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Sample records for reactive gas plasma

  1. Measurements of the negative ion density in reactive gas plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Masako; Ueda, Yoko; Kawai, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Nobuo

    1999-11-01

    The reactive gas plasmas, such as C_4F_8, SiH4 and SF6 gas plasmas, have been widely used in plasma etching or CVD. The radicals and ions species in these plasmas have been reported in a lot of study. However, the negative ion density has not been measured quantitatively, since the conventional Langmuir probe cannot be used due to film depositions on its surface. In this study, the negative ion density in the reactive gas plasmas was measured with a heated Langmuir probe and an 8-mm microwave interferometer as a function of gas flow rate and radial position. Furthermore, the following equation was suggested to estimate the negative ion density only from the probe measurements: fracI_+(X )I_+(Ar) = [ fracI_-(X)I_-(Ar) + fracN_-(X )N_+(Ar)√fracT_e(X)T_e(Ar) ] √fracM_+(Ar)M_+(X), where N- denotes negative ion density and the other characteristics represent the conventional ones. The positive ion mass M+ should be assumed properly. It was confirmed that this equation provides the negative ion density both in the magnetized plasmas, such as ECR plasmas, and non-magnetized plasmas.

  2. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  3. Reactive Species Processes in Plasma-, Gas-, and Liquid-Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan; Winter, Joern; Hammer, Malte; Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Iseni, Sylvain; Tresp, Helena; Dünnbier, Mario; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-09-01

    Especially for the field of plasma medicine, plasmas interacting with liquids are of great interest for environmental, chemical, and biomedical applications. In this work we present optical diagnostics on atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with liquids. Combining the diagnostic results with numerical simulations yields an understanding of fundamental processes such as air species diffusion into the jet effluents or the influence on humidity. Especially for plasma treatment of physiological liquids in ambient air, atmospheric species play a key role. To achieve a desired reactive component output, the generation processes from these ambient air species are controlled. Plasma jets are characterized by planar laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, by absorption and emission spectroscopy, and by flow simulations. With the gained knowledge we are able to tailor the reactive component composition and to influence plasma jet-liquid interaction. We show that reactive species generation within plasma treated liquid can be tuned and apply the findings to biological cells to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). The plasma treated liquids are investigated regarding their pH value, OH radicals, nitrate and nitrite, and H2O2 content. From the tailored plasma treatment a significant insight into the relevant transport processes in plasma treatment of liquids has been gained. Support by the German BMBF 03Z2DN11&12 is acknowledged.

  4. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2000-07-01

    This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

  5. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

  6. Characteristics of M=0 Helicon Wave Plasmas in Reactive Gas Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, S.; Setsuhara, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Shoji, T.

    1997-10-01

    Plasma production in various reactive gases are more important in the actual plasma processing of mateirals than those in rare gas environment. Characteristics of high density plasmas produced by the m=0 azimuthal mode helicon wave in reactive gases in a nonuniform magnetic field is studied experimentally. Loop antennas of several turns are wound on a quartz tube of 38mm diameter to excite the m=0 helicon wave with a 3kW rf oscillator of 13.56MHz. Plasma production is performed in various dissociative gases (H_2,N_2,O2 and/or CF_4) in the pressure range around 0.1Pa and the rf wave fields are measured to know the excitation of the helicon wave in these gases. The plasma density jump from the range of 10^11 cm-3 to 10^12-13 cm-3 is observed for each gas at a critical rf power, after which the excitation of helicon wave is verified to propagate. The optical emission measurements indicate an efficient dissociation of molecules after the density jump. As an example of application of this type of discharge, the DC discharge characteristics in N_2+Ar gas on the cylindrical carbon target set for the sputtering process in the down stream region is studied in correlation with the properties of the helicon wave plasmas.

  7. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  8. Reactive gas plasma specimen processing for use in microanalysis and imaging in analytical electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.; Kestel, B.J.; Henriks, D.

    1997-01-01

    It has long been the bane of analytical electron microscopy (AEM) that the use of focused probes during microanalysis of specimens increases the local rate of hydrocarbon contamination. This is most succinctly observed by the formation of contamination deposits during focused probe work typical of AEM studies. While serving to indicate the location of the electron probe, the contamination obliterates the area of the specimen being analyzed and adversely affects all quantitative microanalysis methodologies. A variety of methods including: UV, electron beam flooding, heating and/or cooling can decrease the rate of contamination, however, none of these methods directly attack the source of specimen borne contamination. Research has shown that reactive gas plasmas may be used to clean both the specimen and stage for AEM, in this study the authors report on quantitative measurements of the reduction in contamination rates in an AEM as a function of operating conditions and plasma gases.

  9. Effects of the electrical parameters and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in liquids exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Eun Jeong; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet was fabricated and studied for plasma-liquid interactions. The plasma jet consists of a quartz-covered pin electrode and outer quartz tube with a tapered nozzle. Using the current-voltage (I-V) and optical emission characteristics of the plasma jet, the plasma density and the speed of the plume were investigated. The optical emission spectra clearly indicated the excited NO, O, OH, N2, and N2+ in the plasma plumes. Then the plasma jets were applied to the deionized water. We investigated the effects of the operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse frequency, and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in the gas and liquid phases. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. The nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the plasmas and liquids.

  10. Corrosion Resistance of High Hardness TiN Coatings Prepared by Gas Tunnel Type Plasma Reactive Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Akira; Jiang, Wei

    2006-10-01

    Thick titanium nitride coatings, which have high hardness, were obtained by gas tunnel type plasma reactive spraying. In this study, the corrosion behavior of the thick TiN coatings was investigated using the electrochemical polarization measurement in 1 M hydrochloric (HCl) solution at room temperature of 295 K. The polarization curve of stainless steel (SUS304) was also measured in order to clarify the effect of corrosion resistance of TiN coatings on the substrates as protective layer. The results showed that the TiN coating could protect the substrate surface from corrosion. It also revealed that the corrosion resistance of TiN coatings was improved as the thickness of TiN coatings was increased.

  11. Role of reactive gas in atmospheric plasma for cell attachment and proliferation on biocompatible poly ɛ-caprolactone film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Uk; Jeong, Ye-Sul; Jeong, Se-Young; Park, So-Young; Bae, Jong-Seong; Kim, Hyun-Gyu; Cho, Chae-Ryong

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports the surface modification of a biocompatible poly ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) film treated by atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) with reactive gases. The change in wettability and surface morphology of the PCL film after the plasma treatment with the reactive gases (Ar, H 2, N 2 and O 2) were determined using contact angle and surface roughness measurements. The chemical bonding states and molecular vibration modes of the activated organic groups on the polymer surface were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transformation infrared techniques. The surface of the ACP-treated PCL films was also examined for their in vitro cell attachment and proliferation using human prostate epithelial cells (HPECs). The increase in the hydrophobicity of the Ar + H 2 plasma-treated PCL film resulted in a lower cell loading in the initial step of cell culture as well as a decrease in the level of cell attachment and proliferation compared with the pristine film. However, the hydrophilic properties of the Ar + N 2, Ar and Ar + O 2 plasma-treated PCL film improved the adhesion properties. Therefore, the Ar + N 2, Ar and Ar + O 2 plasma-treated PCL films showed a better cell distribution and growth than that of the pristine PCL film. The ACP-treated PCL film is potentially useful as a suitable scaffold in biophysics and bio-medical engineering applications.

  12. Plasma & reactive ion etching to prepare ohmic contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, Timothy A.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a low-resistance electrical contact between a metal and a layer of p-type CdTe surface by plasma etching and reactive ion etching comprising: a) placing a CdS/CdTe layer into a chamber and evacuating said chamber; b) backfilling the chamber with Argon or a reactive gas to a pressure sufficient for plasma ignition; and c) generating plasma ignition by energizing a cathode which is connected to a power supply to enable the plasma to interact argon ions alone or in the presence of a radio-frequency DC self-bias voltage with the p-CdTe surface.

  13. Smoothing single-crystalline SiC surfaces by reactive ion etching using pure NF{sub 3} and NF{sub 3}/Ar mixture gas plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tasaka, Akimasa; Kotaka, Yuki; Oda, Atsushi; Saito, Morihiro; Tojo, Tetsuro; Inaba, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    In pure NF{sub 3} plasma, the etching rates of four kinds of single-crystalline SiC wafer etched at NF{sub 3} pressure of 2 Pa were the highest and it decreased with an increase in NF{sub 3} pressure. On the other hand, they increased with an increase in radio frequency (RF) power and were the highest at RF power of 200 W. A smooth surface was obtained on the single-crystalline 4H-SiC after reactive ion etching at NF{sub 3}/Ar gas pressure of 2 Pa and addition of Ar to NF{sub 3} plasma increased the smoothness of SiC surface. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed that the number of pillars decreased with an increase in the Ar-concentration in the NF{sub 3}/Ar mixture gas. The roughness factor (R{sub a}) values were decreased from 51.5 nm to 25.5 nm for the As-cut SiC, from 0.25 nm to 0.20 nm for the Epi-SiC, from 5.0 nm to 0.7 nm for the Si-face mirror-polished SiC, and from 0.20 nm to 0.16 nm for the C-face mirror-polished SiC by adding 60% Ar to the NF{sub 3} gas. Both the R{sub a} values of the Epi- and the C-face mirror-polished wafer surfaces etched using the NF{sub 3}/Ar (40:60) plasma were similar to that treated with mirror polishing, so-called the Catalyst-Referred Etching (CARE) method, with which the lowest roughness of surface was obtained among the chemical mirror polishing methods. Etching duration for smoothing the single-crystalline SiC surface using its treatment was one third of that with the CARE method.

  14. Gas mixture influence on the reactive ion etching of InSb in an inductively coupled methane-hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abautret, J.; Evirgen, A.; Perez, J. P.; Laaroussi, Y.; Cordat, A.; Boulard, F.; Christol, P.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, inductively coupled plasma etching of InSb material has been investigated using methane-hydrogen chemistry. Plasma conditions were first studied in terms of bias autopolarization, partial methane quantity in a CH4/H2 mixture and chamber pressure. The surface morphology of the etched samples was analyzed using an atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope and x-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) measurements. The results highlight the difficulties in removing etching products related to In, and the surface roughness is mainly correlated with the methane ratio in the mixture. The best surface stoichiometry, with a surface roughness of 7 nm and an etch rate of 110 nm min-1, was obtained with the addition of argon. To evaluate the feasibility of high performance infrared photodiodes, InSb monopixels were fabricated by dry etching, electrically characterized under illumination and compared with devices obtained by wet etching.

  15. Degradation of reactive blue 19 by needle-plate non-thermal plasma in different gas atmospheres: Kinetics and responsible active species study assisted by CFD calculations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Liu, Yanan; Li, Rui; Xue, Gang; Ognier, Stéphanie

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the degradation of a model organic compound, reactive blue (RB-19), in aqueous solution using a needle-plate non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor, which was operated using three gas atmospheres (Ar, air, O2) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The relative discharge and degradation parameters, including the peak to peak applied voltage, power, ozone generation, pH, decolorization rates, energy density and the total organic carbon (TOC) reduction were analyzed to determine the various dye removal efficiencies. The decolorization rate for Ar, air and O2 were 59.9%, 49.6% and 89.8% respectively at the energy density of 100 kJ/L. The best TOC reduction was displayed by Ar with about 8.8% decrease, and 0% with O2 and air atmospheres. This phenomenon could be explained by the formation of OH• and O3 in the Ar and O2 atmospheres, which are responsible for increased mineralization and efficient decolorization. A one-dimension model was developed using software COMSOL to simulate the RB-19-ozone reaction and verify the experiments by comparing the simulated and experimental results. It was determined that ozone plays the most important role in the dye removal process, and the ozone contribution rate ranged from 0.67 to 0.82. PMID:27124311

  16. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10-6%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon-acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  17. plasmatis Center for Innovation Competence: Controlling reactive component output of atmospheric pressure plasmas in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    The novel approach of using plasmas in order to alter the local chemistry of cells and cell environment presents a significant development in biomedical applications. The plasmatis center for innovation competence at the INP Greifswald e.V. performs fundamental research in plasma medicine in two interdisciplinary research groups. The aim of our plasma physics research group ``Extracellular Effects'' is (a) quantitative space and time resolved diagnostics and modelling of plasmas and liquids to determine distribution and composition of reactive species (b) to control the plasma and apply differing plasma source concepts in order to produce a tailored output of reactive components and design the chemical composition of the liquids/cellular environment and (c) to identify and understand the interaction mechanisms of plasmas with liquids and biological systems. Methods to characterize the plasma generated reactive species from plasma-, gas- and liquid phase and their biological effects will be presented. The diagnostic spectrum ranges from absorption/emission/laser spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and cell biological diagnostic techniques. Concluding, a presentation will be given of the comprehensive approach to plasma medicine in Greifswald where the applied and clinical research of the Campus PlasmaMed association is combined with the fundamental research at plasmatis center.

  18. Measurement of reactive species for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Plasma medicine has been intensively studied over the last decade. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are responsible for the therapeutic effects in plasma medicine. To examine the therapeutic effects of reactive species, the densities of OH, O, and NO were measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). A helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (10 kV, 10 kHz of 40 μs pulses) and a nanosecond streamer discharge (24 kV, 8 ns, 30 Hz) were utilized to treat mouse melanoma cells in a culture medium. Correlation between the dose of reactive species and deactivation rate of melanoma cells was measured with the aid of LIF. The results showed that the rate of cell death correlates with OH density, but not with O and NO densities. Next, a method to supply a specific reactive species to living organisms was developed. It utilizes photolysis of helium-buffered H2O and O2 by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light to produce reactive species. The VUV method was utilized to sterilize Bacillus atrophaeus on agar plate. With the VUV method, it was succeeded to show sterilization only by OH radicals. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals caused visible sterilization.

  19. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  20. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extends in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  1. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling a gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extend in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  2. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-11

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  3. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-01

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  4. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas; Döbeli, Max

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  5. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Döbeli, Max; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially 18O substituted La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  6. Effect of input power and gas pressure on the roughening and selective etching of SiO2/Si surfaces in reactive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, X. X.; Tam, E.; Huang, X. Z.; Colpo, P.; Rossi, F.; Ostrikov, K.

    2010-09-01

    We report on the application low-temperature plasmas for roughening Si surfaces which is becoming increasingly important for a number of applications ranging from Si quantum dots to cell and protein attachment for devices such as "laboratory on a chip" and sensors. It is a requirement that Si surface roughening is scalable and is a single-step process. It is shown that the removal of naturally forming SiO2 can be used to assist in the roughening of the surface using a low-temperature plasma-based etching approach, similar to the commonly used in semiconductor micromanufacturing. It is demonstrated that the selectivity of SiO2/Si etching can be easily controlled by tuning the plasma power, working gas pressure, and other discharge parameters. The achieved selectivity ranges from 0.4 to 25.2 thus providing an effective means for the control of surface roughness of Si during the oxide layer removal, which is required for many advance applications in bio- and nanotechnology.

  7. Effect of input power and gas pressure on the roughening and selective etching of SiO{sub 2}/Si surfaces in reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, X. X.; Huang, X. Z.; Tam, E.; Ostrikov, K.; Colpo, P.; Rossi, F.

    2010-09-15

    We report on the application low-temperature plasmas for roughening Si surfaces which is becoming increasingly important for a number of applications ranging from Si quantum dots to cell and protein attachment for devices such as 'laboratory on a chip' and sensors. It is a requirement that Si surface roughening is scalable and is a single-step process. It is shown that the removal of naturally forming SiO{sub 2} can be used to assist in the roughening of the surface using a low-temperature plasma-based etching approach, similar to the commonly used in semiconductor micromanufacturing. It is demonstrated that the selectivity of SiO{sub 2}/Si etching can be easily controlled by tuning the plasma power, working gas pressure, and other discharge parameters. The achieved selectivity ranges from 0.4 to 25.2 thus providing an effective means for the control of surface roughness of Si during the oxide layer removal, which is required for many advance applications in bio- and nanotechnology.

  8. Study of hysteresis behavior in reactive sputtering of cylindrical magnetron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakati, H.; M. Borah, S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to make sufficient use of reactive cylindrical magnetron plasma for depositing compound thin films, it is necessary to characterize the hysteresis behavior of the discharge. Cylindrical magnetron plasmas with different targets namely titanium and aluminium are studied in an argon/oxygen and an argon/nitrogen gas environment respectively. The aluminium and titanium emission lines are observed at different flows of reactive gases. The emission intensity is found to decrease with the increase of the reactive gas flow rate. The hysteresis behavior of reactive cylindrical magnetron plasma is studied by determining the variation of discharge voltage with increasing and then reducing the flow rate of reactive gas, while keeping the discharge current constant at 100 mA. Distinct hysteresis is found to be formed for the aluminium target and reactive gas oxygen. For aluminium/nitrogen, titanium/oxygen and titanium/nitrogen, there is also an indication of the formation of hysteresis; however, the characteristics of variation from metallic to reactive mode are different in different cases. The hysteresis behaviors are different for aluminium and titanium targets with the oxygen and nitrogen reactive gases, signifying the difference in reactivity between them. The effects of the argon flow rate and magnetic field on the hysteresis are studied and explained. Project supported by the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India and Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India.

  9. Plasma jet's shielding gas impact on bacterial inactivation.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, Helena; Hänsch, Mareike A Ch; Dünnbier, Mario; Wende, Kristian; Hammer, Malte U; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan; Woedtke, Thomas von

    2015-01-01

    One of the most desired aims in plasma medicine is to inactivate prokaryotic cells and leave eukaryotic cells unharmed or even stimulate proliferation to promote wound healing. The method of choice is to precisely control the plasma component composition. Here the authors investigate the inactivation of bacteria (Escherichia coli) by a plasma jet treatment. The reactive species composition created by the plasma in liquids is tuned by the use of a shielding gas device to achieve a reactive nitrogen species dominated condition or a reactive oxygen species dominated condition. A strong correlation between composition of the reactive components and the inactivation of the bacteria is observed. The authors compare the results to earlier investigations on eukaryotic cells and show that it is possible to find a plasma composition where bacterial inactivation is strongest and adverse effects on eukaryotic cells are minimized. PMID:25832438

  10. Plasma-generated reactive oxygen species for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, J. S.; Hammer, M. U.; Winter, J.; Tresp, H.; Duennbier, M.; Iseni, S.; Martin, V.; Puech, V.; Weltmann, K. D.; Reuter, S.

    2012-10-01

    To get a better insight into the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cellular components, fundamental studies are essential to determine the nature and concentration of plasma-generated ROS, and the chemistry induced in biological liquids by those ROS. In this context, we have measured the absolute density of the main ROS created in three different atmospheric pressure plasma sources: two geometrically distinct RF-driven microplasma jets (μ-APPJ [1] and kinpen [2]), and an array of microcathode sustained discharges [3]. Optical diagnostics of the plasma volumes and effluent regions have been performed: UV absorption for O3 and IR emission for O2(a^1δ) [4]. High concentrations of both ROS have been obtained (10^14--10^17cm-3). The effect of different parameters, such as gas flows and mixtures and power coupled to the plasmas, has been studied. For plasma biomedicine, the determination of the reactive species present in plasma-treated liquids is of great importance. In this work, we focused on the measurement of the concentration of H2O2 and NOX radicals, generated in physiological solutions like NaCl and PBS.[4pt] [1] N. Knake et al., J. Phys. D: App. Phys. 41, 194006 (2008)[0pt] [2] K.D. Weltmann et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 82, 1223 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 141502 (2010)[0pt] [4] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 011502 (2008)

  11. GEC Student Award for Excellence Finalist: Creation of Stable Plasma-Liquid Interfaced Reactive Field using Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Kazuhiko; Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2008-10-01

    The gas-liquid interfacial region which is the boundary between plasmas and liquids, activating physical and chemical reactions, has attracted much attention as novel reactive field in nano-bio material creation. Due to the unique properties of ionic liquids such as their extremely low vapor pressure and high heat capacity, we succeeded in creating the reactive gas (plasmas)-liquid (ionic liquids) interfacial field under a low gas pressure condition, where the plasma ion behavior can be controlled. The effects of plasma ion irradiation on the liquid medium are for the first time quantitatively revealed. In connection with the plasma ion irradiation, the potential structure and optical emission properties of the gas-liquid interfacial plasma are investigated by changing a polarity of the ionic liquid electrode in order to evaluate the ionic liquid-plasma interactions. These results would contribute to systematizing the field of gas-liquid interfacial plasma physics for its applications.

  12. The effect of working gas impurities on plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. Y.; He, M. B.; Liu, D. W.

    2015-04-15

    Air intrusion reduced the purity of working gas inside the tube for plasma jet, and thereby, affected the discharge dynamics. In this paper, the effect of using working gas with different purity level (helium purity 99.99999%, 99.99%, 99.9%, and 99%) on photoionization and the chemical reactivity of plasma jet were studied using a 2 dimensional plasma jet model. Photoionization of air species acted as a source of pre-ionization in front of the ionization region, which facilitated the transition from localized discharge to streamers inside the tube. The density of reactive species inside the tube was found to increase with the concentration of working gas impurities. For the highest purity helium (99.99999%), despite a low photoionization rate and the distance between the photoionization region and ionization region inside the tube, by increasing the applied voltage and decreasing the distance between the electrode and nozzle, plasma jets were formed.

  13. Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field taking into account the internal degrees of freedom and electronic excitation of plasma particles are derived. As a starting point of analysis the kinetic equation with a binary collision operator written in the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck form and with a reactive collision integral allowing for arbitrary chemical reactions is used. The linearized variant of Grad's moment method is applied to deduce the systems of moment equations for plasma and also full and reduced transport equations for plasma species nonequilibrium parameters.

  14. Discharge dynamics and plasma density recovery by on/off switches of additional gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Oh, SeungJu; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of the plasma density is investigated to study plasma dynamics by adding reactive gas (O2) or rare gas (He) in Ar plasmas. When the O2 or He gas is added, plasma density is suddenly decreased, while the plasma density recovers slowly with gas off. It is found that the recovery time is strongly dependent on the gas flow rate, and it can be explained by effect of gas residence time. When the He gas is off in the Ar plasma, the plasma density is overshot compared to the case of the O2 gas pulsing due to enhanced ionizations by metastable atoms. Analysis and calculation for correlation between the plasma density dynamics and the gas pulsing are also presented in detail.

  15. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  16. Apparatus and method for atmospheric pressure reactive atom plasma processing for shaping of damage free surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Carr; Jeffrey W.

    2009-03-31

    Fabrication apparatus and methods are disclosed for shaping and finishing difficult materials with no subsurface damage. The apparatus and methods use an atmospheric pressure mixed gas plasma discharge as a sub-aperture polisher of, for example, fused silica and single crystal silicon, silicon carbide and other materials. In one example, workpiece material is removed at the atomic level through reaction with fluorine atoms. In this example, these reactive species are produced by a noble gas plasma from trace constituent fluorocarbons or other fluorine containing gases added to the host argon matrix. The products of the reaction are gas phase compounds that flow from the surface of the workpiece, exposing fresh material to the etchant without condensation and redeposition on the newly created surface. The discharge provides a stable and predictable distribution of reactive species permitting the generation of a predetermined surface by translating the plasma across the workpiece along a calculated path.

  17. Plasma wakefield acceleration in self-ionized gas or plasmas.

    PubMed

    Deng, S; Barnes, C D; Clayton, C E; O'Connell, C; Decker, F J; Erdem, O; Fonseca, R A; Huang, C; Hogan, M J; Iverson, R; Johnson, D K; Joshi, C; Katsouleas, T; Krejcik, P; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Tsung, F

    2003-10-01

    Tunnel ionizing neutral gas with the self-field of a charged particle beam is explored as a possible way of creating plasma sources for a plasma wakefield accelerator [Bruhwiler et al., Phys. Plasmas (to be published)]. The optimal gas density for maximizing the plasma wakefield without preionized plasma is studied using the PIC simulation code OSIRIS [R. Hemker et al., in Proceeding of the Fifth IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference (IEEE, 1999), pp. 3672-3674]. To obtain wakefields comparable to the optimal preionized case, the gas density needs to be seven times higher than the plasma density in a typical preionized case. A physical explanation is given. PMID:14683089

  18. Whistleron gas in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    De Martino, Salvatore; Falanga, Mariarosaria; Tzenov, Stephan I.

    2005-07-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of whistler waves in magnetized plasmas is studied. Since the plasmas and beam-plasma systems considered here are assumed to be weakly collisional, the point of reference for the analysis performed in the present paper is the system of hydrodynamic and field equations. The renormalization group method is applied to obtain dynamical equations for the slowly varying amplitudes of whistler waves. Further, it has been shown that the amplitudes of eigenmodes satisfy an infinite system of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations. In this sense, the whistler eigenmodes form a sort of a gas of interacting quasiparticles, while the slowly varying amplitudes can be considered as dynamical variables heralding the relevant information about the system. An important feature of the approach is that whistler waves do not perturb the initial uniform density of plasma electrons. The plasma response to the induced whistler waves consists in velocity redistribution which follows exactly the behavior of the whistlers. In addition, selection rules governing the nonlinear mode coupling have been derived, which represent another interesting peculiarity of the description presented here.

  19. Gas Plasma Surface Chemistry for Biological Assays.

    PubMed

    Sahagian, Khoren; Larner, Mikki

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems respond to and interact with surfaces. Gas plasma provides a scalable surface treatment method for designing interactive surfaces. There are many commercial examples of plasma-modified products. These include well plates, filtration membranes, dispensing tools, and medical devices. This chapter presents an overview of gas plasma technology and provides a guide to using gas plasma for modifying surfaces for research or product development. PMID:26160577

  20. Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching

    DOEpatents

    Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

    2013-10-01

    A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

  1. Reactivity zones around an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birer, Özgür

    2015-11-01

    The reactivity zones around an atmospheric pressure plasma jet are revealed by XPS mapping of chemical moieties on a polyethylene surface treated with a 3-mm plasma jet. The area directly hit by the helium plasma jet initially oxidizes and later etches away as the plasma treatment continues. The oxidation initially starts at the center and expands outwards as a ring pattern with different spatial potency. At the end of 10 min plasma jet treatment, distinct ring patterns for -NO, -COO, -CO and -NO3 species can be detected with respectively increasing diameters. The plasma jet can cause chemical changes at locations several millimeters away from the center. The spatial distribution of oxidized species suggests presence of chemical reactivity zones. Introduction of nitrogen into the helium plasma jet, not only increases the type of nitrogen moieties, but enriches the reactivity zones by generating nitrogen molecular ions within the plasma jet. The complex competing reaction mechanisms among the radicals, ions, metastable atoms and UV photons lead to unusual etching patterns on the surfaces.

  2. Reactive plasma atomization of aluminum nitride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Prichard, P.; Besser, M.; Sordelet, D.; Anderson, I.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments were performed to synthesize AlN powders by reacting Al with N using a conventional dc arc plasma as heat source. Feeding Al powder into Ar/N plasma open to atmosphere produced mainly Al oxide. Experiments using a chamber backfilled with nitrogen suppressed the Al oxide, but little AlN was formed. A furnace and crucible assembly was designed to feed molten Al directly into a DeLaval nozzle attached to the face of the dc arc plasma gun. Resulting submicron powders show a significant increase in AlN formation. This was dependent on chamber pressure, plasma velocity, and molten liquid feed rate. Experimental parameters, equipment design, effects of atomization/vaporization/condensation are discussed.

  3. Destruction of Bacterial Biofilms Using Gas Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramzon, Nina

    2005-03-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities embedded in an exopolysaccharidic matrix with a complex architectural structure. Bacteria in biofilms show different properties from those in free life thus, conventional methods of killing bacteria are often ineffective with biofilms. The use of plasmas potentially offers an alternative to conventional sterilization methods since plasmas contain a mixture of charged particles, chemically reactive species, and UV radiation. 4 and 7 day-old biofilms were produced using two bacterial species: Rhizobium gallicum and Chromobacterium violaceum. Gas discharge plasma was produced by using an AtomfloTM reactor (Surfx Technologies) and bacterial biofilms were exposed to it for different periods of time. Our results show that a 10-minute plasma treatment was able to kill 100% of the cells in most cases. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study plasma composition which is then correlated with the effectiveness of killing. These results indicate the potentiality of plasma as an alternative sterilization method. Supported by CSuperb.

  4. Influence of gas pressure on the plasma reaction on polyethersulphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröning, P.; Collaud-Coen, M.; Küttel, O. M.; Schlapbach, L.

    1996-09-01

    Different gases (Ar, H 2, N 2 and O 2) were used for plasma treatments of polyethersulphone (PES) performed in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma. The effect of the gas pressure on the chemical modification of the PES surface during plasma treatment was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental set-up of the plasma chamber connected via an ultra high vacuum transfer to a surface analysis system allows to measure well-defined surface modifications. The experiments have shown that the plasma-polymer interaction in the topmost surface region of the polymer increase with decreasing gas pressure. At low gas pressures ( p < 10 -3 mbar) the plasma attacks first the polar bonds of the sulphonic group, this results in the reduction to sulphide of all sulphonic groups (SO 2 → S) in the study state. This effect decreases progressively for higher gas pressures ( p > 10 -3 mbar) and is no more observable at p = 10 -1 mbar. In addition to the amount of sulfide formation also the time scale of sulfide formation varies with the gas pressure. The time constant for the sulfide formation change from tenth of seconds to about one minute for 10 -4 to 10 -2 mbar gas pressure, respectively. The thickness of the surface layer in which sulphide is formed depends on the pressure and is at least equal to the XPS probing depth of about 100 Å for p < 10 -3 mbar. The incorporation of new chemical functionalities by reactive gas plasma treatments is similar for all gas pressures. Differences were observed in the amount of adsorbed species at the top most surface layer. The higher the gas pressure is, the higher the content of adsorbed species. The results are discussed in function of the flux φi, and the kinetic energy Ekin of the ions interacting with the polymer surface.

  5. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas-phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ɛ-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters.

  6. A Gas-Kinetic Scheme for Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lian,Youg-Sheng; Xu, Kun

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the gas-kinetic BGK scheme for the compressible flow equations is extended to chemical reactive flow. The mass fraction of the unburnt gas is implemented into the gas kinetic equation by assigning a new internal degree of freedom to the particle distribution function. The new variable can be also used to describe fluid trajectory for the nonreactive flows. Due to the gas-kinetic BGK model, the current scheme basically solves the Navier-Stokes chemical reactive flow equations. Numerical tests validate the accuracy and robustness of the current kinetic method.

  7. Cross correlation analysis of plasma perturbation in amplitude modulated reactive dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Teppei; Soejima, Masahiro; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Shigeru

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between plasmas and nano-interface are one of the most important issues in plasma processing. We have studied effects of plasma perturbation on growth of nanoparticles in amplitude modulated reactive dusty plasmas and have clarified that amplitude modulation (AM) leads to suppression of growth of nanoparticles [1]. Here we report results of cross correlation analysis of time evolution of laser light scattering intensity from nanoparticles in reactive plasmas. Experiments were carried out using a capacitively-coupled rf discharge reactor with a two-dimensional laser light scattering (LLS) system. We employed Ar +DM-DMOS discharge plasmas to generate nanoparticles. The peaks at higher harmonics and subharmonics in spectra of laser light scattering intensity were detected, suggesting nonlinear coupling between plasma and nanoparticle amount. We found high cross correlation t between waves at AM frequency and its higher harmonics. Namely, perturbation at fAM closely correlates with those at higher harmonics.

  8. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  9. Plasma effects on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in cancer cells in-vitro exposed by atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure pulsed helium plasma jets are utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, and duty ratio on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in gas and liquid phases and within cells is investigated. The apoptotic changes detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay in cells caused by plasma exposure are observed to correlate well with the levels of extracellular and intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  10. Reactive Evaporation And Plasma Processes For Thin Film Optical Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Johannes

    1989-02-01

    Bombardment of growing films with reactive particles has developed into a powerful technology over the last 3o years. Compared to normal evaporation methods, important improvements are: better adhesion between film and substrate, high film density, fast coating rate and stoichiometric layers with low optical losses. Although the techniques used to achieve the desired properties vary quite dramatically from high pressure plasma processing to bombardment with monoenergetic ion beams in ultra high vacuum environment, from particles with nearly thermal to some keV energy and from discharge currents of some μA to more than 1oo A in industrial applications, the ion-surface interaction, which causes the modification of the films, is the basic of all reactive deposition processes. The purpose of this paper is to review plasma processes for the production of optical coatings including ion assisted deposition, ion plating and ion cluster beam deposition, comparing the structural and optical properties of the films. Some applications of reactive evaporation presented in the following papers demonstrate the potential use of reactive evaporation and plasma processes for solving optical problems.

  11. Production characteristics of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in water using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Timoshkin, Igor; Given, Martin; MacGregor, Scott

    2016-07-01

    A pulsed discharge, a DC corona discharge, and a plasma jet are separately generated above a water surface, and reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the water are investigated. ROS/RNS in water after the sparging of the off-gas of a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge (PB-DBD) are also investigated. H2O2, NO2 ‑, and NO3 ‑ are detected after plasma exposure and only NO3 ‑ after off-gas sparging. Short-lifetime species in plasma are found to play an important role in H2O2 and NO2 ‑ production and long-lifetime species in NO3 ‑ production. NO x may inhibit H2O2 production through OH consumption to produce HNO2 and HNO3. O3 does not contribute to ROS/RNS production. The pulsed plasma exposure is found to be effective for the production of H2O2 and NO2 ‑, and the off-gas sparging of the PB-DBD for the production of NO3 ‑.

  12. Gas-discharge plasma sources for nonlocal plasma technology

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; DeJoseph, C. A. Jr.; Simonov, V. Ya.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlocal plasma technology is based on the effect of self-trapping of fast electrons in the plasma volume [V. I. Demidov, C. A. DeJoseph, Jr., and A. A. Kudryavtsev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 215002 (2006)]. This effect can be achieved by changing the ratio of fast electron flux to ion flux incident on the plasma boundaries. This in turn leads to a significant change in plasma properties and therefore can be useful for technological applications. A gas-discharge device which demonstrates control of the plasma properties by this method is described.

  13. Neutral Gas Plasma Interactions in Space Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Kan

    A sounding rocket experiment, CRIT-II, involving the injection of shaped-charge barium in ionospheric plasma was conducted on May 7, 1989, to investigate Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) hypothesis in space. The CRIT -II main payload was instrumented to make in situ measurements within the neutral barium beam. Among the detectors, UNH provided three energetic particle detectors and two photometers. The data from these detectors are presented. The typical features of the CIV effect were observed including plasma density enhancement, energy and momentum loss of a fast ion beam, excitation of plasma waves, and electron heating. It was found by optical observations that about 4% of the neutral barium was ionized. We believe that about one half of these barium ions were created by electron impact ionization --a CIV mechanism. The cross section for collisions between the barium atoms and the ionospheric oxygen ions was also calculated, assuming that the other half of ionizing barium ions were mainly generated by charge exchange, and found to be in the range from 1 times 10 ^{-17} cm^{-2} at a velocity of 4 km/s to 1 times 10^{-15} cm^{-2} at a velocity of 20 km/s. We also confirmed that the early observed ions were originally from the collisionally accelerated neutral oxygen which charge exchanges with the local oxygen ions. The early stage of electron heating was confirmed to be the result of lower hybrid instabilities excited by the precursor ion beam, using our quasi-linear model calculation. However, the wave spectrum during the passage of main streaming barium was found to be inconsistent with the lower hybrid instabilities proposed by current CIV theories. This could be the main reason for a relatively low ionization yield that one otherwise would expect from CRIT-II. A multi-fluid model of the wave dispersion relation for an unmagnetized beam with finite width in a magnetized plasma was also derived. We found that the nonuniform beam density effect

  14. Unidirectional arrays of vertically standing graphenes in reactive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shailesh; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2011-10-01

    The possibility for the switch-over of the growth mode from a continuous network to unidirectional arrays of well-separated, self-organized, vertically oriented graphene nanosheets has been demonstrated using a unique, yet simple plasma-based approach. The process enables highly reproducible, catalyst-free synthesis of arrays of graphene nanosheets with reactive open graphitic edges facing upwards. Effective control over the nanosheet length, number density, and the degree of alignment along the electric field direction is achieved by a simple variation of the substrate bias. These results are of interest for environment-friendly fabrication of next-generation nanodevices based on three-dimensional, ordered self-organized nanoarrays of active nanostructures with very large surface areas and aspect ratios, highly reactive edges, and controlled density on the substrate. Our simple and versatile plasma-based approach paves the way for direct integration of such nanoarrays directly into the Si-based nanodevice platform.

  15. Unidirectional arrays of vertically standing graphenes in reactive plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailesh; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2011-10-01

    The possibility for the switch-over of the growth mode from a continuous network to unidirectional arrays of well-separated, self-organized, vertically oriented graphene nanosheets has been demonstrated using a unique, yet simple plasma-based approach. The process enables highly reproducible, catalyst-free synthesis of arrays of graphene nanosheets with reactive open graphitic edges facing upwards. Effective control over the nanosheet length, number density, and the degree of alignment along the electric field direction is achieved by a simple variation of the substrate bias. These results are of interest for environment-friendly fabrication of next-generation nanodevices based on three-dimensional, ordered self-organized nanoarrays of active nanostructures with very large surface areas and aspect ratios, highly reactive edges, and controlled density on the substrate. Our simple and versatile plasma-based approach paves the way for direct integration of such nanoarrays directly into the Si-based nanodevice platform. PMID:21918784

  16. The reactive bed plasma system for contamination control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, Joseph G.; Moore, Robert R.; Perry, Tony R.

    1990-01-01

    The contamination control capabilities of the Reactive Bed Plasma (RBP) system is described by delineating the results of toxic chemical composition studies, aerosol filtration work, and other testing. The RBP system has demonstrated its capabilities to decompose toxic materials and process hazardous aerosols. The post-treatment requirements for the reaction products have possible solutions. Although additional work is required to meet NASA requirements, the RBP may be able to meet contamination control problems aboard the Space Station.

  17. Suppression of Tritium Retention in Remote Areas of ITER by Nonperturbative Reactive Gas Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares, F. L.; Ferreira, J. A.; Ramos, A.; Rooij, G. van; Westerhout, J.; Al, R.; Rapp, J.; Drenik, A.; Mozetic, M.

    2010-10-22

    A technique based on reactive gas injection in the afterglow region of the divertor plasma is proposed for the suppression of tritium-carbon codeposits in remote areas of ITER when operated with carbon-based divertor targets. Experiments in a divertor simulator plasma device indicate that a 4 nm/min deposition can be suppressed by addition of 1 Pa{center_dot}m{sup 3} s{sup -1} ammonia flow at 10 cm from the plasma. These results bolster the concept of nonperturbative scavenger injection for tritium inventory control in carbon-based fusion plasma devices, thus paving the way for ITER operation in the active phase under a carbon-dominated, plasma facing component background.

  18. Quantitative diagnostics of reactive, multicomponent low-temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The special emphasis in this work is put on the quantitative determination of the plasma composition of an inductively coupled low temperature plasma (ICP). Several standard plasma diagnostic techniques were applied. As a test case for a multi-component low-temperature plasma argon-hydrogen as well as argon-hydrogen-nitrogen mixed plasmas were investigated. For steady-state plasma operation the ion density and electron temperature were determined with a single tip Langmuir probe. A multi-grid miniature retarding-field analyzer was used to measure the mass integrated ion flux. An energy-dispersive mass spectrometer - a so-called plasma monitor (PM) - was applied to sample ions from the plasma to derive the ion composition. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen and the gas temperature were derived from optical emission spectroscopy. The gas temperature was estimated by the rotational distribution of the Q-branch lines of the hydrogen Fulcher- α diagonal band for the argon-hydrogen mixed plasmas and from the second positive system of N2 in argon-hydrogen-nitrogen mixed plasmas. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen was measured by actinometry. The influence of the substrate material of the counter electrode (stainless steel, copper, tungsten, Macor, and aluminium) on the atomic hydrogen concentration was investigated by OES. In addition, ionization-threshold mass spectrometry (ITMS) was used to determine the densities of atomic nitrogen (N) and atomic hydrogen (H and D). Pulsed plasma operation was applied to directly measure the loss rate of H, D and N in the afterglow from the temporal decay of the ITMS signal. From these data the wall loss probability of atomic hydrogen was determined. Furthermore, a zero-dimensional rate equation model was devised to explain the ion composition in these mixed plasmas with different admixture ratios. In addition to the experimental data on electron density, gas temperature, total pressure, atomic hydrogen density, and Ar, H2

  19. Non-thermal plasmas as gas-phase advanced oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1997-08-01

    Non-thermal plasmas are useful for generating reactive species (free radicals) in a gas stream. Because radical attack reaction rate constants are very large for many chemical species, entrained pollutants are readily decomposed by radicals. Such plasmas can generate both oxidative and reductive radicals; therefore, they show promise for treating a wide variety of pollutants.

  20. Nanocrystalline films for gas-reactive applications

    DOEpatents

    Eastman, Jeffrey A.; Thompson, Loren J.

    2004-02-17

    A gas sensor for detection of oxidizing and reducing gases, including O.sub.2, CO.sub.2, CO, and H.sub.2, monitors the partial pressure of a gas to be detected by measuring the temperature rise of an oxide-thin-film-coated metallic line in response to an applied electrical current. For a fixed input power, the temperature rise of the metallic line is inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity of the oxide coating. The oxide coating contains multi-valent cation species that change their valence, and hence the oxygen stoichiometry of the coating, in response to changes in the partial pressure of the detected gas. Since the thermal conductivity of the coating is dependent on its oxygen stoichiometry, the temperature rise of the metallic line depends on the partial pressure of the detected gas. Nanocrystalline (<100 nm grain size) oxide coatings yield faster sensor response times than conventional larger-grained coatings due to faster oxygen diffusion along grain boundaries rather than through grain interiors.

  1. Investigation of Sterilization Mechanism for Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores with Plasma-Excited Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the mechanism of the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas uses humidified mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores and tyrosine which is amino acid are treated by the plasma-excited neutral gas. Shape change of the treated spore is observed by SEM, and chemical modification of the treated tyrosine is analyzed by HPLC. As a result, the surface of the treated spore shows depression. Hydroxylation and nitration of tyrosine are shown after the treatment. For these reasons, we believe that the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas results from the deformation of spore structure due to the chemical modification of amino acid.

  2. Multicomponent Transport in Polyatomic Reactive Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovangigli, Vincent

    2011-05-01

    We investigate multicomponent reactive flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases. We discuss in particular the conservation equations, the transport fluxes and the transport coefficients in weak and strong magnetic fields. The mathematical properties of the resulting hyperbolic-parabolic systems of partial differential equations modeling multicomponent flows are deduced from the underlying kinetic framework. The structure and solution of the transport linear systems associated with the evaluation of transport coefficients are also addressed. In particular, the convergence of iterative techniques is deduced from the properties of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator. The impact of multicomponent transport is also discussed, notably the importance of Soret effects in various flows and the impact of volume viscosity.

  3. Multicomponent Transport in Polyatomic Reactive Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Giovangigli, Vincent

    2011-05-20

    We investigate multicomponent reactive flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases. We discuss in particular the conservation equations, the transport fluxes and the transport coefficients in weak and strong magnetic fields. The mathematical properties of the resulting hyperbolic-parabolic systems of partial differential equations modeling multicomponent flows are deduced from the underlying kinetic framework. The structure and solution of the transport linear systems associated with the evaluation of transport coefficients are also addressed. In particular, the convergence of iterative techniques is deduced from the properties of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator. The impact of multicomponent transport is also discussed, notably the importance of Soret effects in various flows and the impact of volume viscosity.

  4. Fabrication of Aluminum Nitride Coatings by Reactive Plasma Spraying and Evaluation of Its Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Motohiro; Lee, Chaechul; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Takahashi, Koyata

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has excellent properties such as high corrosion resistance, hardness and thermal conductivity. In this study, AlN coatings were fabricated by reactive plasma spraying by using Al-AlN mixed powder for feedstock. The optimal mixing ratio of Al-AlN particles and spray conditions were investigated. Al-AlN particles were injected into Ar/N2 plasma and were deposited onto graphite substrate. It was possible to fabricate the coatings using Al-10˜40 wt.%AlN powders for feedstock. Especially, using Al-20 wt.%AlN and Al-30 wt.%AlN powders enabled to fabricate dense coatings which consisted of almost completely AlN phase. The nitride phase concentration in the coatings was controlled by RF power and N2 gas flow rate in the plasma gas. Furthermore, it became clear that the hardness of the coatings depended on the nitride concentration in the coatings. The thermal conductivity of the coating was achieved 71.2 (W/m•K). Therefore, it was possible to fabricate AlN based coatings with high thermal conductivity by reactive plasma spraying by using Al-AlN mixed powder.

  5. Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system

    DOEpatents

    Kong, P.C.

    1997-05-06

    A method is described for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap there between. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition. 6 figs.

  6. Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.

    1997-01-01

    A method for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap therebetween. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition.

  7. Gas Plasma Effects on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, E.; Sladek, R. E. J.; Kieft, I. E.

    This paper surveys the research activities at the Eindhoven University of Technology (The Netherlands) in the area of biomedical applications of gas discharge plasmas. A non-thermal atmospheric plasma source (the plasma needle) has been developed, and its interactions with living mammalian cells and bacteria are studied. It is concluded that plasma can efficiently kill bacteria without harming the cells, and also influence the cells without causing cell death (necrosis). In future it will lead to applications like skin (wound) and caries treatment.

  8. Plasma concentrations of endothelin in patients with abnormal vascular reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Predel, H.G.; Meyer-Lehnert, H.; Baecker, A.; Stelkens, H.; Kramer, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    We measured circulating concentrations of endothelin in healthy subjects and in patients with abnormal vascular reactivity. Endothelin concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay after extraction of plasma using Sep-Pak C-18 cartridges in healthy subjects, in patients with diabetes mellitus type I, in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension and in non-dialyzed patients with stable chronic renal failure. Plasma concentrations were similar in healthy controls, in diabetics and in hypertensive patients averaging 5.0{plus minus}0.6 pg/ml, 4.7{plus minus}0.2 pg/ml and 6.5{plus minus}1.0 pg/ml, respectively. In contrast, plasma concentrations of endothelin were markedly elevated in patients with chronic renal failure averaging 16.6{plus minus}2.9 pg/ml. No correlations were observed between serum creatinine concentrations ranging from 124 to 850 {mu}mol/l or blood pressure and plasma concentrations of endothelin. Bicycle ergometric exercise in six healthy subjects and an acute modest i.v. saline load of 1,000 ml of 0.45% NaCl administered within 60 min in six patients with mild essential hypertension did not affect plasma concentrations of endothelin.

  9. Investigation of Sterilization Effect by various Gas Plasmas and Electron Microscopic Observation of Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yota; Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Uehara, Kodai; Oshita, Takaya; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Ikeda, Keiko; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Kohno, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric non-thermal plasmas have attracted attention as a new sterilization method. It is considered that factor of plasma sterilization are mainly reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the sterilization mechanism hasn't been investigated in detail because conventional plasma sources have a limitation in usable gas species and lack variety of ROS. So we developed multi-gas plasma jet which can generate various gas plasmas. In this study, investigation of sterilization effect by various gas plasmas and electron microscopic observation of bacteria were performed. Oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon and air were used as plasma gas. To investigate gas-species dependence of sterilization effect, S.aureus was treated. As a result, nitrogen plasma and carbon dioxide plasma were effective for sterilization. To investigate sterilization mechanism, the surface of S.aureus was observed by scanning electron microscope. As a result, dimples were observed on the surface after irradiation of nitrogen plasma, but no change observed in the case of carbon dioxide plasma. These results suggest that bactericidal mechanism of nitrogen and carbon dioxide plasma should be different. In the presentation, Measurement result of ROS will be reported.

  10. Optimizing Pulse Waveforms in Plasma Jets for Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth; Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2012-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are desired in numerous applications from the destruction of harmful proteins and bacteria for sterilization in the medical field to taking advantage of the metastable characteristics of O2(^1δ) to transfer energy to other species. Advances in atmospheric pressure plasma jets in recent years show the possibility of using this application as a source of reactive oxygen species. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configuration. The computer model used in this study, nonPDPSIM, solves transport equations for charged and neutral species, Poisson's equation for the electric potential, the electron energy conservation equation for the electron temperature, and Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to track sheath accelerated secondary electrons emitted from surfaces and the energy of ions incident onto surfaces. Rate coefficients and transport coefficients for the bulk plasma are obtained from local solutions of Boltzmann's equation for the electron energy distribution. Radiation transport is addressed using a Green's function approach. Various waveforms for the voltage source were examined in analogy to spiker-sustainer systems used at lower gas pressures.

  11. Fast figuring of large optics by reactive atom plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Marco; Jourdain, Renaud; Morantz, Paul; Shore, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of ground-based astronomical observatories will require fabrication and maintenance of extremely large segmented mirrors tens of meters in diameter. At present, the large production of segments required by projects like E-ELT and TMT poses time frames and costs feasibility questions. This is principally due to a bottleneck stage in the optical fabrication chain: the final figuring step. State-of-the-art figure correction techniques, so far, have failed to meet the needs of the astronomical community for mass production of large, ultra-precise optical surfaces. In this context, Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) is proposed as a candidate figuring process that combines nanometer level accuracy with high material removal rates. RAP is a form of plasma enhanced chemical etching at atmospheric pressure based on Inductively Coupled Plasma technology. The rapid figuring capability of the RAP process has already been proven on medium sized optical surfaces made of silicon based materials. In this paper, the figure correction of a 3 meters radius of curvature, 400 mm diameter spherical ULE mirror is presented. This work demonstrates the large scale figuring capability of the Reactive Atom Plasma process. The figuring is carried out by applying an in-house developed procedure that promotes rapid convergence. A 2.3 μm p-v initial figure error is removed within three iterations, for a total processing time of 2.5 hours. The same surface is then re-polished and the residual error corrected again down to λ/20 nm rms. These results highlight the possibility of figuring a metre-class mirror in about ten hours.

  12. Reactive Plasma Spraying of Fine Al2O3/AlN Feedstock Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) is a promising technology for in situ formation of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings. Recently, AlN-based coatings were fabricated by RPS of alumina (Al2O3) powder in N2/H2 thermal plasma. This study investigated the feasibility of RPS of a fine Al2O3/AlN mixture and the influence of the plasma gases (N2, H2) on the nitriding conversion, and coating microstructure and properties. Thick AlN/Al2O3 coatings with high nitride content were successfully fabricated. The coatings consist of h-AlN, c-AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and a small amount of α-Al2O3. Use of fine particles enhanced the nitriding conversion and the melting tendency by increasing the surface area. Furthermore, the AlN additive improved the AlN content in the coatings. Increasing the N2 gas flow rate improved the nitride content and complete crystal growth to the h-AlN phase, and enhanced the coating thickness. On the other hand, though the H2 gas is required for plasma nitriding of the Al2O3 particles, increasing its flow rate decreased the nitride content and the coating thickness. Remarkable influence of the plasma gases on the coating composition, microstructure, and properties was observed during RPS of the fine particles.

  13. Steam chemical reactivity of plasma-sprayed beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Castro, R.G.

    1998-07-01

    Plasma-spraying with the potential for in-situ repair makes beryllium a primary candidate for plasma facing and structural components in experimental magnetic fusion machines. Deposits with good thermal conductivity and resistance to thermal cycling have been produced with low pressure plasma-spraying (LPPS). A concern during a potential accident with steam ingress is the amount of hydrogen produced by the reactions of steam with hot components. In this study the authors measure the reaction rates of various deposits produced by LPPS with steam from 350 C to above 1,000 C. They correlate these reaction rates with measurements of density, open porosity and BET surface areas. They find the reactivity to be largely dependent upon effective surface area. Promising results were obtained below 600 C from a 94% theoretical dense (TD) deposit with a BET specific surface area of 0.085 m{sup 2}/g. Although reaction rates were higher than those for dense consolidated beryllium they were substantially lower, i.e., about two orders of magnitude, than those obtained from previously tested lower density plasma-sprayed deposits.

  14. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  15. In situ measurement of gas composition changes in radio frequency plasmas using a quartz sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Nonaka, Hidehiko

    2009-09-15

    A simple method using a quartz sensor (Q-sensor) was developed to observe gas composition changes in radio frequency (rf) plasmas. The output depends on the gases' absolute pressure, molecular weight, and viscosity. The pressure-normalized quartz sensor output depends only on the molecular weight and viscosity of the gas. Consequently, gas composition changes can be detected in the plasmas if a sensor can be used in the plasmas. Influences imparted by the plasmas on the sensor, such as those by reactive particles (e.g., radicals and ions), excited species, electrons, temperature, and electric potentials during measurements were investigated to test the applicability of this quartz sensor measurement to plasma. The Q-sensor measurement results for rf plasmas with argon, hydrogen, and their mixtures are reproducible, demonstrating that the Q-sensor measurement is applicable for plasmas. In this work, pressure- and temperature-normalized Q-sensor output (NQO) were used to obtain the gas composition information of plasma. Temperature-normalization of the Q-sensor output enabled quartz sensor measurements near plasma electrodes, where the quartz sensor temperature increases. The changes in NQO agreed with results obtained by gas analysis using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Results confirmed that the change in NQO is mainly attributable to changes in the densities and kinds of gas molecules in the plasma gas phase, not by other extrinsic influences of plasma. For argon, hydrogen, and argon-hydrogen plasmas, these changes correspond to reduction in nitrogen, production of carbon monoxide, and dissociation of hydrogen molecules, respectively. These changes in NQO qualitatively and somewhat quantitatively agreed with results obtained using gas analysis, indicting that the measurement has a potential application to obtain the gas composition in plasmas without disturbing industrial plasma processes.

  16. Gas-phase reactivity of ruthenium carbonyl cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Matthew A; Kwok, Samantha; McIndoe, J Scott

    2009-04-01

    Partially-ligated anionic ruthenium carbonyl clusters react with alkenes, arenes, and alkanes in the gas phase; the products undergo extensive C-H activation and lose dihydrogen and carbon monoxide under collision-induced dissociation conditions. Triethylsilane and phenylsilane are also reactive towards the unsaturated clusters, and oxygen was shown to rapidly break down the cluster core by oxidative cleavage of the metal-metal bonds. These qualitative gas-phase reactivity studies were conducted using an easily-installed and inexpensive modification of a commercial electrospray ionization mass spectrometer. Interpretation of the large amounts of data generated in these studies is made relatively straightforward by employing energy-dependent electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EDESI-MS). PMID:19185511

  17. Analysis of the gas phase reactivity of chlorosilanes.

    PubMed

    Ravasio, Stefano; Masi, Maurizio; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2013-06-27

    Trichlorosilane is the most used precursor to deposit silicon for photovoltaic applications. Despite of this, its gas phase and surface kinetics have not yet been completely understood. In the present work, it is reported a systematic investigation aimed at determining what is the dominant gas phase chemistry active during the chemical vapor deposition of Si from trichlorosilane. The gas phase mechanism was developed calculating the rate constant of each reaction using conventional transition state theory in the rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator approximation. Torsional vibrations were described using a hindered rotor model. Structures and vibrational frequencies of reactants and transition states were determined at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, while potential energy surfaces and activation energies were computed at the CCSD(T) level using aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets extrapolating to the complete basis set limit. As gas phase and surface reactivities are mutually interlinked, simulations were performed using a microkinetic surface mechanism. It was found that the gas phase reactivity follows two different routes. The disilane mechanism, in which the formation of disilanes as reaction intermediates favors the conversion between the most stable monosilane species, and the radical pathway, initiated by the decomposition of Si2HCl5 and followed by a series of fast propagation reactions. Though both mechanisms are active during deposition, the simulations revealed that above a certain temperature and conversion threshold the radical mechanism provides a faster route for the conversion of SiHCl3 into SiCl4, a reaction that favors the overall Si deposition process as it is associated with the consumption of HCl, a fast etchant of Si. Also, this study shows that the formation of disilanes as reactant intermediates promotes significantly the gas phase reactivity, as they contribute both to the initiation of radical chain mechanisms and provide a catalytic route for

  18. Challenges Upon Reactive Plasma Spray Nitriding: Al Powders and Fabrication of AlN Coatings as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) is a promising technology for the in situ formation of several ceramic coatings. The focus of this paper is to summarize the state of our current knowledge about the RPS process and using the nitriding of Al particles and the fabrication of aluminum nitride coatings, as a case study. The aspects and challenges in this process such as the influence of the plasma power, in-flight time, particle size, nitriding mechanism, splat morphology, in-flight particle diagnostics, N2 plasma gas, and the feeding rate on the RPS process are analyzed and discussed.

  19. Challenges Upon Reactive Plasma Spray Nitriding: Al Powders and Fabrication of AlN Coatings as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) is a promising technology for the in situ formation of several ceramic coatings. The focus of this paper is to summarize the state of our current knowledge about the RPS process and using the nitriding of Al particles and the fabrication of aluminum nitride coatings, as a case study. The aspects and challenges in this process such as the influence of the plasma power, in-flight time, particle size, nitriding mechanism, splat morphology, in-flight particle diagnostics, N2 plasma gas, and the feeding rate on the RPS process are analyzed and discussed.

  20. Hydrodesulfurization reactivities of various sulfur compounds in vacuum gas oil

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Sakanishi, K.; Mochida, I.

    1996-08-01

    The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of a vacuum gas oil (VGO) was performed at 360 C (6.9 MPa) over a commercial NiMo catalyst to examine the HDS reactivities of various sulfur compounds which exist in the VGO by means of quantitative pseudo-first-order kinetic analysis. Four representative types of aromatic-skeleton sulfur compounds were observed in the VGO: alkylbenzothiophenes (BTs), alkyldibenzothiophenes (DBTs), alkylphenanthro[4,5-b,c,d]thiophenes (PTs), and alkylbenzonaphthothiophenes (BNTs). Among these, alkyl-BTs exhibited the highest HDS reactivity, whereas alkyl-DBTs with alkyl substituents at the 4 and/or 6 positions appeared to have the least reactivity even though their aromatic-skeleton is smaller than those of both alkyl-PTs and -BNTs. Steric hindrance of alkyl groups at specific positions appears to be a major reason for the low reactivity. Quantum chemical calculations on representative sulfur compounds were carried out to compare molecular parameters with their different HDS reactivities.

  1. Effects of humidity on sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores with plasma-excited neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the effects of relative humidity on the sterilization process using a plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals were separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas is nitrogen mixed with 0.1% oxygen, and the relative humidity in the source gas is controlled by changing the mixing ratio of water vapor. The relative humidity near the sample in the reactor chamber is controlled by changing the sample temperature. As a result, the relative humidity near the sample should be kept in the range from 60 to 90% for the sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. When the relative humidity in the source gas increases from 30 to 90%, the sterilization effect is enhanced by the same degree.

  2. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  3. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  4. Caracterisation of Titanium Nitride Layers Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Popescu, Mihaela; Uţu, Dragoş

    2011-01-01

    Forming and cutting tools are subjected to the intense wear solicitations. Usually, they are either subject to superficial heat treatments or are covered with various materials with high mechanical properties. In recent years, thermal spraying is used increasingly in engineering area because of the large range of materials that can be used for the coatings. Titanium nitride is a ceramic material with high hardness which is used to cover the cutting tools increasing their lifetime. The paper presents the results obtained after deposition of titanium nitride layers by reactive plasma spraying (RPS). As deposition material was used titanium powder and as substratum was used titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) images of the deposited layers and the X ray diffraction of the coatings are presented. Demonstration program with layers deposited with thickness between 68,5 and 81,4 μm has been achieved and presented.

  5. Reactive atom plasma (RAP) processing of mirrors for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyan, Pradeep K.; Gardopée, George

    2008-07-01

    Modern day telescopes for astronomy have very complex requirements. Both ground and space based telescopes are getting much larger placing significant productivity requirements on the manufacturing processes employed. Conventional manufacturing paradigms involving mechanical abrasion have limitations related primarily to the material removal mechanisms employed. Reactive Atom Plasma (RAPTM) processing is a sub-aperture, non-contact, deterministic figuring technology performed at atmospheric pressures. The process has high material removal rates, and given the non-contact and atmospheric nature lends itself very well to scaling up for large aperture mirrors/segments. The process also benefits from its ability to simultaneously remove sub-surface damage (SSD) while imparting the desired figure to the surface. Developments are under way currently to scale the process up towards larger clear apertures while being able to figure in high spatial frequency features.

  6. Controlling hydrophilicity of polymer film by altering gas flow rate in atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Woo Seok; Hur, Min; Lee, Jae-Ok; Song, Young-Hoon

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on controlling the hydrophilicity of polyimide films using atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasmas by changing only the gas flow rate. The gas flow changed the discharge atmosphere by mixing the feed gas with ambient air because of the particular geometry of the reactor developed for the study, and a low gas flow rate was found to be favorable because it generated abundant nitrogen or oxygen species that served as sources of hydrophilic functional groups over the polymer surface. After low-gas-flow plasma treatment, the polymer surface exhibited hydrophilic characteristics with increased surface roughness and enhanced chemical properties owing to the surface addition of functional groups. Without adding any reactive gases or requiring high plasma power and longer treatment time, the developed reactor with low-gas-flow operation offered effective and economical wettability control of polyimide films.

  7. The structural and optical properties of black silicon by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steglich, Martin; Käsebier, Thomas; Zilk, Matthias; Pertsch, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Black Silicon nanostructures are fabricated by Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactive Ion Etching (ICP-RIE) in a gas mixture of SF6 and O2 at non-cryogenic temperatures. The structure evolution and the dependency of final structure geometry on the main processing parameters gas composition and working pressure are investigated and explained comprehensively. The optical properties of the produced Black Silicon structures, a distinct antireflection and light trapping effect, are resolved by optical spectroscopy and conclusively illustrated by optical simulations of accurate models of the real nanostructures. By that the structure sidewall roughness is found to be critical for an elevated reflectance of Black Silicon resulting from non-optimized etching processes. By analysis of a multitude of structures fabricated under different conditions, approximate limits for the range of feasible nanostructure geometries are derived. Finally, the technological applicability of Black Silicon fabrication by ICP-RIE is discussed.

  8. Gas-phase reactivity of novel Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alameddin, N.G.; Eyler, J.R.; Richardson, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The discovery of soluble group 4 metallocene-based catalysts for the Ziegler-Natta polymerization of olefins has generated considerable interest in the field. In particular, the versatility of the Cp (cyclopentadienyl) ligand has made practical the development of a host of novel catalysts which can produce extremely regiospecific and stereospecific polymers. With further improvements in activity and stability, these catalysts are expected to make a major impact on the polymerization industry. Presently, catalyst design is driven by using the steric and electronic properties of the ligands to guide the monomer addition. However, since these ligands have considerable steric bulk, the choice of solvent will significantly affect their catalytic properties. Therefore, an understanding of the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts independent of a solvent is one of the first steps to building a better catalyst. The work in progress is a study of the reactivity of zircononene-based catalysts in the gas phase. The authors are in the process of studying the rates of reaction of a series of these compounds with H{sub 2} as well as with a number of olefins. In the gas phase, the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts is revealed and their chemistry can be studied in detail.

  9. Supersonic gas injector for plasma fueling

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Kugel, H W; Kaita, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M; Blanchard, W; Bush, C; Gernhardt, R; Gettelfinger, G; Gray, T; Majeski, R; Menard, J; Provost, T; Sichta, P; Raman, R

    2005-09-30

    A supersonic gas injector (SGI) has been developed for fueling and diagnostic applications on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). It is comprised of a graphite converging-diverging Laval nozzle and a commercial piezoelectric gas valve mounted on a movable probe at a low field side midplane port location. Also mounted on the probe is a diagnostic package: a Langmuir probe, two thermocouples and five pickup coils for measuring toroidal, radial, vertical magnetic field components and magnetic fluctuations at the location of the SGI tip. The SGI flow rate is up to 4 x 10{sup 21} particles/s, comparable to conventional NSTX gas injectors. The nozzle operates in a pulsed regime at room temperature and a reservoir gas pressure up to 0.33 MPa. The deuterium jet Mach number of about 4, and the divergence half-angle of 5{sup o}-25{sup o} have been measured in laboratory experiments simulating NSTX environment. In initial NSTX experiments reliable operation of the SGI and all mounted diagnostics at distances 1-20 cm from the plasma separatrix has been demonstrated. The SGI has been used for fueling of ohmic and 2-4 MW NBI heated L- and H-mode plasmas. Fueling efficiency in the range 0.1-0.3 has been obtained from the plasma electron inventory analysis.

  10. Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on the magnetic flux of a high moment write pole material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jinqiu; Liu Feng; Chen Lifan; Miloslavsky, Lena

    2010-05-15

    Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on NiFe magnetic properties was investigated. Experimental data showed 40% magnetic property degradation for F-containing gas etching, 10% degradation for O-containing gas etching, and 5% degradation for Cl-containing gas etching processes. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the crystallographic orientation remained the same upon the reactive gas etching, which is due to the low ion energy in plasma etching process as opposed to ion milling process with high input energy. It is proposed that the reported magnetic property degradation was mainly caused by the nonmagnetic dead layer formation, rather than the changes in the crystallographic orientation. The dead layer was determined by the NiFe thickness dependence of remnant magnetic flux variations between pre-etched and postetched samples. The dead layer remained nearly constant for O-containing gas etching process with increasing plasma processing time. The nonmagnetic dead layer of {approx}40-50 A formed in O-containing etching gas was observed in transmission electron microscopy cross-sectional image and was in very good agreement with the calculated value based on magnetic flux measurements. Combined magnetic and physical characterizations suggest that the dead layer thickness saturates at the initial stage of the plasma etching and magnetic property remained unchanged with increasing etching duration upon formation of the dead layer.

  11. Dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma probe for sensitive and specific detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendong; Hou, Keyong; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2015-09-01

    A dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma (DARLTP) probe was developed for sensitive and specific detection of explosives by a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. The DARLTP probe was fabricated using a T-shaped quartz tube. The dopant gas was introduced into the plasma stream through a side-tube. Using CH2Cl2 doped wet air as the dopant gas, the detection sensitivities were improved about 4-fold (RDX), 4-fold (PETN), and 3-fold (tetryl) compared with those obtained using the conventional LTP. Furthermore, the formation of [M + (35)Cl](-) and [M + (37)Cl](-) for these explosives enhanced the specificity for their identification. Additionally, the quantities of fragment ions of tetryl and adduct ions such as [RDX + NO2](-) and [PETN + NO2](-) were dramatically reduced, which simplified the mass spectra and avoided the overlap of mass peaks for different explosives. The sensitivity improvement may be attributed to the increased intensity of reactant ion [HNO3 + NO3](-), which was enhanced 4-fold after the introduction of dopant gas. The limits of detection (LODs) for RDX, tetryl, and PETN were down to 3, 6, and 10 pg, respectively. Finally, an explosive mixture was successfully analyzed, demonstrating the potential of the DARLTP probe for qualitative and quantitative analysis of complicated explosives. PMID:26191543

  12. Reactive oxygen species production and discontinuous gas exchange in insects

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S.; Hetz, Stefan K.; Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    While biochemical mechanisms are typically used by animals to reduce oxidative damage, insects are suspected to employ a higher organizational level, discontinuous gas exchange mechanism to do so. Using a combination of real-time, flow-through respirometry and live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that spiracular control associated with the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) in Samia cynthia pupae is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperoxia fails to increase mean ROS production, although minima are elevated above normoxic levels. Furthermore, a negative relationship between mean and mean ROS production indicates that higher ROS production is generally associated with lower . Our results, therefore, suggest a possible signalling role for ROS in DGC, rather than supporting the idea that DGC acts to reduce oxidative damage by regulating ROS production. PMID:21865257

  13. Reactive oxygen species production and discontinuous gas exchange in insects.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S; Hetz, Stefan K; Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L

    2012-03-01

    While biochemical mechanisms are typically used by animals to reduce oxidative damage, insects are suspected to employ a higher organizational level, discontinuous gas exchange mechanism to do so. Using a combination of real-time, flow-through respirometry and live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that spiracular control associated with the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) in Samia cynthia pupae is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperoxia fails to increase mean ROS production, although minima are elevated above normoxic levels. Furthermore, a negative relationship between mean and mean ROS production indicates that higher ROS production is generally associated with lower . Our results, therefore, suggest a possible signalling role for ROS in DGC, rather than supporting the idea that DGC acts to reduce oxidative damage by regulating ROS production. PMID:21865257

  14. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements. PMID:23794223

  15. Contributions of gas-phase plasma chemistry to surface modifications and gas-surface interactions: investigations of fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, Michael F., II

    scatter coefficient include the surface with which the radical interacts, the vibrational temperature (thetaV) of the radical in its gas phase, and radical interactions in the gas phase. The analyses of thetaV in particular were extended to diatomic radicals from other plasma sources, including nitric oxide and fluorosilane systems, to gauge the contributions of vibrational energy to surface reactivity. In general, a monotonic increase in S is observed for CF, NO, and SiF radicals with increasing thetaV. Preliminary results for mixed plasma precursor systems (i.e. FC/H 2, FC/O2) indicate that the choice of feed gas additives has a profound effect on surface modification. Hydrogen additions tend to promote FC film deposition through scavenging of fluorine atoms, whereas oxygen consumes polymerizing species, thus favoring etching regimes. Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (TR-OES) studies of gas-phase species elucidate the mechanisms by which these processes occur. Ultimately, the work presented herein expands the fundamental chemical and physical understanding of fluorocarbon plasma systems.

  16. Formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by repetitive negatively pulsed helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets propagating into humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have many beneficial effects in their use in surface treatment and, in particular, plasma medicine. One of these benefits is the controlled production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the active discharge through the molecular gases added to the primary noble gas in the input mixture, and through the interaction of reactive species in the plasma effluent with the ambient air. In this computational investigation, a parametric study was performed on the production of RONS in a multiply pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet sustained in a He/O2 mixture and flowing into ambient humid air. The consequences of flow rate, O2 fraction, voltage, and repetition rate on reactant densities after a single discharge pulse, after 30 pulses, and after the same total elapsed time were investigated. At the end of the first discharge pulse, voltage has the greatest influence on RONS production. However, the systematic trends for production of RONS depend on repetition rate and flow rate in large part due to the residence time of RONS in the plasma zone. Short residence times result in reactive species produced by the previous pulse still being in the discharge tube or in the path of the ionization wave at the next pulse. The RONS therefore accumulate in the tube and in the near effluent on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This accumulation enables species requiring multiple reactions among the primary RONS species to be produced in greater numbers.

  17. On the plasma chemistry of a cold atmospheric argon plasma jet with shielding gas device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jörn; Bösel, André; Reuter, Stephan; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach combining experimental and numerical methods for the study of reaction mechanisms in a cold atmospheric \\text{Ar} plasma jet is introduced. The jet is operated with a shielding gas device that produces a gas curtain of defined composition around the plasma plume. The shielding gas composition is varied from pure {{\\text{N}}2} to pure {{\\text{O}}2} . The density of metastable argon \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) in the plasma plume was quantified using laser atom absorption spectroscopy. The density of long-living reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), namely {{\\text{O}}3} , \\text{N}{{\\text{O}}2} , \\text{NO} , {{\\text{N}}2}\\text{O} , {{\\text{N}}2}{{\\text{O}}5} and {{\\text{H}}2}{{\\text{O}}2} , was quantified in the downstream region of the jet in a multipass cell using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The jet produces a turbulent flow field and features guided streamers propagating at several \\text{km}~{{\\text{s}}-1} that follow the chaotic argon flow pattern, yielding a plasma plume with steep spatial gradients and a time dependence on the \\text{ns} scale while the downstream chemistry unfolds within several seconds. The fast and highly localized electron impact reactions in the guided streamer head and the slower gas phase reactions of neutrals occurring in the plasma plume and experimental apparatus are therefore represented in two separate kinetic models. The first electron impact reaction kinetics model is correlated to the LAAS measurements and shows that in the guided streamer head primary reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are dominantly generated from \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) . The second neutral species plug-flow model hence uses an \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) source term as sole energy input and yields good agreement with the RONS measured by FTIR spectroscopy.

  18. A Novel Charged Medium Consisting of Gas-Liquid Interfacial Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2009-11-01

    Due to the unique properties of ionic liquids such as their extremely low vapor pressure and high heat capacity, we succeed in creating the reactive gas (plasmas)—liquid (ionic liquids) interfacial field under a low gas pressure condition, where the plasma ion behavior can be controlled. The effects of the plasma ion irradiation on the liquid medium are quantitatively revealed for the first time. In connection with the plasma ion irradiation, the potential structure and optical emission properties of the gas-liquid interfacial plasma are investigated by changing a polarity of the electrode in the liquid to evaluate the plasma-liquid interactions. These results would contribute to synthesizing the metal nanoparticles with carbon nanotubes as a template in the ionic liquid. It is found that the high density, mono-dispersed, and isolated metal nanoparticles are synthesized between or inside the carbon nanotubes by controlling the gas-liquid interfacial plasmas. Furthermore, we can form novel nano-bio composite materials, such as DNA encapsulated carbon nanotubes using the plasma ion irradiation method in an electrolyte plasma with DNA, and demonstrate modifications of the electrical properties of the carbon nanotubes depending on the kinds of encapsulated DNA for the first time.

  19. A Novel Charged Medium Consisting of Gas-Liquid Interfacial Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2009-11-10

    Due to the unique properties of ionic liquids such as their extremely low vapor pressure and high heat capacity, we succeed in creating the reactive gas (plasmas)--liquid (ionic liquids) interfacial field under a low gas pressure condition, where the plasma ion behavior can be controlled. The effects of the plasma ion irradiation on the liquid medium are quantitatively revealed for the first time. In connection with the plasma ion irradiation, the potential structure and optical emission properties of the gas-liquid interfacial plasma are investigated by changing a polarity of the electrode in the liquid to evaluate the plasma-liquid interactions. These results would contribute to synthesizing the metal nanoparticles with carbon nanotubes as a template in the ionic liquid. It is found that the high density, mono-dispersed, and isolated metal nanoparticles are synthesized between or inside the carbon nanotubes by controlling the gas-liquid interfacial plasmas. Furthermore, we can form novel nano-bio composite materials, such as DNA encapsulated carbon nanotubes using the plasma ion irradiation method in an electrolyte plasma with DNA, and demonstrate modifications of the electrical properties of the carbon nanotubes depending on the kinds of encapsulated DNA for the first time.

  20. Reactive Plasma-Sprayed Aluminum Nitride-Based Coating Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Egota, Kazumi; Okamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Recently, thick aluminum nitride/alumina (AlN/Al2O3) composite coatings were successfully fabricated through the reactive plasma spraying of fine Al2O3/AlN mixture in the N2/H2 atmospheric plasma. The coatings consist of AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and α-Al2O3 phases. This study will evaluate the thermal conductivity of these complicated plasma-sprayed coatings and optimize the controlling aspects. Furthermore, the influence of the process parameters on the coatings thermal conductivity will be investigated. The fabricated coatings showed very low thermal conductivity (2.43 W/m K) compared to the AlN sintered compacts. It is attributed to the phase composition of the fabricated coatings, oxide content, and porosity. The presence of Al2O3, Al5O6N and the high coating porosity decreased its thermal conductivity. The presence of oxygen in the AlN lattice creates Al vacancies which lead to phonon scattering and therefore suppressed the thermal conductivity. The formation of γ-Al2O3 phase in the coating leads to further decrease in its conductivity, due to its lower density compared to the α-phase. Moreover, the high porosity of the coating strongly suppressed the conductivity. This is due to the complicated microstructure of plasma spray coatings (splats, porosity, and interfaces, particularly in case of reactive spray process), which obviously lowered the conductivity. Furthermore, the measured coating density was lower than the AlN value and suppressed the coating conductivity. In addition, the spraying parameter showed a varied effect on the coating phase composition, porosity, density, and therefore on its conductivity. Although the N2 gas flow improved the nitride content, it suppressed the thermal conductivity gradually. It is attributed to the further increase in the porosity and further decrease in the density of the coatings with the N2 gas. Furthermore, increasing the arc did not show a significant change on the coating thermal conductivity. On the other hand

  1. Effects of additional vapors on sterilization of microorganism spores with plasma-excited neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Some fundamental experiments are carried out in order to develop a plasma process that will uniformly sterilize both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Air, oxygen, argon, and nitrogen are each used as the plasma source gas to which mixed vapors of water and ethanol at different ratios are added. The reactor chamber is remotely located from the plasma area and a metal mesh for eliminating charged particles is installed between them. Thus, only reactive neutral particles such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are utilized. As a result, adding vapors to the source gas markedly enhances the sterilization effect. In particular, air with water and/or ethanol vapor and oxygen with ethanol vapor show more than 6-log reduction for Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores.

  2. Etching characteristics of LiNbO3 in reactive ion etching and inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Z.; Heard, P. J.; Marshall, J. M.; Thomas, P. A.; Yu, S.

    2008-02-01

    The etching characteristics of congruent LiNbO3 single crystals including doped LiNbO3 and proton-changed LiNbO3 have been studied in reactive ion etching (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching tools, using different recipes of gas mixtures. The effects of parameters including working pressure, RIE power, and ICP power are investigated and analyzed by measurement of etching depth, selectivity, uniformity, etched surface state, and sidewall profile by means of focused ion beam etching, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. The effects of a sample carrier wafer coating have also been investigated. Optimized processes with high etching rates, good mask selectivity, and a near-vertical profile have been achieved. Ridge waveguides on proton-exchanged LiNbO3 have been fabricated and optically measured.

  3. MRI mapping of cerebrovascular reactivity via gas inhalation challenges.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Yezhuvath, Uma; Cheng, Yamei; Marshall, Olga; Ge, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a spatially heterogeneous and temporally dynamic organ, with different regions requiring different amount of blood supply at different time. Therefore, the ability of the blood vessels to dilate or constrict, known as Cerebral-Vascular-Reactivity (CVR), represents an important domain of vascular function. An imaging marker representing this dynamic property will provide new information of cerebral vessels under normal and diseased conditions such as stroke, dementia, atherosclerosis, small vessel diseases, brain tumor, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. In order to perform this type of measurement in humans, it is necessary to deliver a vasoactive stimulus such as CO2 and/or O2 gas mixture while quantitative brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) are being collected. In this work, we presented a MR compatible gas-delivery system and the associated protocol that allow the delivery of special gas mixtures (e.g., O2, CO2, N2, and their combinations) while the subject is lying inside the MRI scanner. This system is relatively simple, economical, and easy to use, and the experimental protocol allows accurate mapping of CVR in both healthy volunteers and patients with neurological disorders. This approach has the potential to be used in broad clinical applications and in better understanding of brain vascular pathophysiology. In the video, we demonstrate how to set up the system inside an MRI suite and how to perform a complete experiment on a human participant. PMID:25549106

  4. MRI Mapping of Cerebrovascular Reactivity via Gas Inhalation Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Yezhuvath, Uma; Cheng, Yamei; Marshall, Olga; Ge, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a spatially heterogeneous and temporally dynamic organ, with different regions requiring different amount of blood supply at different time. Therefore, the ability of the blood vessels to dilate or constrict, known as Cerebral-Vascular-Reactivity (CVR), represents an important domain of vascular function. An imaging marker representing this dynamic property will provide new information of cerebral vessels under normal and diseased conditions such as stroke, dementia, atherosclerosis, small vessel diseases, brain tumor, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. In order to perform this type of measurement in humans, it is necessary to deliver a vasoactive stimulus such as CO2 and/or O2 gas mixture while quantitative brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) are being collected. In this work, we presented a MR compatible gas-delivery system and the associated protocol that allow the delivery of special gas mixtures (e.g., O2, CO2, N2, and their combinations) while the subject is lying inside the MRI scanner. This system is relatively simple, economical, and easy to use, and the experimental protocol allows accurate mapping of CVR in both healthy volunteers and patients with neurological disorders. This approach has the potential to be used in broad clinical applications and in better understanding of brain vascular pathophysiology. In the video, we demonstrate how to set up the system inside an MRI suite and how to perform a complete experiment on a human participant. PMID:25549106

  5. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, I: General transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we derive the set of general transport equations for multicomponent partially ionized reactive plasma in the presence of electric and magnetic fields taking into account the internal degrees of freedom and electronic excitation of plasma particles. Our starting point is a generalized Boltzmann equation with the collision integral in the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck form and a reactive collision integral. We obtain a set of conservation equations for such plasma and employ a linearized variant of Grad's moment method to derive the system of moment (or transport) equations for the plasma species nonequilibrium parameters. Full and reduced transport equations, resulting from the linearized system of moment equations, are presented, which can be used to obtain transport relations and expressions for transport coefficients of electrons and heavy plasma particles (molecules, atoms and ions) in partially ionized reactive plasma.

  6. Disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and tritiated hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniazzi, A. B.; Morton, C. S.

    2008-07-15

    Kinectrics and its predecessor company Ontario Hydro Research Div. (a division of Ontario Hydro) had a fully operational tritium laboratory on site since the early 1980's. During those years numerous projects and experiments were undertaken using hydrogen and tritium for the most part. Metals with an affinity for hydrogen are commonly employed as scavengers of hydrogenic gases from process streams or as hydrogen storage mediums. The two most common of these metals used were depleted uranium and a zirconium-iron alloy (SAES St198). The break-up of Ontario Hydro through deregulation activities resulted in the building of a new, smaller, tritium laboratory and the decommissioning of the original tritium laboratory. Decommissioning activities resulted in the need to safely dispose of these reactive metals. Disposal of these metals is not straight forward. For safe, long term, disposal it has been decided to oxidize the metals in a controlled fashion. The oxidized beds, containing the metals, will be sent to a radioactive waste site for long term storage. Options for disposal of tritiated hydrogen gas are presented and discussed. This paper provides a disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and hydrogen thereby closing the loop in tritium handling. (authors)

  7. Tin removal from extreme ultraviolet collector optics by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.; Srivastava, S. N.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2008-05-15

    Tin (Sn) has the advantage of delivering higher conversion efficiency compared to other fuel materials (e.g., Xe or Li) in an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source, a necessary component for the leading next generation lithography. However, the use of a condensable fuel in a lithography system leads to some additional challenges for maintaining a satisfactory lifetime of the collector optics. A critical issue leading to decreased mirror lifetime is the buildup of debris on the surface of the primary mirror that comes from the use of Sn in either gas discharge produced plasma (GDPP) or laser produced plasma (LPP). This leads to a decreased reflectivity from the added material thickness and increased surface roughness that contributes to scattering. Inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching with halide ions is one potential solution to this problem. This article presents results for etch rate and selectivity of Sn over SiO{sub 2} and Ru. The Sn etch rate in a chlorine plasma is found to be much higher (of the order of hundreds of nm/min) than the etch rate of other materials. A thermally evaporated Sn on Ru sample was prepared and cleaned using an inductively coupled plasma etching method. Cleaning was confirmed using several material characterization techniques. Furthermore, a collector mock-up shell was then constructed and etching was performed on Sn samples prepared in a Sn EUV source using an optimized etching recipe. The sample surface before and after cleaning was analyzed by atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The results show the dependence of etch rate on the location of Sn samples placed on the collector mock-up shell.

  8. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  9. Reactive gas atomization processing for Fe-based ODS alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R; Anderson, Iver E; Kramer, Matthew J; Odette, G R; Stergar, E; Haney, E

    2011-08-24

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis was employed as a simplified method for processing oxide dispersion forming precursor Fe-based powders (e.g., Fe–Cr–Y–Hf). During this process a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar–O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 50 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide shell that was used as a vehicle to transport oxygen into the consolidated microstructure. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatment promoted thermodynamically driven oxygen exchange reactions between trapped films of Cr-enriched oxide and internal (Y, Hf)-enriched intermetallic precipitates, resulting in highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y–Hf–O) that were identified with X-ray diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography results also revealed that the size and distribution of the dispersoids were found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, several oxide dispersion strengthened microstructures were engineered from different powder particle size ranges, illustrating microstructural control as a function of particle solidification rate. Additionally, preliminary thermal–mechanical processing was used to develop a fine scale dislocation substructure for ultimate strengthening of the alloy.

  10. Splat Morphology and Influence of Feeding Rate During Reactive Plasma Spray of Aluminum Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Fabrication of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings using conventional plasma spraying processes directly has been deemed impossible. It is attributed to the thermal decomposition of the AlN feedstock particles during spraying without a stable melting phase. Using the reactivity of the plasma (reactive plasma spraying: RPS) showed a promising consideration for in situ formation of AlN thermally sprayed coatings. Several AlN-based coatings were fabricated through the RPS of aluminum powders in the N2/H2 plasma. The focus of this study is in discussing the morphology of splat deposition during the nitriding of Al particles. Furthermore, the influence of the feeding rate during the RPS and nitriding of Al powders will be investigated. The nitride content, as well as the unreacted molten Al phase, strongly influences splat deposition and morphology during the RPS of Al. The collected splats can be divided into reacted, partially reacted, and unreacted splats. The reacted splats tend to show a disk or egg-shell shape. The partially reacted mainly had outside nitride shells and an unreacted molten Al part in the center. The unreacted splats tended to show a splash shape. The main controlling factor is the time of the droplet impact on the substrate during the reaction sequence. The particle size and spray distance showed significant effects on the splat formation due to their effect on the nitriding conversion and the melting behavior of the particles during RPS nitriding. The powder feeding rate was investigated through increasing the injection rate and by using a low carrier gas flow rate. Increasing the powder feeding rate significantly improved the coating thickness. However, it suppressed the nitriding conversion of the large Al particles. Thus, with increasing the amount of the powder in the plasma, the Al molten particles are easily aggregated and agglomerate together upon colliding on the substrate with an AlN shell on the surface. This prevents the N2 from having

  11. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  12. Species differences in the reactivation of organophosphate-inhibited plasma esterases by diacetylmonoxime.

    PubMed

    Ecobichon, D J

    1976-04-01

    A study was conducted to assess whether the protection afforded to organophosphatepoisoned animals by diacetylmonoxime (DAM) was correlated with the reactivation of non-essential aliesterases (AliE). In vitro, the DAM-catalyzed reactivation of plasma AliE and cholinesterases (psi ChE) of rat, rabbit and guinea pig inhibited by 10-5 M diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) and O,O-dimethyl-2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate (DDVP) was investigated. Marked reactivation of the rat plasma enzymes was achieved with 10mM DAM. Higher concentrations (30 mM) were necessary for the slow reactivation of rabbit and guinea pig plasma AliE. Reactivation of the psiChE of these species was comparatively slow. Reactivation of DDVP-inhibited esterases proceeded in all species at a more rapid rate than those inhibited by DFP. The dependence of psiChE reactivation upon concomitant more rapid reactivation of AliE by DAM was demonstrated using Sephadex fractionated AliE and psiChE but only a marked effect was observed with the rat, suggesting that the plasma AliE of this species is functionally different. The in vitro observations were confirmed by in vivo studies in rats and rabbits. DAM (50 or 150 mg/kg), administered to atropinized rats 15 min before a lethal dose of DFP, protected the animals. Few severe toxic signs were observed and reactivation of both plasma AliE and psiChE occurred. In contrast, DAM protected the rabbit against a lethal dose of DFP but only reactivation of the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase was observed. PMID:1276991

  13. Reactive Plasma Etching of SiC in a Tetrafluoroethane / Oxygen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, James S.; Radican, Kevin; Botello, Eric; Koeck, Deborah C.; Donnelly, David; Geerts, Wilhelmus; Spencer, Gregory; Galloway, Heather C.

    2003-10-01

    Fabrication of waveguides for electrical characterization of dielectric thin films requires a method of etching SiC and SiCN. A method of RF plasma etching was developed to ensure proper ground contact between the substrate and the ground lines. A constant flow of HFC 134a was investigated as compared to various oxygen flow rates, in order to determine the right mixture of HFC 134a and O_2, and the respective etch rate. This presentation will describe the method and techniques that were implemented using a magnetron gun attached to an RF network as a plasma source and a mixture of tetrafluoroethane or HFC 134a and O2 as the process gas.

  14. Propagation mechanisms of guided streamers in plasma jets: the influence of electronegativity of the surrounding gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Norberg, Seth A.; Winter, Jörn; Johnsen, Eric; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K. D.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets for biomedical applications are often sustained in He with small amounts of, for example, O2 impurities and typically propagate into ambient air. The resulting poorly controlled generation of reactive species has motivated the use of gas shields to control the interaction of the plasma plume with the ambient gas. The use of different gases in the shield yields different behavior in the plasma plume. In this paper, we discuss results from experimental and computational investigations of He plasma jets having attaching and non-attaching gas shields. We found that negative ion formation in the He-air mixing region significantly affects the ionization wave dynamics and promotes the propagation of negative guided streamers through an electrostatic focusing mechanism. Results from standard and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy ratios of emission from states of N2 and He imply different electric fields in the plasma plume depending on the composition of the shielding gas. These effects are attributed to the conductivity in the transition region between the plasma plume and the shield gas, and the immobile charge represented by negative ions. The lower conductivity in the attaching mixtures enables more extended penetration of the electric field whereas the negative ions aid in focusing the electrons towards the axis.

  15. Summarizing results on the performance of a selective set of atmospheric plasma jets for separation of photons and reactive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Simon; Jarzina, Fabian; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Golda, Judith; Layes, Vincent; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Benedikt, Jan

    2015-11-01

    A microscale atmospheric-pressure plasma jet is a remote plasma jet, where plasma-generated reactive particles and photons are involved in substrate treatment. Here, we summarize our efforts to develop and characterize a particle- or photon-selective set of otherwise identical jets. In that way, the reactive species or photons can be used separately or in combination to study their isolated or combined effects to test whether the effects are additive or synergistic. The final version of the set of three jets—particle-jet, photon-jet and combined jet—is introduced. This final set realizes the highest reproducibility of the photon and particle fluxes, avoids turbulent gas flow, and the fluxes of the selected plasma-emitted components are almost identical in the case of all jets, while the other component is effectively blocked, which was verified by optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Schlieren-imaging and a fluid dynamics simulation show the stability of the gas flow. The performance of these selective jets is demonstrated with the example of the treatment of E. coli bacteria with the different components emitted by a He-only, a He/N2 and a He/O2 plasma. Additionally, measurements of the vacuum UV photon spectra down to the wavelength of 50 nm can be made with the photon-jet and the relative comparison of spectral intensities among different gas mixtures is reported here. The results will show that the vacuum UV photons can lead to the inactivation of the E.coli bacteria.

  16. Reactive Plasma Etching of SiC in a Tetrafluoroethane / Oxygen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Heather C.; Radican, Kevin P.; Donnelly, David; Koeck, Deborah C.

    2003-03-01

    The etch rate as a function of oxygen concentration was investigated in the RF magnetron plasma etching of SiC with tetrafluoroethane gas. The etch rate and surface roughness was measured with atomic force microscopy, while evidence of polymer deposition was analyzed with FTIR. Etch rates of > 10 nm/sec can be achieved with high selectivity with respect to an aluminum mask, near infinite selectivity with respect to silicon. This has also been found to be compatible with some low-k dielectric films. Tetrafluoroethane is of interest due to its high fluorine content. It is also a nontoxic, ozone friendly gas with a short atmospheric lifetime. The role of oxygen in the etching process will be discussed and this etching process will be compared to other SiC etches that have been previously reported

  17. A new reactive atom plasma technology (RAPT) for precision machining: the etching of ULE optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanara, Carlo; Shore, Paul; Nicholls, John R.; Lyford, Nicholas; Sommer, Phil; Fiske, Peter

    2006-06-01

    The next generation of 30-100 metre diameter extremely large telescopes (ELTs) requires large numbers of hexagonal primary mirror segments. As part of the Basic Technology programme run jointly by UCL and Cranfield University, a reactive atomic plasma technology (RAP(tm)) emerged from the US Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is employed for the finishing of these surfaces. Results are presented on this novel etching technology. The Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) operated at atmospheric pressure using argon, activates the chemical species injected through its centre and promotes the fluorine-based chemical reactions at the surface. Process assessment trials on Ultra Low Expansion (ULE(tm)) plates, previously ground at high material removal rates, have been conducted. The quality of the surfaces produced on these samples using the RAP process are discussed. Substantial volumetric material removal rates of up to 0.446(21) mm 3/s at the highest process speed (1,200 mm/min) were found to be possible without pre-heating the substrate. The influences of power transfer, process speed and gas concentration on the removal rates have been determined. The suitability of the RAP process for revealing and removing sub-surface damage induced by high removal rate grinding is discussed. The results on SiC samples are reported elsewhere in this conference.

  18. Dusty Plasma Structures in Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, D. V.; Antipov, S. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    The possibility of attainment of large Mach numbers is analyzed for the case of heavy ions drifting in a light gas. Under conditions of typical experiments with dust structures in plasmas, the use of the mixture of light and heavy gases is shown to make it possible to suppress the ion heating in the electric field and to form supersonic flows characterized by large Mach numbers. The drift of krypton ions in helium is considered as an example. Experiments with dc glow discharge at 1-10% of Kr show that the transition to the discharge in mixture leads to increase of interaction anisotropy and reinforcement of coupling of dust particles in the direction of ion drift. On the other hand, under certain conditions the phenomenon of abnormal 'heating' of dust particles was observed when the particles can obtain high kinetic energy which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical.

  19. Reactive oxygen species controllable non-thermal helium plasmas for evaluation of plasmid DNA strand breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young Kim, Jae; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Ballato, John; Cao, Weiguo; Kim, Sung-O.

    2012-11-01

    Non-thermal, oxygen-rich helium plasmas were investigated to achieve an enhanced reactive oxygen species concentration at low voltage driving conditions. A non-thermal plasma device was fabricated based on a theta-shaped tube, and its potential was investigated for use in topological alteration of plasmid DNA. The optical emission spectra of the plasma showed that the oxygen flow affected the plasma properties, even though an oxygen plasma was not produced. The plasmid DNA strand breaks became more significant with the addition of oxygen flow to the helium in a single hollow, theta-shaped tube with other experimental conditions being unchanged.

  20. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo

    2014-04-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ∝ log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  1. Spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure microwave induced nitrogen plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microwave induced N2 plasma is diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy with respect to the plasma gas temperature. The spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature is discussed with respect to the spectral line broadening of Ar I and the various emission rotational-vibrational band systems of N2(B-A), N2(C-B) and \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}). It is found that the Boltzmann plot of the selective spectral lines from \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}) at 391.4 nm is preferable to others with an accuracy better than 5% for an atmospheric-pressure plasma of high gas temperature. On the basis of the thermal balance equation, the dependences of the plasma gas temperature on the absorbed power, the gas flow rate, and the gas composition are investigated experimentally with photographs recording the plasma morphology.

  2. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  3. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  4. Formation of diatomic molecular radicals in reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance discharge and pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; You, Qinghu; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-04-15

    The reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N{sub 2} gas and pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target was characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with space resolution for a study of gas-phase reactions and molecular radical formation in the plasma. The plasma exhibits very high reactivity compared with the plasma generated solely by ECR discharge or by pulsed laser ablation and contains highly excited species originally present in the ambient gaseous environment and directly ablated from the target as well as formed as the products of gas-phase reactions occurring in the plasma. The space distribution and the time evolution of the plasma emission give an access to the gas-phase reactions for the formation of C{sub 2} and CN radicals, revealing that C{sub 2} radicals are formed mainly in the region near the target while CN radicals can be formed in a much larger region not only in the vicinity of the target, but especially in the region near a substrate far away from the target.

  5. Impact of Gas Heating in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that the neutral gas in inductively coupled plasma reactors heats up significantly during processing. The resulting gas density variations across the reactor affect reaction rates, radical densities, plasma characteristics, and uniformity within the reactor. A self-consistent model that couples the plasma generation and transport to the gas flow and heating has been developed and used to study CF4 discharges. A Langmuir probe has been used to measure radial profiles of electron density and temperature. The model predictions agree well with the experimental results. As a result of these comparisons along with the poorer performance of the model without the gas-plasma coupling, the importance of gas heating in plasma processing has been verified.

  6. Enhancement of Functional Ceramic Coating Performance by Gas Tunnel Type Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Akira

    2016-02-01

    A high-precision plasma system has been pursued for advanced thermal processing. The gas tunnel type plasma jet device developed by the author exhibits high energy density and also high efficiency. Among its various applications is the plasma spraying of ceramics such as Al2O3 and ZrO2. The performance of these ceramic coatings is superior to conventional ones. Properties such as the mechanical and chemical properties of the zirconia coatings were reported in previous studies. In this study, the enhancement of the performance of functional ceramic coatings by the gas tunnel type plasma spraying method was carried out using different powders. Results show that the alumina/zirconia composite system exhibited improvements of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. The alumina/zirconia composite coating has the potential for use as a high functionally graded thermal barrier coating. Another application of the gas tunnel type plasma is for surface modification of metals. As an example, TiN films were formed in 5 s and, thick TiN coatings were easily obtained by gas tunnel type plasma reactive spraying.

  7. Separation of VUV/UV photons and reactive particles in the effluent of a He/O2 atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.; Lackmann, J.-W.; Narberhaus, F.; Bandow, J. E.; Denis, B.; Benedikt, J.

    2011-07-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas can be used for treatment of living tissues or for inactivation of bacteria or biological macromolecules. The treatment is usually characterized by a combined effect of UV and VUV radiation, reactive species and ions. This combination is usually beneficial for the effectiveness of the treatment but it makes the study of fundamental interaction mechanisms very difficult. Here we report on an effective separation of VUV/UV photons and heavy reactive species in the effluent of a microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ). The separation is realized by an additional flow of helium gas under well-defined flow conditions, which deflects heavy particles in the effluent without affecting the VUV and UV photons. Both components of the effluent, the photons and the reactive species, can be used separately or in combination for sample treatment. The results of treatment of a model plasma polymer film and vegetative Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli cells are shown and discussed. A simple model of the He gas flow and reaction kinetics of oxygen atoms in the gas phase and at the surface is used to provide a better understanding of the processes in the plasma effluent. The new jet modification, called X-Jet for its appearance, will simplify the investigation of interaction mechanisms of atmospheric pressure plasmas with biological samples.

  8. Optical diagnostics of reactive species in atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    This paper reviews optical measurements of reactive species in atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasmas: streamer discharge, dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), plasma jet, and plasma-assisted ignition and combustion. Measurements of OH, O, N, {{\\text{O}}3} , NO, {{\\text{N}}2} (A, B, C), {{\\text{O}}2} (a, b), {{\\text{N}}2}(v) , {{\\text{O}}2}(v) , He*, Ar*, \\text{N}2+ , CH, and CH2O by laser-induced fluorescence, absorption, optical emission spectroscopy, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering methods are included. Reactive species measurement in low-frequency (\\cong 1 Hz) pulsed streamer discharge is introduced, and reactive species production and reaction processes indicated by these measurements are described in detail. Measurements in high-frequency DBD, atmospheric-pressure diffuse discharge, and dc corona discharge are described. Measurements in plasma jets are also reviewed: rf plasma jets, kHz plasma jets, and additional plasma jets. Finally, measurements in plasma-assisted ignition and combustion are described and reviewed in addition to measurements in conventional spark ignition. A comprehensive list of the reviewed measurements is provided.

  9. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  10. Composition control of InN/WO3 nanocomposite by in-situ reactive plasma annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroni, Azianty; Goh, Boon Tong; Alizadeh, Mahdi; Rahman, Saadah Abdul

    2016-05-01

    A composition control and formation of InN/WO3 nanocomposite on the as-grown In2O3 by in-situ reactive plasma annealing was investigated. The reactive plasma annealing changes the facets crystalline In2O3 structure to nanograin structure of InN/WO3 nanocomposite with the grain size of 100-200 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the formation of In2O3, InN and WO3 nanostructures in the nanocomposite. In-situ reactive plasma annealing enhances the removing of In2O3 and facilitates the formation of InN/WO3 nanocomposite. Furthermore, the reduction of oxygen in In2O3 leads to a decreasing in optical energy gap from 2.91 to 2.63 eV.

  11. Gas plasma sterilization of microorganisms and mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    SHINTANI, HIDEHARU; SAKUDO, AKIKAZU; BURKE, PETER; McDONNELL, GERALD

    2010-01-01

    The use of true gas plasmas for the inactivation of microorganisms is an area of dynamic research. Many types of gases are used as a source of plasma, and different plasma production methods have been applied. The antimicrobial mechanisms of oxygen-based gas plasmas may be due to an etching effect on microbial structures, particularly bacterial endospores resulting in shrinkage. By contrast, the definite mechanisms of actions of other gas plasma sources, such as N2, He, Ne, Ar and Xe gases, have not been clearly defined and indeed may be distinct. The speculated mechanisms of these gas plasmas involve the direct attack of metastable (excited molecular), UV and/or VUV to microbial structures, specifically the inner membrane and DNA in the core of bacterial endospores. According to this speculation, sterilized spore figures would remain unchanged. However, these mechanisms remain to be clarified. Future perspectives on the use of gas plasma for sterilization are of interest, as it is possible that appropriate sterility assurance levels can be obtained in parallel with material and functional compatibility. Traditional sterilization methods are often limited in these requirements. Therefore, gas plasma sterilization may prove to be an appropriate alternative sterilization procedure. PMID:22993596

  12. Effect of human plasma on the reactivation of sarin-inhibited human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Worek, F; Eyer, P; Kiderlen, D; Thiermann, H; Szinicz, L

    2000-03-01

    The reactivation of organophosphate-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by oximes inevitably results in the formation of highly reactive phosphoryloximes (POX), which are able to re-inhibit the enzyme. In this study, the dependence of POX formation on AChE concentration was investigated with sarin-inhibited human erythrocyte AChE (EryAChE). A marked dependence was found with obidoxime but not with the experimental oxime HI 6, suggesting great differences in the decomposition rates of the respective POXs. At a physiological erythrocyte content the reactivation of EryAChE was markedly affected by POX with obidoxime and pralidoxime (2-PAM) but not with the newer oximes HI 6 and HLö 7. Addition of extensively dialysed, sarin-treated human plasma reduced the reactivation by obidoxime and 2-PAM even more. Obidoxime and 2-PAM were superior to HI 6 and HLö 7 in reactivating butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). This effect was pronounced in diluted plasma, but was obscured in concentrated plasma, probably because of re-inhibition by the generated POX. Addition of native erythrocytes to sarin-treated plasma resulted in marked inhibition of EryAChE in the presence of obidoxime, suggesting a higher affinity of the POX for EryAChE. The results indicate that obidoxime and 2-PAM may reactivate sarin-inhibited AChE insufficiently due to re-inhibition by the POX formed. In addition, the re-inhibition of Ery-AChE may be aggravated by the POX that is produced during BChE reactivation. These reactions must be regarded as therapeutically detrimental and disqualify those oximes which are capable of forming stable POX by reactivation of BChE. PMID:10817663

  13. Optical emission studies of reactive species in plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kampas, F.J.; Griffith, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Optical emission studies of the glow-discharge deposition of a-Si:H alloys reveal the presence of reactive species derived from process gases and impurities. Studies of the dependences of emission intensities upon deposition parameters elucidate the mechanisms of formation of these species. Effects of impurities detected by emission spectroscopy upon a-Si:H film electronic properties are discussed. A model of the chemical reactions involved in film growth is presented.

  14. Plasma arc welding torch having means for vortexing plasma gas exiting the welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is described wherein a plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of the welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. The plasma gas is provided with a vortexing motion prior to exiting the body by a vortex motion imparting member which is mounted in an orifice housing member and carried in the forward portion of the torch body. The orifice housing member is provided with an orifice of an predetermined diameter through which the electric arc and the plasma gas exits.

  15. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  16. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01

    Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the

  17. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned toward conditions usually encountered in the Marce...

  18. Reactive spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitride reinforced titanium alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borkar, Tushar; Nag, Soumya; Ren, Yang; Tiley, Jaimie; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2014-12-25

    Coupled in situ alloying and nitridation of titanium–vanadium alloys, has been achieved by introducing reactive nitrogen gas during the spark plasma sintering (SPS) of blended titanium and vanadium elemental powders, leading to a new class of nitride reinforced titanium alloy composites. The resulting microstructure includes precipitates of the d-TiN phase with the NaCl structure, equiaxed (or globular) precipitates of a nitrogen enriched hcp a(Ti,N) phase with a c/a ratio more than what is expected for pure hcp Ti, and fine scale plate-shaped precipitates of hcp a-Ti, distributed within a bcc b matrix. During SPS processing, the d-TiN phase appears to form at a temperature of 1400 C, while only hcp a(Ti,N) and a-Ti phases form at lower processing temperatures. Consequently, the highest microhardness is exhibited by the composite processed at 1400 C while those processed at 1300 C or below exhibit lower values. Processing at temperatures below 1300 C, resulted in an incomplete alloying of the blend of titanium and vanadium powders. These d-TiN precipitates act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the a(Ti,N) precipitates that appear to engulf and exhibit an orientation relationship with the nitride phase at the center. Furthermore, fine scale a-Ti plates are precipitated within the nitride precipitates, presumably resulting from the retrograde solubility of nitrogen in titanium.

  19. Plasma reforming of glycerol for synthesis gas production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinli; Hoang, Trung; Lobban, Lance L; Mallinson, Richard G

    2009-05-28

    Glycerol can be effectively converted to synthesis gas (selectivity higher than 80%) with small amounts of water or no water using plasmas at low temperature and atmospheric pressure, without external heating. PMID:19436906

  20. Transition of RF internal antenna plasma by gas control

    SciTech Connect

    Hamajima, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Hiruta, Toshihito; Kanno, Yoshinori

    2012-07-11

    The transition between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was investigated with the internal radio frequency (RF) multi-turn antenna. The transition between them showed the hysteresis curve. The radiation power and the period of the self-pulse mode became small in proportion to the gas pressure. It was found that the ICP transition occurred by decreasing the gas pressure from 400 Pa.

  1. Gas plasma sterilization--application of space-age technology.

    PubMed

    Crow, S; Smith, J H

    1995-08-01

    Gas plasma sterilization is new to the healthcare field. The first such sterilizer has been manufactured by Advanced Sterilization Products (J&J, Irvine, CA). The system uses hydrogen peroxide as the substrate gas and radio frequency emissions to generate plasma. This system is a low-temperature, quick-acting process with no toxic residues. It appears that this sterilizer system holds promise in the healthcare field and could help to reduce the use of ethylene oxide. PMID:7594394

  2. Neutral gas-plasma interaction - The case of the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W.-H.

    Recent developments in the study of the gas-plasma interaction at Io and in the Io plasma torus are reviewed. It is suggested that the 'energy crisis' in the hot Io plasma torus may be partially resolved by a local energy generation mechanism such as the magnetic pumping process. It is also argued that the Jovian ring could act as an additional plasma source in injecting cold plasma component into the inner plasma torus, and that the formation of an ion wake may permit a much more extended electromagnetic coupling between Io and the Jovian ionosphere.

  3. EDITORIAL: Gas plasmas in biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, Eva

    2006-08-01

    It is my great pleasure to introduce this special cluster devoted to recent developments in biomedical plasma technology. It is an even greater pleasure to behold the enormous progress which has been made in this area over the last five years. Research on biomedical plasma applications proceeds hand in hand with the development of new material processing technologies, based on atmospheric plasma sources. In the beginning, major research effort was invested in the development and control of new plasma sources—in this laborious process, novel devices were constructed and characterized, and also new plasma physical phenomena were discovered. Self-constriction of micro-plasmas, pattern formation, filamentation of glow discharges and various mode transitions are just a few examples. It is a real challenge for theorists to gain an understanding of these complex phenomena. Later, the devices had to be thoroughly tested and automated, and various safety issues had to be addressed. At present, many atmospheric plasma sources are ready to use, but not all fundamental and technical problems have been resolved by far. There is still plenty of room for improvement, as in any dynamic area of research. The recent trends are clear: the application area of plasmas expands into processing of unconventional materials such as biological scaffolds, and eventually living human, animal and plant tissues. The gentle, precise and versatile character of cold plasmas simply invites this new application. Firstly, non-living surfaces have been plasma-treated to attain desired effects in biomedical research; tissue engineering will soon fully profit from this powerful technique. Furthermore, studies on cultured plant and animal cells have provided many findings, which are both fundamentally interesting and potentially applicable in health care, veterinary medicine and agriculture. The most important and hitherto unique property of plasma treatment is that it can evade accidental cell death

  4. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock - The transition from reactive to kinetic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-06-01

    Particle simulation experiments were used to analyze the electron beam-plasma instability. It is shown that there is a transition from the reactive state of the electron beam-plasma instability to the kinetic instability of Langmuir waves. Quantitative tests, which include an evaluation of the dispersion relation for the evolving non-Maxwellian beam distribution, show that a quasi-linear theory describes the onset of this transition and applies again fully to the kinetic stage. This stage is practically identical to the late stage seen in simulations of plasma waves in the electron foreshock described by Dum (1990).

  5. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock - The transition from reactive to kinetic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Particle simulation experiments were used to analyze the electron beam-plasma instability. It is shown that there is a transition from the reactive state of the electron beam-plasma instability to the kinetic instability of Langmuir waves. Quantitative tests, which include an evaluation of the dispersion relation for the evolving non-Maxwellian beam distribution, show that a quasi-linear theory describes the onset of this transition and applies again fully to the kinetic stage. This stage is practically identical to the late stage seen in simulations of plasma waves in the electron foreshock described by Dum (1990).

  6. Reactive Ion Etching of Polymers in Oxygen Based Plasmas: a Study of Etch Mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Sandra Wolterman

    The reactive ion etching of polymers has been studied in oxygen-based plasmas in an effort to understand the contributions of various mechanisms to the etching of these materials. Of the four active etch mechanisms; surface damage promoted etching, chemical sputtering, chemically enhanced physical sputtering, and direct reactive ion etching; the emphasis of this work has been on determining the relative contribution of direct reactive ion etching to the overall etching process. The etching of photoresist, polyimide, and amorphous carbon in O_2-CF_4 plasmas was studied in an asymmetrical reactive ion etcher at pressures ranging from 5 to 100 mtorr. Etch yield, ion flux, and oxygen atom concentration data were collected. The fit of this data to a linear model proposed by Joubert et al. (J. Appl. Phys., 65, 1989, 5096) was compared to the fit of the data to a nonlinear model proposed by the author. The linear model accounts for contribution due to three of the four etch mechanisms, but does not include contributions due to direct reactive ion etching. The nonlinear model accounts for contributions due to all four etch mechanisms. Experimental results indicate that the nonlinear model provides a better fit to the data than does the linear model. The relative contribution of direct reactive ion etching to the etching of photoresist ranges from 27% to 81% as the pressure decreases from 100 to 5 mtorr. Similar results are obtained for polyimide and amorphous carbon.

  7. Termination of a Magnetized Plasma on a Neutral Gas: The End of the Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. M.; Gekelman, W.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments are performed at the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device at UCLA to study the neutral boundary layer (NBL) between a magnetized plasma and a neutral gas along the direction of a confining magnetic field. This is the first experiment to measure plasma termination within a neutral gas without the presence of a wall or obstacle. A magnetized, current-free helium plasma created by a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathode terminates entirely within a neutral helium gas. The plasma is weakly ionized (ne/nn˜1%) and collisional λn≪Lplasma. The NBL occurs where the plasma pressure equilibrates with the neutral gas pressure, consistent with a pressure balance model. It is characterized by a field-aligned ambipolar electric field, developing self-consistently to maintain a current-free termination of the plasma on the neutral gas. Probes are inserted into the plasma to measure the plasma density, flow, temperature, current, and potential. These measurements confirm the presence of the ambipolar field and the pressure equilibration model of the NBL.

  8. Laser-induced gas plasma etching of fused silica under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhadj, Selim; Guss, Gabe; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Bass, Isaac

    2012-11-01

    Laser machining of optics to mitigate surface defects has greatly enhanced the ability to process large optics such as those found in fusion-class lasers. Recently, the use of assist reactive gases has shown promise in enhancing manifold etching rates relative to ambient conditions for CW-laser exposures. However, these methods still require significant heating of the substrate that induce residual stress, redeposit coverage, material flow, and compromise the final surface finish and damage threshold. While very reactive fluorinated gases are capable to reduce treatment temperatures even further, they are also inherently toxic and not readily transferable to large processing facilities. In this report, we look at whether a short-lived gas plasma could provide the safe and effective etchant sought, while still reducing the thermal load on the surface. We test this approach using a YAG laserinduced gas plasma to act as a source of the etchant for fused silica, a common optical material. The configuration and orientation of the beam and optical apparatus with respect to the surface was critical in preventing surface damage while etching the surface. Results with N2 and air gas plasmas are shown, along with a description of the various experimental implementations attempted.

  9. Fundamental limits on gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    In the plasma, the electrons do not react directly with the NOx molecules. The electrons collide mainly with the background gas molecules like N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Electron impact on these molecules result partly in dissociation reactions that produce reactive species like N, O and OH. The NOx in the engine exhaust gas initially consist mostly of NO. The ground state nitrogen atom, N, is the only species that could lead to the chemical reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. The O radical oxidizes NO to NO{sub 2} leaving the same amount of NOx. The OH radical converts NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. Acid products in the plasma can easily get adsorbed on surfaces in the plasma reactor and in the pipes. When undetected, the absence of these oxidation products can often be mistaken for chemical reduction of NOx. In this paper the authors will examine the gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx. They will show that under the best conditions, the plasma can chemically reduce 1.6 grams of NOx per brake-horsepower-hour [g(NOx)/bhp-hr] when 5% of the engine output energy is delivered to the plasma.

  10. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and change of cell viability induced by atmospheric pressure plasma in normal and cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja Kim, Sun; Min Joh, Hea; Chung, T. H.

    2013-10-01

    The effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. Using a detection dye, the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found to be increased in plasma-treated cells compared to non-treated and gas flow-treated cells. A significant overproduction of ROS and a reduction in cell viability were induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS, and cell viability was less changed. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as a cancer therapy.

  11. Non-thermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells via Production of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Rachel; Kalghatgi, Sameer; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Fridman, Gregory; Shereshevsky, Alexey; Torabi, Behzad; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Podolsky, Erica; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane; Brooks, Ari D.

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma may provide a novel approach to treat malignancies via induction of apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of DBD plasma to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells. Melanoma cells were exposed to plasma at doses that did not induce necrosis, and cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated by Trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining, caspase-3 cleavage, and TUNEL® analysis. Trypan blue staining revealed that non-thermal plasma treatment significantly decreased the viability of cells in a dose-dependent manner 3 and 24 h after plasma treatment. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed a significant increase in apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 24, 48, and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001). Caspase-3 cleavage was observed 48 h post-plasma treatment at a dose of 15 J/cm2. TUNEL® analysis of plasma-treated cells demonstrated an increase in apoptosis at 48 and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001) at a dose of 15 J/cm2. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, significantly decreased apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 5 and 15 J/cm2. Plasma treatment induces apoptosis in melanoma cells through a pathway that appears to be dependent on production of intracellular ROS. DBD plasma production of intracellular ROS leads to dose-dependent DNA damage in melanoma cells, detected by γ-H2AX, which was completely abrogated by pre-treating cells with ROS scavenger, NAC. Plasma-induced DNA damage in turn may lead to the observed plasma-induced apoptosis. Since plasma is non-thermal, it may be used to selectively treat malignancies. PMID:21046465

  12. Method for atmospheric pressure reactive atom plasma processing for surface modification

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Jeffrey W.

    2009-09-22

    Reactive atom plasma processing can be used to shape, polish, planarize and clean the surfaces of difficult materials with minimal subsurface damage. The apparatus and methods use a plasma torch, such as a conventional ICP torch. The workpiece and plasma torch are moved with respect to each other, whether by translating and/or rotating the workpiece, the plasma, or both. The plasma discharge from the torch can be used to shape, planarize, polish, and/or clean the surface of the workpiece, as well as to thin the workpiece. The processing may cause minimal or no damage to the workpiece underneath the surface, and may involve removing material from the surface of the workpiece.

  13. Effects of various reactive gas atmospheres on the properties of bio-oil using microwave pyrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass produces organic liquids (bio-oil), bio-char, water, and non-condensable gases. The non-condensable gas component typically contains syngas (H2, CO and CO2) as well as small hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H6, and C3H8). Tail Gas Reactive Pyrolysis (TGRP), a patent p...

  14. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  15. Reactive plasma upgrade of squalane - a heavy oil simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.; Detering, B.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-10-01

    U.S. light crude oil production has steadily declined over the last two decades. However, huge known heavy oil deposits in the North American continent remain largely untapped. In the past 10 years, the API gravity of crude oils has been decreasing by about 0.17% per year, and the sulfur content has been increasing by about 0.027% per year. As the API gravity of crude oil decreases, there will be an urgent need for economically viable new technologies to upgrade the heavy oil to a high API gravity feed stock for the refineries. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is investigating an innovative plasma process to upgrade heavy oil and refinery residuum. This paper will present some of the results and the implications of this technology for heavy oil upgrade and conversion.

  16. Reactive Plasma Nitriding of AL2O3 Powder in Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    Among advanced ceramics, aluminum nitride (AlN) had attracted much attention in the field of electrical and structural applications due to its outstanding properties. However, it is difficult to fabricate AlN coating by conventional thermal spray processes directly. Due to the thermal decomposition of feedstock AlN powder during spraying without a stable melting phase (which is required for deposition in thermal spray). Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) has been considered as a promising technology for in-situ formation of AlN thermally sprayed coatings. In this study the possibility of fabrication of AlN coating by reactive plasma nitriding of alumina (Al2O3) powder using N2/H2 plasma was investigated. It was possible to fabricate a cubic-AlN (c-AlN) based coating and the fabricated coating consists of c-AlN, α-Al2O3, Al5O6N and γ-Al2O3. It was difficult to understand the nitriding process from the fabricated coatings. Therefore, the Al2O3 powders were sprayed and collected in water. The microstructure observation of the collected powder and its cross section indicate that the reaction started from the surface. Thus, the sprayed particles were melted and reacted in high temperature reactive plasma and formed aluminum oxynitride which has cubic structure and easily nitride to c-AlN. During the coatings process the particles collide, flatten, and rapidly solidified on a substrate surface. The rapid solidification on the substrate surface due to the high quenching rate of the plasma flame prevents AlN crystal growth to form the hexagonal phase. Therefore, it was possible to fabricate c-AlN/Al2O3 based coatings through reactive plasma nitriding reaction of Al2O3 powder in thermal spray.

  17. Effect of plasma jet diameter on the efficiency of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kakuta, Maito; Furuta, Hiroshi; Akatsuka, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-06-01

    The plasma jet generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in solution is important in biology, medicine, and disinfection. Studies using a wide variety of plasma jet devices have been carried out for this purpose, making it difficult to compare the performance between devices. In this study, we compared the efficiency of RONS generation in deionized (DI) water between 3.7-mm- and 800-µm-sized helium (He) plasma jets (hereafter mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively) at different treatment distances and times. The efficiency of RONS generation was determined by considering the total amount of RONS generated in DI water with respect to the input energy and gas consumption. We found that the mm-jet generated 20% more RONS in the DI water than the µm-jet at the optimized distance. However, when the input power and He gas consumption were taken into account, we discovered that the µm-jet was 5 times more efficient in generating RONS in the DI water. Under the parameters investigated in this study, the concentration of RONS continued to increase as a function of treatment time (up to 30 min). However treatment distance had a marked effect on the efficiency of RONS generation: treatment distances of 25 and 30 mm were optimal for the mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively. Our method of comparing the efficiency of RONS generation in solution between plasma jets could be used as a reference protocol for the development of efficient plasma jet sources for use in medicine, biology, and agriculture.

  18. Miniaturized Argon Plasma: Neutral Gas Characteristics in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Farahat

    2015-10-01

    Plasma-neutral gas dynamics is computationally investigated in a miniaturized microthruster that encloses Ar and contains dielectric material sandwiched between two metal plates using a two-dimensional plasma mode. Spatial and temporal plasma properties are investigated by solving the Poisson equation with the conservation equations of charged and excited neutral plasma species using the COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2b. The microthruster property is found to depend on the secondary electron emission coefficient. The electrohydrodynamic force (EHD) is calculated and found to be significant in the sheath area near the dielectric layer and is found to affect gas flow dynamics including the Ar excimer formation and density. The effects of pressure and secondary emission coefficient are discussed. The plasma characteristics are affected by small changes in the secondary electron emission coefficient, which could result from the dielectric erosion and aging, and is found to affect the electrohydrodynamic force produced when the microthruster is used to produce thrust for a small spacecraft.

  19. Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of AlN Coatings: Influence of Aluminum Feedstock Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-03-01

    Feedstock powder characteristics (size distribution, morphology, shape, specific mass, and injection rate) are considered to be one of the key factors in controlling plasma-sprayed coatings microstructure and properties. The influence of feedstock powder characteristics to control the reaction and coatings microstructure in reactive plasma spraying process (RPS) is still unclear. This study, investigated the influence of feedstock particle size in RPS of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings, through plasma nitriding of aluminum (Al) feedstock powders. It was possible to fabricate AlN-based coatings through plasma nitriding of all kinds of Al powders in atmospheric plasma spray (APS) process. The nitriding ratio was improved with decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder, due to improving the nitriding reaction during flight. However, decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder suppressed the coatings thickness. Due to the loss of the powder during the injection, the excessive vaporization of fine Al particles and the completing nitriding reaction of some fine Al particles during flight. The feedstock particle size directly affects on the nitriding, melting, flowability, and the vaporization behaviors of Al powders during spraying. It concluded that using smaller particle size powders is useful for improving the nitriding ratio and not suitable for fabrication thick AlN coatings in reactive plasma spray process. To fabricate thick AlN coatings through RPS, enhancing the nitriding reaction of Al powders with large particle size during spraying is required.

  20. The interaction of atmospheric pressure plasma jets with cancer and normal cells: generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and changes of the cell proliferation and cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Hun; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Leem, Sun Hee

    2013-09-01

    The possibility of atmospheric pressure plasmas is emerging as a candidate in cancer therapy. The primary role is played by reactive oxygen species (ROS), UV photons, charged particles and electric fields. Among them, intracellular ROS induced by plasma are considered to be the key constituents that induce cellular changes and apoptosis. In this study, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. The plasma treatment was performed under different working gases, applied voltages, gas flow rates, and with and without additive oxygen flow. Using a detection dye, we observed that plasma exposure leads to the increase of the intracellular ROS and that the intracellular ROS production can be controlled by plasma parameters. A significant ROS generation was induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells and the overproduction of ROS contributes to the reduced cell proliferation. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS and cell proliferation was less changed. The plasma treatment also resulted in the alteration of the cell cycle that contributes to the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as cancer therapy. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea under Contract No. 2012R1A1A2002591 and 2012R1A1A3010213.

  1. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  2. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  3. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  4. Operation of Ferroelectric Plasma Sources in a Gas Discharge Mode

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2004-03-08

    Ferroelectric plasma sources in vacuum are known as sources of ablative plasma, formed due to surface discharge. In this paper, observations of a gas discharge mode of operation of the ferroelectric plasma sources (FPS) are reported. The gas discharge appears at pressures between approximately 20 and approximately 80 Torr. At pressures of 1-20 Torr, there is a transition from vacuum surface discharge to the gas discharge, when both modes coexist and the surface discharges sustain the gas discharge. At pressures between 20 and 80 Torr, the surface discharges are suppressed, and FPS operate in pure gas discharge mode, with the formation of almost uniform plasma along the entire surface of the ceramics between strips. The density of the expanding plasma is estimated to be about 1013 cm-3 at a distance of 5.5 mm from the surface. The power consumption of the discharge is comparatively low, making it useful for various applications. This paper also presents direct measurements of the yield of secondary electron emission from ferroelectric ceramics, which, at low energies of primary electrons, is high and dependent on the polarization of the ferroelectric material

  5. Supramolecular reactivity in the gas phase: investigating the intrinsic properties of non-covalent complexes.

    PubMed

    Cera, Luca; Schalley, Christoph A

    2014-03-21

    The high vacuum inside a mass spectrometer offers unique conditions to broaden our view on the reactivity of supramolecules. Because dynamic exchange processes between complexes are efficiently suppressed, the intrinsic and intramolecular reactivity of the complexes of interest is observed. Besides this, the significantly higher strength of non-covalent interactions in the absence of competing solvent allows processes to occur that are unable to compete in solution. The present review highlights a series of examples illustrating different aspects of supramolecular gas-phase reactivity ranging from the dissociation and formation of covalent bonds in non-covalent complexes through the reactivity in the restricted inner phase of container molecules and step-by-step mechanistic studies of organocatalytic reaction cycles to cage contraction reactions, processes induced by electron capture, and finally dynamic molecular motion within non-covalent complexes as unravelled by hydrogen-deuterium exchange processes performed in the gas phase. PMID:24435245

  6. Polar Effects Control the Gas-phase Reactivity of Charged para-Benzyne Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wittrig, Ashley M.; Archibold, Enada F.; Sheng, Huaming; Nash, John J.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2014-01-01

    The gas-phase reactivity of charged para-benzynes is entirely unexplored as they and/or their precursors tend to undergo ring-opening upon their generation. We report here a gas-phase reactivity study of two such benzynes, the 2,5-didehydropyridinium and 5,8-didehydroisoquinolinium cations, generated in a modified dual-linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer. Both biradicals were found to form diagnostic products with organic molecules, indicating the presence of two radical sites. As opposed to earlier predictions that the singlet-triplet (S-T) splitting controls the radical reactivity of such species, the 2,5-didehydropyridinium cation reacts much faster in spite of its larger S-T splitting. Calculated vertical electron affinities of the radical sites of the para-benzynes, a parameter related to the polarity of the transition states of their reactions, appears to be the most important reactivity controlling factor. PMID:25838787

  7. Calcium influx through TRP channels induced by short-lived reactive species in plasma-irradiated solution.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Non-equilibrium helium atmospheric-pressure plasma (He-APP), which allows for a strong non-equilibrium chemical reaction of O2 and N2 in ambient air, uniquely produces multiple extremely reactive products, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), in plasma-irradiated solution. We herein show that relatively short-lived unclassified reactive species (i.e., deactivated within approximately 10 min) generated by the He-APP irradiation can trigger physiologically relevant Ca(2+) influx through ruthenium red- and SKF 96365-sensitive Ca(2+)-permeable channel(s), possibly transient receptor potential channel family member(s). Our results provide novel insight into understanding of the interactions between cells and plasmas and the mechanism by which cells detect plasma-induced chemically reactive species, in addition to facilitating development of plasma applications in medicine. PMID:27169489

  8. Calcium influx through TRP channels induced by short-lived reactive species in plasma-irradiated solution

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Non-equilibrium helium atmospheric-pressure plasma (He-APP), which allows for a strong non-equilibrium chemical reaction of O2 and N2 in ambient air, uniquely produces multiple extremely reactive products, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), in plasma-irradiated solution. We herein show that relatively short-lived unclassified reactive species (i.e., deactivated within approximately 10 min) generated by the He-APP irradiation can trigger physiologically relevant Ca2+ influx through ruthenium red- and SKF 96365-sensitive Ca2+-permeable channel(s), possibly transient receptor potential channel family member(s). Our results provide novel insight into understanding of the interactions between cells and plasmas and the mechanism by which cells detect plasma-induced chemically reactive species, in addition to facilitating development of plasma applications in medicine. PMID:27169489

  9. Process controllability of inductively coupled plasma-enhanced reactive sputter deposition for the fabrication of amorphous InGaZnOx channel thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Nakata, Keitaro; Otani, Hirofumi; Osaki, Soichiro; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The process controllability of inductively coupled plasma-enhanced reactive sputter deposition for the fabrication of amorphous InGaZnOx (a-IGZO) channel thin-film transistors (TFTs) was investigated. a-IGZO film deposition with the addition of H2 gas was performed using a plasma-assisted reactive sputtering system to control the oxidation process during a-IGZO film formation by balancing the oxidation and reduction reactions. Optical emission spectroscopy measurements indicate the possibility for the oxidation reaction to be inhibited by a decrease in the density of oxygen atoms and the reduction effect of hydrogen during a-IGZO film deposition due to the addition of H2 gas. The characteristics of TFTs fabricated using a-IGZO films deposited with a plasma-enhanced magnetron sputtering deposition system were investigated. The results indicate the possibility of expanding the process window by controlling the balance between oxidation and reduction with the addition of H2 gas. TFTs with a-IGZO films that were deposited with the addition of H2 gas exhibited good performance with a field-effect mobility (μFE) of 15.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 and a subthreshold gate voltage swing (S) of 0.48 V decade-1.

  10. From nucleation to nanowires: a single-step process in reactive plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Levchenko, Igor; Cvelbar, Uros; Sunkara, Mahendra; Mozetic, Miran

    2010-10-01

    This feature article introduces a deterministic approach for the rapid, single-step, direct synthesis of metal oxide nanowires. This approach is based on the exposure of thin metal samples to reactive oxygen plasmas and does not require any intervening processing or external substrate heating. The critical roles of the reactive oxygen plasmas, surface processes, and plasma-surface interactions that enable this growth are critically examined by using a deterministic viewpoint. The essentials of the experimental procedures and reactor design are presented and related to the key process requirements. The nucleation and growth kinetics is discussed for typical solid-liquid-solid and vapor-solid-solid mechanisms related to the synthesis of the oxide nanowires of metals with low (Ga, Cd) and high (Fe) melting points, respectively. Numerical simulations are focused on the possibility to predict the nanowire nucleation points through the interaction of the plasma radicals and ions with the nanoscale morphological features on the surface, as well as to control the localized 'hot spots' that in turn determine the nanowire size and shape. This generic approach can be applied to virtually any oxide nanoscale system and further confirms the applicability of the plasma nanoscience approaches for deterministic nanoscale synthesis and processing. PMID:20721365

  11. Non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma induces angiogenesis through reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2012-01-01

    Vascularization plays a key role in processes such as wound healing and tissue engineering. Non-thermal plasma, which primarily produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), has recently emerged as an efficient tool in medical applications including blood coagulation, sterilization and malignant cell apoptosis. Liquids and porcine aortic endothelial cells were treated with a non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in vitro. Plasma treatment of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and serum-free medium increased ROS concentration in a dose-dependent manner, with a higher concentration observed in serum-free medium compared with PBS. Species concentration inside cells peaked 1 h after treatment, followed by a decrease 3 h post treatment. Endothelial cells treated with a plasma dose of 4.2 J cm–2 had 1.7 times more cells than untreated samples 5 days after plasma treatment. The 4.2 J cm–2 plasma dose increased two-dimensional migration distance by 40 per cent compared with untreated control, while the number of cells that migrated through a three-dimensional collagen gel increased by 15 per cent. Tube formation was also enhanced by plasma treatment, with tube lengths in plasma-treated samples measuring 2.6 times longer than control samples. A fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) neutralizing antibody and ROS scavengers abrogated these angiogenic effects. These data indicate that plasma enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation is due to FGF-2 release induced by plasma-produced ROS. Non-thermal plasma may be used as a potential tool for applying ROS in precise doses to enhance vascularization. PMID:21653568

  12. Preparation of superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O films by a reactive plasma evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Kazuo; Eguchi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Toyonobu; Akashi, Kazuo

    1988-04-01

    Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting films were prepared by a reactive plasma evaporation method, in which mixed powders were coevaporated in a thermal RF Ar + O2 plasma, and the ternary-composition controlled high-temperature metallic vapors were codeposited onto a substrate. The deposition rate was much more than 10 micron/min, which is several orders of magnitude higher than those reported for other methods. The structure of the prepared films was identified as an orthorhombic oxygen-deficient perovskite phase, and some films showed the preferred orientation of (001). The as-deposited film without postannealing showed a superconducting transition temperature Tcm (midpoint) of 94 K.

  13. Rapid Fabrication of Lightweight SiC Optics using Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, Peter S.

    2006-01-01

    Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) processing is a non-contact, plasma-based processing technology that can be used to generate damage-free optical surfaces. We have developed tools and processes using RAP that allow us to shape extremely lightweight mirror Surfaces made from extremely hard-to-machine materials (e.g. SiC). We will describe our latest results using RAP in combination with other technologies to produce finished lightweight SiC mirrors and also discuss applications for RAP in the rapid fabrication of mirror segments for reflective and grazing incidence telescopes.

  14. Properties of AlN films deposited by reactive ion-plasma sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Bert, N. A.; Bondarev, A. D.; Zolotarev, V. V.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Lubyanskiy, Ya. V.; Lyutetskiy, A. V.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Petrunov, A. N.; Pikhtin, N. A. Ayusheva, K. R.; Arsentyev, I. N.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2015-10-15

    The properties of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and AlN dielectric coatings deposited by reactive ion-plasma sputtering are studied. The refractive indices of the dielectric coatings are determined by optical ellipsometry. It is shown that aluminum nitride is the optimal material for achieving maximum illumination of the output mirror of a semiconductor laser. A crystalline phase with a hexagonal atomic lattice and oxygen content of up to 10 at % is found by transmission electron microscopy in the aluminum-nitride films. It is found that a decrease in the concentration of residual oxygen in the chamber of the reactive ion-plasma sputtering installation makes it possible to eliminate the appearance of vertical pores in the bulk of the aluminum-nitride film.

  15. Etching characteristics of LiNbO{sub 3} in reactive ion etching and inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Z.; Yu, S.; Heard, P. J.; Marshall, J. M.; Thomas, P. A.

    2008-02-01

    The etching characteristics of congruent LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals including doped LiNbO{sub 3} and proton-changed LiNbO{sub 3} have been studied in reactive ion etching (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching tools, using different recipes of gas mixtures. The effects of parameters including working pressure, RIE power, and ICP power are investigated and analyzed by measurement of etching depth, selectivity, uniformity, etched surface state, and sidewall profile by means of focused ion beam etching, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. The effects of a sample carrier wafer coating have also been investigated. Optimized processes with high etching rates, good mask selectivity, and a near-vertical profile have been achieved. Ridge waveguides on proton-exchanged LiNbO{sub 3} have been fabricated and optically measured.

  16. Direct evidence of reactive ion etching induced damages in Ge2Sb2Te5 based on different halogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juntao; Xia, Yangyang; Liu, Bo; Feng, Gaoming; Song, Zhitang; Gao, Dan; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Weiwei; Chan, Yipeng; Feng, Songlin

    2016-08-01

    Chalcogenide glasses based on Ge-Te-Sb are processed using reactive ion etching (RIE) in the fabrication of phase change memory (PCM). These materials are known to be halogenated easily and apt to be damaged when exposed to halogen gas based plasmas which can cause severe halogenation-induced degradation. In this paper, we investigate the RIE induced damage of popular phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) in different halogen based plasmas (CF4, Cl2 and HBr) highly diluted by argon. After blanket etching, results of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy directly showed that the surface of Cl2 etched samples were roughest with a Ge deficient damaged layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to investigate the chemical shift of constituent elements. Selected scans over the valence band peaks of Te 3d revealed that electrons were transferred from chalcogenide to halogen and the highest halogenation was observed on the GST etched by CF4. The GST films masked with patterned TiN were also etched. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and surface scan directly showed the line profile and the damaged layer. Almost vertical and smooth sidewall without damaged layer makes HBr a promising gas for GST etch in the fabrication of high-density memory devices.

  17. The sub-micron hole array in sapphire produced by inductively-coupled plasma reactive ion etching.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Ming-Hua; Chang, Chun-Ming; Huang, Su-Wei; Lee, Chao-Te; Wu, Tzung-Chen; Hsueh, Wen-Jeng; Ma, Kung-Jeng; Chiang, Donyau

    2012-02-01

    The sub-micron hole array in a sapphire substrate was fabricated by using nanosphere lithography (NSL) combined with inductively-coupled-plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) technique. Polystyrene nanospheres of about 600 nm diameter were self-assembled on c-plane sapphire substrates by the spin-coating method. The diameter of polystyrene nanosphere was modified by using oxygen plasma in ICP-RIE system. The size of nanosphere modified by oxygen plasma was varied from 550 to 450 nm with different etching times from 15 to 35 s. The chromium thin film of 100 nm thick was then deposited on the shrunk nanospheres on the substrate by electron-beam evaporation system. The honeycomb type chromium mask can be obtained on the sapphire substrate after the polystyrene nanospheres were removed. The substrate was further etched in two sets of chlorine/Argon and boron trichloride/Argon mixture gases at constant pressure of 50 mTorr in ICP-RIE processes. The 400 nm hole array in diameter can be successfully produced under suitable boron trichloride/Argon gas flow ratio. PMID:22630019

  18. Development of voids in pulsed and CW- driven reactive plasmas with large nanoparticle density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, I.; Sikimić, B.; Aschinger, A.; Berndt, J.; Kovačević, E.; Winter, J.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution deals with the nanoparticle distribution inside of plasma with large nanoparticle density. In particular, the formation of voids i.e. dust-free regions in pulsed and CW discharge regime is analyzed. The discharge was ignited in a mixture of argon and acetylene in the conditions favorable for nanoparticles’ formation and growth. The temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of nanoparticles during their growth is studied experimentally by means of a laser light scattering technique. The experimental results show that the void expands much faster in the case of pulsed plasma than in the CW plasma operated for the same gas mixture and at the same (average) input power. In the CW plasma, we observed a rapid expansion of the void after some tens of minutes, whereas the corresponding process in the pulsed plasma occurred after some tens of seconds.

  19. Gas laser with dual plasma mixing

    DOEpatents

    Pinnaduwage, L.A.

    1999-04-06

    A gas laser includes an enclosure forming a first chamber, a second chamber and a lasing chamber which communicates through a first opening to the first chamber and through a second opening to the second chamber. The lasing chamber has a pair of reflectors defining a Fabry-Perot cavity. Separate inlets enable different gases to be introduced into the first and second chambers. A first cathode within the first chamber is provided to produce positive ions which travel into the lasing chamber and a second cathode of a pin-hollow type within the second chamber is provided to produce negative ions which travel into the lasing chamber. A third inlet introduces a molecular gas into the lasing chamber, where the molecular gas becomes excited by the positive and negative ions and emits light which lases in the Fabry-Perot cavity. 2 figs.

  20. Gas laser with dual plasma mixing

    DOEpatents

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.

    1999-01-01

    A gas laser includes an enclosure forming a first chamber, a second chamber and a lasing chamber which communicates through a first opening to the first chamber and through a second opening to the second chamber. The lasing chamber has a pair of reflectors defining a Fabry-Perot cavity. Separate inlets enable different gases to be introduced into the first and second chambers. A first cathode within the first chamber is provided to produce positive ions which travel into the lasing chamber and a second cathode of a pin-hollow type within the second chamber is provided to produce negative ions which travel into the lasing chamber. A third inlet introduces a molecular gas into the lasing chamber, where the molecular gas becomes excited by the positive and negative ions and emits light which lases in the Fabry-Perot cavity.

  1. Carbon dioxide as working gas for laboratory plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, R.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements with a RF probe, retarding potential analyzer and mass spectrometer in a laboratory plasma tank were performed using the gases CO2, N2, A and He in order to compare their properties as working gases for laboratory plasma production. The overall result of that CO2 leads to higher plasma densities at lower neutral-gas pressures as well as to a larger Maxwellian component of the electron population, while the electron temperature is lower than that when N2, A and He are used.

  2. Reactive Gas transport in soil: Kinetics versus Local Equilibrium Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Jia, Ruijan

    2010-05-01

    Gas transport through the unsaturated soil zone was studied using an analytical solution of the gas transport model that is mathematically equivalent to the Two-Region model. The gas transport model includes diffusive and convective gas fluxes, interphase mass transfer between the gas and water phase, and biodegradation. The influence of non-equilibrium phenomena, spatially variable initial conditions, and transient boundary conditions are studied. The objective of this paper is to compare the kinetic approach for interphase mass transfer with the standard local equilibrium approach and to find conditions and time-scales under which the local equilibrium approach is justified. The time-scale of investigation was limited to the day-scale, because this is the relevant scale for understanding gas emission from the soil zone with transient water saturation. For the first time a generalized mass transfer coefficient is proposed that justifies the often used steady-state Thin-Film mass transfer coefficient for small and medium water-saturated aggregates of about 10 mm. The main conclusion from this study is that non-equilibrium mass transfer depends strongly on the temporal and small-scale spatial distribution of water within the unsaturated soil zone. For regions with low water saturation and small water-saturated aggregates (radius about 1 mm) the local equilibrium approach can be used as a first approximation for diffusive gas transport. For higher water saturation and medium radii of water-saturated aggregates (radius about 10 mm) and for convective gas transport, the non-equilibrium effect becomes more and more important if the hydraulic residence time and the Damköhler number decrease. Relative errors can range up to 100% and more. While for medium radii the local equilibrium approach describes the main features both of the spatial concentration profile and the time-dependence of the emission rate, it fails completely for larger aggregates (radius about 100 mm

  3. Space charge sheath in plasma-neutral gas interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramani, N.; Mattoo, S. K.

    1986-04-01

    A space charge sheath is found to be formed whenever a high-velocity magnetized plasma stream penetrates a gas cloud. The sheath is always located at the head of the plasma stream, and its thickness is very small compared to the length of the plasma stream. Soon after the sheath is formed it quickly slows down to the Alfven critical velocity. The plasma behind the sheath continues to move at higher velocity until the whole plasma stream is retarded to the critical velocity. In the interaction at gas density of about 10 to the 19th/cu cm, the sheaths are observed to be accompanied by a single loop of current with current density of about 10,000 A/sq m. Maximum potential in the sheath ranges between 50 and 200 V. Presently available models for the sheath may explain the initiation of the sheath formation. Physical processes like heating of the electrons and ionization of the gas cloud which come into play at a later stage of the interaction are not included in these models. These processes considerably alter the potential structure in the sheath region. A schematic model of the observed sheath is presented. Experiments reveal a threshold value of the magnetic field for plasma retardation to occur. This seems to correspond to the threshold condition for excitation of the modified two-stream instability, which can lead to the electron heating. The observed currents are found sufficient to account for the plasma retardation at a gas density of about 10 to the 17th/cu m.

  4. A photoluminescence study of plasma reactive ion etching-induced damage in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouffak, Z.; Bensaoula, A.; Trombetta, L.

    2014-11-01

    GaN films with reactive ion etching (RIE) induced damage were analyzed using photoluminescence (PL). We observed band-edge as well as donor-acceptor peaks with associated phonon replicas, all in agreement with previous studies. While both the control and damaged samples have their band-edge peak location change with temperature following the Varshni formula, its intensity however decreases with damage while the D—A peak increases considerably. Nitrogen post-etch plasma was shown to improve the band edge peak and decrease the D—A peak. This suggests that the N2 plasma has helped reduce the number of trapped carriers that were participating in the D—A transition and made the D°X transition more active, which reaffirms the N2 post-etch plasma treatment as a good technique to heal the GaN surface, most likely by filling the nitrogen vacancies previously created by etch damage.

  5. Modeling carbon nanotube growth on the catalyst-substrate surface subjected to reactive plasma [

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2014-06-15

    The paper presents a theoretical model to study the growth of the carbon nanotube (CNT) on the catalyst substrate surface subjected to reactive plasma. The charging rate of the CNT, kinetics of electron, ions and neutral atoms, the growth rate of the CNT because of diffusion and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle inclusion of the issue of the plasma sheath is undertaken in the present model. Numerical calculations on the effect of ion density and temperature and the substrate bias on the growth of the CNT have been carried out for typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that the height of CNT increases with the ion density of carbon ions and radius of CNT decreases with hydrogen ion density. The substrate bias also affects the growth rate of the CNT. The field emission characteristics from the CNTs can be analyzed from the results obtained.

  6. Water-Gas Shift and Methane Reactivity on Reducible Perovskite-Type Oxides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Comparative (electro)catalytic, structural, and spectroscopic studies in hydrogen electro-oxidation, the (inverse) water-gas shift reaction, and methane conversion on two representative mixed ionic–electronic conducting perovskite-type materials La0.6Sr0.4FeO3−δ (LSF) and SrTi0.7Fe0.3O3−δ (STF) were performed with the aim of eventually correlating (electro)catalytic activity and associated structural changes and to highlight intrinsic reactivity characteristics as a function of the reduction state. Starting from a strongly prereduced (vacancy-rich) initial state, only (inverse) water-gas shift activity has been observed on both materials beyond ca. 450 °C but no catalytic methane reforming or methane decomposition reactivity up to 600 °C. In contrast, when starting from the fully oxidized state, total methane oxidation to CO2 was observed on both materials. The catalytic performance of both perovskite-type oxides is thus strongly dependent on the degree/depth of reduction, on the associated reactivity of the remaining lattice oxygen, and on the reduction-induced oxygen vacancies. The latter are clearly more reactive toward water on LSF, and this higher reactivity is linked to the superior electrocatalytic performance of LSF in hydrogen oxidation. Combined electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman measurements in turn also revealed altered surface and bulk structures and reactivities. PMID:26045733

  7. Gas Effect On Plasma Dynamics Of Laser Ablation Zinc Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T.; Lafane, S.; Malek, S.

    2008-09-01

    In order to synthesis zinc oxide thin films and nanostructures, laser ablation of ZnO target into both vacuum and oxygen atmosphere was performed. The gas effect on the plume dynamics was studied for O2 pressures varied between 10-2 to 70 mbar. Plasma plume evolution was investigated by ICCD camera fast imaging. The plasma was created by a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) at a fluence of 2 J/cm2. The light emitted by the plume was observed along the perpendicular to the ejection direction through a fast intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). We have found that the plasma dynamics is very affected by the gas pressures. The photographs reveal the stratification of plasma into slow and fast components for 0.5 mbar O2 pressures and beyond. The photographs also show the apparition of hydrodynamic instabilities which are related to chemical reactions between the plasma and the surrounding gas for a certain range of pressures.

  8. Gas Effect On Plasma Dynamics Of Laser Ablation Zinc Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T.; Lafane, S.; Malek, S.

    2008-09-23

    In order to synthesis zinc oxide thin films and nanostructures, laser ablation of ZnO target into both vacuum and oxygen atmosphere was performed. The gas effect on the plume dynamics was studied for O{sub 2} pressures varied between 10{sup -2} to 70 mbar. Plasma plume evolution was investigated by ICCD camera fast imaging. The plasma was created by a KrF excimer laser ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} = 25 ns) at a fluence of 2 J/cm{sup 2}. The light emitted by the plume was observed along the perpendicular to the ejection direction through a fast intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). We have found that the plasma dynamics is very affected by the gas pressures. The photographs reveal the stratification of plasma into slow and fast components for 0.5 mbar O{sub 2} pressures and beyond. The photographs also show the apparition of hydrodynamic instabilities which are related to chemical reactions between the plasma and the surrounding gas for a certain range of pressures.

  9. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  10. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  11. Co-processing of agricultural plastic waste and switchgrass via tail gas reactive pyrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixtures of agricultural plastic waste in the form of polyethylene hay bale covers (PE) (4-37%) and switchgrass were investigated using the US Department of Agriculture’s tail gas reactive pyrolysis (TGRP) at different temperatures (400-570 deg C). TGRP of switchgrass and plastic mixtures significan...

  12. Mathematical model of gas plasma applied to chronic wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Zhang, Y. T.

    2013-11-15

    Chronic wounds are a major burden for worldwide health care systems, and patients suffer pain and discomfort from this type of wound. Recently gas plasmas have been shown to safely speed chronic wounds healing. In this paper, we develop a deterministic mathematical model formulated by eight-species reaction-diffusion equations, and use it to analyze the plasma treatment process. The model follows spatial and temporal concentration within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix material, nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory cell. Two effects of plasma, increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load, are considered in this model. The plasma treatment decreases the complete healing time from 25 days (normal wound healing) to 17 days, and the contributions of increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load are about 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Increasing plasma treatment frequency from twice to three times per day accelerates healing process. Finally, the response of chronic wounds of different etiologies to treatment with gas plasmas is analyzed.

  13. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    Herceg, Zoran; Kovačević, Danijela Bursać; Kljusurić, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zorić, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds. PMID:26213024

  14. Mathematical model of gas plasma applied to chronic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Zhang, Y. T.

    2013-11-01

    Chronic wounds are a major burden for worldwide health care systems, and patients suffer pain and discomfort from this type of wound. Recently gas plasmas have been shown to safely speed chronic wounds healing. In this paper, we develop a deterministic mathematical model formulated by eight-species reaction-diffusion equations, and use it to analyze the plasma treatment process. The model follows spatial and temporal concentration within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix material, nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory cell. Two effects of plasma, increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load, are considered in this model. The plasma treatment decreases the complete healing time from 25 days (normal wound healing) to 17 days, and the contributions of increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load are about 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Increasing plasma treatment frequency from twice to three times per day accelerates healing process. Finally, the response of chronic wounds of different etiologies to treatment with gas plasmas is analyzed.

  15. Reactive hydroxyl radical-driven oral bacterial inactivation by radio frequency atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung Kil; Choi, Myeong Yeol; Koo, Il Gyo; Kim, Paul Y.; Kim, Yoonsun; Kim, Gon Jun; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H.; Collins, George J.; Lee, Jae Koo

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrated bacterial (Streptococcus mutans) inactivation by a radio frequency power driven atmospheric pressure plasma torch with H2O2 entrained in the feedstock gas. Optical emission spectroscopy identified substantial excited state •OH generation inside the plasma and relative •OH formation was verified by optical absorption. The bacterial inactivation rate increased with increasing •OH generation and reached a maximum 5-log10 reduction with 0.6% H2O2 vapor. Generation of large amounts of toxic ozone is drawback of plasma bacterial inactivation, thus it is significant that the ozone concentration falls within recommended safe allowable levels with addition of H2O2 vapor to the plasma.

  16. Reactive hydroxyl radical-driven oral bacterial inactivation by radio frequency atmospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sung Kil; Lee, Jae Koo; Choi, Myeong Yeol; Koo, Il Gyo; Kim, Paul Y.; Kim, Yoonsun; Kim, Gon Jun; Collins, George J.; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H.

    2011-04-04

    We demonstrated bacterial (Streptococcus mutans) inactivation by a radio frequency power driven atmospheric pressure plasma torch with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} entrained in the feedstock gas. Optical emission spectroscopy identified substantial excited state OH generation inside the plasma and relative OH formation was verified by optical absorption. The bacterial inactivation rate increased with increasing OH generation and reached a maximum 5-log{sub 10} reduction with 0.6%H{sub 2}O{sub 2} vapor. Generation of large amounts of toxic ozone is drawback of plasma bacterial inactivation, thus it is significant that the ozone concentration falls within recommended safe allowable levels with addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} vapor to the plasma.

  17. Gas breakdown and plasma impedance in split-ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Parsons, Stephen; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2016-02-01

    The appearance of resonant structures in metamaterials coupled to plasmas motivates the systematic investigation of gas breakdown and plasma impedance in split-ring resonators over a frequency range of 0.5-9 GHz. In co-planar electrode gaps of 100 μm, the breakdown voltage amplitude decreases from 280 V to 225 V over this frequency range in atmospheric argon. At the highest frequency, a microplasma can be sustained using only 2 mW of power. At 20 mW, we measure a central electron density of 2 × 1020 m-3. The plasma-electrode overlap plays a key role in the microplasma impedance and causes the sheath impedance to dominate the plasma resistance at very low power levels. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  18. Iridium single atom tips fabricated by field assisted reactive gas etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John A.; Urban, Radovan; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2016-03-01

    We present a simple, reliable method to fabricate Ir single atom tips (SATs) from polycrystalline wire. An electrochemical etch in CaCl2 solution is followed by a field assisted reactive gas etch in vacuum at room temperature using oxygen as an etching gas and neon as an imaging gas. Once formed, SATs are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures and their underlying structure is examined through evaporation of the apex atoms. Furthermore, a method is developed to repair Ir SATs at liquid nitrogen temperatures when apex atoms evaporate. This method may be used to fabricate Ir SAT ion sources.

  19. NiCr etching in a reactive gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.; Boucher, R.; Morgenroth, W.; Meyer, H. G.

    2007-05-15

    The authors have etched NiCr through a resist mask using Cl/Ar based chemistry in an electron cyclotron resonance etch system. The optimum gas mixture and etch parameters were found for various ratios of Ni to Cr, based on the etch rate, redeposits, and the etch ratio to the mask. The introduction of O{sub 2} into the chamber, which is often used in the etching of Cr, served to both increase and decrease the etch rate depending explicitly on the etching parameters. Etch rates of >50 nm min{sup -1} and ratios of >1 (NiCr:Mask) were achieved for NiCr (80:20). Pattern transfer from the mask into the NiCr was achieved with a high fidelity and without redeposits for a Cl/Ar mix of 10% Ar (90% Cl{sub 2}) at an etch rate of {approx_equal}50 nm min{sup -1} and a ratio of 0.42 (NiCr:ZEP 7000 e-beam mask)

  20. Intracellular ROS mediates gas plasma-facilitated cellular transfection in 2D and 3D cultures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dehui; Wang, Biqing; Xu, Yujing; Chen, Zeyu; Cui, Qinjie; Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a versatile tool for delivering oligonucleotides into mammalian cells. Compared to lipofection and electroporation methods, plasma transfection showed a better uptake efficiency and less cell death in the transfection of oligonucleotides. We demonstrated that the level of extracellular aqueous reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gas plasma is correlated with the uptake efficiency and that this is achieved through an increase of intracellular ROS levels and the resulting increase in cell membrane permeability. This finding was supported by the use of ROS scavengers, which reduced CAP-based uptake efficiency. In addition, we found that cold atmospheric plasma could transfer oligonucleotides such as siRNA and miRNA into cells even in 3D cultures, thus suggesting the potential for unique applications of CAP beyond those provided by standard transfection techniques. Together, our results suggest that cold plasma might provide an efficient technique for the delivery of siRNA and miRNA in 2D and 3D culture models. PMID:27296089

  1. Intracellular ROS mediates gas plasma-facilitated cellular transfection in 2D and 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Wang, Biqing; Xu, Yujing; Chen, Zeyu; Cui, Qinjie; Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a versatile tool for delivering oligonucleotides into mammalian cells. Compared to lipofection and electroporation methods, plasma transfection showed a better uptake efficiency and less cell death in the transfection of oligonucleotides. We demonstrated that the level of extracellular aqueous reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gas plasma is correlated with the uptake efficiency and that this is achieved through an increase of intracellular ROS levels and the resulting increase in cell membrane permeability. This finding was supported by the use of ROS scavengers, which reduced CAP-based uptake efficiency. In addition, we found that cold atmospheric plasma could transfer oligonucleotides such as siRNA and miRNA into cells even in 3D cultures, thus suggesting the potential for unique applications of CAP beyond those provided by standard transfection techniques. Together, our results suggest that cold plasma might provide an efficient technique for the delivery of siRNA and miRNA in 2D and 3D culture models. PMID:27296089

  2. Is gas-discharge plasma a new solution to the old problem of biofilm inactivation?

    PubMed

    Joaquin, Jonathan C; Kwan, Calvin; Abramzon, Nina; Vandervoort, Kurt; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2009-03-01

    Conventional disinfection and sterilization methods are often ineffective with biofilms, which are ubiquitous, hard-to-destroy microbial communities embedded in a matrix mostly composed of exopolysaccharides. The use of gas-discharge plasmas represents an alternative method, since plasmas contain a mixture of charged particles, chemically reactive species and UV radiation, whose decontamination potential for free-living, planktonic micro-organisms is well established. In this study, biofilms were produced using Chromobacterium violaceum, a Gram-negative bacterium present in soil and water and used in this study as a model organism. Biofilms were subjected to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet for different exposure times. Our results show that 99.6 % of culturable cells are inactivated after a 5 min treatment. The survivor curve shows double-slope kinetics with a rapid initial decline in c.f.u. ml(-1) followed by a much slower decline with D values that are longer than those for the inactivation of planktonic organisms, suggesting a more complex inactivation mechanism for biofilms. DNA and ATP determinations together with atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy show that non-culturable cells are still alive after short plasma exposure times. These results indicate the potential of plasma for biofilm inactivation and suggest that cells go through a sequential set of physiological and morphological changes before inactivation. PMID:19246743

  3. Impact of surface structure and feed gas composition on Bacillus subtilis endospore inactivation during direct plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Christian; Steins, Veronika; Reineke, Kai; Rademacher, Antje; Klocke, Michael; Rauh, Cornelia; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the inactivation efficiency of cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on Bacillus subtilis endospores dependent on the used feed gas composition and on the surface, the endospores were attached on. Glass petri-dishes, glass beads, and peppercorns were inoculated with the same endospore density and treated with a radio frequency plasma jet. Generated reactive species were detected using optical emission spectroscopy. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based ratio detection system was established to monitor the DNA damage during the plasma treatment. Argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen as feed gas emitted the highest amounts of UV-C photons and considerable amount of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Plasma generated with argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen was characterized by the highest emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas the UV-C emission was negligible. The use of pure argon showed a negligible emission of UV photons and atomic oxygen, however, the emission of vacuum (V)UV photons was assumed. Similar maximum inactivation results were achieved for the three feed gas compositions. The surface structure had a significant impact on the inactivation efficiency of the plasma treatment. The maximum inactivation achieved was between 2.4 and 2.8 log10 on glass petri-dishes and 3.9 to 4.6 log10 on glass beads. The treatment of peppercorns resulted in an inactivation lower than 1.0 log10. qPCR results showed a significant DNA damage for all gas compositions. Pure argon showed the highest results for the DNA damage ratio values, followed by argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen. In case of argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen the inactivation seems to be dominated by the action of ROS. These findings indicate the significant role of VUV and UV photons in the inactivation process of B. subtilis endospores. PMID:26300855

  4. Impact of surface structure and feed gas composition on Bacillus subtilis endospore inactivation during direct plasma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hertwig, Christian; Steins, Veronika; Reineke, Kai; Rademacher, Antje; Klocke, Michael; Rauh, Cornelia; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the inactivation efficiency of cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on Bacillus subtilis endospores dependent on the used feed gas composition and on the surface, the endospores were attached on. Glass petri-dishes, glass beads, and peppercorns were inoculated with the same endospore density and treated with a radio frequency plasma jet. Generated reactive species were detected using optical emission spectroscopy. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based ratio detection system was established to monitor the DNA damage during the plasma treatment. Argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen as feed gas emitted the highest amounts of UV-C photons and considerable amount of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Plasma generated with argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen was characterized by the highest emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas the UV-C emission was negligible. The use of pure argon showed a negligible emission of UV photons and atomic oxygen, however, the emission of vacuum (V)UV photons was assumed. Similar maximum inactivation results were achieved for the three feed gas compositions. The surface structure had a significant impact on the inactivation efficiency of the plasma treatment. The maximum inactivation achieved was between 2.4 and 2.8 log10 on glass petri-dishes and 3.9 to 4.6 log10 on glass beads. The treatment of peppercorns resulted in an inactivation lower than 1.0 log10. qPCR results showed a significant DNA damage for all gas compositions. Pure argon showed the highest results for the DNA damage ratio values, followed by argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen. In case of argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen the inactivation seems to be dominated by the action of ROS. These findings indicate the significant role of VUV and UV photons in the inactivation process of B. subtilis endospores. PMID:26300855

  5. Influence of reactive species on the modification of biomolecules generated from the soft plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attri, Pankaj; Kumar, Naresh; Park, Ji Hoon; Yadav, Dharmendra Kumar; Choi, Sooho; Uhm, Han S.; Kim, In Tae; Choi, Eun Ha; Lee, Weontae

    2015-02-01

    Plasma medicine is an upcoming research area that has attracted the scientists to explore more deeply the utility of plasma. So, apart from the treating biomaterials and tissues with plasma, we have studied the effect of soft plasma with different feeding gases such as Air, N2 and Ar on modification of biomolecules. Hence, in this work we have used the soft plasma on biomolecules such as proteins ((Hemoglobin (Hb) and Myoglobin (Mb)), calf thymus DNA and amino acids. The structural changes or structural modification of proteins and DNA have been studied using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy, protein oxidation test, gel electrophoresis, UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and 1D NMR, while Liquid Chromatograph/Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometer (LC/CE-MS) based on qualitative and quantitative bio-analysis have been used to study the modification of amino acids. Further, the thermal analysis of the protein has been studied with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD. Additionally, we have performed docking studies of H2O2 with Hb and Mb, which reveals that H2O2 molecules preferably attack the amino acids near heme group. We have also shown that N2 gas plasma has strong deformation action on biomolecules and compared to other gases plasma.

  6. Influence of reactive species on the modification of biomolecules generated from the soft plasma

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Pankaj; Kumar, Naresh; Park, Ji Hoon; Yadav, Dharmendra Kumar; Choi, Sooho; Uhm, Han S.; Kim, In Tae; Choi, Eun Ha; Lee, Weontae

    2015-01-01

    Plasma medicine is an upcoming research area that has attracted the scientists to explore more deeply the utility of plasma. So, apart from the treating biomaterials and tissues with plasma, we have studied the effect of soft plasma with different feeding gases such as Air, N2 and Ar on modification of biomolecules. Hence, in this work we have used the soft plasma on biomolecules such as proteins ((Hemoglobin (Hb) and Myoglobin (Mb)), calf thymus DNA and amino acids. The structural changes or structural modification of proteins and DNA have been studied using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy, protein oxidation test, gel electrophoresis, UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and 1D NMR, while Liquid Chromatograph/Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometer (LC/CE-MS) based on qualitative and quantitative bio-analysis have been used to study the modification of amino acids. Further, the thermal analysis of the protein has been studied with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD. Additionally, we have performed docking studies of H2O2 with Hb and Mb, which reveals that H2O2 molecules preferably attack the amino acids near heme group. We have also shown that N2 gas plasma has strong deformation action on biomolecules and compared to other gases plasma. PMID:25649786

  7. Influence of reactive species on the modification of biomolecules generated from the soft plasma.

    PubMed

    Attri, Pankaj; Kumar, Naresh; Park, Ji Hoon; Yadav, Dharmendra Kumar; Choi, Sooho; Uhm, Han S; Kim, In Tae; Choi, Eun Ha; Lee, Weontae

    2015-01-01

    Plasma medicine is an upcoming research area that has attracted the scientists to explore more deeply the utility of plasma. So, apart from the treating biomaterials and tissues with plasma, we have studied the effect of soft plasma with different feeding gases such as Air, N2 and Ar on modification of biomolecules. Hence, in this work we have used the soft plasma on biomolecules such as proteins ((Hemoglobin (Hb) and Myoglobin (Mb)), calf thymus DNA and amino acids. The structural changes or structural modification of proteins and DNA have been studied using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy, protein oxidation test, gel electrophoresis, UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and 1D NMR, while Liquid Chromatograph/Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometer (LC/CE-MS) based on qualitative and quantitative bio-analysis have been used to study the modification of amino acids. Further, the thermal analysis of the protein has been studied with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD. Additionally, we have performed docking studies of H2O2 with Hb and Mb, which reveals that H2O2 molecules preferably attack the amino acids near heme group. We have also shown that N2 gas plasma has strong deformation action on biomolecules and compared to other gases plasma. PMID:25649786

  8. Wound healing modeling: investigating ambient gas plasma treatment efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orazov, Marat; Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B.

    2012-11-01

    Chronic wounds are thought to be caused, in part, by the presence and persistence of aerobic microbes that deplete the local oxygen concentration and prevent or slow the rate of oxygen-dependent healing. Atmospheric-pressure gas plasmas have been shown to be strong bactericidal agents and there is evidence that plasma treatment can safely kill bacteria in wounds and speed wound healing. In this study, we adapted a six-species reaction-diffusion model of epithelial wound healing and used it to predict the efficacy of various plasma treatment protocols. We assume that the only effect of plasma application to the wound is to reduce the bacterial load and that this in turn reduces the bacterial oxygen consumption in the wound. The model follows the spatial and temporal concentration or density profiles within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts and extracellular matrix material. We highlight the importance of the effects of plasma application on the rate of bacterial regrowth in the wound. Even a relatively large initial reduction in the bacterial wound population may not be sufficient for improved healing if bacterial regrowth is not limited. Although it is clear that current efforts to model wound healing in general and the effects of plasma in particular are in their early stage, the present results suggest several important directions for coupling plasma models with models of tissue biochemical responses.

  9. Optimization of time on CF4/O2 etchant for inductive couple plasma reactive ion etching of TiO2 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adzhri, R.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Fathil, M. F. M.; Hashim, U.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Ayub, R. M.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Voon, C. H.; Foo, K. L.; M. Nuzaihan M., N.; Azman, A. H.; Zaki, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the optimum etching of titanium dioxide (TiO2) using inductive couple plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) on our fabricated devices. By using a combination of CF4/O2 gases as plasma etchant with ratio of 3:1, three samples of TiO2 thin film were etched with different time duration of 10 s, 15 s and 20 s. The ion bombardment of CF4 gases with plasma enhancement by O2 gas able to break the oxide bond of TiO2 and allow anisotropic etch profile with maximum etch rate of 18.6 nm/s. The sample was characterized by using optical profilometer to determine the depth of etched area and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for etch profile characterization.

  10. Gas flow dependence of atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Muyang; Yang, Congying; Liu, Sanqiu; Chen, Xiaochang; Ni, Gengsong; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is presented to explain the gas flow dependence of discharge characteristics in helium plasma needle at atmospherics pressure. The diffusional mixing layer between the helium jet core and the ambient air has a moderate effect on the streamer propagation. The obtained simulation results present that the streamer shows the ring-shaped emission profile at a moderate gas flow rate. The key chemical reactions which drive the streamer propagation are electron-impact ionization of helium neutral, nitrogen and oxygen molecules. At a moderate gas flow rate of 0.5 slm, a significant increase in propagation velocity of the streamer is observed due to appropriate quantity of impurities air diffuse into the helium. Besides, when the gas flow rate is below 0.35 slm, the radial density of ground-state atomic oxygen peaks along the axis of symmetry. However, when the gas flow rate is above 0.5 slm, a ring-shaped density distribution appears. The peak density is on the order of 1020 m-3 at 10 ns in our work.

  11. Removal of carbon contaminations by RF plasma generated reactive species and subsequent effects on optical surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P. K. Rai, S. K.; Modi, M. H.; Nayak, M.; Lodha, G. S.; Kumar, M.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.

    2015-06-24

    Carbon contamination on optical elements is a serious issue in synchrotron beam lines for several decades. The basic mechanism of carbon deposition on optics and cleaning strategies are not fully understood. Carbon growth mechanism and optimized cleaning procedures are worldwide under development stage. Optimized RF plasma cleaning is considered an active remedy for the same. In present study carbon contaminated optical test surfaces (carbon capped tungsten thin film) are exposed for 30 minutes to four different gases, rf plasma at constant power and constant dynamic pressure. Structural characterization (thickness, roughness and density) of virgin samples and plasma exposed samples was done by soft x-ray (λ=80 Å) reflectivity measurements at Indus-1 reflectivity beam line. Different gas plasma removes carbon with different rate (0.4 to 0.65 nm /min). A thin layer 2 to 9 nm of different roughness and density is observed at the top surface of tungsten film. Ar gas plasma is found more suitable for cleaning of tungsten surface.

  12. Removal of carbon contaminations by RF plasma generated reactive species and subsequent effects on optical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, P. K.; Kumar, M.; Rai, S. K.; Modi, M. H.; Chakera, J. A.; Nayak, M.; Naik, P. A.; Lodha, G. S.

    2015-06-01

    Carbon contamination on optical elements is a serious issue in synchrotron beam lines for several decades. The basic mechanism of carbon deposition on optics and cleaning strategies are not fully understood. Carbon growth mechanism and optimized cleaning procedures are worldwide under development stage. Optimized RF plasma cleaning is considered an active remedy for the same. In present study carbon contaminated optical test surfaces (carbon capped tungsten thin film) are exposed for 30 minutes to four different gases, rf plasma at constant power and constant dynamic pressure. Structural characterization (thickness, roughness and density) of virgin samples and plasma exposed samples was done by soft x-ray (λ=80 Å) reflectivity measurements at Indus-1 reflectivity beam line. Different gas plasma removes carbon with different rate (0.4 to 0.65 nm /min). A thin layer 2 to 9 nm of different roughness and density is observed at the top surface of tungsten film. Ar gas plasma is found more suitable for cleaning of tungsten surface.

  13. Smart coating technology by gas tunnel type plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Akira

    2008-10-01

    Nano-science & technology is one of the most important scientific fields, and the material processing using the nano-technology is now advanced towards more precise and controllable smart stage. Regarding thermal processing, plasma system with high precise, has been expected for smart thermal processing. The gas tunnel type plasma system developed by the author exhibits high energy density and also high efficiency. Among the applications to the various thermal processing, one practical application is plasma spraying of ceramics such as A12O3 and ZrO2. The characteristics of these ceramic coatings were superior to the conventional ones. The ZrO2 composite coating has the possibility of the development of high functionally graded TBC (thermal barrier coating). In this study, the performance such as the mechanical properties, thermal behavior and high temperature oxidation resistance of the alumina/zirconia functionally graded TBCs produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying was investigated and discussed. The results showed that the alumina/zirconia composite system exhibited the improvement of mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. Now, one of the advanced plasma application, a smart coating technology, is expected to obtain the desired characteristics of ceramics with improved corrosion resistance, thermal resistance, and wear resistance.

  14. Dynamic gas flow during plasma operation in TMX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, W.L.; Carter, M.R.; Clower, C.A.; Drake, R.P.; Hunt, A.L.; Simonen, T.C.; Turner, W.C.

    1982-11-12

    Control of the neutral density outside of the plasma radius is essential for proper operation of the various plasma configurations in TMX-U. TMX-U excess-beam, stream-gun, gas-box, and beam-reflux gases are pumped internally in regions defined by 73/sup 0/ Ti-gettered liners and warm Ti-gettered plasma liners. The array of fast and slow ion gauges - a large TMX-U diagnostic - has been used to measure the dynamic pressure in many of the liner-defined regions on three time scales. The natural divertor action, or plasma pump effect, of mirror plasmas has been measured using the ion gauge diagnostics on a fast time scale during operation of TMX-U with ECRH start-up. Routine operation of TMX-U is enhanced by the ability to verify the effectiveness of gettering and to locate leaks using pressure data collected on the two slow time scales. A computer code, DYNAVAC 6, which treats TMX-U as a set of conductance-coupled regions with pumping and sources in each region, has been used to successfully model the overall gas dynamics during all phases of TMX-U operation.

  15. Dynamic gas flow during plasma operation in TMX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, W.L.; Calderon, M.O.; Carter, M.R.; Clower, C.A.; Drake, R.P.; Hunt, A.L.; Lang, D.; Simonen, T.C.; Turner, W.C.

    1983-04-01

    Control of the neutral density outside of the plasma radius is essential for proper operation of the various plasma configurations in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). TMX-U excess-beam, stream-gun, gas-box, and beam-reflux gases are pumped internally in regions defined by 73/sup 0/ Ti-gettered liners and warm Ti-gettered plasma liners. The array of fast and slow ion gauges: a large TMX-U diagnostic: has been used to measure the dynamic pressure in many of the liner-defined regions on three time scales. The natural divertor action, or plasma pump effect, of mirror plasmas has been measured using the ion gauge diagnostics on a fast time scale during operation of TMX-U with ECRH start up. Routine operation of TMX-U is enhanced by the ability to verify the effectiveness of gettering and to locate leaks using pressure data collected on the two slow time scales. A computer code, dynaVac 6, which treats TMX-U as a set of conductance-coupled regions with pumping and sources in each region, has been used to successfully model the overall gas dynamics during all phases of TMX-U operation.

  16. Helium-based cold atmospheric plasma-induced reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptotic pathway attenuated by platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Paras; Rehman, Mati Ur; Zhao, Qing Li; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Plasma is generated by ionizing gas molecules. Helium (He)-based cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) was generated using a high-voltage power supply with low-frequency excitation (60 Hz at 7 kV) and He flow at 2 l/min. Platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) are potent antioxidants due to their unique ability to scavenge superoxides and peroxides. These features make them useful for the protection against oxidative stress-associated pathologies. Here, the effects of Pt-NPs on He-CAP-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanism were examined in human lymphoma U937 cells. Apoptosis was measured after cells were exposed to He-CAP in the presence or absence of Pt-NPs. The effects of combined treatment were determined by observing the changes in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and both mitochondrial and Fas dependent pathway. The results indicate that Pt-NPs substantially scavenge He-CAP-induced superoxides and peroxides and inhibit all the pathways involved in apoptosis execution. This might be because of the SOD/catalase mimetic effects of Pt-NPs. These results showed that the Pt-NPs can induce He-CAP desensitization in human lymphoma U937 cells. PMID:27256594

  17. Low-temperature growth of gallium nitride films by inductively coupled-plasma-enhanced reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Chih-Jui; Chau-Nan Hong, Franklin

    2014-05-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films were grown on sapphire substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering. Inductively coupled-plasma (ICP) source was installed between the substrate holder and the sputtering target to increase the plasma density and the degree of ionization of nitrogen gas. Liquid Ga and Ar/N{sub 2} were used as the sputtering target and sputtering gases, respectively. X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that the authors could grow high quality GaN crystallites at 500 °C. However, the crystalline GaN (0002) peak remained even by lowering the growth temperature down to 300 °C. The N:Ga ratio of the film grown at 500 °C was almost 1:1, and the nitrogen composition became higher toward the 1:1 N:Ga ratio with increasing the growth temperature. The high degree of ionization induced by ICP source was essential to the growth of high crystalline quality GaN films.

  18. Reactive sputtering of titanium in Ar/CH4 gas mixture: Target poisoning and film characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Fouad, O.A.; Rumaiz, A.; Shah, S.

    2009-03-01

    Reactive sputtering of titanium target in the presence of Ar/CH{sub 4} gas mixture has been investigated. With the addition of methane gas to above 1.5% of the process gas a transition from the metallic sputtering mode to the poison mode was observed as indicated by the change in cathode current. As the methane gas flow concentration increased up to 10%, the target was gradually poisoned. The hysteresis in the cathode current could be plotted by first increasing and then subsequently decreasing the methane concentration. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of the deposited films confirmed the formation of carbide phases and the transition of the process from the metallic to compound sputtering mode as the methane concentration in the sputtering gas is increased. The paper discusses a sputtering model that gives a rational explanation of the target poisoning phenomenon and shows an agreement between the experimental observations and calculated results.

  19. Modeling of non-thermal plasma in flammable gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.; Kochetov, I. V.; Leonov, S. B.

    2008-07-01

    An idea of using plasma-assisted methods of fuel ignition is based on non-equilibrium generation of chemically active species that speed up the combustion process. It is believed that gain in energy consumed for combustion acceleration by plasmas is due to the non-equilibrium nature of discharge plasma, which allows radicals to be produced in an above-equilibrium amount. Evidently, the size of the effect is strongly dependent on the initial temperature, pressure, and composition of the mixture. Of particular interest is comparison between thermal ignition of a fuel-air mixture and non-thermal plasma initiation of the combustion. Mechanisms of thermal ignition in various fuel-air mixtures have been studied for years, and a number of different mechanisms are known providing an agreement with experiments at various conditions. The problem is -- how to conform thermal chemistry approach to essentially non-equilibrium plasma description. The electric discharge produces much above-equilibrium amounts of chemically active species: atoms, radicals and ions. The point is that despite excess concentrations of a number of species, total concentration of these species is far below concentrations of the initial gas mixture. Therefore, rate coefficients for reactions of these discharge produced species with other gas mixture components are well known quantities controlled by the translational temperature, which can be calculated from the energy balance equation taking into account numerous processes initiated by plasma. A numerical model was developed combining traditional approach of thermal combustion chemistry with advanced description of the plasma kinetics based on solution of electron Boltzmann equation. This approach allows us to describe self-consistently strongly non-equilibrium electric discharge in chemically unstable (ignited) gas. Equations of pseudo-one-dimensional gas dynamics were solved in parallel with a system of thermal chemistry equations, kinetic equations

  20. Smart Coating Technology by Gas Tunnel Type Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, A.

    2008-07-01

    Nano-science & technology is one of the most important scientific fields, and the material processing using the nano-technology is now advanced towards more precise and controllable smart stage. Regarding thermal processing, an important key should be the the performance of the applied heat source. A plasma is fundamentally the most superior heat source, because of high temperature, high energy density, easy controllable, etc. Therefore more precious plasma system has been expected for smart thermal processing. The gas tunnel type plasma system developed by the author has high energy density and also high efficiency. The concept and the feature of this plasma system are explained and the applications to the various thermal processing are described in this report. One practical application is plasma spraying of ceramics such as Al_2O_3 and ZrO_2. The characteristics of these ceramic coatings were superior to the conventional ones. The ZrO_2 composite coating has the possibility of the development of high functionally graded TBC (thermal barrier coating). Another application of gas tunnel type plasma is surface modification of metals. For example the TiN films were formed in a very short time of 5 s. Now, advanced plasma application of spraying methods as a smart coating technology is expected to obtain the desired characteristics of ceramics such as corrosion resistance, thermal resistance, and wear resistance by reducing the porosity and increasing the coating density. One application of the smart coating technology is a formation of the metallic glass coating with high function, and another is Hydroxiapatite coating for bio-medical application. The formation process of those coatings and the coating characteristics were investigated in this study.

  1. Growth and properties of amorphous silicon films grown using pulsed-flow reactive plasma beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalal, Vikram L.; Knox, Ralph; Kandalaft, Nabeeh; Baldwin, Greg

    1991-01-01

    The growth and properties of a-Si:H films grown using a novel deposition technique, reactive plasma beam epitaxy, are discussed. In this technique, a remote H plasma produced in a microwave-ECR reactor is used to grow a-Si:H films at low pressures. The H ions react with SiH4 introduced near the substrate to produce the film. The flow of SiH4 is pulsed on or off, thereby achieving in-situ annealing of the film during growth by H ions and radicals. The films produced by this technique appear to have good electronic quality, and are more stable than the standard glow discharge films.

  2. Rapid damage-free shaping of silicon carbide using reactive atom plasma (RAP) processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Yogesh; Chang, Andrew K.; Berrett, John W.; Futtere, Kenneth; Gardopee, George J.; Kelley, Jude; Kyler, Thomas; Lee, Jeonghwa; Lyford, Nick; Proscia, David; Sommer, Phillip R.

    2006-06-01

    Mechanical grinding and shaping of optical materials imparts damage that manifests itself as defects and cracks that can propagate well below the surface of the optic. Mitigation of damage is necessary to preserve the integrity of the optic and relieve residual stress that can be detrimental to its performance. Typically, a sequence of subsequent polishing steps with finer and finer grit sizes is used to remove damage, but the process can be painfully slow especially for hard materials such as silicon carbide and often fails to remove all the damage. Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP TM) processing, a non-contact, atmospheric pressure plasma-based process, has been shown to reveal and mitigate sub-surface damage in optical materials. Twyman stress tests on thin glass and SiC substrates demonstrate RAP's ability to relieve the stress while at the same time improving surface form.

  3. Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J.

    2009-10-15

    Thermal creep flow (TCF) is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary. Here, TCF is demonstrated experimentally in a dusty plasma. Stripes on a glass box are heated by laser beam absorption, leading to both TCF and a thermophoretic force. The design of the experiment allows isolating the effect of TCF. A stirring motion of the dust particle suspension is observed. By eliminating all other explanations for this motion, we conclude that TCF at the boundary couples by drag to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result provides an experimental verification, for the field of fluid mechanics, that TCF in the slip-flow regime causes steady-state gas flow in a confined volume.

  4. Plasma physics issues in gas discharge laser development

    SciTech Connect

    Garscadden, A. ); Kushner, M.J.; Eden, J.G. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1991-12-01

    In this paper an account is given of the interplay between partially ionized plasma physics and the development of gas discharge lasers. Gas discharge excitation has provided a wide array of laser devices extending from the soft X-ray region to the far infrared. The scaling of gas discharge lasers in power and energy also covers many orders of magnitude. The particular features of three regimes are discussed: short wavelength lasers (deep UV to soft X-ray); visible and near UV lasers; and infrared molecular gas lasers. The current status (Fall 1990) of these areas is reviewed, and an assessment is made of future research topics that are perceived to be important.

  5. Impact of the etching gas on vertically oriented single wall and few walled carbon nanotubes by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohier, A.; Minea, T. M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Granier, A.

    2007-03-01

    Vertically oriented single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) and few walled nanotubes (FWNTs) have been grown by electronic cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on silica flat substrates. The impact of the plasma parameters on SWNT and FWNT growth has been investigated using two different etching gas mixtures, namely, C2H2/NH3 and C2H2/H2 with various ratios and applied bias voltages. Kinetic studies are also proposed in order to describe the FWNT growth mechanism by plasma techniques. A key role played by the reactive gas (NH3 and H2) is observed in the PECVD process, contrary to multiwalled nanotube growth. It is demonstrated that the balance between FWNT growth versus FWNT etching can be widely modulated by varying the gas mixture and bias voltage. It is shown that the use of hydrogen for hydrocarbon gas dilution restricts the destruction of SWNT and FWNT by the plasma species (ions and radicals).

  6. Impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Boehman, Andre L.

    2008-12-15

    This paper expands the consideration of the factors affecting the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of diesel soot to include the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Past work showed that soot derived from oxygenated fuels such as biodiesel carries some surface oxygen functionality and thereby possesses higher reactivity than soot from conventional diesel fuel. In this work, results show that EGR exerts a strong influence on the physical properties of the soot which leads to enhanced oxidation rate. HRTEM images showed a dramatic difference between the burning modes of the soot generated under 0 and 20% EGR. The soot produced under 0% EGR strictly followed an external burning mode with no evidence of internal burning. In contrast, soot generated under 20% EGR exhibited dual burning modes: slow external burning and rapid internal burning. The results demonstrate clearly that highly reactive soot can be achieved by manipulating the physical properties of the soot via EGR. (author)

  7. Plasma quench technology for natural gas conversion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, B.A.; Kong, P.C.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the experimental demonstration of a process for direct conversion of methane to acetylene in a thermal plasma. The process utilizes a thermal plasma to dissociate methane and form an equilibrium mixture of acetylene followed by a supersonic expansion of the hot gas to preserve the produced acetylene in high yield. The high translational velocities and rapid cooling result in an overpopulation of atomic hydrogen which persists throughout the expansion process. The presence of atomic hydrogen shifts the equilibrium composition by inhibiting complete pyrolysis of methane and acetylene to solid carbon. This process has the potential to reduce the cost of producing acetylene from natural gas. Acetylene and hydrogen produced by this process could be used directly as industrial gases, building blocks for synthesis of industrial chemicals, or oligomerized to long chain liquid hydrocarbons for use as fuels. This process produces hydrogen and ultrafine carbon black in addition to acetylene.

  8. Transport in a field aligned magnetized plasma/neutral gas boundary: the end of the plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher Michael

    The objective of this dissertation is to characterize the physics of a boundary layer between a magnetized plasma and a neutral gas along the direction of a confining magnetic field. A series of experiments are performed at the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD) at UCLA to study this field aligned Neutral Boundary Layer (NBL) at the end of the plasma. A Lanthanum Hexaboride (LaB6) cathode and semi-transparent anode creates a magnetized, current-free helium plasma which terminates on a neutral helium gas without touching any walls. Probes are inserted into the plasma to measure the basic plasma parameters and study the transport in the NBL. The experiment is performed in the weakly ionized limit where the plasma density (ne) is much less than the neutral density (nn) such that ne/nn < 5%. The NBL is characterized by a field-aligned electric field which begins at the point where the plasma pressure equilibrates with the neutral gas pressure. Beyond the pressure equilibration point the electrons and ions lose their momentum by collisions with the neutral gas and come to rest. An electric field is established self consistently to maintain a current-free termination through equilibration of the different species' stopping rates in the neutral gas. The electric field resembles a collisional quasineutral sheath with a length 10 times the electron-ion collision length, 100 times the neutral collision length, and 10,000 times the Debye length. Collisions with the neutral gas dominate the losses in the system. The measured plasma density loss rates are above the classical cross-field current-free ambipolar rate, but below the anomalous Bohm diffusion rate. The electron temperature is below the ionization threshold of the gas, 2.2 eV in helium. The ions are in thermal equilibrium with the neutral gas. A generalized theory of plasma termination in a Neutral Boundary Layer is applied to this case using a two-fluid, current-free, weakly ionized transport model. The electron

  9. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  10. Gas Contamination In Plasma-Arc-Welded Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Torres, Martin R.; Gurevitch, Alan C.; Newman, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Document describes experimental investigation on visible and tactile effects of gaseous contaminants in variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of 2219 T-87 aluminum alloy. Contaminant gases (nitrogen, methane, oxygen, and hydrogen) introduced in argon arc and in helium shield gas in various controlled concentrations. Report represents results of experiments in form of photographs of fronts, backs, polished cross sections, and etched cross sections of welds made with various contaminants at various concentrations. Provides detailed discussion of conditions under which welds made.

  11. Reconstructive tomography in gas dynamics and plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikalov, Valerii Vladimirovich; Preobrazhenskii, Nikolai Georgievich

    The physics, mathematics, and principal applications of reconstructive tomography are examined with particular reference to problems in aerodynamics, gas dynamics, and plasma physics. The discussion covers fluoroscopic tomography and tomosynthesis, tomography with a priori constraints, mathematical formalisms of the linear tomography of asymmetric objects, theoretical principles of the linear tomography of two-dimensional objects, and algorithms of two-dimensional linear tomography. Some problems in three-dimensional linear tomography are also discussed.

  12. Ultra-Intense Laser Pulse Propagation in Gas and Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T. M.

    2004-10-26

    It is proposed here to continue their program in the development of theories and models capable of describing the varied phenomena expected to influence the propagation of ultra-intense, ultra-short laser pulses with particular emphasis on guided propagation. This program builds upon expertise already developed over the years through collaborations with the NSF funded experimental effort lead by Professor Howard Milchberg here at Maryland, and in addition the research group at the Ecole Polytechnique in France. As in the past, close coupling between theory and experiment will continue. The main effort of the proposed research will center on the development of computational models and analytic theories of intense laser pulse propagation and guiding structures. In particular, they will use their simulation code WAKE to study propagation in plasma channels, in dielectric capillaries and in gases where self focusing is important. At present this code simulates the two-dimensional propagation (radial coordinate, axial coordinate and time) of short pulses in gas/plasma media. The plasma is treated either as an ensemble of particles which respond to the ponderomotive force of the laser and the self consistent electric and magnetic fields created in the wake of pulse or as a fluid. the plasma particle motion is treated kinetically and relativistically allowing for study of intense pulses that result in complete cavitation of the plasma. The gas is treated as a nonlinear medium with rate equations describing the various stages of ionization. A number of important physics issues will be addressed during the program. These include (1) studies of propagation in plasma channels, (2) investigation of plasma channel nonuniformities caused by parametric excitation of channel modes, (3) propagation in dielectric capillaries including harmonic generation and ionization scattering, (4) self guided propagation in gas, (5) studies of the ionization scattering instability recently

  13. Design and Preliminary Performance Testing of Electronegative Gas Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Thomas M.; Schloeder, Natalie R.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Dankanich, John W.; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-01-01

    In classical gridded electrostatic ion thrusters, positively charged ions are generated from a plasma discharge of noble gas propellant and accelerated to provide thrust. To maintain overall charge balance on the propulsion system, a separate electron source is required to neutralize the ion beam as it exits the thruster. However, if high-electronegativity propellant gases (e.g., sulfur hexafluoride) are instead used, a plasma discharge can result consisting of both positively and negatively charged ions. Extracting such electronegative plasma species for thrust generation (e.g., with time-varying, bipolar ion optics) would eliminate the need for a separate neutralizer cathode subsystem. In addition for thrusters utilizing a RF plasma discharge, further simplification of the ion thruster power system may be possible by also using the RF power supply to bias the ion optics. Recently, the PEGASES (Plasma propulsion with Electronegative gases) thruster prototype successfully demonstrated proof-of-concept operations in alternatively accelerating positively and negatively charged ions from a RF discharge of a mixture of argon and sulfur hexafluoride.i In collaboration with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Georgia Institute of Technology High-Power Electric Propulsion Laboratory (HPEPL) is applying the lessons learned from PEGASES design and testing to develop a new thruster prototype. This prototype will incorporate design improvements and undergo gridless operational testing and diagnostics checkout at HPEPL in April 2014. Performance mapping with ion optics will be conducted at NASA MSFC starting in May 2014. The proposed paper discusses the design and preliminary performance testing of this electronegative gas plasma thruster prototype.

  14. Reactive Gas Environment Induced Structural Modification of Noble-Transition Metal Alloy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, V.; Yang, L.; Yin, J.; Loukrakpam, R.; Shan, S.; Wanjala, B.; Luo, J.; Chapman, K. W.; Zhong, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    Noble-transition metal (noble=Pt,Au; transition=Co,Ni,Cu) alloy particles with sizes of about 5 nm have been studied by in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction while subjected to oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) gas atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The different gas atmospheres do not affect substantially the random alloy, face-centered-cubic structure type of the particles but do affect the way the metal atoms pack together. In an O2 atmosphere, atoms get extra separated from each other, whereas, in an H2 atmosphere, they come closer together. The effect is substantial, amounting to 0.1 Å difference in the first neighbor atomic distances, and concurs with a dramatic change of the particle catalytic properties. It is argued that such reactive gas induced “expansion shrinking” is a common phenomenon that may be employed for the engineering of “smart” nanoparticles responding advantageously to envisaged gas environments.

  15. Gas-Phase Neutral Binary Oxide Clusters: Distribution, Structure, and Reactivity toward CO.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2012-09-01

    Neutral binary (vanadium-cobalt) oxide clusters are generated and detected in the gas phase for the first time. Their reactivities toward carbon monoxide (CO) are studied both experimentally and theoretically. Experimental results suggest that neutral VCoO4 can react with CO to generate VCoO3 and CO2. Density functional theory studies show parallel results as well as provide detailed reaction mechanisms. PMID:26292125

  16. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1991-05-01

    The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

  17. Effect of auranofin on plasma fibronectin, C reactive protein, and albumin levels in arthritic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, K M; Stecher, V J; Pruden, D J

    1988-01-01

    Auranofin, a member of a class of compounds with disease modifying activity, was given to arthritic rats to determine if it could reverse the abnormal plasma concentrations of fibronectin (Fn), C reactive protein (CRP), and albumin, which were unaffected by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). When auranofin was orally administered for two weeks to adjuvant induced arthritic rats it significantly inhibited swelling of the injected and non-injected paws at doses of 3 and 10 mg/kg. Rocket electroimmunoassay measurement of plasma proteins in normal, arthritic, and auranofin treated arthritic rats indicated that auranofin at 10 mg/kg significantly decreased (by 77%) the abnormally high concentration of arthritic rat plasma Fn, though it had no effect on Fn concentrations when administered to normal rats. CRP, which was raised approximately twofold above normal in arthritic rats, was reduced by 56% after treatment of arthritic rats with auranofin at 10 mg/kg, though CRP concentrations in normal rats were unaffected by auranofin treatment. Depressed albumin concentrations in arthritic rats were significantly enhanced (by 30%) by dosing with 10 mg/kg of auranofin. At the 3 mg/kg dose, auranofin did not significantly change plasma concentrations of Fn, CRP, and albumin in arthritic rats. At a dose of 10 mg/kg, however, auranofin, in addition to inhibiting chronic systemic paw inflammation, also altered abnormal concentrations of plasma Fn, CRP, and albumin in the adjuvant arthritic rat, thus distinguishing auranofin from standard NSAIDs we have previously tested. PMID:3260094

  18. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase plasma glucose via reactive oxygen species-induced insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Wang, Changlin; Ma, Xiao; He, Hongjuan; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2015-10-01

    There have been few reports about the possible toxic effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanoparticles on the endocrine system. We explored the endocrine effects of oral administration to mice of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (0, 64 and 320 mg kg(-1) body weight per day to control, low-dose and high-dose groups, respectively, 7 days per week for 14 weeks). TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), and their physiological distribution was investigated by inductively coupled plasma. Biochemical analyzes included plasma glucose, insulin, heart blood triglycerides (TG), free fatty acid (FFA), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related markers (total SOD, GSH and MDA). Phosphorylation of IRS1, Akt, JNK1, and p38 MAPK were analyzed by western blotting. Increased titanium levels were found in the liver, spleen, small intestine, kidney and pancreas. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose significantly increased whereas there was no difference in plasma insulin secretion. Increased ROS levels were found in serum and the liver, as evidenced by reduced total SOD activity and GSH level and increased MDA content. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles induced insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver, shown by increased phosphorylation of IRS1 (Ser307) and reduced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473). The pathway by which TiO2 nanoparticles increase ROS-induced IR were included in the inflammatory response and phosphokinase, as shown by increased serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and increased phosphorylation of JNK1 and p38 MAPK in liver. These results show that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles increases ROS, resulting in IR and increasing plasma glucose in mice. PMID:25826740

  19. Laser mass-spectrometry for online diagnosis of reactive plasmas with many species

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Chunlei; Gao Liang; Liu Jiahong; Zhang Lei; Ding Hongbin

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to design a diagnostic system for reactive plasma environment by combining molecular-beam time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectroscopy with laser spectroscopy technique. The combination of TOF mass spectrometers and pulsed lasers is favorable in the diagnosis of intermediate species distribution since they allow the simultaneous but separate recording of the spectra of different species. In the plasma system, the intermediate species in electronic ground state or low lying excited state is pumped to higher energy level with resonant laser excitation, and then, the ionization with a second laser system is possible which can readily be detected by the TOF analyzer. The ionization itself is only used as a detection mechanism for the observation of the excitation of these states. In this manner, the population distribution of intermediate species can be determined with state-selective and mass-selective feature. Also, in this article, a flexible data acquisition and automatic control system based on LABVIEW was designed to integrate all the stand-alone measurement instruments including a TOF spectrometer, a laser system, a high performance oscilloscope, and a digital delay generator into a single personal computer-based control unit. Moreover, a virtual Boxcar integrator with hundreds of channels has been developed to enhance the signal while filtering out the random noises. Finally, the many potentials of this technique in the application of plasma diagnosis will be discussed.

  20. Fusion reactivity, confinement, and stability of neutral-beam heated plasmas in TFTR and other tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyeon, K.; Sabbagh, S.A.

    1996-05-01

    The hypothesis that the heating beam fueling profile shape connects the edge condition and improved core confinement and fusion reactivity is extensively studied on TFTR and applied to other tokamaks. The derived absolute scalings based on beam fueling profile shape for the stored energy and neutron yield can be applied to the deuterium discharges at different major radii in TFTR. These include Supershot, High poloidal beta, L-mode, and discharges with a reversed shear (RS) magnetic configuration. These scalings are also applied to deuterium-tritium discharges. The role of plasma parameters, such as plasma current, Isdo2(p), edge safety factor, qsdo5(a), and toroidal field, Bsdo2(T), in the performance and stability of the discharges is explicitly studied. Based on practical and externally controllable plasma parameters, the limitation and optimization of fusion power production of the present TFTR is investigated and a path for a discharge condition with fusion power gain, Q > 1 is suggested based on this study. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks.

  1. Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-04-15

    The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and ion flux (J{sub ion}) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring T{sub e} and J{sub ion} for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

  2. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Protonated 2-, 3-, and 4-Dehydropyridine Radicals Toward Organic Reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeuya, Anthony; Price, Jason M.; Jankiewicz, Bartłomiej J.; Nash, John J.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2009-11-01

    To explore the effects of the electronic nature of charged phenyl radicals on their reactivity, reactions of the three distonic isomers of n-dehydropyridinium cation (n = 2, 3, or 4) have been investigated in the gas phase by using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. All three isomers react with cyclohexane, methanol, ethanol, and 1-pentanol exclusively via hydrogen atom abstraction and with allyl iodide mainly via iodine atom abstraction, with a reaction efficiency ordering of 2 > 3 > 4. The observed reactivity ordering correlates well with the calculated vertical electron affinities of the charged radicals (i.e., the higher the vertical electron affinity, the faster the reaction). Charged radicals 2 and 3 also react with tetrahydrofuran exclusively via hydrogen atom abstraction, but the reaction of 4 with tetrahydrofuran yields products arising from nonradical reactivity. The unusual reactivity of 4 is likely to result from the contribution of an ionized carbene-type resonance structure that facilitates nucleophilic addition to the most electrophilic carbon atom (C-4) in this charged radical. The influence of such a resonance structure on the reactivity of 2 is not obvious, and this may be due to stabilizing hydrogen-bonding interactions in the transition states for this molecule. Charged radicals 2 and 3 abstract a hydrogen atom from the substituent in both phenol and toluene, but 4 abstracts a hydrogen atom from the phenyl ring, a reaction that is unprecedented for phenyl radicals. Charged radical 4 reacts with tert-butyl isocyanide mainly by hydrogen cyanide (HCN) abstraction, whereas CN abstraction is the principal reaction for 2 and 3. The different reactivity observed for 4 (as compared to 2 and 3) is likely to result from different charge and spin distributions of the reaction intermediates for these charged radicals.

  3. Gas-phase reactivity of protonated 2-, 3-, and 4-dehydropyridine radicals toward organic reagents.

    PubMed

    Adeuya, Anthony; Price, Jason M; Jankiewicz, Bartłomiej J; Nash, John J; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2009-12-10

    To explore the effects of the electronic nature of charged phenyl radicals on their reactivity, reactions of the three distonic isomers of n-dehydropyridinium cation (n = 2, 3, or 4) have been investigated in the gas phase by using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. All three isomers react with cyclohexane, methanol, ethanol, and 1-pentanol exclusively via hydrogen atom abstraction and with allyl iodide mainly via iodine atom abstraction, with a reaction efficiency ordering of 2 > 3 > 4. The observed reactivity ordering correlates well with the calculated vertical electron affinities of the charged radicals (i.e., the higher the vertical electron affinity, the faster the reaction). Charged radicals 2 and 3 also react with tetrahydrofuran exclusively via hydrogen atom abstraction, but the reaction of 4 with tetrahydrofuran yields products arising from nonradical reactivity. The unusual reactivity of 4 is likely to result from the contribution of an ionized carbene-type resonance structure that facilitates nucleophilic addition to the most electrophilic carbon atom (C-4) in this charged radical. The influence of such a resonance structure on the reactivity of 2 is not obvious, and this may be due to stabilizing hydrogen-bonding interactions in the transition states for this molecule. Charged radicals 2 and 3 abstract a hydrogen atom from the substituent in both phenol and toluene, but 4 abstracts a hydrogen atom from the phenyl ring, a reaction that is unprecedented for phenyl radicals. Charged radical 4 reacts with tert-butyl isocyanide mainly by hydrogen cyanide (HCN) abstraction, whereas CN abstraction is the principal reaction for 2 and 3. The different reactivity observed for 4 (as compared to 2 and 3) is likely to result from different charge and spin distributions of the reaction intermediates for these charged radicals. PMID:19902945

  4. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  5. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  6. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  7. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source For VASMIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Glover, T. W.; Jacobson, V. T.; McCaskill, G. E.; Winter, D. S.; Baity, F. W.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    The VASIMR space propulsion development effort relies on a high power (greater than 10kW) helicon source to produce a dense flowing plasma (H, D and He) target for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) acceleration of the ions. Subsequent expansion in an expanding magnetic field (magnetic nozzle) converts ion lunetic energy to directed momentum. This plasma source must have critical features to enable an effective propulsion device. First, it must ionize most of the input neutral flux of gas, thus producing a plasma stream with a high degree of ionization for application of ICR power. This avoids propellant waste and potential power losses due to charge exchange. Next, the plasma stream must flow into a region of high magnetic field (approximately 0.5 T) for efficient ICR acceleration. Third, the ratio of input power to plasma flux must be low, providing an energy per ion-electron pair approaching 100 eV. Lastly, the source must be robust and capable of very long life-times (years). In our helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a ratio of input gas to plasma flux near 100%. The plasma flows from the helicon region (B approximately 0.1 T) into a region with a peak magnetic field of 0.8 T. The energy input per ion-electron pair has been measured at 300 plus or minus 100 eV. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show an enhanced efficiency mode of operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 3.5 kW of input power. An upgrade to a power level of 10 kW is underway. Much of our recent work has been with a Boswell double-saddle antenna design. We are also converting the antenna design to a helical type. With these modifications, we anticipate an improvement in the ionization efficiency. This paper presents the results from scaling the helicon in the VX-10 device from 3.5 to 10 kW. We also compare the operation with a double-saddle to a helical antenna design. Finally, we

  8. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Clinical Outcomes after Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Ago, Tetsuro; Hata, Jun; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is elevated in response to inflammation caused by brain infarction, the association of CRP with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke remains uncertain. This study examined whether plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) levels at onset were associated with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors and acute infections after stroke. Methods We prospectively included 3653 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent and were hospitalized within 24 h of onset. Plasma hsCRP levels were measured on admission and categorized into quartiles. The association between hsCRP levels and clinical outcomes, including neurological improvement, neurological deterioration, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≥3 at 3 months), were investigated using a logistic regression analysis. Results Higher hsCRP levels were significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke subtype, conventional risk factors, intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, and acute infections during hospitalization (multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile as a reference: 0.80 [0.65–0.97] for neurological improvement, 1.72 [1.26–2.34] for neurological deterioration, and 2.03 [1.55–2.67] for a poor functional outcome). These associations were unchanged after excluding patients with infectious diseases occurring during hospitalization, or those with stroke recurrence or death. These trends were similar irrespective of stroke subtypes or baseline stroke severity, but more marked in patients aged <70 years (Pheterogeneity = 0.001). Conclusions High plasma hsCRP is independently associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27258004

  9. Simulation of emission spectra from nonuniform reactive laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Jörg; Lorusso, Antonella; Perrone, Alessio; Strafella, Francesco; Dutouquet, Christophe; Torralba, Béatrice

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that chemical reactions leading to the formation of AlO radicals in plasmas produced by ablation of aluminum or Ti-sapphire with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses can be predicted by the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, emission spectra recorded with an echelle spectrometer and a gated detector were compared to the spectral radiance computed for uniform and nonuniform equilibrium plasmas. The calculations are based on analytical solutions of the radiation transfer equation. The simulations show that the plasmas produced in argon background gas are almost uniform, whereas temperature and density gradients are evidenced in air. Furthermore, chemical reactions exclusively occur in the cold plume periphery for ablation in air. The formation of AlO is negligible in argon as the plasma temperature is too large in the time interval of interest up to several microseconds. Finally, the validity of local thermodynamic equilibrium is shown to depend on time, space, and on the elemental composition. The presented conclusions are of interest for material analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and for laser materials processing.

  10. Simulation of emission spectra from nonuniform reactive laser-induced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Jörg; Lorusso, Antonella; Perrone, Alessio; Strafella, Francesco; Dutouquet, Christophe; Torralba, Béatrice

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that chemical reactions leading to the formation of AlO radicals in plasmas produced by ablation of aluminum or Ti-sapphire with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses can be predicted by the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, emission spectra recorded with an echelle spectrometer and a gated detector were compared to the spectral radiance computed for uniform and nonuniform equilibrium plasmas. The calculations are based on analytical solutions of the radiation transfer equation. The simulations show that the plasmas produced in argon background gas are almost uniform, whereas temperature and density gradients are evidenced in air. Furthermore, chemical reactions exclusively occur in the cold plume periphery for ablation in air. The formation of AlO is negligible in argon as the plasma temperature is too large in the time interval of interest up to several microseconds. Finally, the validity of local thermodynamic equilibrium is shown to depend on time, space, and on the elemental composition. The presented conclusions are of interest for material analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and for laser materials processing. PMID:26651798

  11. Observation of tritium in gas/plasma loaded titanium samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Shyam, A.; Kaushik, T. C.; Rout, R. K.; Kulkarni, L. V.; Krishnan, M. S.; Malhotra, S. K.; Nagvenkar, V. G.; Iyengar, P. K.

    1991-05-01

    The observation of significant neutron yield from gas loaded titanium samples at Frascati in April 1989 opened up an alternate pathway to the investigation of anomalous nuclear phenomena in deuterium/solid systems, complimenting the electrolytic approach. Since then at least six different groups have successfully measured burst neutron emission from deuterated titanium shavings following the Frascati methodology, the special feature of which was the use of liquid nitrogen to create repeated thermal cycles resulting in the production of non-equilibrium conditions in the deuterated samples. At Trombay several variations of the gas loading procedure have been investigated including induction heating of single machined titanium targets in a glass chamber as well as use of a plasma focus device for deuteriding its central titanium electrode. Stemming from earlier observations both at BARC and elsewhere that tritium yield is ≂108 times higher than neutron output in cold fusion experiments, we have channelised our efforts to the search for tritium rather than neutrons. The presence of tritium in a variety gas/plasma loaded titanium samples has been established successfully through a direct measurement of the radiations emitted as a result of tritium decay, in contradistinction to other groups who have looked for tritium in the extracted gases. In some samples we have thus observed tritium levels of over 10 MBq with a corresponding (t/d) ratio of ≳10-5.

  12. Reactivity worth of gas expansion modules (GEMs) in the fast flux test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.R.; Nelson, J.V.; Burke, T.M.; Rawlins, J.A.; Daughtry, J.W.; Bennett, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    A new passive shutdown device called a gas expansion module (GEM) has been developed at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory to insert negative reactivity during a primary system loss of flow in a liquid-metal reactor (LMR). A GEM is a hollow removable core component which is sealed at the top and open at the bottom. An argon gas bubble trapped inside the assembly expands when core inlet pressure decreases (caused by a flow reduction) and expels sodium from the assembly. The GEMs are designed so that the level of the liquid-sodium primary system coolant within a GEM is above the top of the core when the primary pumps are operating at full flow and is below the bottom of the core when the primary pumps are off. When a GEM is placed at the boundary of the core and radial reflector, the drop in sodium level increases core neutron leakage and inserts negative reactivity. The results of these measurements confirm the effectiveness of GEMs in adding negative reactivity in loss-of-flow situations. It follows, therefore, that the inherent safety of LMRs, comparable in size to the FFTF, can be enhanced by the use of GEMs.

  13. Deposition of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite-based biocompatible composite by reactive plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Dragoş, Uţu

    2012-02-01

    Titanium nitride is a bioceramic material successfully used for covering medical implants due to the high hardness meaning good wear resistance. Hydroxyapatite is a bioactive ceramic that contributes to the restoration of bone tissue, which together with titanium nitride may contribute to obtaining a superior composite in terms of mechanical and bone tissue interaction matters. The paper presents the experimental results in obtaining composite layers of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite by reactive plasma spraying in ambient atmosphere. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that in both cases of powders mixtures used (10% HA + 90% Ti; 25% HA + 75% Ti), hydroxyapatite decomposition occurred; in variant 1 the decomposition is higher compared with the second variant. Microstructure of the deposited layers was investigated using scanning electron microscope, the surfaces presenting a lamellar morphology without defects such as cracks or microcracks. Surface roughness values obtained vary as function of the spraying distance, presenting higher values at lower thermal spraying distances.

  14. Single-crystal superconducting nanowires of NbSe{sub 2} fabricated by reactive plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Shaun A.; Staley, Neal E.; Wisser, Jacob J.; Shen, Chenyi; Xu, Zhuan; Liu, Ying

    2014-02-03

    We present the preparation and measurements of nanowires of single-crystal NbSe{sub 2}. These nanowires were prepared on ultrathin (≲10 nm) flakes of NbSe{sub 2} mechanically exfoliated from a bulk single crystal using a process combining electron beam lithography and reactive plasma etching. The electrical contacts to the nanowires were prepared using Ti/Au. Our technique, which overcomes several limitations of methods developed previously for fabricating superconducting nanowires, also allows for the preparation of complex superconducting nanostructures with a desired geometry. Current-voltage characteristics of individual superconducting single-crystal nanowires with widths down to 30 nm and cross-sectional areas as low as 270 nm{sup 2} were measured.

  15. Conclusive evidence of abrupt coagulation inside the void during cyclic nanoparticle formation in reactive plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Nijdam, S.; Beckers, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results that confirm in a direct way our earlier explanation of an abrupt coagulation event as the cause for the void hiccup. In a recent paper, we reported on the fast and interrupted expansion of voids in a reactive dusty argon-acetylene plasma. The voids appeared one after the other, each showing a peculiar, though reproducible, behavior of successive periods of fast expansion, abrupt contraction, and continued expansion. The abrupt contraction was termed "hiccup" and was related to collective coagulation of a new generation of nanoparticles growing in the void using relatively indirect methods: electron density measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. In this letter, we present conclusive evidence using SEM of particles collected at different moments in time spanning several growth cycles, which enables us to follow the nanoparticle formation process in great detail.

  16. Instability of dusty particle system in gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Filinov, V.S.; Petrov, O.F.; Fortov, V.E.; Molotkov, V.I.

    2005-10-31

    An effective anisotropic potential is proposed for the interaction between dust particles in a gas-discharge plasma. In addition to the Coulomb repulsion this potential takes into account attraction due to the spatial positive plasma charge originating from focusing of the ionic fluxes by dusty particles. The time evolution of the dust particle kinetic and potential energies from random initial configurations have been investigated by the Brownian dynamics method. Results of our simulation showed that the attraction between dusty particles can be the main physical reason of formation and decay of classical bound dust particle pairs and many particle complexes with low potential energy, while the kinetic energy (temperature) of unbound dust particles and particle oscillating in bound complexes may increase on three order as observed in experiments.

  17. On the optical and morphological properties of microstructured Black Silicon obtained by cryogenic-enhanced plasma reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, K. N.; Basset, P.; Marty, F.; Leprince-Wang, Y.; Bourouina, T.

    2013-05-01

    Motivated by the need for obtaining low reflectivity silicon surfaces, we report on (sub-) micro-texturing of silicon using a high throughput fabrication process involving SF6/O2 reactive ion etching at cryogenic temperatures, leading to Black Silicon (BS). The corresponding high aspect ratio conical spikes of the microstructured surface give rise to multiple reflections and hence, enhanced absorption under electromagnetic radiation. Aiming a better understanding of this mechanism, we performed a systematic study by varying several plasma process parameters: O2/SF6 gas flow rate ratio, silicon temperature, bias voltage, and etching time. We determined the process window which leads to BS formation and we studied the influence of the process parameters on the surface morphology of the obtained BS samples, through analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The measured optical reflectance of BS is in the order of 1% in the visible and near infrared ranges (400-950 nm). We noticed that the lowest reflectance is obtained close to the threshold parameters of BS formation. Absorptance spectral response of BS is measured from 1.3 to 17 μm, and we observed a great enhancement of absorptance up to about 75% compared to flat silicon. We also obtained through these experiments, a clear evidence of a correlation between the excellent optical properties and the aspect ratio of the BS conical microstructures in the measured wavelength ranges.

  18. Tuning the Reactivity of a Cu/ZnO Nanocatalyst via Gas Phase Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Suárez, Luis; Frenzel, Johannes; Marx, Dominik; Meyer, Bernd

    2013-02-01

    By calculation of a thermodynamic phase diagram we provide an atomistic understanding of the morphological changes in ZnO-supported Cu nanocatalysts, which are subject to strong metal-support interactions, in response to the redox properties of the surrounding gas phase, i.e., depending on temperature and pressure. The reactivity, and thus the strong metal-support interactions, of this catalyst is traced back to a redox-state dependent occupation of delocalized ZnO substrate bands and localized Cu cluster states at the Fermi level. It is shown that at the conditions of industrial methanol synthesis complex electronic charge transfer processes across the metal-support interface, driven by morphological and electronic changes, explain the enhanced catalytic reactivity toward CO2.

  19. Tuning the reactivity of a Cu/ZnO nanocatalyst via gas phase pressure.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Suárez, Luis; Frenzel, Johannes; Marx, Dominik; Meyer, Bernd

    2013-02-22

    By calculation of a thermodynamic phase diagram we provide an atomistic understanding of the morphological changes in ZnO-supported Cu nanocatalysts, which are subject to strong metal-support interactions, in response to the redox properties of the surrounding gas phase, i.e., depending on temperature and pressure. The reactivity, and thus the strong metal-support interactions, of this catalyst is traced back to a redox-state dependent occupation of delocalized ZnO substrate bands and localized Cu cluster states at the Fermi level. It is shown that at the conditions of industrial methanol synthesis complex electronic charge transfer processes across the metal-support interface, driven by morphological and electronic changes, explain the enhanced catalytic reactivity toward CO(2). PMID:23473174

  20. Supersonic gas jets for laser-plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, K.; Veisz, L.

    2012-05-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of De Laval nozzles, which are ideal for gas jet generation in a wide variety of experiments. Scaling behavior of parameters especially relevant to laser-plasma experiments as jet collimation, sharpness of the jet edges and Mach number of the resulting jet is studied and several scaling laws are given. Special attention is paid to the problem of the generation of microscopic supersonic jets with diameters as small as 150 μm. In this regime, boundary layers dominate the flow formation and have to be included in the analysis.

  1. Plasma Sprayed Pour Tubes and Other Melt Handling Components for Use in Gas Atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, David; Rieken, Joel; Heidloff, Andy; Besser, Matthew; Anderson, Iver

    2011-04-01

    Ames Laboratory has successfully used plasma sprayed ceramic components made from yttria stabilized zirconia as melt pouring tubes for gas atomization for many years. These tubes have proven to be strong, thermal shock resistant and versatile. Various configurations are possible both internally and externally. Accurate dimensions are achieved internally with a machined fugitive graphite mandrel and externally by diamond grinding. The previous study of the effect of spray parameters on density was extended to determine the effect of the resulting density on the thermal shock characteristics on down-quenching and up-quenching. Encouraging results also prompted investigation of the use of plasma spraying as a method to construct a melt pour exit stopper that is mechanically robust, thermal shock resistant, and not susceptible to attack by reactive melt additions. The Ames Laboratory operates two close-coupled high pressure gas atomizers. These two atomizers are designed to produce fine and coarse spherical metal powders (5{mu} to 500{mu} diameter) of many different metals and alloys. The systems vary in size, but generally the smaller atomizer can produce up to 5 kg of powder whereas the larger can produce up to 25 kg depending on the charge form and density. In order to make powders of such varying compositions, it is necessary to have melt systems capable of heating and containing the liquid charge to the desired superheat temperature prior to pouring through the atomization nozzle. For some metals and alloys this is not a problem; however for some more reactive and/or high melting materials this can pose unique challenges. Figure 1 is a schematic that illustrates the atomization system and its components.

  2. On the different regimes of gas heating in air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of the gas temperature in air (N2-20%O2) plasma discharges are presented for different values of the reduced electric field, E/N g, electron density n e, pressure and tube radius. This study is based on the solutions to the time-dependent gas thermal balance in a cylindrical geometry coupled to the electron, vibrational and chemical kinetics, for E/{{N}\\text{g}}=50 and 100 Td (1 Td = 10-17 V cm2), 109  ⩽  n e  ⩽  1011 cm-3, pressure in the range 1-20 Torr, and also considering different tube radius, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 cm. The competing role of different gas heating mechanisms is discussed in detail within the time range 0.01-100 ms. For times below 1 ms, gas heating occurs from O2 dissociation by electron impact through pre-dissociative excited states, e + O2  →  e + \\text{O}2*   →  e + 2O(3P) and …  →  e + O(3P) + O(1D), as well as through the quenching of N2 electronically excited states by O2. For longer times, simulation results show that gas heating comes from processes N(4S) + NO(X)  →  N2(X, v ~ 3) + O, N2(A) + O  →  NO(X) + N(2D), V-T N2-O collisions and the recombination of oxygen atoms at the wall. Depending on the given E/N g and n e values, each one of these processes can be an important gas-heating channel. The contribution of V-T N2-O exchanges to gas heating is important in the analysis of the gas temperature for different pressures and values of the tube radius. A global picture of these effects is given by the study of the fraction of the discharge power spent on gas heating, which is always ~15%. The values for the fractional power transferred to gas heating from vibrational and electronic excitation are also presented and discussed.

  3. Nucleation and growth of Nb nanoclusters during plasma gas condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, K. R.; Jiao, C. Q.; DeCerbo, J. N.

    2013-06-21

    Niobium nanoclusters were produced using a plasma gas condensation process. The influence of gas flow rate, aggregation length, and source current on the nanocluster nucleation and growth were analyzed. Nanoclusters with an average diameter from 4 nm to 10 nm were produced. Cluster size and concentration were tuned by controlling the process inputs. The effects of each parameter on the nucleation zone, growth length, and residence time was examined. The parameters do not affect the cluster formation and growth independently; their influence on cluster formation can be either cumulative or competing. Examining the nucleation and growth over a wide combination of parameters provided insight into their interactions and the impact on the growth process. These results provide the opportunity for a broader understanding into the nucleation and growth of nanoclusters and some insights into how process parameters interact during deposition. This knowledge will enhance the ability to create nanoclusters with desired size dispersions.

  4. Plasma polymerization of an ethylene-nitrogen gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudis, M.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure has been developed whereby nitrogen can be incorporated into an organic film from an ethylene-nitrogen gas mixture using an internal electrode capacitively coupled radio frequency reactor. The presence of nitrogen has been shown directly by infrared transmittance spectra and electron spectroscopic chemical analysis data, and further indirect evidence was provided by dielectric measurements and by the reverse osmosis properties of the film. Preparation of a nitrogen containing film did not require vapor from an organic nitrogen containing liquid monomer. Some control over the bonding and stoichiometry of the polymer film was provided by the added degree of freedom of the nitrogen partial pressure in the gas mixture. This new parameter strongly affected the dielectric properties of the plasma polymerized film and could affect the reverse osmosis behavior.

  5. Model for high rate gas flows in deformable and reactive porous beds

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, A M

    1985-01-08

    This report presents the development of a one dimensional planar Lagrange hydrodynamic computer model which describes the processes preceding detonation. The model treats gas flow, deflagration, and compaction in a porous bed of reactive material. The early part of deflagration to detonation experiment with porous HMX is simulated. Sensitivity of the simulation calculation to ignition and burn rate parameters is illustrated and discussed. The effects of changing the mean particle size of the porous material are investigated. There is widespread interest in runaway reaction hazards that may be associated with porosity in propellant and explosive materials. Experimentally, such reactions are initiated and observed in long, thick walled hollow tubes, filled with a granular porous bed of reactive material. We will present comparisons with an experiment on porous HMX to illustrate details of the model and to point out what we believe are important features of the observed phenomenon. A geometric finite element cell is devised that allows gas to flow through a compacting matrix. The experimental simulation considers the DDT process from initial squib burn through the onset of general matrix deflagration (convective burning), to the development of a fully dense compaction wave. While this simulation did not calculate turnover to detonation, it did illustrate that the transition occurred as soon as the compaction wave became fully dense. It is shown that deflagration and gas permeation lags compaction at the time of transition. This suggests that the actual transition involves an additional compaction dependent process. 18 references, 20 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Beam-plasma instabilities and their impact on D-D reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necas, Ales; Magee, R.; Tajima, T.; Nicks, B.; Seggebruch, M.; Garate, E.; Allfrey, I.; Valentine, T.; entire TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the C-2U program is to achieve 5 +ms steady state FRC sustainment via beam injection. In support, we simulate possible beam driven instabilities that are non-destructive, but transfer energy from fast ions to the plasma, causing phase space bunching. Such a mechanism may explain an experimentally observed anomalous neutron signal (10-100 × greater than the predicted thermonuclear component and peaking between 1-2 ms, correlated with a 1 ms beam slowing down time), as other explanations have been eliminated (D in the beams, fast-thermal ion head-on collisions, and miscalculation of Ti). We propose that the hydrogen beam generates an energetic ion population that then drives collective modes in the plasma, giving rise to an instability and increased fusion rate. A two-body correlation function is employed to determine DD reactivity enhancements. The instability changes character from electrostatic (ES; phase velocity is 70% of the beam velocity) in the low beta edge to fully electromagnetic (EM; at magnetosonic speeds) in the core, with an associated reduction in growth rates. A 1D ES analytical dispersion relation will be compared with a 1D3V PIC code (full EM study only performed with PIC code). Results from simulations are consistent with the observed neutron yield.

  7. C-reactive protein collaborates with plasma lectins to boost immune response against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ng, Patricia M L; Le Saux, Agnès; Lee, Chia M; Tan, Nguan S; Lu, Jinhua; Thiel, Steffen; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak L

    2007-07-25

    Although human C-reactive protein (CRP) becomes upregulated during septicemia, its role remains unclear, since purified CRP showed no binding to many common pathogens. Contrary to previous findings, we show that purified human CRP (hCRP) binds to Salmonella enterica, and that binding is enhanced in the presence of plasma factors. In the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, CRP is a major hemolymph protein. Incubation of hemolymph with a range of bacteria resulted in CRP binding to all the bacteria tested. Lipopolysaccharide-affinity chromatography of the hemolymph co-purified CRP, galactose-binding protein (GBP) and carcinolectin-5 (CL5). Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays suggested that these pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) form pathogen recognition complexes. We show the conservation of PRR crosstalk in humans, whereby hCRP interacts with ficolin (CL5 homologue). This interaction stabilizes CRP binding to bacteria and activates the lectin-mediated complement pathway. We propose that CRP does not act alone but collaborates with other plasma PRRs to form stable pathogen recognition complexes when targeting a wide range of bacteria for destruction. PMID:17581635

  8. A Kinetic Plasma-Pumped Rare Gas Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsey, Guy; Güçlü, Yaman; Verboncoeur, John; Christlieb, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Extending from diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPAL), Han and Heaven have shown that rare gas metastable states, np5 (n + 1) s[ 3 / 2 ] 2 , can operate as the base of a three-level laser with excition of the (n + 1) s --> (n + 1) p transitions. Though both the rare gas lasers (RGL) and DPALs can be excited with incoherent optical pumping, RGLs do not suffer from the highly reactive behavior of alkali metals. Since metastable populations are maintained via electric discharge, we propose using a tuned electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to modify RGL efficiencies and drive the population inversion. The EEDF is maintained by the discharge along with the introduction of electron sources. Using our kinetic global modeling framework (KGMf) and three gas systems (helium buffered argon and krypton along with pure argon), we first validate the intracavity intensity laser model and then generate gain and energy efficiency baselines for each system. Parameter scanning methods are then used to find optimized EEDFs and system parameters for metastable production, generation of a lasing population inversion, and increasing RGL operation efficiencies. Finally, we determine if an RGL can operate without optical pumping. Supported by AFOSR and a MSU Strategic Partnership Grant

  9. Establishing isokinetic flow for a plasma torch exhaust gas diagnostic for a plasma hearth furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, B.R.

    1996-05-01

    Real time monitoring of toxic metallic effluents in confined gas streams can be accomplished through use of Microwave Induced Plasmas to perform atomic emission spectroscopy, For this diagnostic to be viable it is necessary that it sample from the flowstream of interest in an isokinetic manner. A method of isokinetic sampling was established for this device for use in the exhaust system of a plasma hearth vitrification furnace. The flow and entrained particulate environment were simulated in the laboratory setting using a variable flow duct of the same dimensions (8-inch diameter, schedule 40) as that in the field and was loaded with similar particulate (less than 10 {mu}m in diameter) of lake bed soil typically used in the vitrification process. The flow from the furnace was assumed to be straight flow. To reproduce this effect a flow straightener was installed in the device. An isokinetic sampling train was designed to include the plasma torch, with microwave power input operating at 2.45 GHz, to match local freestream velocities between 800 and 2400 ft/sec. The isokinetic sampling system worked as planned and the plasma torch had no difficulty operating at the required flowrates. Simulation of the particulate suspension was also successful. Steady particle feeds were maintained over long periods of time and the plasma diagnostic responded as expected.

  10. Characterization of combined power plasma jet using AC high voltage and nanosecond pulse for reactive species composition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kato, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    In the application studies for both bio-medical and agricultural applications, the roles of the reactive oxide and/or nitride species generated in the plasma has been reported as a key to control the effects and ill-effects on the living organism. The correlation between total OH radical exposure from an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet and the sterilization threshold on Botrytis cinerea is presented. With the increase of the OH radical exposure to the Botrytis cinerea, the probability of sterilization is increased. In this study, to resolve the roles of reactive species including OH radicals, a combined power plasma jet using nanosecond pulses and low-frequency sinusoidal AC high voltage (a few kHz) is studied for controlling the composition of the reactive species. The nanosecond pulses are superimposed on the AC voltage which is in synchronization with the AC phase. The undergoing work to characterize the combined power discharge with electric charge and voltage cycle on the plasma jet will also be presented to discuss the discharge characteristics to control the composition of the reactive species.

  11. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN WHOLE BLOOD, BLOOD PLASMA AND BREAST MILK: VALIDATION OF A POTENTIAL MARKER OF EXPOSURE AND EFFECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized to contribute to the pathobiology of many diseases. We have applied a simple chemiluminescent (CL) probe to detect ROS in various biological fluids (plasma, whole blood, urine and breast milk) in an environmental arsenic drinking wate...

  12. Inactivation of microorganisms and endotoxins by low temperature nitrogen gas plasma exposure.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Hideharu; Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Sekiya, Takayuki; Tamazawa, Kahoru; Taniguchi, Akira; Kido, Nobuo

    2007-12-01

    The plasma of several different gases has shown a sporicidal activity. From these gases, nitrogen gas was most difficult to produce atomic nitrogen radicals. However, these radicals have a high energy, indicating that nitrogen gas plasma could be used to sterilize microorganisms and inactivate endotoxins. The sterilization mechanism of nitrogen gas plasma is the synergistic effect of a high rising-up voltage pulse, UV irradiation and atomic nitrogen radicals. Thus, the target cells were damaged by degradation, which resulted in death. The biological indicator (BI) used in this study was Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 at a population of 1 x 10(6) CFU/sheet. Sterility assurance was confirmed by using the BI. Moreover, endotoxins were successfully inactivated. More than 5 log reduction of endotoxins could be attained with 30 minutes of nitrogen gas plasma exposure. Material functionality influenced by nitrogen gas plasma presented a satisfactory result. No deterioration of polymers could be observed by nitrogen gas plasma exposure. PMID:18198719

  13. An effusive molecular beam technique for studies of polyatomic gas-surface reactivity and energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, G. W.; Navin, J. K.; Valadez, L.; Johánek, V.; Harrison, I.

    2011-04-01

    An effusive molecular beam technique is described to measure alkane dissociative sticking coefficients, S(Tg, Ts; ϑ), on metal surfaces for which the impinging gas temperature, Tg, and surface temperature, Ts, can be independently varied, along with the angle of incidence, ϑ, of the impinging gas. Effusive beam experiments with Tg = Ts = T allow for determination of angle-resolved dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T; ϑ), which when averaged over the cos (ϑ)/π angular distribution appropriate to the impinging flux from a thermal ambient gas yield the thermal dissociative sticking coefficient, S(T). Nonequilibrium S(Tg, Ts; ϑ) measurements for which Tg ≠ Ts provide additional opportunities to characterize the transition state and gas-surface energy transfer at reactive energies. A resistively heated effusive molecular beam doser controls the Tg of the impinging gas striking the surface. The flux of molecules striking the surface from the effusive beam is determined from knowledge of the dosing geometry, chamber pressure, and pumping speed. Separate experiments with a calibrated leak serve to fix the chamber pumping speed. Postdosing Auger electron spectroscopy is used to measure the carbon of the alkyl radical reaction product that is deposited on the surface as a result of alkane dissociative sticking. As implemented in a typical ultrahigh vacuum chamber for surface analysis, the technique has provided access to a dynamic range of roughly 6 orders of magnitude in the initial dissociative sticking coefficient for small alkanes on Pt(111).

  14. Comparative study between atmospheric microwave and low-frequency plasmas: Production efficiency of reactive species and their effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Im Hee; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Ho Young; Shin, Hyun Kook; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Sim, Jae Yoon; Lee, Jae Koo

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of low-frequency (LF) and microwave-powered plasmas were investigated. The optical emission of these two plasmas indicated that more chemicals were generated by microwave plasma than by LF plasma with the intensities being higher by factors of about 9, 3, 5, and 1.6 for OH (309 nm), O (777 nm), NO (247 nm), and Ca2+ (290 nm), respectively. Application experiments were also conducted. A steel plate became hydrophilic after 45 s of microwave plasma treatment. This is more than ten times faster than in the case of LF plasma treatment, an action related to the generation of reactive species (e.g., OH, O, and NO) as measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Ca2+ generation was verified by blood coagulation experiment. Microwave-plasma-induced coagulation was twice faster than LF-plasma-induced coagulation. Simulation results that explain the chemical generation in microwave plasma were also included. High-energy electrons were considered a major factor for microwave plasma characteristics.

  15. Laser ablated copper plasmas in liquid and gas ambient

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-05-15

    The dynamics of copper ablated plasma plumes generated using laser ablation of copper targets in both liquid (de-ionized water) and gas (air) ambients is reported. Using time and space resolved visible emission spectroscopy (450-650 nm), the plasma plumes parameters are investigated. The electron density (n{sub e}) determined using Stark broadening of the Cu I (3d{sup 10}4d{sup 1} {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}-3d{sup 10}4p{sup 1} {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} at 521.8 nm) line is estimated and compared for both plasma plumes. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) was estimated using the relative line emission intensities of the neutral copper transitions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectral analysis of the ablated copper surface indicated abundance of spherical nanoparticles in liquid while those in air are amalgamates of irregular shapes. The nanoparticles suspended in the confining liquid form aggregates and exhibit a surface plasmon resonance at ∼590 nm.

  16. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Boundary instability of an erosion laser plasma expanding into a background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Grishina, V. G.; Derkach, O. N.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1993-12-01

    The stability of the contact region in the system consisting of an erosion plasma and a gas has been determined experimentally under conditions such that the length of the applied laser pulse is longer than the rise time of the instability, and the expansion of the erosion plume is accompanied by breakdown of the background gas. The evolution of perturbations of the plasma front following the introduction of initial perturbations with a fixed spatial period has been studied. It is possible to model the injection of plasma bunches into a low-pressure gas by studying the dynamics of the vaporization at moderate laser-light intensities, characteristic of technological applications.

  17. Gas-injection experiments on a dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Barnouin, O.; Javedani, J.; Del Medico, S.; Miley, G.H.; Bromley, B.

    1994-12-31

    Rockford Technology Associates, Inc. (RTA) has been doing experiments on the Dense Plasma focus (DPF) device at the Fusion Studies Laboratory of the University of Illinois. This DPF consists of four racks of five 2-{mu}F capacitors whose charge is switched onto the inner electrode of a plasma focus by four Trigatron spark gaps. The stored energy is 12.5 kJ at 25 kV. The bank is usually discharged in a static fill of H{sub 2} at {approx} 6 torr. Preliminary experiments aimed at exploring the potential of the DPF device as a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and as an x-ray source for lithography have investigated various alternative ways of injecting gas between the electrodes. One of those approaches consists of injecting gas from the tip of the inner electrode at a steady rate. In this operation, the DPF chamber pressure was held constant by running the vacuum pump at full throttle. This operation simulated simultaneous pulsed injection at the base insulator and electrode tip. Hydrogen was fed through a 1/16th-inch hole at a flow rate of {approx} 90 cm/s. Pulsing was then performed at 23 kV, and the corresponding variations of the current were observed using a Rogowski coil. It is found that the plasma collapses into a pinch at the same time as in conventional experiments using a static fill. The singularity in the current waveform is slightly smaller with tip injection, but its size and shape are easily reproducible. Further details and comparison of this operation with conventional pulsing will be presented.

  18. He+O{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O plasmas as a source of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. X.; Wang, X. H.; Rong, M. Z.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2011-05-30

    The effect of water in the chemistry of atmospheric-pressure He+O{sub 2} plasmas is studied by means of a comprehensive global model. Water enables the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cocktails that are rich not only in O, O{sub 2}*, and O{sub 3} but also in OH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Due to its polar nature, water also leads to cluster formation, possibly affecting the plasma dynamics. Since the lifetime of many of the ROS is short, the plasma chemistry plays two roles: (i) direct interaction with superficial cells and (ii) triggering of a secondary chemistry that propagates the plasma treatment to regions away from the plasma-surface interface.

  19. Cluster Size Dependence of Etching by Reactive Gas Cluster Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Iaso

    2008-11-03

    Mass-selected reactive gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) were formed using a permanent magnetic filter. Irradiations of CO{sub 2} GCIB on amorphous carbon films and irradiations of SF{sub 6} and SF{sub 6}/Ar mixed GCIB on Si surfaces were performed to study the cluster size dependence on etching yields by reactive GCIB. The reactive sputtering yield of carbon by CO{sub 2} GCIB was almost ten times higher than that by Ar GCIB. In the case of (CO{sub 2}){sub 20000} GCIB with energy of 20 keV (1 eV/atom), it showed the high sputtering yield of 200 atoms/ion, however, there was little crater formation on the carbon surface. It is thought that very soft etching without crater formation would take place in this condition. In the case of SF{sub 6} GCIB on Si, the etching depth of Si showed maximum value when the fraction of SF{sub 6} to Ar was around 50%. As the etching yield was higher than pure SF{sub 6} GCIB, there was a strong ion assisted etching effects in the case of Ar/SF{sub 6} mixed cluster ion irradiations.

  20. Modelling penetration and plasma response of a dense neutral gas jet in a post-thermal quenched plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Wu, W.

    2014-02-01

    This paper is about the dynamics of gas jet injection and propagation into the cold, current quench (CQ) discharge following the thermal quench (TQ) phase of a disruption event. Understanding the processes involved in the interpenetration between a dense, fast-moving supersonic gas jet and a magnetized plasma is fundamental to the solution of the disruption mitigation problem using massive gas injection. An analytical model was developed that provides the penetration depth of the jet in the CQ discharge. The model developed incorporates the injector, the vacuum space between injector and plasma, and the low beta CQ plasma through which the jet penetrates. The radially moving gas stagnates at some point inside the plasma by formation of a ‘bottle shock’, resulting in a certain penetration depth. Consistent with experimental findings, it is shown that high fuelling efficiency >70% and good penetration beyond the q = 2 surface is possible in such plasma discharges, but in normal (unquenched) plasma discharges penetration of dense gas jets will be quite poor. The paper also sheds light on how the external plasma responds to allow interpenetration of perfectly insulating gas jet through a strong magnetic field B2/2μ0 ≫ ρu2. The paper also develops semi-analytical models for the response of the cold, high-current, collision-dominated plasma to the insertion of a dense neutral jet: the propagation of cooling waves out along the magnetic field lines, the heated and ionized surface layer which also expands outwards along the magnetic field lines, and the electrical breakdown of the neutral gas within the jet volume. Although good penetration in the ITER post-TQ discharge can be achieved, the plasma resistivity is only marginally enhanced. This may render repetitive gas inject ineffective, as the concept requires a sizable resistivity enhancement to initiate a current profile contraction, and resulting kink-tearing activity to suppress runaway avalanching.

  1. Pyrolysis process for producing condensed stabilized hydrocarbons utilizing a beneficially reactive gas

    DOEpatents

    Durai-Swamy, Kandaswamy

    1982-01-01

    In a process for recovery of values contained in solid carbonaceous material, the solid carbonaceous material is comminuted and then subjected to pyrolysis, in the presence of a carbon containing solid particulate source of heat and a beneficially reactive transport gas in a transport flash pyrolysis reactor, to form a pyrolysis product stream. The pyrolysis product stream contains a gaseous mixture and particulate solids. The solids are separated from the gaseous mixture to form a substantially solids-free gaseous stream which comprises volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals newly formed by pyrolysis. Preferably the solid particulate source of heat is formed by oxidizing part of the separated particulate solids. The beneficially reactive transport gas inhibits the reactivity of the char product and the carbon-containing solid particulate source of heat. Condensed stabilized hydrocarbons are obtained by quenching the gaseous mixture stream with a quench fluid which contains a capping agent for stabilizing and terminating newly formed volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals. The capping agent is partially depleted of hydrogen by the stabilization and termination reaction. Hydrocarbons of four or more carbon atoms in the gaseous mixture stream are condensed. A liquid stream containing the stabilized liquid product is then treated or separated into various fractions. A liquid containing the hydrogen depleted capping agent is hydrogenated to form a regenerated capping agent. At least a portion of the regenerated capping agent is recycled to the quench zone as the quench fluid. In another embodiment capping agent is produced by the process, separated from the liquid product mixture, and recycled.

  2. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmore, R. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lidster, R. T.; Lee, J. D.; Evans, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Lewis, A. C.; Hamilton, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London), which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20-30% of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50% of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that, 60% of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50% of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for but, very significant under-reporting of diesel related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~ 4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  3. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmore, R. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lidster, R. T.; Lee, J. D.; Evans, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Lewis, A. C.; Hamilton, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London), which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20-30 % of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50 % of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that 60 % of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50 % of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for, but very significant, under-reporting of diesel-related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  4. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  5. Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-10-15

    Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository for spent fuel and high-level nuclear wastes, leads to the generation and accumulation of hydrogen gas in the backfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-term repository safety. Previous studies used H{sub 2} generation rates based on the volume of the waste or canister material and the stoichiometry of the corrosion reaction. However, iron corrosion and H{sub 2} generation rates vary with time, depending on factors such as amount of iron, water availability, water contact area, and aqueous and solid chemistry. To account for these factors and feedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to iron corrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena that are driven by gas-pressure buildup associated with H{sub 2} generation and water consumption. Results indicate that by dynamically calculating H{sub 2} generation rates based on a simple model of corrosion chemistry, and by coupling this corrosion reaction with two-phase flow processes, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup could be much smaller compared to a model that neglects the coupling between flow and reactive transport mechanisms. By considering the feedback of corrosion chemistry, the gas pressure increases initially at the canister, but later decreases and eventually returns to a stabilized pressure that is slightly higher than the background pressure. The current study focuses on corrosion under anaerobic conditions for which the coupled hydrogeochemical model was used to examine the role of selected physical parameters on the H{sub 2} gas generation and corresponding pressure buildup in a nuclear waste repository. The developed model can be applied to evaluate the effect of water and mineral chemistry of the buffer and host rock on the corrosion reaction for future site-specific studies.

  6. A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-05-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  7. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  8. Reactive sputter-deposition of AlN films by dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Sadiq, Mehboob; Ahmad, S.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.; Ahmad, R.; Waheed, A.

    2006-11-15

    A low energy (1.45 kJ) dense plasma focus device is used to deposit thin films of aluminum nitride (AlN) at room temperature on silicon substrates. For deposition of films, a conventional hollow copper anode is replaced with a solid aluminum anode and nitrogen is used as fill gas. The films are deposited using a multiple number of focus shots by placing the substrate in front of the anode. The deposited films are characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and a microhardness test. The XRD analysis of the films shows that the deposited films show strong c-axis alignment. The Raman spectra of the films indicate that the deposited films are under compressive stress and crystalline quality decreases with increasing number of focus shots. The microhardness results point toward the uniform deposition of hard AlN layers on silicon substrates.

  9. Tunable Circularly Polarized Terahertz Radiation from Magnetized Gas Plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-M; Gibbon, P; Sheng, Z-M; Li, Y-T

    2015-06-26

    It is shown, by simulation and theory, that circularly or elliptically polarized terahertz radiation can be generated when a static magnetic (B) field is imposed on a gas target along the propagation direction of a two-color laser driver. The radiation frequency is determined by √[ω(p)(2)+ω(c)(2)/4]+ω(c)/2, where ω(p) is the plasma frequency and ω(c) is the electron cyclotron frequency. With the increase of the B field, the radiation changes from a single-cycle broadband waveform to a continuous narrow-band emission. In high-B-field cases, the radiation strength is proportional to ω(p)(2)/ω(c). The B field provides a tunability in the radiation frequency, spectrum width, and field strength. PMID:26197126

  10. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source for VASIMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Glover, Timothy W.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; Baity, F. Wally; Carter, Mark D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2004-01-01

    In the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a plasma flux to input gas rate ratio near 100% for both helium and deuterium at power levels up to 10 kW. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show enhanced efficiency operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 10 kW of input power. The data here uses a Boswell double-saddle antenna design with a magnetic cusp just upstream of the antenna. Similar to ORNL, for deuterium at near 10 kW, we find an enhanced performance of operation at magnetic fields above the lower hybrid matching condition.

  11. Nonthermal plasma systems and methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2005-05-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  12. Low temperature, fast deposition of metallic titanium nitride films using plasma activated reactive evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Montes de Oca Valero, J.A.; Le Petitcorps, Y.; Manaud, J.P.; Chollon, G.; Carrillo Romo, F.J.; Lopez M, A.

    2005-05-01

    Titanium and titanium nitride thin films were deposited on silica glass and W substrates at a high coating growth rate by plasma-activated reactive evaporation (ARE). The crystal structure, preferred orientation and grain size of the coatings were determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique using Cu-K{alpha} x rays. The analysis of the coating morphology was performed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The composition of the films was analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA). The titanium and titanium nitride condensates were collected on a carbon-coated collodion film then characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to study the structures of the deposits at very short deposition times. The resistivity of the films was measured by using the four-point-probe method. The titanium coatings were found to consist of very fine particles (40 nm in grain size) and to exhibit a strong (002) texture. The titanium nitride coatings were substoichiometric (TiN{sub x},x<1), with an oxygen content ranging from 7 to 15 at. % depending on the deposition conditions. The deposits were found to exhibit a (111) preferred orientation. This behavior became stronger with coating thickness. In spite of the presence of oxygen, all the TiN{sub x} coatings obtained at low temperature and a high growth rate in this work exhibited a rather high electrical conductivity.

  13. Nanometer fabrication in mercury cadmium telluride by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, C. R.; Hoffman, C. A.; Meyer, J. R.; Dobisz, E. A.

    1993-08-01

    It has been recently reported (J.R. Meyer, F.J. Bartoli, C.A. Hoffman, and L.R. Ram-Mohan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1963 [1990]) that novel electronic and optical effects are anticipated in nanometer scale features of narrow band gap semiconductors such as mercury cadmium telluride (MCT). These efforts could lead to the creation of non-linear optical switches, high efficiency infrared lasers, and unique nanoelectronic devices. This work reports on the first realization of MCT nanostructures through the application of e-beam lithography and reactive ion etching with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma source. It is shown that the low energy ions produced by an ECR system can etch MCT with good selectivity over an e-beam resist mask and with high resolution. Using these fabrication methods, 40 70 nm features with aspect ratios of 3 5∶1 and sidewall angles greater than 88° have been demonstrated. Qualitative investigations of some of the etch mechanisms of this technique are made, and results suggest a desorption limited process.

  14. Positron transport and thermalization - the plasma-gas interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, Joan

    2008-11-01

    Low energy positrons are now used in many fields including atomic physics, material science and medicine [1]. Plasma physics is providing new tools for this research, including Penning-Malmberg buffer-gas traps to accumulate positrons and the use of rotating electric fields (the ``rotating wall'' technique) to compress positrons radially and create tailored beams [1]. These devices (now available commercially), which rely in key instances on positron-neutral interactions, are a convenient way to create plasmas and beams for a variety of applications. A deeper understanding of the relevant cooling and loss mechanisms is required to take full advantage of this technology. This talk focuses on a recent study of positrons in such a tenuous gaseous environment in the presence of an applied electric field [2]. Energy-resolved collision cross sections and a Monte Carlo code modified to include positrionium (Ps) formation are used to obtain transport coefficients and the thermalization and Ps-formation rates. A markedly different type of negative differential conductivity is observed (i.e., not seen in electron systems), due to the non-conservative nature of the Ps-formation process. It is particularly prominent in gases with large, highly energy dependent Ps-formation cross sections. The relevance of these calculations to other positron applications will also be discussed, including a currently planned study of positrons in gaseous water. It is hoped that these calculations will inspire a new generation of positron transport experiments.*Work done in collaboration with Z.Lj. Petrovi'c, A. Bankovi'c, M. Suvakov, G. Malovi'c, S. Dujko, S.J. Buckman. 1. C. M. Surko and R. G. Greaves, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2333-2348 (2004).2. A. Bankovi'c, J. P. Marler, M. Suvakov, G. Malovi'c, and Z. Lj. Petrovi'c, Nucl. Instrum. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B 266, 462-465 (2008).

  15. Improved Back-Side Purge-Gas Chambers For Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezell, Kenneth G.; Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved chambers for inert-gas purging of back sides of workpieces during plasma arc welding in keyhole (full-penetration) mode based on concept of directing flows of inert gases toward, and concentrating them on, hot weld zones. Tapered chamber concentrates flow of inert gas on plasma arc plume and surrounding metal.

  16. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O{sub 2} plasma-jet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-07-28

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  17. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O2 plasma-jet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Shiratani, Masaharu; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  18. Reactivity studies of plasma-synthesized aluminum trifluoride and electrochemical synthesis of non-stoichiometric silver selenide nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajime, Evan Koon Lun Yuuji

    A high surface area aluminum trifluoride material ("plasma-AIF3 ") has previously been synthesized in our laboratory by decomposition of zeolitic precursors in fluorine-containing, low-temperature plasmas. The characterization of the halogen exchange reactivity of this unique fluoride material is presented in Part 1 of the dissertation. A gas flow reactor was designed and built to study the isothermal and temperature-dependent halogen exchange activity of plasma-AIF3, with comparisons being made to the well-known halogen exchange catalyst beta-AIF3. Isothermal experiments showed that plasma-AIF3 is an active halogen exchange catalyst for the dismutation of dichlorodifluoromethane, while temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments revealed a lower temperature onset of activity with plasma-AIF3 when compared to beta-AIF3. The existence of two distinct active sites for halogen exchange on aluminum fluoride is proposed, with sites characteristic of plasma-AIF3 and R-AIF3 having lower and higher temperature onsets of activity, respectively. TPR data for hydrated plasma-AIF3 showed a significant attenuation of the lower temperature active sites, while the higher temperature site remained relatively unchanged in activity. Temperature-programmed X-ray diffraction of plasma-AIF3 revealed the existence of beta-AIF 3 crystallites at temperatures between 225 and 500°C, thus rationalizing the existence of the higher temperature active site (associated with beta-AIF 3) in plasma-AIF3 during heating. Plasma-AIF3 also displayed a high affinity for crystalline hydrate formation with extended exposure to moist air, and TPR experiments performed on commercially available AIF3·3H2O produced plots similar in shape and features when compared to plasma-AIF3. The thermal transformation processes of the trihydrate suggest the origin of the lower temperature active site to be associated with an amorphous bulk AIF3 structure. Part 2 of the dissertation summarizes the current efforts

  19. Usefulness of C-Reactive Protein Plasma Levels to Predict Exercise Intolerance in Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Canada, Justin McNair; Fronk, Daniel Taylor; Cei, Laura Freeman; Carbone, Salvatore; Erdle, Claudia Oddi; Abouzaki, Nayef Antar; Melchior, Ryan David; Thomas, Christopher Scott; Christopher, Sanah; Turlington, Jeremy Shane; Trankle, Cory Ross; Thurber, Clinton Joseph; Evans, Ronald Kenneth; Dixon, Dave L; Van Tassell, Benjamin Wallace; Arena, Ross; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) have evidence of chronic systemic inflammation. Whether inflammation contributes to the exercise intolerance in patients with HF is, however, not well established. We hypothesized that the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), an established inflammatory biomarker, predict impaired cardiopulmonary exercise performance, in patients with chronic systolic HF. We measured CRP using high-sensitivity particle-enhanced immunonephelometry in 16 patients with ischemic heart disease (previous myocardial infarction) and chronic systolic HF, defined as a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 50% and New York Heart Association class II-III symptoms. All subjects with CRP >2 mg/L, reflecting systemic inflammation, underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing using a symptom-limited ramp protocol. CRP levels predicted shorter exercise times (R = -0.65, p = 0.006), lower oxygen consumption (VO2) at the anaerobic threshold (R = -0.66, p = 0.005), and lower peak VO2 (R = -0.70, p = 0.002), reflecting worse cardiovascular performance. CRP levels also significantly correlated with an elevated ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope (R = +0.64, p = 0.008), a reduced oxygen uptake efficiency slope (R = -0.55, p = 0.026), and reduced end-tidal CO2 level at rest and with exercise (R = -0.759, p = 0.001 and R = -0.739, p = 0.001, respectively), reflecting impaired gas exchange. In conclusion, the intensity of systemic inflammation, measured as CRP plasma levels, is associated with cardiopulmonary exercise performance, in patients with ischemic heart disease and chronic systolic HF. These data provide the rationale for targeted anti-inflammatory treatments in HF. PMID:26546248

  20. Discharge characteristics and hydrodynamics behaviors of atmospheric plasma jets produced in various gas flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric nonequilibrium plasma jets have been widely employed in biomedical applications. For biomedical applications, it is an important issue to understand the complicated mechanism of interaction of the plasma jet with liquid. In this study, we present analysis of the discharge characteristics of a plasma jet impinging onto the liquid surface under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. For this purpose, we analyzed gas flow patters by using a Schlieren gas-flow imaging system in detail The plasma jet impinging into the liquid surface expands along the liquid surface. The diameter of the expanded plasma increases with gas flow rate, which is well explained by an increase in the diameter of the laminar gas-flow channel. When the gas flow rate is further increased, the gas flow mode transits from laminar to turbulence in the gas flow channel, which leads to the shortening of the plasm-jet length. Our experiment demonstrated that the gas flow patterns strongly affect the discharge characteristics in the plasma-jet system. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' (24108003) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT).

  1. Effects of ionic liquid electrode on pulse discharge plasmas in the wide range of gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qiang; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2010-11-15

    Gas-liquid interfacial pulse discharge plasmas are generated in the wide range of gas pressures, where an ionic liquid is used as the liquid electrode. By analyzing the characteristics of discharge voltage and current, the discharge mechanisms at low and high pressures are found to be dominated by secondary electron emission and first Townsend ionization, respectively. Therefore, the discharge properties at low and high pressures are mainly determined by the cathode material and the discharge gas type, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma properties are investigated by a double Langmuir probe. The density of the positive pulse plasma is found to be much smaller than that of the negative pulse plasma, although the discharge voltage and current of the negative and positive pulse plasmas are of the same order of magnitude. The positive pulse discharge plasma is considered to quickly diffuse onto the chamber wall from the radially central region due to its high plasma potential compared with that in the peripheral region.

  2. Production of centimeter-scale, high-density plasmas with a linear gas jet

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.; Darrow, C.B.; Jones, R.; Sawyer, W.; Crane, J.; Ditmire, T.; Perry, M.D. ); Filbert, P.C. )

    1995-01-01

    A novel linear gas jet has been developed and used to produce centimeter-scale, 10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] electron density plasmas. Long regions of high density are important to many types of experiments, including x-ray laser and laser-plasma interaction studies. This new type of gas jet has been characterized by stimulated Raman backscatter emission from the plasma.

  3. Structure and reactivity of benzoylnitrene radical anion in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wijeratne, Neloni R; Wenthold, Paul G

    2007-12-01

    The open-shell benzoylnitrene radical anion, readily generated by electron ionization of benzoylazide, undergoes unique chemical reactivity with radical reagents and Lewis acids in the gas phase. Reaction with nitric oxide, NO, proceeds by loss of N2 and formation of benzoate ion. This novel reaction is also observed to occur with phenylnitrene anion, forming phenoxide. Similar reactivity was observed in the reaction between benzoylnitrene radical anion and NO2, forming benzoate ion and nitrous oxide. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the reaction has a high-energy barrier that is overcome by the energy released by bond formation. Benzoylnitrene radical anion also transfers oxygen anion to NO and NO2 as well as to CS2 and SO2. In contrast, phenylnitrene anion reacts with carbon disulfide by C+ or CS+ abstraction, forming S- or S2-. Electronic structure calculations indicate that benzoylnitrene in the ground state resembles a slightly polarized benzoate anion, but with a free radical localized on the nitrogen. PMID:18001090

  4. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  5. Silicon oxynitride thin films synthesised by the reactive gas pulsing process using rectangular pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, E.; Weber, S.; Billard, A.; Martin, N.

    2011-09-01

    Silicon oxynitride thin films were synthesised by the reactive gas pulsing process using an argon, oxygen and nitrogen gas mixture from a semiconductor Si target. Argon and nitrogen were introduced at a constant mass flow rate, whereas oxygen gas was periodically supplied using a rectangular pulsed flow rate. The O2 injection time TON (or duty cycle α) was the only varied parameter. The influences of this parameter on the discharge behaviour, on the Si target voltage, and on the resulting chemical composition of the films were investigated. The temporal evolution of the total pressure exhibits exponential shape differing from the rectangular oxygen pulse shape, due to the response time of the gas flowmeter and to the progressive oxidation of the target and the chamber walls. During the TON time, the preferential adsorption of the introduced O2 induces a decay in Si target voltage. Reversion to the nitrided mode is still possible as soon as the O2 injection is stopped. The elemental analyses assessed by secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) showed that the O/N ratio within silicon oxynitride films linearly depends on the TON time. Increasing the duty cycle α over a certain value results in an oxidised steady state formation during the TON time. This formation was observed by real time measurements of the emission lines ratio I(O*)/I(Ar*) indicative of the O2 partial pressure and confirmed by the time derivative of the target voltage. During the TOFF time, the alternation with the nitrided mode becomes impossible, leading to the specific synthesis of stoichiometric SiO2 films.

  6. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  7. Investigation of plasma-dust structures in He-Ar gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Maiorov, S. A.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Dosbolayev, M. K.

    2008-09-15

    The paper reports on the first experiments with plasma-dust formations in dc gas discharge plasma for a He-Ar mixture. It is shown that the choice of light and heavy gases for the mixture suppresses ion heating in electric field under the conventional conditions of experiments and results in a supersonic jet with high Mach numbers. Distribution functions for drifting ions in the gas mixture are calculated for various mixture concentrations, electric field strengths, and gas pressures.

  8. Plasma channel created by ionization of gas by a surface wave

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, V. N.; Kuz’min, G. P.; Minaev, I. M. Rukhadze, A. A.; Tikhonevich, O. V.

    2015-09-15

    Conditions for gas ionization in the field of a slow surface wave excited by a microwave source are considered. The gas ionization rate and the plasma density distribution over the radius of the discharge tube were studied by the optical method. The experiments were conducted in a dielectric tube with a radius much smaller than the tube length, the gas pressure being ∼1–3 Torr. It is shown that the stationary distribution of the plasma density is determined by diffusion processes.

  9. Baseline Plasma C-Reactive Protein Concentrations and Motor Prognosis in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Atsushi; Oeda, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Tomita, Satoshi; Kohsaka, Masayuki; Park, Kwiyoung; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP), a blood inflammatory biomarker, is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease. In animal models of Parkinson disease (PD), systemic inflammatory stimuli can promote neuroinflammation and accelerate dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, the association between long-term systemic inflammations and neurodegeneration has not been assessed in PD patients. Objective To investigate the longitudinal effects of baseline CRP concentrations on motor prognosis in PD. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective analysis of 375 patients (mean age, 69.3 years; mean PD duration, 6.6 years). Plasma concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP were measured in the absence of infections, and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS-III) scores were measured at five follow-up intervals (Days 1–90, 91–270, 271–450, 451–630, and 631–900). Main Outcome Measure Change of UPDRS-III scores from baseline to each of the five follow-up periods. Results Change in UPDRS-III scores was significantly greater in PD patients with CRP concentrations ≥0.7 mg/L than in those with CRP concentrations <0.7 mg/L, as determined by a generalized estimation equation model (P = 0.021) for the entire follow-up period and by a generalized regression model (P = 0.030) for the last follow-up interval (Days 631–900). The regression coefficients of baseline CRP for the two periods were 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21–2.61) and 2.62 (95% CI 0.25–4.98), respectively, after adjusting for sex, age, baseline UPDRS-III score, dementia, and incremental L-dopa equivalent dose. Conclusion Baseline plasma CRP levels were associated with motor deterioration and predicted motor prognosis in patients with PD. These associations were independent of sex, age, PD severity, dementia, and anti-Parkinsonian agents, suggesting that subclinical systemic inflammations could accelerate neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:26308525

  10. Polygenic Overlap Between C-Reactive Protein, Plasma Lipids and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Rahul S.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Dehghan, Abbas; Ridker, Paul M; Chasman, Daniel I.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Holland, Dominic; Chen, Chi-Hua; Karow, David S.; Brewer, James B.; Hess, Christopher P.; Williams, Julie; Sims, Rebecca; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Choi, Seung Hoan; Bis, Joshua C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; DeStefano, Anita L.; van der Lee, Sven J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Launer, Lenore; Seshadri, Sudha; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Hardy, John; Ulstein, Ingun Dina; Aarsland, Dag; Fladby, Tormod; White, Linda R.; Sando, Sigrid B.; Rongve, Arvid; Witoelar, Aree; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hyman, Bradley T.; Snaedal, Jon; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiological findings suggest a relationship between Alzheimer's disease (AD), inflammation and dyslipidemia, although the nature of this relationship is not well understood. We investigated whether this phenotypic association arises from a shared genetic basis. Methods and Results Using summary statistics (p-values and odds ratios) from genome-wide association studies of over 200,000 individuals, we investigated overlap in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with clinically diagnosed AD and C-reactive protein (CRP), triglycerides (TG), high- (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels. We found up to 50-fold enrichment of AD SNPs for different levels of association with CRP, LDL, HDL and TG SNPs using an FDR threshold < 0.05. By conditioning on polymorphisms associated with the four phenotypes, we identified 55 loci associated with increased AD risk. We then conducted a meta-analysis of these 55 variants across four independent AD cohorts (total n = 29,054 AD cases and 114,824 healthy controls) and discovered two genome-wide significant variants on chromosome 4 (rs13113697, closest gene HS3ST1, odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-1.11, p = 2.86 × 10−8) and chromosome 10 (rs7920721, closest gene ECHDC3, OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.04-1.11, p = 3.38 × 10−8). We also found that gene expression of HS3ST1 and ECHDC3 was altered in AD brains compared with control brains. Conclusions We demonstrate genetic overlap between AD, CRP, and plasma lipids. By conditioning on the genetic association with the cardiovascular phenotypes, we identify novel AD susceptibility loci including two genome-wide significant variants conferring increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25862742

  11. Multilayered metal oxide thin film gas sensors obtained by conventional and RF plasma-assisted laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitu, B.; Marotta, V.; Orlando, S.

    2006-04-01

    Multilayered thin films of In 2O 3 and SnO 2 have been deposited by conventional and RF plasma-assisted reactive pulsed laser ablation, with the aim to evaluate their behaviour as toxic gas sensors. The depositions have been carried out by a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser ( λ = 532 nm, τ = 7 ns) on Si(1 0 0) substrates, in O 2 atmosphere. The thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical resistance measurements. A comparison of the electrical response of the simple (indium oxide, tin oxide) and multilayered oxides to toxic gas (nitric oxide, NO) has been performed. The influence on the structural and electrical properties of the deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature and RF power is reported.

  12. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  13. Gas-phase structure and reactivity of the keto tautomer of the deoxyguanosine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Feketeová, Linda; Chan, Bun; Khairallah, George N; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maître, Philippe; Radom, Leo; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-10-21

    Guanine radical cations are formed upon oxidation of DNA. Deoxyguanosine (dG) is used as a model, and the gas-phase infrared (IR) spectroscopic signature and gas-phase unimolecular and bimolecular chemistry of its radical cation, dG˙(+), A, which is formed via direct electrospray ionisation (ESI/MS) of a methanolic solution of Cu(NO3)2 and dG, are examined. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out on 28 isomers and comparisons between their calculated IR spectra and the experimentally-measured spectra suggest that A exists as the ground-state keto tautomer. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of A proceeds via cleavage of the glycosidic bond, while its ion–molecule reactions with amine bases occur via a number of pathways including hydrogen-atom abstraction, proton transfer and adduct formation. A hidden channel, involving isomerisation of the radical cation via adduct formation, is revealed through the use of two stages of CID, with the final stage of CID showing the loss of CH2O as a major fragmentation pathway from the reformed radical cation, dG˙(+). Quantum chemistry calculations on the unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity are also consistent with A being present as a ground-state keto tautomer. PMID:25942055

  14. Fault reactivation and seismicity risk from CO2 sequestration in the Chinshui gas field, NW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Chia-Yu; Hung, Jih-Hao

    2015-04-01

    The Chinshui gas field located in the fold-thrust belt of western Taiwan was a depleted reservoir. Recently, CO2 sequestration has been planned at shallower depths of this structure. CO2 injection into reservoir will generate high fluid pressure and trigger slip on reservoir-bounding faults. We present detailed in-situ stresses from deep wells in the Chinshui gas field and evaluated the risk of fault reactivation for underground CO2 injection. The magnitudes of vertical stress (Sv), formation pore pressure (Pf) and minimum horizontal stress (Shmin) were obtained from formation density logs, repeat formation tests, sonic logs, mud weight, and hydraulic fracturing including leak-off tests and hydraulic fracturing. The magnitude of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) was constrained by frictional limit of critically stressed faults. Results show that vertical stress gradient is about 23.02 MPa/km (1.02 psi/ft), and minimum horizontal stress gradient is 18.05 MPa/km (0.80 psi/ft). Formation pore pressures were hydrostatic at depths 2 km, and increase with a gradient of 16.62 MPa/km (0.73 psi/ft). The ratio of fluid pressure and overburden pressure (λp) is 0.65. The upper bound of maximum horizontal stress constrained by strike-slip fault stress regime (SHmax>Sv>Shmin) and coefficient of friction (μ=0.6) is about 18.55 MPa/km (0.82 psi/ft). The orientation of maximum horizontal stresses was calculated from four-arm caliper tools through the methodology suggested by World Stress Map (WMS). The mean azimuth of preferred orientation of borehole breakouts are in ~65。N. Consequently, the maximum horizontal stress axis trends in 155。N and sub-parallel to the far-field plate-convergence direction. Geomechanical analyses of the reactivation of pre-existing faults was assessed using 3DStress and Traptester software. Under current in-situ stress, the middle block fault has higher slip tendency, but still less than frictional coefficient of 0.6 a common threshold value for

  15. Transport in a field-aligned magnetized plasma and neutral gas boundary: the end of the plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher; Gekelman, Walter

    2012-10-01

    A series of experiments at the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD) at UCLA study the Neutral Boundary Layer (NBL) between a magnetized plasma and a neutral gas in the direction of the confining field. A lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathode and semi-transparent anode create a current-free, weakly ionized (ne/nn<5%), helium plasma (B˜250 G, Rplasma=10cm, ne<10^12cm^3, Te<3eV, and Ti˜Tn) that terminates on helium gas without touching any walls. Probes inserted into the plasma measure the basic plasma parameters in the NBL. The NBL begins where the plasma and neutral gas pressures equilibrate and the electrons and ions come to rest through collisions with the neutral gas. A field-aligned electric field (δφ/kTe˜1) is established self-consistently to maintain a current-free termination and dominates transport in the NBL, similar to a sheath but with a length L˜10λei˜10^2λen˜10^5λD. A two-fluid weakly-ionized transport model describes the system. A generalized Ohm's Law correctly predicts the electric field observed. The pressure balance criteria and magnitude of the termination electric field are confirmed over a scaling of parameters. The model can also be used to describe the atmospheric termination of aurora or fully detached gaseous divertors.

  16. As-grown Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films by reactive coevaporation with oxygen plasma cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, M.; Akoh, H.; Takada, S.

    1989-10-01

    We have developed a new fabrication process of as-grown Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films using a reactive coevaporation method specially with the rf-plasma cooling in the low oxygen pressure of 0.4 mTorr. By this O2 plasma cooling process, the transition temperature Tc is improved from 40 to 81 K for the film with a thickness of 1000 Å. The x-ray diffraction analysis shows that the activated oxygen species generated by the rf plasma make Y-Ba-Cu-O films oxidize sufficiently even in the low pressure of oxygen. In addition, we have studied the thickness dependence of Tc for as-grown films with various thicknesses of 60-2000 Å.

  17. As-grown Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films by reactive coevaporation with oxygen plasma cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, M.; Akoh, H.; Takada, S. )

    1989-10-15

    We have developed a new fabrication process of as-grown Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films using a reactive coevaporation method specially with the rf-plasma cooling in the low oxygen pressure of 0.4 mTorr. By this O{sub 2} plasma cooling process, the transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} is improved from 40 to 81 K for the film with a thickness of 1000 A. The x-ray diffraction analysis shows that the activated oxygen species generated by the rf plasma make Y-Ba-Cu-O films oxidize sufficiently even in the low pressure of oxygen. In addition, we have studied the thickness dependence of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} for as-grown films with various thicknesses of 60--2000 A.

  18. Structural modification of the skin barrier by OH radicals: a reactive molecular dynamics study for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Paal, J.; Verlackt, C. C.; Yusupov, M.; Neyts, E. C.; Bogaerts, A.

    2015-04-01

    While plasma treatment of skin diseases and wound healing has been proven highly effective, the underlying mechanisms, and more generally the effect of plasma radicals on skin tissue, are not yet completely understood. In this paper, we perform ReaxFF-based reactive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of plasma generated OH radicals with a model system composed of free fatty acids, ceramides, and cholesterol molecules. This model system is an approximation of the upper layer of the skin (stratum corneum). All interaction mechanisms observed in our simulations are initiated by H-abstraction from one of the ceramides. This reaction, in turn, often starts a cascade of other reactions, which eventually lead to the formation of aldehydes, the dissociation of ceramides or the elimination of formaldehyde, and thus eventually to the degradation of the skin barrier function.

  19. Effect of air plasma treatment on the dyeing of Tencel fabric with C.I. Reactive Black 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. S.; Liu, H. L.; Yu, W. D.

    2015-02-01

    The Tencel fabrics were treated by the atmospheric pressure plasma with air for different length of time and dyed with the C.I. Reactive Black 5 at 1%, 5% and 10% o.m.f. The effect of the prolonged plasma treatment time was characterized by both the weight loss and the whiteness index analyses, which implied that with the increase of the plasma treatment time, the treated fabrics were lighter and yellower than the untreated ones. The contact angle decreased dramatically from 139° to instantly spread. The results of SEM showed that, with the prolonged treatment time, more significant crater-like surface morphology on the fiber of Tencel samples was formed. Compared with untreated samples, the values of dye bath exhaustion and total fixation effect were higher. But they did not increase with the prolonged plasma treatment time. With the prolonged storage time after the plasma treatment, the result to ageing effect indicated that the values of dye bath exhaustion and total fixation effect reduced. The Integ values for characterizing the coloring effect were evaluated by the CIE system of color measurement. In most cases, the Integ values reached the highest ones when the plasma treatment time was 10 or 20 min. When the concentration of the dye bath was low (at 1% o.m.f.), the longer plasma treatment time was, the higher the Integ value was. However, if the fabrics after plasma treatment were stored for 21 days, the longer plasma treatment time did not cause the larger Integ value. When the concentration was 1%, the Integ value increased with the weight loss increasing, which was different from the values of fabrics with 5% and 10% concentration. If the dyeing concentration was low, the fixation had a more significant effect on the color fastness to wet rubbing; in contrast, if the dyeing concentration was high, the surface roughness had a more important effect on it.

  20. Aqueous extractive upgrading of bio-oils created by tail-gas reactive pyrolysis to produce pure hydrocarbons and phenols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tail-gas reactive pyrolysis (TGRP) of biomass produces bio-oil that is lower in oxygen (~15 wt% total) and significantly more hydrocarbon-rich than traditional bio-oils or even catalytic fast pyrolysis. TGRP bio-oils lend themselves toward mild and inexpensive upgrading procedures. We isolated oxyge...

  1. Distillation and isolation of commodity chemicals from Bio-oil made by tail-gas reactive prolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Owing to instabilities, very little has been accomplished with regards to simple cost-effective separations of fast-pyrolysis bio-oil. However, recent developments in the use of tail-gas reactive pyrolysis (TGRP) (Mullen and Boateng 2013) provide higher quality bio-oils that are thermally stable. We...

  2. Evaluation of the effect of elastic joints on the auto-oscillation of spacecraft with gas-reactive direction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasin, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model was obtained, on the basis of the method of mixed coordinates, of a generalized flexible spacecraft at one end of which was appended the directive action of a system of gas reactive nozzles. Various structural forms were obtained functionally describing flexible spacecraft, as systems consisting of a solid central body with flexible structural elements joined to it.

  3. Particle Dynamics in Neutral-Gas Confined Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong W.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-produced plasma from a metallic target can be confined to higher plasma densities by immersing the target in an inert gas medium at increasingly high density. The plasma becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, however, when the mass density of the neutral gas exceeds the plasma mass density substantially.[1] A new plasma diagnostic method is developed to help examine the early time development of the gas-plasma interfacial structure. A preliminary study based on plasma polarization spectroscopy is presented, in which the dynamics of atoms and ions are visualized in the presence of electromagnetic fields due to charge separation. The ambient gas pressure of argon is varied as active control in the low-pressure regime. Time-resolved multi-directional projections of an aluminum plasma are obtained in line and continuum emissions, polarization and spectral broadening including Doppler shifts. The electrostatic potential of the target is also followed. The results indicate a bifurcation of the phase-space distribution function and structural segmentation of the plasma into a thermalized core and a crown with highly aligned, energetic atoms and ions. Reconstruction of the plasma structure appears possible by generalization of the two new algorithms we have developed.[1,2] 1. Y.W. Kim and J.-C. Oh, Rev. Sci. Inst. 72, 948 (2001). 2. Y.W. Kim and C.D. Lloyd-Knight, Rev. Sci. Inst. 72, 944 (2001).

  4. On the reactivity of plasma-treated photo-catalytic TiO2 surfaces for oxidation of C2H2 and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatik, D.; Marinov, D.; Guaitella, O.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fundamental aspects of interactions of plasmas with catalytic surfaces. Based on this approach the reactivity of plasma treated and stimulated catalytic surfaces of TiO2 is studied by analysing the oxidation (i) of C2H2 to CO and CO2 and (ii) of CO to CO2. The inner surface of a Pyrex discharge tube is coated with TiO2 films impregnated with TiO2 nanoparticles, which provides a surface area of about 4 m2. In addition to the exposure of the TiO2 surface by low-pressure radio-frequency plasmas using O2, Ar or N2 (f = 13.56 MHz, p = 0.53 mbar, P = 17 W) the surfaces are stimulated by heating and UV radiation treatment. The temporal development of the concentrations of the precursor gases C2H2 or CO and of the reaction products is monitored using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, which provides multi-component detection in the mid-infrared spectral range. The C2H2 concentration was found to be nearly constant over time after a pre-treatment with Ar or N2 discharges using an initial gas mixture of 1% C2H2 in Ar. However, a strong decay of the concentration of C2H2 is observed for pure O2 plasma pre-treatment. In general, the decay is found to be nearly exponential with time constant in the order of about 10 min. The reactive adsorption of C2H2 molecules on the inner surface of the tube reactor showed a density of about 7.5 × 1012 C2H2 molecules cm-2. This behaviour demonstrates that the reaction (O_{ads} +C_{2} H_{2})_{{TiO}_{2}} produces some adsorbed intermediates, which can be thermally or photo-catalytically oxidized to CO2. In contrast, when 1% CO in Ar is used as an initial gas mixture no adsorption processes on the TiO2 surface could be detected. An effective destruction of CO took part via photo-catalytic oxidation.

  5. Role of neutral gas in scrape-off layer tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bisai, N.; Jha, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-02-15

    Neutral gas in scrape-off layer of tokamak plasma plays an important role as it can modify the plasma turbulence. In order to investigate this, we have derived a simple two-dimensional (2D) model that consists of electron continuity, quasi-neutrality, and neutral gas continuity equations using neutral gas ionization and charge exchange processes. Simple 1D profile analysis predicts neutral penetration depth into the plasma. Growth rate obtained from the linear theory has been presented. The 2D model equations have been solved numerically. It is found that the neutral gas reduces plasma fluctuations and shifts spectrum of the turbulence towards lower frequency side. The neutral gas fluctuation levels have been presented. The numerical results have been compared with Aditya tokamak experiments.

  6. An atmospheric-pressure cold plasma leads to apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by accumulating intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R. N.; Feng, H. Q.; Liang, Y. D.; Zhang, Q.; Tian, Y.; Su, B.; Zhang, J.; Fang, J.

    2013-07-01

    A non-thermal plasma is known to induce apoptosis of various cells but the mechanism is not yet clear. A eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiaewas used to investigate the cellular and biochemical regulations of cell apoptosis and cell cycle after an atmospheric-pressure cold plasma treatment. More importantly, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) was first involved in monitoring the process of plasma-induced apoptosis in this study. We analysed the cell apoptosis and cell cycle by flow cytometry and observed the changes in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ concentration, cell mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) as well as nuclear DNA morphology via fluorescence staining assay. All experimental results indicated that plasma-generated ROS leads to the accumulation of intracellular ROS and Ca2+ that ultimately contribute to apoptosis associated with cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through depolarization of Δψm and fragmenting nuclear DNA. This work provides a novel insight into the physical and biological mechanism of apoptosis induced by a plasma which could benefit for promoting the development of plasmas applied to cancer therapy.

  7. Investigations of lower hybrid wave-plasma coupling by gas puffing in HT-7

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Qin, Y. L.; Li, W. K.; Zhang, L. Z.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Wang, M.; Meng, L. G.; Xu, H. D.; Wang, D. X.; Jie, Y. X.; Sun, Y. W.; Shen, B.; Zhang, W.; Wang, X. M.; Wu, J. H.; Gao, X.; Zhang, X. D.; Zhao, Y. P.

    2010-02-15

    Lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling experiments in HT-7 [J. K. Xie and HT-7 Group, Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Fusion Energy, Montreal, 1996 (IAEA, Trieste, 1997), Vol. 1, p. 685] were carried out by means of puffing gas (CD{sub 4} and D{sub 2}) just around the antenna. Both experiments show that wave-plasma coupling is improved by the gas puffing. The maximum distance between the plasma and the antenna is limited to about 8 cm due to the plasma disruption. The variation in the lined averaged density in the different channels gives a possible evidence of the mechanism of the ionization of neutral gas. The effect of the gas flow rate on the wave-plasma coupling shows that an optimized gas flow rate is necessary for good coupling, being consistent with simulation through Brambilla theory qualitatively. Experiments with puffing D{sub 2} show that the improved coupling results from the global density increase and the local gas puffing. Langmuir probe measurements indicate that the gas puffing effectively increases the density and decreases the temperature in scrape of layer. Studies show that the ionization of the puffed gas is affected by both LHW electric field and plasma temperature. Comparison of D{sub 2} and CD{sub 4} puffing shows that D{sub 2} improves coupling better with less effect on core density.

  8. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad; Margot, Joëlle

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon) and pressure (from ˜5 × 10-7 Torr up to atmosphere) is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  9. Endotoxin removal by radio frequency gas plasma (glow discharge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Angela

    2011-12-01

    -IR measurements were repeated after employing 3-minute RFGD treatments sequentially for more than 10 cycles to observe removal of deposited matter that correlated with diminished EU titers. The results showed that 5 cycles, for a total exposure time of 15 minutes to low-temperature gas plasma, was sufficient to reduce endotoxin titers to below 0.05 EU/ml, and correlated with concurrent reduction of major endotoxin reference standard absorption bands at 3391 cm-1, 2887 cm-1, 1646 cm -1 1342 cm-1, and 1103 cm-1 to less than 0.05 Absorbance Units. Band depletion varied from 15% to 40% per 3-minute cycle of RFGD exposure, based on peak-to-peak analyses. In some cases, 100% of all applied biomass was removed within 5 sequential 3-minute RFGD cycles. The lipid ester absorption band expected at 1725 cm-1 was not detectable until after the first RFGD cycle, suggesting an unmasking of the actual bacterial endotoxin membrane induced within the gas plasma environment. Future work must determine the applicability of this low-temperature, quick depyrogenation process to medical devices of more complicated geometry than the flat surfaces tested here.

  10. Influence of the gas-flow Reynolds number on a plasma column in a glass tube

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Dong Jun; Uhm, Han S.; Cho, Guangsup

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric-plasma generation inside a glass tube is influenced by gas stream behavior as described by the Reynolds number (Rn). In experiments with He, Ne, and Ar, the plasma column length increases with an increase in the gas flow rate under laminar flow characterized by Rn < 2000. The length of the plasma column decreases as the flow rate increases in the transition region of 2000 < Rn < 4000. For a turbulent flow beyond Rn > 4000, the length of the plasma column is short in front of the electrode, eventually leading to a shutdown.

  11. Fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled-plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the ZnO/GaN heterojunction light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shr-Jia; Chang, Chun-Ming; Kao, Jiann-Shiun; Chen, Fu-Rong; Tsai, Chuen-Horng

    2010-07-15

    This article reports fabrication of n-ZnO photonic crystal/p-GaN light emitting diode (LED) by nanosphere lithography to further booster the light efficiency. In this article, the fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals is carried out by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs. The CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gas gives high etching rate of n-ZnO film, which yields a better surface morphology and results less plasma-induced damages of the n-ZnO film. Optimal ZnO lattice parameters of 200 nm and air fill factor from 0.35 to 0.65 were obtained from fitting the spectrum of n-ZnO/p-GaN LED using a MATLAB code. In this article, we will show our recent result that a ZnO photonic crystal cylinder has been fabricated using polystyrene nanosphere mask with lattice parameter of 200 nm and radius of hole around 70 nm. Surface morphology of ZnO photonic crystal was examined by scanning electron microscope.

  12. Uranium plasma emission at gas-core reaction conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Jalufka, N. W.; Hohl, F.; Lee, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results of uranium plasma emission produced by two methods are reported. For the first method a ruby laser was focused on the surface of a pure U-238 sample to create a plasma plume with a peak plasma density of about 10 to the 20th power/cu cm and a temperature of about 38,600 K. The absolute intensity of the emitted radiation, covering the range from 300 to 7000 A was measured. For the second method, the uranium plasma was produced in a 20 kilovolt, 25 kilojoule plasma-focus device. The 2.5 MeV neutrons from the D-D reaction in the plasma focus are moderated by polyethylene and induce fissions in the U-235. Spectra of both uranium plasmas were obtained over the range from 30 to 9000 A. Because of the low fission yield the energy input due to fissions is very small compared to the total energy in the plasma.

  13. Effect of Deuterium Gas Puff On The Edge Plasma In NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S. J.

    2014-02-20

    This paper describes a detailed examination of the effects of a relatively small pulsed deuterium gas puff on the edge plasma and edge turbulence in NSTX. This gas puff caused little or no change in the line-averaged plasma density or total stored energy, or in the edge density and electron temperature up to the time of the peak of the gas puff. The radial profile of the Dα light emission and the edge turbulence within this gas puff did not vary significantly over its rise and fall, implying that these gas puffs did not significantly perturb the local edge plasma or edge turbulence. These measurements are compared with modeling by DEGAS 2, UEDGE, and with simplified estimates for the expected effects of this gas puff.

  14. Forebody and base region real gas flow in severe planetary entry by a factored implicit numerical method. II - Equilibrium reactive gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Green, M. J.; Lombard, C. K.

    1981-01-01

    The factored-implicit, gas-dynamic algorithm has been adapted to the numerical simulation of equilibrium reactive flows. Changes required in the perfect gas version of the algorithm are developed, and the method of coupling gas-dynamic and chemistry variables is discussed. A flow-field solution that approximates a Jovian entry case was obtained by this method and compared with the same solution obtained by HYVIS, a computer program much used for the study of planetary entry. Comparison of surface pressure distribution and stagnation line shock-layer profiles indicates that the two solutions agree well.

  15. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanhong; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Tie, Weihao; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2016-06-01

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from "plasmoid" to "plasma flow," and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through "cloud," "core-cloud," and "branch" in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted "U"-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the "branch" channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%-90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  16. Decorative black TiCxOy film fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering without importing oxygen reactive gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Katsushi; Wakabayashi, Masao; Tsukakoshi, Yukio; Abe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Decorative black TiCxOy films were fabricated by dc (direct current) magnetron sputtering without importing the oxygen reactive gas into the sputtering chamber. Using a ceramic target of titanium oxycarbide (TiC1.59O0.31), the oxygen content in the films could be easily controlled by adjustment of total sputtering gas pressure without remarkable change of the carbon content. The films deposited at 2.0 and 4.0 Pa, those are higher pressure when compared with that in conventional magnetron sputtering, showed an attractive black color. In particular, the film at 4.0 Pa had the composition of TiC1.03O1.10, exhibited the L* of 41.5, a* of 0.2 and b* of 0.6 in CIELAB color space. These values were smaller than those in the TiC0.29O1.38 films (L* of 45.8, a* of 1.2 and b* of 1.2) fabricated by conventional reactive sputtering method from the same target under the conditions of gas pressure of 0.3 Pa and optimized oxygen reactive gas concentration of 2.5 vol.% in sputtering gas. Analysis of XRD and XPS revealed that the black film deposited at 4.0 Pa was the amorphous film composed of TiC, TiO and C. The adhesion property and the heat resisting property were enough for decorative uses. This sputtering process has an industrial advantage that the decorative black coating with color uniformity in large area can be easily obtained by plain operation because of unnecessary of the oxygen reactive gas importing which is difficult to be controlled uniformly in the sputtering chamber.

  17. Combined effect of protein and oxygen on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the plasma treatment of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nishtha; Szili, Endre J.; Oh, Jun-Seok; Hong, Sung-Ha; Michelmore, Andrew; Graves, David B.; Hatta, Akimitsu; Short, Robert D.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of protein and molecular, ground state oxygen (O2) on the plasma generation, and transport of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in tissue are investigated. A tissue target, comprising a 1 mm thick gelatin film (a surrogate for real tissue), is placed on top of a 96-well plate; each well is filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) containing one fluorescent or colorimetric reporter that is specific for one of three RONS (i.e., H2O2, NO2-, or OH•) or a broad spectrum reactive oxygen species reporter (2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein). A helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet contacts the top of the gelatin surface, and the concentrations of RONS generated in PBS are measured on a microplate reader. The data show that H2O2, NO2-, or OH• are generated in PBS underneath the target. Independently, measurements are made of the O2 concentration in the PBS with and without the gelatin target. Adding bovine serum albumin protein to the PBS or gelatin shows that protein either raises or inhibits RONS depending upon the O2 concentration. Our results are discussed in the context of plasma-soft tissue interactions that are important in the development of CAP technology for medicine, biology, and food manufacturing.

  18. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocarlan, C.; Wiggins, S. M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2013-09-15

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.0 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}, the peak normalized laser vector potential, a{sub 0}, increases from 1.0 to 1.85 close to the entrance plane of the capillary compared with a{sub 0} = 1.41 when the plume is neglected.

  19. Tumor-selective mitochondrial network collapse induced by atmospheric gas plasma-activated medium

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Sahara, Junki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Noboru; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Soma, Masayoshi; Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric gas plasma (AGP) exhibits cytotoxicity against malignant cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. However, the mechanisms of its tumor-selective cytotoxicity remain unclear. Here we report that AGP-activated medium increases caspase-independent cell death and mitochondrial network collapse in a panel of human cancer cells, but not in non-transformed cells. AGP irradiation stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGP-activated medium, and in turn the resulting stable ROS, most likely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) accumulation. Culture in AGP-activated medium resulted in cell death and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering, and these responses were inhibited by ROS scavengers. AGP-activated medium also increased dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission in a tumor-specific manner, and H2O2 administration showed similar effects. Moreover, the vulnerability of tumor cells to mitochondrial network collapse appeared to result from their higher sensitivity to mROS accumulation induced by AGP-activated medium or H2O2. The present findings expand our previous observations on death receptor-mediated tumor-selective cell killing and reinforce the importance of mitochondrial network remodeling as a powerful target for tumor-selective cancer treatment. PMID:26942565

  20. Tumor-selective mitochondrial network collapse induced by atmospheric gas plasma-activated medium.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Sahara, Junki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Noboru; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Soma, Masayoshi; Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-12

    Non-thermal atmospheric gas plasma (AGP) exhibits cytotoxicity against malignant cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. However, the mechanisms of its tumor-selective cytotoxicity remain unclear. Here we report that AGP-activated medium increases caspase-independent cell death and mitochondrial network collapse in a panel of human cancer cells, but not in non-transformed cells. AGP irradiation stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGP-activated medium, and in turn the resulting stable ROS, most likely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) accumulation. Culture in AGP-activated medium resulted in cell death and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering, and these responses were inhibited by ROS scavengers. AGP-activated medium also increased dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission in a tumor-specific manner, and H2O2 administration showed similar effects. Moreover, the vulnerability of tumor cells to mitochondrial network collapse appeared to result from their higher sensitivity to mROS accumulation induced by AGP-activated medium or H2O2. The present findings expand our previous observations on death receptor-mediated tumor-selective cell killing and reinforce the importance of mitochondrial network remodeling as a powerful target for tumor-selective cancer treatment. PMID:26942565

  1. Treatment of Dye Wastewater by Using a Hybrid Gas/Liquid Pulsed Discharge Plasma Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Na; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan; Masayuki, Sato

    2012-02-01

    A hybrid gas/liquid pulsed discharge plasma reactor using a porous ceramic tube is proposed for dye wastewater treatment. High voltage pulsed discharge plasma was generated in the gas phase and simultaneously the plasma channel was permeated through the tiny holes of the ceramic tube into the water phase accompanied by gas bubbles. The porous ceramic tube not only separated the gas phase and liquid phase but also offered an effective plasma spreading channel. The effects of the peak pulse voltage, additive gas varieties, gas bubbling rate, solution conductivity and TiO2 addition were investigated. The results showed that this reactor was effective for dye wastewater treatment. The decoloration efficiency of Acid Orange II was enhanced with an increase in the power supplied. Under the studied conditions, 97% of Acid Orange II in aqueous solution was effectively decolored with additive oxygen gas, which was 51% higher than that with argon gas, and the increasing O2 bubbling rate also benefited the decoloration of dye wastewater. Water conductivity had a small effect on the level of decoloration. Catalysis of TiO2 could be induced by the pulsed discharge plasma and addition of TiO2 aided the decoloration of Acid Orange II.

  2. Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low-pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. K.; Ogino, A.; Nagatsu, M.

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the inactivation characteristics of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores under different plasma exposure conditions using low-pressure microwave plasma in nitrogen, oxygen and an air-simulated (N2:O2=4:1) gas mixture. The microwave-excited surface-wave plasma discharges were produced at low pressure by a large volume device. The directly plasma-exposed spores, up to 106 populations, were successfully inactivated within 15, 10 and 5 min of surface-wave plasma treatment using nitrogen, oxygen and an air-simulated gas mixture, respectively, as working gases within the temperature of 75 °C. The contribution of different inactivation factors was evaluated by placing different filters (e.g. a LiF plate, a quartz plate and a Tyvek® sheet) as indirect exposure of spores to the plasma. It was observed that optical emissions (including vacuum UV (VUV)/UV) play an important role in the inactivation process. To further evaluate the effect of VUV/UV photons, we placed an evacuated isolated chamber, inside which spores were set, into the main plasma chamber. The experimental results show that the inactivation time by VUV/UV photons alone, without working gas in the immediate vicinity of the spores, is longer than that with working gas. This suggests that the VUV/UV emission is responsible not only for direct UV inactivation of spores but also for generation of reactive neutral species by photoexcitation. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed significant changes in the morphology of directly plasma-exposed spores but no change in the spores irradiated by VUV/UV photons only.

  3. Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor short term thermal response to flow and reactivity transients

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The analyses reported here have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Division of Regulatory Applications of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The short-term thermal response of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is analyzed for a range of flow and reactivity transients. These include loss of forced circulation (LOFC) without scram, moisture ingress, spurious withdrawal of a control rod group, hypothetical large and rapid positive reactivity insertion, and a rapid core cooling event. The coupled heat transfer-neutron kinetics model is also described.

  4. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  5. Enhanced biocompatibility of TiO2 surfaces by highly reactive plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkar, Ita; Kulkarni, Mukta; Drašler, Barbara; Rugelj, Neža; Recek, Nina; Drobne, Damjana; Kovač, Janez; Humpolicek, Petr; Iglič, Aleš; Mozetič, Miran

    2016-06-01

    In the present study the biological response to various nanotopographic features after gaseous plasma treatment were studied. The usefulness of nanostructured surfaces for implantable materials has already been acknowledged, while less is known on the combined effect of nanostructured plasma modified surfaces. In the present work the influence of oxygen plasma treatment on nanostructured titanium oxide (TiO2) surfaces was studied. Characterization of the TiO2 surface chemical composition and morphological features was analyzed after plasma modification by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by scanning electron microscopy while surface wettability was studied with measuring the water contact angle. Cell adhesion and morphology was assessed from images taken with scanning electron microscopy, whereas cell viability was measured with a calorimetric assay. The obtained results showed that oxygen plasma treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces significantly influences the adhesion and morphology of osteoblast-like cells in comparison to untreated nanostructured surfaces. Marked changes in surface composition of plasma treated surfaces were observed, as plasma treatment removed hydrocarbon contamination and removed fluorine impurities, which were present due to the electrochemical anodization process. However no differences in wettability of untreated and plasma treated surfaces were noticed. Treatment with oxygen plasma stimulated osteoblast-like cell adhesion and spreading on the nanostructured surface, suggesting the possible use of oxygen plasma surface treatment to enhance osteoblast-like cell response.

  6. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Cesium-Containing Species by Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Šulková, Katarína; Cantrel, Laurent; Louis, Florent

    2015-09-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of cesium species reactions have been studied by using high-level quantum chemical tools. A systematic theoretical study has been done to find suitable methodology for calculation of reliable thermodynamic properties, allowing us to determine bimolecular rate constants with appropriate kinetic theories of gas-phase reactions. Four different reactions have been studied in this work: CsO + H2 = CsOH + H (R1), Cs + HI = CsI + H (R2), CsI + H2O = CsOH + HI (R3), and CsI + OH = CsOH + I (R4). All reactions involve steam, hydrogen, and iodine in addition of cesium. Most of the reactions are fast and (R3) and (R4) proceed even without energetic barrier. In terms of chemical reactivity in the reactor coolant system (RCS) in the case of severe accident, it can be expected that there will be no kinetic limitations for main cesium species (CsOH and CsI) transported along the RCS. Cs chemical speciation inside the RCS should be governed by the thermodynamics. PMID:26237575

  7. Noble-transition metal nanoparticle breathing in a reactive gas atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Valeri; Shan, Shiyao; Chupas, Peter; Yin, Jun; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-08-21

    In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis is used to obtain fundamental insight into the effect of the reactive gas environment on the atomic-scale structure of metallic particles less than 10 nm in size. To substantiate our recent discovery we investigate a wide range of noble-transition metal nanoparticles and confirm that they expand and contract radially when treated in oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) atmospheres, respectively. The results are confirmed by supplementary XAFS experiments. Using computer simulations guided by the experimental diffraction data we quantify the effect in terms of both relative lattice strain and absolute atomic displacements. In particular, we show that the effect leads to a small percent of extra surface strain corresponding to several tenths of Ångström displacements of the atoms at the outmost layer of the particles. The effect then gradually decays to zero within 4 atomic layers inside the particles. We also show that, reminiscent of a breathing type structural transformation, the effect is reproducible and reversible. We argue that because of its significance and widespread occurrence the effect should be taken into account in nanoparticle research. PMID:23828235

  8. Dust-gas Interactions in Dusty X-ray Emitting Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2006-01-01

    Dusty shocked plasmas cool primarily by infrared emission from dust that is collisionally heated by the ambient hot gas. The infrared emission provides therefore an excellent diagnostic of the conditions (density and temperature) of the shocked gas. In this review I will discuss the physical processes in these plasmas, with a particular emphasis on recent infrared observations of the interaction between the blast wave of SN1987a and its equatorial ring.

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN HUMAN PLASMA AND BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly associated with diseased states (including asthma, cardiovascular disease, cancer) infections, and exposure to various toxicants in humans. It is of interest in epidemiology studies to characterize the association of oxidative stress in...

  10. Resonant charge-exchange involving excited helium atoms and reactive transport of local thermodynamic equilibrium helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarim, A. V.; Smirnov, B. M.; Laricchiuta, A.; Capitelli, M.

    2012-06-01

    The cross sections for charge-exchange and charge-transfer processes are evaluated for collisions of helium ions with parent-atoms in ground and excited states, with the principal quantum number n = 1-5, in the collision energy range from thermal up to 10 eV. Corresponding diffusion-type collision integrals are derived, and the role of "abnormal" transport of electronically excited states on the reactive thermal conductivity of equilibrium helium plasma, at atmospheric pressure, estimated in the frame of a simplified approach.

  11. Reactive and internal contributions to the thermal conductivity of local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma: The effect of electronically excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, D.; Colonna, G.; Laricchiuta, A.; Capitelli, M.

    2012-12-01

    Internal and reactive contributions to the thermal conductivity of a local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma have been calculated using the Chapman-Enskog method. Low-lying (LL) electronically excited states (i.e., states with the same principal quantum number of the ground state) and high-lying (HL) ones (i.e., states with principal quantum number n > 2) have been considered. Several models have been developed, the most accurate being a model that treats the LL states as separate species while disregarding the presence of HL states, on account of their enormous transport cross sections.

  12. Reactive and internal contributions to the thermal conductivity of local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma: The effect of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Colonna, G.; Laricchiuta, A.; Capitelli, M.

    2012-12-15

    Internal and reactive contributions to the thermal conductivity of a local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma have been calculated using the Chapman-Enskog method. Low-lying (LL) electronically excited states (i.e., states with the same principal quantum number of the ground state) and high-lying (HL) ones (i.e., states with principal quantum number n> 2) have been considered. Several models have been developed, the most accurate being a model that treats the LL states as separate species while disregarding the presence of HL states, on account of their enormous transport cross sections.

  13. Characterization of a novel double-gas-jet laser plasma EUV source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijn, Rene; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fledderus, H. F.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Hegeman, Petra; Constantinescu, Raluca C.; Bijkerk, Fred

    2000-07-01

    A novel laser plasma EUV source geometry based on a (pulsed) double gas jet system has been characterized for utilization in EUV Lithography. The use of a secondary annular jet of a buffer gas in conjunction with the primary jet of target gas provides a considerable gain in EUV yield of an order of magnitude. The best CE data at 12.8 nm were obtained using xenon as target gas and hydrogen as buffer gas. The plasma source was driven using a short-wavelength KrF laser (0.9 J, 27 ns). Conversion efficiencies (CE) and EUV pulse shapes have been measured using calibrated Mo/Si multilayer mirrors and filtered junction diodes. A pinhole camera, equipped with a back illuminated CCD camera, was used to determine the plasma size in a wavelength range from 6 - 16 nm.

  14. Evaluation of fatty acid oxidation by reactive oxygen species induced in liquids using atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2015-10-01

    We investigated fatty acid oxidation by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal helium plasma using linoleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, together with evaluating active species induced in liquids. If the ambient gas contains oxygen, direct plasma such as plasma jets coming into contact with the liquid surface supplies various active species, such as singlet oxygen, ozone, and superoxide anion radicals, to the liquid. The direct plasma easily oxidizes linoleic acid, indicating that fatty acid oxidation will occur in the direct plasma. In contrast, afterglow flow, where the plasma is terminated in a glass tube and does not touch the surface of the liquid sample, supplies mainly superoxide anion radicals. The fact that there was no clear observation of linoleic acid oxidation using the afterglow reveals that it may not affect lipids, even in an atmosphere containing oxygen. The afterglow flow can potentially be used for the sterilization of aqueous solutions using the reduced pH method, in medical and dental applications, because it provides bactericidal activity in the aqueous solution despite containing a smaller amount of active species.

  15. Impact of the etching gas on vertically oriented single wall and few walled carbon nanotubes by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gohier, A.; Minea, T. M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Granier, A.

    2007-03-01

    Vertically oriented single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) and few walled nanotubes (FWNTs) have been grown by electronic cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on silica flat substrates. The impact of the plasma parameters on SWNT and FWNT growth has been investigated using two different etching gas mixtures, namely, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/NH{sub 3} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2} with various ratios and applied bias voltages. Kinetic studies are also proposed in order to describe the FWNT growth mechanism by plasma techniques. A key role played by the reactive gas (NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}) is observed in the PECVD process, contrary to multiwalled nanotube growth. It is demonstrated that the balance between FWNT growth versus FWNT etching can be widely modulated by varying the gas mixture and bias voltage. It is shown that the use of hydrogen for hydrocarbon gas dilution restricts the destruction of SWNT and FWNT by the plasma species (ions and radicals)

  16. A microwave plasma cleaning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, C. C.; Nelson, W. D.; Schechter, D. E.; Thompson, L. M.; Glover, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    In a microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source, reactive plasmas of oxygen and its mixtures of argon have been used for evaluating plasma cleaning technologies. Small aluminum samples (0.95 x 1.9 cm) were coated with thin films (less than or equal to 20 micrometers in thickness) of Shell Vitrea oil and cleaned with reactive plasmas. The discharge parameters, such as gas pressure, magnetic field, substrate biasing, and microwave power, were varied to change cleaning conditions. A mass spectroscopy (or residual gas analyzer) was used to monitor the status of plasma cleaning. Mass loss of the samples after plasma cleaning was measured to estimate cleaning rates. Measured cleaning rates of low-pressure (0.5-m torr) argon/oxygen plasmas were as high as 2.7 micrometers/min. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine cleanliness of the sample surfaces. In this paper, significant results of the plasma cleaning are reported and discussed.

  17. Influence of ionic liquid and ionic salt on protein against the reactive species generated using dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Pankaj; Sarinont, Thapanut; Kim, Minsup; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Cho, Art E.; Ha Choi, Eun; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    The presence of salts in biological solution can affect the activity of the reactive species (RS) generated by plasma, and so they can also have an influence on the plasma-induced sterilization. In this work, we assess the influence that diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP), an ionic liquid (IL), and sodium chloride (NaCl), an ionic salt (IS), have on the structural changes in hemoglobin (Hb) in the presence of RS generated using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in the presence of various gases [O2, N2, Ar, He, NO (10%) + N2 and Air]. We carry out fluorescence spectroscopy to verify the generation of •OH with or without the presence of DEAP IL and IS, and we use electron spin resonance (ESR) to check the generation of H• and •OH. In addition, we verified the structural changes in the Hb structure after treatment with DBD in presence and absence of IL and IS. We then assessed the structural stability of the Hb in the presence of IL and IS by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that the IL has a strong effect on the conservation of the Hb structure relative to that of IS against RS generated by plasma. PMID:26656857

  18. Effects of abdominal surgery on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and plasma anti-oxidative capacity in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mudron, P; Herzog, K; Höltershinken, M; Rehage, J

    2007-10-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the effects of surgical stress on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in dairy cows. Ten Holstein-Friesian dairy cows, mean age 5.26 years, admitted for treatment of left abomasal displacement (omentopexy), were used in our study. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein prior to surgery, immediately and then 15, 30, 60, 90 min, and 2, 5, 10, and 24 h after reposition of abomasum. Surgical stress resulted in a significant increase in plasma cortisol concentrations (P < 0.001) with the highest mean levels 15 min after surgery (32.4 +/- 18.1 microg/l) as well as in serum levels of glucose (P < 0.001) and non-esterified fatty acids (P < 0.001). Similarly, surgery transiently enhanced the plasma levels of TBARS (P < 0.001). The highest TBARS plasma levels (0.91 +/- 0.18 micromol/l) were recognized 60 min after reposition of abomasums. There were no significant differences in FRAP in dairy cows before and after reposition of abomasum. In conclusion, these data indicate that stress reaction caused by surgical correction of left displacement of abomasum can be associated with higher production of TBARS. PMID:17877587

  19. Influence of ionic liquid and ionic salt on protein against the reactive species generated using dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attri, Pankaj; Sarinont, Thapanut; Kim, Minsup; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Cho, Art E.; Ha Choi, Eun; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-12-01

    The presence of salts in biological solution can affect the activity of the reactive species (RS) generated by plasma, and so they can also have an influence on the plasma-induced sterilization. In this work, we assess the influence that diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP), an ionic liquid (IL), and sodium chloride (NaCl), an ionic salt (IS), have on the structural changes in hemoglobin (Hb) in the presence of RS generated using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in the presence of various gases [O2, N2, Ar, He, NO (10%) + N2 and Air]. We carry out fluorescence spectroscopy to verify the generation of •OH with or without the presence of DEAP IL and IS, and we use electron spin resonance (ESR) to check the generation of H• and •OH. In addition, we verified the structural changes in the Hb structure after treatment with DBD in presence and absence of IL and IS. We then assessed the structural stability of the Hb in the presence of IL and IS by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that the IL has a strong effect on the conservation of the Hb structure relative to that of IS against RS generated by plasma.

  20. Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai

    2012-07-15

    Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

  1. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Ohba, T.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  2. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report, September 1987--January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1991-05-01

    The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

  3. Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    MM Hall

    2006-01-31

    A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing.

  4. On anomalous temporal evolution of gas pressure in inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Chang, H. Y.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J.

    2013-04-01

    The temporal measurement of gas pressure in inductive coupled plasma revealed that there is an interesting anomalous evolution of gas pressure in the early stage of plasma ignition and extinction: a sudden gas pressure change and its relaxation of which time scales are about a few seconds and a few tens of second, respectively, were observed after plasma ignition and extinction. This phenomenon can be understood as a combined result between the neutral heating effect induced by plasma and the pressure relaxation effect for new gas temperature. The temporal measurement of gas temperature by laser Rayleigh scattering and the time dependant calculations for the neutral heating and pressure relaxation are in good agreement with our experimental results. This result and physics behind are expected to provide a new operational perspective of the recent plasma processes of which time is very short, such as a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition/etching, a soft etch for disposal of residual by-products on wafer, and light oxidation process in semiconductor manufacturing.

  5. Antioxidant capacity of foods for scavenging reactive oxidants and inhibition of plasma lipid oxidation induced by multiple oxidants.

    PubMed

    Niki, Etsuo

    2016-05-18

    Unregulated oxidation of biological molecules induced by multiple oxidants has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Consequently, the effects of antioxidants contained in foods, beverages and supplements on the maintenance of health and prevention of diseases have attracted much attention of the public as well as scientists. However, recent human studies have shown inconsistent results and failed to demonstrate the beneficial effects of antioxidants. The mechanisms and dynamics of antioxidant action and assessment of antioxidant capacity have been the subject of extensive studies and arguments. In the present article, the antioxidant capacity has been reviewed focusing on two main issues: the capacity of antioxidants to scavenge multiple reactive oxidants and to inhibit plasma lipid oxidation induced by different biological oxidants. It is emphasized that the capacity of antioxidants to scavenge reactive oxidants does not always correlate linearly with the capacity to inhibit lipid oxidation and that it is necessary to specify the oxidant to assess the efficacy of antioxidants, since multiple oxidants contribute to oxidative damage in vivo and the effects of antioxidants depend on the nature of oxidants. A convenient and rapid method using a microplate reader is discussed for assessing the antioxidant capacity against plasma lipid oxidation induced by multiple oxidants including peroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, hypochlorite, 15-lipoxygenase, and singlet oxygen. PMID:27090496

  6. Gas barrier properties of titanium oxynitride films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.-C.; Chang, L.-S.; Lin, H. C.

    2008-03-01

    Titanium oxynitride (TiN xO y) films were deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by means of a reactive radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system in which the power density and substrate bias were the varied parameters. Experimental results show that the deposited TiN xO y films exhibited an amorphous or a columnar structure with fine crystalline dependent on power density. The deposition rate increases significantly in conjunction as the power density increases from 2 W/cm 2 to 7 W/cm 2. The maximum deposition rate occurs, as the substrate bias is -40 V at a certain power densities chosen in this study. The film's roughness slightly decreases with increasing substrate bias. The TiN xO y films deposited at power densities above 4 W/cm 2 show a steady Ti:N:O ratio of about 1:1:0.8. The water vapor and oxygen transmission rates of the TiN xO y films reach values as low as 0.98 g/m 2-day-atm and 0.60 cm 3/m 2-day-atm which are about 6 and 47 times lower than those of the uncoated PET substrate, respectively. These transmission rates are comparable to those of DLC, carbon-based and Al 2O 3 barrier films. Therefore, TiN xO y films are potential candidates to be used as a gas permeation barrier for PET substrate.

  7. Photochemical studies of reactive intermediates involved in gas phase ion-neutral reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Osterheld, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared multiple photon dissociation was used to study unimolecular reactions of gas phase ions in a Fourier transform mass spectrometer. Specifically, the influence of intermediates on reactivity and dynamics was investigated. Dissociation of nitrobenzene cation displays a variety of surprising and apparently non-statistical behavior. The authors demonstrated that some of its reactions involve an isomerization to phenyl nitrite cation by a dissociation/reassociation mechanism in an ion-neutral complex. This allowed the behavior to be explained by normal statistical reactions. Previous work in other laboratories suggested that methane loss from acetone cation occurs by tunneling of a hydrogen atom. Part of the evidence came from the observation of very large isotope effects. The authors demonstrated that methane loss could not occur by tunneling. They further showed that the isotope effects result from normal zero point vibrational energy differences in an ion-neutral complex mechanism. Two simple dissociations of butanone cation do not compete as expected. They also found that the rates for the low energy reactions are much slower than statistical calculations. They explained these results by a prior isomerization to an ion-neutral complex. They calculated that the ion-neutral complex has a higher density of states than butanone cation even at energies well below a reaction threshold. McLafferty and co-workers demonstrated that acetone enol cation isomerizes to a symmetric acetone cation structure which then loses methyl groups at unequal rates. The authors have confirmed this behavior and demonstrated that the non-statistical dissociation depends on the internal energy. They proposed that an excited vibrational mode of the transition state for isomerization couples more strongly with the reaction coordinate, thus yielding more non-statistical dissociation.

  8. Gas-phase reactivity of metavanadate [VO3]- towards methanol and ethanol: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Waters, Tom; Wedd, Anthony G; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2007-01-01

    The gas-phase reactivity of the metavanadate anion [VO3]- towards methanol and ethanol was examined by a combination of ion-molecule reaction and isotope labelling experiments in a quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer. The experimental data were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations. [VO3]- dehydrated methanol to eliminate water and form [VO2(eta2-OCH2)]-, which features an [eta2-C,O-OCH2]2- ligand formed by formal removal of two protons from methanol and which is isoelectronic with peroxide. [VO3]- reacted with ethanol in an analogous manner to form [VO2(eta2-OCHCH3)]-, as well as by loss of ethene to form [VO2(OH)2]-. The calculations predicted that important intermediates in these reactions were the hydroxo alkoxo anions [VO2(OH)(OCH2R)]- (R: H, CH3). These were predicted to undergo intramolecular hydrogen-atom transfer to form [VO(OH)2(eta1-OCHR)]- followed by eta1-O-->eta2-C,O rearrangements to form [VO(OH)2(eta2-OCHR)]-. The latter reacted further to eliminate water and generate the product [VO2(eta2-OCHR)]-. This major product observed for [VO3]- is markedly different from that observed previously for [NbO3]- containing the heavier Group 5 congener niobium. In that case, the major product of the reaction was an ion of stoichiometry [Nb, O3, H2]- arising from the formal dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde. The origin of this difference was examined theoretically and attributed to the intermediate alkoxo anion [NbO2(OH)(OCH3)]- preferring hydride transfer to form [HNbO2(OH)]- with loss of formaldehyde. This contrasts with the hydrogen-atom-transfer pathway observed for [VO2(OH)(OCH3)]-. PMID:17661322

  9. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions: a model for the determination of biologically reactive electrophilic contaminants in the environment.

    PubMed

    Freeman, J A; Johnson, J V; Yost, R A; Kuehl, D W

    1994-06-01

    A promising instrumental technique has been investigated to rapidly screen complex environmental samples for chemical contaminants having the propensity to covalently bond to biomacromolecules such as DNA. Radical molecular ions of pyridine, a model compound for nucleophilic bases of DNA, were mass-selected and allowed to react with electrophilic environmental contaminants in the collision cell of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analytes were introduced into the collision cell via a gas chromatographic column. Reactive chemicals are then characterized by scanning Q3 to identify associative reaction products. A good qualitative correlation was observed for the gas-phase reactivity of a series of electrophilic reagents with both their alkylating reactivity in solution (4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine) and AMES test mutagenicity which had been previously published. Femtomole limits of detection for specific associative reaction products were demonstrated. Gas-phase reactions of ions of environmental contaminants (introduced into the source) with neutral pyridine (in the collision cell) were also investigated. Reactions of the radical molecular ion of the allyl reagents with neutral pyridine were similar to results from the mass-selected reaction of the pyridine radical molecular ion with neutral allylic reagents. PMID:8030792

  10. Effects of irradiation distance on supply of reactive oxygen species to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid by an atmospheric O2/He plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Kusumegi, Shota; Kudo, Akihiro; Sakanoshita, Tomohiro; Tsurumaru, Takuya; Sato, Akihiro; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-05-01

    The impact of irradiation distances on plasma jet-induced specific effects on the supply of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid was investigated using a KI-starch gel reagent that can be employed as a ROS indicator even in water. O3 exposure experiments without plasma irradiation were also performed to elucidate the specific effects of the plasma jet. Relative concentrations of ROS transported to the bottom were evaluated using absorbance measurements. The results indicated that ROS supply to the bottom is markedly enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation at shorter irradiation distances, whereas similar results could not be obtained for the O3 exposure. In these cases, the liquid mixing in the depth direction was also enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation only, and the supply of reactive atomic oxygen to the liquid surface was markedly increased as well.

  11. Synergistic catalytic removal NOX and the mechanism of plasma and hydrocarbon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Sha, Xiang-ling; Zhang, Lei; He, Hui-bin; Ma, Zhen-hua; Wang, Long-wei; Wang, Yu-xin; She, Li-xia

    2016-07-01

    This paper using a method of catalytic adsorption combined with dielectric barrier discharge plasma which added to hydrocarbon gases. The different background gases, different dielectric properties and different pore sizes of the hydrolysis coke on the denitrification performance was studied. The effect of the coaction of plasma and the different properties of the removal of NO in flue gas was investigated, and the catalytic mechanism of the synergistic effect of plasma and hydrocarbon gas was discussed. The results shown that: The denitrification rate was significantly affected by plasma power and the initial concentration of NO; the reaction was restrained by the presence of oxygen and greatly promoted by the hydrocarbon gases. The permittivity of the catalyst has a great influence on the activity and the porous structure of the catalyst can obviously promote the reaction when the low temperature plasma combined with hydrocarbon gases.

  12. Quantification of dimethindene in plasma by gas chromatography-mass fragmentography using ammonia chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauert, G; Herrle, I; Wermeille, M

    1993-08-11

    A gas chromatographic-mass fragmentographic method using ammonia chemical ionization for the determination of dimethindene in human plasma is described. The drug was isolated from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction with hexane-2-methylbutanol. Plasma components were separated on a capillary column coated with chemically bonded methyl silicone. For detection of dimethindene, its quasi-molecular ion (M + H+) was mass fragmentographically monitored after chemical ionization with ammonia as reagent gas. Dimethindene was quantified using methaqualone as the internal standard: the quantification limit in plasma was 0.2 ng/ml, the within-run precision was 8.0% and the inter-run precision 5.6%. The plasma concentration-time profile was established after a single dose of 4 mg of dimethindene with an average maximum concentration of 5.5 ng/ml, detectable up to 48 h post application. PMID:8408399

  13. Plasma chemistry of NO in complex gas mixtures excited with a surfatron launcher.

    PubMed

    Hueso, J L; González-Elipe, A R; Cotrino, J; Caballero, A

    2005-06-01

    The plasma chemistry of NO has been investigated in gas mixtures with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon and Ar as carrier gas. Surface wave discharges operating at microwave frequencies have been used for this study. The different plasma reactions have been analyzed for a pressure range between 30 and 75 Torr. Differences in product concentration and/or reaction yields smaller than 10% were found as a function of this parameter. The following gas mixtures have been considered for investigation: Ar/NO, Ar/NO/O2, Ar/NO/CH4, Ar/CH4/O2, Ar/NO/CH4/O2. It is found that NO decomposes into N2 and O2, whereas other products such as CO, H2, and H2O are also formed when CH4 and O2 are present in the reaction mixture. Depending on the working conditions, other minority products such as HCN, CO2, and C2 or higher hydrocarbons have been also detected. The reaction of an Ar/NO plasma with deposits of solid carbon has also been studied. The experiments have provided useful information with respect to the possible removal of soot particles by this type of plasma. It has been shown that carbon deposits are progressively burned off by interaction with the plasma, and practically 100% decomposition of NO was found. Plasma intermediate species have been studied by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Bands and/or peaks due to N2*, NO*, OH*, C2*, CN*, CH*, or H* were detected with different relative intensities depending on the gas mixture. From the analysis of both the reaction products and efficiency and the type of intermediate species detected by OES, different plasma reactions and processes are proposed to describe the plasma chemistry of NO in each particular mixture of gases. The results obtained provide interesting insights about the plasma removal of NO in real gas exhausts. PMID:16833840

  14. Study Of The Gas Balance By Injection Of Hydrocarbons Into The Plasma Simulator PSI 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bohmeyer, Werner; Markin, Andrey; Koch, Bernd; Fussmann, Gerd; Krenz, Gordon

    2006-01-15

    The stationary plasma of the plasma generator PSI 2 is used to study the gas balance of hydrocarbons and hydro-gen by means of mass spectrometers. For this purpose H2, acetylene and ethylene are injected into argon and hydrogen plasmas. It is found that hydrogenation of the hydrocarbon layers is strongly influenced by the hydrocarbon species injected previously. Furthermore, time constants of more than 1000 s for achieving stationary conditions are identified in some cases. The H/C ratio of the hydrocarbon layers is found to vary from about 1 to 1.4 for argon and hydrogen plasmas, respectively.

  15. Modification of plasma flows with gas puff in the scrape-off layer of ADITYA tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Sangwan, Deepak; Jha, Ratneshwar; Brotankova, Jana; Gopalkrishna, M. V.

    2013-06-15

    The parallel Mach numbers are measured at three locations in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma of ADITYA tokamak by using Mach probes. The flow pattern is constructed from these measurements and the modification of flow pattern is observed by introducing a small puff of working gas. In the normal discharge, there is an indication of shell structure in the SOL plasma flows, which is removed during the gas puff. The plasma parameters, particle flux and Reynolds stress are also measured in the normal discharge and in the discharge with gas puff. It is observed that Reynolds stress and Mach number are coupled in the near SOL region and decoupled in the far SOL region. The coupling in the near SOL region gets washed away during the gas puff.

  16. Selective Reduction of NOx in Oxygen Rich Environment with Plasma-Assisted Catalysis: Role of Plasma and Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, Alexander G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Balmer, Marilou L.; Peden, Charles HF.; Malkin, A; Hoard, John; Balmer, M.L.; Fisher, G.; Hoard, J.

    2001-09-01

    Catalytic activity of selected materials (BaY and NaY zeolites, and g-Alumina) for selective NOx reduction in combination with a non-thermal plasma was investigated. Our studies suggest that aldehydes formed during the plasma treatment of simulated diesel exhaust are the important species for the reduction of NOx to N2. Indeed, all materials that are active in plasma-assisted catalysis were found to be very effective in the thermal reduction of NOx in the presence of aldehydes. For example, the thermal catalytic activity of a BaY zeolite with aldehydes gives 80-90% NOx removal at 250 C with 200ppm NOx at the inlet, 1000ppm of C1 as acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and butyraldehyde, and SV=12,000 h?. The hydrocarbon reductants, n-octane and 1-propyl alcohol have also shown high thermal catalytic activity for NOx removal over BaY, NaY and g-alumina. We believe that this activity is due to the fact that in an oxygen rich environment these compounds can be thermally oxidized over the catalysts to form the important aldehyde reaction intermediates.

  17. Enhancement of gas response of ZnO micro-nano structured films through plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaunay, Jean-Jacques; Yanagisawa, Kazumasa; Nishino, Toshiki; Yamada, Ichiro

    2007-02-01

    Films of ZnO micro-nano structures were deposited on quartz substrates and subsequently plasma treated in O II, N II and CF 4. It was found that exposure to oxygen plasma enhanced gas response to ethanol vapor of the ZnO films by a factor 2. The effect of surface plasma treatments on the gas response of the ZnO films was discussed in reference to surface morphology observed by high-magnification SEM and surface chemical state determined by XPS. SEM observation revealed that O II plasma treatment induced less surface roughening than N II and CF 4 plasmas, in agreement with the view that O II plasma should reduce preferential sputtering. Deconvolution of the O 1s X-ray photoelectron peak indicated an increase in the Zn-O bond surface density relatively to O-H bond density for the O II plasma treated surface, whereas the O-H bond surface density was increased relatively to the Zn-O bond density for the N II and CF 4 plasma treated films. The O II plasma was found to partially clean the surface from hydroxyl groups and to expose more Zn cations, which might have caused the enhancement of sensor response by increasing the density of active sites for oxidation/reduction reactions.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immuno extract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. PMID:26585590

  19. Insights into the reactive ion etching mechanism of nanocrystalline diamond films as a function of film microstructure and the presence of fluorine gas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Ju-Heon; Lee, Wook-Seong; Park, Jong-Keuk; Hwang, Gyu Weon; Baik, Young-Joon; Jeong, Jeung-hyun; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2010-02-15

    Inhomogeneous etching of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films, which produces nanopillars during reactive ion etching process, is problematic to the microfabrication of NCD films for the sensor and actuator applications. Thus, its origin was investigated for various initial microstructures of the NCD films, SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} gas ratios during etching, and plasma powers. The etched NCD film surface roughness became more pronounced (leading to larger pillar diameters and heights) for larger initial microstructural features (larger grain and cluster sizes), particularly at low plasma powers. The surface roughening was significantly reduced with the addition of SF{sub 6}, almost disappearing at SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} of 5% to 10%. These results indicate that the etch rate was locally enhanced at the interfaces between grains or clusters, and the etch rate disparity between intragranular and intergranular (or cluster) carbons increased with decreasing ion energy, implying a chemical reaction rate-limited etching mechanism. The role of SF{sub 6} could be explained to reduce the energy barrier for the chemical reaction of intragranular carbons. Here we suggest that the etching rate is limited by an energy barrier that could be reduced by defect generation during ion bombardment or by catalytic radicals.

  20. A fully-implicit finite-volume method for multi-fluid reactive and collisional magnetized plasmas on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.; Deconinck, H.; Mansour, N. N.; Poedts, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present a Finite Volume scheme for solving Maxwell's equations coupled to magnetized multi-fluid plasma equations for reactive and collisional partially ionized flows on unstructured meshes. The inclusion of the displacement current allows for studying electromagnetic wave propagation in a plasma as well as charge separation effects beyond the standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) description, however, it leads to a very stiff system with characteristic velocities ranging from the speed of sound of the fluids up to the speed of light. In order to control the fulfillment of the elliptical constraints of the Maxwell's equations, we use the hyperbolic divergence cleaning method. In this paper, we extend the latter method applying the CIR scheme with scaled numerical diffusion in order to balance those terms with the Maxwell flux vectors. For the fluids, we generalize the AUSM+-up to multiple fluids of different species within the plasma. The fully implicit second-order method is first verified on the Hartmann flow (including comparison with its analytical solution), two ideal MHD cases with strong shocks, namely, Orszag-Tang and the MHD rotor, then validated on a much more challenging case, representing a two-fluid magnetic reconnection under solar chromospheric conditions. For the latter case, a comparison with pioneering results available in literature is provided.

  1. Reduction of NOx and PM in marine diesel engine exhaust gas using microwave plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, W.; FInst, P.; Manivannan, N.; Beleca, R.; Abbod, M.

    2015-10-01

    Abatement of NOx and particulate matters (PM) of marine diesel exhaust gas using microwave (MW) non-thermal plasma is presented in this paper. NOx mainly consist of NO and less concentration of NO2 in a typical two stoke marine diesel engine and microwave plasma generation can completely remove NO. MW was generated using two 2kW microwave sources and a saw tooth passive electrode. Passive electrode was used to generate high electric field region within microwave environment where high energetic electrons (1-3eV) are produced for the generation of non-thermal plasma (NTP). 2kW gen-set diesel exhaust gas was used to test our pilot-scale MW plasma reactor. The experimental results show that almost 100% removal of NO is possible for the exhaust gas flow rate of 60l/s. It was also shown that MW can significantly remove soot particles (PM, 10nm to 365nm) entrained in the exhaust gas of 200kW marine diesel engine with 40% engine load and gas flow rate of 130l/s. MW without generating plasma showed reduction up to 50% reduction of PM and with the plasma up to 90% reduction. The major challenge in these experiments was that igniting the desired plasma and sustaining it with passive electrodes for longer period (10s of minutes) as it required fine tuning of electrode position, which was influenced by many factors such as gas flow rate, geometry of reactor and MW power.

  2. The Instability of Terahertz Plasma Waves in Two Dimensional Gated and Ungated Quantum Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping

    2016-04-01

    The instability of terahertz (THz) plasma waves in two-dimensional (2D) quantum electron gas in a nanometer field effect transistor (FET) with asymmetrical boundary conditions has been investigated. We analyze THz plasma waves of two parts of the 2D quantum electron gas: gated and ungated regions. The results show that the radiation frequency and the increment (radiation power) in 2D ungated quantum electron gas are much higher than that in 2D gated quantum electron gas. The quantum effects always enhance the radiation power and enlarge the region of instability in both cases. This allows us to conclude that 2D quantum electron gas in the transistor channel is important for the emission and detection process and both gated and ungated parts take part in that process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 10975114)

  3. Plasma ionization frequency, edge-to-axis density ratio, and density on axis of a cylindrical gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    A rigorous derivation of expressions, starting from the governing equations, for the ionization frequency, edge-to-axis ratio of plasma density, plasma density at the axis, and radially averaged plasma density in a cylindrical gas discharge has been obtained. The derived expressions are simple and involve the relevant parameters of the discharge: Cylinder radius, axial current, and neutral gas pressure. The found expressions account for ion inertia, ion temperature, and changes in plasma ion collisionality.

  4. Coupling between geochemical reactions and multicomponent gas and solute transport in unsaturated media: A reactive transport modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K. U.

    2007-05-01

    The two-way coupling that exists between biogeochemical reactions and vadose zone transport processes, in particular gas phase transport, determines the composition of soil gas. To explore these feedback processes quantitatively, multicomponent gas diffusion and advection are implemented into an existing reactive transport model that includes a full suite of geochemical reactions. Multicomponent gas diffusion is described on the basis of the dusty gas model, which accounts for all relevant gas diffusion mechanisms. The simulation of gas attenuation in partially saturated landfill soil covers, methane production, and oxidation in aquifers contaminated by organic compounds (e.g., an oil spill site) and pyrite oxidation in mine tailings demonstrate that both diffusive and advective gas transport can be affected by geochemical reactions. Methane oxidation in landfill covers reduces the existing upward pressure gradient, thereby decreasing the contribution of advective methane emissions to the atmosphere and enhancing the net flux of atmospheric oxygen into the soil column. At an oil spill site, methane oxidation causes a reversal in the direction of gas advection, which results in advective transport toward the zone of oxidation both from the ground surface and the deeper zone of methane production. Both diffusion and advection contribute to supply atmospheric oxygen into the subsurface, and methane emissions to the atmosphere are averted. During pyrite oxidation in mine tailings, pressure reduction in the reaction zone drives advective gas flow into the sediment column, enhancing the oxidation process. In carbonate-rich mine tailings, calcite dissolution releases carbon dioxide, which partly offsets the pressure reduction caused by O2 consumption.

  5. Effect of N{sub 2} + H{sub 2} gas mixtures in plasma nitriding on tribological properties of duplex surface treated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Taktak, Sukru Gunes, Ibrahim; Ulker, Sukru; Yalcin, Yilmaz

    2008-12-15

    Thermo-reactive diffusion chromizing followed by pulsed plasma nitriding were carried out on AISI 52100 and 8620 bearing steels. The chromized samples were pulse-plasma nitrided for 5 h at 500 deg. C in various N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixtures. The coated steels were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microhardness testing. The unlubricated wear behaviors of only chromized and duplex treated steels were investigated in ball-on-disc system tests at room temperature. X-ray diffraction patterns of the duplex treated samples containing H{sub 2} indicated the formation of dominant CrN and Cr{sub 2}N nitrides as well as the formation of Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} and Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides. Gas mixtures in the plasma nitriding, which was performed after chromizing, have a significant influence on the wear rate of the duplex treated steels. The wear and friction tests showed that the lowest friction coefficient and wear rates were observed for the samples duplex treated in a 50%N{sub 2} +50%H{sub 2} plasma. Conversely, the lowest wear resistance was observed on the samples duplex treated in a gas mixture of 75%N{sub 2} + 25%H{sub 2}, probably due to formation of a hard and brittle layer.

  6. Nonthermal plasma processor utilizing additive-gas injection and/or gas extraction

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2006-06-20

    A device for processing gases includes a cylindrical housing in which an electrically grounded, metal injection/extraction gas supply tube is disposed. A dielectric tube surrounds the injection/extraction gas supply tube to establish a gas modification passage therearound. Additionally, a metal high voltage electrode circumscribes the dielectric tube. The high voltage electrode is energizable to create nonthermal electrical microdischarges between the high voltage electrode and the injection/extraction gas supply tube across the dielectric tube within the gas modification passage. An injection/extraction gas and a process gas flow through the nonthermal electrical microdischarges within the gas modification passage and a modified process gas results. Using the device contaminants that are entrained in the process gas can be destroyed to yield a cleaner, modified process gas.

  7. Stoichiometric silicon oxynitride thin films reactively sputtered in Ar/N2O plasmas by HiPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänninen, Tuomas; Schmidt, Susann; Wissting, Jonas; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Silicon oxynitride (SiO x N y , x=0.2-1.3, y=0.2 -0.7) thin films were synthesized by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering from a pure silicon target in Ar/N2O atmospheres. It was found that the composition of the material can be controlled by the reactive gas flow and the average target power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that high average powers result in more silicon-rich films, while lower target powers yield silicon-oxide-like material due to more pronounced target poisoning. The amount of nitrogen in the films can be controlled by the percentage of nitrous oxide in the working gas. The nitrogen content remains at a constant level while the target is operated in the transition region between metallic and poisoned target surface conditions. The extent of target poisoning is gauged by the changes in peak target current under the different deposition conditions. XPS also shows that varying concentrations and ratios of oxygen and nitrogen in the films result in film chemical bonding structures ranging from silicon-rich to stoichiometric silicon oxynitrides having no observable Si-Si bond contributions. Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows that the film optical properties depend on the amount and ratio of oxygen and nitrogen in the compound, with film refractive indices measured at 633 nm ranging between those of SiO2 and Si3N4.

  8. Mechanisms of gas precipitation in plasma-exposed tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Cowgill, D. F.; Donovan, D. C.; Shimada, M.; Wampler, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    Precipitation in subsurface bubbles is a key process that governs how hydrogen isotopes migrate through and become trapped within plasma-exposed tungsten. We describe a continuum-scale model of hydrogen diffusion in plasma-exposed materials that includes the effects of precipitation. The model can account for bubble expansion via dislocation loop punching, using an accurate equation of state to determine the internal pressure. This information is used to predict amount of hydrogen trapped by bubbles, as well as the conditions where the bubbles become saturated. In an effort to validate the underlying assumptions, we compare our results with published positron annihilation and thermal desorption spectroscopy data, as well as our own measurements using the tritium plasma experiment (TPE).

  9. Mechanisms of gas precipitation in plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    R. D. Kolasinski; D. F. Cowgill; D. C. Donovan; M. Shimada

    2012-05-01

    Precipitation in subsurface bubbles is a key process that governs how hydrogen isotopes migrate through and become trapped within plasma-exposed tungsten. We describe a continuum-scale model of hydrogen diffusion in plasma-exposed materials that includes the effects of precipitation. The model can account for bubble expansion via dislocation loop punching, using an accurate equation of state to determine the internal pressure. This information is used to predict amount of hydrogen trapped by bubbles, as well as the conditions where the bubbles become saturated. In an effort to validate the underlying assumptions, we compare our results with published positron annihilation and thermal desorption spectroscopy data, as well as our own measurements using the tritium plasma experiment (TPE).

  10. A Plasma Opening Switch Based on a Gas-Puff/Axial Wire Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Joseph; de Grouchy, Philip; Ouart, Nicholas; Qi, Niansheng; Atoyan, Levon; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce; Giuliani, John

    2015-11-01

    We are investigating an idea for switching current from a gas-puff shell to an axial metal wire as a mechanism for generating inductive voltage spikes and x-rays above 10 keV. The outer annulus of a 7 cm. diameter triple-annular gas-puff nozzle is used to inject gas into the electrode gap of the COBRA 1 MA generator, with a single wire on-axis. We show that the current pulse produced by COBRA initially travels through the lower inductance pre-ionized outer shell plasma, generating an azimuthal magnetic field which drives this shell radially inwards. Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth occurs on the outer edge of this imploding plasma, which disrupts the current carrying column, inhibiting the axial flow of current through the gas-puff plasma and possibly causing the current to switch to the higher inductance wire. A disruption to the current through the gas-puff shell caused by instability growth should be measurable as a voltage spike, as the current finds a new path either through the wire or elsewhere in the imploding plasma shell. We investigate this effect as instability conditions are varied, by adjusting the density and species of the injected gas. This work was sponsored by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE cooperative agreement.

  11. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned towards conditions usually encountered in the Marcellus shale play in the Northeastern US at an approximate depth of 1500 m (~;;4,500 feet). Our modeling simulations indicate that when faults are present, micro-seismic events are possible, the magnitude of which is somewhat larger than the one associated with micro-seismic events originating from regular hydraulic fracturing because of the larger surface area that is available for rupture. The results of our simulations indicated fault rupture lengths of about 10 to 20 m, which, in rare cases can extend to over 100 m, depending on the fault permeability, the in situ stress field, and the fault strength properties. In addition to a single event rupture length of 10 to 20 m, repeated events and aseismic slip amounted to a total rupture length of 50 m, along with a shear offset displacement of less than 0.01 m. This indicates that the possibility of hydraulically induced fractures at great depth (thousands of meters) causing activation of faults and creation of a new flow path that can reach shallow groundwater resources (or even the surface) is remote. The expected low permeability of faults in producible shale is clearly a limiting factor for the possible rupture length and seismic magnitude. In fact, for a fault that is initially nearly-impermeable, the only possibility of larger fault slip event would be opening by hydraulic fracturing; this would allow pressure to penetrate the matrix along the fault and to reduce the frictional strength over a sufficiently large fault surface patch. However, our simulation results show that if the fault is initially impermeable, hydraulic fracturing along the fault results in numerous small micro-seismic events along with the propagation, effectively

  12. N2 Gas Plasma Inactivates Influenza Virus by Inducing Changes in Viral Surface Morphology, Protein, and Genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2013-01-01

    We have recently treated with N2 gas plasma and achieved inactivation of bacteria. However, the effect of N2 gas plasma on viruses remains unclear. With the aim of developing this technique, we analyzed the virucidal effect of N2 gas plasma on influenza virus and its influence on the viral components. We treated influenza virus particles with inert N2 gas plasma (1.5 kpps; kilo pulses per second) produced by a short high-voltage pulse generated from a static induction thyristor power supply. A bioassay using chicken embryonated eggs demonstrated that N2 gas plasma inactivated influenza virus in allantoic fluid within 5 min. Immunochromatography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Coomassie brilliant blue staining showed that N2 gas plasma treatment of influenza A and B viruses in nasal aspirates and allantoic fluids as well as purified influenza A and B viruses induced degradation of viral proteins including nucleoprotein. Analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that N2 gas plasma treatment induced changes in the viral RNA genome. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that aggregation and fusion of influenza viruses were induced by N2 gas plasma treatment. We believe these biochemical changes may contribute to the inactivation of influenza viruses by N2 gas plasma. PMID:24195077

  13. N 2 gas plasma inactivates influenza virus by inducing changes in viral surface morphology, protein, and genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have recently treated with N2 gas plasma and achieved inactivation of bacteria. However, the effect of N2 gas plasma on viruses remains unclear. With the aim of developing this technique, we analyzed the virucidal effect of N2 gas plasma on influenza virus and its influence on the viral components. We treated influenza virus particles with inert N2 gas plasma (1.5 kpps; kilo pulses per second) produced by a short high-voltage pulse generated from a static induction thyristor power supply. A bioassay using chicken embryonated eggs demonstrated that N2 gas plasma inactivated influenza virus in allantoic fluid within 5 min. Immunochromatography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Coomassie brilliant blue staining showed that N2 gas plasma treatment of influenza A and B viruses in nasal aspirates and allantoic fluids as well as purified influenza A and B viruses induced degradation of viral proteins including nucleoprotein. Analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that N2 gas plasma treatment induced changes in the viral RNA genome. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that aggregation and fusion of influenza viruses were induced by N2 gas plasma treatment. We believe these biochemical changes may contribute to the inactivation of influenza viruses by N2 gas plasma. PMID:24195077

  14. Plasma Nitrite Response and Arterial Reactivity Differentiate Vascular Health and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jason D; Miller, Elizabeth M; Schwark, Earl; Robbins, Jennifer. L.; Duscha, Brian D; Annex, Brian H

    2009-01-01

    NO is crucial for endothelial function and vascular health. Plasma nitrite (NO2-) is the main oxidation product of NO and has been shown to reflect changes in eNOS activity. We hypothesized that plasma NO2- response to physical exercise stress along with physiological endothelial function would be reduced with increasing severity of vascular disease. Subject groups were; a) risk factors but no vascular disease (RF); b) Type 2 diabetes with no vascular disease (DM); c) diagnosed peripheral arterial disease (PAD); and d) DM+PAD. Venous blood was drawn at rest and 10min following maximal exercise. Plasma samples were analyzed by reductive chemiluminescence. Brachial diameters were imaged prior to, during and following 5min of forearm occlusion (BAFMD). There were no differences in resting plasma NO2- or BA diameters between groups. The PAD groups had lower age adjusted BAFMD responses (p≤0.05). Within group analysis revealed an increase in NO2- in the RF group (+39.3%), no change in the DM (−15.51%), and a decrease in the PAD (−44.20%) and PAD+DM (−39.95%). This was maintained after adjusting for age and VO2peak (p≤0.05). ΔNO2- and BAFMD were the strongest independent predictors of VO2peak.in multivariate linear regression. These findings suggest ΔNO2- discriminates severity of cardiovascular disease risk, is related to endothelial function and predicts exercise capacity. PMID:19371597

  15. Stability of polyphenols in chokeberry juice treated with gas phase plasma.

    PubMed

    Bursać Kovačević, Danijela; Gajdoš Kljusurić, Jasenka; Putnik, Predrag; Vukušić, Tomislava; Herceg, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-12-01

    Chokeberry juice was subjected to cold atmospheric gas phase plasma and changes in hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols and anthocyanins were monitored. Plasma treatments were carried out under different treatment times and juice volumes under constant gas flow (0.75dm(3)min(-1)). The results were compared against control (untreated) and pasteurized chokeberry juice (80°C/2min). During pasteurization, the most unstable were hydroxycinnamic acids with losses of up to 59%, while flavonols and anthocyanins increased by 5% and 9%, respectively. On the contrary, plasma treated chokeberry juice showed higher concentrations of hydroxycinnamic acids and 23% loss of anthocyanins in comparison to untreated juice. In order to obtain the optimal cold plasma treatment parameters principal component and sensitivity analysis were used. Such parameters can be potentially used for pasteurization in terms of phenolic stability of chokeberry juice. Optimal treatment was at 4.1min and sample volume of 3cm(3). PMID:27374539

  16. Analysis of whole blood samples with low gas flow inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Sascha; Künnemeyer, Jens; Terborg, Lydia; Trümpler, Stefan; Günsel, Andreas; Wiesmüller, Gerhard A; Karst, Uwe; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Low gas flow ICP-OES with a total argon consumption below 0.7 L/min is introduced for the analysis of trace elements in blood samples to investigate the influence of samples containing an organic solvent in a demanding matrix on the performance of this plasma for the first time. Therefore, gadolinium was determined in human plasma samples and mercury in red blood cells, human plasma, and precipitated plasma protein fraction. Limits of detection (LOD) were determined to be in the low microgram per liter range for the analytes and the accuracy of the method was assessed by comparison with a conventional Fassel-type torch-based ICP-OES. It was proven that the low gas flow ICP-OES leads to comparable results with the instrument based on the Fassel-type torch. PMID:25240935

  17. Note: Design and investigation of a multichannel plasma-jet triggered gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Weihao; Liu, Xuandong; Zhang, Qiaogen; Liu, Shanhong

    2014-07-01

    We described the fabrication and testing of a multichannel plasma-jet triggered gas switch (MPJTGS). A novel six-channel annular micro-plasma-gun was embedded in the trigger electrode to generate multichannel plasma jets as a nanosecond trigger pulse arrived. The gas breakdown in multiple sites of the spark gap was induced and fixed around jet orifices by the plasma jets. We tested the multichannel discharge characteristics of the MPJTGS in two working modes with charge voltage of 50 kV, trigger voltage of +40 kV (25 ns rise time), and trigger energy of 240 J, 32 J, and 2 J, respectively, at different working coefficients. Results show that the average number of discharge channels increased as the trigger energy increased, and decreased as the working coefficient decreased. At a working coefficient of 87.1% and trigger energy of 240 J, the average number of discharge channels in Mode II could reach 4.1.

  18. Effects of forming gas plasma treatment on low-temperature Cu–Cu direct bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungdong; Nam, Youngju; Eunkyung Kim, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature Cu–Cu direct bonding becomes of great importance as Cu is widely used as an interconnection material in the packaging industry. Preparing a clean surface is a key to successful Cu–Cu direct bonding. We investigated the effects of forming gas plasma treatment on the reduction of Cu oxide and Cu–Cu bonding temperature. As plasma input power and treatment time increased, Cu oxide could be effectively reduced, and this could be attributed to the enhanced chemical reaction between forming gas plasma and Cu oxide. When the bonding temperature was reduced from 415 to 300 °C, the bonding strength of the plasma-treated interface was increased from 1.8 to 5.55 J/m2 while that of the wet-treated interface was decreased.

  19. Measurement of neutral gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi Hoong

    2015-04-24

    Measuring the temperature of neutrals in inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) is important as heating of neutral particles will influence plasma characteristics such as the spatial distributions of plasma density and electron temperature. Neutral gas temperatures were deduced using a non-invasive technique that combines gas actinometry, optical emission spectroscopy and simulation which is described here. Argon gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz ICP were found to fall within the range of 500 − 800 K for input power of 140 − 200 W and pressure of 0.05 − 0.2 mbar. Comparing spectrometers with 0.2 nm and 0.5 nm resolution, improved fitting sensitivity was observed for the 0.2 nm resolution.

  20. Generation and confinement of microwave gas-plasma in photonic dielectric microstructure.

    PubMed

    Debord, B; Jamier, R; Gérôme, F; Leroy, O; Boisse-Laporte, C; Leprince, P; Alves, L L; Benabid, F

    2013-10-21

    We report on a self-guided microwave surface-wave induced generation of ~60 μm diameter and 6 cm-long column of argon-plasma confined in the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. At gas pressure of 1 mbar, the micro-confined plasma exhibits a stable transverse profile with a maximum gas-temperature as high as 1300 ± 200 K, and a wall-temperature as low as 500 K, and an electron density level of 10¹⁴ cm⁻³. The fiber guided fluorescence emission presents strong Ar⁺ spectral lines in the visible and near UV. Theory shows that the observed combination of relatively low wall-temperature and high ionisation rate in this strongly confined configuration is due to an unprecedentedly wide electrostatic space-charge field and the subsequent ion acceleration dominance in the plasma-to-gas power transfer. PMID:24150390

  1. Variations in C-reactive protein, plasma free radicals and fibrinogen values in patients with osteoarthritis treated with Pycnogenol.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Errichi, S; Zulli, C; Errichi, B M; Vinciguerra, G; Ledda, A; Di Renzo, A; Stuard, S; Dugall, M; Pellegrini, L; Gizzi, G; Ippolito, E; Ricci, A; Cacchio, M; Cipollone, G; Ruffini, I; Fano, F; Hosoi, M; Rohdewald, P

    2008-01-01

    In a previous, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we evaluated the efficacy of a 3-month treatment with Pycnogenol for 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Pycnogenol significantly decreased joint pain and improved joint function as evaluated using the WOMAC score and walking performance of patients on a treadmill. In this study, we further investigated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Pycnogenol in a subset of the osteoarthritis patients presenting with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma-free radicals. Elevated CRP levels have been suggested to be associated with disease progression in osteoarthritis. In our study, 29 subjects of the Pycnogenol group and 26 patients in the placebo group showed CRP levels higher than 3 mg/l at baseline. Comparison of blood specimens drawn at baseline and after 3-month treatment showed that Pycnogenol significantly decreased plasma free radicals to 70.1% of baseline values. Plasma CRP levels decreased from baseline 3.9 mg/l to 1.1 mg/l in the Pycnogenol group whereas the control group had initial values of 3.9 mg/l which decreased to 3.6 mg/l. The CRP decrease in the Pycnogenol was statistical significant as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Fibrinogen levels were found to be lowered to 62.8% of initial values (P < 0.05) in response to Pycnogenol. No significant changes for plasma free radicals, CRP and fibrinogen were found in the placebo-treated group. The decrease of systemic inflammatory markers suggests that Pycnogenol may exert anti-inflammatory activity in osteoarthritic joints and patients did not present with other ailments or infections. The nature of the anti-inflammatory effects of Pycnogenol with regard to CRP warrants further investigation. PMID:19017467

  2. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  3. Plasma species dynamics in a laser produced carbon plasma expanding in low pressure neutral gas background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, H. M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Bhuyan, H.; Chuaqui, H.; Wyndham, E.

    2012-06-01

    We present time and space resolved spectroscopic observations of a laser produced carbon plasma, in an argon background. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 370 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, with a fluence of 6.8 J/cm2, is used to produce a plasma from a solid graphite target, at a base pressure of 0.5 mTorr, and with 80 mTorr Argon background. The spectral emission in the visible is recorded with 15 ns time resolution. 20 ns time resolution plasma imagining, filtered at characteristic carbon species emission wavelengths, is used to study the dynamics of the expanding plasma. Two different fronts with ionic or molecular compositions are seen to detach from de laser target plasma.

  4. Influence of NH4Cl Powder Addition for Fabrication of Aluminum Nitride Coating in Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Reactive plasma spray is the key to fabricating aluminum nitride (AlN) thermally sprayed coatings. It was possible to fabricate AlN/Al composite coatings using atmospheric plasma spray process through plasma nitriding of Al powders (Al 30 μm). The nitriding reaction and the AlN content could be improved by controlling the spray distance and the feedstock powder particle size. Increasing the spray distance and/or using smaller particle size of Al powders improved the in-flight nitriding reaction. However, it was difficult to fabricate thick and dense AlN coatings with an increase in the spray distance and/or when using fine particles. Thus, the coatings thickness was suppressed because of the complete nitriding of some particles (formation of AlN particles) during flight, which prevents the particle deposition. Furthermore, the excessive vaporization of Al fine particles (due to increased particle temperature) decreased the deposition efficiency. To fabricate thick AlN coatings in the reactive plasma spray process, improving the nitriding reaction of the large Al particles at short spray distance is required to decrease the vaporization of Al particles during flight. This study investigated the influence of adding ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) powders on the nitriding process of large Al powders and on the microstructure of the fabricated coatings. It was possible to fabricate thick AlN coatings at 100 mm spray distance with small addition of NH4Cl powders to the Al feedstock powders (30 μm). Addition of NH4Cl to the starting Al powders promoted the formation of AlN through changing the reaction path to vapor-phase nitridation chlorination-nitridation sequences as confirmed by the thermodynamic analysis of possible intermediate reactions. This changes the nitriding reaction to a mild way, so it is more controlled with no explosive mode and with relatively low heating rates. Thus, NH4Cl acts as a catalyst, nitrogen source, and diluent agent. Furthermore, the evolved

  5. Modeling and experiments on differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Koppers, W. R.; Rooij, G. J. van; Goedheer, W. J.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes; Kleyn, A. W.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.

    2009-03-15

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to investigate the efficiency of differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows. Skimmers are used to separate the neutrals from the plasma beam, which is guided from the source to the target by a strong axial magnetic field. In this way, the neutrals are prevented to reach the target region. The neutral flux to the target must be lower than the plasma flux to enable ITER relevant plasma-surface interaction (PSI) studies. It is therefore essential to control the neutral gas dynamics. The DSMC method was used to model the expansion of a hot gas in a low pressure vessel where a small discrepancy in shock position was found between the simulations and a well-established empirical formula. Two stage differential pumping was modeled and applied in the linear plasma devices Pilot-PSI and PLEXIS. In Pilot-PSI a factor of 4.5 pressure reduction for H{sub 2} has been demonstrated. Both simulations and experiments showed that the optimum skimmer position depends on the position of the shock and therefore shifts for different gas parameters. The shape of the skimmer has to be designed such that it has a minimum impact on the shock structure. A too large angle between the skimmer and the forward direction of the gas flow leads to an influence on the expansion structure. A pressure increase in front of the skimmer is formed and the flow of the plasma beam becomes obstructed. It has been shown that a skimmer with an angle around 53 deg. gives the best performance. The use of skimmers is implemented in the design of the large linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI. Here, a three stage differentially pumped vacuum system is used to reach low enough neutral pressures near the target, opening a door to PSI research in the ITER relevant regime.

  6. Studies of Magnetized Plasmas Interacting with Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Gordon San-Yin

    1995-01-01

    Experiments and computer simulations have been performed in a linear magnetized helium and argon plasma column of similar collisionalities to that expected in ITER to examine heat flow and particle parameters. Plasma properties are found to differ significantly at low and high ambient neutral pressures. At pressures below 100 mT, plasmas obey the low -recycling prediction of approximate plasma pressure balance. Density decreases by a factor of about 2 to 3 with respect to that upstream, and T_{e} remains isothermal. Power flow is predominantly convective. Results obtained with varying neutral pressures and input power are consistent with zero-dimensional modeling of particle and energy balances. Ion are found to be heated by the electrons via classical energy equilibration, moderated by charge-exchange. Neutrals are heated above room temperatures. They exhibit a two-temperature population, the hotter neutrals due to charge-exchange with ions, and the colder via electron -neutral elastic collisions. The 2-d fluid code B2 has been modified to simulate the experimental conditions. Results are in good agreement. A novel regime of abrupt collapse in plasma pressure, affecting both density and T_{e} and accompanied by a dramatic increase in neutral line radiation, has been observed in high (>100 mT) pressure discharges. A potential structure akin to a double layer is calculated to exist. This phenomenon of thermal collapse is favored by a high neutral pressure, a large positive target bias, and a sufficiently long column. It is postulated that the disparate rates of momentum exchange between electrons and ions with neutrals are responsible for the formation of such collapses. The large increase in radiation is partly attributed to 3-body recombination during stagnated flow, although the estimated power loss is insufficient to account for the observations. The B2 neutral particle treatment has been found to be inadequate at these higher pressures. These results motivate

  7. Plasma protein thiols, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein and red blood cell acetylcholinesterase in patients undergoing intrauterine insemination

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Krishnananda; Kumar, Pratap; Adiga, Satish Kumar; Rao, Anjali; Lanka, Anupama; Singh, Jaipal

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), protein thiols (PT), ceruloplasmin (CP) and C-reactive proteins (CRPs) to assess any change in their levels following intrauterine insemination (IUI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-two patients aged 31 ± 4.65 years (mean ± SD) with primary infertility selected for IUI. All of them had induced ovulation with clomiphene citrate 50 mg from day 2 to day 6. After taking the consent, 2 ml of blood was withdrawn before and after 24 h of IUI for biochemical estimations. RESULTS: We observed a significant decrease in plasma CP, PT and RBC AChE (P < 0.001) following IUI compared with the respective pre-procedure levels. Highly sensitive CRP showed a marginal increase after IUI. CONCLUSION: Fluctuations in levels of the above parameters point to their role in the female reproductive system and in the outcome of the IUI. PMID:19562071

  8. Low-temperature-deposited insulating films of silicon nitride by reactive sputtering and plasma-enhanced CVD: Comparison of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masaru; Takeyama, Mayumi B.; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Nakamura, Tomoji; Noya, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    The characteristics of SiN x films deposited by reactive sputtering and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are examined to obtain high-density films at low deposition temperatures. PECVD SiN x films deposited at 200 °C show low densities of 2.14-2.20 g/cm3 regardless of their composition, while their refractive index varies depending on their composition. PECVD requires the substrate temperature to obtain high-density films, because a possible cause of low-density films is the amount of Si-H bond, rather than that of N-H bond, in the films originating from hydrogen incorporated by the insufficient decomposition of SiH4 molecules at low temperatures. The sputtered SiN x films with high density are obtained at a temperature lower than 200 °C and considered a promising candidate for insulating films at low process temperatures.

  9. Fabrication of single-crystal silicon nanotubes with sub-10 nm walls using cryogenic inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqin; Chen, Yiqin; Zhu, Xupeng; Zheng, Mengjie; Dong, Fengliang; Chen, Peipei; Xu, Lihua; Chu, Weiguo; Duan, Huigao

    2016-09-01

    Single-crystal silicon nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years due in part to their unique optical properties. In this work, we demonstrate direct fabrication of single-crystal silicon nanotubes with sub-10 nm walls which show low reflectivity. The fabrication was based on a cryogenic inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching process using high-resolution hydrogen silsesquioxane nanostructures as the hard mask. Two main etching parameters including substrate low-frequency power and SF6/O2 flow rate ratio were investigated to determine the etching mechanism in the process. With optimized etching parameters, high-aspect-ratio silicon nanotubes with smooth and vertical sub-10 nm walls were fabricated. Compared to commonly-used antireflection silicon nanopillars with the same feature size, the densely packed silicon nanotubes possessed a lower reflectivity, implying possible potential applications of silicon nanotubes in photovoltaics.

  10. Modeling of gas flow in the cylindrical channels of high-voltage plasma torches with rod electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovskoy, A. M.; Popov, S. D.; Surov, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    The article is devoted to the calculation of gas dynamic parameters of gas flow in various areas of low-temperature plasma generator, therefore, target area's grid was built for the simulation of plasma gas flow in channels of studied high-voltage AC plasma torches and calculations of three-dimensional gas flow was made using GAMBIT and FLUENT soft-ware and Spalart-Allmares turbulence model, air flow was simulated in the tangential feed's areas, in the cylindrical channel, in the tapering nozzle chamber and in the mixing chamber of plasma torches and outside (in the environment); thus, 3D-modelling of the cold plasma-forming gas flow was performed in cylindrical channels of studied high-voltage AC plasma torches with rod electrodes for the first time.

  11. [Study on vibrational temperature and gas temperature in a hollowneedle-plate discharge plasma].

    PubMed

    Dong, Li-fang; Liu, Wei-yuan; Yang, Yu-jie; Wang, Shuai

    2010-09-01

    A 1.6-3 cm long plasma torch was generated when argon gas was introduced by using a hollowneedle-plate discharge device working in atmosphere. The vibrational temperature and the gas temperature at plasma root and tip were studied by using optical emission spectrum at different argon gas flow. The gas temperature was obtained by comparing experimental line shape of OH radicals band around 309 nm with its simulated line shape. The vibrational temperature was calculated using N2 second posi tive band system C3:pi u-B3 pi g. It was found that the gas temperatures at arc root and arc tip are equal and they decrease with the argon flow rate increasing. The gas temperature decreases from 350 to 300 K when argon flow rate increases from 3.0 to 6.5 mL x min(-1). The vibrational temperature at are tip (1950 K) is higher than that at arc root (1755 K) under a low gas flow rate (e.g., 3.0 mL x min(-1)). With gas flow rate increasing, the vibrational temperature at both tip and root decreases, but the decreasing rate at are tip is faster than that at arc root. When gas flow is larger, the vibrational temperatures at tip and root tend to be equal. PMID:21105384

  12. Production and reactivity of the hydroxyl radical in homogeneous high pressure plasmas of atmospheric gases containing traces of light olefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, L.; Pasquiers, S.; Blin-Simiand, N.; Postel, C.

    2007-05-01

    A photo-triggered discharge has been used to study the production kinetic mechanisms and the reactivity of the hydroxyl radical in a N2/O2 mixture (5% oxygen) containing ethane or ethene for hydrocarbon concentration values in the range 1000-5000 ppm, at 460 mbar total pressure. The discharge (current pulse duration of 60 ns) has allowed the generation of a transient homogeneous non-equilibrium plasma, and the time evolution of the OH density has been measured (relative value) in the afterglow (up to 200 µs) by laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Experimental results have been explained using predictions of a self-consistent 0D discharge and plasma reactivity modelling, and reduced kinetic schemes for OH have been validated. It has been shown that recombination of H- and O-atoms, as well as reaction of O with the hydroperoxy radical HO2, plays a very important role in the production of OH radicals in the mixture with ethane. H is a key species for production of OH and HO2 radicals. As for ethane, O, H and HO2 are key species for the production of OH in the case of ethene, but carbonated radicals, following the partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon molecule by O, also play a non-negligible role. The rate constant for O- and H-atom recombination has been estimated to be 3 × 10-30 cm6 s-1 at near ambient temperature, consistent with LIF measurements on OH for both mixtures with ethane and ethene.

  13. Formation of a Multi-Charged Plasma in the Directed Gas Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, I. S.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Shalashov, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    We consider a gas-dynamic model describing the formation of a plasma with multiply ionized ions under the conditions of resonant heating of the electron component. Based on the isothermal approximation, possible regimes of the plasma flow are classified, the influence of the geometric divergence of the flow on the formation of the ion charge distribution is studied, and optimal regimes for the achievement of the maximum ion charge are identified. The model can be used for optimization and interpretation of modern experiments on generation of the extreme ultraviolet radiation due to the excitation of lines of multiply ionized atoms in a gas flow heated by strong millimeter or submillimeter waves.

  14. Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M.; Yoshida, I.

    2009-02-16

    The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10{sup -2}-6x10{sup 2} s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in < or approx. 2x10{sup -1} s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10{sup -1}-10{sup 0} s, polysilane accumulation in 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in > or approx. 10{sup 1} s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

  15. Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunomura, S.; Yoshida, I.; Kondo, M.

    2009-02-01

    The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10-2-6×102 s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in ≲2×10-1 s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10-1-100 s, polysilane accumulation in 100-102 s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in ≳101 s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

  16. Titanium oxynitride films for a bipolar plate of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell prepared by inductively coupled plasma assisted reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Han, D. H.; Kim, J. N.; Lee, J. J.

    Titanium oxynitride (TiN xO y) films are investigated for application as a bipolar plate coating material in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). TiN xO y films with various amounts of oxygen are deposited on stainless-steel substrates by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted reactive sputtering by changing the oxygen gas flow rate. The interfacial contact resistance (ICR) and the corrosion resistance of the TiN xO y films are measured under PEMFC simulated conditions. When the amount of oxygen in the TiN xO y film is approximately <12 at.% (O 2 flow rate ≤0.2 sccm), the corrosion resistance is enhanced considerably, whereas the interfacial contact resistance does not change. The corrosion current density decreases from 8 × 10 -6 A cm -2 for the TiN-coated sample to 2.7 × 10 -6 A cm -2 at 0.6 V vs. SCE as a result of oxygen incorporation in the TiN film. The ICR value remains at 2.5 mΩ cm 2 at 150 N cm -2. When a small amount of oxygen is added to the TiN film, it is postulated that the oxygen atoms locate at the column and grain boundaries, and thus prevent corrosive media from penetrating into the substrate while not deteriorating the electrical property of the film.

  17. Effect of N{sub 2} and Ar gas on DC arc plasma generation and film composition from Ti-Al compound cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhirkov, Igor Rosen, Johanna; Oks, Efim

    2015-06-07

    DC arc plasma from Ti, Al, and Ti{sub 1−x}Al{sub x} (x = 0.16, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.70) compound cathodes has been characterized with respect to plasma chemistry (charged particles) and charge-state-resolved ion energy for Ar and N{sub 2} pressures in the range 10{sup −6} to 3 × 10{sup −2} Torr. Scanning electron microscopy was used for exploring the correlation between the cathode and film composition, which in turn was correlated with the plasma properties. In an Ar atmosphere, the plasma ion composition showed a reduction of Al of approximately 5 at. % compared to the cathode composition, while deposited films were in accordance with the cathode stoichiometry. Introducing N{sub 2} above ∼5 × 10{sup −3} Torr, lead to a reduced Al content in the plasma as well as in the film, and hence a 1:1 correlation between the cathode and film composition cannot be expected in a reactive environment. This may be explained by an influence of the reactive gas on the arc mode and type of erosion of Ti and Al rich contaminations, as well as on the plasma transport. Throughout the investigated pressure range, a higher deposition rate was obtained from cathodes with higher Al content. The origin of generated gas ions was investigated through the velocity rule, stating that the most likely ion velocities of all cathode elements from a compound cathode are equal. The results suggest that the major part of the gas ions in Ar is generated from electron impact ionization, while gas ions in a N{sub 2} atmosphere primarily originate from a nitrogen contaminated layer on the cathode surface. The presented results provide a contribution to the understanding processes of plasma generation from compound cathodes. It also allows for a more reasonable approach to the selection of composite cathode and experimental conditions for thin film depositions.

  18. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Lipopolysaccharides with Gas-Phase Nitric Acid: Reactive Sites and Reaction Pathways.

    PubMed

    Trueblood, Jonathan V; Estillore, Armando D; Lee, Christopher; Dowling, Jacqueline A; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-08-18

    Recent studies have shown that sea spray aerosol (SSA) has a size-dependent, complex composition consisting of biomolecules and biologically derived organic compounds in addition to salts. This additional chemical complexity most likely influences the heterogeneous reactivity of SSA, as these other components will have different reactive sites and reaction pathways. In this study, we focus on the reactivity of a class of particles derived from some of the biological components of sea spray aerosol including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that undergo heterogeneous chemistry within the reactive sites of the biological molecule. Examples of these reactions and the relevant reactive sites are proposed as follows: R-COONa(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-COOH and R-HPO4Na(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-H2PO4. These reactions may be a heterogeneous pathway not only for sea spray aerosol but also for a variety of other types of atmospheric aerosol as well. PMID:27445084

  19. Argon plasma inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching study for smooth sidewall thin film lithium niobate waveguide application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulliac, G.; Calero, V.; Ndao, A.; Baida, F. I.; Bernal, M.-P.

    2016-03-01

    Lithium Niobate (LN) exhibits unique physical properties such as remarkable electro-optical coefficients and it is thus an excellent material for a wide range of fields like optic communications, lasers, nonlinear optical applications, electric field optical sensors etc. In order to further enhance the optical device performance and to be competitive with silicon photonics, sub-micrometric thickness lithium niobate films are crucial. A big step has been achieved with the development of LN thin films by using smart cut technology and wafer bonding and these films are nowadays available in the market. However, it is a challenge to obtain the requirements of the high quality thin LN film waveguide. In this letter, we show smooth ridge waveguides fabricated on 700 nm thickness thin film lithium niobate (TFLN). The fabrication has been done by developing and optimizing three steps of the technological process, the mask fabrication, the plasma etching, and a final cleaning wet etching step in order to remove the lithium niobate redeposition on the side walls. We have obtained single mode propagation with light overall losses of only 5 dB/cm.

  20. Inductively coupled plasma-reactive ion etching of InSb using CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Guodong; Sun Weiguo; Xu Shuli; Zhao Hongyan; Su Hongyi; Wang Haizhen

    2009-07-15

    InSb is an important material for optoelectronic devices. Most InSb devices are currently wet etched, and the etching geometries are limited due to the isotropic nature of wet etching. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-reactive ion etching (RIE) is a more desirable alternative because it offers a means of producing small anisotropic structures especially needed in large format infrared focal plane arrays. This work describes the novel use of ICP-RIE for fabricating InSb mesas with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma and presents the influences of the process parameters on the etch rate and surface morphology. The parameters investigated include bias radio frequency power (50-250 W), %CH{sub 4} in H{sub 2} (10-50), argon (Ar) partial pressure (0-0.3 Pa with total pressure of 1.0 Pa), and total pressure (0.35-4 Pa). With the process parameters optimized in this investigated ranges, good etching results have been achieved with etch rates up to 80 nm/min, and etch features with sidewall angles of about 80 degree sign , the etched surface is as smooth as before the RIE process.

  1. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVisscher, A.; Dewulf, J.; Van Durme, J.; Leys, C.; Morent, R.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2008-02-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation.

  2. Two-Dimensional Plasma Density Distributions in Low-Pressure Gas Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, E.V.; Dvinin, S.A.; Mikheev, V.V.; Omarov, M.O.; Sviridkina, V. S.

    2004-12-15

    The plasma density distribution in a two-dimensional nonuniform positive column of a low-pressure gas discharge is studied in the hydrodynamic approximation with allowance for ion inertia. Exact solutions are derived for discharges in a rectangular and a cylindrical chamber. Asymptotic solutions near the coordinate origin and near the critical surface are considered. It is shown that, for potential plasma flows, the flow velocity component normal to the plasma boundary is equal to the ion acoustic velocity. The results obtained can be used to analyze the processes occurring in low-pressure plasmochemical reactors.

  3. Effects of various gas mixtures on plasma nitriding behavior of AISI 5140 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Karakan, Mehmet; Alsaran, Akguen; Celik, Ayhan

    2002-10-15

    AISI 5140 steel was plasma nitrided at various gas mixtures of nitrogen, hydrogen, and argon to investigate the actions of hydrogen and argon on plasma nitriding. The structural and mechanical properties of ion-nitrided AISI 5140 steel have been assessed by evaluating composition of phases, surface hardness, compound layer thickness, and case depth by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), microhardness tests, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the growth of compound layer can be controlled and the diffusion improved when the gas mixture includes H{sub 2} gas. Additionally, it was determined that the amount of Ar in dual gas mixture must be at 20% minimum to obtain distinctive surface hardness and compound layer thickness.

  4. Suboxide/subnitride formation on Ta masks during magnetic material etching by reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hu; Muraki, Yu; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2015-07-15

    Etching characteristics of tantalum (Ta) masks used in magnetoresistive random-access memory etching processes by carbon monoxide and ammonium (CO/NH{sub 3}) or methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) plasmas have been examined by mass-selected ion beam experiments with in-situ surface analyses. It has been suggested in earlier studies that etching of magnetic materials, i.e., Fe, Ni, Co, and their alloys, by such plasmas is mostly due to physical sputtering and etch selectivity of the process arises from etch resistance (i.e., low-sputtering yield) of the hard mask materials such as Ta. In this study, it is shown that, during Ta etching by energetic CO{sup +} or N{sup +} ions, suboxides or subnitrides are formed on the Ta surface, which reduces the apparent sputtering yield of Ta. It is also shown that the sputtering yield of Ta by energetic CO{sup +} or N{sup +} ions has a strong dependence on the angle of ion incidence, which suggests a correlation between the sputtering yield and the oxidation states of Ta in the suboxide or subnitride; the higher the oxidation state of Ta, the lower is the sputtering yield. These data account for the observed etch selectivity by CO/NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}OH plasmas.

  5. Doped semiconductor nanoparticles synthesized in gas-phase plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R. N.; Almeida, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    Crystalline nanoparticles (NPs) of semiconductor materials have been attracting huge research interest due to their potential use in future applications like photovoltaics and bioimaging. The important role that intentional impurity doping plays in semiconductor technology has ignited a great deal of research effort aiming at synthesizing semiconductor NPs doped with foreign impurities and at understanding their physical and chemical properties. In this respect, plasma-grown semiconductor NPs doped in situ during synthesis have been key in studies of doped NPs. This article presents a review of the advances in understanding the properties of doped semiconductor NPs synthesized by means of plasma methods and the role played by these NPs for our current understanding of doped NPs and the general behavior of doping in nanoscale materials.

  6. Features of plasma glow in low pressure terahertz gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Bratman, V. L.; Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Koldanov, V. A.; Razin, S. V.; Litvak, A. G.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.

    2013-12-15

    Investigations of the low pressure (1–100 Torr) gas discharge in the powerful (1 kW) quasi-optical terahertz (0.55 THz) wave beams were made. An intense afterglow was observed after the end of gyrotron terahertz radiation pulse. Afterglow duration significantly exceeded radiation pulse length (8 μs). This phenomenon could be explained by the strong dependence of the collisional-radiative recombination rate (that is supposed to be the most likely mechanism of electron losses from the low pressure terahertz gas discharge) on electron temperature.

  7. Features of plasma glow in low pressure terahertz gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratman, V. L.; Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Koldanov, V. A.; Litvak, A. G.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.

    2013-12-01

    Investigations of the low pressure (1-100 Torr) gas discharge in the powerful (1 kW) quasi-optical terahertz (0.55 THz) wave beams were made. An intense afterglow was observed after the end of gyrotron terahertz radiation pulse. Afterglow duration significantly exceeded radiation pulse length (8 μs). This phenomenon could be explained by the strong dependence of the collisional-radiative recombination rate (that is supposed to be the most likely mechanism of electron losses from the low pressure terahertz gas discharge) on electron temperature.

  8. Spectroscopic Characterization and Reactivity of Triplet and Quintet Iron(IV) Oxo Complexes in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Andris, Erik; Jašík, Juraj; Gómez, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Closely structurally related triplet and quintet iron(IV) oxo complexes with a tetradentate aminopyridine ligand were generated in the gas phase, spectroscopically characterized, and their reactivities in hydrogen‐transfer and oxygen‐transfer reactions were compared. The spin states were unambiguously assigned based on helium tagging infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of the mass‐selected iron complexes. It is shown that the stretching vibrations of the nitrate counterion can be used as a spectral marker of the central iron spin state. PMID:26878833

  9. Linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a lot of attention in the last decade due to their huge potential for biomedical applications. In my group, we have characterized an RF driven APPJ in great detail. The characterization includes electrical measurements, imaging, optical emission spectroscopy, (two photon enhanced) laser induced fluorescence, Thomson scattering, Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering and mass spectrometry. This led to a detailed knowledge of the electron density, electron temperature, gas temperature, NO, O, OH, O3 densities, ionic species and air concentrations in the plasma effluent. Living organisms for in vitro studies are typically kept in complex solutions or culture media. Plasma-bio interactions involves not only the production of reactive species in the plasma gas phase but also transport to the liquid phase and plasma induced liquid phase chemistry and its impact on the living organisms. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species have been identified as the key reactive species. Recent results of my group show that controlling the gas phase plasma chemistry can lead to significant different biological responses of the living organisms corresponding to different chemical pathways. The effect of plasma jet interaction with liquids containing mammalian cells, bacteria and virus will be discussed. The outcomes of these studies allow unraveling chemical pathways responsible for plasma-bio interactions and linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions.

  10. Study of Gas and Plasma Conditions in the High Isp VASIMR Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, O.; Molvig, K.

    2002-01-01

    Internal electrode-free VASIMR thruster [1-3] consists of three major sections: plasma production, plasma heating, and plasma exhaust. In our previous works [6-10] we have performed an extensive study of plasma dynamics in the plasma source. We have developed several models of helicon plasma discharge utilizing hydrogen (deuterium) gas, and analyzed its performance in the experimental set-up [4-5]. In the present work we are trying to expand and apply existing models to the helium gas propellant case. Though the specific impulse is somewhat lower with heavier helium atoms, but unlike hydrogenic species helium doesn't form molecules, and therefore shows less radiative losses. We extend 0-D plasma-chemistry, 1-D mixed-collisional and kinetic gas flow models [11] to characterize gas/plasma composition and condition in the helium helicon discharge. Recent experiments suggest that there is a strong dependence of both VASIMR 1st and 2nd stage performance on the magnetic field mirror ratio in the VX-10 experimental configuration. We study effects of the plasma particles trapping in a strong magnetic field and their acceleration by the combination of the mirror force and ambipolar potential for the typical VASIMR experiment conditions. We also discuss possibility for plasma instabilities and comment on the micro-scale plasma transport in the VASIMR thruster. [1] Chang Díaz F.R., "Research Status of The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket", Proc. 39th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics (Pittsburgh, PA, 1997), Bulletin of APS, 42 (1997) 2057. [2] Chang Díaz, F. R., Squire, J. P., Carter, M., et al., `'Recent Progress on the VASIMR'', Proc. 41th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics (Seattle, WA, 1999), Bulletin of APS, 44 (1999) 99. [3] Chang Díaz, F. R., Squire, J. P., Ilin, A. V., et al. "The Development of the VASIMR Engine", Proceedings of International Conference on Electromagnetics in Advanced Applications (ICEAA99), Sept. 13

  11. The Association between Plasma 25OHD3 Concentrations, C-Reactive Protein Levels, and Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Postmenopausal Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schnatz, Peter F.; Vila-Wright, Sharon; Jiang, Xuezhi; Register, Thomas C.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Clarkson, Thomas B.; Appt, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify potential relationships between plasma 25OHD, C-reactive protein (CRP), coronary artery atherosclerosis (CAA), and coronary artery remodeling in monkeys consuming atherogenic diets. Methods Female cynomolgus monkeys (n=74) were fed a casein-lactalbumin (C/L) based, moderately atherogenic diet for 12 months. They then consumed either a soy (n=35) or C/L (n=39) based diet for 32 months. CRP concentrations were then determined and monkeys underwent surgical menopause. Each diet group was then re-randomized to receive soy (n=36) or C/L (n=38). After 32 post-menopausal months, 25OHD, CRP, CAA, and coronary artery remodeling were determined. All monkeys received a women’s equivalent of 1,000 IU/day of 25OHD3 and 1,200 mg/day of calcium, throughout the study. Results The pre and post-menopausal dietary protein sources had no effect on post-menopausal 25OHD3 concentrations (p=0.6). Across treatment groups, there was a statistically significant inverse relationship between 25OHD3 concentrations and CRP at necropsy (r=-0.35, p=0.003). A significant inverse correlation between 25OHD3 concentration and the change in CRP, from pre-menopause to post-menopause, was observed (r=-0.32, p=0.007). The significant associations identified between plasma 25OHD3 and CRP remained after controlling for postmenopausal diet. Those monkeys with a greater increase in CRP also had significantly more CAA and less ability to maintain normal lumens by remodeling. Conclusions Higher plasma concentrations of 25OHD3 were associated with lower CRP. Lower CRP was associated with less coronary atherosclerosis and improved coronary artery remodeling. These findings suggest that 25OHD3 concentrations are associated with an anti-inflammatory state and may support an association between oral 25OHD3 and cardioprotection. PMID:22713861

  12. Human plasma contains cross-reactive Abeta conformer-specific IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    O'Nuallain, Brian; Acero, Luis; Williams, Angela D; Koeppen, Helen P McWilliams; Weber, Alfred; Schwarz, Hans P; Wall, Jonathan S; Weiss, Deborah T; Solomon, Alan

    2008-11-25

    Two conformers of aggregated Abeta, i.e., fibrils and oligomers, have been deemed important in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We now report that intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) derived from pools of human plasma contains IgGs that recognize conformational epitopes present on fibrils and oligomers, but not their soluble monomeric precursor. We have used affinity chromatography to isolate these antibodies and have shown that they cross-reacted with comparable nanomolar avidity with both types of Abeta aggregates; notably, binding was not inhibited by soluble Abeta monomers. Our studies provide further support for investigating the therapeutic use of IVIG in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18956886

  13. Comparative modeling of fault reactivation and seismicity in geologic carbon storage and shale-gas reservoir stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio; Cappa, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The potential for fault reactivation and induced seismicity are issues of concern related to both geologic CO2 sequestration and stimulation of shale-gas reservoirs. It is well known that underground injection may cause induced seismicity depending on site-specific conditions, such a stress and rock properties and injection parameters. To date no sizeable seismic event that could be felt by the local population has been documented associated with CO2 sequestration activities. In the case of shale-gas fracturing, only a few cases of felt seismicity have been documented out of hundreds of thousands of hydraulic fracturing stimulation stages. In this paper we summarize and review numerical simulations of injection-induced fault reactivation and induced seismicity associated with both underground CO2 injection and hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs. The simulations were conducted with TOUGH-FLAC, a simulator for coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical modeling. In this case we employed both 2D and 3D models with an explicit representation of a fault. A strain softening Mohr-Coulomb model was used to model a slip-weakening fault slip behavior, enabling modeling of sudden slip that was interpreted as a seismic event, with a moment magnitude evaluated using formulas from seismology. In the case of CO2 sequestration, injection rates corresponding to expected industrial scale CO2 storage operations were used, raising the reservoir pressure until the fault was reactivated. For the assumed model settings, it took a few months of continuous injection to increase the reservoir pressure sufficiently to cause the fault to reactivate. In the case of shale-gas fracturing we considered that the injection fluid during one typical 3-hour fracturing stage was channelized into a fault along with the hydraulic fracturing process. Overall, the analysis shows that while the CO2 geologic sequestration in deep sedimentary formations are capable of producing notable events (e

  14. A comparison of gas temperatures measured by ultraviolet laser scattering in atmospheric plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, Bradley S.; Adams, Steven F.

    2015-12-01

    A laser scattering system utilizing an ultraviolet laser with a triple grating spectrometer has been assembled in order to measure gas temperature in atmospheric plasma sources. Such laser scattering interactions offer a non-invasive technique for investigating atmospheric microplasma sources, which have potential applications in remote optical sensing, materials processing, and environmental decontamination. This particular system is unique in that it utilizes a ultraviolet laser line (266 nm), which increases the cross section for Rayleigh and Raman scattering by a factor of 16 in comparison to the more common 532 nm laser operating in the visible range. In this work, the laser scattering system is used to directly compare the rotational gas temperature (T r) and gas kinetic temperature (T g) in two different atmospheric plasma sources [1]: a direct current plasma jet operating on nitrogen and [2] a conventional pin-pin glow microdischarge in air. Results show agreement between T r and T g both in the low temperature afterglow of the plasma jet (300-700 K) and the hot center of the atmospheric glow (1500-2000 K). These observations lend credence to the common assumption of rotational relaxation in atmospheric plasmas and validate the ultraviolet laser diagnostic for future application in atmospheric microplasma sources.

  15. Bright nitriding of Cr-Mo-steels in plasma and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Larisch, B.; Spies, H.J.; Hoeck, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although the reduction of the white layer in special gas atmospheres directly after nitriding and bright nitriding were reported a long time ago, the white layer is mostly removed by mechanical or chemical means in industrial practice. The main reason for this is poor process control. However, new requirements such as the duplex treatment (nitriding + hardcoating), demand a more detailed examination of bright nitriding. Today, new possibilities exist for process control in gas nitriding by solid electrolyte sensors. Steel grades 17CrMoV10 and 31CrMoV9 were bright nitrided in gas and plasma. In contrast to the above experiments, in the two-step technology no white layer forms in the first step (20min) at a higher nitriding potential. By this, the formation of a soft surface layer (of iron) can be avoided. Limits of this technology--for instance in the depth of the formed nitrided case--are discussed. Reasons for the often discussed faster nitriding in plasma are explained on the basis of the experimental results. The influence of ion bombardment in plasma nitriding on the activation of the surface and the nitriding results is discussed in comparison to gas nitriding. In this context the advantages of plasma nitriding--with respect to higher chromium alloyed steels (>5%Cr), which tend to passivation--are shown.

  16. MS2 virus inactivation by atmospheric-pressure cold plasma using different gas carriers and power levels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Liang, Yongdong; Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-02-01

    In this study, airborne MS2 bacteriophages were exposed for subsecond time intervals to atmospheric-pressure cold plasma (APCP) produced using different power levels (20, 24, and 28 W) and gas carriers (ambient air, Ar-O2 [2%, vol/vol], and He-O2 [2%, vol/vol]). In addition, waterborne MS2 viruses were directly subjected to the APCP treatment for up to 3 min. MS2 viruses with and without the APCP exposure were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Viral inactivation was shown to exhibit linear relationships with the APCP generation power and exposure time (R(2) > 0.95 for all energy levels tested) up to 95% inactivation (1.3-log reduction) after a subsecond airborne exposure at 28 W; about the same inactivation level was achieved for waterborne viruses with an exposure time of less than 1 min. A larger amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as atomic oxygen, in APCP was detected for a higher generation power with Ar-O2 and He-O2 gas carriers. SEM images, SDS-PAGE, and agarose gel analysis of exposed waterborne viruses showed various levels of damage to both surface proteins and their related RNA genes after the APCP exposure, thus leading to the loss of their viability and infectivity. PMID:25416775

  17. MS2 Virus Inactivation by Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma Using Different Gas Carriers and Power Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Liang, Yongdong; Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, airborne MS2 bacteriophages were exposed for subsecond time intervals to atmospheric-pressure cold plasma (APCP) produced using different power levels (20, 24, and 28 W) and gas carriers (ambient air, Ar-O2 [2%, vol/vol], and He-O2 [2%, vol/vol]). In addition, waterborne MS2 viruses were directly subjected to the APCP treatment for up to 3 min. MS2 viruses with and without the APCP exposure were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Viral inactivation was shown to exhibit linear relationships with the APCP generation power and exposure time (R2 > 0.95 for all energy levels tested) up to 95% inactivation (1.3-log reduction) after a subsecond airborne exposure at 28 W; about the same inactivation level was achieved for waterborne viruses with an exposure time of less than 1 min. A larger amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as atomic oxygen, in APCP was detected for a higher generation power with Ar-O2 and He-O2 gas carriers. SEM images, SDS-PAGE, and agarose gel analysis of exposed waterborne viruses showed various levels of damage to both surface proteins and their related RNA genes after the APCP exposure, thus leading to the loss of their viability and infectivity. PMID:25416775

  18. A common neoepitope is created when the reactive center of C1-inhibitor is cleaved by plasma kallikrein, activated factor XII fragment, C1 esterase, or neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed Central

    de Agostini, A; Patston, P A; Marottoli, V; Carrel, S; Harpel, P C; Schapira, M

    1988-01-01

    The reactive center of C1-inhibitor, a plasma protease inhibitor that belongs to the serpin superfamily, is located on a peptide loop which is highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. With plasma kallikrein, C1s and beta-Factor XIIa, this cleavage occurs at the reactive site residue P1 (Arg444); with neutrophil elastase, it takes place near P1, probably at residue P3 (Val442). After these cleavages, C1-inhibitor is inactivated and its conformation is modified. Moreover, in vivo, cleaved C1-inhibitor is removed from the blood stream more rapidly than the intact serpin, which suggests that proteolysis unmasks sites responsible for cellular recognition and the uptake of the cleaved inhibitor. In the study reported here, we show, using an MAb, that an identical neoepitope is created on C1-inhibitor after the cleavage of its exposed loop by plasma kallikrein, C1s, beta-Factor XIIa, and by neutrophil elastase. Images PMID:2457036

  19. 3D Modeling of Laser Propagation in Ionizing Gas and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, J.; Antonsen, T., Jr.; Huang, C.; Mori, W.

    2003-10-01

    The interaction of a high intensity laser with ionizing gas and plasmas is of current interest for both Laser Wakefield Accelerators and x-ray generation. We have developed a 3D fluid simulation code based on the same quasistatic approximation used in the 2D code WAKE [1]. The object oriented structure of the code also allows it to couple to the quickPIC particle code [2]. We will present 3D studies of the ionization scattering instability [3], which occurs when a laser pulse propagates in an ionizing gas. [1] P. Mora and T. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4(1), January 1997 [2] J. Cooley, T. Antonsen, Jr., C. Huang, etal., Proceedings, Advanced Accelerator Concepts, 2002 [3] Z. Bian and T. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 8(7), July 2001 * work supported by NSF and DOE

  20. Comparison of a gas chromatographic and colorimetric method for the determination of plasma paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Chambers, R E; Jones, K

    1976-07-01

    Plasma paracetamol levels have generally been determined either by gas chromatography (Stewart and Willis, 1975), which relies on complex equipment, or by spectrophotometry (Knepil, 1974), which can be time-consuming. The introduction by Glynn and Kendal (1975) of a simple colorimetric method based on the reaction of paracetamol with nitrous acid to give 2-nitro-4-acetamidophenol appears to have overcome these disadvantages, thereby providing a suitable procedure for the rapid measurement of plasma paracetamol in cases of overdose. The method was reported to be specific for paracetamol, no interference being caused either by the sulphate and glucuronide conjugates of paracetamol or by a large number of other commonly found drugs. This communication presents the results of a study in which plasma paracetamol levels determined by the colorimetric method were compared with those determined by an established gas chromatographic technique. PMID:952476

  1. Hybrid Particle-Continuum Methods for Nonequilibrium Gas and Plasma Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Iain D.

    2011-05-20

    Two different hybrid particle-continuum methods are described for simulation of nonequilibrium gas and plasma dynamics. The first technique, used for nonequilibrium hypersonic gas flows, uses either a continuum description or a particle method throughout a flow domain based on local conditions. This technique is successful in reproducing the results of full particle simulations at a small fraction of the cost. The second method uses a continuum model of the electrons combined with a particle description of the ions and atoms for simulating plasma jets. The physical accuracy of the method is assessed through comparisons with plasma plume measurements obtained in space. These examples illustrate that the complex physical phenomena associated with nonequilibrium conditions can be simulated with physical accuracy and numerical efficiency using such hybrid approaches.

  2. Investigation of a Gas Jet-Produced Hollow Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N; Blumenfeld, I.; Hogan, M.J.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; Davidson, A.W.; Huang, C.; /UCLA

    2009-05-21

    The effect of ion motion and the need for practical positron propagation in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) have incited interest in hollow plasma channels. These channels are typically assumed to be cylindrically symmetric; however, a different geometry might be easier to achieve. The introduction of an obstruction into the outlet of a high Mach number gas jet can produce two parallel slabs of gas separated by a density depression. Here, there is a detailed simulation study of the density depression created in such a system. This investigation reveals that the density depression is insufficient at the desired plasma density. However, insights from the simulations suggest another avenue for the creation of the hollow slab geometry.

  3. Empirical evaluation of the radiative cooling coefficient for krypton gas in the FTU plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K.B.; Pacella, D.; Gregory, B.C.; May, M.J.; Mazzitelli, G.; Gabellieri, L.; Leigheb, M.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Soukanovskii, V.; Goldstein, W.H.

    1997-11-18

    For future fusion reactors, a careful balance must be achieved between the cooling of the outer plasma via impurity radiation and the deleterious effects of inevitable core penetration by impurity ions. We have injected krypton gas into the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) plasma. The measured visible bremsstrahlung and bolometric signals from krypton have been inverted and the resulting radial impurity density profile and power loss profile for krypton gas are extracted. Using the measured electron density and temperature profiles, the radiative cooling coefficient for krypton is derived. The level of intrinsic impurities (Mo, Cr, Mn and Fe) in the plasma during the krypton puffing is monitored with a VUV SPRED spectrometer. Models for krypton emissivity from the literature are compared to our measured results. 7 figs.

  4. Method for forming synthesis gas using a plasma-catalyzed fuel reformer

    DOEpatents

    Hartvigsen, Joseph J; Elangovan, S; Czernichowski, Piotr; Hollist, Michele

    2015-04-28

    A method of forming a synthesis gas utilizing a reformer is disclosed. The method utilizes a reformer that includes a plasma zone to receive a pre-heated mixture of reactants and ionize the reactants by applying an electrical potential thereto. A first thermally conductive surface surrounds the plasma zone and is configured to transfer heat from an external heat source into the plasma zone. The reformer further includes a reaction zone to chemically transform the ionized reactants into synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A second thermally conductive surface surrounds the reaction zone and is configured to transfer heat from the external heat source into the reaction zone. The first thermally conductive surface and second thermally conductive surface are both directly exposed to the external heat source. A corresponding apparatus and system are also disclosed herein.

  5. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  6. Effect Of Process Gas Mixture On Reactively DC Magnetron Sputtered (Al1_xSix)OyNz Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjornard, Erik

    1989-02-01

    (A1 1-x Si x )0yNz films have properties which make them desirable as durable overcoats and corrosion barriers in optical thin film structures. (Al, Si )O N films were reactively DC sputtered from Al, Si targets (x = 0.0, 0.117, 0.30) in Ar/N2/O2 atmospheres. Nitride films had sputter efficiencies three times that of the oxides and ESCA analysis of the films showed that the film composition varied non-linearly with reactive gas ratio and sputter rate, incorporating more oxygen than nitrogen for a given gas flow. This behavior is correlated with the hysteresis curves for the oxide and nitride states. Optical properties of the films were also found to vary with index dropping disproportionately to the 0/(0+N) flow ratio, but linearly with the ratio of atomic percent of 0 and N in the films. Durability properties of (A1 1_x Si x)0 NZ films were tested at several compositions. It was found that with high nitrogen context the wear resistance increased with Si content and the oxides were generally less wear resistant than the nitrides. The corrosion resistance also increased with Si content, but in this case, the oxides were generally more stable. Film stress became more compressive with 0 and Si content. Analysis of ESCA binding energy data indicates that the Si forms alumino-silicate bonds in the film, which apparently contributes to the durability properties.

  7. Study on dynamics of the influence exerted by plasma on gas flow field in non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaisrani, M. Hasnain; Xian, Yubin; Li, Congyun; Pei, Xuekai; Ghasemi, Maede; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, first, steady state of the plasma jet at different operating conditions is investigated through Schlieren photography with and without applying shielding gas. Second, the dynamic process for the plasma impacting on the gas flow field is studied. When the discharge is ignited, reduction in laminar flow occurs. However, when the gas flow rate is too low or too high, this phenomenon is not obvious. What is more, both frequency and voltage have significant impact on the effect of plasma on the gas flow, but the former is more significant. Shielding gas provides a curtain for plasma to propagate further. High speed camera along with Schlieren photography is utilized to study the impact of plasma on the gas flow when plasma is switched on and off. The transition of the gas flow from laminar to turbulent or vice versa happens right after the turbulent front. It is concluded that appearance and propagation of turbulence front is responsible for the transition of the flow state.

  8. Effect of grain size on the hardness and reactivity of plasma-sintered beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Nakamichi, Masaru

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium and its intermetallic compounds have attracted great attention as promising neutron multipliers in fusion reactors. In this study, mechanical and chemical properties of fabricated plasma-sintered beryllium (PS-Be) with different grain-sizes are investigated. Density and hardness analysis results of the fabricated PS-Be samples infer that a smaller grain size in the sintered Be indicates higher porosity and hardness. Sintered Be with a large grain size exhibits better resistance toward oxidation at 1273 K in dry air and at 1073 K in Ar/1% H2O, since oxidation at the grain boundaries of the determines the rate. In contrast, at 1273 K in Ar/1% H2O, a catastrophic oxidation is indicated by the increase of weight of the samples and the generation of H2 from the bulk Be.

  9. Nanopore formation process in artificial cell membrane induced by plasma-generated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated morphological change of an artificial lipid bilayer membrane induced by oxygen radicals which were generated by non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma. Neutral oxygen species, O((3)Pj) and O2((1)Δg), were irradiated of a supported lipid bilayer existing under a buffer solution at various conditions of dose time and distances, at which the dose amounts of the oxygen species were calculated quantitatively. Observation using an atomic force microscope and a fluorescence microscope revealed that dose of the neutral oxygen species generated nanopores with the diameter of 10-50 nm in a phospholipid bilayer, and finally destructed the bilayer structure. We found that protrusions appeared on the lipid bilayer surface prior to the formation of nanopores, and we attributed the protrusions to the precursor of the nanopores. We propose a mechanism of the pore formation induced by lipid oxidation on the basis of previous experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:27216034

  10. Recent nuclear pumped laser results. [gas mixtures and laser plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.; Wells, W. E.; Akerman, M. A.; Anderson, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Recent direct nuclear pumped laser research has concentrated on experiments with three gas mixtures (Ne-N2, He-Ne-O2, and He-Hg). One mixture has been made to lase and gain has been achieved with the other two. All three of these mixtures are discussed with particular attention paid to He-Hg. Of interest is the 6150-angstroms ion transition in Hg(+). The upper state of this transition is formed directly by charge transfer and by Penning ionization.

  11. Reaction of chlorine radical with tetrahydrofuran: a theoretical investigation on mechanism and reactivity in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Begum, Samiyara; Subramanian, Ranga

    2014-06-01

    Reaction of chlorine (Cl) radical with heterocyclic saturated ether, tetrahydrofuran has been studied. The detailed reactivity and mechanism of this reaction is analyzed using hybrid density functional theory (DFT), B3LYP and BB1K methods, and aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. To explore the mechanism of the reaction of tetrahydrofuran with Cl radical, four possible sites of hydrogen atom (H) abstraction pathways in tetrahydrofuran were analyzed. The barrier height and rate constants are calculated for the four H-abstraction channels. The BB1K calculated rate constant for α-axial H-abstraction is comparable with the experimentally determined rate constant. It reflects that α-axial H-abstraction is the main degradation pathway of tetrahydrofuran with Cl radical. DFT-based reactivity descriptors are also calculated and these values describe α-axial H-abstraction as the main reaction channel. PMID:24867438

  12. Nonlinear structure of the diffusing gas-metal interface in a thermonuclear plasma.

    PubMed

    Molvig, Kim; Vold, Erik L; Dodd, Evan S; Wilks, Scott C

    2014-10-01

    This Letter describes the theoretical structure of the plasma diffusion layer that develops from an initially sharp gas-metal interface. The layer dynamics under isothermal and isobaric conditions is considered so that only mass diffusion (mixing) processes can occur. The layer develops a distinctive structure with asymmetric and highly nonlinear features. On the gas side of the layer the diffusion coefficient goes nearly to zero, causing a sharp "front," or well defined boundary between mix layer and clean gas with similarities to the Marshak thermal waves. Similarity solutions for the nonlinear profiles are found and verified with full ion kinetic code simulations. A criterion for plasma diffusion to significantly affect burn is given. PMID:25325648

  13. Generation of thin, near critical density gas targets for laser plasma interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Fatholah; Goers, Andy; Hine, George; Feder, Linus; Miao, Bo; Milchberg, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We present the design and characterization of a thin (200µm FWHM), high density pulsed gas jet which we use to study near critical and overcritical laser plasma interactions. We show that cryogenic cooling of the pulsed jet provides the necessary density enhancement for reaching overcritical plasma densities at 800 nm (> 1 . 7 × >102 1 cm-3) with pure hydrogen gas at plenum pressures below 1000 psi. Further, we present 2D and 3D PIC simulations showing the interaction of femtosecond pulses with our experimentally measured near critical gas density profile. The simulations show electron and ion acceleration at drive pulse energies as low as a few tens of millijoules. This work supported by DTRA and the US Department of Energy.

  14. Removal of H2S from gas stream using combined plasma photolysis technique at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Xia, Lanyan; Ge, Xiaoxue; Jing, Hengye; Dong, Wenbo; Hou, Huiqi

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, H(2)S in gas stream was successfully decomposed at atmospheric pressure by dielectric barrier discharge plasma and VUV-UV radiation from a combined plasma photolysis reactor (CDBD). In comparison with DBD, CDBD enhanced H(2)S removal efficiency significantly at the same applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency was determined as a function of Kr pressure, applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration, and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency could reach as high as 93% at inlet H(2)S concentration of 27.1 mg m(-3), residence time of 0.4 s, and applied voltage of 7.5 kV. The main products were discerned as H(2)O and SO(4)(2-) based on FTIR and IC analysis. PMID:22436586

  15. Process Conditions and Microstructures of Ceramic Coatings by Gas Phase Deposition Based on Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Hospach, A.; Zotov, N.; Vaßen, R.

    2013-03-01

    Plasma spraying at very low pressure (50-200 Pa) is significantly different from atmospheric plasma conditions (APS). By applying powder feedstock, it is possible to fragment the particles into very small clusters or even to evaporate the material. As a consequence, the deposition mechanisms and the resulting coating microstructures could be quite different compared to conventional APS liquid splat deposition. Thin and dense ceramic coatings as well as columnar-structured strain-tolerant coatings with low thermal conductivity can be achieved offering new possibilities for application in energy systems. To exploit the potential of such a gas phase deposition from plasma spray-based processes, the deposition mechanisms and their dependency on process conditions must be better understood. Thus, plasma conditions were investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. Coating experiments were performed, partially at extreme conditions. Based on the observed microstructures, a phenomenological model is developed to identify basic growth mechanisms.

  16. A reference protocol for comparing the biocidal properties of gas plasma generating devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A.; Seri, P.; Borghi, C. A.; Shama, G.; Iza, F.

    2015-12-01

    Growing interest in the use of non-thermal, atmospheric pressure gas plasmas for decontamination purposes has resulted in a multiplicity of plasma-generating devices. There is currently no universally approved method of comparing the biocidal performance of such devices and in the work described here spores of the Gram positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633) are proposed as a suitable reference biological agent. In order to achieve consistency in the form in which the biological agent in question is presented to the plasma, a polycarbonate membrane loaded with a monolayer of spores is proposed. The advantages of the proposed protocol are evaluated by comparing inactivation tests in which an alternative microorganism (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus—MRSA) and the widely-used sample preparation technique of directly pipetting cell suspensions onto membranes are employed. In all cases, inactivation tests with either UV irradiation or plasma exposure were more reproducible when the proposed protocol was followed.

  17. Prediction of the Grade of Acute Cholecystitis by Plasma Level of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kabul Gurbulak, Esin; Gurbulak, Bunyamin; Akgun, Ismail Ethem; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Battal, Muharrem; Fevzi Celayir, Mustafa; Demir, Uygar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute cholecystitis is the most common complication of gallbladder stones. Today, Tokyo guidelines criteria are recommended for diagnosis, grading, and management of acute cholecystitis. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) at different cut-off values to predict the severity of the disease and its possible role in grading the disease with regard to the guideline. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective study, analyzing 682 cases out of consecutive 892 patients with acute cholecystitis admitted to two different general surgery clinics in Istanbul, Turkey. Records of patients diagnosed with acute cholecystitis were screened retrospectively from the hospital computer database between January 2011 and July 2014. A total of 210 patients with concomitant diseases causing high CRP levels were excluded from the study. The criteria of Tokyo guidelines were used in grading the severity of acute cholecystitis, and patients were divided into 3 groups. CRP values at the time of admission were analyzed and compared among the groups. Results: Mean CRP levels of groups were found to be significantly different, 18.96 mg/L in Group I, 133.51 mg/L in Group II, and 237.23 mg/L in Group III (P < 0.001). Having examined CRP values among the groups, they were found to be highly and significantly correlated with the disease grade (P < 0.0001). After evaluating CRP levels according to the grade of the disease, group 2 was distinguished from group 1 with a cut-off CRP level of 70.65 mg/L, and from group 3 with a value of 198.95 mg/L. Those results were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: CRP, a well-known acute phase reactant that increases rapidly in various inflammatory processes, can be accepted as a strong predictor in classifying different grades of the disease, and treatment can be reliably planned according to this classification. PMID:26023353

  18. PLASMA EFFECTS ON FAST PAIR BEAMS. II. REACTIVE VERSUS KINETIC INSTABILITY OF PARALLEL ELECTROSTATIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Krakau, S.; Supsar, M. E-mail: steffen.krakau@rub.de

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of TeV gamma-rays from distant blazars with the extragalactic background light produces relativistic electron-positron pair beams by the photon-photon annihilation process. Using the linear instability analysis in the kinetic limit, which properly accounts for the longitudinal and the small but finite perpendicular momentum spread in the pair momentum distribution function, the growth rate of parallel propagating electrostatic oscillations in the intergalactic medium is calculated. Contrary to the claims of Miniati and Elyiv, we find that neither the longitudinal nor the perpendicular spread in the relativistic pair distribution function significantly affect the electrostatic growth rates. The maximum kinetic growth rate for no perpendicular spread is even about an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding reactive maximum growth rate. The reduction factors in the maximum growth rate due to the finite perpendicular spread in the pair distribution function are tiny and always less than 10{sup –4}. We confirm earlier conclusions by Broderick et al. and our group that the created pair beam distribution function is quickly unstable in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium. Therefore, there is no need to require the existence of small intergalactic magnetic fields to scatter the produced pairs, so that the explanation (made by several authors) for the Fermi non-detection of the inverse Compton scattered GeV gamma-rays by a finite deflecting intergalactic magnetic field is not necessary. In particular, the various derived lower bounds for the intergalactic magnetic fields are invalid due to the pair beam instability argument.

  19. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  20. In situ measurements of plasma properties during gas-condensation of Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, M. A.; Voeller, S. A.; Patterson, M. M.; Shield, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    Since the mean, standard deviation, and modality of nanoparticle size distributions can vary greatly between similar input conditions (e.g., power and gas flow rate), plasma diagnostics were carried out in situ using a double-sided, planar Langmuir probe to determine the effect the plasma has on the heating of clusters and their final size distributions. The formation of Cu nanoparticles was analyzed using cluster-plasma physics, which relates the processes of condensation and evaporation to internal plasma properties (e.g., electron temperature and density). Monitoring these plasma properties while depositing Cu nanoparticles with different size distributions revealed a negative correlation between average particle size and electron temperature. Furthermore, the modality of the size distributions also correlated with the modality of the electron energy distributions. It was found that the maximum cluster temperature reached during plasma heating and the material's evaporation point regulates the growth process inside the plasma. In the case of Cu, size distributions with average sizes of 8.2, 17.3, and 24.9 nm in diameter were monitored with the Langmuir probe, and from the measurements made, the cluster temperatures for each deposition were calculated to be 1028, 1009, and 863 K. These values are then compared with the onset evaporation temperature of particles of this size, which was estimated to be 1059, 1068, and 1071 K. Thus, when the cluster temperature is too close to the evaporation temperature, less particle growth occurs, resulting in the formation of smaller particles.

  1. Gas phase microreaction: nanomaterials synthesis via plasma exposure of liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Paul; Mahony, Charles; Kelsey, Colin; Hamilton, Neil; Askari, Sadegh; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Diver, Declan; Mariotti, Davide

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-liquid interactions are complex but offer considerable scope for use in nanomaterials synthesis. The introduction of individual picolitre micro-droplets into a steady-state low temperature plasma at atmospheric pressure, offers opportunities for enhanced scope and control of plasma-liquid chemistry and material properties. The gas-phase micro-reactor is similar in concept to liquid bubble microfluidics currently under intense research but with enhanced opportunities for scale-up. For nanomaterials and quantum dot synthesis, the addition of a liquid phase within the plasma expands considerably the scope for core-shell and alloy formation. The synthesis and encapsulation within a liquid droplet allows continuous delivery of nanoparticles to remote sites for plasma medicine, device fabrication or surface coating. We have synthesized Au nanoparticles in flight using AuHCl4 droplets with plasma flight times <0.1 ms. Also, Ag nanoparticles have been synthesized downstream via the delivery of plasma exposed water droplets onto AgNO3 laden substrates. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  2. Surface modification and stability of detonation nanodiamonds in microwave gas discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanishevsky, Andrei V.; Walock, Michael J.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2015-12-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (DND), with low hydrogen content, were exposed to microwave plasma generated in pure H2, N2, and O2 gases and their mixtures, and investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Considerable alteration of the DND surface was observed under the plasma conditions for all used gases, but the diamond structure of the DND particle core was preserved in most cases. The stabilizing effect of H2 in H2/N2 and H2/O2 binary gas plasmas on the DND structure and the temperature-dependent formation of various CNHx surface groups in N2 and H2/N2 plasmas were observed and discussed for the first time. DND surface oxidation and etching were the main effects of O2 plasma, whereas the N2 plasma led to DND surfaces rich in amide groups below 1073 K and nitrile groups at higher temperatures. Noticeable graphitization of the DND core structure was detected only in N2 plasma when the substrate temperature was above 1103 K.

  3. C-Reactive Protein Modifies the Association of Plasma Leptin With Coronary Calcium in Asymptomatic Overweight Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Seth S.; Qasim, Atif N.; Rader, Dan J.; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests putative interactions of leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the pathogenesis of adiposity-related atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated whether CRP levels modify the relationship of leptin levels with coronary artery calcium (CAC). We examined 1,460 asymptomatic individuals from two community-based cross-sectional studies coordinated at a single, university-based research center. We focused on subjects who were overweight or obese (BMI ≥25) given greater biologic plausibility in this setting. In multivariable CAC models, we analyzed the interaction of log-transformed plasma leptin levels with higher CRP levels as defined by three cut-points: two clinically based (2 mg/l, 3 mg/l) and one dataset specific (sex-specific upper quartile). The association of plasma leptin with CAC was modified by higher CRP regardless of cut-point (interaction term P values all <0.01 in fully adjusted models). Leptin levels were associated with CAC in those with high, but not low CRP levels (e.g., tobit ratio for a 1 unit increase in ln(leptin) (95% CI): 2.18 (1.29–3.66) if CRP level ≥3 mg/l; N = 461 vs. 0.94 (0.67–1.31) if CRP levels <3 mg/l; N = 999) in fully adjusted models. No interaction with CRP was present in control analyses with adiponectin, BMI and waist circumference. In conclusion, in asymptomatic overweight and obese adults, increased leptin levels were independently associated with increased CAC in the presence of high, but not low CRP levels, supporting a leptin-CRP interface in atherosclerosis risk. PMID:21738237

  4. Association of exome sequences with plasma C-reactive protein levels in >9000 participants

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Ursula M.; Auer, Paul L.; Bis, Joshua C.; Lin, Honghuang; Wei, Peng; Pankratz, Nathan; Lange, Leslie A.; Brody, Jennifer; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kim, Daniel S.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Fornage, Myriam; Haessler, Jeffery; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Leal, Suzanne M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tracy, Russell; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Willer, Cristen; Loos, Ruth; Melander, Olle; Mcpherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Kees; Reilly, Muredach; Watkins, Hugh; Girelli, Domenico; Fontanillas, Pierre; Chasman, Daniel I.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peters, Ulrike; Dupuis, Josée; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Gross, Myron D.; Reiner, Alex P.

    2015-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration is a heritable systemic marker of inflammation that is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Genome-wide association studies have identified CRP-associated common variants associated in ∼25 genes. Our aims were to apply exome sequencing to (1) assess whether the candidate loci contain rare coding variants associated with CRP levels and (2) perform an exome-wide search for rare variants in novel genes associated with CRP levels. We exome-sequenced 6050 European-Americans (EAs) and 3109 African-Americans (AAs) from the NHLBI-ESP and the CHARGE consortia, and performed association tests of sequence data with measured CRP levels. In single-variant tests across candidate loci, a novel rare (minor allele frequency = 0.16%) CRP-coding variant (rs77832441-A; p.Thr59Met) was associated with 53% lower mean CRP levels (P = 2.9 × 10−6). We replicated the association of rs77832441 in an exome array analysis of 11 414 EAs (P = 3.0 × 10−15). Despite a strong effect on CRP levels, rs77832441 was not associated with inflammation-related phenotypes including coronary heart disease. We also found evidence for an AA-specific association of APOE-ε2 rs7214 with higher CRP levels. At the exome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10−8), we confirmed associations for reported common variants of HNF1A, CRP, IL6R and TOMM40-APOE. In gene-based tests, a burden of rare/lower frequency variation in CRP in EAs (P ≤ 6.8 × 10−4) and in retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORA) in AAs (P = 1.7 × 10−3) were associated with CRP levels at the candidate gene level (P < 2.0 × 10−3). This inquiry did not elucidate novel genes, but instead demonstrated that variants distributed across the allele frequency spectrum within candidate genes contribute to CRP levels. PMID:25187575

  5. Association of exome sequences with plasma C-reactive protein levels in >9000 participants.

    PubMed

    Schick, Ursula M; Auer, Paul L; Bis, Joshua C; Lin, Honghuang; Wei, Peng; Pankratz, Nathan; Lange, Leslie A; Brody, Jennifer; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kim, Daniel S; Carlson, Christopher S; Fornage, Myriam; Haessler, Jeffery; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kooperberg, Charles; Leal, Suzanne M; Psaty, Bruce M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tracy, Russell; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Willer, Cristen; Loos, Ruth; Melander, Olle; Mcpherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Kees; Reilly, Muredach; Watkins, Hugh; Girelli, Domenico; Fontanillas, Pierre; Chasman, Daniel I; Gabriel, Stacey B; Gibbs, Richard; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peters, Ulrike; Dupuis, Josée; Wilson, James G; Rich, Stephen S; Morrison, Alanna C; Benjamin, Emelia J; Gross, Myron D; Reiner, Alex P

    2015-01-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration is a heritable systemic marker of inflammation that is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Genome-wide association studies have identified CRP-associated common variants associated in ∼25 genes. Our aims were to apply exome sequencing to (1) assess whether the candidate loci contain rare coding variants associated with CRP levels and (2) perform an exome-wide search for rare variants in novel genes associated with CRP levels. We exome-sequenced 6050 European-Americans (EAs) and 3109 African-Americans (AAs) from the NHLBI-ESP and the CHARGE consortia, and performed association tests of sequence data with measured CRP levels. In single-variant tests across candidate loci, a novel rare (minor allele frequency = 0.16%) CRP-coding variant (rs77832441-A; p.Thr59Met) was associated with 53% lower mean CRP levels (P = 2.9 × 10(-6)). We replicated the association of rs77832441 in an exome array analysis of 11 414 EAs (P = 3.0 × 10(-15)). Despite a strong effect on CRP levels, rs77832441 was not associated with inflammation-related phenotypes including coronary heart disease. We also found evidence for an AA-specific association of APOE-ε2 rs7214 with higher CRP levels. At the exome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)), we confirmed associations for reported common variants of HNF1A, CRP, IL6R and TOMM40-APOE. In gene-based tests, a burden of rare/lower frequency variation in CRP in EAs (P ≤ 6.8 × 10(-4)) and in retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORA) in AAs (P = 1.7 × 10(-3)) were associated with CRP levels at the candidate gene level (P < 2.0 × 10(-3)). This inquiry did not elucidate novel genes, but instead demonstrated that variants distributed across the allele frequency spectrum within candidate genes contribute to CRP levels. PMID:25187575

  6. Xenon Additives Detection in Helium Micro-Plasma Gas Analytical Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy; Mustafaev, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    Electron energy spectra of Xe atoms at He filled micro-plasma afterglow gas analyzer were observed using Collisional Electron Spectroscopy (CES) method [1]. According to CES, diffusion path confinement for characteristic electrons makes it possible to measure electrons energy distribution function (EEDF) at a high (up to atmospheric) gas pressure. Simple geometry micro-plasma CES sensor consists of two plane parallel electrodes detector and microprocessor-based acquisition system providing current-voltage curve measurement in the afterglow of the plasma discharge. Electron energy spectra are deduced as 2-nd derivative of the measured current-voltage curve to select characteristic peaks of the species to be detected. Said derivatives were obtained by the smoothing-differentiating procedure using spline least-squares approximation of a current-voltage curve. Experimental results on CES electron energy spectra at 10-40 Torr in pure He and in admixture with 0.3% Xe are discussed. It demonstrates a prototype of the new miniature micro-plasma sensors for industry, safety and healthcare applications. [1]. A.A.Kudryavtsev, A.B.Tsyganov. US Patent 7,309,992. Gas analysis method and ionization detector for carrying out said method, issued December 18, 2007.

  7. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  8. Intense microwave pulse propagation through gas breakdown plasmas in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, D.P.

    1986-10-08

    High-power microwave pulse-compression techniques are used to generate 2.856 GHz pulses which are propagated in a TE/sub 10/ mode through a gas filled section of waveguide, where the pulses interact with self-generated gas-breakdown plasmas. Pulse envelopes transmitted through the plasmas, with duration varying from 2 ns to greater than 1 ..mu..s, and peak powers of a few kW to nearly 100 MW, are measured as a function of incident pulse and gas pressure for air, nitrogen, and helium. In addition, the spatial and temporal development of the optical radiation emitted by the breakdown plasmas are measured. For transmitted pulse durations greater than or equal to 100 ns, good agreement is found with both theory and existing measurements. For transmitted pulse duration as short as 2 ns (less than 10 rf cycles), a two-dimensional model is used in which the electrons in the plasma are treated as a fluid whose interactions with the microwave pulse are governed by a self-consistent set of fluid equations and Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field. The predictions of this model for air are compared with the experimental results over a pressure range of 0.8 torr to 300 torr. Good agreement is obtained above about 1 torr pressure, demonstrating that microwave pulse propagation above the breakdown threshold can be accurately modeled on this time scale. 63 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Investigation of a Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source for the VASIMR Space Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Jacobson, V. T.; Glover, T. W.; Baity, F. W.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.; Bengtson, R. D.; Bering, E. A., III

    2003-01-01

    An efficient plasma source producing a high-density (approx.10(exp 19/cu m) light gas (e.g. H, D, or He) flowing plasma with a high degree of ionization is a critical component of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept. We are developing an antenna to apply ICRF power near the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance to further accelerate the plasma ions to velocities appropriate for space propulsion applications. The high degree of ionization and a low vacuum background pressure are important to eliminate the problem of radial losses due to charge exchange. We have performed parametric (e.g. gas flow, power (0.5 - 3 kW), magnetic field , frequency (25 and 50 MHz)) studies of a helicon operating with gas (H2 D2, He, N2 and Ar) injected at one end with a high magnetic mirror downstream of the antenna. We have explored operation with a cusp and a mirror field upstream. Plasma flows into a low background vacuum (<10(exp -4) torr) at velocities higher than the ion sound speed. High densities (approx. 10(exp 19/cu m) have been achieved at the location where ICRF will be applied, just downstream of the magnetic mirror.

  10. Fueling of QH-mode plasmas on DIII-D with pellets and gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylor, L. R.; Jernigan, T. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Combs, S. K.; Doyle, E. J.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; West, W. P.

    2005-03-01

    The quiescent high confinement mode (QH-mode) discovered on DIII-D [K.H. Burrell et al. Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2153; C.M. Greenfield et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 (2001) 4544] has the promising features of stationary good H-mode plasma confinement with an H-mode edge, but without the periodic edge localized modes (ELMs) common in H-mode that produce a divertor pulsed heat load. Experiments have been carried out with pellet and gas fueling to determine if the QH-mode is robust to theses edge perturbations. Pellets of different sizes were injected from several different locations [L.R. Baylor, T.C. Jernigan et al. J. Nucl. Mater. 290 (2001) 398] and gas puffs were introduced to study core fueling in QH-mode plasmas. The QH-mode is generally a low density operating regime and so there is interest in developing a fueling scheme that can lead to high density to make the QH-mode attractive as a burning plasma scenario. Results indicate that the QH-mode is maintained with small perturbations in density, however large pellet perturbations and gas puffs lead to an almost instantaneous transition to ELMing H-mode.

  11. PREFACE: 12th International Conference on Gas Discharge Plasmas and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, N.; Landl, N.; Bogdan, A.; Yudin, A.

    2015-11-01

    The 12th International Conference ''Gas Discharge Plasmas and Their Applications'' (GDP 2015) was held in Tomsk, Russia, on September 6-11, 2015. GDP 2015 represents a continuation of the conferences on physics of gas discharge held in Russia since 1984 and seminars and conferences on the technological applications of low temperature plasmas traditionally organized in Tomsk. The six-day Conference brought together the specialists from different countries and organizations and provided an excellent opportunity to exchange knowledge, make oral contributions and poster presentations, and initiate discussions on the topics that are of interest to the Conference participants. The selected papers of the Conference cover a wide range of technical areas and modern aspects of the physical processes in the generators of low-temperature plasma, the low and high-pressure discharges, the pulsed plasma sources, the surface modification, and other gas-discharge technologies. The Conference was hosted by Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk Scientific Center, and Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building.

  12. Transition from gas to plasma kinetic equilibria in gravitating axisymmetric structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2014-04-15

    The problem of the transition from gas to plasma in gravitating axisymmetric structures is addressed under the assumption of having initial and final states realized by kinetic Maxwellian-like equilibria. In astrophysics, the theory applies to accretion-disc scenarios around compact objects. A formulation based on non-relativistic kinetic theory for collisionless systems is adopted. Equilibrium solutions for the kinetic distribution functions describing the initial neutral matter and the resulting plasma state are constructed in terms of single-particle invariants and expressed by generalized Maxwellian distributions. The final plasma configuration is related to the initial gas distribution by the introduction of appropriate functional constraints. Qualitative aspects of the solution are investigated and physical properties of the system are pointed out. In particular, the admitted functional dependences of the fluid fields carried by the corresponding equilibrium distributions are determined. Then, the plasma is proved to violate the condition of quasi-neutrality, implying a net charge separation between ions and electrons. This result is shown to be independent of the precise realization of the plasma distribution function, while a physical mechanism able to support a non-neutral equilibrium state is proposed.

  13. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-06-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  14. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    PubMed Central

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m−1, over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  15. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas.

    PubMed

    Corde, S; Adli, E; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clausse, B; Clayton, C E; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; Yakimenko, V

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m(-1), over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  16. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; et al

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by upmore » to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.« less

  17. Low power gas discharge plasma mediated inactivation and removal of biofilms formed on biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F.

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of gas discharge plasma has been studied for quiet some time. However, high biofilm inactivation activity of plasma was only recently reported. Studies indicate that the etching effect associated with plasmas generated represent an undesired effect, which may cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. Meanwhile, the strong etching effects from these high power plasmas may also alter the surface chemistry and affect the biocompatibility of biomaterials. In this study, we examined the efficiency and effectiveness of low power gas discharge plasma for biofilm inactivation and removal. Among the three tested gases, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon, discharge oxygen demonstrated the best anti-biofilm activity because of its excellent ability in killing bacteria in biofilms and mild etching effects. Low power discharge oxygen completely killed and then removed the dead bacteria from attached surface but had negligible effects on the biocompatibility of materials. DNA left on the regenerated surface after removal of biofilms did not have any negative impact on tissue cell growth. On the contrary, dramatically increased growth was found for these cells seeded on regenerated surfaces. These results demonstrate the potential applications of low power discharge oxygen in biofilm treatments of biomaterials and indwelling device decontaminations. PMID:23894232

  18. Two-stage plasma gun based on a gas discharge with a self-heating hollow emitter.

    PubMed

    Vizir, A V; Tyunkov, A V; Shandrikov, M V; Oks, E M

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents the results of tests of a new compact two-stage bulk gas plasma gun. The plasma gun is based on a nonself-sustained gas discharge with an electron emitter based on a discharge with a self-heating hollow cathode. The operating characteristics of the plasma gun are investigated. The discharge system makes it possible to produce uniform and stable gas plasma in the dc mode with a plasma density up to 3x10(9) cm(-3) at an operating gas pressure in the vacuum chamber of less than 2x10(-2) Pa. The device features high power efficiency, design simplicity, and compactness. PMID:20192469

  19. Plasma modification of polymethylmethacrylate and polythyleneterephthalate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groning, P.; Collaud, M.; Dietler, G.; Schlapbach, L.

    1994-07-01

    Noble gas (He, Ar, Xe) and reactive gas (O2, N2) plasma treatments of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces were performed in an electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma. In situ surface analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals well-defined surface compositions. From these measurements it is concluded that, independently of the plasma gas, the plasma ions easily decompose the ester group in PMMA in its constituents by an ion-electron recombination process, while in PET the ester decomposition is less pronounced. The difference is ascribed to the presence in PET of a phenyl ring, which protects the ester group by various mechanisms. The study of O2 plasma treatments shows that the equilibrium between the depletion of oxygen and the incorporation of the reactive species in the polymer surface is solely determined by the ion current. The plasma-polymer interactions are qualtitatively explained by simple rules of intermolecular forces and ion-electron recombination phenomena.

  20. The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2008-10-15

    Possible means of reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions include injecting CO{sub 2} in petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery or storing CO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into subsurface reservoirs would induce a complex interplay of multiphase flow, capillary trapping, dissolution, diffusion, convection, and chemical reactions that may have significant impacts on both short-term injection performance and long-term fate of CO{sub 2} storage. Reactive Transport Modeling is a promising approach that can be used to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of injected CO{sub 2} and associated gas-fluid-rock interactions. This presentation will summarize recent advances in reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and review key technical issues on (1) the short- and long-term behavior of injected CO{sub 2} in geological formations; (2) the role of reservoir mineral heterogeneity on injection performance and storage security; (3) the effect of gas mixtures (e.g., H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on CO{sub 2} storage; and (4) the physical and chemical processes during potential leakage of CO{sub 2} from the primary storage reservoir. Simulation results suggest that CO{sub 2} trapping capacity, rate, and impact on reservoir rocks depend on primary mineral composition and injecting gas mixtures. For example, models predict that the injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with H{sub 2}S in both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs lead to acidified zones and mineral dissolution adjacent to the injection well, and carbonate precipitation and mineral trapping away from the well. Co-injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and in particular with SO{sub 2} causes greater formation alteration and complex sulfur mineral (alunite, anhydrite, and pyrite) trapping, sometimes at a much faster rate than previously thought. The results from Reactive Transport Modeling provide valuable insights for analyzing and assessing the dynamic

  1. Multilayer Resist Profile Control in Oxygen Reactive Ion Etching Using Ethanol Gas Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yasuki; Aoyama, Ryouichi; Suzuki, Seki

    1994-07-01

    By adding ethanol gas to oxygen-based chemistry, the controllability of resist profile and the overetch characteristic, under the condition with nearly no areas of material to be etched (etchable area), are improved. A model for resist profile control in which the resist profile is determined by the ratio of the sum of the isotropic etching component and the isotropic deposition component to the anisotropic etching component, is examined by evaluating the dependence of the resist profile and the etching rate on gas composition, the product of ion energy and ion current density (ion impact), and line and space (L & S) width. Both the gas composition and L & S width affect the sum of isotropic components. Ion impact affects the anisotropic etching component. When the isotropic components are balanced, resist profile is independent of ion impact and L & S width.

  2. Gas laser for efficient sustaining a continuous optical discharge plasma in scientific and technological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zimakov, V P; Kuznetsov, V A; Kedrov, A Yu; Solov'ev, N G; Shemyakin, A N; Yakimov, M Yu

    2009-09-30

    A stable high-power laser is developed for the study and technical applications of a continuous optical discharge (COD). The laser based on the technology of a combined discharge in a scheme with a fast axial gas flow emits 2.2 kW at 10.6 {mu}m per meter of the active medium in continuous and repetitively pulsed regimes with the electrooptical efficiency 20%. The sustaining of the COD plasma in argon and air is demonstrated at the atmospheric pressure. The emission properties of the COD plasma are studied and its possible applications are discussed. (lasers)

  3. Simulation of laser-plasma interaction experiments with gas-filled hohlraums on the LIL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Teychenné, D.; Monteil, M.-C.; Casanova, M.; Marion, D.; Tran, G.; Huser, G.; Rousseaux, C.; Hüller, S.; Héron, A.; Pesme, D.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-plasma interaction is a major issue for achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion schemes, and still a major concern for the upcoming french laser mégajoule (LMJ) program. In order to mitigate the deleterious effects due to laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), clearly evidenced during the recent US National Ignition Campaign conducted on the National Ignition Facility, we use the LIL facility as a demonstrator for LPI studies. In this article, we focus on preliminary results regarding the propagation of a typical LMJ quadruplet through gas-filled hohlraums. Results on hohlraum energetics will then be discussed.

  4. Effects of Ti addiction in WO 3 thin film ammonia gas sensor prepared by dc reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming; Yong, Cholyun; Feng, Youcai; Lv, Yuqiang; Han, Lei; Liang, Jiran; Wang, Haopeng

    2006-11-01

    WO 3 sensing films (1500 Å) were deposited using dc reactive magnetron sputtering method on alumina substrate on which patterned interdigital Pt electrodes were previously formed. The additive Ti was sputtered with different thickness (100-500 Å) onto WO 3 thin films and then the films as-deposited were annealed at 400°C in air for 3h. The crystal structure and chemical composition of the films were characterized by XRD and XPS analysis. The effect of Ti addition on sensitive properties of WO 3 thin film to the NH 3 gas was then discussed. WO 3 thin films added Ti revealed excellent sensitivity and response characteristics in the presence of low concentration of NH 3 (5-400 ppm) gas in air at 200°C operating temperature. Especially,in case 300 Å thickness of additive Ti, WO 3 thin films have a promotional effect on the response speed to NH 3 and selectivity enhanced with respect to other gases (CO, C IIH 5OH, CH 4). The influence of different substrates, including alumina, silicon and glass, on sensitivity to NH 3 gas has also been investigated.

  5. Early stage oxynitridation process of Si(001) surface by NO gas: Reactive molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Haining; Srivastava, Pooja; Choi, Keunsu; Kim, Seungchul; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol

    2016-03-01

    Initial stage of oxynitridation process of Si substrate is of crucial importance in fabricating the ultrathin gate dielectric layer of high quality in advanced MOSFET devices. The oxynitridation reaction on a relaxed Si(001) surface is investigated via reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A total of 1120 events of a single nitric oxide (NO) molecule reaction at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1000 K are statistically analyzed. The observed reaction kinetics are consistent with the previous experimental or calculation results, which show the viability of the reactive MD technique to study the NO dissociation reaction on Si. We suggest the reaction pathway for NO dissociation that is characterized by the inter-dimer bridge of a NO molecule as the intermediate state prior to NO dissociation. Although the energy of the inter-dimer bridge is higher than that of the intra-dimer one, our suggestion is supported by the ab initio nudged elastic band calculations showing that the energy barrier for the inter-dimer bridge formation is much lower. The growth mechanism of an ultrathin Si oxynitride layer is also investigated via consecutive NO reactions simulation. The simulation reveals the mechanism of self-limiting reaction at low temperature and the time evolution of the depth profile of N and O atoms depending on the process temperature, which would guide to optimize the oxynitridation process condition.

  6. Responses of Solid Tumor Cells in DMEM to Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Non-Thermal Plasma and Chemically Induced ROS Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Neha; Uddin, Nizam; Sim, Geon Bo; Hong, Young June; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Lee, Su Jae; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of different reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by soft jet plasma and chemical-induced ROS systems with regard to cell death in T98G, A549, HEK293 and MRC5 cell lines. For a comparison with plasma, we generated superoxide anion (O2−), hydroxyl radical (HO·), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with chemicals inside an in vitro cell culture. Our data revealed that plasma decreased the viability and intracellular ATP values of cells and increased the apoptotic population via a caspase activation mechanism. Plasma altered the mitochondrial membrane potential and eventually up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of BAX, BAK1 and H2AX gene but simultaneously down-regulated the levels of Bcl-2 in solid tumor cells. Moreover, a western blot analysis confirmed that plasma also altered phosphorylated ERK1/2/MAPK protein levels. At the same time, using ROS scavengers with plasma, we observed that scavengers of HO· (mannitol) and H2O2 (catalase and sodium pyruvate) attenuated the activity of plasma on cells to a large extent. In contrast, radicals generated by specific chemical systems enhanced cell death drastically in cancer as well as normal cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion but not specific with regard to the cell type as compared to plasma. PMID:25715710

  7. Responses of Solid Tumor Cells in DMEM to Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Non-Thermal Plasma and Chemically Induced ROS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Neha; Uddin, Nizam; Sim, Geon Bo; Hong, Young June; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Lee, Su Jae; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of different reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by soft jet plasma and chemical-induced ROS systems with regard to cell death in T98G, A549, HEK293 and MRC5 cell lines. For a comparison with plasma, we generated superoxide anion (O2-), hydroxyl radical (HO.), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with chemicals inside an in vitro cell culture. Our data revealed that plasma decreased the viability and intracellular ATP values of cells and increased the apoptotic population via a caspase activation mechanism. Plasma altered the mitochondrial membrane potential and eventually up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of BAX, BAK1 and H2AX gene but simultaneously down-regulated the levels of Bcl-2 in solid tumor cells. Moreover, a western blot analysis confirmed that plasma also altered phosphorylated ERK1/2/MAPK protein levels. At the same time, using ROS scavengers with plasma, we observed that scavengers of HO. (mannitol) and H2O2 (catalase and sodium pyruvate) attenuated the activity of plasma on cells to a large extent. In contrast, radicals generated by specific chemical systems enhanced cell death drastically in cancer as well as normal cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion but not specific with regard to the cell type as compared to plasma.

  8. Detection of reactive oxygen species supplied into the water bottom by atmospheric non-thermal plasma jet using iodine-starch reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Eto, Wataru; Hamada, Masaki; Wakabayashi, Yasutaka; Abe, Yasufumi; Kihara, Keisuke

    2015-08-01

    The supply of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to a target through liquid by plasma jet should be clarified. In this study, a non-thermal plasma jet was irradiated onto the water surface in atmospheric air, and the ROS reaching the water bottom were detected using a gel reagent with iodine-starch reactions. As a result, two-dimensional ROS distributions were visually obtained at the bottom, and the relative ROS concentration was obtained by absorbance measurement. Oxygen addition to helium led to a higher ROS supply into the bottom than helium plasma jet and ozone exposure. A doughnut-shaped ROS distribution was clearly observed at the bottom under certain conditions. The ROS concentration at the bottom significantly depended on irradiation distance and water layer thickness. It is observed from the results obtained using a liquid reagent that the plasma-jet-induced flow and the mixing effect play an important role in ROS supply into the bottom.

  9. Two-dimensional concentration distribution of reactive oxygen species transported through a tissue phantom by atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Sato, Akihiro; Kusumegi, Shota; Kudo, Akihiro; Sakanoshita, Tomohiro; Tsurumaru, Takuya; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-07-01

    The two-dimensional concentration distribution of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) transported through an agarose-film tissue phantom by atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet irradiation is visualized using a KI-starch gel reagent. Oxygen addition to helium enhances ROS transportation through the film. A radial ROS distribution pattern at the plasma-irradiated film surface changes into a doughnut-shaped pattern after passing through the film. The ROS transportation speed is 0.14–0.2 mm/min. We suggest that there are two types of ROS transportation pathways in the plasma-irradiated film: linear and circular. The majority of ROSs are transported through the circular pathway. ROS concentration distributions changed markedly with irradiation distance. Diffusive ROS transportation due to a concentration gradient is negligible in plasma-irradiated films.

  10. Correlation between optical characterization of the plasma in reactive magnetron sputtering deposition of Zr N on SS 316L and surface and mechanical properties of the deposited films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragiel, A.; Machorro, R.; Muñoz-Saldaña, J.; Salinas, J.; Cota, L.

    2008-05-01

    Optical and surface spectroscopies as well as nanoindentation techniques have been used to study ZrN coatings on 316L stainless steel obtained by DC-reactive magnetron sputtering. The deposit process was carried out using initial and working pressures of 10 -6 Torr and 10 -3 Torr, respectively. The experimental set-up for optical spectra acquisition was designed for the study in situ of the plasma in the deposition chamber. Auger spectroscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the coatings. Nanoindentation tests were carried out to measure the mechanical properties of the coating. Plasma characterization revealed the presence of CN molecules and Cr ions in the plasma. Surface spectroscopy results showed that ZrN, Zr 3N 4 and ZrC coexist in the coating. These results allowed the understanding of the mechanical behavior of the coatings, demonstrating the importance of the plasma characterization as a tool for tailoring the properties of hard coatings.

  11. Gas temperature in transient CO2 plasma measured by Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehmer, F.; Welzel, S.; Klarenaar, B. L. M.; van der Meiden, H. J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Engeln, R.

    2015-04-01

    Rotational Raman scattering on the vibrational ground state of CO2 was performed to determine the gas temperature in narrow-gap dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs). The Raman spectrometer was equipped with a straightforward spectral filtering to mask ca. 30 cm-1 (0.85 nm) centered around the excitation wavelength of 532 nm. Linearisation of the observed transitions (J = 18-42) was applied to retrieve gas temperatures in discharge gaps of 1 mm. The DBD was operated in pure CO2 at atmospheric pressure and non-negligible gas heating of about 160 K was observed at 33 W injected power. Based on a simplified energy balance the gas temperature measurements were extrapolated to a broad range of injected plasma power values (0-60 W).

  12. Fabricating a reactive surface on the fibroin film by a room-temperature plasma jet array for biomolecule immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Liang; Zheng, Xu; Lü, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Zhao-Xia; Sylvain, Massey; Wilson, Smith; Michael, Tatoulian; Yang, Si-Ze

    2012-10-01

    A simple dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet array was designed with a liquid electrode and helium gas. The characteristics of the jet array discharge and the preliminary polymerization with acrylic acid (AA) monomer were presented. The plasma reactor can produce a cold jet array with a gas temperature lower than 315 K, using an applied discharge power between 6 W and 30 W (Vdis × Idis). A silk fibroin film (SFF) was modified using the jet array and AA monomer, and the treated SFF samples were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and contact angle (CA). The deposition rate of the poly acrylic acid (PAA) was able to reach 300 nm/min, and the surface roughness and energy increased with the AA flow rate. The FTIR results indicate that the modified SFF had more carboxyl groups (-COOH) than the original SFF. This latter characteristic allowed the modified SFF to immobilize more quantities of antimicrobial peptide (AP, LL-37) which inhibited the Escherichia coli (E. Coli) effectively.

  13. Gas discharge plasmas are effective in inactivating Bacillus and Clostridium spores.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shawn; Abramzon, Nina; Jackson, James O; Lin, Wei-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Bacterial spores are the most resistant form of life and have been a major threat to public health and food safety. Nonthermal atmospheric gas discharge plasma is a novel sterilization method that leaves no chemical residue. In our study, a helium radio-frequency cold plasma jet was used to examine its sporicidal effect on selected strains of Bacillus and Clostridium. The species tested included Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, and Clostridium botulinum type A and type E. The plasmas were effective in inactivating selected Bacillus and Clostridia spores with D values (decimal reduction time) ranging from 2 to 8 min. Among all spores tested, C. botulinum type A and C. sporogenes were significantly more resistant to plasma inactivation than other species. Observations by phase contrast microscopy showed that B. subtilis spores were severely damaged by plasmas and the majority of the treated spores were unable to initiate the germination process. There was no detectable fragmentation of the DNA when the spores were treated for up to 20 min. The release of dipicolinic acid was observed almost immediately after the plasma treatment, indicating the spore envelope damage could occur quickly resulting in dipicolinic acid release and the reduction of spore resistance. PMID:22075631

  14. Reforming of biogas to synthesis gas by a rotating arc plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Woo-Jae; Park, Hyun-Woo; Liu, Jing-Lin; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-09-01

    In order to produce synthesis gas, reforming of biogas composed with 60 percent for CH4 and 40 percent for CO2 was performed by a novel rotating arc plasma process. The effect of O2/CH4 ratio on the conversion, syngas composition and energy cost was investigated to evaluate the performance of proposed system compared with conventional gliding arc plasma process. When the O2/CH4 ratio was increased from 0.4 to 0.9, the conversions of CH4 and O2 increased up to 97.5 percent and 98.8 percent, respectively, while CO2 conversion was almost constant to be 38.6 percent. This is due to more enhance the partial oxidation of CH4 to CO and H2 than that of dry reforming by increasing the O2/CH4 ratio. In this work, energy cost of 32 kJ/mol was achieved with high syngas composition of 71 percent using pure O2 as oxidant reactant. These are lower than those of different arc plasma processes (energy cost of 122 - 1870 kJ/mol) such as spark, spark-shade and gliding arc plasma. Because, this rotating arc plasma can remain in a long arc length and a large volume of plasma with constant arc length mode.

  15. Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Helen C.; Richardson, Patricia R.; Campbell, Gaynor A.; Kovalev, Valeri I.; Maier, Robert; Barton, James S.; Jones, Anita C.; De Large, Greg; Casey, Mark; Baxter, Robert L.

    2009-11-01

    The development of methods for measuring the efficiency of gas-plasma decontamination has lagged far behind application. An approach to measuring the efficiency of protein removal from solid surfaces using fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin and epifluorescence scanning (EFSCAN) is described. A method for fluorescently labelling proteins, which are adsorbed and denatured on metal surfaces, has been developed. Both approaches have been used to evaluate the efficiency of radio frequency (RF) gas-plasma decontamination protocols. Examples with 'real' surgical instruments demonstrate that an argon-oxygen RF gas-plasma treatment can routinely reduce the protein load by about three orders of magnitude beyond that achieved by current decontamination methods.

  16. Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-12-08

    The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

  17. Reduce the matrix effect in biological tissue imaging using dynamic reactive ionization and gas cluster ion beams.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    In the context of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) experiment, dynamic reactive ionization (DRI) involves introducing a reactive dopant, HCl, into an Ar gas cluster primary ion beam along with a source of water to enable dissociation of HCl to free protons. This concerted effect, precisely occurring at the impact site of the cluster beam, enhances the protonation of molecular species. Here, the authors apply this methodology to study the hippocampus and cerebellum region of a frozen-hydrated mouse brain section. To determine the degree of enhancement associated with DRI conditions, sequential tissue slices were arranged in a mirrored configuration so that comparable regions of the tissue could be explored. The results show that the protonated lipid species are increased by ∼10-fold, but that the normally prevalent salt adducts are virtually unaffected. This observation is discussed as a novel approach to minimizing SIMS matrix effects in complex materials. Moreover, the chemical images of protonated lipid ions exhibit clearer features in the cerebellum region as compared to images acquired with the pure Ar cluster beam. PMID:26856333

  18. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO from flue gas using 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Sun, X.J.; Fang, H.; Liu, F.

    2007-04-15

    Fly ash, industry-grade lime, and an additive, MnO{sub 2} (M), were used to prepare an 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent. Experiments of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification were carried in a flue gas circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The effects of influencing factors were also investigated on the removal efficiencies of desulfurization and denitrification. Removal efficiencies of 95.5% for SO{sub 2} and 64.8% for NO were obtained respectively under the optimal experimental conditions. The component of the spent absorbent was analyzed with chemical analysis methods. The results indicated that more nitrogen species appeared in the spent absorbent except sulfur species. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an accessory X-ray energy spectrometer (EDS) were used to observe microproperties of the samples, including fly ash, oxidizing highly reactive absorbent, and spent absorbent. The simultaneous removal mechanism of SO{sub 2} and NO based on this absorbent was proposed according to the experimental results.

  19. Development and characterization of very dense submillimetric gas jets for laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sylla, F.; Kahaly, S.; Flacco, A.; Malka, V.; Veltcheva, M.

    2012-03-15

    We report on the characterization of recently developed submillimetric He gas jets with peak density higher than 10{sup 21} atoms/cm{sup 3} from cylindrical and slightly conical nozzles of throat diameter of less than 400 {mu}m. Helium gas at pressure 300-400 bar has been developed for this purpose to compensate the nozzle throat diameter reduction that affects the output mass flow rate. The fast-switching electro-valve enables to operate the jet safely for multi-stage vacuum pump assembly. Such gaseous thin targets are particularly suitable for laser-plasma interaction studies in the unexplored near-critical regime.

  20. Development and characterization of very dense submillimetric gas jets for laser-plasma interaction.

    PubMed

    Sylla, F; Veltcheva, M; Kahaly, S; Flacco, A; Malka, V

    2012-03-01

    We report on the characterization of recently developed submillimetric He gas jets with peak density higher than 10(21) atoms/cm(3) from cylindrical and slightly conical nozzles of throat diameter of less than 400 μm. Helium gas at pressure 300-400 bar has been developed for this purpose to compensate the nozzle throat diameter reduction that affects the output mass flow rate. The fast-switching electro-valve enables to operate the jet safely for multi-stage vacuum pump assembly. Such gaseous thin targets are particularly suitable for laser-plasma interaction studies in the unexplored near-critical regime. PMID:22462922