The data covers homogeneous, heterogeneous, composite, inorganic and binary explosives and allows comparison across the entire explosive field. Table 1 lists detonation front curvatures. Table 2 lists Size Effect data, i.e. the change of detonation velocity with cylinder radius. Table 3 lists failure radii and detonation velocities. Table 4 lists explosive compositions. A total of 51 references dating back into the 1950`s are given. Calculated reaction zones, radii of curvature and growth rate coefficients are listed.

  18. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: Mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface.

  19. Audience Reactions to Two Visual Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Richard David

    One hundred undergraduate business students completed a questionnaire designed to determine their reactions to a traditional and a "flashier" textbook format. Before completing the questionnaire, subjects spent several minutes examining two business textbooks--one an older textbook with black ink on white paper, narrow margins, and few…

  20. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbin, Laura B.; Winstanley, Henry F.; Mitchell, Sarah L.; Fowler, Andrew C.; Sander, Graham C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front.

  1. Fluid-rock reaction weakening of fault zones

    SciTech Connect

    Wintsch, R.P.; Christoffersen, R.; Kronenberg, A.K.

    1995-07-10

    The presence of weak phyllosilicates may explain the low shear strengths of fault zones if they define well-developed fabrics. The growth of phyllosilicates is favored in meteoric water-dominated granitic fault systems, where mineral-aqueous fluid equilibria predict that modal phyllosilicate will increase via feldspar replacement reactions. In deeper, more alkaline, rock-dominated regimes, the reactions reverse, and feldspars tend to replace phyllosilicates. In Mg-rich mafic rocks, however, phyllosilicates (chlorite, biotite) can replace stronger framework and chain silicates in both shallower (<{approximately}10 km) meteoric H{sub 2}O-dominated and in deeper, alkaline, rock-dominated regimes. Where these phyllosilicates precipitate in active fault zones, they contribute directly to reaction softening. Because low-temperature deformation of phyllosilicates is not governed by frictional processes alone but can occur by pressure-independent dislocation glide, the strength of phyllosilicate-rich fault rocks can be low at all depths. Low strain rate creep during interseismic periods can align phyllosilicate grains in foliated gouge and phyllonites. Where preferred orientations are strong and contiguity of phyllosilicates is large, strengths of rocks within fault zones may approach minimum strengths defined by single phyllosilicate crystals. Fault zones containing localized high concentrations of phyllosilicates with strong preferred orientations in well-defined folia can exhibit aseismic slip, especially where mafic Mg-rich rocks occur along the fault (like parts of the San Andreas Fault). 104 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Metasomatic reaction bands at the Mt. Hochwart gneiss-peridotite contact (Ulten Zone, Italy): insights into fluid-rock interaction in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocchi, M.; Mair, V.; Tropper, P.; Bargossi, G. M.

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the contact zone between peridotite lenses and host gneisses located on the northern side of the Hochwart peak, also known as Vedetta Alta (Ulten Zone, Alto Adige -Südtirol) where metasomatic contact bands occur. The country rocks are gneisses consisting mainly of quartz, K-feldspar, garnet, kyanite, biotite and muscovite. The ultramafic body consists of a hectometre-sized garnet peridotite and harzburgite lens. The reaction zone shows mineralogic zoning from phlogopite-rich to tremolite-anthophyllite-talc-rich rocks from the host gneiss towards the peridotite. In some cases, lenses of serpentine and talc in association with chlorite, and trondhjemitic pods develop at the ultramafic rocks border to the gneisses. Trondhjemite dikes with pegmatoid texture also crosscut the peridotite body. Phlogopite aggregates with accessory zircon, Cl-apatite and tourmaline and phlogopite-hornblende aggregates also occur. The combination of petrography, mineral chemistry and mass balance calculations constrains the gains and losses of elements during metasomatism. Reaction zone formation involved extensive addition of H2O, K2O and LILE from the fluid, whereas MgO, CaO and Al2O3 were removed from the peridotite. Thus, the formation of the reaction zones between the mantle rocks and the gneisses was triggered by considerable fluid/melt circulation, causing crystallisation of mainly phlogopite, anthophyllite and talc, and the release of a trondhjemitic residual melt. Field mapping provides evidence that the internal structures of the host migmatites (folds) and those of the peridotites (foliation, fluid texture) are discordant. Pseudosection calculations give insights into the P-T conditions (T 660-700°C; P 0.5-0.7 GPa) of metasomatism responsible for the formation of reaction zones, which is related to the retrograde path of the Ulten Zone peridotites. Our results suggest that the redistribution of major and trace elements in subduction zones is strongly influenced

  3. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes.

    PubMed

    Cribbin, Laura B; Winstanley, Henry F; Mitchell, Sarah L; Fowler, Andrew C; Sander, Graham C

    2014-12-15

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front. PMID:25461883

  4. Density Effect on Detonation Reaction Zone Length in Solid Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubyatinsky, S. N.; Loboiko, B. G.

    1997-07-01

    Density effect on detonation reaction zone length have been studied on RDX and PETN using a photoelectric technique to record the radiation intensity history of the shock front in chloroform placed on the charge face. Charge density was found to drastically affect the reaction zone length as well as the charge appearance. The charges pressed to 0.92 of crystal density were completely opaque and exhibited the von Neumann spike of 0.3 mm in length, typical for high explosives. The charges solvent-pressed to 0.99 of crystal density were agated (semi-transparent, resembling agates) and did not exhibited the von Neumann spike, which implies that its length did not exceed 0.03 mm. The following explanation was offered. In agated, practically non-porous, charges the detonation front is a strong plane shock inducing almost instant reaction. In charges consisting of separate crystals the detonation front becomes three-dimensional. As a result some fraction of explosive is compressed by a sequence of shocks almost isentropically and reacts relatively slowly, so that it can be measured.

  5. Effect of primary-zone equivalence ratio on pollutant formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Test were conducted to determine the effect of primary-zone equivalence ratio on the formation of smoke and other gaseous pollutants in an experimental can combustor. Several fuel injection techniques were examined at primary-zone equivalence ratios from 0.8 to 2.0. The main emphasis was on reducing fuel-rich-combustion smoke levels. Two of the four fuel injection configurations studied produced smoke levels below a smoke number of 20 at a primary-zone equivalence ratio of about 1.7. As the fuel mixing and atomization were recorded at primary-zone equivalence ratios as high as 2.0. The gaseous emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen were quite sensitive to the fuel injection configuration as well as to the primary-zone equilvalence ratio.

  6. Convection associated with exclusion zone formation in colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Musa, Sami; Florea, Daniel; Wyss, Hans M; Huyghe, Jacques M

    2016-01-28

    The long-range repulsion of colloids from various interfaces has been observed in a wide range of studies from different research disciplines. This so-called exclusion zone (EZ) formation occurs near surfaces such as hydrogels, polymers, or biological tissues. It was recently shown that the underlying physical mechanism leading to this long-range repulsion is a combination of ion-exchange at the interface, diffusion of ions, and diffusiophoresis of colloids in the resulting ion concentration gradients. In this paper, we show that the same ion concentration gradients that lead to exclusion zone formation also imply that diffusioosmosis near the walls of the sample cell must occur. This should lead to convective flow patterns that are directly associated with exclusion zone formation. We use multi-particle tracking to study the dynamics of particles during exclusion zone formation in detail, confirming that indeed two pronounced vortex-like convection rolls occur near the cell walls. These dramatic flow patterns persist for more than 4 hours, with the typical velocity decreasing as a function of time. We find that the flow velocity depends strongly on the surface properties of the sample cell walls, consistent with diffusioosmosis being the main physical mechanism that governs these convective flows. PMID:26616213

  7. FORMATION OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS IN A DEAD ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Armitage, Philip J.; Alexander, Richard D.

    2013-08-10

    Circumbinary planets have been observed at orbital radii where binary perturbations may have significant effects on the gas disk structure, on planetesimal velocity dispersion, and on the coupling between turbulence and planetesimals. Here, we note that the impact of all of these effects on planet formation is qualitatively altered if the circumbinary disk structure is layered, with a non-turbulent midplane layer (dead zone) and strongly turbulent surface layers. For close binaries, we find that the dead zone typically extends from a radius close to the inner disk edge up to a radius of around 10-20 AU from the center of mass of the binary. The peak in the surface density occurs within the dead zone, far from the inner disk edge, close to the snow line, and may act as a trap for aerodynamically coupled solids. We suggest that circumbinary planet formation may be easier near this preferential location than for disks around single stars. However, dead zones around wide binaries are less likely, and hence planet formation may be more difficult there.

  8. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface. Résumé. Il se produit au voisinage de l'interface entre les aquifères et les imperméables plusieurs réactions biogéochimiques importantes. Il s'agit des réactions de réduction de l'oxygène, de la dénitrification et de la réduction de Fe3+, SO42- et CO2 (méthanogenèse). Dans certaines situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté imperméable de l'interface, avec des accepteurs d'électrons qui vont de l'aquifère vers l'imperméable riche en donneurs d'électrons. Dans d'autres situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté aquifère de l'interface, avec des donneurs d'électrons qui se déplacent de l'imperméable vers l'aquifère riche en accepteurs d'électrons ou en microorganismes. Ainsi, l'interface aquif

  9. Pseudo-Reaction Zone model calibration for Programmed Burn calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiquete, Carlos; Meyer, Chad D.; Quirk, James J.; Short, Mark

    2015-06-01

    The Programmed Burn (PB) engineering methodology for efficiently calculating detonation timing and energy delivery within high explosive (HE) engineering geometries separates the calculation of these two core components. Modern PB approaches utilize Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) to provide accurate time-of-arrival information throughout a given geometry, via an experimentally calibrated propagation law relating the surface normal velocity to its local curvature. The Pseudo-Reaction Zone (PRZ) methodology is then used to release the explosive energy in a finite span following the prescribed arrival of the DSD propagated front through a reactive, hydrodynamic calculation. The PRZ energy release rate must be coupled to the local burn velocity set by the DSD surface evolution. In order to synchronize the energy release to the attendant timing calculation, detonation velocity and front shapes resulting from reactive burn simulations utilizing the PRZ rate law and parameters will be fitted to analogues generated via the applied DSD propagation law, thus yielding the PRZ model calibration for the HE.

  10. Horizontal shear zones: physical modeling of formation and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokun, A. N.

    2009-11-01

    On examples of ductile viscous materials (pastes), which demonstrated the deformational type of coagulation behavior and the reproduced zones of the horizontal shear of a brittle fracture, ductile flow, and intermediate types. The formation of coagulation agglomerates appeared well organized, both in terms of time and structurally. The found systems of fractures revealed a sequential course of the deformation process and the contribution of each system in the total structural transformation was established. By virtue of rheological analysis of coagulation structures, the basic parameters (yield strength, viscosity), and their input into the model of the deformational response (brittle, ductile), were determined. The substantial composition and its deformational properties of the material under question appeared to dictate the structure of shear zones and their general mutual organization. The rheological analysis of coagulation clusters of model materials allowed for the justified interpretation of experimental data to regulate deformation processes effectively and predict their results.

  11. Mechanism of décollement formation in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2011-12-01

    The mechanism of décollement formation was investigated through a particle-based simulation model assuming homogeneity (e.g. no weak layer or pore fluid). A décollement-like structure appeared as a spontaneously localized shear deformation near the bottom of the sediment when the thickness of the sediment was sufficient to balance the gravitational force and tectonic loading. In contrast, no such décollement-like structure was formed when the sediment was too thin; in this case, the entire prism was deformed because of plate motion. These results are consistent with various observations in real subduction zones. A precise analysis of the stress state evolution during accretion reveals that the formation of a décollement-like structure is controlled by the spatio-temporal distribution of isotropic compression states.

  12. Understanding Mechanisms of Rind Formation in Mélange Zones using Highly Siderophile Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, J. K.; Penniston-Dorland, S. C.; Walker, R. J.; Marschall, H. R.

    2012-12-01

    Two mechanisms have previously been proposed for the formation of reaction zones found between mafic and ultramafic rocks in mélange zones. These mechanisms are fluid-assisted metasomatism (transport by fluid flow or by diffusion through an intergranular fluid) and tectonic mixing. We are currently studying the highly siderophile element (HSE) compositions of mafic and ultramafic rocks and reaction zones from several different high P/T metamorphic complexes, including the Catalina Schist (Santa Catalina Island, CA), the Cycladic Complex (Syros, Greece), the Samana Metamorphic Complex (Dominican Republic), and the Franciscan Complex (CA). The mafic rocks in all localities have high 187Os/188Os and low Os, Ir and Ru concentrations, consistent with basaltic protoliths. The more mantle-like rocks (serpentinite, mélange matrix) and the reaction zones have lower 187Os/188Os, and higher Os, Ir and Ru concentrations. Here we report data from traverses across two reaction features: one from the Catalina Schist, the other from the Cycladic complex. The Catalina traverse consists of twelve samples along 30cm between an amphibolite-grade mafic block and its reaction rind (actinolite-chlorite schist) adjacent to ultramafic-rich matrix. The traverse from Syros consists of five samples along 165cm between blueschist-grade metamorphosed volcaniclastic (basaltic to intermediate) tuffs and a >50 m serpentinite lens between which there is a 1-2m thick reaction blackwall zone dominantly consisting of chlorite schist. Samples of the Catalina rind are enriched in whole-rock SiO2, K2O, Rb, Ba, MgO, Cr, Ni, Os, Ir, and Ru relative to samples of the block core, and are depleted in FeO, Al2O3, TiO2, CaO, and Zr. 187Os/188Os ratios are distinctly lower in the rind (0.13 to 0.18) compared to the block (0.43 to 2.23). The Syros blackwall has elevated MgO, CaO, Cr and Ni relative to the non-metasomatised assemblage, while there is depletion of Rb, Ba, and K2O. The HSE concentrations are

  13. [Formations and reactions of aromatic furazan compounds].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, M; Takabatake, T; Miyazawa, T

    2001-06-01

    A reaction from various kinds of nitroquinoline with hydroxylamine in potassium hydroxide alkalinity produced a novel product, furazanoquinoline, besides the known amino derivatives. The products obtained were furazano [3,4-f] quinoline (5) from 5-nitroquinoline (1) and 6-nitroquinoline (6), and furazano [3,4-h] quinoline (10) from 7-nitroquinoline (8) and 8-nitroquinoline (11). The reaction mechanism was believed to be as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. The photoreaction of benzofuroxan (19) in acetonitrile containing a little water, under a high pressure mercury lamp, produced 1H-azepine-2,7-dione (20), while under irradiation using a low pressure lamp, 6H-furazano [4,5-c] carbazole-3-oxide (21) and compound 20 were obtained. Then the photoproduct 20 produced photodimer 22 by irradiation in acetonitrile: water (9:1, v/v) using a high or low pressure mercury lamp, while photolysis with alkali proceeded as in the photoreaction of N-alkylimide to give 7-hydroxy-1H-azepine-2-one (23). When pyrido [2,3-c] furoxan (24) was irradiated in acetonitrile containing a little water with a low pressure mercury lamp, 3-nitro-2-pyridone (25) was obtained. When compound 24 was irradiated in the presence of morpholine with a low pressure mercury lamp in an argon atmosphere, 6-morpholinopyridine 2,3-dioxime (26) was produced. Quinoxaline 1,4-dioxide derivatives (31, 33), phenazine 5,10-dioxide derivatives (36, 37) and pyrido [2,3-b] pyrazine derivatives (38, 39) were synthesized from the corresponding furoxan catalyzed by silica gel or molecular sieves, and their antibacterial properties were evaluated. The results of antibacterial screening tests in vitro, revealed strong activity against Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:11433773

  14. Reaction zone microstructure in a Ti3Al + Nb/SiC composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, S. F.; Smith, S. D.; Brindley, P. K.

    1990-01-01

    A composite of Ti-25Al-13Nb (atomic percent) matrix with a continuous SiC fiber (SCS-6) reinforcement was fabricated by hot pressing powder cloths and mats of fiber. The fiber/matrix reaction zone was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy/analytical electron microscopy (TEM/AEM) techniques. The extent of reaction was determined, phases were identified, and solute partitioning among the phases was determined. It was found that the matrix had reacted only with a portion of the carbon-rich outer layer of the SCS-6 fiber. The reaction zone contained two concentric zones which are distinguished by the presence of different carbide phases. Both zones contained a hexagonal Si-bearing phase, and one of the zones also contained some fine scattered porosity. The results are discussed with reference to available phase equilibria data.

  15. Formation of mesic nuclei by (γ,p) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahiro, H.; Jido, D.; Hirenzaki, S.

    2005-10-01

    We present a theoretical study on formation rates of η and ω meson-nucleus systems induced by (γ,p) reactions on nuclear targets at ideal recoilless condition. We find that the smaller distortion effect in the (γ,p) reaction enables us to investigate properties of the mesons created deeply inside nucleus more clearly. We also consider excitation of scalar-isoscalar (σ) mode in nucleus in order to investigate spectral enhancement around two-pion threshold caused by partial restoration of chiral symmetry. We conclude that valuable information of meson-nucleus interactions can be extracted from global structure of the missing mass spectra in the (γ,p) reaction.

  16. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  17. Periodic Vesicle Formation in Tectonic Fault Zones--an Ideal Scenario for Molecular Evolution.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich; Dávila, María J

    2015-06-01

    Tectonic fault systems in the continental crust offer huge networks of interconnected channels and cavities. Filled mainly with water and carbon dioxide (CO2), containing a wide variety of hydrothermal chemistry and numerous catalytic surfaces, they may offer ideal reaction conditions for prebiotic chemistry. In these systems, an accumulation zone for organic compounds will develop at a depth of approximately 1 km where CO2 turns sub-critical and dissolved components precipitate. At this point, periodic pressure changes caused for example by tidal influences or geyser activity may generate a cyclic process involving repeated phase transitions of carbon dioxide. In the presence of amphiphilic compounds, this will necessarily lead to the transient formation of coated water droplets in the gas phase and corresponding vesicular structures in the aqueous environment. During this process, the concentration of organic components inside the droplets and vesicles would be drastically increased, allowing for favorable reaction conditions and, in case of the vesicles generated, large trans-membrane concentration gradients. Altogether, the process of periodic formation and destruction of vesicles could offer a perfect environment for molecular evolution in small compartments and for the generation of protocells. The basic process of vesicle formation is reproduced experimentally with a lipid in a water/CO2 system. PMID:25716918

  18. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Li Junqing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-10-15

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus, and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118, and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  19. Metasomatic Reaction Zones as Monitors of Trace Element Transfer at the Slab-Mantle Interface: the Case of the Hochwart Peridotite (Ulten Zone, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocchi, M.; Hermann, J.; Bargossi, G. M.; Mair, V.; Morten, L.

    2006-12-01

    Ultramafic blocks belonging to the Hochwart peridotite outcrop (Ulten Zone, Italian Alps) preserve a series of metasomatic mineral zones generated by infiltration of Si-rich hydrous fluids which occurred at the gneiss- peridotite interface. The age of the high pressure metamorphism for the Hochwart complex has been constrained at 330 Ma (Tumiati et al., 2003, EPSL, 210, 509-526). The country rocks are stromatic gneisses consisting mainly of quartz, K-feldspar, garnet, kyanite, biotite and muscovite. The ultramafic body consists of strongly serpentinized metaperidotites which are exposed as a hectometre-size lens along a steep gully, associated to monomineralic zones that developed at the contact between the peridotite body and the garnet gneiss country rocks. The composition of the metasomatic zones has been investigated in detail and records an order of metasomatic zoning formed by phlogopite-rich to tremolite-anthophyllite-rich rocks going from the host gneiss towards the peridotite. In some cases, the ultramafics fade into the gneisses developing serpentine and talc which has replaced, presumably at lower temperatures, the serpentine matrix and occurs in association with chlorite. Phlogopite aggregates (phlogopitite) with accessory minerals (quartz + zircon + apatite) and metabasic pods (phlogopite and hornblende) also occur. Black tourmaline (schorl-dravite solid solution) has been found for the first time in the contact near the phlogopite zone, suggesting an external addition of elements (boron and fluorine) to the system at high temperature. The formation of the metasomatic zones composed exclusively of hydrous phases must have involved extensive H2O-metasomatism as already documented for the Ulten peridotites. The source for these fluids can be a system of trondhjemitic-pegmatitic dikes cutting the peridotite that would have channelled aqueous fluids into the ultramafic rocks. Whole-rock geochemistry and trace element (LA ICP-MS) composition of hydrous

  20. Determining the mechanical strength of CO2-induced reaction zones in wellbore cement: is it worth it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Marcelis, Fons; van der Linden, Arjan; Liteanu, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    CO2 injection, either for long-term CO2 storage (CCS) or Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), strongly hinges on maintaining storage integrity. Injection and legacy wells penetrating the caprock pose one of the most likely points of leakage. In order to be able to predict the long-term integrity of such wellbores, it's important to understand their chemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviour, and how it may change due to CO2 exposure. Generally, in response to CO2/brine/cement interactions, a number of different reaction zones are observed, each with their own chemical, and hence mechanical, signature. To aid mechanical modelling efforts, assessing the risk of cement failure caused by stress and temperature changes, knowledge is required of the strength of each of these zones. We performed experiments on Class G Portland cement to investigate the chemical-mechanical coupling due to CO2-exposure. Batch reaction experiments, in the presence of CO2-rich brine, were performed under typical storage conditions (T = 65° C, PCO2 = 8 MPa) for various periods of time (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 months). After exposure, mechanical tests were performed on the observed reaction zones, using the so-called core scratching technique, to evaluate the unconfined compressive strength (UCS) as a function of exposure time. Chemical analyses (CT-imaging, SEM microscopy, EDX chemical analysis) showed the formation of three reaction zones, similarly to what has been observed in other studies. Measurements of the mechanical strength of these different zones showed highly variable results. Such variations have also been observed in other studies, using different measurement techniques. The large variability in strength measurements is most likely an inherent result of the heterogenic nature of cement, which affects the extent and location of reaction throughout the sample. This begs the question: is it worth studying the mechanical strength of reaction-induced zones in cement? Or will it suffice to

  1. Coupling and Reactions of 5-Hydroxyconiferyl Alcohol in Lignin Formation.

    PubMed

    Elder, Thomas; Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T; Crowley, Michael F

    2016-06-15

    The catechol alcohols, caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, may be incorporated into lignin either naturally or through genetic manipulation. Due to the presence of o-OH groups, these compounds form benzodioxanes, a departure from the interunit connections found in lignins derived from the cinnamyl alcohols. In nature, lignins composed of caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol are linear homopolymers and, as such, may have properties that make them amenable for use in value-added products, such as lignin-based carbon fibers. In the current work, results from density functional theory calculations for the reactions of 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, taking stereochemistry into account, are reported. Dehydrogenation and quinone methide formation are found to be thermodynamically favored for 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, over coniferyl alcohol. The comparative energetics of the rearomatization reactions suggest that the formation of the benzodioxane linkage is under kinetic control. Ring-opening reactions of the benzodioxane groups show that the bond dissociation enthalpy of the α-O cleavage reaction is lower than that of the β-O reaction. The catechol lignins represent a novel form of the polymer that may offer new opportunities for bioproducts and genetic targets. PMID:27236926

  2. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Detonation Reaction Zone Experiments on Single Crystals of PETN and HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley; Tarver, Craig

    2015-06-01

    Fedorov et al. reported nanosecond time resolved interface particle velocity records for detonation reaction zone profiles of single crystals of PETN and HMX with adjoining LiF windows. Von Neumann spike and Chapman-Jouguet pressures were measured, and reaction zone lengths and times wereinferred. The single crystal detonation velocities and von Neumann spike pressures are higher than those measured for heterogeneous PETN and HMX-based explosives pressed to 98-99% theoretical maximum density. Due to the absence of voids, the single crystal detonation reaction zone lengths and times for both PETN and HMX were longer than those for their heterogeneous explosives. Ignition and Growth modeling results are compared to the single crystal PETN and HMX measurements and to previous experimental results for pressed PETN and HMX charges. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Groundwater compatibility with formation water and pay zone rocks in Pervomaysk oil-gas-condensate field to maintain formation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, N.; Nazarov, A.; Alekseev, S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes the research results in determining the compatibility of groundwater from Aptain-Albian-Cenomanian aquifer with formation water and pay zone rocks in U1 layer sediments, Pervomaysk oil field.

  4. f 1 (1285) formation in photon-photon fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R. E.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, A. R.; Barnett, B. A.; Bauer, D. A.; Bay, A.; Bengtsson, H.-U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Buchanan, C. D.; Buijs, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Chao, H.-Y.; Chun, S.-B.; Clark, A. R.; Cowan, G. D.; Crane, D. A.; Dahl, O. I.; Daoudi, M.; Derby, K. A.; Eastman, J. J.; Eberhard, P. H.; Edberg, T. K.; Eisner, A. M.; Enomoto, R.; Erné, F. C.; Fairfield, K. H.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hylen, J.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H. S.; Kenney, R. W.; Khacheryan, S.; Kofler, R. R.; Langeveld, W. G. J.; Layter, J. G.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Loken, S. C.; Lu, A.; Lynch, G. R.; Madaras, R. J.; Magnuson, B. D.; Masek, G. E.; Mathis, L. G.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Miller, E. S.; Moses, W.; Nygren, D. R.; Oddone, P. J.; Paar, H. P.; Park, S. K.; Pellett, D. E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M. T.; Ross, R. R.; Rouse, F. R.; Schwitkis, K. A.; Sens, J. C.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B. C.; Slater, W. E.; Smith, J. R.; Steinman, J. S.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stork, D. H.; Strauss, M. G.; Sullivan, M. K.; Takahashi, T.; Toutounchi, S.; Van Tyen, R.; Van Dalen, G. J.; Vernon, W.; Wagner, W.; Wang, E. M.; Wang, Y.-X.; Wenzel, W. A.; Wolf, Z. R.; Yamamoto, H.; Yellin, S. J.; Zeitlin, C.; TPC/Two-Gamma Collaboration

    1988-07-01

    We have observed formation of the f 1 (1285) in the reaction e +e -→e +e -π+π-η( η→ γγ). Its γγ ∗ width is determined in several Q2 bins. The γγ coupling parameter for the f 1 (1285) is found to be 2.4±0.5±0.5 keV. This value is compared to that for the X (1420), another J=1 state formed in γγ fusion reactions, which may belong to the same meson nonet.

  5. Development and testing of a compartmentalized reaction network model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams, R.H.; Loague, K.; Kent, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    The work reported here is the first part of a larger effort focused on efficient numerical simulation of redox zone development in contaminated aquifers. The sequential use of various electron acceptors, which is governed by the energy yield of each reaction, gives rise to redox zones. The large difference in energy yields between the various redox reactions leads to systems of equations that are extremely ill-conditioned. These equations are very difficult to solve, especially in the context of coupled fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical simulations. We have developed a general, rational method to solve such systems where we focus on the dominant reactions, compartmentalizing them in a manner that is analogous to the redox zones that are often observed in the field. The compartmentalized approach allows us to easily solve a complex geochemical system as a function of time and energy yield, laying the foundation for our ongoing work in which we couple the reaction network, for the development of redox zones, to a model of subsurface fluid flow and solute transport. Our method (1) solves the numerical system without evoking a redox parameter, (2) improves the numerical stability of redox systems by choosing which compartment and thus which reaction network to use based upon the concentration ratios of key constituents, (3) simulates the development of redox zones as a function of time without the use of inhibition factors or switching functions, and (4) can reduce the number of transport equations that need to be solved in space and time. We show through the use of various model performance evaluation statistics that the appropriate compartment choice under different geochemical conditions leads to numerical solutions without significant error. The compartmentalized approach described here facilitates the next phase of this effort where we couple the redox zone reaction network to models of fluid flow and solute transport.

  6. Effect of Ultrasonic Vibration on Unmixed Zone Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yan; Xu, Cailu; Han, Qingyou

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration was introduced into the molten super-austenitic-stainless weld metal during the shielded metal arc welding process. It was observed that the unmixed zone in the weld metal was completely eliminated by high-intensity ultrasonic vibrations. This is mainly due to a complete mixing of the molten filler metal and base metal, at the freezing front, caused by the acoustically induced cavitation and streaming. The elimination of the unmixed zone can significantly enhance the corrosion resistance of the weldment because the unmixed zone is the preferential location for the corrosion attack.

  7. Active zones of mammalian neuromuscular junctions: formation, density, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Presynaptic active zones are synaptic vesicle release sites that playessential roles in the function and pathology of mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The molecular mechanisms of active zone organization utilize presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in NMJs as scaffolding proteins. VDCCs interact extracellularly with the muscle-derived synapse organizer, laminin β2, and interact intracellularly with active zone-specific proteins, such as Bassoon, CAST/Erc2/ELKS2alpha, ELKS, Piccolo, and RIMs. These molecular mechanisms are supported by studies in P/Q- and N-type VDCCs double-knockout mice, and they are consistent with the pathological conditions of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and Pierson syndrome, which are caused by autoantibodies against VDCCs or by a laminin β2 mutation. During normal postnatal maturation, NMJs maintain the density of active zones, while NMJs triple their size. However, active zones become impaired during aging. Propitiously, muscle exercise ameliorates the active zone impairment in aged NMJs, which suggests the potential for therapeutic strategies. PMID:23252894

  8. The use of trace element zoning patterns in garnet to infer reaction paths of metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Witte, Clemens; Dohmen, Ralf; O'Brien, Patrick; Erpel, Lars; Halama, Ralf; Schmidt, Alexander; Ditterova, Hana

    2015-04-01

    Garnet is one of the most versatile minerals in metamorphic petrology. It is stable over a large pressure and temperature range and thus occurs in many metamorphic environments. Garnet has a wide range of chemical compositions and its major and trace element composition well reflects the pressure (P), temperature (T) and chemical conditions (X) as well as the element transport kinetic properties of the host rock during growth. Hence, compositional growth zonations in garnet contain information about most geochemical, mineralogical and petrological properties of metamorphic rocks. However, detailed interpretation of complex zoning patterns in metamorphic garnet was hindered mainly by the lack of knowledge about the various contributions of kinetic and equilibrium effects to the trace element incorporation into garnet. In this contribution we combine thermodynamic equilibrium calculations together with mass balanced trace element distribution among coexisting phases with diffusion models that simulate kinetically controlled element transport in a reacting host rock. Comparison of the model results with natural garnets enables detailed interpretation of commonly observed major and trace element patterns in high-pressure (HP) and ultra-high pressure (UHP) garnets in terms of reaction paths and physico-chemical properties of the host rock. The comparison of our numerical models with a series of well-investigated (U)HP samples shows that the kinetic influence on rare earth element incorporation into garnet is limited in most rocks at the early stages of garnet growth and increases with increasing grade of rock transformation. We show that REE zoning patterns can be used to distinguish between cold (lawsonite-stable) and warm (epidote-stable) prograde reaction paths. REE liberation along a warm P-T trajectory occurs in three breakdown reactions involving chlorite, epidote and amphibole. All three reactions result in characteristic heavy (HREE) and medium (MREE) REE growth

  9. Formation of Complex Molecules via radiative association reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The detection of increasing numbers of complex organic molecules in the various phases of star formation plays a key role since they follow the same chemical rules of carbon-based chemistry that are observed in our planet Earth. Many of these molecules are believed to be formed on the surfaces of grains, and can then be released to the gas phase when these grains are heated. This is evident when we observe a rich chemistry in hot core regions. However, recently complex organic molecules have also been observed in cold clouds. Therefore, it is necessary to re-examine various pathways for the formation of these molecules in the gas phase. In this presentation, I will discuss role of radiative association reactions in the formation of complex molecules in the gas phase and at low temperature. We will compare abundance of assorted molecules with and without new radiative association reactions and will show that the abundance of a few complex molecules such as HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3 etc. can go up due to introduction of these reactions, which can help to explain their observed abundances.

  10. Microkinetics of oxygenate formation in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction.

    PubMed

    van Santen, Rutger A; Ghouri, Minhaj; Hensen, Emiel M J

    2014-06-01

    Microkinetics simulations are presented on the intrinsic activity and selectivity of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction with respect to the formation of long chain oxygenated hydrocarbons. Two different chain growth mechanisms are compared: the carbide chain growth mechanism and the CO insertion chain growth mechanism. The microkinetics simulations are based on quantum-chemical data on reaction rate parameters of the elementary reaction steps of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction available in the literature. Because the overall rate constant of chain growth remains too low the CO insertion chain growth mechanism is not found to produce higher hydrocarbons, except for ethylene and acetaldehyde or the corresponding hydrogenated products. According to the carbide mechanism available quantum-chemical data are consistent with high selectivity to long chain oxygenated hydrocarbon production at low temperature. The anomalous initial increase with temperature of the chain growth parameter observed under such conditions is reproduced. It arises from the competition between the apparent rate of C-O bond activation to produce "CHx" monomers to be inserted into the growing hydrocarbon chain and the rate of chain growth termination. The microkinetics simulations data enable analysis of selectivity changes as a function of critical elementary reaction rates such as the rate of activation of the C-O bond of CO, the insertion rate of CO into the growing hydrocarbon chain or the rate constant of methane formation. Simulations show that changes in catalyst site reactivity affect elementary reaction steps differently. This has opposing consequences for oxygenate production selectivity, so an optimizing compromise has to be found. The simulation results are found to be consistent with most experimental data available today. It is concluded that Fischer-Tropsch type catalysis has limited scope to produce long chain oxygenates with high yield, but there is an opportunity to improve the yield of C2

  11. Method for selectively plugging highly permeable zones in a subterranean formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefner, M.L.

    1989-03-07

    A method for selectively plugging relatively high permeability zones in a subterranean formation having relatively high permeability zones and relatively low permeability zones penetrated by at least one injection well in fluid communication with a substantial portion of the formation comprising the sequential steps of: (a) injecting a predetermined amount of a solidifiable selective gel solution comprising xanthan chromium (in the 3+ state), sodium hydroxide and formaldehyde in a brine solution containing sodium chloride and calcium chloride into the formation via the injection well at a predetermined pressure sufficient to cause the gel solution to coat and temporarily plug the face of the relatively low permeability zones near the injection well without any significant amount of gel penetrating the relatively low permeability zones while allowing the gel solution to flow into the relatively high permeability zones; (b) thereafter injecting a predetermined amount of a solidifiable non-selective solution comprising polyacrylamides, polysaccharides and unpolymerized acrylamide monomers into the formation via the injection well before the previously injected selective gel solution solidifies in the relatively high permeability zones that preferentially enters the relatively high permeability zones and allowing the injected non-selective solution to solidify and plug the relatively high permeability zones; and (c) injecting a predetermined amount of a flushing agent having a gel breaker into the formation via the injection well that removes the selective gel coating from the face of the relatively low permeability zones thereby restoring permeability of the face of the relatively low permeability zones to fluids subsequently injected into the formation.

  12. Effect of reaction time on the formation of disinfection byproducts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of reaction time on the trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-halide formation potentials was determined by chlorinating water samples from the Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers. Samples were collected for three seasons at 12 locations on the Mississippi from Minneapolis, Minnesota, to New Orleans, Louisiana, and on the Missouri and Ohio 1.6 kilometers above their confluences with the Mississippi. Both types of compounds formed rapidly during the initial stages of the reaction-time period, with formation rates decreasing with time. The ratio of the nonpurgeable total organic-halide and trihalomethane concentrations decreased with time, with the nonpurgeable total organic-halide compounds forming faster during the first stages of the time period and the trihalomethane compounds forming faster during the latter stages of the time period. Variation with distance along the Mississippi River of the formation rates approximately paralleled the variation of the dissolved organic carbon concentration, indicating that the rates of formation, as well as the concentrations of the compounds formed, depended on the dissolved organic carbon concentration.

  13. Acid-catalyzed Heterogeneous Reactions in SOA Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N.; Keywood, M.; Varutbangkul, V.; Gao, S.; Loewer, E.; Surratt, J.; Richard, F. C.; John, S. H.

    2003-12-01

    The importance of heterogeneous reactions in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has recently excited a great deal of interest in the aerosol community. Jang and Kamens (2001) showed enhanced aerosol yield from aldehydes, which can be produced by atmospheric photochemical reactions, in the presence of acidic seed. They suggest that the carbonyl functional groups of the aldehydes further react in the aerosol phase via hydration, polymerization, and hemiacetal/acetal formation with alcohols at an accelerated rate in the presence of acid. Jang et al. (2003) demonstrated similar results using a flow reactor and Czoschke et al. (in press) qualitatively showed increased yields for isoprene and alpha-pinene ozonolysis in the presence of acidic seed. While these findings are intriguing and important, the conditions under which the experiments were carried out were atmospherically unrealistic. A series of SOA formation experiments have been carried out in the Caltech Indoor Chamber Facility, which is comprised of dual 28 m3 FEP Teflon chambers, with the flexibility to carry out both dark ozonolysis and photochemical OH oxidation reactions. Cycloheptene and alpha-pinene were oxidized in the presence of neutral seed under dry (<10% RH) and humid (50% RH) conditions and in the presence of acidic seed under humid (50% RH) conditions. The SOA yields for these experiments will be presented, and the extent of the influence of acid-catalyzed reactions on SOA yield will be discussed. Reference List 1. Cocker, D. R. III. and R. C. Flagan and J. H. Seinfeld, State-of-the-art chamber facility for studying atmospheric aerosol chemistry, Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2594-2601, 2001. 2. Czoschke, N. M., M. Jang, and R. M. Kamens, Effect of acid seed on biogenic sceondary organic aerosol growth, Atmospheric Environment, In press. 3. Jang, M., S. Lee, and R. M. Kamens, Organic aerosol growth by acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of octanal in a flow reactor

  14. Exclusion-Zone Formation From Discontinuous Nafion Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Xavier A; Pollack, Gerald H

    2011-11-30

    Many hydrophilic materials in aqueous solution show near-surface zones that exclude suspended colloids and dissolved molecules. These exclusion zones (EZs) can extend for tens to hundreds of micrometers from the hydrophilic surface, and show physicochemical properties that differ from bulk water. So far, only continuous surfaces of polymers, gels, or biological specimens have been studied. In this report, we explore the interactions between exclusion zones generated by discontinuous, regularly spaced EZ-generating surfaces, namely strips of Nafion on a glass surface. Various inter-strip spacings were studied. When Nafion surfaces are separated by 100 micrometers or less, EZs merged with one another, forming a single, continuous, stable EZ. Separations larger than 100 micrometers produced discontinuous EZs that did not merge. This result has implication for the mechanism by which independent EZs can merge with one another. PMID:24826197

  15. Exclusion-Zone Formation From Discontinuous Nafion Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Xavier A.; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2012-01-01

    Many hydrophilic materials in aqueous solution show near-surface zones that exclude suspended colloids and dissolved molecules. These exclusion zones (EZs) can extend for tens to hundreds of micrometers from the hydrophilic surface, and show physicochemical properties that differ from bulk water. So far, only continuous surfaces of polymers, gels, or biological specimens have been studied. In this report, we explore the interactions between exclusion zones generated by discontinuous, regularly spaced EZ-generating surfaces, namely strips of Nafion on a glass surface. Various inter-strip spacings were studied. When Nafion surfaces are separated by 100 micrometers or less, EZs merged with one another, forming a single, continuous, stable EZ. Separations larger than 100 micrometers produced discontinuous EZs that did not merge. This result has implication for the mechanism by which independent EZs can merge with one another. PMID:24826197

  16. Kinetics of enol formation from reaction of OH with propene.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Lam K; Zhang, Hongzhi R; Zhang, Shaowen; Eddings, Eric; Sarofim, Adel; Law, Matthew E; Westmoreland, Phillip R; Truong, Thanh N

    2009-04-01

    Kinetics of enol generation from propene has been predicted in an effort to understand the presence of enols in flames. A potential energy surface for reaction of OH with propene was computed by CCSD(T)/cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations. Rate constants of different product channels and branching ratios were then calculated using the Master Equation formulation (J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 10528). Of the two enol products, ethenol is dominant over propenol, and its pathway is also the dominant pathway for the OH + propene addition reactions to form bimolecular products. In the temperature range considered, hydrogen abstraction dominated propene + OH consumption by a branching ratio of more than 90%. Calculated rate constants of enol formation were included in the Utah Surrogate Mechanism to model the enol profile in a cyclohexane premixed flame. The extended model shows consistency with experimental data and gives 5% contribution of ethenol formation from OH + propene reaction, the rest coming from ethene + OH. PMID:19271758

  17. Compound nucleus formation in reactions between massive nuclei: Fusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, N.V.; Cherepanov, E.A.; Nasirov, A.K.; Permjakov, V.P.; Volkov, V.V.

    1995-05-01

    The evaporation residue cross sections {sigma}{sub ER} in reactions between massive nuclei have been analyzed within different models of complete fusion. The calculations in the framework of the optical model, the surface friction model, and the macroscopic dynamic model can give the results which are by few orders of magnitude different from experimental data. This takes place due to neglect of the competition between complete fusion and quasifission. A possible mechanism of compound nucleus formation in heavy-ion-induced reactions has been suggested. The analysis of the complete fusion of nuclei on the basis of dinuclear system approach has allowed one to reveal an important feature of the fusion process of massive nuclei, that is, the appearance of the fusion barrier during dinuclear system evolution to a compound nucleus. As a result, the competition between complete fusion and quasifission arises and strongly reduces the cross section of the compound nucleus formation. A model is proposed for calculation of this competition in a massive symmetric dinuclear system. This model is applied for collision energies above the Coulomb barrier. The {sigma}{sub ER} values calculated in the framework of dinuclear system approach seem to be close to the experimental data. For illustration the reactions {sup 100}Mo+{sup 100}Mo, {sup 110}Pd+{sup 110}Pd, and {sup 124}Sn+{sup 96}Zr have been considered.

  18. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  19. Formation of superheavy elements in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolańczuk, Robert

    2001-04-01

    We calculate the formation cross sections of transactinides (superheavy elements), as well as heavy actinides (No and Lr), which have been or might be obtained in fusion reactions with the evaporation of only one neutron. We use both more realistic fusion barrier and survival probability of the compound nucleus in comparison with the original phenomenological model [Phys. Rev. C 59, 2634 (1999)] that prompted the Berkeley experiment on the synthesis of a new superheavy element 118 [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1104 (1999)]. Calculations are performed for asymmetric and symmetric target-projectile combinations and for reactions with stable and radioactive-ion beams. The formation cross sections measured at GSI-Darmstadt for transactinides and heavy actinides, as well as that for superheavy element 118 reported by the LBNL-Berkeley group, are reproduced within a factor of 2.4, on average. Based on the obtained relatively large cross sections, we predict that optimal reactions with stable beams for the synthesis of so far unobserved superheavy elements 119, 120, and 121 are 209Bi(86Kr, 1n)294119, 208Pb(88Sr, 1n)295120, and 209Bi(88Sr, 1n)296121, respectively. This is because of the magic of both the target and the projectile that leads to larger Q value and, consequently, lower effective fusion barrier with larger transmission probability. The same effect is responsible for relatively large cross sections predicted for the symmetric reactions 136Xe(124Sn, 1n)259Rf, 136Xe(136Xe, 1n)271Hs,138Ba(136Xe, 1n)273110, and 140Ce(136Xe, 1n)275112. Although shell effects in the magic nuclei 124Sn, 136Xe, 138Ba, and 140Ce are not as strong as in 208Pb and 209Bi, they act on both the target and the projectile and lead to the prediction of measurable cross sections.

  20. Hyporheic zone denitrification: Controls on effective reaction depth and contribution to whole-stream mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Böhlke, J. K.; Voytek, Mary A.; Scott, Durelle; Tobias, Craig R.

    2013-10-01

    Stream denitrification is thought to be enhanced by hyporheic transport but there is little direct evidence from the field. To investigate at a field site, we injected 15NO3-, Br (conservative tracer), and SF6 (gas exchange tracer) and compared measured whole-stream denitrification with in situ hyporheic denitrification in shallow and deeper flow paths of contrasting geomorphic units. Hyporheic denitrification accounted for between 1 and 200% of whole-stream denitrification. The reaction rate constant was positively related to hyporheic exchange rate (greater substrate delivery), concentrations of substrates DOC and nitrate, microbial denitrifier abundance (nirS), and measures of granular surface area and presence of anoxic microzones. The dimensionless product of the reaction rate constant and hyporheic residence time, λhzτhz define a Damköhler number, Daden-hz that was optimal in the subset of hyporheic flow paths where Daden-hz ≈ 1. Optimal conditions exclude inefficient deep pathways where substrates are used up and also exclude inefficient shallow pathways that require repeated hyporheic entries and exits to complete the reaction. The whole-stream reaction significance, Rs (dimensionless), was quantified by multiplying Daden-hz by the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone. Together these two dimensionless metrics, one flow-path scale and the other reach-scale, quantify the whole-stream significance of hyporheic denitrification. One consequence is that the effective zone of significant denitrification often differs from the full depth of the hyporheic zone, which is one reason why whole-stream denitrification rates have not previously been explained based on total hyporheic-zone metrics such as hyporheic-zone size or residence time.

  1. The influence of metasomatic reactions on distributed vs. localized slip in ultramafic shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarling, Matthew S.; Tulley, Chris J.; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The Livingstone Fault is a >1000 km long terrane boundary in New Zealand that juxtaposes ultramafic rocks of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt against quartzofeldspathic rocks of the continental Caples Terrane. The fault is characterized by a zone of sheared serpentinite mélange tens to several hundreds of meters wide with a generally well-defined scaly fabric, containing entrained pods of massive serpentinite, volcanic rocks and quartzofeldspathic rocks. Talc- and tremolite- forming metasomatic reactions occurred frequently within the mélange zone, along the margins of the mélange and at the edges of entrained pods. These reactions were the result of the interaction between the serpentine minerals and silica bearing fluids derived from the quartzofeldspathic Caples Terrane. In the bulk of the mélange, structures such as distributed scaly fabrics, S-C fabrics, and networks of fibrous serpentine veins suggest a broad delocalization of strain, likely accommodated by pressure-solution mechanisms along the serpentinite- and talc-bearing fabrics. However, at the margins of the mélange zone and the edges of pods, layers of tremolite tens of centimeters thick are characterized by a highly indurated microstructure consisting of networks of tightly interwoven, acicular tremolite crystals forming a semi-nephritic to nephritic texture. In these metasomatic regions, discrete cataclastic slip zones associated with well-polished slickenlined surfaces are observed at the interfaces of the serpentinite and Caples Terrane quartzofeldspathics. In the Livingstone Fault, this style of highly-localized slip is uniquely associated withthe development of the indurated nephritic textures. Because tremolite is a frictionally-strong and generally velocity-weakening calc-silicate, we speculate that the tremolite-forming metasomatic reactions may have promoted localized and unstable fault slip within a shear zone that was otherwise deforming by creep. Employing scanning and transmission

  2. Hyporheic zone denitrification: controls on effective reaction depth and contribution to whole-stream mass balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Judson W.; Böhlke, John Karl; Voytek, Mary A.; Scott, Durelle; Tobias, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Stream denitrification is thought to be enhanced by hyporheic transport but there is little direct evidence from the field. To demonstrate at a field site, we injected 15NO3−, Br (conservative tracer), and SF6 (gas exchange tracer) and compared measured whole-stream denitrification with in situ hyporheic denitrification in shallow and deeper flow paths of contrasting geomorphic units. Hyporheic denitrification accounted for between 1 and 200% of whole-stream denitrification. The reaction rate constant was positively related to hyporheic exchange rate (greater substrate delivery), concentrations of substrates DOC and nitrate, microbial denitrifier abundance (nirS), and measures of granular surface area and presence of anoxic microzones. The dimensionless product of the reaction rate constant and hyporheic residence time, λhzτhz define a Damköhler number, Daden-hz that was optimal in the subset of hyporheic flow paths where Daden-hz ≈ 1. Optimal conditions exclude inefficient deep pathways transport where substrates are used up and also exclude inefficient shallow pathways that require repeated hyporheic entries and exits to complete the reaction. The whole-stream reaction significance, Rs (dimensionless), was quantified by multiplying Daden-hz by the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone. Together these two dimensionless metrics, one flow-path scale and the other reach-scale, quantify the whole-stream significance of hyporheic denitrification. One consequence is that the effective zone of significant denitrification often differs from the full depth of the hyporheic zone, which is one reason why whole-stream denitrification rates have not previously been explained based on total hyporheic-zone metrics such as hyporheic-zone size or residence time.

  3. The effect of Co alloying content on the kinetics of reaction zone growth in tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Tien, J. K.; Caulfield, T.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    A Co-free modified superalloy similar in composition to Waspaloy is investigated in an effort to understand the effect of Co on reaction zone growth kinetics and verify the chemistry dependence of reaction zone growth in the matrix of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites. The values of the parabolic rate constant, characterizing the kinetics of reaction zone growth, for the Waspaloy matrix and the C-free alloy as well as five other alloys from a previous study confirm the dependence of reaction zone growth kinetics on cobalt content of the matrix. The Co-free alloy composite exhibits the slowest reaction zone growth among all tungsten fiber reinforced composites studied to date.

  4. Theoretical aspects of product formation from the NCO + NO reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.; He, Y. ); Melius, C.F. )

    1993-09-09

    The reaction of NCO with NO, an important elementary process involved in the reduction of NO[sub x] by HNCO, has been studied theoretically using the BAC-MP4 technique in conjunction with RRKM calculations. The computed molecular structures and thermochemical data for various intermediates and transition states suggest that the reaction takes place primarily via the singlet, ground electronic state OCNNO molecule according to the following mechanism; (step a) NCO + NO [leftrightarrow] [sup 1]OCNNO [yields] N[sub 2]O + CO; (step b) NCO + NO [leftrightarrow] [sup 1]OCNNO [yields] c-OCNNO[minus] N[sub 2] + CO[sub 2]. The formation of N[sub 2]O + CO occurs by the fragmentation of the singlet OCNNO intermediate step (a), whereas the production of N[sub 2] + CO[sub 2] by cyclization-fragmentation occurs via step b. The tight transition states leading to the formation of these products, coupled with the loose entrance channel, give rise to the experimentally observed strong negative temperature dependence which can be quantitatively accounted for by the results of RRKM calculations based on the BAC-MP4 data. The experimentally measured product branching ratio for channels a and b could be accounted for theoretically by lowering the calculated energy barrier for step a by 3.6 kcal/mol, corresponding to about 15% of the barrier height. 22 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold O + OH reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian Kent; Quemener, Goulven; Balakrishman, Naduvalath

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold collisions between hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. A time-independent quantum formalism based on hyperspherical coordinates is employed for the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and reactive cross sections as well as the vibrational and rotational populations of the product O{sub 2} molecules are reported. A J-shifting approximation is used to compute the rate coefficients. At temperatures T = 10--100 mK for which the OH molecules have been cooled and trapped experimentally, the elastic and reactive rate coefficients are of comparable magnitude, while at colder temperatures, T < 1 mK, the formation of molecular oxygen becomes the dominant pathway. The validity of a classical capture model to describe cold collisions of OH and O is also discussed. While very good agreement is found between classical and quantum results at T = 0.3 K, at higher temperatures, the quantum calculations predict a higher rate coefficient than the classical model, in agreement with experimental data for the O + OH reaction. The zero-temperature limiting value of the rate coefficient is predicted to be about 6 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup 01}, a value comparable to that of barrierless alkali metal atom-dimer systems and about a factor of five larger than that of the tunneling dominated F + H{sub 2} reaction.

  6. Experimental elaboration of faulting induced by fluid-releasing mineral reactions in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.; Zhang, J.; Jung, H.; Dobrzinetskaya, L.

    2003-04-01

    Dehydration embrittlement has been cited repeatedly as a potential mechanism for triggering earthquakes at depths where unassisted brittle failure is impossible due to the normal-stress-dependence of friction. We are investigating two different aspects of this problem in the laboratory: (i) dehydration of antigorite under stress where the ΔV of reaction varies from strongly positive to distinctly negative; (ii) deformation of eclogite in which the nominally anhydrous minerals contain small amounts of dissolved H_2O that can lead to faulting induced by very small amounts of melting stimulated by exsolution of H_2O. (i) Antigorite has the largest stability field of the serpentines and is often cited as potentially being the source of most or all mantle earthquakes to a depth of over 200 km. However, like other low-pressure hydrous phases, the net volume change accompanying antigorite dehydration varies from strongly positive at low P to negative at P > ˜2-2.5 GPa. Fracture mechanics theory predicts that dehydration should not induce shear failure if ΔV<0. To test the effect of ΔV on faulting, we have deformed an extensively-serpentinized peridotite at P = 1-6 GPa. We conducted constant strain rate experiments in a Griggs-type apparatus at P = 1.0 - 3.4 GPa and rapid-pumping experiments in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus, culminating in pressures as high as 6 GPa. Independent of the sign of ΔV, specimens subjected to stress during dehydration yielded extremely thin zones of reaction products with shear offset across them. Some were clearly faults whereas others could be precursors to faulting. Fluid released at grain boundaries between antigorite and relict olivine locally produced Mode I cracks &fluid inclusions. (ii) Deformation of "wet" eclogite at 3 GPa and temperatures between the wet and dry solidi induced exsolution of H_2O and formation of very small amounts (<1%) of melt, leading to faulting. At lower temperature the rock was extremely strong but

  7. Monitoring of water and thermal transfers in the vadose zone of a carbonate reservoir formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerepi, A.; Loisy, C.; Burlot, R.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is the monitoring of water and thermal transfers in vadose zone of a carbonate reservoir formation during three hydrological cycles (August 2001- November 2004). The application of the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) and Self-Potential (SP) methods to determine the water content of porous rock has been widely investigated. More than 285 studied point measurements of rock water content observed during three hydrological cycles and distributed among an abandoned underground quarry in Gironde, France, show a permanently undersaturated limestone (between 35% and 50 %). We also investigated the unsaturated zone in a borehole between 0 and 20 m depth until the water table. 14 TDR and SP electrodes investigate the vadose zone. For the understanding of the streaming potential and electric behaviour from the SP method of a vadose zone we performed an experimental device which allows us to quantify the measurements of electrokinetic coupling coefficient at various saturation conditions. The results show that the vadose zone is characterized by three different sub-zones which are different water dynamics. The shallow zone down to a depth of seven meters corresponds to a zone with a significant variation of water saturation related to evapotranspiration dynamic water. The second zone (so-called transition zone) between seven to sixteen meters displays a high stability. The third zone (zone of capillary fringe) between sixteen to twenty meter shows a high and constant water saturation. Experimental results show three periods of maximum water content corresponding to three occurring effective precipitations. The dephasing and the amplitude attenuation of the hydraulic and thermal waves with the depth can be modelled and explained by the physical properties of the porous medium in an unsaturated zone such as the diffusivity, the water relative permeability, the capillarity pressure versus water saturation and the effective porosity.

  8. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  9. Method for Controlling a Producing Zone of a Well in a Geological Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Byerly, Kent A. (Inventor); Amini, B. Jon (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    System and methods for transmitting and receiving electromagnetic pulses through a geological formation. A preferably programmable transmitter having an all-digital portion in a preferred embodiment may be operated at frequencies below 1 MHz without loss of target resolution by transmitting and over sampling received long PN codes. A gated and stored portion of the received signal may be correlated with the PN code to determine distances of interfaces within the geological formation, such as the distance of a water interfaces from a wellbore. The received signal is oversampled preferably at rates such as five to fifty times as high as a carrier frequency. In one method of the invention, an oil well with multiple production zones may be kept in production by detecting an approaching water front in one of the production zones and shutting down that particular production zone thereby permitting the remaining production zones to continue operating.

  10. Method for controlling a producing zone of a well in a geological formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Byerly, Kent A. (Inventor); Amini, B. Jon (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    System and methods for transmitting and receiving electromagnetic pulses through a geological formation. A preferably programmable transmitter having an all-digital portion in a preferred embodiment may be operated at frequencies below 1 MHz without loss of target resolution by transmitting and over sampling received long PN codes. A gated and stored portion of the received signal may be correlated with the PN code to determine distances of interfaces within the geological formation, such as the distance of a water interfaces from a wellbore. The received signal is oversampled preferably at rates such as five to fifty times as high as a carrier frequency. In one method of the invention, an oil well with multiple production zones may be kept in production by detecting an approaching water front in one of the production zones and shutting down that particular production zone thereby permitting the remaining production zones to continue operating.

  11. Formation of Formaldehyde and Glyoxal From The Toluene + Oh Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Wirtz, K.; Platt, U.

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are emitted into the urban atmosphere mostly as part of au- tomobile exhaust. Toluene thereby is the single most abundant aromatic compound emitted into the atmosphere. Despite the importance of aromatic hydrocarbon oxi- dation for the formation of photooxidants from urban plumes the oxidation mech- anism of aromatic hydrocarbons is far from being understood.Considerable progress has been made in recent years concerning our understanding of the ring-retaining path- ways, while major uncertainties remain to be linked with the operative ring-cleavage mechanisms. The representation of the aromatic oxidation in presently used chemical transport models (CTM) is estimated a major uncertainty for these models. This work presents data on formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal, which are two impor- tant ring-cleavage products from the the toluene + OH reaction. While glyoxal was observed to form as a high yield primary product (Volkamer et al., JPC A, 2001, 105, 7865-7874) the formation of HCHO is observed delayed, i.e. as a secondary prod- uct. The temporal behaviour of glyoxal and HCHO concentrations allowed to con- clude that short lived stable intermediate compounds must form upon ring-cleavage of toluene. With an approximate lifetime of the order of ten minutes, these highly reac- tive intermediate compounds are likely to be a significant radical source. Atmospheric implications of the results are adressed.

  12. The formation of Kuiper-belt binaries through exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Funato, Yoko; Makino, Junichiro; Hut, Piet; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Kinoshita, Daisuke

    2004-02-01

    Recent observations have revealed that an unexpectedly high fraction--a few per cent--of the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) that inhabit the Kuiper belt are binaries. The components have roughly equal masses, with very eccentric orbits that are wider than a hundred times the radius of the primary. Standard theories of binary asteroid formation tend to produce close binaries with circular orbits, so two models have been proposed to explain the unique characteristics of the TNOs. Both models, however, require extreme assumptions regarding the size distribution of the TNOs. Here we report a mechanism that is capable of producing binary TNOs with the observed properties during the early stages of their formation and growth. The only required assumption is that the TNOs were initially formed through gravitational instabilities in the protoplanetary dust disk. The basis of the mechanism is an exchange reaction in which a binary whose primary component is much more massive than the secondary interacts with a third body, whose mass is comparable to that of the primary. The low-mass secondary component is ejected and replaced by the third body in a wide but eccentric orbit. PMID:14765188

  13. Preferential dealkylation reactions of s-triazine herbicides in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, M.S.; Michael, Thurman E.

    1994-01-01

    The preferential dealkylation pathways of the s-triazine herbicides, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine), propazine [2-chloro-4,6-bis(isopropylamino)-s-triazine], and simazine [2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine], and two monodealkylated triazine metabolites, deisopropylatrazine (DIA: 2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylamino-s-triazine) and deethylatrazine (DEA: 2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) were investigated on two adjacent Eudora silt-loam plots growing corn (Zea mays L.). Results from the shallow unsaturated zone and surface-water runoff showed preferential removal of an ethyl side chain from atrazine, simazine, and DIA relative to an isopropyl side chain from atrazine, propazine, and DEA. It is hypothesized that deethylation reactions may proceed at 2-3 times the rate of deisopropylation reactions. It is concluded that small concentrations of DIA reportedly associated with the degradation of atrazine may be due to a rapid turnover rate of the metabolite in the unsaturated zone, not to small production levels. Because of continued dealkylation of both monodealkylated metabolites, a strong argument is advanced for the presence of a didealkylated metabolite in the unsaturated zone.

  14. PLANETESIMAL FORMATION IN MAGNETOROTATIONALLY DEAD ZONES: CRITICAL DEPENDENCE ON THE NET VERTICAL MAGNETIC FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Hirose, Shigenobu

    2012-07-01

    Turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI) affects planetesimal formation by inducing diffusion and collisional fragmentation of dust particles. We examine conditions preferred for planetesimal formation in MRI-inactive 'dead zones' using an analytic dead-zone model based on our recent resistive MHD simulations. We argue that successful planetesimal formation requires not only a sufficiently large dead zone (which can be produced by tiny dust grains) but also a sufficiently small net vertical magnetic flux (NVF). Although often ignored, the latter condition is indeed important since the NVF strength determines the saturation level of turbulence in MRI-active layers. We show that direct collisional formation of icy planetesimal across the fragmentation barrier is possible when the NVF strength is lower than 10 mG (for the minimum-mass solar nebula model). Formation of rocky planetesimals via the secular gravitational instability is also possible within a similar range of the NVF strength. Our results indicate that the fate of planet formation largely depends on how the NVF is radially transported in the initial disk formation and subsequent disk accretion processes.

  15. Migration of humus substances from soil to water and the main chemical reaction (in different natural zone of Russian Federation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Marina; Moiseenko, Tatiana; Gashkina, Natalia; Kremleva, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Migration of humus substances (HS) from soil to natural water has zonal specificity. Soil HS of different natural areas characterized by specific functional features, different molecular weight (MW) distribution and other physicochemical parameters. Due to the specifics of formation, waters in Russia widely distributed colored water with high concentrations of humus substances. HS involved in many chemical reactions in natural waters/soil. The most important: 1.Dissociation, association and same destruction - reactions are particularly important for assessing the acidification of natural waters 2.Complexation with metals - reactions reduce the toxicity of most metals We researched the differences in the qualitative and quantitative composition of soil HS catchment and HS in natural waters of some climatic zones. Samples were taking: the mixing zone forests (sod-podzolic soils) and the steppe zone (black earth) European Territory of Russia (ETR). In order to examine process of migration humus substances from soil to water have been performed HPLC, IR spectrometry and mass spectrometry analyses. We funded change of HS structure and MW in soil/water. The water HS of the mixed forest characterized as same ratio of functional groups as soil catchments. The molecular weight distribution in water - predominate medium (500-1000 kDa), and low molecular weight fractions (<100 kDa). HS water in steppe zone differs from catchment soils. In HS catchment soils predominate nitrogen- and sulfur- functional group and in HS water - nitrogen-, oxygen- functional group. The molecular weight of HS in natural waters is macromolecular fractions ( > 1000 kDa). For evaluating of the acidification effect on structures of humic substances in natural waters/soil we used date of survey more than 300 lakes on the European Russia (ETP) and Western Siberia (WS) for assessing chemical parameters. Chemical analyzes of water samples were performed by a single method in accordance with the

  16. Impacts of diffusive transport on carbonate mineral formation from magnesium silicate-CO2-water reactions.

    PubMed

    Giammar, Daniel E; Wang, Fei; Guo, Bin; Surface, J Andrew; Peters, Catherine A; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2014-12-16

    Reactions of CO2 with magnesium silicate minerals to precipitate magnesium carbonates can result in stable carbon sequestration. This process can be employed in ex situ reactors or during geologic carbon sequestration in magnesium-rich formations. The reaction of aqueous CO2 with the magnesium silicate mineral forsterite was studied in systems with transport controlled by diffusion. The approach integrated bench-scale experiments, an in situ spectroscopic technique, and reactive transport modeling. Experiments were performed using a tube packed with forsterite and open at one end to a CO2-rich solution. The location and amounts of carbonate minerals that formed were determined by postexperiment characterization of the solids. Complementing this ex situ characterization, (13)C NMR spectroscopy tracked the inorganic carbon transport and speciation in situ. The data were compared with the output of reactive transport simulations that accounted for diffusive transport processes, aqueous speciation, and the forsterite dissolution rate. All three approaches found that the onset of magnesium carbonate precipitation was spatially localized about 1 cm from the opening of the forsterite bed. Magnesite was the dominant reaction product. Geochemical gradients that developed in the diffusion-limited zones led to locally supersaturated conditions at specific locations even while the volume-averaged properties of the system remained undersaturated. PMID:25420634

  17. A "Fossil Vadose Zone" from the Triassic Cooper Canyon Formation (Dockum Group) of West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, R. M.; Hughes, E.; Hubbell, J. M.; Grisak, G.; Cook, S.; Pickens, J.; Griffith, B. C.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogeologic investigations at a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Andrews County, Texas, have revealed evidence of a "fossil vadose zone" present within the redbeds of the Cooper Canyon Formation. The Cooper Canyon Formation is the uppermost stratigraphic unit in the Triassic Dockum Group in the study area and consists of very low permeability claystone and mudstone with several areally extensive siltstone/sandstone interbeds. Piezometers installed within two of the siltstone/sandstone zones show that water levels can rise up to about 20 m above the top of the zones and that uppermost of these zones is locally unsaturated. Waters in these zones have radiometric age dates of about 16,000 years. Recently twelve boreholes were drilled into the Cooper Canyon, cored, and sampled for in situ water potential (the sum of the matric and osmotic potential) and other hydraulic properties including moisture content, porosity, electrical conductivity of a saturated paste (EC), and chloride content. Water potential and saturation data show that Cooper Canyon mudstones are unsaturated to depths greater than 110 m with water potentials typically ranging from -2 MPa to -5 MPa. Very low water potentials (less than -1 MPa) occur within 0.1 m to 1 m of the upper and lower contacts of the siltstone/sandstone zones. Hydraulic gradients are outward from the siltstone/sandstone zones, and water potential values in the mudstones show one or more minima. These conditions preclude vertical flow between the land surface and underlying units and between siltstone/sandstone zones. The average air-entry pressure for Cooper Canyon rocks is about -1 MPa, and water saturation averages 83%. Chloride concentration profiles show a strong bulge in the sediments and rocks above the Cooper Canyon suggesting that very little Holocene recharge has reached the redbeds. Chloride concentrations within the siltstone/sandstone zones are higher than the surrounding mudstones, indicating

  18. Time variation in the reaction-zone structure of two-phase spray detonations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. H.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the time-varying detonation structure in a monodisperse spray is presented. The theory identifies experimentally observed reaction-zone overpressures as deriving from blast waves formed therein by the explosive ignition of the spray droplets, and follows in time the motion, change in strength, and interactions of these blast waves with one another, and with the leading shock. The results are compared with experimental data by modeling the motion of a finite-size circular pressure transducer through the theoretical data field in an x-t space.

  19. Reaction zone structure for strong, weak overdriven, and weak underdriven oblique detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Joseph M.; Gonthier, Keith A.

    1992-01-01

    A simple dynamic systems analysis is used to give examples of strong, weak overdriven, and weak underdriven oblique detonations. Steady oblique detonations consisting of a straight lead shock attached to a solid wedge followed by a resolved reaction zone structure are admitted as solutions to the reactive Euler equations. This is demonstrated for a fluid that is taken to be an inviscid, calorically perfect ideal gas that undergoes a two-step irreversible reaction with the first step exothermic and the second step endothermic. This model admits solutions for a continuum of shock wave angles for two classes of solutions identified by a Rankine-Hugoniot analysis: strong and weak overdriven waves. The other class, weak underdriven, is admitted for eigenvalue shock-wave angles. Chapman-Jouguet waves, however, are not admitted. These results contrast those for a corresponding onestep model that, for detonations with a straight lead shock, only admits strong, weak overdriven, and Chapman-Jouguet solutions.

  20. Modeling discrete gas bubble formation and mobilization during subsurface heating of contaminated zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Magdalena M.; Mumford, Kevin G.; Johnson, Richard L.; Sleep, Brent E.

    2011-04-01

    During thermal remediation the increase in subsurface temperature can lead to bubble formation and mobilization. In order to investigate the effect of gas formation on resulting aqueous concentrations, a 2D finite difference flow and mass transport model was developed which incorporates a macroscopic invasion percolation (MIP) model to simulate bubble expansion and movement. The model was used to simulate three soil scenarios with different permeabilities and entry pressures at various operating temperatures and groundwater velocities. It was observed that discrete bubble formation occurred in all three soils, upward mobility being limited by lower temperatures and higher entry pressures. Bubble mobilization resulted in a different aqueous mass distribution than if no discrete gas formation was modeled, especially at higher temperatures. This was a result of bubbles moving upwards to cooler areas, then collapsing, and contaminating previously clean zones. The cooling effect also led to possible non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) formation which was not predicted using a model without discrete bubble formation.

  1. Experimental Measurements of the Chemical Reaction Zone of Detonating Liquid Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyer, Viviane; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Stahl, David B.; Doucet, Michel; Decaris, Lionel

    2009-12-01

    We have a joint project between CEA-DAM Le Ripault and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to study the chemical reaction zone in detonating high explosives using several different laser velocimetry techniques. The short temporal duration of the von Neumann spike and early part of the reaction zone make these measurements difficult. Here, we report results obtained from detonation experiments using VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) and PDV (photon Doppler velocimetry) methods to measure the particle velocity history at a detonating nitromethane/PMMA interface. Experiments done at CEA were high-explosive-plane-wave initiated and those at LANL were gas-gun-projectile initiated with a detonation run of about 6 charge diameters in all experiments. The experiments had either glass or brass confinement. Excellent agreement of the interface particle velocity measurements at both Laboratories were obtained even though the initiation methods and the velocimetry systems were somewhat different. Some differences were observed in the peak particle velocity because of the ˜2 ns time resolution of the techniques—in all cases the peak was lower than the expected von Neumann spike. This is thought to be because the measurements were not high enough time resolution to resolve the spike.

  2. Experimental Measurements of the Chemical Reaction Zone of Detonating Liquid Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyer, Viviane; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Stahl, David B.; Doucet, Michel

    2009-06-01

    We have a joint project between CEA-DAM Le Ripault and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to study the chemical reaction zone in detonating high explosives using several different laser velocimetry techniques. The short temporal duration of the features (von Neumann spike and sonic locus) of the reaction zone make these measurements difficult. Here, we report results obtained from using and PDV (photon Doppler velocimetry) methods to measure the particle velocity history at a detonating HE (nitromethane)/PMMA interface. Experiments done at CEA were high-explosive-plane-wave initiated and those at LANL were gas-gun-projectile initiated with a detonation run of about 6 charge diameters in all experiments, in either glass or brass confinement. Excellent agreement of the interface particle velocity measurements at both Laboratories were obtained even though the initiation systems and the velocimetry systems were different. Some differences were observed in the von Neumann spike height because of the approximately 2 nanosecond time resolution of the techniques -- in some or all cases the spike top was truncated.

  3. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : the Effect of Pressure on the Rate of Propagation of the Reaction Zone and upon the Rate of Molecular Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1932-01-01

    This study of gaseous explosive reaction has brought out a number of important fundamental characteristics of the explosive reaction indicating that the basal processes of the transformation are much simpler and corresponds more closely to the general laws and principles of ordinary transformations than is usually supposed. The report calls attention to the point that the rate of molecular transformation within the zone was found in all cases to be proportional to pressure, that the transformation within the zone is the result of binary impacts. This result is of unusual interest in the case of the reaction of heavy hydrocarbon fuels and the reaction mechanism proposed by the recent kinetic theory of chain reactions.

  4. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip-based immunoassay with multiple reaction zones: Toward on-chip multiplex detection platform

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhaohui; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-09-20

    In this work, a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchip-based immuno-sensing platform with integrated pneumatic micro valves is described. The microchip was fabricated with multiple layer soft lithography technology. By controlling the activation status of corresponding valves, reagent flows in the microchannel network can be well manipulated so that immuno-reactions only take place at designated reaction zones (DRZs). Four DRZs are included in the prototype microchip. Since these DRZs are all isolated from each other by micro valves, cross contamination is prevented. Using the inner surface of the all-PDMS microchannel as immunoassay substrate, on-chip sandwich format solid phase immunoassay was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this immuno-sensing platform. Mouse IgG and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used as the model analyte and the signal reporter respectively. Only 10 ul sample is needed for the assay and low detection limit of 5 ng/ml (≈33 pM) was achieved though low-cost polyclonal antibodies were used in our experiment for feasibility study only. The encouraging results from mouse IgG immunoassay proved the feasibility of our microchip design. With slight modification of the assay protocol, the same chip design can be used for multi-target detection and can provide a simple, cost-effective and integrated microchip solution for multiplex immunoassay applications.

  5. Origin and formation of carbonaceous material veins in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Li, Haibing; Zhang, Jinjiang; Zhang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    This paper establishes a reference data set of carbonaceous materials (CMs) from the active fault zone of the Longmen Shan fault belt that ruptured in the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake and presents an application of these data for studies of both other exhumed carbonaceous-rich fault zones and deep-drilling cores. The CMs distributed in the active fault zone are found as narrow veins and located along the slip surfaces. Microstructural observation shows that the carbonaceous material veins (CMVs) are located along slip surfaces in the fault gouge zones. Some CMVs have a cataclastic fabric, and their branches intrude into voids around the slip surfaces. Raman spectra of the CMVs show a wide (full width at half maximum >200 cm-1) D-peak at ~1345 cm-1 (defect peak), which is much lower than the O-peak at ~1595 cm-1 (ordered peak), indicating a metamorphic temperature of zeolite facies or lower than 250 °C. In addition, the stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C values) of the CMVs, ranging from -23.4 to -26.4‰, are very similar to that of the kerogen collected from the Late Triassic Xujiahe Formation in Sichuan Basin. Given the data at which it may be formed, the Xujiahe Formation is the most likely origin of CMs for the CMVs, and it seems that some CMVs in the fault zone were crushed and intruded into the voids during coseismic events, possibly driven by an enhanced pore fluid pressure. Since graphitization is suggested as an indicator of transient frictional heating in this area, our study providing a reference data set of CMs would help future CM-rich fault-zone research to retrieve seismic signatures presumably occurring in the Longmen Shan fault zone belt.

  6. Structural analysis of high-pressure shear zones (Bacariza Formation, Cabo Ortegal, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puelles, P.; Mulchrone, K. F.; Ábalos, B.; Ibarguchi, J. I. Gil

    2005-06-01

    High-pressure granulites of the Bacariza Formation (Cabo Ortegal Complex, NW Spain) exhibit spectacular examples of ductile shear zones developed at different scales in rocks containing pre-existing foliations. A detailed structural analysis was carried out on these shear zones in order to unravel and compare the role of various parameters controlling the deformation process (i.e. heterogeneous simple shear, components of homogeneous deformation, heterogeneous volume change and degree of non-coaxiality). Although heterogeneous simple shear largely dominated, negligible deviations from the ideal simple shear model were detected involving shortening along the structural directions perpendicular to the stretching axis (within the foliation plane) of the finite strain ellipsoid. The relationship between displacement parallel to a half-shear zone and the normal distance from its boundary provided the basis for the estimation of the stress exponent in the power-law constitutive flow equation associated with each shear zone, which is interpreted as a rheological indicator. These geometric and rheological results, and the thermobaric conditions of high-pressure shear zone deformation, indicate that these shear zones accommodated dominant plastic rock flow coeval with high-pressure and high-temperature deformations under moderate stress levels concomitant with elevated strain rates.

  7. Reducing permeability of highly permeable zones in oil and gas formations

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.D.

    1988-09-27

    This patent describes a process for reducing flow into a thief zone penetrated by a water injection well bore which comprises injecting down the well bore and into the thief zone a mixture of an aqueous solution of a water soluble polyalkylenimine polymer and a cross-linking agent containing difunctional groups which are capable of delayed cross-linking with the polymer whereby delayed indepth gelling of the polymer takes place in the formation, the cross-linking agent being selected from the group consisting of difunctional aldehydes, ketones, alkyl halides, isocyanates, carboxylic acids and compounds having activated double bonds.

  8. Formation of the compression zone in a plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Solyakov, D. G. Petrov, Yu. V.; Garkusha, I. E.; Chebotarev, V. V.; Ladygina, M. S.; Cherednichenko, T. N.; Morgal’, Ya. I.; Kulik, N. V.; Stal’tsov, V. V.; Eliseev, D. V.

    2013-12-15

    Processes occurring in a plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) during the formation of the compression zone are discussed. The paper presents results of measurements of the spatial distribution of the electric current in the plasma flow, the temporal and spatial (along the flow) distributions of the plasma density, and the profiles of the velocity of individual flow layers along the system axis. The spatial distribution of the electromagnetic force in the flow is analyzed. It is shown that the plasma flow is decelerated when approaching the compression zone and reaccelerated after passing it. In this case, the plasma flow velocity decreases from ν = (2–3) × 10{sup 7} cm/s at the MPC output to ν < 10{sup 6} cm/s in the region of maximum compression and then again increases to 10{sup 7} cm/s at a distance of 15–17 cm from the MPC output. In some MPC operating modes, a displacement of the magnetic field from the compression zone and the formation of toroidal electric current vortices in the plasma flow after passing the compression zone were detected.

  9. Experimental and Thermokinetic Simulation Studies on the Formation of Deleterious Zones in Dissimilar Ferritic Steel Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, R.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2013-05-01

    The methods to predict and prevent the formation of hard and soft zones in dissimilar weldments of 9Cr-1Mo and 2¼Cr-1Mo ferritic steels during high-temperature exposure are examined in this article. The computational studies have been carried out using multicomponent diffusion model incorporated in Dictra and validated by experimental methods using EPMA and TEM. Carbon concentration profiles across the interface of the weld joint between the two ferritic steels were simulated in the temperatures ranging from 823 K to 1023 K (from 550 °C to 750 °C) for various time durations using "diffusion in dispersed phase model" in Dictra. When precipitation and diffusion were incorporated into the calculations simultaneously, the agreement was better between the calculated and the experimentally measured values of carbon concentration profiles, type, and volume fractions of carbides in the hard zone and diffusion zone, width, and the activation energy. Calculation results of thermodynamic potentials of carbon in 2¼Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo steels suggested that the diffusion is driven by the activity gradient of carbon across the joint. The effectiveness of nickel-based diffusion barrier in suppressing the formation of hard and soft zones is demonstrated using calculations based on the cell model incorporated in Dictra.

  10. Reaction Weakening of Dunite in Friction Experiments at Hydrothermal Conditions and Its Relevance to Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. E.; Lockner, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    To improve our understanding of processes occurring in the mantle wedge near the downdip limit of seismicity in subduction zones, we conducted triaxial friction tests on dunite gouge at temperatures in the range 200-350°C, 50 MPa fluid pressure and 100 MPa effective normal stress. Dunite, quartzite, and granite forcing blocks were used respectively to approximate changing rock/fluid chemistry with decreasing distance above the subduction thrust. All experiments were characterized by an initial increase in frictional strength to a peak value, followed by a decrease associated with shearing-enhanced alteration of the dunite gouge. Reaction products and the extent of weakening varied with the chemical environment. In the dunite-block experiments, strength gradually declined from the peak value to a coefficient of friction, µ ~ 0.5-0.6, consistent with the frictional strength of serpentine that formed on the shear surfaces from alteration of the gouge. Interaction of dunite gouge with quartzite and granite driving blocks resulted in significantly greater weakening, to μ ~ 0.3, at temperatures of 250°C and higher. Talc and serpentine partly replaced dunite gouge sheared between quartzite blocks, and metastable saponitic smectite clays crystallized in dunite sheared between granite blocks, as a result of fluid-assisted chemical exchange with the minerals in the wall rocks. These results suggest that rapid and substantial weakening can occur in the mantle wedge immediately overlying the subducting slab. Whichever the chemical environment, attainment of peak strength typically was accompanied by oscillatory slip with small stress drops that gradually was replaced by stable slip with increasing displacement. This oscillatory behavior in some ways resembles the tremor events that have been reported near the forearc mantle corner in subduction zones, and it may indicate the possible involvement of mineral reactions in some instances of tremor.

  11. Modelling the Formation of Liver Zones within the Scope of Fractional Order Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Atangana, Abdon; Oukouomi Noutchie, Suares Clovis

    2014-01-01

    We develop and extend earlier results related to mathematical modelling of the liver formation zone by the adoption of noninteger order derivative. The hidden uncertainties in the model are captured and controlled thanks to the Caputo derivative. The stationary states are investigated and the time-dependent solution is approximated using two recent iteration methods. In particular, we discuss the convergence of these methods by constructing a suitable Hilbert space. PMID:25276791

  12. Understanding bond formation in polar one-step reactions. Topological analyses of the reaction between nitrones and lithium ynolates.

    PubMed

    Roca-López, David; Polo, Victor; Tejero, Tomás; Merino, Pedro

    2015-04-17

    The mechanism of the reaction between nitrones and lithium ynolates has been studied using DFT methods at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ/PCM=THF level. After the formation of a starting complex an without energy barrier, in which the lithium atom is coordinated to both nitrone and ynolate, the reaction takes place in one single kinetic step through a single transition structure. However, the formation of C-C and C-O bonds takes place sequentially through a typical two-stage, one-step process. A combined study of noncovalent interactions (NCIs) and electron localization function (ELFs) of selected points along the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) of the reaction confirmed that, in the transition structure, only the C-C bond is being formed to some extent, whereas an electrostatic interaction is present between carbon and oxygen atoms previous to the formation of the C-O bond. Indeed, the formation of the second C-O bond only begins when the first C-C bond is completely formed without formation of any intermediate. Once the C-C bond is formed and before the C-O bond formation starts the RMS gradient norm dips, approaching but not reaching 0, giving rise to a hidden intermediate. PMID:25803829

  13. Gas-oil fluids in the formation of travertines in the Baikal rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarinov, A. A.; Yalovik, L. I.; Shumilova, T. G.; Kanakin, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Active participation of gas-oil fluids in the processes of mineral formation and petrogenesis in travertines of the Arshan and Garga hot springs is substantiated. The parageneses of the products of pyrolytic decomposition and oxidation of the gas-oil components of hydrothermal fluids (amorphous bitumen, graphite-like CM, and graphite) with different genetic groups of minerals crystallized in a wide range of P-T conditions were established. Travertines of the Baikal rift zone were formed from multicomponent hydrous-gas-oil fluids by the following basic mechanisms of mineral formation: chemogenic, biogenic, cavitation, fluid pyrometamorphism, and pyrolysis.

  14. Dienamine-Catalyzed Nitrone Formation via Redox Reaction.

    PubMed

    Fraboni, Americo J; Brenner-Moyer, Stacey E

    2016-05-01

    The first catalytic method to directly introduce nitrone functionality onto aldehyde substrates is described. This reaction proceeds by an unprecedented organocatalytic redox mechanism in which an enal is oxidized to the γ-nitrone via dienamine catalysis, thereby reducing an equivalent of nitrosobenzene. This reaction is a unique example of divergent reactivity of an enal, which represents a novel strategy for rapidly accessing small libraries of N,O-heterocycles. Alternatively, divergent reactivity can be suppressed simply by changing solvents. PMID:27070296

  15. Pattern Formation and Reaction Textures during Dunite Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of olivine-bearing rocks by fluids is one of the most pervasive geochemical processes on the surface of the Earth. Serpentinized and/or carbonated ultramafic rocks often exhibit characteristic textures on many scales, from polygonal mesh textures on the grain-scale to onion-skin or kernel patterns on the outcrop scale. Strong disequilibrium between pristine ultramafic rocks and common geological fluids such as water and carbon dioxide leads to rapid reactions and coupled mechanical and chemical feedbacks that manifest as characteristic textures. Textural evolution during metasomatic reactions can control effective reaction rates by modulating dynamic porosity and therefore reactant supply and reactive surface area. We run hydrostatic experiments on thermally cracked dunites saturated with carbon dioxide bearing brine at 15 MPa confining pressure and 150°C to explore the evolution of physical properties and reaction textures as carbon mineralization takes place in the sample. Compaction and permeability reduction are observed throughout experiments. Rates of porosity and permeability changes are sensitive to pore fluid chemistry. After reaction, samples are imaged in 3-dimension (3D) using a dual-beam FIB-SEM. Analysis of the high resolution 3D microstructure shows that permeable, highly porous domains are created by olivine dissolution at a characteristic distance from pre-existing crack surfaces while precipitation of secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnesite is limited largely to the primary void space. The porous dissolution channels provide an avenue for fluid ingress, allow reactions to continue and could lead to progressive hierarchical fracturing. Initial modeling of the system indicates that this texture is the result of coupling between dissolution-precipitation reactions and the local stress state of the sample.

  16. Quantum chemical mechanism in parasitic reaction of AlGaN alloys formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Osamu; Nakamura, Koichi; Tachibana, Akitomo; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Akutsu, Nakao; Matsumoto, Koh

    2000-06-01

    The mechanism of parasitic reactions among trimethylaluminum (TMA), trimethylgallium (TMG), and NH 3 in atmospheric pressure (AP) MOVPE for growth of AlGaN is theoretically studied using the quantum chemical method. The calculations show that metal-nitrogen chain growth reaction easily proceeds through the successive reactions of 'complex formation with NH 3' and 'CH 4 elimination by the bimolecular mechanism'. Additionally, a parasitic reaction in APMOVPE using other raw material is also investigated. The calculated result shows that small change of raw material raises activation energy of parasitic reaction, and, thus, the parasitic reaction is suppressed. This result suggests a way to improve APMOVPE by a suitable choice of substituent.

  17. An Investigation of Model Catalyzed Hydrocarbon Formation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tysoe, W. T.

    2001-05-02

    Work was focused on two areas aimed at understanding the chemistry of realistic catalytic systems: (1) The synthesis and characterization of model supported olefin metathesis catalysts. (2) Understanding the role of the carbonaceous layer present on Pd(111) single crystal model catalysts during reaction.

  18. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  19. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  20. Predicting brittle zones in the Bakken Formation using well logs and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecher, Michael E.

    The oil-in-place estimate for the Bakken Formation has varied from 10 billion barrels in 1974 to 503 billion barrels in 1999. However, only a small fraction of this estimate is recoverable due to the formation having very low porosity and permeability. Implementation of hydraulic fracture stages along horizontal wells in the Bakken has been productive. Recently, identification of zones where the formation is brittle has been used to improve hydraulic fracture stimulation efficiency in an effort to improve production. The first goal for this thesis is to identify a correlation between brittleness and production data by using elastic moduli and normalized production values. The hypothesis for this study is that rock with a low Poisson's ratio and high Young's modulus will be more brittle and will ultimately produce a higher amount of oil than more ductile rock. The next goal was to create and test a method to identify brittle zones with high normalized production in a 3D seismic data set without well control using producing wells from outside the survey with dipole sonic logs from the Bakken Formation. Correlations between normalized production values and elastic moduli were subsequently identified. Cumulative first-four-months' production was found to have the best correlation to the elastic moduli. Correlations of normalized production values and Poisson's ratio showed that sections of the middle Bakken with low Poisson's ratio yield higher normalized production values. Correlations of Young's modulus and normalized production showed that middle Bakken zones with low Young's modulus have higher normalized production values. However, when using additional wells that were not used for well-to-3D seismic correlations, the correlation shows that higher Young's modulus yield higher normalized production. The correlation with additional wells best represented the data and agrees with the initial hypothesis. Brittle zones were mapped in a 3D seismic data set by

  1. Brittle-ductile shear zone formation in the McKim Limestone: eastern Monument Upwarp, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyum, S.; Pollard, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    The McKim Limestone is part of a regressive, marine sedimentary sequence of strata that was deposited in the Pennsylvanian to Permian periods. It is well-exposed across large portions of Raplee anticline and Comb monocline; a pair of kilometer-scale folds that mark the Monument Upwarp of the Colorado Plateau in southeastern Utah. Two conjugate sets of echelon vein arrays, with complementary echelon pressure solution seam arrays, occur as bed-perpendicular, systematic deformation features in the 1-3 m thick McKim Limestone unit. Based on large vein to vein array angles, large vein aperture to length ratios, and the presence of vein-perpendicular pressure solution seams, these structures are interpreted to have developed within localized, brittle-ductile shear zones. Topics of debate among structural geologists regarding the formation mechanism of echelon veins include the initiation mode of vein segments (tensile or shear), the relative age between shear zone initiation and vein formation, the interpretation of strain within a shear zone, and the development of sigmoidal veins as being indicative of rotation. These concepts often are founded on geometric observations and kinematic models of deformation (e.g. simple shear) that are independent of the constitutive properties of the rock, are not constrained by the equations of motion, and do not honor the boundary conditions on the vein surfaces. Here we show a more realistic representation of brittle-ductile shear zone formation by introducing numerical models that consider the mechanical properties of limestone, are constrained by the equations of motion, and explicitly define the vein surfaces and their boundary conditions. The commercial finite element software, Abaqus FEA, is used to investigate the deformed geometry of model echelon vein arrays as a function of the remotely applied stress, the initial geometry of the vein arrays, and the constitutive properties of the solid. These geometric patterns are compared

  2. Vadose zone attenuation of organic compounds at a crude oil spill site - Interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Contaminant attenuation processes in the vadose zone of a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN have been simulated with a reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport, solute transport, and the most relevant biogeochemical reactions. Dissolution and volatilization of oil components, their aerobic and anaerobic degradation coupled with sequential electron acceptor consumption, ingress of atmospheric O2, and the release of CH4 and CO2 from the smear zone generated by the floating oil were considered. The focus of the simulations was to assess the dynamics between biodegradation and gas transport processes in the vadose zone, to evaluate the rates and contributions of different electron accepting processes towards vadose zone natural attenuation, and to provide an estimate of the historical mass loss. Concentration distributions of reactive (O2, CH4, and CO2) and non-reactive (Ar and N2) gases served as key constraints for the model calibration. Simulation results confirm that as of 2007, the main degradation pathway can be attributed to methanogenic degradation of organic compounds in the smear zone and the vadose zone resulting in a contaminant plume dominated by high CH4 concentrations. In accordance with field observations, zones of volatilization and CH4 generation are correlated to slightly elevated total gas pressures and low partial pressures of N2 and Ar, while zones of aerobic CH4 oxidation are characterized by slightly reduced gas pressures and elevated concentrations of N2 and Ar. Diffusion is the most significant transport mechanism for gases in the vadose zone; however, the simulations also indicate that, despite very small pressure gradients, advection contributes up to 15% towards the net flux of CH4, and to a more limited extent to O2 ingress. Model calibration strongly suggests that transfer of biogenically generated gases from the smear zone provides a major control on vadose zone gas distributions and vadose zone carbon

  3. Coupled transport and reaction kinetics control the nitrate source-sink function of hyporheic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnetske, Jay P.; Haggerty, Roy; Wondzell, Steven M.; Bokil, Vrushali A.; GonzáLez-Pinzón, Ricardo

    2012-11-01

    The fate of biologically available nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in stream ecosystems is controlled by the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical reaction kinetics. However, determining the relative role of physical and biogeochemical controls at different temporal and spatial scales is difficult. The hyporheic zone (HZ), where groundwater-stream water mix, can be an important location controlling N and C transformations because it creates strong gradients in both the physical and biogeochemical conditions that control redox biogeochemistry. We evaluated the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical redox reactions by linking an advection, dispersion, and residence time model with a multiple Monod kinetics model simulating the concentrations of oxygen (O2), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We used global Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses with a nondimensional form of the model to examine coupled nitrification-denitrification dynamics across many scales of transport and reaction conditions. Results demonstrated that the residence time of water in the HZ and the uptake rate of O2 from either respiration and/or nitrification determined whether the HZ was a source or a sink of NO3 to the stream. We further show that whether the HZ is a net NO3 source or net NO3 sink is determined by the ratio of the characteristic transport time to the characteristic reaction time of O2 (i.e., the Damköhler number, DaO2), where HZs with DaO2 < 1 will be net nitrification environments and HZs with DaO2 ≪ 1 will be net denitrification environments. Our coupling of the hydrologic and biogeochemical limitations of N transformations across different temporal and spatial scales within the HZ allows us to explain the widely contrasting results of previous investigations of HZ N dynamics which variously identify the HZ as either a net source or sink of NO3. Our model results suggest that only estimates of residence times and O2uptake rates

  4. Chronostratigraphic significance of cathodoluminescence zoning in syntaxial cement: Mississippian Lake Valley Formation, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Tracy D.; Lohmann, Kyger C.; Meyers, William J.

    1996-08-01

    Echinoderm-syntax ial cement crystals have been collected at several stratigraphic levels within the Lake Valley Formation, which is overlain by a major pre-Pennsylvanian subaerial exposure surface. The crystals were microsampled along growth bands, and yielded high-resolution elemental and isotopic information that record fluid evolution during their growth. Although cement crystals show little variation in cathodoluminescence character and bulk chemistry throughout the regional extent of the formation, intracrystalline patterns in minor element and stable isotope chemistry allow for the identification of several settings of cementation, including the marine phreatic, marine-meteoric mixing, and meteoric phreatic zones. When placed in a regional-stratigraphic context, crystal growth records enable reconstruction of the temporal and spatial extent of these diagenetic environments. Isotopic, petrographic and stratigraphic constraints indicate that cementation was related to two temporally distinct meteoric systems. Most Lake Valley Formation syntaxial cement formed in the marine phreatic and marine-meteoric mixing zones during the earliest phase of cementation. Of this cement, in excess of 60% formed in the marine phreatic zone and lowermost marine-meteoric mixing zone. Smaller volumes precipitated from progressively fresher mixtures of marine and meteoric fluid during the gradual expansion of a freshwater lens that developed in response to pre-Pennsylvanian lowering of sea level. Meteoric phreatic fluids were relatively unimportant during this episode of cementation. In contrast, cement of entirely meteoric phreatic origin is associated with a later meteoric system, but is found only in the northern part of the study area and at stratigraphic levels immediately adjacent to the pre-Pennsylvanian unconforrnity. Our results indicate that cements in the upper and lower parts of the Lake Valley Formation are genetically and temporally unrelated. Thus, the cement

  5. Periodic stripe formation by a Turing-mechanism operating at growth zones in the mammalian palate

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Andrew D.; Ohazama, Atsushi; Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Sharpe, Paul T.; Kondo, Shigeru; Basson, M. Albert; Gritli-Linde, Amel; Cobourne, Martyn T.; Green, Jeremy B.A.

    2012-01-01

    We present direct evidence of an activator-inhibitor system in the generation of the regularly spaced transverse ridges of the palate. We show that new ridges, or rugae, marked by stripes of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression, appear at two growth zones where the space between previously laid-down rugae increases. However, inter-rugal growth is not absolutely required: new stripes still appear when growth is inhibited. Furthermore, when a ruga is excised new Shh expression appears, not at the cut edge but as bifurcating stripes branching from the neighbouring Shh stripe, diagnostic of a Turing-type reaction-diffusion mechanism. Genetic and inhibitor experiments identify Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) and Shh as an activator-inhibitor pair in this system. These findings demonstrate a reaction-diffusion mechanism likely to be widely relevant in vertebrate development. PMID:22344222

  6. Heterotrimeric kinesin-2 (KIF3) mediates transition zone and axoneme formation of mouse photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Wei, Yuxiao; Ronquillo, Cecinio C; Marc, Robert E; Yoder, Bradley K; Frederick, Jeanne M; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    Anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) employing kinesin-2 molecular motors has been implicated in trafficking of photoreceptor outer segment proteins. We generated embryonic retina-specific (prefix "emb") and adult tamoxifen-induced (prefix "tam") deletions of KIF3a and IFT88 in adult mice to study photoreceptor ciliogenesis and protein trafficking. In (emb)Kif3a(-/-) and in (emb)Ift88(-/-) mice, basal bodies failed to extend transition zones (connecting cilia) with outer segments, and visual pigments mistrafficked. In contrast, (tam)Kif3a(-/-) and (tam)Ift88(-/-) photoreceptor axonemes disintegrated slowly post-induction, starting distally, but rhodopsin and cone pigments trafficked normally for more than 2 weeks, a time interval during which the outer segment is completely renewed. The results demonstrate that visual pigments transport to the retinal outer segment despite removal of KIF3 and IFT88, and KIF3-mediated anterograde IFT is responsible for photoreceptor transition zone and axoneme formation. PMID:25825494

  7. Interploidy hybridization in sympatric zones: the formation of Epidendrum fulgens × E. puniceoluteum hybrids (Epidendroideae, Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Ana P; Chinaglia, Mariana; Palma-Silva, Clarisse; Pinheiro, Fábio

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization is a primary cause of extensive morphological and chromosomal variation and plays an important role in plant species diversification. However, the role of interploidal hybridization in the formation of hybrid swarms is less clear. Epidendrum encompasses wide variation in chromosome number and lacks strong premating barriers, making the genus a good model for clarifying the role of chromosomes in postzygotic barriers in interploidal hybrids. In this sense, hybrids from the interploidal sympatric zone between E. fulgens (2n = 2x = 24) and E. puniceoluteum (2n = 4x = 56) were analyzed using cytogenetic techniques to elucidate the formation and establishment of interploidal hybrids. Hybrids were not a uniform group: two chromosome numbers were observed, with the variation being a consequence of severe hybrid meiotic abnormalities and backcrossing with E. puniceoluteum. The hybrids were triploids (2n = 3x = 38 and 40) and despite the occurrence of enormous meiotic problems associated with triploidy, the hybrids were able to backcross, producing successful hybrid individuals with broad ecological distributions. In spite of the nonpolyploidization of the hybrid, its formation is a long-term evolutionary process rather than a product of a recent disturbance, and considering other sympatric zones in Epidendrum, these events could be recurrent. PMID:24198942

  8. Oceanic crust formation in the Egeria Fracture Zone Complex (Central Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Minor, Marine; Gaina, Carmen; Sigloch, Karin; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to analyse in detail the oceanic crust fabric and volcanic features (seamounts) formed for the last 10 million years at the Central Indian Ridge between 19 and 21 latitude south. Multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data has been collected in 2013 as part of the French-German expedition RHUM-RUM (Reunion hotspot and upper mantle - Reunion's unterer mantel). Three long profiles perpendicular on the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), south of the Egeria fracture zone, document the formation of oceanic crust since 10 million years, along with changes in plate kinematics and variations in the magmatic input. We have inspected the abyssal hill geometry and orientation along conjugate oceanic flanks and within one fracture zone segment where we could identify J-shaped features that are indicators of changes in plate kinematics. The magnetic anomaly data shows a slight asymmetry in seafloor spreading rates on conjugate flanks: while a steady increase in spreading rate from 10 Ma to the present is shown by the western flank, the eastern part displays a slowing down from 5 Ma onwards. The deflection of the anti J-shaped abyssal hill lineations suggest that the left-stepping Egeria fracture zone complex (including the Egeria, Flinders and an un-named fracture zone to the southeast) was under transpression from 9 to 6 Ma and under transtension since 3 Ma. The transpressional event was triggered by a clockwise mid-ocean ridge reorientation and a decrease of its offset, whereas the transtensional regime was probably due to a counter-clockwise change in the spreading direction and an increase of the ridge offset. The new multibeam data along the three profiles reveal that crust on the eastern side is smoother (as shown by the abyssal hill number and structure) and hosts several seamounts (with age estimations of 7.67, 6.10 and 0.79 Ma), in contrast to the rougher conjugate western flank. Considering that the western flank was closer to the Reunion plume, and therefore

  9. The feeding zones of terrestrial planets and insights into Moon formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaib, Nathan A.; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2015-05-01

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation consists of several hundred approximately lunar mass bodies accreting into a few terrestrial planets. This final stage is stochastic, making it hard to predict which parts of the original planetesimal disk contributed to each of our terrestrial planets. Here we present an extensive suite of terrestrial planet formation simulations that allows quantitative analysis of this process. Although there is a general correlation between a planet's location and the initial semi-major axes of its constituent planetesimals, we concur with previous studies that Venus, Earth, and Mars analogs have overlapping, stochastic feeding zones. We quantify the feeding zone width, Δa , as the mass-weighted standard deviation of the initial semi-major axes of the planetary embryos and planetesimals that make up the final planet. The size of a planet's feeding zone in our simulations does not correlate with its final mass or semi-major axis, suggesting there is no systematic trend between a planet's mass and its volatile inventory. Instead, we find that the feeding zone of any planet more massive than 0.1M⊕ is roughly proportional to the radial extent of the initial disk from which it formed: Δa ≈ 0.25 (amax -amin) , where amin and amax are the inner and outer edge of the initial planetesimal disk. These wide stochastic feeding zones have significant consequences for the origin of the Moon, since the canonical scenario predicts the Moon should be primarily composed of material from Earth's last major impactor (Theia), yet its isotopic composition is indistinguishable from Earth. In particular, we find that the feeding zones of Theia analogs are significantly more stochastic than the planetary analogs. Depending on our assumed initial distribution of oxygen isotopes within the planetesimal disk, we find a ∼ 5% or less probability that the Earth and Theia will form with an isotopic difference equal to or smaller than the Earth and Moon

  10. Contact resistance and normal zone formation in coated yttrium barium copper oxide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Robert Calvin

    2001-11-01

    This project presents a systematic study of contact resistance and normal zone formation in silver coated YBa2CU3Ox (YBCO) superconductors. A unique opportunity exists in YBCO superconductors because of the ability to use oxygen annealing to influence the interfacial properties and the planar geometry of this type of superconductor to characterize the contact resistance between the silver and YBCO. The interface represents a region that current must cross when normal zones form in the superconductor and a high contact resistance could impede the current transfer or produce excess Joule heating that would result in premature quench or damage of the sample. While it has been shown in single-crystalline YBCO processing methods that the contact resistance of the silver/YBCO interface can be influenced by post-process oxygen annealing, this has not previously been confirmed for high-density films, nor for samples with complete layers of silver deposited on top of the YBCO. Both the influence of contact resistance and the knowledge of normal zone formation on conductor sized samples is essential for their successful implementation into superconducting applications such as transmission lines and magnets. While normal zone formation and propagation have been studied in other high temperature superconductors, the amount of information with respect to YBCO has been very limited. This study establishes that the processing method for the YBCO does not affect the contact resistance and mirrors the dependence of contact resistance on oxygen annealing temperature observed in earlier work. It has also been experimentally confirmed that the current transfer length provides an effective representation of the contact resistance when compared to more direct measurements using the traditional four-wire method. Finally for samples with low contact resistance, a combination of experiments and modeling demonstrate an accurate understanding of the key role of silver thickness and substrate

  11. Model for Transition Zone Formation from Upwelling Thermo-Chemical Plumes of Intermediate Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    The mantle transition zone has been limited to a layer of approximately 250 km at the base of the upper mantle, identified by studies in seismology and mineral physics. However, there are many uncertainties as to the nature of formation of this mid-mantle layer, its evolution over geological time, physical properties, and its role facilitating or inhibiting whole mantle flow. Here, we conduct laboratory fluid experiments using high viscosity corn syrup fluids and liquid gallium to study mantle convection processes in the early Earth. Specifically, we consider early core formation events involving metal-silicate plumes which sink following impact events and entrain magma ocean material from the surface during descent. Preliminary studies indicate that low viscosity, buoyant material, that makes up the model magma ocean near the surface is entrained in conduits that form behind quickly descending liquid metal plumes to the base of the lower mantle. This low density material brought to the base of the model lower mantle becomes buoyant and subsequently rises back up to the top of the fluid box forming a new intermediate material that has experienced both chemical and thermal diffusion along its mantle pathway and empties at the top of the lower mantle or base of a magma ocean. Two-component fluid experiments are considered in the presence of a hot lower thermal boundary layer at Rayleigh numbers of 103 to 105 and low Reynolds number flow, and indicate that upwelling thermo-chemical plumes may form following core formation events. This new third fluid layer of intermediate rheology is considered as a model for the mantle transition zone. Shadow graph images indicate a sharp density contrast with surrounding fluids that persists for long times, consistent with seismic discontinuities observed for the Earth's transition zone. We will present quantitative estimates of material rheology, density, and flow properties for scaling with a silicate mantle, geophysical, and

  12. Investigating the Role of Dehydration Reactions in Subduction Zone Pore Pressures Using Newly-Developed Permeability-Porosity Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Screaton, E.; Daigle, H.; James, S.; Meridth, L.; Jaeger, J. M.; Villaseñor, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    Dehydration reactions are linked to shallow subduction zone deformation through excess pore pressures and their effect on mechanical properties. Two reactions, the transformation of smectite to illite and of opal-A to opal-CT and then to quartz, can occur relatively early in the subduction process and may affect the propagation of the plate boundary fault, the updip limit of velocity-weakening frictional paper, and tsunamigenesis. Due to large variations between subduction zones in heat flow, sedimentation rates, and geometries, dehydration location may peak prior to subduction to as much as 100 km landward of the deformation front. The location of the dehydration reaction peak relative to when compaction occurs, causes significant differences in pore pressure generation. As a result, a key element to modeling excess pore pressures due to dehydration reactions is the assumed relationship between permeability and porosity. Data from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) drilling of subduction zone reference sites were combined with previously collected results to develop relationships for porosity-permeability behavior for various sediment types. Comparison with measurements of deeper analog data show that porosity-permeability trends are maintained through burial and diagenesis to porosities <10%, suggesting that behavior observed in shallow samples is informative for predicting behavior at depth following subduction. We integrate these permeability-porosity relationships, compaction behavior, predictions of temperature distribution, kinetic expressions for smectite and opal-A dehydration, into fluid flow models to examine the role of dehydration reactions in pore pressure generation.

  13. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  14. Evidence of reaction rate influencing cubic and hexagonal phase formation process in CdS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Kuldeep; Kalita, M. P. C.

    2016-05-01

    CdS nanocrystals are synthesized by co-precipitation method using 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as capping agent. Cubic, hexagonal and their mixture are obtained by varying the ME concentration. Lower (higher) ME concentration results in cubic (hexagonal) phase. The crystallite sizes are in the range 3-7 nm. Increase in ME concentration lead to lower reaction rate between Cd2+ and S2- of the precursors, and slower reaction rate is found to favor hexagonal phase formation over the cubic one in CdS nanocrystals. Role of reaction rate in the phase formation process provides a way to synthesize CdS nanocrystals in desired crystal phase.

  15. Redox reactions and complex formation of transplutonium elements in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives a brief analysis of the kinetics and mechanism of a number of redox processes and the complex formation of transplutonium elements in unusual oxidation states. The composition and strength of complexes of TPE with various addends have been determined. The new experimental data on the oxidation potentials of americium and berkelium ions in solutions are cited in abbreviated form. It follows from the data that in phosphoric acid solutions, when the H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentration is increased from 10 to 15 M, the oxidation potential of the couple Am(IV)-Am(III) decreases. The oxidation potentials of the couples Am(VI)-Am(V), Cm(V)-Cm(IV), and Bk(IV)Bk(III) are also presented.

  16. Conditions of kyanite formation from fluid in an alpine shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultze, Dina; Loges, Anselm; Franz, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermally formed quartz-kyanite rocks from the WSW-ENE-striking Greiner shear zone (Pfitscher Joch, Italy) on the south-western border of Tauern window were investigated in order to reconstruct conditions and processes of kyanite formation from metamorphic fluids. It is known from experiments that kyanite does not precipitate spontaneously from a qz-saturated, Al-rich fluid in spite of p-T conditions well inside the thermodynamic stability field of kyanite. Natural samples where kyanite nucleates spontaneously from fluid were investigated in order to understand what factors may control inhibition of nucleation in experiments. The Greiner shear zone cuts a variety of metasedimentary (metapelites, -psammites) units of the lower Schieferhülle, which lie between two distinct Zentralgneis units (Tuxer gneiss core in the north, Zillertaler gneiss core in the south). At the Pfitscher Joch near to the Rotbachlspitze (2897 m), the shear zone intersects the tectonic contact between the Schieferhülle metasediments and the Zillertaler gneiss in an acute angle. A number of segregations (up to 1m in diameter) composed mainly of quartz, feldspar and tourmaline are found along strike in the most silica-rich sheared stratigraphic layers. Besides kyanite and quartz the vein rocks show a range of other refractory mineral phases, especially pyrophyllite, rutile and zircon. Minor amounts of xenotime and monazite represent the REE carrier in these rocks. Growth textures indicate simultaneous crystallization of quartz, kyanite, rutile and zircon, whereas pyrophyllite may represent alteration processes in a later stage during obduction of the rocks. Additionally, in some samples muscovite and tourmaline were observed. The potassium and boron supply is likely provided by the metapelite or gneiss units adjacent to the shear zone. In the metapelites tourmaline is most abundant in the vicinity of the shear zone, suggesting migration of boron-rich fluids either to or from the shear zone

  17. Evaluating the Influence of Chemical Reactions on Wellbore Cement Integrity and Geochemical Tracer Behavior in Hydraulically-Fractured Shale Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verba, C.; Lieuallen, A.; Yang, J.; Torres, M. E.; Hakala, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ensuring wellbore integrity for hydraulically-fractured shale reservoirs is important for maintaining zonal isolation of gases and fluids within the reservoir. Chemical reactions between wellbore cements, the shale formation, formation fluids, and fracturing fluids could affect the ability for cement to form an adequate seal. This study focuses on experimental investigations to evaluate how cement, rock, brines, and fracturing fluids react under conditions similar to the perforated zone associated with the Marcellus shale (Greene County, Pennsylvania). Two pressure/temperature regimes were investigated- moderate (25 MPa, 50oC) and high (27.5 MPa, 90oC). Shale collected from the Lower Marcellus section was encased in Class A cement, cured for 24 hours, and then exposed to simulated conditions in experimental autoclave reactors. The simulated formation fluid was a synthetic brine, modeled after a flowback fluid contained 187,000 mg/l total dissolved solids and had a pH of 7.6. The effect of pH was probed to evaluate the potential for cement reactivity under different pH conditions, and the potential for contaminant or geochemical tracer release from the shale (e.g. arsenic and rare earth elements). In addition to dissolution reactions, sorption and precipitation reactions between solutes and the cement are being evaluated, as the cement could bond with solute-phase species during continued hydration. The cements are expected to show different reactivity under the two temperature conditions because the primary cement hydration product, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is heavily influenced by temperature. Results from these experimental studies will be used both to inform the potential changes in cement chemistry that may occur along a wellbore in the hydraulically-fractured portion of a reservoir, and the types of geochemical tracers that may be useful in tracking these reactions.

  18. The formation of illite from nontronite by mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaisi, D.P.; Eberl, D.D.; Dong, H.; Kim, J.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of illite through the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction is considered to be one of the most important mineral reactions occurring during diagenesis. In biologically catalyzed systems, however, this transformation has been suggested to be rapid and to bypass the high temperature and long time requirements. To understand the factors that promote the S-I reaction, the present study focused on the effects of pH, temperature, solution chemistry, and aging on the S-I reaction in microbially mediated systems. Fe(III)-reduction experiments were performed in both growth and non-growth media with two types of bacteria: mesophilic (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) and thermophilic (Thermus scotoductus SA-01). Reductive dissolution of NAu-2 was observed and the formation of illite in treatment with thermophilic SA-01 was indicated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A basic pH (8.4) and high temperature (65??C) were the most favorable conditions forthe formation of illite. A long incubation time was also found to enhance the formation of illite. K-nontronite (non-permanent fixation of K) was also detected and differentiated from the discrete illite in the XRD profiles. These results collectively suggested that the formation of illite associated with the biologically catalyzed smectite-to-illite reaction pathway may bypass the prolonged time and high temperature required for the S-I reaction in the absence of microbial activity.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation from benzyl radicals: a reaction kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet

    2016-03-01

    The role of resonantly stabilized radicals such as propargyl, cyclopentadienyl and benzyl in the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene in the high temperature environments has been long known. In this work, the possibility of benzyl recombination to form three-ring aromatics, phenanthrene and anthracene, is explored. A reaction mechanism for it is developed, where reaction energetics are calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set) and CBS-QB3, while temperature-dependent reaction kinetics are evaluated using transition state theory. The mechanism begins with barrierless formation of bibenzyl from two benzyl radicals with the release of 283.2 kJ mol(-1) of reaction energy. The further reactions involve H-abstraction by a H atom, H-desorption, H-migration, and ring closure to gain aromaticity. Through mechanism and rate of production analyses, the important reactions leading to phenanthrene and anthracene formation are determined. Phenanthrene is found to be the major product at high temperatures. Premixed laminar flame simulations are carried out by including the proposed reactions for phenanthrene formation from benzyl radicals and compared to experimentally observed species profiles to understand their effects on species concentrations. PMID:26923612

  20. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from bimolecular reactions of phenyl radicals at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Constantinidis, P; Schmitt, H-C; Fischer, I; Yan, B; Rijs, A M

    2015-11-21

    The self-reaction of the phenyl radical is one of the key reactions in combustion chemistry. Here we study this reaction in a high-temperature flow reactor by IR/UV ion dip spectroscopy, using free electron laser radiation as mid-infrared source. We identified several major reaction products based on their infrared spectra, among them indene, 1,2-dihydronaphthalene, naphthalene, biphenyl and para-terphenyl. Due to the structural sensitivity of the method, the reaction products were identified isomer-selectively. The work shows that the formation of indene and naphthalene, which was previously considered to be evidence for the HACA (hydrogen abstraction C2H2 addition) mechanism in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soot can also be understood in a phenyl addition model. PMID:26457393

  1. Paleomagnetism of Harutagawa formation in the Hohi Volcanic Zone in northeastern part of Kyushu Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudou, T.; Shibuya, H.

    2008-12-01

    The Beppu-Shimabara graben in the Hohi Volcanic Zone (HVZ) in northeastern part of Kyushu Island, Japan is thought to be a volcano-tectonic depression. Volcanic stratigraphy and age studies of the area have unraveled the late Pliocene structural formation history of HVZ (e.g. Kamata, 1994, Kido, 2007). The age and sedimentation rate of lacustrine deposits in HVZ is one of the keys for interpreting the temporal relation between the formation of Beppu-Shimabara graben and the huge pyroclastic flows appeared in the area. We study the magnetostratigraphy of the Harutagawa formation, which is one of those lacustrine deposits. The formation is dominated by conglomerates and mad stones to siltstones, in the lower and upper parts, respectively, but bares many tuff layers all over the formation. Fission track ages of two tuff layers, one is from lower part and the other is from upper part of Harutagawa formation, are determined as 3.86 ± 0.77Ma and 3.6 ± 0.2Ma, respectively (Kido, 2007). Samples for paleomagnetic analyses have been collected at 28 sites in several continuous outcrop of the Harutagawa formation. The sites are set to be spaced equally in the stratigraphy. Samples were collected by a portable electric motor drill. A few pilot specimens from each site are subjected to progressive thermal and alternating field (AF) demagnetization. However, AF demagnetization is not effective. All remaining specimens are, therefore, submitted to the progressive thermal demagnetization. The samples have mean magnetic intensity of 1.7 × 10- 4A/m and 7.7 × 10-5A/m before and after demagnetization, respectively. Samples from 6 sites have no stable component or are thought to be completely remagnetized by the present magnetic field. As the result, 22 sites are determined their polarities; 8 were reversed and 14 were normal. The normal polarity sites were correlative to Sidufjall, Nunivak and Cochiti subchrons in the Gilbert reversed polarity chron. This correlation indicates that

  2. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  3. Simulations of Pore Formation in Lipid Membranes: Reaction Coordinates, Convergence, Hysteresis, and Finite-Size Effects.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Neha; Hub, Jochen S

    2016-07-12

    Transmembrane pores play an important role in various biophysical processes such as membrane permeation, membrane fusion, and antimicrobial peptide activity. In principal, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide an accurate model of pore formation in lipid membranes. However, the free energy landscape of transmembrane pore formation remains poorly understood, partly because potential of mean force (PMF) calculations of pore formation strongly depend on the choice of the reaction coordinate. In this study, we used umbrella sampling to compute PMFs for pore formation using three different reaction coordinates, namely, (i) a coordinate that steers the lipids in the lateral direction away from the pore center, (ii) the distance of a single lipid phosphate group from the membrane center, and (iii) the average water density inside a membrane-spanning cylinder. Our results show that while the three reaction coordinates efficiently form pores in membranes, they suffer from strong hysteresis between pore-opening and pore-closing simulations, suggesting that they do not restrain the systems close to the transition state for pore formation. The two reaction coordinates that act via restraining the lipids lead to more pronounced hysteresis compared with the coordinate acting on the water molecules. By comparing PMFs computed from membranes with different numbers of lipids, we observed significant artifacts from the periodic boundary conditions in small simulation systems. Further analysis suggests that the formation and disruption of a continuous hydrogen-bonding network across the membrane corresponds to the transition state for pore formation. Our study provides molecular insights into the critical steps of transmembrane pore formation, and it may guide the development of efficient reaction coordinates for pore formation. PMID:27254744

  4. Formation of Fragment Rich Pseudotachylite Zones During Central Uplift Formation in the Vredefort Impact Structure, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieger, D.; Riller, U.; Reimold, W. U.; Gibson, R. L.

    Field-based structural analysis of the Vredefort Dome focused on mapping of pre-impact planar mineral fabrics and structural properties of fragment-rich pseudotachylite zones, such as geometry, orientation, brecciation intensity of the zones.

  5. The sensitivity of mechanical properties of TFRS composites to variations in reaction zone size and properties. [Tungsten Fiber Reinforced Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craddock, James N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Petrasek, Donald W.; Brindley, Pamela K.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS) composites are calculated using a 3-component micromechanical model. The properties and size of the reaction zone are varied and the effect of these variations on the composite properties are studied. Results are presented in graphical and tabular form. Post-matrix yield behavior is examined in terms of the tangent modulus of the composite and measures of the effective strength of the lamina.

  6. Formation of HCN+ in Heterogeneous Reactions of N2+ and N+ with Surface Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnisch, Martina; Keim, Alan; Scheier, Paul; Herman, Zdenek

    2013-10-01

    A significant increase of the ion yield at m/z 27 in collisions of low-energy ions of N2+ and N+ with hydrocarbon-covered room-temperature or heated surfaces of tungsten, carbon-fiber composite, and beryllium, not observed in analogous collisions of Ar+, is ascribed to the formation of HCN+ in heterogeneous reactions between N2+ or N+ and surface hydrocarbons. The formation of HCN+ in the reaction with N+ indicated an exothermic reaction with no activation barrier, likely to occur even at very low collision energies. In the reaction with N2+, the formation of HCN+ was observed to a different degree on these room-temperature and heated (150 and 300 °C) surfaces at incident energies above about 50 eV. This finding suggested an activation barrier or reaction endothermicity of the heterogeneous reaction of about 3-3.5 eV. The main process in N2+ or N+ interaction with the surfaces is ion neutralization; the probability of forming the reaction product HCN+ was very roughly estimated for both N2+ and N+ ions to about one in 104 collisions with the surfaces.

  7. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X-ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  8. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1992-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, auger electron spectroscopy, and x ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  9. Formation of harzburgite by pervasive melt/rock reaction in the upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelemen, P.B.; Dick, H.J.B.; Quick, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Many mantle peridotite samples are too rich in SiO2 (in the form of orthopyroxene) and have ratios of light to heavy rare earth elements that are too high to be consistent with an origin as the residuum of partial melting of the primitive mantle. Trace element studies of melt/rock reaction zones in the Trinity peridotite provide evidence for reaction of the mantle lithosphere with ascending melts, which dissolved calcium-pyroxene and precipitated orthopyroxene as magma mass decreased. This process can account for the observed major and trace element compositions of lithospheric mantle samples, and may accordingly be prevalent in the upper mantle.

  10. Preprophase band formation and cortical division zone establishment: RanGAP behaves differently from microtubules during their band formation

    PubMed Central

    Yabuuchi, Takatoshi; Nakai, Tomonori; Sonobe, Seiji; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Correct positioning of the division plane is a prerequisite for plant morphogenesis. The preprophase band (PPB) is a key intracellular structure of division site determination. PPB forms in G2 phase as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) that narrows in prophase and specializes few-micrometer-wide cortical belt region, named the cortical division zone (CDZ), in late prophase. The PPB comprises several molecules, some of which act as MT band organization and others remain in the CDZ marking the correct insertion of the cell plate in telophase. Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) is accumulated in the CDZ and forms a RanGAP band in prophase. However, little is known about when and how RanGAPs gather in the CDZ, and especially with regard to their relationships to MT band formation. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal distribution of RanGAPs and MTs in the preprophase of onion root tip cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and showed that the RanGAP band appeared in mid-prophase as the width of MT band was reduced to nearly 7 µm. Treatments with cytoskeletal inhibitors for 15 min caused thinning or broadening of the MT band but had little effects on RanGAP band in mid-prophase and most of late prophase cells. Detailed image analyses of the spatial distribution of RanGAP band and MT band showed that the RanGAP band positioned slightly beneath the MT band in mid-prophase. These results raise a possibility that RanGAP behaves differently from MTs during their band formation. PMID:26237087

  11. Reservoir characteristics of Putnam zone (Silurian Interlake Formation) lithofacies, southwestern Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Inden, R. ); Oglesby, C. ); Byrnes, A. ); Cluff, B. )

    1991-06-01

    Reservoirs in the Putnam zone (lower Interlake Formation) in the southwestern part of the Williston basin include oolitic-pellet dolomite grainstone, fossil-pellet grainstone, and a wide spectrum of reef-related, fossil-corral dolomite packstones and coral-stromatoporoid rudstone/boundstones. Each of these potential reservoirs has a unique pore system and, thus a different set of petrophysical properties which define their reservoir characteristics. Oolitic grainstones have a homogeneous intercrystalline-micro-crystalline pore system, whereas the fossil-pellet dolomite grainstone facies consists of separate mesovugs dispersed in well-interconnected intercrystalline porosity. Capillary pressure curves indicate that pore-throat heterogeneity is greater, and entry pressures lower, for reefal lithofacies than for pelletal grainstones. These curves also demonstrate why many of the producing fields tend to have high water cuts. In many oolitic-pellet grainstone units, irreducible water saturations of 10% would not be reached until a hydrocarbon column of 700 ft was reached. High water production characteristics are therefore expected because Red River/Interlake structures attain only 50-100 ft of closure. This, however, does not mean that Putnam is not an economic zone, especially as a secondary objective. Wells in Putnam and Crane fields, for instance, have reserves in excess of 300,000 bbl of oil. The reservoirs here may be dominated by the reef-related facies, which have an extremely high relative permeability to oil.

  12. Formation of Zones with Maximum Supersonic Cavitation Intensity in Single-Component and Multicomponent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtin, B. I.; Ivashov, A. I.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Skorokhodov, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies have been made on the formation of highly active cavitation zones in fluid media at high pressures (up to 6.5 MPa) and temperatures (up to 150°C) with the use of a high-power ultrasonic installation. It has been shown that attempts to increase the cavitation intensity in single-component and multicomponent media by increasing the power of the ultrasonic installation to above a certain limit lead to a strong degradation of the cavitation processes. This is due to the appearance of hydrodynamical flows generated by longitudinal vibrations of the installation radiator waveguide. Eliminating or weakening such flows makes it possible to increase markedly the efficiency of cavitation treatment by increasing the medium pressure (in the range of 0.5-1.5 MPa) and choosing the optimum ratio between the temperature of the medium and the power of the ultrasonic installation (specific acoustic power of the radiator). We recommend to use for the cavitation intensity index the acoustic activity of the cavitation zone (acoustic noise amplitude in the frequency range of 200 kHz-10 MHz), as well as its physical activity determined by the destruction rate of thin-layer indicators.

  13. Formation of Zones with Maximum Supersonic Cavitation Intensity in Single-Component and Multicomponent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtin, B. I.; Ivashov, A. I.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Skorokhodov, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental studies have been made on the formation of highly active cavitation zones in fluid media at high pressures (up to 6.5 MPa) and temperatures (up to 150°C) with the use of a high-power ultrasonic installation. It has been shown that attempts to increase the cavitation intensity in single-component and multicomponent media by increasing the power of the ultrasonic installation to above a certain limit lead to a strong degradation of the cavitation processes. This is due to the appearance of hydrodynamical flows generated by longitudinal vibrations of the installation radiator waveguide. Eliminating or weakening such flows makes it possible to increase markedly the efficiency of cavitation treatment by increasing the medium pressure (in the range of 0.5-1.5 MPa) and choosing the optimum ratio between the temperature of the medium and the power of the ultrasonic installation (specific acoustic power of the radiator). We recommend to use for the cavitation intensity index the acoustic activity of the cavitation zone (acoustic noise amplitude in the frequency range of 200 kHz-10 MHz), as well as its physical activity determined by the destruction rate of thin-layer indicators.

  14. Self-consistent formation of parallel electric fields in the auroral zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, David; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents results from a fully self-consistent kinetic particle simulation of the time-dependent formation of large scale parallel electric fields in the auroral zone. The results show that magnetic mirroring of the hot plasma that streams earthward from the magnetotail leads to a charge separation potential drop of many kilovolts, over an altitude range of a few thousand kilometers. Once the potential drop is formed, it remains relatively static and is maintained in time by the constant input of hot plasma from the tail; the parallel electric field accelerates ions away from Earth and ionospheric electrons towards the Earth. At altitudes above where the ions are mirror reflected and accelerated by the parallel electric field, low frequency waves are generated, possibly due to an ion/ion two-stream interaction.

  15. Al-O complex formation in ion implanted Czochralski and floating-zone Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Ferla, A.; Torrisi, L.; Galvagno, G.; Rimini, E.; Ciavola, G.; Carnera, A.; Gasparotto, A.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum ions at 100 MeV were implanted into floating-zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ) grown Si substrates. At this energy the influence of the surface on the subsequent thermal treatment is negligible. In FZ samples the electrical active dose, as measured by spreading resistance profilometry, is independent of the annealing time at 1200 °C. In the CZ samples instead it considerably decreases with time. Secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis in CZ samples have revealed the presence of a multipeak structure around the projected range region for both Al and O signals. In FZ the structure is just detectable. The results imply that the Al-O complex formation is enhanced by the presence of oxygen but that it is catalyzed by the damage created during the implant. The carrier profiles coincide in both CZ and FZ diffused substrates by predeposition of Al from a solid source, i.e., in damage-free samples.

  16. Deduction of compound nucleus formation probability from the fragment angular distributions in heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, C.; Thomas, R. G.; Mohanty, A. K.; Kapoor, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    The presence of various fissionlike reactions in heavy-ion induced reactions is a major hurdle in the path to laboratory synthesis of heavy and super-heavy nuclei. It is known that the cross section of forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the three factors—the capture cross section, probability of compound nucleus formation PCN, and the survival probability of the compound nucleus against fission. As the probability of compound nucleus formation, PCN is difficult to theoretically estimate because of its complex dependence on several parameters; attempts have been made in the past to deduce it from the fission fragment anisotropy data. In the present work, the fragment anisotropy data for a number of heavy-ion reactions are analyzed and it is found that deduction of PCN from the anisotropy data also requires the knowledge of the ratio of relaxation time of the K degree of freedom to pre-equilibrium fission time.

  17. Numerical study on the impacts of heterogeneous reactions on ozone formation in the Beijing urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yuanhang; Wang, Wei

    2006-12-01

    The air quality model CMAQ-MADRID (Community Multiscale Air Quality-Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution) was employed to simulate summer O3 formation in Beijing China, in order to explore the impacts of four heterogeneous reactions on O3 formation in an urban area. The results showed that the impacts were obvious and exhibited the characteristics of a typical response of a VOC-limited regime in the urban area. For the four heterogeneous reactions considered, the NO2 and HO2 heterogeneous reactions have the most severe impacts on O3 formation. During the O3 formation period, the NO2 heterogeneous reaction increased new radical creation by 30%, raising the atmospheric activity as more NO→NO2 conversion occurred, thus causing the O3 to rise. The increase of O3 peak concentration reached a maximum value of 67 ppb in the urban area. In the morning hours, high NO titration reduced the effect of the photolysis of HONO, which was produced heterogeneously at night in the surface layer. The NO2 heterogeneous reaction in the daytime is likely one of the major reasons causing the O3 increase in the Beijing urban area. The HO2 heterogeneous reaction accelerated radical termination, resulting in a decrease of the radical concentration by 44% at the most. O3 peak concentration decreased by a maximum amount of 24 ppb in the urban area. The simulation results were improved when the heterogeneous reactions were included, with the O3 and HONO model results close to the observations.

  18. [THE THROMBUS FORMATION IN THE PROSTHESIS AS A REACTION OF ORGANISM ON ITS MATERIAL].

    PubMed

    Alekseyeva, T A; Gupalo, Yu M; Kolomoets, A M; Lazarenko, O N; Lazarenko, G O; Litvin, P M; Lohs, I V; Smorzhevskiy, V J; Stepkin, V I

    2016-04-01

    Abstract Vascular prostheses, excised because of their functional properties loss, were studied. Using different methods there was established, that this complication is caused by the thrombus formation as a reaction of organism on the prosthesis material. The testing procedure on compatibility was proposed, using atomic-power microscope. Components of a patient immunity may identify the prosthesis material and start the rejection mechanisms in case of negative reaction. PMID:27434951

  19. Granular Shear Zone Formation: Acoustic Emission Measurements and Fiber-bundle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    We couple the acoustic emissions method with conceptual models of granular material behavior for investigation of granular shear zone formation and to assess eminence of landslide hazard. When granular materials are mechanically loaded or sheared, they tend to produce discrete events of force network restructuring, and frictional interaction at grain contacts. Such abrupt perturbations within the granular lattice release part of the elastic energy stored in the strained material. Elastic waves generated by such events can be measured as acoustic emissions (AE) and may be used as surrogates for intermittent structural transitions associated with shear zone formation. To experimentally investigate the connection between granular shearing and acoustic signals we performed an array of strain-controlled shear-frame tests using glass beads. AE were measured with two different systems operating at two frequency ranges. High temporal resolution measurements of the shear stresses revealed the presence of small fluctuations typically associated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic bursts. Shear stress jumps and linked acoustic signals give account of discrete events of grain network rearrangements and obey characteristic exponential frequency-size distributions. We found that statistical features of force jumps and AE events depend on mechanical boundary conditions and evolve during the straining process. Activity characteristics of high-frequency (> 30 kHz) AE events is linked to friction between grains. To interpret failure associated AE signals, we adapted a conceptual fiber-bundle model (FBM) that describes some of the salient statistical features of failure and associated energy production. Using FBMs for the abrupt mechanical response of the granular medium and an associated grain and force chain AE generation model provides us with a full description of the mechanical-acoustical granular shearing process. Highly resolved AE may serve as a diagnostic tool not only

  20. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R; Meyer, Anne S

    2014-02-19

    The degradation compounds formed during pretreatment when lignocellulosic biomass is processed to ethanol or other biorefinery products include furans, phenolics, organic acids, as well as mono- and oligomeric pentoses and hexoses. Depending on the reaction conditions glucose can be converted to 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF) and/or levulinic acid, formic acid and different phenolics at elevated temperatures. Correspondingly, xylose can follow different reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of furan-2-carbaldehyde (furfural) and/or various C-1 and C-4 compounds. At least four routes for the formation of HMF from glucose and three routes for furfural formation from xylose are possible. In addition, new findings show that biomass monosaccharides themselves can react further to form pseudo-lignin and humins as well as a wide array of other compounds when exposed to high temperatures. Hence, several aldehydes and ketones and many different organic acids and aromatic compounds may be generated during hydrothermal treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. The reaction mechanisms are of interest because the very same compounds that are possible inhibitors for biomass processing enzymes and microorganisms may be valuable biobased chemicals. Hence a new potential for industrial scale synthesis of chemicals has emerged. A better understanding of the reaction mechanisms and the impact of the reaction conditions on the product formation is thus a prerequisite for designing better biomass processing strategies and forms an important basis for the development of new biorefinery products from lignocellulosic biomass as well. PMID:24412507

  1. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone-initiated reactions with nicotine and secondhand tobacco smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Destaillats, Hugo; Smith, Jared D.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Gundel, Lara A.

    2010-11-01

    We used controlled laboratory experiments to evaluate the aerosol-forming potential of ozone reactions with nicotine and secondhand smoke. Special attention was devoted to real-time monitoring of the particle size distribution and chemical composition of SOA as they are believed to be key factors determining the toxicity of SOA. The experimental approach was based on using a vacuum ultraviolet photon ionization time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (VUV-AMS), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and off-line thermal desorption coupled to mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) for gas-phase byproducts analysis. Results showed that exposure of SHS to ozone induced the formation of ultrafine particles (<100 nm) that contained high molecular weight nitrogenated species ( m/ z 400-500), which can be due to accretion/acid-base reactions and formation of oligomers. In addition, nicotine was found to contribute significantly (with yields 4-9%) to the formation of secondary organic aerosol through reaction with ozone. The main constituents of the resulting SOA were tentatively identified and a reaction mechanism was proposed to elucidate their formation. These findings identify a new component of thirdhand smoke that is associated with the formation of ultrafine particles (UFP) through oxidative aging of secondhand smoke. The significance of this chemistry for indoor exposure and health effects is highlighted.

  2. The Central Molecular Zone of the Milky Way: Lessons about Star Formation from an extreme Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Jens; Thushara Pillai, G. S.; Zhang, Qizhou; Lu, Xing; Immer, Katharina

    2015-08-01

    The Central Molecular Zone of the Milky Way (CMZ; innermost ~100pc) hosts a number of remarkably dense and massive clouds. These are subject to extreme environmental conditions, including very high cosmic ray fluxes and strong magnetic fields. Exploring star formation under such exceptional circumstances is essential for several of reasons. First, the CMZ permits to probe an extreme point in the star formation parameter space, which helps to test theoretical models. Second, CMZ clouds might help to understand the star formation under extreme conditions in more distant environments, such as in starbursts and the early universe.One particularly striking aspect is that — compared to the solar neighborhood — CMZ star formation in dense gas is suppressed by more than an order of magnitude (Longmore et al. 2012, Kauffmann et al. 2013). This questions current explanations for relations between the dense gas and the star formation rate (e.g., Gao & Solomon 2004, Lada et al. 2012). In other words, the unusually dense and massive CMZ molecular clouds form only very few stars, if any at all. Why is this so?Based on data from ALMA, CARMA, and SMA interferometers, we present results from the Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey (GCMS), the first study of a comprehensive sample of molecular clouds in the CMZ. This research yields a curious result: most of the major CMZ clouds are essentially devoid of significant substructure of the sort usually found in regions of high-mass star formation (Kauffmann et al. 2013). Preliminary analysis indicates that some clouds rather resemble homogeneous balls of gas. This suggests a highly dynamic picture of cloud evolution in the CMZ where clouds form, disperse, and re-assemble constantly. This concept is benchmarked against a new ALMA survey and first results from a legacy survey on the SMA.It is plausible that dense clouds in other galaxies have a similar internal structure. Instruments like ALMA and the JWST will soon permit to

  3. Stream discharge events increase the reaction efficiency of the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, J. H.; Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Streambed structures such as dunes, pool-riffles or bars enhance the exchange of stream water and solutes with the subsurface, the hyporheic zone. Prior studies have evaluated the factors which control hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes for steady state hydrological conditions using numerical models. However, the impact of natural discharge variability on water and solute exchange, creating hydraulically specific conditions for the reactions in the shallow streambed, has not been studied so far. In our study, we set up a transient flow and reactive transport model to elucidate the impact of single stream discharge events on water exchange, solute transport and reactions within the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar. The discharge events were varied by their duration and the maximum stream discharge. Temporally variable hydraulic heads were assigned as hydraulic head boundary conditions at the top of the reactive groundwater model MIN3P. A steady ambient groundwater flow field was introduced by lateral upstream and downstream hydraulic head boundaries, generating in combination with the stream water level, losing, neutral, or gaining stream conditions. Stream water borne dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon and nitrate can infiltrate into the modelling domain across the top boundary and can react with each other by aerobic respiration and denitrification. Our results show that water and solute exchange through the hyporheic zone (only stream water that infiltrates into the subsurface and exfiltrates back to the stream) is highly dependent on the interplay between event characteristics and the ambient groundwater level. In scenarios where the stream discharge shifts the hydraulic system to strong and long-lasting losing conditions, hyporheic flow paths are longer and the extent of the hyporheic zone are deeper than under base flow conditions and small events where gaining conditions prevail. Consequently, stream discharge events may

  4. How can macromolecular crowding inhibit biological reactions? The enhanced formation of DNA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sen; Trochimczyk, Piotr; Sun, Lili; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Zhang, Xuzhu; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the already known effect that macromolecular crowding usually promotes biological reactions, solutions of PEG 6k at high concentrations stop the cleavage of DNA by HindIII enzyme, due to the formation of DNA nanoparticles. We characterized the DNA nanoparticles and probed the prerequisites for their formation using multiple techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence analytical ultracentrifugation etc. In >25% PEG 6k solution, macromolecular crowding promotes the formation of DNA nanoparticles with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers. The formation of DNA nanoparticles is a fast and reversible process. Both plasmid DNA (2686 bp) and double-stranded/single-stranded DNA fragment (66bp/nt) can form nanoparticles. We attribute the enhanced nanoparticle formation to the depletion effect of macromolecular crowding. This study presents our idea to enhance the formation of DNA nanoparticles by macromolecular crowding, providing the first step towards a final solution to efficient gene therapy. PMID:26903405

  5. How can macromolecular crowding inhibit biological reactions? The enhanced formation of DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sen; Trochimczyk, Piotr; Sun, Lili; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Zhang, Xuzhu; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the already known effect that macromolecular crowding usually promotes biological reactions, solutions of PEG 6k at high concentrations stop the cleavage of DNA by HindIII enzyme, due to the formation of DNA nanoparticles. We characterized the DNA nanoparticles and probed the prerequisites for their formation using multiple techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence analytical ultracentrifugation etc. In >25% PEG 6k solution, macromolecular crowding promotes the formation of DNA nanoparticles with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers. The formation of DNA nanoparticles is a fast and reversible process. Both plasmid DNA (2686 bp) and double-stranded/single-stranded DNA fragment (66bp/nt) can form nanoparticles. We attribute the enhanced nanoparticle formation to the depletion effect of macromolecular crowding. This study presents our idea to enhance the formation of DNA nanoparticles by macromolecular crowding, providing the first step towards a final solution to efficient gene therapy. PMID:26903405

  6. Reaction Rates for the Formation of Deuterium Tritide from Deuterium and Tritium

    SciTech Connect

    McConville, G. T.; Menke, D. A.; Ellefson, R. E.

    1985-04-01

    The rates of formation of DT in a mixture of D2 and T2 have been measured as a function of initial T2 concentration, pressure, temperature,and methane concentration in a stainless steel reaction container which had been treated to inhibit protium ingrowth. An attempt has been made to explain the experimental resuts on the basis of ion-molecule chain reactions. Some of the observations are consistent with a gas-phase ion, ground-state molecule reaction, but some of the more interesting observations require more complicated models. The addition of excited state molecules or heterogeneous catalytic effects are possibilities that will need further experiments for confirmation.

  7. Substrate decomposition in galvanic displacement reaction: Contrast between gold and silver nanoparticle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Tapas; Kabiraj, D.; Satpati, Biswarup

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated substrate decomposition during formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in galvanic displacement reaction on germanium surfaces. Silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized by electroless deposition on sputter coated germanium thin film (˜ 200 nm) grown initially on silicon substrate. The naoparticles formation and the substrate corrosion were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy.

  8. Substrate decomposition in galvanic displacement reaction: Contrast between gold and silver nanoparticle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tapas; Satpati, Biswarup

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated substrate decomposition during formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in galvanic displacement reaction on germanium surfaces. Silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized by electroless deposition on sputter coated germanium thin film (∼ 200 nm) grown initially on silicon substrate. The nanoparticles formation and the substrate corrosion were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy.

  9. Boundaries of intergrowths between mineral individuals: A zone of secondary mineral formation in aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodskaya, R. L.; Bil'Skaya, I. V.; Lyakhnitskaya, V. D.; Markovsky, B. A.; Sidorov, E. G.

    2007-12-01

    Intergrowth boundaries between mineral individuals in dunite of the Gal’moenan massif in Koryakia was studied in terms of crystal morphology, crystal optics, and ontogenesis. The results obtained allowed us to trace the staged formation of olivine and chromite and four generations of these minerals. Micro-and nanotopography of boundary surfaces between intergrown mineral individuals of different generations was examined with optic, electron, and atomic force microscopes. The boundaries between mineral individuals of different generations are distinguished by their microsculpture for both olivine and chromite grains. Both minerals demonstrate a compositional trend toward refinement from older to younger generations. The decrease in the iron mole fraction in olivine and chromite is accompanied by the crystallization of magnetite along weakened zones in olivine of the first generation and as outer rims around the chromite grains of the second generation observable under optic and electronic microscopes. The subsequent refinement of chromite results in the release of PGE from its lattice, as established by atomic power microscopy. The newly formed PGM are localized at the boundaries between mineral individuals and, thus, mark a special stage in the ontogenetic evolution of mineral aggregates. Further recrystallization is expressed in the spatial redistribution of grain boundaries and the formation of monomineralic intergrowth boundaries, i.e., the glomerogranular structure of rock and substructures of PGM, chromite, and olivine grains as intermediate types of organization of the granular assemblies in the form of reticulate, chain, and cellular structures and substructures of aggregates.

  10. Tetraspanin 7 regulates sealing zone formation and the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Haemin; Kim, Min Kyung; Song, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Zang Hee; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Tetraspanin family proteins regulate morphology, motility, fusion, and signaling in various cell types. We investigated the role of the tetraspanin 7 (Tspan7) isoform in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts. Tspan7 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis. When Tspan7 expression was reduced in primary precursor cells by siRNA-mediated gene knock-down, the generation of multinuclear osteoclasts was not affected. However, a striking cytoskeletal abnormality was observed: the formation of the podosome belt structure was inhibited and the microtubular network were disrupted by Tspan7 knock-down. Decreases in acetylated microtubules and levels of phosphorylated Src and Pyk2 in Tspan7 knock-down cells supported the involvement of Tspan7 in cytoskeletal rearrangement signaling in osteoclasts. This cytoskeletal defect interfered with sealing zone formation and subsequently the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts on dentin surfaces. Our results suggest that Tspan7 plays an important role in cytoskeletal organization required for the bone-resorbing function of osteoclasts by regulating signaling to Src, Pyk2, and microtubules. PMID:27416754

  11. Denuded Zone Formation in Germanium Codoped Heavily Phosphorus-Doped Czochralski Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Xia; Chen, Jia-He; Wu, Peng; Zeng, Yu-Heng; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Yang, De-Ren

    2011-03-01

    The formation of a denuded zone (DZ) by conventional furnace annealing (CFA) and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) based denudation processing is investigated and the gettering of copper (Cu) atoms in germanium co-doped heavily phosphorus-doped Czochralski (GHPCZ) silicon wafers is evaluated. It is suggested that both a good quality defect-free DZ with a suitable width in the sub-surface area and a high density bulk micro-defect (BMD) region could be formed in heavily phosphorus-doped Czochralski (HPCZ) silicon and GHPCZ silicon wafers. This is ascribed to the formation of phosphorus-vacancy (P-V) related complexes and germanium-vacancy (GeV) related complexes. Compared with HPCZ silicon, the DZ width is wider in the GHPCZ silicon sample with CFA-based denudation processing but narrower in the one with two-step RTA pretreatments. These phenomena are ascribed to the enhancing effect of germanium on oxygen out-diffusion movement and oxygen precipitate nucleation, respectively. Furthermore, fairly clean DZs near the surface remain in both the HPCZ and GHPCZ silicon wafers after Cu in-diffusion, except for the HPCZ silicon wafer which underwent denudation processing with a CFA pretreatment, suggesting that germanium doping could improve the gettering of Cu contamination.

  12. Aqua-planet simulations of the formation of the South Atlantic convergence zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieto Ferreira, Rosana; Chao, Winston C.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of Amazon Basin convection and cold fronts on the formation and maintenance of the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ) is studied using aqua-planet simulations with a general circulation model. In the model, a circular patch of warm sea-surface temperature (SST) is used to mimic the effect of the Amazon Basin on South American monsoon convection. The aqua-planet simulations were designed to study the effect of the strength and latitude of Amazon Basin convection on the formation of the SACZ. The simulations indicate that the strength of the SACZ increases as the Amazon convection intensifies and is moved away from the equator. Of the two controls studied here, the latitude of the Amazon convection exerts the strongest effect on the strength of the SACZ. An analysis of the synoptic-scale variability in the simulations shows the importance of frontal systems in the formation of the aqua-planet SACZ. Composite time series of frontal systems that occurred in the simulations show that a robust SACZ occurs when fronts penetrate into the subtropics and become stationary there as they cross eastward of the longitude of the Amazon Basin. Moisture convergence associated with these frontal systems produces rainfall not along the model SACZ region and along a large portion of the northern model Amazon Basin. Simulations in which the warm SST patch was too weak or too close to the equator did not produce frontal systems that extended into the tropics and became stationary, and did not form a SACZ. In the model, the SACZ forms as Amazon Basin convection strengthens and migrates far enough southward to allow frontal systems to penetrate into the tropics and stall over South America. This result is in agreement with observations that the SACZ tends to form after the onset of the monsoon season in the Amazon Basin.

  13. Thermal donor formation and annihilation in oxygen-implanted float-zone silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S. ); Stein, H.J. ); Shatas, S.C. ); Ponce, F.A. )

    1992-09-01

    The formation and annihilation behaviors of thermal donors in {sup 16}O{sup +}-, {sup 18}O{sup +}-, or {sup 16}O{sup +}+{sup 12}C{sup +}-implanted float-zone silicon have been investigated with secondary ion mass spectrometry, spreading resistance probe, Hall effect, and transmission electron microscopy. Various oxygen or carbon+oxygen-implanted samples were laser annealed to remove implant damage and subjected to furnace annealing at 450 {degree}C for up to 100 h to activate oxygen-related thermal donors. Oxygen concentrations at the peak of the implanted profiles exceed the maximum for Czochralski Si by an order of magnitude. It is found that the third to fourth power dependence of thermal donor formation on oxygen generally observed for Czochralski Si does not hold for the higher oxygen concentration in the implanted layer. Annihilation characteristics of thermal donors formed in the oxygen implanted layers were investigated by the rapid thermal annealing technique. A rapid thermal anneal at 1150 {degree}C for 30 s was required to remove all the thermal donors. Based upon the annihilation kinetics data, it is tentatively concluded that both old and new thermal donors exist in the oxygen-implanted layer. For carbon+oxygen-coimplanted samples, the data have shown that carbon greatly increases the new thermal donor concentration in the implanted layer. Finally, precipitate morphologies for both oxygen-only- and carbon+oxygen-coimplanted samples after a 450 {degree}C furnace annealing were investigated by high resolution electron microscopy. In the case of oxygen-implant-only samples, predominant precipitate morphologies are needlelike while platelet defects predominate for carbon+oxygen-coimplanted samples. Since carbon increases the formation rate of new thermal donors, it is unlikely that they are distinctly related to needlelike precipitates as claimed in previous studies.

  14. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure on phosphodiester bond formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN

    1989-01-01

    The formation of oligomers from deoxynucleotides, catalyzed by Na(+)-montmorillonite, was investigated with special attention given to the effect of the monomer structure on the phosphodiester bond formation. It was found that adenine deoxynucleotides bind more strongly to montmorillonite than do the corresponding ribonucleotides and thymidine nucleotides. Tetramers of 2-prime-dpA were detected in the reaction of 2-prime-d-5-prime-AMP with a water-soluble carbodiimide EDAC in the presence of Na(+)-montmorillonite, illustrating the possible role of minerals in the formation of biopolymers on the primitive earth.

  15. Formation of Secondary Particulate Matter by Reactions of Gas Phase Hexanal with Sulfate Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of secondary particulate matter from the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds can significantly contribute to the particulate burden, but the formation of organic secondary particulate matter is poorly understood. One way of producing organic secondary particulate matter is the oxidation of hydrocarbons with seven or more carbon atoms to get products with low vapor pressure. However, several recent reports suggest that relatively low molecular weight carbonyls can enter the particle phase by undergoing heterogeneous reactions. This may be a very important mechanism for the formation of organic secondary particulate matter. Atmospheric aldehydes are important carbonyls in the gas phase, which form via the oxidation of hydrocarbons emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this poster, we report the results on particle growth by the heterogeneous reactions of hexanal. A 5 L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is set up to conduct the reactions in the presence of seed aerosol particles of deliquesced ammonia bisulfate. Hexanal is added into CSTR by syringe pump, meanwhile the concentrations of hexanal are monitored with High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC 1050). A differential Mobility Analyzer (TSI 3071) set to an appropriate voltage is employed to obtain monodisperse aerosols, and another DMA associated with a Condensation Nuclear Counter (TSI 7610) is used to measure the secondary particle size distribution by the reaction in CSTR. This permits the sensitive determination of particle growth due to the heterogeneous reaction, very little growth occurs when hexanal added alone. Results for the simultaneous addition of hexanal and alcohols will also be presented.

  16. IN VIVO FORMATION OF HALOGENATED REACTION PRODUCTS FOLLOWING PERORAL SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date the principal concern of the disinfection of potable water has centered on the formation of halogenated organic reaction products and the adverse health effects that these products may have. However, an additional area for concern relating to water disinfection is the pot...

  17. THE OZONE REACTION WITH BUTADIENE: FORMATION OF TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product ...

  18. Comparative Study Using Different Infrared Zones of the Solventless Activation of Organic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Córdova, María Olivia Noguez; Flores Ramírez, Carlos I.; Bejarano, Benjamín Velasco; Arroyo Razo, Gabriel A.; Pérez Flores, Francisco J.; Tellez, Vladimir Carranza; Ruvalcaba, René Miranda

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the results of a study comparing the use of irradiation from different regions of the infrared spectrum for the promotion of several organic reactions, are presented and discussed. This use of eco-conditions provides a green approach to chemical synthesis. A set of ten different organic reactions were evaluated, including the Knoevenagel, Hantzsch, Biginelli and Meldrum reactions. It is important to highlight the use of a commercial device that produces infrared irradiation in the near infrared region and its distribution by convection providing heating uniformity, significantly reducing reaction times, achieving good yields and proceeding in the absence of solvent. It is also worth noting that a variety of different reactions may be performed at the same time. Finally, the products obtained were identified using TLC, together with corresponding MS-data, complementarily in comparison of NMR 1H and 13C data with literature information. PMID:22272092

  19. A quantitative approach to understanding amphibole reaction rims: Texture, mineralogy, and processes of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, S. H.; Larsen, J. F.; Coombs, M. L.; Dunn, A.

    2012-12-01

    Amphibole is an important mineral present in many calc-alkaline volcanic deposits. A hydrous phase, volcanic amphibole is only stable at pressures greater than 100 MPa (approx. 4 km) and in melts containing at least 4 wt % H2O. When removed from their thermal and barometric stability field, amphiboles decompose to form aggregate rims of anhydrous minerals. Reaction rim thicknesses have been used to estimate timescales and rates of magma ascent, important parameters in determining eruptive style. However, the textures and mineralogy of reaction rims are complex; multiple forcing factors, such as heating and decompression, are responsible for their formation. Few studies have performed in-depth, systematic, and quantitative investigations of reaction rim textures and mineralogy: as a result, amphibole reaction rims are poorly understood. Based on natural reaction rims from Augustine Volcano Alaska, we have developed a new crystallization kinetics model for reaction rim formation in which the differences in reaction rim textures represent different degrees of forcing away from equilibrium. We present the results of an experimental study used to test this model. We performed experiments using a sintered high-silica andesite glass from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano. The starting powder was seeded with unrimmed amphibole phenocrysts. After at least 24 hours of equilibration at Augustine storage conditions (140 MPa/ 860oC), experiments were heated or decompressed. The experimental series experiments took samples to differing degrees of thermal of barometric instability, over different time scales, ranging from 3 hours to several days. The resulting reaction rims were analyzed using a variety of analytical imaging and X-ray mapping techniques. Reaction rims thickened and became more texturally and mineralogically complex as a result of 1) greater time spent outside of stability and; 2) the magnitude of instability experienced.

  20. A structured three-dimensional polymer electrolyte with enlarged active reaction zone for Li-O2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet-Mercier, Nadège; Wong, Raymond A.; Thomas, Morgan L.; Dutta, Arghya; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Yogi, Chihiro; Ohta, Toshiaki; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2014-11-01

    The application of conventional solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) to lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries has suffered from a limited active reaction zone due to thick SPE and subsequent lack of O2 gas diffusion route in the positive electrode. Here we present a new design for a three-dimensional (3-D) SPE structure, incorporating a carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode, adapted for a gas-based energy storage system. The void spaces in the porous CNT/SPE film allow an increased depth of diffusion of O2 gas, providing an enlarged active reaction zone where Li+ ions, O2 gas, and electrons can interact. Furthermore, the thin SPE layer along the CNT, forming the core/shell nanostructure, aids in the smooth electron transfer when O2 gas approaches the CNT surface. Therefore, the 3-D CNT/SPE electrode structure enhances the capacity in the SPE-based Li-O2 cell. However, intrinsic instability of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) of the SPE matrix to superoxide (O2.-) and high voltage gives rise to severe side reactions, convincing us of the need for development of a more stable electrolyte for use in this CNT/SPE design.

  1. A structured three-dimensional polymer electrolyte with enlarged active reaction zone for Li–O2 batteries

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet-Mercier, Nadège; Wong, Raymond A.; Thomas, Morgan L.; Dutta, Arghya; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Yogi, Chihiro; Ohta, Toshiaki; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2014-01-01

    The application of conventional solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) to lithium-oxygen (Li–O2) batteries has suffered from a limited active reaction zone due to thick SPE and subsequent lack of O2 gas diffusion route in the positive electrode. Here we present a new design for a three-dimensional (3-D) SPE structure, incorporating a carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode, adapted for a gas-based energy storage system. The void spaces in the porous CNT/SPE film allow an increased depth of diffusion of O2 gas, providing an enlarged active reaction zone where Li+ ions, O2 gas, and electrons can interact. Furthermore, the thin SPE layer along the CNT, forming the core/shell nanostructure, aids in the smooth electron transfer when O2 gas approaches the CNT surface. Therefore, the 3-D CNT/SPE electrode structure enhances the capacity in the SPE-based Li–O2 cell. However, intrinsic instability of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) of the SPE matrix to superoxide (O2·−) and high voltage gives rise to severe side reactions, convincing us of the need for development of a more stable electrolyte for use in this CNT/SPE design. PMID:25410536

  2. Stratigraphic sections showing coal correlations within the lower coal zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Fillmore Ranch and Seaverson Reservoir quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Honey, J.G.; Hettinger, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Stratigraphic sections showing coal correlations within the lower coal zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Fillmore Ranch and Seaverson Reservoir quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming are presented.

  3. Secondary organic aerosol formation initiated from reactions between ozone and surface-sorbed squalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyi; Waring, Michael S.

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has shown that ozone reactions on surface-sorbed D-limonene can promote gas phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation indoors. In this work, we conducted 13 steady state chamber experiments to measure the SOA formation entirely initiated by ozone reactions with squalene sorbed to glass, at chamber ozone of 57-500 ppb for two relative humidity (RH) conditions of 21% and 51%, in the absence of seed particles. Squalene is a nonvolatile compound that is a component of human skin oil and prevalent on indoor surfaces and in settled dust due to desquamation. The size distributions, mass and number secondary emission rates (SER), aerosol mass fractions (AMF), and aerosol number fractions (ANF) of formed SOA were quantified. The surface AMF and ANF are defined as the change in SOA mass or number formed, respectively, per ozone mass consumed by ozone-squalene reactions. All experiments but one exhibited nucleation and mass formation. Mass formation was relatively small in magnitude and increased with ozone, most notably for the RH = 51% experiments. The surface AMF was a function of the chamber aerosol concentration, and a multi-product model was fit using the 'volatility basis set' framework. Number formation was relatively strong at low ozone and low RH conditions. Though we cannot extrapolate our results because experiments were conducted at high air exchange rates, we speculate that this process may enhance particle number more than mass concentrations indoors.

  4. Hierarchical data format (HDF5) for Modflow, Modpath and ZoneBudget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosemans, A.; Batelaan, O.; Louwyck, A.; Lermytte, J.

    2012-04-01

    More and more spatially detailed time dependent groundwater models are used and hence input files for models like Modflow (USGS) are becoming larger and larger. These input files are in ASCII format and contain datasets with values for each cell, changing often for each stress period. To diminish the problem of huge ASCII files, the datasets of the input files can be stored in an HDF5 file (Hierarchical data format). HDF5 is a data model, library and file format designed by HDFgroup for storing and managing data, flexible and efficient input and output and high volume and complex data. The file has a binary format and can be compressed with different kinds of compression methods. An HDF5 file consists among others of groups and datasets, referencing a dataset in the HDF5 file is similar to referencing a file in a folder of a file system. The contents of an HDF5 file can be viewed with HDFview, a Java-based viewer. HDF5 files can be constructed manually with the help of HDFview, or with the help of programming languages like C, C++, Matlab, Fortran or Python. The goal of this contribution is to show how HDF can improve data management of Modflow. A similar HDF5 link to Modflow has been implemented in the interface Groundwater Modeling System. Modflow has been extended to be able to read datasets from the ASCII input files which contain a reference to an HDF5 file for every real 1 or 2-dimensional dataset, every 2-dimensional integer dataset and the stress lists described in the Modflow user manual as U1DREL, U2DREL, U2DINT and ULSTRD. Two other programs from USGS, Modpath and Zonebudget, are also using partly the same input files as Modflow, and have been extended to be able to read the requested datasets from the HDF5 file. The total Modflow input file size, i.e. converted ASCII files and HDF5 file, will be decimated compared to the original size. Partly this is due to 'zlib' compression, 'zlib' is a free lossless data compression library. Due to faster reading of

  5. Formation of lithospheric detachments: quantifying the mechanical effect of hydration reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, Benjamin; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Yamato, Philippe; Watremez, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Many authors have published experimentally determined flow laws of rheologically important monophase aggregates and polyphase rocks. These laws provide good first order constraints on lithology-controlled lithospheric strength variations. However, since the whole range of mineralogical and chemical rock compositions cannot be experimentally tested, variations in reaction-controlled rock strength cannot be systematically and fully characterized. We here present the results of a study coupling thermodynamical and Thermomechanical modelling aiming at predicting the mechanical impact of metamorphic reactions on the strength of the mantle during its exhumation in rifted zones. Thermodynamic modelling is used for calculating the mineralogical composition of a typical peridotite as a function of pressure, temperature and water content. For a given P-T condition, the calculated modes and flow laws parameters for each phase constituting the paragenesis are then used as input of the Minimized Power Geometric model for predicting the polyphase aggregate strength. Hence, by considering P-T evolutions characteristic of exhumed mantle, we quantify the strength of the mantle as a function of pressure, temperature and hydration history in a rift zone. The mechanical impact of such metamorphic reactions and hydration is first quantified in 1D for three simplified hydration schemes and then introduced in preliminary 2D models which coupled fluid transfer to the thermodynamically derived rheological parameters. Schemes with limited hydratation are found to keep rocks in condition close to brittle ductile transition for a longer time and to permit more efficient mantle exhumation.

  6. Combining direct residence time measurements and biogeochemistry to calculate in-situ reaction rates in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittroff, Marco; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is an active interface between groundwater, riparian and surface water systems. Exchange and reaction of water, nutrients, and organic matter occur due to variations in surface and groundwater flow regimes, bed topography and active biogeochemistry fuelled by bioavailable carbon. There has been an increasing focus on coupling the residence time of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. However, there are very few tracers that can be used to measure residence times in-situ, especially in complex groundwater-surface water settings. In this work we have used the natural radioisotope Radon (222Rn) as an in-situ tracer for river water residence time in a riffle-pool sequence (Rote Main River), and combined this information with biogeochemical parameters (DOC and C quality, O3, NO3, CO2). We can clearly observe a dependence of reaction progress on the water residence times, with oxygen and nitrate reduction following inverse logarithmic trends as a function of time. By comparing with initial concentrations (the river end member) with riverbed levels we have estimated first-order in-situ reduction rates for nitrate and oxygen. Nitrate reduction rates are at the higher end of published values, which is likely due to the continual supply of bioavailable carbon from the river system. This work helps to better understand the function and efficiency of the hyporheic zone as a natural filter for redox sensitive species such as nitrate at the groundwater - steam interface. It also provides a useful method for estimating residence times in complex, higher order river systems.

  7. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  8. A Kinetic Ladle Furnace Process Simulation Model: Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone Model Using FactSage Macro Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ende, Marie-Aline; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The ladle furnace (LF) is widely used in the secondary steelmaking process in particular for the de-sulfurization, alloying, and reheating of liquid steel prior to the casting process. The Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone model using the FactSage macro processing code was applied to develop a kinetic LF process model. The slag/metal interactions, flux additions to slag, various metallic additions to steel, and arcing in the LF process were taken into account to describe the variations of chemistry and temperature of steel and slag. The LF operation data for several steel grades from different plants were accurately described using the present kinetic model.

  9. DOE capabilities for in-situ characterization and monitoring of formation properties in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.R.; Brodeur, J.R.; Koizumi, C.J.; Conaway, J.G.; Mikesell, J.L.; Nelson, P.H.; Stromswold, D.C.; Wilson, R.D.

    1993-09-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) Program faces the difficult task of characterizing the properties of the subsurface and identifying and mapping a large number of contaminants at landfills, surface disposal areas, spill sites, nuclear waste tanks, and subsurface contaminant plumes throughout the complex of DOE facilities. Geophysical borehole logs can measure formation properties such as bulk density, water content, and lithology, and can quantitatively analyze for radionuclides and such elements as chlorine and heavy metals. Since these measurements can be replaced as desired, they can be used for both initial characterization and monitoring of changes in contaminant concentration and water content (sometimes linked to contaminant migration), at a fraction of the cost of conventional sampling. The techniques develop at several DOE laboratories, and the experience that the authors have gained in making in-situ measurements in the vadose zone, are applicable to problems at many other DOE sites. Moreover, they can capitalize on existing inventories of boreholes. By building on this experience workers involved in ER projects at those sites should be able to obtain high-quality data at substantial reductions in cost and time.

  10. On the feeding zone of planetesimal formation by the streaming instability

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Johansen, Anders E-mail: anders@astro.lu.se

    2014-09-10

    The streaming instability is a promising mechanism to overcome the barriers in direct dust growth and lead to the formation of planetesimals. Most previous studies of the streaming instability, however, were focused on a local region of a protoplanetary disk with a limited simulation domain such that only one filamentary concentration of solids has been observed. The characteristic separation between filaments is therefore not known. To address this, we conduct the largest-scale simulations of the streaming instability to date, with computational domains up to 1.6 gas scale heights both horizontally and vertically. The large dynamical range allows the effect of vertical gas stratification to become prominent. We observe more frequent merging and splitting of filaments in simulation boxes of high vertical extent. We find multiple filamentary concentrations of solids with an average separation of about 0.2 local gas scale heights, much higher than the most unstable wavelength from linear stability analysis. This measures the characteristic separation of planetesimal forming events driven by the streaming instability and thus the initial feeding zone of planetesimals.

  11. Effect of grossular on garnet-biotite, Fe Mg exchange reactions: evidence from garnet with mixed growth and diffusion zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, J.

    1996-07-01

    Garnets that exhibit mixed growth and diffusion zoning are used to evaluate the effect of grossular content on garnet Fe Mg exchange reactions. These garnets from the uppermost amphibolite-facies to granulite-facies gneiss of the Wissahickon Group, southeastern Pennsylvania, show variation in grossular content (0.035< X Ca<0.14) but nearly constant Mg? ( X Mg/( X Mg+ X Fe) and X Mn through the interior indicating re-equilibration of garnet and matrix minerals with respect to iron, magnesium, and manganese. Mg? is not correlated with calcium content, evidence that the effect of calcium on garnet Fe Mg exchange reactions is small or is offset by other interactions in almandine-rich garnets. In either case, the data presented here indicate that correction for calcium content of garnets in the application of garnet-biotite geothermometry to high-grade metapelites is unnecessary and may lead to an overestimate of peak temperature.

  12. Spatial Heterogeneity and Imperfect Mixing in Chemical Reactions: Visualization of Density-Driven Pattern Formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Hastings, Harold M.; Testa, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Imore » mperfect mixing is a concern in industrial processes, everyday processes (mixing paint, bread machines), and in understanding salt water-fresh water mixing in ecosystems. The effects of imperfect mixing become evident in the unstirred ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, the prototype for chemical pattern formation. Over time, waves of oxidation (high ferriin concentration, blue) propagate into a background of low ferriin concentration (red); their structure reflects in part the history of mixing in the reaction vessel. However, it may be difficult to separate mixing effects from reaction effects. We describe a simpler model system for visualizing density-driven pattern formation in an essentially unmixed chemical system: the reaction of pale yellow Fe 3 + with colorless SCN − to form the blood-red Fe ( SCN ) 2 + complex ion in aqueous solution. Careful addition of one drop of Fe ( NO 3 ) 3 to KSCN yields striped patterns after several minutes. The patterns appear reminiscent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and convection rolls, arguing that pattern formation is caused by density-driven mixing.« less

  13. Chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation from phenyl radical pyrolysis and reaction of phenyl and acetylene.

    PubMed

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-15

    An experimental investigation of phenyl radical pyrolysis and the phenyl radical + acetylene reaction has been performed to clarify the role of different reaction mechanisms involved in the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) serving as precursors for soot formation. Experiments were conducted using GC/GC-MS diagnostics coupled to the high-pressure single-pulse shock tube present at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For the first time, comprehensive speciation of the major stable products, including small hydrocarbons and large PAH intermediates, was obtained over a wide range of pressures (25-60 atm) and temperatures (900-1800 K) which encompass the typical conditions in modern combustion devices. The experimental results were used to validate a comprehensive chemical kinetic model which provides relevant information on the chemistry associated with the formation of PAH compounds. In particular, the modeling results indicate that the o-benzyne chemistry is a key factor in the formation of multi-ring intermediates in phenyl radical pyrolysis. On the other hand, the PAHs from the phenyl + acetylene reaction are formed mainly through recombination between single-ring aromatics and through the hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism. Polymerization is the common dominant process at high temperature conditions. PMID:22339468

  14. Effect of gel network on pattern formation in the ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite reaction.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tomonaga; Yoshida, Ryo

    2011-06-01

    Stationary patterns have been researched experimentally since the discovery of the Turing pattern in the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (CIMA) reaction and the self-replicating spot pattern in the ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite (FIS) reaction. In this study, we reproduced the pattern formation in the FIS reaction by using poly(acrylamide) gels. Gels with different swelling ratios were prepared to use as a medium. The effect of the swelling ratio was compared with the effect of thickness. It was found that the swelling ratio greatly influenced pattern formation. Oscillating spot patterns appeared at high swelling ratios, and lamellar patterns appeared at a low swelling ratio. Self-replicating spot patterns appeared in between the two areas. The front velocities, which were observed in the initial stage of pattern formation, depended on the swelling ratio. Furthermore, this dependence obeys the free volume theory of diffusion. These results provide evidence that the change in front velocities is caused by a change in diffusion. Pattern formation can be controlled not only by thickness but also by swelling ratio, which may be useful for creating novel pattern templates. PMID:21557556

  15. Pattern formation on networks with reactions: A continuous-time random-walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angstmann, C. N.; Donnelly, I. C.; Henry, B. I.

    2013-03-01

    We derive the generalized master equation for reaction-diffusion on networks from an underlying stochastic process, the continuous time random walk (CTRW). The nontrivial incorporation of the reaction process into the CTRW is achieved by splitting the derivation into two stages. The reactions are treated as birth-death processes and the first stage of the derivation is at the single particle level, taking into account the death process, while the second stage considers an ensemble of these particles including the birth process. Using this model we have investigated different types of pattern formation across the vertices on a range of networks. Importantly, the CTRW defines the Laplacian operator on the network in a non-ad hoc manner and the pattern formation depends on the structure of this Laplacian. Here we focus attention on CTRWs with exponential waiting times for two cases: one in which the rate parameter is constant for all vertices and the other where the rate parameter is proportional to the vertex degree. This results in nonsymmetric and symmetric CTRW Laplacians, respectively. In the case of symmetric Laplacians, pattern formation follows from the Turing instability. However in nonsymmetric Laplacians, pattern formation may be possible with or without a Turing instability.

  16. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone reactions with single terpenoids and terpenoid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, Michael S.; Wells, J. Raymond; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2011-08-01

    Ozone reacts with indoor-emitted terpenoids to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Most SOA research has focused on ozone reactions with single terpenoids or with consumer products, and this paper reports the results from an investigation of SOA formation from ozone reactions with both single terpenoids and mixtures of D-limonene, α-pinene, and α-terpineol. Transient experiments were conducted at low (25 ppb) and high (100 ppb) initial concentrations of ozone. The three terpenoids were tested singly and in combinations in a manner that controlled for their different reaction rates with ozone. The SOA formation was assessed by examining the evolution in time of the resulting number size-distributions and estimates of the mass concentrations. The results suggest that at higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations, SOA number formation follows a linear trend as a function of the initial rate of reaction. This finding was valid for both single terpenoids and mixtures. Generally speaking, higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations also led to larger geometric mean diameters and smaller geometric standard deviations of fitted lognormal distributions of the formed SOA. By assuming a density, mass concentrations were also assessed and did not follow as consistent of a trend. At low ozone concentration conditions, reactions with only D-limonene yielded the largest number concentrations of any experiment, even more than experiments with mixtures containing D-limonene and much higher overall terpenoid concentrations. This finding was not seen for high ozone concentrations. These experiments demonstrate quantifiable trends for SOA forming reactions of ozone and mixtures, and this work provides a framework for expanding these results to more complex mixtures and consumer products.

  17. Quantifying the ionic reaction channels in the Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxut, Aurelia; Nozière, Barbara; Rossignol, Stéphanie; George, Christian; Waxman, Eleanor Marie; Laskin, Alexander; Slowik, Jay; Dommen, Josef; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs; Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Glyoxal, a common organic gas in the atmosphere, has been identified in recent years as an important Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) precursor (Volkamer et al., 2007). But, unlike with other precursors, the SOA is largely produced by particle-phase reactions (Volkamer et al., 2009) and equilibria (Kampf et al. 2013) that are still not entirely characterized. Since 2009 series of smog chamber experiments have been performed within the Eurochamp program at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, to investigate SOA formation from glyoxal. In these experiments, glyoxal was produced by the gas-phase oxidation of acetylene in the presence of seeds, the seed composition and other conditions being varied. The 2011 campaign resulted in the identification of salting processes controlling the glyoxal partitioning in the seeds (Kampf et al. 2013). This presentation will report results of the 2013 campaign focusing on the identification of the various reactions (ionic or photo-induced) contributing to the SOA mass. In particular, the contribution of the ionic reactions, i.e. mediated by NH4+, were investigated by quantifying the formation of imidazoles (imidazole, imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde, 2,2'-biimidazole) from the small condensation channel of glyoxal with ammonia. For this, the SOA produced were collected on quartz filters and analyzed by Orbitrap LC/MS (Q-Exactive Thermo Fisher). The formation of other products such as organic acids was also investigated to determine potential competing reactions. Time-resolved MOUDI sampling coupled with nano-DESY/ESI-MS/MS analysis was also used to identify nitrogen- and sulphur-containing products from all the reactions. The results obtained for a range of conditions will be presented and compared with recent mechanistic information on the ionic reaction channels (Nozière et al., in preparation, 2013). The implementation of all this new information into a glyoxal-SOA model will be discussed.

  18. Photoinduced Vesicle Formation via the Copper-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Konetski, Danielle; Gong, Tao; Bowman, Christopher N

    2016-08-16

    Synthetic vesicles have a wide range of applications from drug and cosmetic delivery to artificial cell and membrane studies, making simple and controlled formation of vesicles a large focus of the field today. Here, we report the use of the photoinitiated copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction using visible light to introduce spatiotemporal control into the formation of vesicles. Upon the establishment of the spatiotemporal control over vesicle formation, it became possible to adjust initiation conditions to modulate vesicle sizes resulting in the formation of controllably small or large vesicles based on light intensity or giant vesicles when the formation was initiated in flow-free conditions. Additionally, this photoinitiated method enables vesicle formation at a density 400-fold higher than initiation using sodium ascorbate as the catalyst. Together, these advances enable the formation of high-density, controlled size vesicles using low-energy wavelengths while producing enhanced control over the formation characteristics of the vesicle. PMID:27443396

  19. Diffusion and reaction of pollutants in stratus clouds: application to nocturnal acid formation in plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Seigneur, C.; Saxena, P.; Mirabella, V.A.

    1985-09-01

    A mathematical model is presented that describes the transport, turbulent diffusion, and chemical reactions of air pollutants in stratus clouds. The chemical kinetic mechanism treats 97 gaseous, heterogeneous, and aqueous reactions between 54 species. The dispersion and night-time chemistry of a power plant plume in a stratus cloud is simulated. The contributions of various chemical pathways to the formation of sulfate and nitrate, the differences between plume and background concentrations, and the effect of reduced primary emissions on secondary pollutants are discussed. Calculated sulfate and nitrate concentrations are commensurate with measured atmospheric concentrations.

  20. Formation of Somitogenesis-like Pattern in a Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Fumitaka; Miyakawa, Kenji

    2008-08-01

    The Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction system showing stationary patterns is realized on the basis of water-in-oil microemulsions with the surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate. We experimentally demonstrate the formation of somitogenesis-like pattern in which chemical waves arising from spontaneous bulk oscillations are successively arrested and then stacked. The experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by numerical simulations using the two-variable oregonator model. These show that a somitogenesis can be accounted for by the genuine reaction-diffusion model.

  1. Giant scour-fills in ancient channel-lobe transition zones: Formative processes and depositional architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstra, M.; Hodgson, D. M.; Peakall, J.; Flint, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    Scours are common features of modern deep-marine seascapes, particularly downstream of the mouths of slope channels within channel-lobe transition zones (CLTZs). Their dimensions can exceed hundreds of metres in width and length, and tens of metres in depth. However, the stratigraphic architecture of large (> 100 m width) scours have not been described in detail from exhumed CLTZs. Here, the infill of two erosional features (0.5-1 km long and 15-20 m thick) from the Permian Karoo Basin succession, South Africa, are presented from palaeogeographically well-constrained CLTZs; one from Fan 3 in the Tanqua depocentre and one from Unit A5 in the Laingsburg depocentre. The basal erosion surfaces of the features are asymmetric with steep, undulating, and composite upstream margins, and low gradient simple downstream margins. The basal infill consists of thin-bedded siltstone and sandstone beds cut by closely-spaced scours; these beds are interpreted as partially reworked fine grained tails of bypassing flows with evidence for flow deflection. The erosional features are interpreted as giant scour-fills. The Unit A5 scour-fill shows a simple cut-and-fill history with lateral and upward transitions from siltstone- to sandstone-prone deposits. In contrast, the Fan 3 scour-fill shows headward erosion and lengthening of the scour surface suggesting temporal changes in the interaction between turbidity currents and the scour surface. This relationship could support the occurrence of a hydraulic jump during scour formation, whilst the majority of the fill represents deposition from subcritical flows. Different scour preservation mechanisms can be used to explain the style of infill. The architecture, sedimentary facies and palaeoflow patterns of the scour-fills are distinctly different from well documented adjacent basin-floor channel-fills at the same stratigraphic levels. The recognition of scour-fills helps to constrain their sedimentological and stratigraphic expression in

  2. First stage of CoSi{sub 2} formation during a solid-state reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Delattre, R.; Thomas, O.; Perrin-Pellegrino, C.; Rivero, C.; Simola, R.

    2014-12-28

    The kinetics of CoSi{sub 2} formation via a solid-state reaction between CoSi and single crystal Si has been the object of many studies in the past. Because of the importance of nucleation, complex kinetics has been reported. In this work, we investigate CoSi{sub 2} formation kinetics with in-situ diffraction during isothermal annealing of CoSi films on Si (100). In-situ measurements allow capturing the initial stage of CoSi{sub 2} formation. An initial t{sup 3/2} time-dependent evolution is observed and attributed to 3D growth of individual nuclei. This first regime is followed after the coalescence of the nuclei by a classical parabolic t{sup 1/2} one-dimensional film growth. We evidence a marked influence of the initial Co thickness (50 nm vs 10 nm) on the growth kinetics. A significant slowdown of the CoSi{sub 2} formation kinetics is observed for the thinnest film, whereas the activation energy remains the same. These results shine a new light on the complex formation kinetics of CoSi{sub 2} during solid-state reaction between CoSi and single crystal silicon and bring new knowledge about what occurs in the ultra-thin film regime, which is important for nanotechnologies.

  3. Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-03-16

    The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.

  4. Brown carbon formation by aqueous-phase carbonyl compound reactions with amines and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Powelson, Michelle H; Espelien, Brenna M; Hawkins, Lelia N; Galloway, Melissa M; De Haan, David O

    2014-01-21

    Reactions between small water-soluble carbonyl compounds, ammonium sulfate (AS), and/or amines were evaluated for their ability to form light-absorbing species in aqueous aerosol. Aerosol chemistry was simulated with bulk phase reactions at pH 4, 275 K, initial concentrations of 0.05 to 0.25 M, and UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring. Glycolaldehyde-glycine mixtures produced the most intense absorbance. In carbonyl compound reactions with AS, methylamine, or AS/glycine mixtures, product absorbance followed the order methylglyoxal > glyoxal > glycolaldehyde > hydroxyacetone. Absorbance extended into the visible, with a wavelength dependence fit by absorption Ångstrom coefficients (Å(abs)) of 2 to 11, overlapping the Å(abs) range of atmospheric, water-soluble brown carbon. Many reaction products absorbing between 300 and 400 nm were strongly fluorescent. On a per mole basis, amines are much more effective than AS at producing brown carbon. In addition, methylglyoxal and glyoxal produced more light-absorbing products in reactions with a 5:1 AS-glycine mixture than with AS or glycine alone, illustrating the importance of both organic and inorganic nitrogen in brown carbon formation. Through comparison to biomass burning aerosol, we place an upper limit on the contribution of these aqueous carbonyl-AS-amine reactions of ≤ 10% of global light absorption by brown carbon. PMID:24351110

  5. Some new reaction pathways for the formation of cytosine in interstellar space - A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. P.; Tandon, Poonam; Mishra, Priti

    2013-03-01

    The detection of nucleic acid bases in carbonaceous meteorites suggests that their formation and survival is possible outside of the Earth. Small N-heterocycles, including pyrimidine, purines and nucleobases, have been extensively sought in the interstellar medium. It has been suggested theoretically that reactions between some interstellar molecules may lead to the formation of cytosine, uracil and thymine though these processes involve significantly high potential barriers. We attempted therefore to use quantum chemical techniques to explore if cytosine can possibly form in the interstellar space by radical-radical and radical-molecule interaction schemes, both in the gas phase and in the grains, through barrier-less or low barrier pathways. Results of DFT calculations for the formation of cytosine starting from some of the simple molecules and radicals detected in the interstellar space are being reported. Global and local descriptors such as molecular hardness, softness and electrophilicity, and condensed Fukui functions and local philicity indices were used to understand the mechanistic aspects of chemical reaction. The presence and nature of weak bonds in the molecules and transition states formed during the reaction process have been ascertained using Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIMs). Two exothermic reaction pathways starting from propynylidyne (CCCH) and cyanoacetylene (HCCCN), respectively, have been identified. While the first reaction path is found to be totally exothermic, it involves a barrier of 12.5 kcal/mol in the gas phase against the lowest value of about 32 kcal/mol reported in the literature. The second path is both exothermic and barrier-less. The later has, therefore, a greater probability of occurrence in the cold interstellar clouds (10-50 K).

  6. Formation of O3/+/ by the reaction of metastable O2/+/ ions with O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Pang, K. D.; Monahan, K. M.

    1974-01-01

    The high resolution of the photoionization mass spectrophotometer was utilized to resolve some doubts about the participating species in the reaction of metastable oxygen molecular ions with oxygen molecules to yield ozone ions and oxygen radicals. It is found from inspection of the appearance potential of the ozone ion that an a4 Pi-excited state is responsible for the formation of ozone near the appearance potential of these lines.

  7. Reaction of furan-based o-quinodimethanes with triplet oxygen. Formation of cyclic peroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chin-Hsing; Trahanovsky, W.S.

    1995-08-25

    Formation of cyclic peroxides 2a,2b, and 2c from the reactions of 2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofuran (1a) and the 5-methyl (1b) and 5-tert-butyl (1c) derivatives with triplet oxygen is reported. Thermolysis of cyclic peroxide 2c gives dialdehyde 5, hydroxy aldehydes 6 and 7, and diol 8 as products. 1 fig.

  8. Thermochemistry and Reaction Barriers for the Formation of Levoglucosenone from Cellobiose

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2011-10-19

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  9. Thermochemistry and Reaction Barriers for the Formation of Levoglucosenone from Cellobiose

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  10. Thermochemistry and reaction barriers for the formation of levoglucosenone from cellobiose.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  11. Applied velocity versus offset (VVO) to validated & characterized fracturing zone in intra Baturaja Formation, South Sumatera Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardiyan, Hilman; Rusli, Saifatur

    2016-01-01

    The velocity versus offset (VVO) as new geophysical method can be applied to detect some geological phenomenon, such as hydrocarbon trap, structural-fracture anomaly, facies changes, etc. The VVO method is data driven, based on the normal move out equation (NMO) and measuring the local event correlation between adjacent traces to get velocity gradient attributes which is derived from cross-plotting the velocity versus offset (VVO). This paper is describing applied VVO model that controlled by well data which indicated fracture from logs data, especially Resistivity Imager Logs or Formation Micro Imager (FMI). Images FMI logs data at Intra-Baturaja Carbonate Formation (BRF) in South Palembang Sub-basin (SPB), South Sumatera, shows vugs with fractures which orientation is roughly NNW-SSE. Meanwhile, the 2D NMO seismic gathers indicated those all as hockey stick at far offset. By applying VVO method, hockey stick can be identified and then used to validated, characterized and localized where the fracturing zone in intra-Baturaja Formation is. Laterally, VVO quantified as velocity gradient attribute which associated with geological model as the fracturing zone in study area. Characterization fracturing zone in Intra Baturaja Formation as geological lateral model by design is a challenging task for most exploration and production. In term of exploration where limited data is available, it can be used step ahead as carbonate fracture reservoir candidate in proven area and adjacent, especially in SPB South Sumatra.

  12. Proton Mobility in b₂ Ion Formation and Fragmentation Reactions of Histidine-Containing Peptides.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carissa R; Abutokaikah, Maha T; Harrison, Alex G; Bythell, Benjamin J

    2016-03-01

    A detailed energy-resolved study of the fragmentation reactions of protonated histidine-containing peptides and their b2 ions has been undertaken. Density functional theory calculations were utilized to predict how the fragmentation reactions occur so that we might discern why the mass spectra demonstrated particular energy dependencies. We compare our results to the current literature and to synthetic b2 ion standards. We show that the position of the His residue does affect the identity of the subsequent b2 ion (diketopiperazine versus oxazolone versus lactam) and that energy-resolved CID can distinguish these isomeric products based on their fragmentation energetics. The histidine side chain facilitates every major transformation except trans-cis isomerization of the first amide bond, a necessary prerequisite to diketopiperazine b2 ion formation. Despite this lack of catalyzation, trans-cis isomerization is predicted to be facile. Concomitantly, the subsequent amide bond cleavage reaction is rate-limiting. PMID:26602904

  13. Proton Mobility in b2 Ion Formation and Fragmentation Reactions of Histidine-Containing Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Carissa R.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Harrison, Alex G.; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed energy-resolved study of the fragmentation reactions of protonated histidine-containing peptides and their b2 ions has been undertaken. Density functional theory calculations were utilized to predict how the fragmentation reactions occur so that we might discern why the mass spectra demonstrated particular energy dependencies. We compare our results to the current literature and to synthetic b2 ion standards. We show that the position of the His residue does affect the identity of the subsequent b2 ion (diketopiperazine versus oxazolone versus lactam) and that energy-resolved CID can distinguish these isomeric products based on their fragmentation energetics. The histidine side chain facilitates every major transformation except trans-cis isomerization of the first amide bond, a necessary prerequisite to diketopiperazine b2 ion formation. Despite this lack of catalyzation, trans-cis isomerization is predicted to be facile. Concomitantly, the subsequent amide bond cleavage reaction is rate-limiting.

  14. [Riboflavin-radical formation by mechanochemical solid-state reaction using stainless steel vessel].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shin-ichi; Furuta, Youji; Okita, Shintarou; Sasai, Yasushi; Aramaki, Hideki; Kuzuya, Masayuki

    2004-03-01

    The mechanochemical reaction of free riboflavin (FR) due to vibratory ball milling was carried out in a stainless steel vessel at room temperature under anaerobic conditions. The ESR of the fractured sample showed a broad single-line spectrum. It is suggested that the solid-state single-electron transfer (SSET) reaction from the surface of the stainless steel vessel to FR proceeded during the vibratory milling, resulting in the formation of the corresponding anion radicals. When the mechanochemical reaction of FR in the presence of calcium pantothenate (PC) was carried out, the radical concentration increased with the increasing PC content. It was shown that the anion radical in the metal complex was stable for a lengthy period of time even in highly humid air. PMID:15049132

  15. Pattern formation in the iodate-sulfite-thiosulfate reaction-diffusion system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haimiao; Pojman, John A; Zhao, Yuemin; Pan, Changwei; Zheng, Juhua; Yuan, Ling; Horváth, Attila K; Gao, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    Sodium polyacrylate-induced pH pattern formation and starch-induced iodine pattern formation were investigated in the iodate-sulfite-thiosulfate (IST) reaction in a one-side fed disc gel reactor (OSFR). As binding agents of the autocatalyst of hydrogen ions or iodide ions, different content of sodium polyacrylate or starch has induced various types of pattern formation. We observed pH pulses, striped patterns, mixed spots and stripes, and hexagonal spots upon increasing the content of sodium polyacrylate and observed iodine pulses, branched patterns, and labyrinthine patterns upon increasing the starch content in the system. Coexistence of a pH front and an iodine front was also studied in a batch IST reaction-diffusion system. Both pH and iodine front instabilities were observed in the presence of sodium polyacrylate, i.e., cellular fronts and transient Turing structures resulting from the decrease in diffusion coefficients of activators. The mechanism of multiple feedback may explain the different patterns in the IST reaction-diffusion system. PMID:22068976

  16. Reaction pathways towards the formation of dolomite-analogues at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Carlos; Pina, Carlos M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present results of a study of the crystallisation behaviour of the dolomite-analogues norsethite and PbMg(CO3)2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Whereas precipitation of norsethite was previously obtained by mixing solutions (Hood et al., 1974; Pimentel and Pina, 2014a,b), we report, for the first time, the synthesis of PbMg(CO3)2 by using the same method. The formation of both phases was promoted by ageing slurries for periods of time ranging from a few days (norsethite) up to 6 months (PbMg(CO3)2). The crystallisation of both norsethite and PbMg(CO3)2 occurs by sequences of dissolution-precipitation reactions involving several amorphous and crystalline precursor phases, which were identified and characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Depending on the initial composition and Ba:Mg and Pb:Mg ratios in the slurries, different precursors and reaction kinetics were observed. This demonstrates the existence of different reaction pathways towards the formation of the investigated dolomite-analogues. Our experimental results provide new insights into the possible mechanisms of formation of dolomite and other double carbonates in nature.

  17. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  18. Evidence of [eta]' or ordered zone formation in aluminum alloy 7075 from differential scanning calorimetry. [Aluminium alloy 7075

    SciTech Connect

    Bartges, C.W. )

    1993-05-01

    The development of high strength levels in Al-Mg-Zn-(Cu) alloys is dependent on the decomposition of the supersaturated solid solution ([alpha][sub ss]). The equilibrium phase, [eta], and the transition phase, [eta][prime], have compositions Mg(Zn, Al, Cu)[sub 2] and the GP Zones are solute rich clusters. Several authors have presented evidence that there is another precipitate which forms between the GP Zones and [eta][prime], though there is some controversy whether it is crystallographically distinct from the matrix, [eta][prime], or an ordered GP Zone. Regardless of their structure, these particles are seldom observed and are not usually considered in the decomposition of these alloys. Most of the previous observations of these particles have been the result of involved transmission electron microscopic and X-ray scattering experiments. This report shows they may also be detected using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Also significant is the fact that the particles were observed in AA 7075, an important commercial alloy. Lloyd and Chaturvedi also saw indications of [eta][prime] or ordered zones using DSC, but the results reported herein are different in several important respects. DSC traces of alloys aged for various times at room temperature and 121 C have shown there is at least one phase which can form during the decomposition of aluminum alloy 7075 that is not usually stated in the decomposition reaction. The results of previous studies suggest they may be ordered GP Zones or [eta][prime].

  19. Formation of Chlorotriophenoxy Radicals from Complete Series Reactions of Chlorotriophenols with H and OH Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    The chlorothiophenoxy radicals (CTPRs) are key intermediate species in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes/thianthrenes (PCDT/TAs). In this work, the formation of CTPRs from the complete series reactions of 19 chlorothiophenol (CTP) congeners with H and OH radicals were investigated theoretically by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The profiles of the potential energy surface were constructed at the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The rate constants were evaluated by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT) theory with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution at 600–1200 K. The present study indicates that the structural parameters, thermal data, and rate constants as well as the formation potential of CTPRs from CTPs are strongly dominated by the chlorine substitution at the ortho-position of CTPs. Comparison with the study of formation of chlorophenoxy radicals (CPRs) from chlorophenols (CPs) clearly shows that the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by H is more efficient than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by H, whereas the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by OH is less impactful than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by OH. Reactions of CTPs with H can occur more readily than that of CTPs with OH, which is opposite to the reactivity comparison of CPs with H and OH. PMID:26270566

  20. Formation of Chlorotriophenoxy Radicals from Complete Series Reactions of Chlorotriophenols with H and OH Radicals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    The chlorothiophenoxy radicals (CTPRs) are key intermediate species in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes/thianthrenes (PCDT/TAs). In this work, the formation of CTPRs from the complete series reactions of 19 chlorothiophenol (CTP) congeners with H and OH radicals were investigated theoretically by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The profiles of the potential energy surface were constructed at the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The rate constants were evaluated by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT) theory with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution at 600-1200 K. The present study indicates that the structural parameters, thermal data, and rate constants as well as the formation potential of CTPRs from CTPs are strongly dominated by the chlorine substitution at the ortho-position of CTPs. Comparison with the study of formation of chlorophenoxy radicals (CPRs) from chlorophenols (CPs) clearly shows that the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by H is more efficient than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by H, whereas the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by OH is less impactful than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by OH. Reactions of CTPs with H can occur more readily than that of CTPs with OH, which is opposite to the reactivity comparison of CPs with H and OH. PMID:26270566

  1. Intimations of neck formation in heavy-ion subbarrier fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stelson, P.H.

    1990-07-01

    Since the observed fusion cross sections for collisions between heavy ions at subbarrier energies are orders of magnitude larger than would be expected for barrier tunnelling, one is faced with the task of identifying the basic force which is strong enough to overcome the strong Coulomb force and bring about fusion. The two possibilities seem to be excursions of the nuclear surface (and strong nuclear force) due to collective motions of the colliding nuclei and formation of a neck of nuclear matter. The first possibility has received the most attention. However, the systematics of fusion cross sections suggest neck formation is playing an important role. Neck formation can also result in a reseparation of the composite system and we review the experimental information on these reactions at barrier and subbarrier energies. 15 refs., 18 figs.

  2. Reaction of benzophenone UV filters in the presence of aqueous chlorine: kinetics and chloroform formation.

    PubMed

    Duirk, Stephen E; Bridenstine, David R; Leslie, Daniel C

    2013-02-01

    The transformation of two benzophenone UV filters (Oxybenzone and Dioxybenzone) was examined over the pH range 6-11 in the presence of excess aqueous chlorine. Under these conditions, both UV filters were rapidly transformed by aqueous chlorine just above circumneutral pH while transformation rates were significantly lower near the extremes of the pH range investigated. Observed first-order rate coefficients (k(obs)) were obtained at each pH for aqueous chlorine concentrations ranging from 10 to 75 μM. The k(obs) were used to determine the apparent second-order rate coefficient (k(app)) at each pH investigated as well as determine the reaction order of aqueous chlorine with each UV filter. The reaction of aqueous chlorine with either UV filter was found to be an overall second-order reaction, first-order with respect to each reactant. Assuming elemental stoichiometry described the reaction between aqueous chlorine and each UV filter, models were developed to determine intrinsic rate coefficients (k(int)) from the k(app) as a function of pH for both UV filters. The rate coefficients for the reaction of HOCl with 3-methoxyphenol moieties of oxybenzone (OXY) and dioxybenzone (DiOXY) were k(1,OxY) = 306 ± 81 M⁻¹s⁻¹ and k(1,DiOxY) = 154 ± 76 M⁻¹s⁻¹, respectively. The k(int) for the reaction of aqueous chlorine with the 3-methoxyphenolate forms were orders of magnitude greater than the un-ionized species, k(2,OxY) = 1.03(±0.52) × 10⁶ M⁻¹s⁻¹ and k(2_1,DiOxY) = 4.14(±0.68) × 10⁵ M⁻¹s⁻¹. Also, k(int) for the reaction of aqueous chlorine with the DiOXY ortho-substituted phenolate moiety was k(2_2,DiOxY) = 2.17(±0.30) × 10³ M⁻¹s⁻¹. Finally, chloroform formation potential for OXY and DiOXY was assessed over the pH range 6-10. While chloroform formation decreased as pH increased for OXY, chloroform formation increased as pH increased from 6 to 10 for DiOXY. Ultimate molar yields of chloroform per mole of UV filter were pH dependent

  3. Modelling reaction front formation and oscillatory behaviour in a contaminant plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbin, Laura; Fowler, Andrew; Mitchell, Sarah; Winstanley, Henry

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater contamination is a concern in all industrialised countries that suffer countless spills and leaks of various contaminants. Often, the contaminated groundwater forms a plume that, under the influences of regional groundwater flow, could eventually migrate to streams or wells. This can have catastrophic consequences for human health and local wildlife. The process known as bioremediation removes pollutants in the contaminated groundwater through bacterial reactions. Microorganisms can transform the contaminant into less harmful metabolic products. It is important to be able to predict whether such bioremediation will be sufficient for the safe clean-up of a plume before it reaches wells or lakes. Borehole data from a contaminant plume which resulted from spillage at a coal carbonisation plant in Mansfield, England is the motivation behind modelling the properties of a contaminant plume. In the upper part of the plume, oxygen is consumed and a nitrate spike forms. Deep inside the plume, nitrate is depleted and oscillations of organic carbon and ammonium concentration profiles are observed. While there are various numerical models that predict the evolution of a contaminant plume, we aim to create a simplified model that captures the fundamental characteristics of the plume while being comparable in accuracy to the detailed numerical models that currently exist. To model the transport of a contaminant, we consider the redox reactions that occur in groundwater systems. These reactions deplete the contaminant while creating zones of dominant terminal electron accepting processes throughout the plume. The contaminant is depleted by a series of terminal electron acceptors, the order of which is typically oxygen, nitrate, manganese, iron, sulphate and carbon dioxide. We describe a reaction front, characteristic of a redox zone, by means of rapid reaction and slow diffusion. This aids in describing the depletion of oxygen in the upper part of the plume. To

  4. Imaging Proton Transfer and Dihalide Formation Pathways in Reactions of F– + CH3I

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ion–molecule reactions of the type X– + CH3Y are commonly assumed to produce Y– through bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2). Beyond this reaction, additional reaction products have been observed throughout the last decades and have been ascribed to different entrance channel geometries differing from the commonly assumed collinear approach. We have performed a crossed beam velocity map imaging experiment on the F– + CH3I reaction at different relative collision energies between 0.4 and 2.9 eV. We find three additional channels competing with nucleophilic substitution at high energies. Experimental branching ratios and angle- and energy differential cross sections are presented for each product channel. The proton transfer product CH2I– is the main reaction channel, which competes with nucleophilic substitution up to 2.9 eV relative collision energy. At this level, the second additional channel, the formation of IF– via halogen abstraction, becomes more efficient. In addition, we present the first evidence for an [FHI]− product ion. This [FHI]− product ion is present only for a narrow range of collision energies, indicating possible dissociation at high energies. All three products show a similar trend with respect to their velocity- and scattering angle distributions, with isotropic scattering and forward scattering of the product ions occurring at low and high energies, respectively. Reactions leading to all three reaction channels present a considerable amount of energy partitioning in product internal excitation. The internally excited fraction shows a collision energy dependence only for CH2I–. A similar trend is observed for the isoelectronic OH– + CH3I system. The comparison of our experimental data at 1.55 eV collision energy with a recent theoretical calculation for the same system shows a slightly higher fraction of internal excitation than predicted, which is, however, compatible within the experimental accuracy. PMID:26799548

  5. Imaging Proton Transfer and Dihalide Formation Pathways in Reactions of F(-) + CH3I.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Eduardo; Michaelsen, Tim; Stei, Martin; Bastian, Björn; Meyer, Jennifer; Mikosch, Jochen; Wester, Roland

    2016-07-14

    Ion-molecule reactions of the type X(-) + CH3Y are commonly assumed to produce Y(-) through bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2). Beyond this reaction, additional reaction products have been observed throughout the last decades and have been ascribed to different entrance channel geometries differing from the commonly assumed collinear approach. We have performed a crossed beam velocity map imaging experiment on the F(-) + CH3I reaction at different relative collision energies between 0.4 and 2.9 eV. We find three additional channels competing with nucleophilic substitution at high energies. Experimental branching ratios and angle- and energy differential cross sections are presented for each product channel. The proton transfer product CH2I(-) is the main reaction channel, which competes with nucleophilic substitution up to 2.9 eV relative collision energy. At this level, the second additional channel, the formation of IF(-) via halogen abstraction, becomes more efficient. In addition, we present the first evidence for an [FHI](-) product ion. This [FHI](-) product ion is present only for a narrow range of collision energies, indicating possible dissociation at high energies. All three products show a similar trend with respect to their velocity- and scattering angle distributions, with isotropic scattering and forward scattering of the product ions occurring at low and high energies, respectively. Reactions leading to all three reaction channels present a considerable amount of energy partitioning in product internal excitation. The internally excited fraction shows a collision energy dependence only for CH2I(-). A similar trend is observed for the isoelectronic OH(-) + CH3I system. The comparison of our experimental data at 1.55 eV collision energy with a recent theoretical calculation for the same system shows a slightly higher fraction of internal excitation than predicted, which is, however, compatible within the experimental accuracy. PMID:26799548

  6. Formation processes of floe size distribution in the marginal ice zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, T.; Kohout, A.; Fraser, A.

    2013-12-01

    Since the marginal ice zone (MIZ) is the outer sea ice zone, its behavior is key to the understanding of the variability of sea ice extent associated with climate change. Especially for the melting processes in MIZ, where relatively small ice floes are dominant, floe size distribution (FSD) is an important parameter because smaller ice floes are subject to stronger lateral melting due to their larger cumulative perimeters. As the MIZ is characterized by vigorous interaction between sea ice and waves, breakup of sea ice due to flexural forcing and collisions is considered to play an essential role in the determination of FSD there. However, the available data have been very limited so far. Analysis of the observations of ice floes with a heli-borne video camera, focusing on the floe size ranging from 2 m to 100 m, in the Sea of Okhotsk, the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica, revealed that while FSD is basically scale-invariant, a regime shift occurs at a size of about a few tens of meters, irrespective of the study region. It was also shown 1) that the floe size at which regime shift occurs slightly increases from 20 to 40 m with ice thickness, consistent with the theory of the flexural failure of sea ice; and 2) that to explain the scale invariance in FSD for smaller floes, a fragility of sea ice which is relevant to the strength of sea ice relative to waves can be a useful physical parameter to be correlated with the fractal dimension. Thus these results confirm the importance of wave-ice interaction to the formation of FSD. Based on this, a possible mechanism of the melting process was hypothesized that in the melting season sea ice extent retreats keeping the FSD relative to the ice edge nearly constant. As a next step and to confirm and further investigate this result, we planned to conduct the concurrent measurements of FSD, wave activities, and ice thickness off East Antarctica during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem Experiment 2 (SIPEX2) in September to

  7. Early growth of Kohala volcano and formation of long Hawaiian rift zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    Transitional-composition pillow basalts from the toe of the Hilo Ridge, collected from outcrop by submersible, have yielded the oldest ages known from the Island of Hawaii: 1138 ?? 34 to 1159 ?? 33 ka. Hilo Ridge has long been interpreted as a submarine rift zone of Mauna Kea, but the new ages validate proposals that it is the distal east rift zone of Kohala, the oldest subaerial volcano on the island. These ages constrain the inception of tholeiitic volcanism at Kohala, provide the first measured duration of tholeiitic shield building (???870 k.y.) for any Hawaiian volcano, and show that this 125-km-long rift zone developed to near-total length during early growth of Kohala. Long eastern-trending rift zones of Hawaiian volcanoes may follow fractures in oceanic crust activated by arching of the Hawaiian Swell in front of the propagating hotspot. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  8. Revision of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction rate and oxygen abundance in H-burning zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caciolli, A.; Mazzocchi, C.; Capogrosso, V.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Elekes, Z.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Lemut, A.; Marta, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Palmerini, S.; Prati, P.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H. P.; Vomiero, A.

    2011-09-01

    Context. The NO cycle takes place in the deepest layer of a H-burning core or shell, when the temperature exceeds T ≃ 30 × 106 K. The O depletion observed in some globular cluster giant stars, always associated with a Na enhancement, may be due to either a deep mixing during the red giant branch (RGB) phase of the star or to the pollution of the primordial gas by an early population of massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, whose chemical composition was modified by the hot bottom burning. In both cases, the NO cycle is responsible for the O depletion. Aims: The activation of this cycle depends on the rate of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction. A precise evaluation of this reaction rate at temperatures as low as experienced in H-burning zones in stellar interiors is mandatory to understand the observed O abundances. Methods: We present a new measurement of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction performed at LUNA covering for the first time the center of mass energy range 70-370 keV, which corresponds to stellar temperatures between 65 × 106 K and 780 × 106 K. This range includes the 15N(p, γ)16O Gamow-peak energy of explosive H-burning taking place in the external layer of a nova and the one of the hot bottom burning (HBB) nucleosynthesis occurring in massive AGB stars. Results: With the present data, we are also able to confirm the result of the previous R-matrix extrapolation. In particular, in the temperature range of astrophysical interest, the new rate is about a factor of 2 smaller than reported in the widely adopted compilation of reaction rates (NACRE or CF88) and the uncertainty is now reduced down to the 10% level.

  9. Sourcing Phenocrysts in Zoned Eruption Sequences Using Trace Elements: the Diego Hernandez Formation, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Neumann, E.

    2001-12-01

    The Diego Hernandez Formation (DHF) consists of several plinian fallout and ignimbrite sequences. With few exceptions, the dominant volume of each eruptive package consists of compositionally variable phonolite with smaller amounts of basaltic and intermediate components. In addition to mixing with the mafic components, compositional variations among the phonolitic component are due to crystal-liquid separation corresponding to up to 60% crystallization of a phonolitic starting liquid. Sphene crystallization plays a dominant role in controlling abundances of REE and HFSE among Tenerife phonolites. Sphene preferentially sequesters MREE, leading to strongly parabolic REE patterns among residual liquids. We have used this feature of the zoned Tenerife phonolites to match the REE content of individual pyroxene crystals, analyzed by laser ablation ICP-MS, to observed liquids using the elastic strain mineral-melt partitioning model of Blundy and Wood [1]. The strongly parabolic REE patterns of the liquids allow matching solely using the calculated Young's modulus of the host M2 cation site in pyroxene, without any independent constraint on the strain-free partition coefficient D0. For sodian salite pyroxenes in the phonolites, we find that most did not grow from the host liquid represented by the pumice clasts in which the crystals were erupted. Instead, most grew from liquids significantly more evolved, with lower MREE/LREE and MREE/HREE than the observed host. Elevated Zr contents in the salites support this conclusion, although the Zr abundances cannot be modelled with the same degree of confidence as the REE. The required liquids correspond to both the most-evolved phonolite compositions observed within the DHF, and to cognate syenite fragments found in the ignimbrites. Sodian salite also occurs as cores to titanaugite grains that grew from the basaltic component. These observations are consistent with a model in which invading basaltic magma melts syenite, and

  10. Reaction-path calculations of groundwater chemistry and mineral formation at Rainier Mesa, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J F

    1983-12-01

    Reaction-patch calculations of groundwater chemistry and mineral formation at Rainier Mesa, Nevada, have been done using a model of volcanic-glass dissolution by water that is initially saturated with CO{sub 2}. In the reaction-path calculation, rate processes control the availability of species through dissolution of volcanic glass, and equilibrium processes distribute the species between the aqueous phase and mineral phases in equilibrium at each step in the reaction path. The EQ3/6 chemical-equilibrium programs were used for the calculation. Formation constants were estimated for three zeolites (clinoptilolite, mordenite, and heulandite), so they could be considered as possible mineral precipitates. The first stage of mineral evolution, from volcanic glass to a cristobalite, smectite clay, and zeolite mixture, was modeled quite well. Predicted aqueous-phase compositions and precipitates agree with observations at Rainier Mesa and other Nevada Test Site areas. Further mineral evolution, to quartz, clay, analcime, and albite mixtures, was also modeled. Decreasing aqueous silica activity from the first stage, where cristobalite precipitates, to later stages, where quartz is present, was the controlling variable in the mineral evolution. 30 references, 20 figures, 4 tables.

  11. Strain Partitioning into Dry and Wet Zones, and the Formation of Calcic Myrmekites in Syntectonic Syenites During High-T Crystallization/Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Toni, G. B.; Bitencourt, M. D. F.; Nardi, L. V. S.

    2014-12-01

    Myrmekites are fine intergrowths of (generally Na-rich) plagioclase and vermicular quartz developed on K-feldspar. The myrmekite-forming reaction is intimately related to deformation as it results in volume decrease and finer grainsize, thus enhancing plastic behaviour. In south Brazil, myrmekites are described in 642 Ma syntectonic syenites intrusive in a ca. 650 Ma collisional thrust pile comprised of granulite-facies gneisses. Syenites are porphyritic or fine-grained equigranular, with biotite, clinopyroxene (Cpx) and amphibole as mafic phases. They are variably deformed, and disposed in alternating m- to cm-thick layers. Within low-strain zones, well-developed magmatic foliation and lineation are marked by shape alignment of K-feldspar (Kf) and mafic minerals. Subgrains and recrystallized grains (ca. 0,5 mm) are common features at the border of Kf megacrysts, developed to different degrees. In highly deformed sites, the strain softening promoted by the inflow of late-magmatic fluids has lead to deformation partitioning into wet and dry zones, where different end-products are formed from a single syenite protolith. Within the dry zones, high-T recrystallization is abundant in both Kf and Cpx, but primary mineralogy is preserved. Within the wet zones the rock contains biotite and minor amphibole, but no Cpx. Kf megacrysts are progressively invaded by myrmekite (An38-43) mantles, especially along foliation-parallel faces. In their pressure shadows, 5mm-sized, subhedral plagioclase crystals (An44-48) containing irregular quartz inclusions are interpreted as crystallized from Ca-enriched, late-magmatic fluids which have destabilized Cpx. Large plagioclase crystals and myrmekite aggregates are further recrystallized, and the process has eventually lead to the formation of plagioclase-rich rocks restricted to m-thick bands. Deformation partitioning into dry and wet zones, and the fact that myrmekites are restricted to the latter demonstrate that fluids are the

  12. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  13. Secondary organic aerosol formation by self-reactions of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in evaporating droplets.

    PubMed

    De Haan, David O; Corrigan, Ashley L; Tolbert, Margaret A; Jimenez, Jose L; Wood, Stephanie E; Turley, Jacob J

    2009-11-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are scavenged by clouds, where a fraction of these compounds are oxidized during the lifetime of the droplet. As a cloud droplet evaporates, the remaining glyoxal and methylglyoxal must either form low-volatility compounds such as oligomers and remain in the aerosol phase, or transfer back to the gas phase. A series of experiments on evaporating aqueous aerosol droplets indicates that over the atmospherically relevant concentration range for clouds and fog (4-1000 microM), 33 +/- 11% of glyoxal and 19 +/- 13% of methylglyoxal remains in the aerosol phase while the remainder evaporates. Measurements of aerosol density and time-dependent AMS signal changes are consistent with the formation of oligomers by each compound during the drying process. Unlike glyoxal, which forms acetal oligomers, exact mass AMS data indicates that the majority of methylglyoxal oligomers are formed by aldol condensation reactions, likely catalyzed by pyruvic acid, formed from methylglyoxal disproportionation. Our measurements of evaporation fractions can be used to estimate the global aerosol formation potential of glyoxal and methylglyoxal via self-reactions at 1 and 1.6 Tg C yr(-1), respectively. This is a factor of 4 less than the SOA formed by these compounds if their uptake is assumed to be irreversible. However, these estimates are likely lower limits for their total aerosol formation potential because oxidants and amines will also react with glyoxal and methylglyoxal to form additional low-volatility products. PMID:19924942

  14. The formation and decay of superheavy nuclei produced in 48Ca-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Balasubramaniam, M.; Gupta, Raj K.; Münzenberg, G.; Scheid, W.

    2003-04-01

    The formation of superheavy nuclei in 48Ca+232Th, 238U, 242,244Pu and 248Cm reactions and their subsequent decay are studied within the quantum mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT) and the QMFT-based preformed cluster decay model (PCM) of Gupta and collaborators. According to QMFT, all these 48Ca-induced reactions are cold fusion reactions with relative excitation energies larger than those for the Pb-induced cold fusion reactions and smaller than those for the lighter beam, i.e. Mg, Si or S-induced hot fusion reactions. The same reactions were first suggested by Gupta et al in 1977 on the basis of QMFT, and this study re-establishes the same result. In fact, for such heavy isotopes of Z = 110 to 116, 50Ca is shown to be a better beam for cold fusion, but 50Ca is a radioactive nucleus. The alpha-decay half-lives of these nuclei after 3n and/or 4n evaporations, i.e. of the evaporation residues of these compound systems, calculated on PCM compare reasonably well with the experiments published by the Dubna group and another recent calculation. As expected for such rare decays, PCM calculations show that the alpha-preformation factors are small, ~10-8 to 10-10. The possible competition of alpha-decays with heavy cluster emissions from these superheavy nuclei is also probed from the point of view of searching for new nuclear structure information and possible future experiments with such exotic nuclei. The decay half-lives for some clusters are in fact shown to be lower than the limits of experiments for nuclei with enough available atoms.

  15. Fission and quasifission modes in heavy-ion-induced reactions leading to the formation of Hs{sup *}

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Goennenwein, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.; Goes Brennand, E. de

    2011-06-15

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb have been measured. All reactions lead to Hs isotopes. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs{sup *}, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, leading to the formation of a similar compound nucleus, the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier fusion-fission is the main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragments for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies.

  16. Phase formation during Mn thin film reaction with Ge: Self-aligned germanide process for spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbes, O.; Portavoce, A.; Le Thanh, V.; Girardeaux, C.; Michez, L.

    2013-10-01

    Interesting results have been reported concerning the magnetic properties of the Mn5Ge3 compound, opening the road to possibly create spin injectors in Ge. However, a process compatible with the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor technology, allowing to produce a Mn5Ge3 layer on the active regions of Ge-based transistors has not been well established yet. Here, we report on the solid state reaction between a 50 nm-thick Mn film and amorphous Ge, aiming to investigate a similar process than the one (Salicide) used for contact production in the standard Si technology. In situ X-ray diffraction combined with ex situ structural and magnetic characterizations were used to identify and study phase formation during the Mn/Ge reaction.

  17. Spatiotemporal Pattern Formation and Chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction in a Reverse Microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Irving R.; Vanag, Vladimir K.

    2003-08-01

    We study the spatiotemporal behavior of the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction in a reverse microemulsion consisting of water, octane and the surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT). By varying the microemulsion composition, we can "tune" its structure, specifically the size and spacing between the nanometer-sized water droplets in which the polar BZ reactants reside. We find a remarkable array of pattern formation as the microemulsion structure and BZ chemistry are varied. Behaviors observed include stationary Turing patterns, traveling and standing waves, spirals, targets, antispirals and antitargets (which travel into rather than out from their center), and spatiotemporal chaos. A simple reaction-diffusion model, which accounts for the BZ chemistry and the differential diffusion of species within water droplets and in the bulk oil phase, is able to reproduce nearly all of the observed behavior.

  18. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N.; Allwood, Daniel M.; Blakemore, David C.; Ley, Steven V.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures.

  19. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  20. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme. PMID:26731734

  1. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) inmore » high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.« less

  2. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates ({approx}1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry traces to 725 deg. C. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 10{sup 5} K/s) in high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (T{sub max}) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6{+-}0.1 m/s and 1220{+-}50 K, respectively, and that the measured T{sub max} is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (T{sub ad}). The difference between T{sub max} and T{sub ad} is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after T{sub max} and results in the release of 20%-30% of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.

  3. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION AROUND THE CIRCUMBINARY HABITABLE ZONE: INWARD MIGRATION IN THE PLANETESIMAL SWARM

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Yanxiang; Zhou Jilin; Xie Jiwei E-mail: zhoujl@nju.edu.cn

    2013-01-20

    According to the core accretion theory, circumbinary embryos can form only beyond a critical semimajor axis (CSMA). However, due to the relatively high density of solid materials in the inner disk, a significant amount of small planetesimals must exist in the inner zone when embryos form outside this CSMA. Thus, embryo migration induced by the planetesimal swarm is possible after gas disk depletion. Through numerical simulations, we found that (1) the scattering-driven inward migration of embryos is robust and planets can form in the habitable zone if we adopt a mass distribution of an MMSN-like disk; (2) the total mass of the planetesimals in the inner region and continuous embryo-embryo scattering are two key factors that cause significant embryo migrations; and (3) the scattering-driven migration of embryos is a natural water-delivery mechanism. We propose that planet detections should focus on the close binary with its habitable zone near CSMA.

  4. Oligomer Formation Reactions of Criegee Intermediates in the Ozonolysis of Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Inomata, S.; Hirokawa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitutes a substantial fraction of atmospheric fine particulate matters and has an effect on visibility, climate and human health. One of the major oxidizing processes leading to SOA formation is an ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons (UHCs).[1] Despite of its importance, the contribution of the ozonolysis of UHCs to the SOA formation in the troposphere is not sufficiently understood due to a lack of information on reaction pathways to produce low volatile compounds. While many studies have previously been focused on SOA formation from the ozonolysis of large UHCs, SOA formation from the ozonolysis of UHCs with less than six carbon atoms have been rarely investigated because their products are expected to be too volatile to contribute to the SOA formation. Very recently, a few studies have reported the SOA formation from the ozonolysis of such small UHCs but chemical mechanisms are still unclear. [2-4] In order to understand SOA formation from the ozonolysis of the small UHCs, this study investigated gas- and particle-phase products in laboratory experiments with a Teflon bag using a negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) with chloride ion transfer for chemical ionization. This technique is suitable for analysis of compounds such as carboxylic acids and hydroperoxides expected to be produced in the ozonolysis of UHCs with less fragmentation, high selectivity, and high sensitivity. In the particle-phase analysis, SOAs collected on a PTFE filter were heated, and thermally desorbed compounds were analyzed. In the gas-phase analysis, series of peaks with an interval of a mass-to-charge ratio equal to the molecular weight of a Criegee intermediate formed in their ozonolysis were observed. These peaks were attributed to oligomeric hydroperoxides composed of Criegee intermediates as a chain unit. These oligomeric hydroperoxides were also observed in the particle-phase analysis, indicating that the oligomeric

  5. Search for reaction conditions and catalyst for selective prebiotic formation of Aldopentoses from Glycolaldehyde and Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delidovich, Irina; Taran, Oxana; Parmon, Valentin; Gromov, Nikolay

    2012-07-01

    Formation of organic compounds from simple precursors appears to have been one of the first steps from geochemistry towards modern biochemistry. The Earth lagoons, hydrothermal springs, cosmic dust, meteorites, protoplanetary disk, etc. has been considered as the possible ``reactors'' in which the prebiotic synthesis could have taken place. The finding of reactions and reaction conditions which allow to produce the high yields of the biologically relevant substances from simple compounds could help us to verify different hypothesis of plausible prebotic conditions. In this work we have studied the formation of vitally important sugars, namely aldopentoses (ribose, xylose, lyxose and arabinose), from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde over catalysts. Aldopentoses nowadays play the important roles as the components of polysaccharides, glycosides, nucleic acids and ATP. Glycolaldehyde is the simplest monosaccharide, which was found in the interstellar space [1], where it could be generated as a result of several processes, for instance, condensation of formaldehyde under UV-radiation [2]. In this work the peculiarities of interaction between glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde in the presence of soluble (phosphate and borate buffers) and solid (minerals apatite and montmorillonites) catalysts were studied. The dependences of composition of the reaction products on the catalyst nature, molar ratio of substrates, pH value of reaction mixture were revealed. The yields of aldopentoses amount to ca. 60-65% in the presence of borate catalyst under optimized reaction conditions. Borate acts not only as a catalyst, but also as the stabilizer of active intermediates and aldopentoses from side reactions [3]. Borates are present in some mineral and clays (serpentine, montmorillonite etc.) and in water of Cityhot springs (Geyser valley, placeKamchatka) in rather high concentrations. Therefore catalysis by borates could be considered as plausible prebotic condition. Acknowledgements. We

  6. Numerical simulation of formation of cyclone vortex flows in the intratropical zone of convergence and their early detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingalev, I. V.; Astaf'eva, N. M.; Orlov, K. G.; Chechetkin, V. M.; Mingalev, V. S.; Mingalev, O. V.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanisms of formation of cyclonic vortices in the tropical atmosphere of the Earth are investigated in the intratropical zone of convergence using numerical simulation made with the complete system of equations of gas dynamics taking into account transport of infrared radiation, phase transitions of water vapor into microdrops of water and ice particles, and sedimentation of these drops and ice particles in the field of gravity force. Observational data on the structure of dominant air streams, which are formed in the intratropical zone of convergence over the North Atlantic in the periods of its highest thermodynamic intensity and instability, are used in the initial and boundary conditions of the model. Formation of cyclonic vortex flows is obtained numerically at sufficiently strong bending of the intratropical zone of convergence. The results of numerical modeling are compared with the data of satellite microwave monitoring: global radio thermal fields of the Earth from the electronic collection GLOBAL-Field allowing one to study the structure of atmospheric motions in a wide range of space-time scales.

  7. [Role of carotid chemoreceptors in formation of adaptive reactions in animals].

    PubMed

    Agadzhanian, N A; Elfimov, A I; Shevchenko, L V

    2003-01-01

    After surgical denervation of sinocarotid reflexogenic zones and bilateral glomectomy in white laboratory rats oxygen consumption, rectal temperature, rate of cardial contractions and thermoregulatory activity of skeletal muscles display authentic increase. Glomectomy results in decreasing calorigecic effect of noradrenaline. Compensatory increase of thermoregulatory activity of sceletal muscles in response to beta-adrenogenic blocade with inderal in post-glomectomic animals is authentically less, than before inactivation of carotid receptors. In animals after carotid glomectomy resistance to acute hypoxia is clearly reduced. True reduction of number of erythrocytes, of hemoglobin concentration, of hematocrite parameter in post glomectic animals was found, which indicates anemisation phenomena. It was found that glomectomy after adaptation of animals in the mountains of Tien Shan at the height of 3200 m during 30 days didn't substantively change resistance to acute hypoxia. Resistance to acute hypoxia of animals living on mountains (susliks, marmots) is higher than of animals living on plains. Glomectomy performed on animals living on mountain resulted in an insignificant decrease in resistance to acute hypoxia. Resistance to acute hypoxia in postglomectic animals was found to be directly linked with absolute amount of hemoglobin concentration and erythrocyte number. In that way denervation of sinocarotid reflexogenic zones and bilateral glomectomy is an adequate method of comparative research of functions regulation mechanism during formation of adaptive responses in animals in dependence of various factors of external environment in norm, as well, as in pathology. PMID:12918264

  8. Heterogeneous reactions of glyoxal on mineral particles: A new avenue for oligomers and organosulfate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Wu, Huihui; Zhao, Yue; Huang, Dao; Huang, Liubin; Chen, Zhongming

    2016-04-01

    Glyoxal (GL) plays a crucial role in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), because it is highly water soluble and capable of oligomerization. This is the first study to describe irreversible heterogeneous reactions of GL on clean and acidic gas-aged SiO2, α-Al2O3, and CaCO3 particles, as models of real mineral particles, at various relative humidity and without irradiation and gas phase oxidants. A series of products, including oligomers, organosulfates, and organic acids, which contribute to SOA formation, were produced. GL uptake on SO2-aged α-Al2O3 enabled the oxidation of surface S(IV) to S(VI). The presence of adsorbed water on particles favored GL uptake and the formation of oligomers and organosulfate, but it suppressed organic acid formation. In addition, the aging process enhanced the positive effect of adsorbed water on GL uptake. These findings will further our understanding of the GL sink and SOA sources in the atmosphere.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CO{sub 2} FORMATION BY SURFACE REACTIONS OF NON-ENERGETIC OH RADICALS WITH CO MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira; Hama, Tetsuya; Pirronello, Valerio

    2010-04-01

    Surface reactions between carbon monoxide and non-energetic hydroxyl radicals were carried out at 10 K and 20 K in order to investigate possible reaction pathways to yield carbon dioxide in dense molecular clouds. Hydroxyl radicals, produced by dissociating water molecules in microwave-induced plasma, were cooled down to 100 K prior to the introduction of CO. The abundances of species were monitored in situ using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Formation of CO{sub 2} was clearly observed, even at 10 K, suggesting that reactions of CO with OH proceed with little or no activation barrier. The present results indicate that CO{sub 2} formation, due to reactions between CO and OH, occurs in tandem with H{sub 2}O formation, and this may lead to the formation of CO{sub 2} ice in polar environments, as typically observed in molecular clouds.

  10. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR GROWTH TO SOOT -A REVIEW OF CHEMICAL REACTION PATHWAYS. (R824970)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation by combustion processes of airborne species of current health concern such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot particles necessitates a detailed understanding of chemical reaction pathways responsible for their formation. The present review discus...

  11. Nucleophilicity and P-C Bond Formation Reactions of a Terminal Phosphanido Iridium Complex.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ángel L; Casado, Miguel A; Ciriano, Miguel A; de Bruin, Bas; López, José A; Tejel, Cristina

    2016-01-19

    The diiridium complex [{Ir(ABPN2)(CO)}2(μ-CO)] (1; [ABPN2](-) = [(allyl)B(Pz)2(CH2PPh2)](-)) reacts with diphenylphosphane affording [Ir(ABPN2)(CO)(H) (PPh2)] (2), the product of the oxidative addition of the P-H bond to the metal. DFT studies revealed a large contribution of the terminal phosphanido lone pair to the HOMO of 2, indicating nucleophilic character of this ligand, which is evidenced by reactions of 2 with typical electrophiles such as H(+), Me(+), and O2. Products from the reaction of 2 with methyl chloroacetate were found to be either [Ir(ABPN2)(CO)(H)(PPh2CH2CO2Me)][PF6] ([6]PF6) or [Ir(ABPN2)(CO)(Cl)(H)] (7) and the free phosphane (PPh2CH2CO2Me), both involving P-C bond formation, depending on the reaction conditions. New complexes having iridacyclophosphapentenone and iridacyclophosphapentanone moieties result from reactions of 2 with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate and dimethyl maleate, respectively, as a consequence of a further incorporation of the carbonyl ligand. In this line, the terminal alkyne methyl propiolate gave a mixture of a similar iridacyclophosphapentanone complex and [Ir(ABPN2){CH═C(CO2Me)-CO}{PPh2-CH═CH(CO2Me)}] (10), which bears the functionalized phosphane PPh2-CH═CH(CO2Me) and an iridacyclobutenone fragment. Related model reactions aimed to confirm mechanistic proposals are also studied. PMID:26695592

  12. Organosulfate Formation through the Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide with Unsaturated Fatty Acids and Long-Chain Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Passananti, Monica; Kong, Lingdong; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; Chen, Jianmin; Donaldson, D James; George, Christian

    2016-08-22

    The heterogeneous reaction between SO2 and unsaturated compounds results in the efficient production of organosulfates for several fatty acids and long-chain alkenes. The presence of an acid group, the physical state of the reactants (solid or liquid), the nature of the double bond (cis, trans, terminal), and the use of light irradiation all have an impact on the reaction rate. The reaction was investigated using different set-ups (coated flow tube, aerosol flow tube, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform cell). The reaction products were identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry and the impact of this reaction on organosulfate formation in the atmosphere is discussed. PMID:27458109

  13. Formation of albitite-hosted uranium within IOCG systems: the Southern Breccia, Great Bear magmatic zone, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montreuil, Jean-François; Corriveau, Louise; Potter, Eric G.

    2015-03-01

    Uranium and polymetallic U mineralization hosted within brecciated albitites occurs one kilometer south of the magnetite-rich Au-Co-Bi-Cu NICO deposit in the southern Great Bear magmatic zone (GBMZ), Canada. Concentrations up to 1 wt% U are distributed throughout a 3 by 0.5 km albitization corridor defined as the Southern Breccia zone. Two distinct U mineralization events are observed. Primary uraninite precipitated with or without pyrite-chalcopyrite ± molybdenite within magnetite-ilmenite-biotite-K-feldspar-altered breccias during high-temperature potassic-iron alteration. Subsequently, pitchblende precipitated in earthy hematite-specular hematite-chlorite veins associated with a low-temperature iron-magnesium alteration. The uraninite-bearing mineralization postdates sodic (albite) and more localized high-temperature potassic-iron (biotite-magnetite ± K-feldspar) alteration yet predates potassic (K-feldspar), boron (tourmaline) and potassic-iron-magnesium (hematite ± K-feldspar ± chlorite) alteration. The Southern Breccia zone shares attributes of the Valhalla (Australia) and Lagoa Real (Brazil) albitite-hosted U deposits but contains greater iron oxide contents and lower contents of riebeckite and carbonates. Potassium, Ni, and Th are also enriched whereas Zr and Sr are depleted with respect to the aforementioned albitite-hosted U deposits. Field relationships, geochemical signatures and available U-Pb dates on pre-, syn- and post-mineralization intrusions place the development of the Southern Breccia and the NICO deposit as part of a single iron oxide alkali-altered (IOAA) system. In addition, this case example illustrates that albitite-hosted U deposits can form in albitization zones that predate base and precious metal ore zones in a single IOAA system and become traps for U and multiple metals once the tectonic regime favors fluid mixing and oxidation-reduction reactions.

  14. Peptide bond formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium: formamide and acetamide as prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-09-20

    A theoretical study of the reactions of NH{sub 4}{sup +} with formaldehyde and CH{sub 5}{sup +} with formamide is carried out. The viability of these gas-phase ion-molecule reactions as possible sources of formamide and acetamide under the conditions of interstellar medium is evaluated. We report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies and an analysis of their potential energy surfaces. Formation of protonated formamide from the reaction between ammonium cation and formaldehyde is an exothermic process, but all the channels located on the potential energy surface leading to this product present net activation energies. For the reaction between methanium and formamide, different products are possible from a thermodynamic point of view. An analysis of its potential energy surface showed that formation of protonated acetamide and amino acetaldehyde takes place through barrier-free paths. Therefore, this reaction could be a feasible source of acetamide and amino acetaldehyde in space.

  15. Formation mechanisms of 3,4-dinitrofuroxan via nitration reaction of furoxan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yajing; Ye, Yuqing; Liu, Jianyong; Lai, Weipeng

    2016-03-01

    A systematic investigations on the nitration of furoxan by two typical nitration reagents nitronium tetrafluoroborate (BF4NO2) and dilute nitric acid (HNO3) in chloroform (CHCl3) solvent using density functional theory (DFT) method to reveal the formation mechanism of 3,4-dinitrofuroxan (DNFO) and explore new synthesis routes. The geometry optimizations of the minima and transition states involved in the two nitration reactions are performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G** basis set level. The CCSD single-point energy corrections at the same level are carried out on top of the optimized geometries to obtain the accurate energy. Calculated results demonstrate that the electrophilic substitutions of nitronium ions from the nitration reagents and the abstractions of protons in the complex intermediates are the main formation mechanism of DNFO. BF4- is shown to be a better proton abstracter than HNO3 and H2O due to its no barrier combination with H+. The abstraction of proton by HNO3 is predicted to be more feasible than H2O because it can supply the nitration attacker (NO2+) and release more heat. Chloroform is a feasible solvent and heating properly is necessary for the two reactions due to the relatively high barrier of 37 kcal/mol. These conclusions provide some significant indications on the new experimental synthesis of DNFO.

  16. Formation of Lactic Acid from Cellulosic Biomass by Alkaline Hydrothermal Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Jini, F.; Kishita, A.; Enomoto, H.; Tohji, K.

    2008-02-01

    Glucose, as a model compound of cellulosic biomass, was used as a test material. Ca(OH)2 and NaOH were selected as alkali. Results showed that both NaOH and Ca(OH)2, can promote the formation of lactic acid in a hydrothermal reaction of glucose. In the case of the addition of NaOH, lactic acid was obtained with a good yield of 27% based on a carbon base at 300 °C for 60 s with a NaOH concentration of 2.5 M. In the case of the addition of Ca(OH)2, the highest yield of lactic acid is 20%, which occurred at 300 °C for 60 s with a Ca(OH)2 concentration of 0.32 M. The formation mechanisms of lactic acid from glucose were also discussed according to intermediate products identified. Lactic acid may be generated via formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde besides via the aldose having three carbon atoms in hydrothermal reaction which all formed by the reverse aldol condensation of hexoses.

  17. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation During Formation of Macromolecular Organic Grain Coatings via FTT Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Johnson, N. M.; Elsila-Cook, J.; Kopstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of carbon isotopic fractionation of various organic compounds found in meteorites may provide useful diagnostic information concerning the environments and mechanisms that were responsible for their formation. Unfortunately, carbon has only two stable isotopes, making interpretation of such observations quite problematic. Chemical reactions can increase or decrease the C-13/C-12 ratio by various amounts, but the final ratio will depend on the total reaction pathway followed from the source carbon to the final product, a path not readily discernable after 4.5 billion years. In 1970 Libby showed that the C-13/C-12 ratios of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon were similar by comparing carbon from the Murchison meteorite to that of terrestrial sediments. More recent studies have shown that the C-13/C-12 ratio of the Earth and meteorites may be considerably enriched in C-13 compared to the ratio observed in the solar wind [2], possibly suggesting that carbon produced via ion-molecule reactions in cold dark clouds could be an important source of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon. However, meteoritic carbon has been subjected to parent body processing that could have resulted in significant changes to the C-13/C-12 ratio originally present while significant variation has been observed in the C-13/C-12 ratio of the same molecule extracted from different terrestrial sources. Again we must conclude that understanding the ratio found in meteorites may be difficult.

  18. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly

  19. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) bothmore » significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the

  20. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  1. Unified reaction pathways for the prebiotic formation of RNA and DNA nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Jeilani, Yassin Aweis; Williams, Phoenix N; Walton, Sofia; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2016-07-27

    The reaction pathways for the prebiotic formation of nucleobases are complex and lead to the formation of a mixture of products. In the past 50 years, there has been a concerted effort for identifying a unified mechanism for the abiotic origin of the biomolecules but with little success. In the present theoretical study, we identified two prominent precursors for the building up of RNA and DNA nucleobases under prebiotic conditions: (a) 1,2-diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN), which is a tetramer of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and (b) formamide, a hydrolysis product of HCN; it is important to emphasize that HCN is the source of both precursors. We find that free radical pathways are potentially appropriate to account for the origin of nucleobases from HCN. The current study unites the formamide pathways with the DAMN pathways. The mechanisms for the formation of the RNA and DNA nucleobases (uracil, adenine, purine, cytosine) were studied by quantum chemical computations using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. All the routes involved proceed with relatively low energy barriers (within the error margin of DFT methods). We showed that the radical mechanisms for the formation of nucleobases could be unified through common precursors. The results demonstrated that 4-aminoimidazole-5-carbonitrile (AICN), which is a known precursor for nucleobases, is a product of DAMN. The overall mechanisms are internally consistent with the abiotic formation of the nucleobases, namely (a) under a meteoritic impact scenario on the early Earth's surface that generated high internal energy, and/or (b) in the (gas phase) interstellar regions without the presence of catalysts. PMID:27220279

  2. Commitment, Compliance and Comfort Zones: The Effects of Formative Assessment on Vocational Education Students' Learning Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecclestone, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Research evidence that well-executed formative assessment raises achievement and enhances motivation and autonomy has influenced policy and practice in schools and universities in the United Kingdom. Formative assessment is also built into the aims and assessment activities of outcome-based qualifications in post-compulsory education. Behind these…

  3. Formation of the giant Shakhdara migmatitic gneiss dome, Pamir, India-Asia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stübner, Konstanze; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Hacker, Bradley; Dunkl, István; Gloaguen, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Cenozoic gneiss domes comprise one third of the surface exposure of the Pamir Mountains and provide a window into deep crustal processes of the India-Asia collision. The largest of these is the 350 × 90 km Shakhdara-Alichur composite dome of the southern Pamir, Tajikistan and Afghanistan. The Shakhdara and Alichur domes formed by footwall exhumation of two low-angle detachments: In the larger Shakhdara dome the top-to-S South Pamir shear zone (SPSZ) exhumed crust from 30-40 km depth; in the Alichur dome the top-to-N Alichur shear zone exhumed upper crustal rocks. The subdomes are separated by a low-strain horst. Non-coaxial shear in the Shakhdara dome is pervasive over the ~4 km thick SPSZ. The top of the shear zone is preserved at mountain peaks, the base is incised by the Panj gorge, which exposes the 'core' of the dome; total erosion is less than 4 km throughout most of the dome. We use a comprehensive geo-thermochronologic dataset of titanite, monazite, and zircon U/Th-Pb, mica Rb-Sr and 40Ar/39Ar, zircon and apatite fission track, and zircon (U-Th)/He ages to constrain the exhumation history of the southern Pamir domes. Doming started at ~21 Ma by crustal buckling and activation of a top-to-N normal shear zone (Gunt shear zone) along the northern rim of the Shakhdara dome, resulting in exhumation and cooling. The bulk of the exhumation was accomplished by northward extrusion of the SPSZ footwall, which was active from ~18-15 Ma to ~2 Ma; exhumation rates were 1-3 mm/yr. Erosion rates during and after the end of doming were 0.3-0.5 mm/yr within the domes and 0.1-0.3 mm/yr in the horst and in the SE Pamir plateau; incision rates of the major drainages were up to 1.0 mm/yr. Doming by footwall exhumation of the SPSZ resulted in up to 90 km N-S extension, coeval with ongoing N-S convergence between India and Asia. Extension opposes shortening along and above the reactivated Rushan-Pshart suture zone, a wide fold-thrust belt north of the Shakhdara-Alichur domes

  4. [The main radionuclides and dose formation in fish of the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, D I; Kaglian, A E; Kireev, S I; Nazarov, A B; Klenus, V G

    2008-01-01

    The results of the researches of spices-specificity, accumulation dynamics and distribution of 90Sr, of 137Cs and of transuranic elements in fish of the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone are analysed. The data of estimations of absorbed doze rate from incorporated radionuclides for pray fish and predatory species are given. For the fish from the lake of the left-bank floodplain of the Pripyat River the increase of 90Sr specific activity is registered which is presumably connected with the dynamics of the physical-chemical forms of the radionuclide in soils and their wash out in water bodies from the catchment basin. Now about 90% of internal dose rate of fish from closed aquatic ecosystems within the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone is caused by 90Sr incorporation. PMID:18666579

  5. Kinetics and Thermochemistry of ClCO Formation from the Cl + CO Association Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Kreutter, K. D.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    Laser flash photolysis of Cl2/CO/M mixtures (M = N2, CO, Ar, CO2) has been employed in conjunction with Cl((sup 2)P(sub J)) detection by time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate equilibration kinetics in the reactions Cl((sup 2)P(sub J)) + CO ClCO as a function of temperature (185-260 K) and pressure (14-200 Torr). The association and dissociation reactions are found to be in the low-pressure limit over the range of experimental conditions investigated. In N2 and/or CO buffer gases, the temperature dependences of the ClCO formation and dissociation reaction rate constants are described by the Arrhenius expressions k(sub 1) = (1.05 +/- 0.36) x 10(exp -34) exp[(810 +/- 70)/T] cm(exp 6)/molecules(exp 2).s and k(sub -1) = (4.1 +/- 3.1) x 10(exp -10) exp[(-2960 +/- 60)/T]cu cm/(molecule.s) (errors are 2 sigma). Second- and third-law analyses of the temperature dependence of the equilbrium constant (k/k-1) lead to the following thermodynamic parameters for the association reaction: Delta-H(sub 298) = -7.7 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol, Delta-H(sub 0) = -6.9 +/- 0.7 kcal/mol, Delta-S(sub 298) = -23.8 +/- 2.0 cal/mole.K, Delta-H(sub f,298)(ClCO) = 5.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol (errors are 2 sigma). The results repported in this study significantly reduce the uncertainties in all reported kinetic and thermodynamic parameters.

  6. Isotachophoretic zone formation of serum albumin in different free fluid electrophoresis instruments.

    PubMed

    Thormann, W; Firestone, M A; Sloan, J E; Long, T D; Mosher, R A

    1990-04-01

    The isotachophoretic behavior of a model protein, serum albumin, was examined (i) by computer simulation, (ii) by capillary isotachophoresis in HPE 100 and Tachophor 2127, (iii) by continuous flow isotachophoresis in Elphor VaP 22 and the BIO-STREAM Separator and (iv) by recycling isotachophoresis in an apparatus of our own design. Variations in monitored zone shapes can be explained by differences in engineering aspects and fluid stabilization principles of the instruments. PMID:2340824

  7. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to determine if the formation of the generally observed layer of large porosity adjacent to the as-nitride surfaces of reaction bonded silicon nitrides could be prevented during processing. Isostatically pressed test bars were prepared from wet vibratory milled Si powder. Sintering and nitriding were each done under three different conditions:(1) bars directly exposed to the furnance atmosphere; (2) bars packed in Si powder; (3) bars packed in Si3N4 powder. Packing the bars in either Si of Si3N4 powder during sintering retarded formation of the layer of large porosity. Only packing the bars in Si prevented formation of the layer during nitridation. The strongest bars (316 MPa) were those sintered in Si and nitrided in Si3N4 despite their having a layer of large surface porosity; failure initiated at very large pores and inclusions. The alpha/beta ratio was found to be directly proportional to the oxygen content; a possible explanation for this relationship is discussed.

  8. Levoglucosan formation from crystalline cellulose: importance of a hydrogen bonding network in the reaction.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Takashi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2013-12-01

    Levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-D-glucopyranose) formation by the thermal degradation of native cellulose was investigated by MP4(SDQ)//DFT(B3LYP) and DFT(M06-2X)//DFT(B3LYP) level computations. The computational results of dimer models lead to the conclusion that the degradation occurs by a concerted mechanism similar to the degradation of methyl β-D-glucoside reported in our previous study. One-chain models of glucose hexamer, in which the interchain hydrogen bonds of real cellulose crystals are absent, do not exhibit the correct reaction behavior of levoglucosan formation; for instance, the activation enthalpy (Ea =≈38 kcal mol(-1) ) is considerably underestimated compared to the experimental value (48-60 kcal mol(-1) ). This problem is solved with the use of two-chain models that contain interchain hydrogen bonds. The theoretical study of this model clearly shows that the degradation of the internal glucosyl residue leads to the formation of a levoglucosan precursor at the chain end and levoglucosan is selectively formed from this levoglucosan end. The calculated Ea (56-62 kcal mol(-1) ) agrees well with the experimental value. The computational results of three-chain models indicate that this degradation occurs selectively on the crystalline surface. All these computational results provide a comprehensive understanding of several experimental facts, the mechanisms of which have not yet been elucidated. PMID:24243863

  9. Density functional computational studies on the glucose and glycine Maillard reaction: Formation of the Amadori rearrangement products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Roy, Amlan K.; Shipar, Abul Haider; Ahmed, M. Samsuddin

    Theoretical energy changes of various intermediates leading to the formation of the Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs) under different mechanistic assumptions have been calculated, by using open chain glucose (O-Glu)/closed chain glucose (A-Glu and B-Glu) and glycine (Gly) as a model for the Maillard reaction. Density functional theory (DFT) computations have been applied on the proposed mechanisms under different pH conditions. Thus, the possibility of the formation of different compounds and electronic energy changes for different steps in the proposed mechanisms has been evaluated. B-Glu has been found to be more efficient than A-Glu, and A-Glu has been found more efficient than O-Glu in the reaction. The reaction under basic condition is the most favorable for the formation of ARPs. Other reaction pathways have been computed and discussed in this work.0

  10. Break up of the lithosphere and the formation of the sedimentary basins in the Eurasia-Pacific transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodnikov, A. G.; Sergeyeva, N. A.; Zabarinskaya, L. P.

    2009-04-01

    The studies of the deep structure of the sedimentary basins were carried out in the frame of the international Geotraverse Project from deep sections of the tectonosphere including the lithosphere and asthenosphere on the basis of combined interpretation of geological and geophysical data. Research subjects are the sedimentary basins of the transition zone from Eurasian continent to the Pacific such as Northern Sakhalin basin, Deryugin basin and Tatar strait trough in the Sea of Okhotsk and sedimentary basins of the North China Plain and Philippine Sea. It was established that the formation of sedimentary basins is associated with the processes going on in the Earth's interior specifically in the asthenosphere. The asthenosphere occurs at depth of 50 - 80 km under the old Paleogene basisns and at depth of around 30 km under the Neogene basins. Under the Pliocene-Quaternary inter-arc basins the asthenosphere occurs at depth of 10-20-km. Upwelling of the hot asthenosphere to the crust caused the break-up of the lithosphere, the formation of rifts, basalt magma eruption, and hydrothermal activity. Sedimentary basins are related to ancient and recent subduction zones. They are distinguished for their anomalous deep structure. Their features are rift structures or spreading centers in their basement; active magmatism at the initial stage of formation; hydrothermal processes associated with sulfides formation; high density of the heat flow; the location of the asthenospheric diapirs beneath sedimentary basins. Asthenospheric diapirs are the source of fluids and heat. Mantle fluids comprise both gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons. The asthenospheric diapirs are likely to be channels by which hot mantle fluids penetrate into sedimentary basins, thus providing organic matter transformation and being an additional source of hydrocarbons.